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Sample records for acute infectious gastroenteritis

  1. Acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Graves, Nancy S

    2013-09-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a common infectious disease syndrome, causing a combination of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. There are more than 350 million cases of acute gastroenteritis in the United States annually and 48 million of these cases are caused by foodborne bacteria. Traveler's diarrhea affects more than half of people traveling from developed countries to developing countries. In adult and pediatric patients, the prevalence of Clostridium difficile is increasing. Contact precautions, public health education, and prudent use of antibiotics are necessary goals in decreasing the prevalence of Clostridium difficle. Preventing dehydration or providing appropriate rehydration is the primary supportive treatment of acute gastroenteritis.

  2. Acute Infectious Gastroenteritis Potentiates a Crohn's Disease Pathobiont to Fuel Ongoing Inflammation in the Post-Infectious Period

    PubMed Central

    Small, Cherrie L.; Xing, Lydia; Law, Hong T.

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition of diverse etiology. Exposure to foodborne pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis produces a long-term risk of CD well into the post-infectious period but the mechanistic basis for this ongoing relationship to disease onset is unknown. We developed two novel models to study the comorbidity of acute gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella Typhimurium or Citrobacter rodentium in mice colonized with adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC), a bacterial pathobiont linked to CD. Here, we show that disease activity in the post-infectious period after gastroenteritis is driven by the tissue-associated expansion of the resident AIEC pathobiont, with an attendant increase in immunopathology, barrier defects, and delays in mucosal restitution following pathogen clearance. These features required AIEC resistance to host defense peptides and a fulminant inflammatory response to the enteric pathogen. Our results suggest that individuals colonized by AIEC at the time of acute infectious gastroenteritis may be at greater risk for CD onset. Importantly, our data identify AIEC as a tractable disease modifier, a finding that could be exploited in the development of therapeutic interventions following infectious gastroenteritis in at-risk individuals. PMID:27711220

  3. Ulcerative colitis presenting as acute infectious gastroenteritis with a paralytic ileus

    PubMed Central

    Schoenmaker, Suzanne Gerdien; Tjon a Ten, Walther E

    2012-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl who presented with signs of acute infectious gastroenteritis, just as two members of her family is described. As the patient did not improve, a sigmoidoscopy was performed and the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC) was made. Our hypothesis is that an infection triggered the development of UC. Her paralytic ileus was probably triggered by the increased nitric oxide produced in the macrophages and smooth muscles of the inflamed bowel. PMID:22605860

  4. Fever without apparent source on clinical examination, lower respiratory infections in children, other infectious diseases, and acute gastroenteritis and diarrhea of infancy and early childhood.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, P L; Klig, J E; Shapiro, E D; Baron, M A

    1996-02-01

    This section focuses on issues in infectious disease that are commonly encountered in pediatric office practice. Paul McCarthy discusses recent literature regarding the evaluation and management of acute fevers without apparent source on clinical examination in infants and children and the evaluation of children with prolonged fevers of unknown origin. Jean Klig reviews recent literature about lower respiratory tract infection in children. Eugene Shapiro discusses recent developments in the literature concerning several infectious diseases commonly facing practitioners in the office. Michael Baron reviews recent literature about gastroenteritis and diarrhea of infancy and early childhood.

  5. Fever without apparent source on clinical examination, lower respiratory infections in children, other infectious diseases, and acute gastroenteritis and diarrhea of infancy and early childhood.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, P L; Klig, J E; Kahn, J S; Shapiro, E D; Baron, M A

    1997-02-01

    This section focuses on issues in infectious disease that are commonly encountered in pediatric office practice. Paul McCarthy discusses recent literature regarding the evaluation and management of acute fevers without apparent source on clinical examination in infants and children and the evaluation of children with prolonged fevers of unknown origin. Jean Klig reviews recent literature about lower respiratory tract infection in children. Jeffrey Kahn and Eugene Shapiro discuss literature concerning several infectious diseases commonly seen in office settings and concerning which recent developments are of interest. Michael Baron reviews recent literature about gastroenteritis and diarrhea of infancy and early childhood.

  6. Therapy of acute gastroenteritis: role of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Zollner-Schwetz, I; Krause, R

    2015-08-01

    Acute infectious diarrhoea remains a very common health problem, even in the industrialized world. One of the dilemmas in assessing patients with acute diarrhoea is deciding when to test for aetiological agents and when to initiate antimicrobial therapy. The management and therapy of acute gastroenteritis is discussed in two epidemiological settings: community-acquired diarrhoea and travellers' diarrhoea. Antibiotic therapy is not required in most patients with acute gastroenteritis, because the illness is usually self-limiting. Antimicrobial therapy can also lead to adverse events, and unnecessary treatments add to resistance development. Nevertheless, empirical antimicrobial therapy can be necessary in certain situations, such as patients with febrile diarrhoeal illness, with fever and bloody diarrhoea, symptoms persisting for >1 week, or immunocompromised status.

  7. A Study on the Epidemiology and Aetiology of Acute Gastroenteritis in Adult Patients Presenting at the Infectious Diseases Hospital in Tirana, Albania

    PubMed Central

    Stroni, Gentian P.; Dhimolea, Majlinda M.; Pipero, Pëllumb S.; Kraja, Dhimiter V.; Sallavaci, Suela Y.; Bino, Silva F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute gastroenteritis remains a common cause of hospital emergency room visits in Albania. However, the aetiology of severe gastroenteritis leading to hospitalization in adults frequently remains unclear. Aims: Our objective was to study the epidemiology and causes of community-acquired, acute gastroenteritis in adult patients presenting to hospital. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Methods: A prospective study was conducted from January 2010 to January 2012, among patients ≥15 years old with community-acquired gastroenteritis presenting to the emergency room of the University Hospital “Mother Theresa” in Tirana, Albania. Stool samples and rectal swabs were collected from the patients for microbiological testing. Results: The median age of the study patients was 33 (15–88) years and 577 (58%) were females. The median age of males was 35 (15–87) years. The vast majority of cases occurred in urban area (849, 85%), p<0.01. Patients were admitted throughout the year with peak admissions for patients infected by bacterial pathogens in summer and those affected by viral pathogens in autumn. A total of 917 (91.7%) patients underwent a laboratory examination. The overall isolation rate was 51%. Bacterial pathogens were found in 29%, viral pathogens in 19% and protozoal pathogens in 2.5% of patients. No aetiological agent or other cause of acute diarrhoea was found in 449 (49%) patients. Twenty-nine (3.2%) patients were hospitalized. Conclusion: Despite extensive laboratory investigations, enteropathogens were detected in only 51% of adult patients who presented to the hospital ER with acute gastroenteritis. Viral infections ranked as the second most common cause of gastroenteritis in adults. PMID:25625016

  8. Mucosal Immunity and acute viral gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Rose, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a major killer of the very young worldwide. Rotavirus is the most common intestinal virus, causing acute gastroenteritis and extra-intestinal complications especially in young and chronically ill subjects. As early as 1991, the WHO recommended as high priority the development of a vaccine against rotavirus, the major pathogen causing enteric infections. Since the introduction of rotavirus vaccines for infant immunization programmes in different parts of the world in 2006, vaccination against rotavirus has resulted in substantial declines in severe gastroenteritis. The oral rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq(®) and Rotarix(®) are excellent examples for their unique features and principles of mucosal immunization. We elaborate on rotavirus immunity and the success of rotavirus vaccination and aspects also beyond infants' acute gastroenteritis.

  9. [The mode of differential diagnostic of and acute alcoholic gastroenteritis].

    PubMed

    Makarov, V K; Makarov, P V

    2014-12-01

    The study was carried out to develop mode of differential diagnostic of salmonella and acute alcoholic gastroenteritis on the basis of phospholipid specter of blood serum. The indicators of phospholipid fractions of blood serum were analyzed in 50 healthy persons, 50 patients with acute alcoholic gastroenteritis and 50 patients with salmonella gastroenteritis were analyzed. The relative content of following fractions of whole phospholipids were analyzed--total lysophospholipids, sphyngomiyelin, phosphatidcholine, phosphatidyletanolamin. The phospholipid spectrum of blood serum can be applied in differential diagnostic of salmonella gastroenteritis and acute alcoholic gastroenteritis. The disorders of metabolism of lipids under given pathological conditions have a multidirectional character. The salmonella gastroenteritis is characterized by decreasing of relative content of total lysophospholipids and increasing of phosphatidcholine as compared with standard conditions. The acute alcoholic gastroenteritis is characterized by increasing of relative content of total lysophospholipids and phosphatidcholine and decreasing of level of phosphatidcholine. The content of total Iysophospholipids in blood serum is lower on 35% or 30.0 mg% permits diagnosing acute alcoholic gastroenteritis. The content of phosphaltidcholine in blood serum higher than 40% or 50 mg% permits diagnosing salmonella gastroenteritis.

  10. Estimating the Contribution of Acute Gastroenteritis to the Overall Prevalence of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Eric D; Riddle, Mark S; Chang, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Recent studies reveal that acute gastroenteritis can precipitate irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms leading to the concept of post-infectious IBS. However, the overall contribution of gastroenteritis to the total IBS prevalence is unknown. In this exercise we try to estimate the contribution of gastroenteritis in IBS using the published literature and a longitudinal approach. Methods Existing literature was reviewed to determine the incidence of IBS after gastroenteritis, the rate of remission over time, data on rates of gastroenteritis in a given population and any patterns of resistance to these effects in human populations. This produced 3 models. The first assumed all humans were susceptible to gastroenteritis and its ability to produce IBS. The second assumed (using meta-analysis data) that 90% of humans in a given outbreak would be resistant to this effect. The third model used a high gastroenteritis exposure rate as might be seen in military deployment. Results In model 1, the prevalence was unrealistically high with an eventual steady state of 43.6% of the population affected by IBS. In a very conservative approach (model 2), steady state was achieved after 10 years to an overall prevalence of 8.9%. Interestingly, based on a high 1 year exposure rate such as military deployment, the maximum prevalence (steady state) was reached before 1 year suggesting high risk. Conclusions Although hypothetical in approach, based on conservative estimates in existing literature the contribution of gastroenteritis to the overall prevalence of IBS is substantial. PMID:22523730

  11. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan.

    PubMed

    Onozuka, Daisuke

    2014-06-03

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Infectious gastroenteritis cases were non-stationary and significantly associated with the IOD and ENSO (Multivariate ENSO Index [MEI], Niño 1 + 2, Niño 3, Niño 4, and Niño 3.4) for a period of approximately 1 to 2 years. This association was non-stationary and appeared to have a major influence on the synchrony of infectious gastroenteritis transmission. Our results suggest that non-stationary patterns of association between global climate factors and incidence of infectious gastroenteritis should be considered when developing early warning systems for epidemics of infectious gastroenteritis.

  12. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onozuka, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Infectious gastroenteritis cases were non-stationary and significantly associated with the IOD and ENSO (Multivariate ENSO Index [MEI], Niño 1 + 2, Niño 3, Niño 4, and Niño 3.4) for a period of approximately 1 to 2 years. This association was non-stationary and appeared to have a major influence on the synchrony of infectious gastroenteritis transmission. Our results suggest that non-stationary patterns of association between global climate factors and incidence of infectious gastroenteritis should be considered when developing early warning systems for epidemics of infectious gastroenteritis.

  13. Gastroenteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the "stomach flu?" What you probably had was gastroenteritis - not a type of flu at all. Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of the lining of the ... caused by a virus, bacteria or parasites. Viral gastroenteritis is the second most common illness in the ...

  14. Acute Gastroenteritis on Cruise Ships - United States, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Amy L; Vaughan, George H; Banerjee, Shailendra N

    2016-01-15

    From 1990 to 2004, the reported rates of diarrheal disease (three or more loose stools or a greater than normal frequency in a 24-hour period) on cruise ships decreased 2.4%, from 29.2 cases per 100,000 travel days to 28.5 cases (1,2). Increased rates of acute gastroenteritis illness (diarrhea or vomiting that is associated with loose stools, bloody stools, abdominal cramps, headache, muscle aches, or fever) occurred in years that novel strains of norovirus, the most common etiologic agent in cruise ship outbreaks, emerged (3). To determine recent rates of acute gastroenteritis on cruise ships, CDC analyzed combined data for the period 2008-2014 that were submitted by cruise ships sailing in U.S. jurisdiction (defined as passenger vessels carrying ≥13 passengers and within 15 days of arriving in the United States) (4). CDC also reviewed laboratory data to ascertain the causes of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks and examined trends over time. During the study period, the rates of acute gastroenteritis per 100,000 travel days decreased among passengers from 27.2 cases in 2008 to 22.3 in 2014. Rates for crew members remained essentially unchanged (21.3 cases in 2008 and 21.6 in 2014). However, the rate of acute gastroenteritis was significantly higher in 2012 than in 2011 or 2013 for both passengers and crew members, likely related to the emergence of a novel strain of norovirus, GII.4 Sydney (5). During 2008-2014, a total of 133 cruise ship acute gastroenteritis outbreaks were reported, 95 (71%) of which had specimens available for testing. Among these, 92 (97%) were caused by norovirus, and among 80 norovirus specimens for which a genotype was identified, 59 (73.8%) were GII.4 strains. Cruise ship travelers experiencing diarrhea or vomiting should report to the ship medical center promptly so that symptoms can be assessed, proper treatment provided, and control measures implemented.

  15. Acute Gastroenteritis on Cruise Ships - United States, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Amy L; Vaughan, George H; Banerjee, Shailendra N

    2016-01-01

    From 1990 to 2004, the reported rates of diarrheal disease (three or more loose stools or a greater than normal frequency in a 24-hour period) on cruise ships decreased 2.4%, from 29.2 cases per 100,000 travel days to 28.5 cases (1,2). Increased rates of acute gastroenteritis illness (diarrhea or vomiting that is associated with loose stools, bloody stools, abdominal cramps, headache, muscle aches, or fever) occurred in years that novel strains of norovirus, the most common etiologic agent in cruise ship outbreaks, emerged (3). To determine recent rates of acute gastroenteritis on cruise ships, CDC analyzed combined data for the period 2008-2014 that were submitted by cruise ships sailing in U.S. jurisdiction (defined as passenger vessels carrying ≥13 passengers and within 15 days of arriving in the United States) (4). CDC also reviewed laboratory data to ascertain the causes of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks and examined trends over time. During the study period, the rates of acute gastroenteritis per 100,000 travel days decreased among passengers from 27.2 cases in 2008 to 22.3 in 2014. Rates for crew members remained essentially unchanged (21.3 cases in 2008 and 21.6 in 2014). However, the rate of acute gastroenteritis was significantly higher in 2012 than in 2011 or 2013 for both passengers and crew members, likely related to the emergence of a novel strain of norovirus, GII.4 Sydney (5). During 2008-2014, a total of 133 cruise ship acute gastroenteritis outbreaks were reported, 95 (71%) of which had specimens available for testing. Among these, 92 (97%) were caused by norovirus, and among 80 norovirus specimens for which a genotype was identified, 59 (73.8%) were GII.4 strains. Cruise ship travelers experiencing diarrhea or vomiting should report to the ship medical center promptly so that symptoms can be assessed, proper treatment provided, and control measures implemented. PMID:26766396

  16. Hypernatraemic dehydration and acute gastro-enteritis in children.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ekteish, F; Zahraa, J

    2002-09-01

    A prospective study was conducted over a 2-year period to detect the effect of feeding practice, in particular the role of artificial milk formulae, in children admitted with hypernatraemic dehydration (serum sodium > or = 150 mmol/L) caused by acute gastro-enteritis, and to record morbidity and mortality in these patients. A control group was selected from infants and children admitted with gastro-enteritis but normal sodium levels. Sixty-seven children aged 18 days to 18 months (mean 6.9 months) were studied and represented 4.6% of all children admitted during the study with acute gastro-enteritis. Their mean serum sodium level was 161 mmol/L, the highest being 194 mmol/L. Twenty-four infants (36%) with hypernatraemic dehydration were on evaporated cow's milk powder compared with ten (15%) in the control group (p < 0.01). Five hypernatraemic infants (7.5%) were breastfed compared with 40 (60%) isonatraemic controls (p < 0.00001). Six children from the hypernatraemic group developed convulsions and two died. Hypernatraemic dehydration remains an important and serious complication in infants with gastro-enteritis in our area. Artificial milk feeding, particularly the use of evaporated cow's milk powder, is a predisposing factor for hypernatraemia in infantile gastro-enteritis. This study emphasises the importance of breast-feeding and the need to educate mothers to avoid giving evaporated cow's milk formulae to babies under 1 year of age if breast-feeding is not possible.

  17. Xyloglucan for the Treatment of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children: Results of a Randomized, Controlled, Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pleșea Condratovici, Cătălin; Bacarea, Vladimir; Piqué, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Background. Xyloglucan, a film-forming agent, improves intestinal mucosa resistance to pathologic damage. The efficacy, safety, and time of onset of the antidiarrheal effect of xyloglucan were assessed in children with acute gastroenteritis receiving oral rehydration solution (ORS). Methods. This randomized, controlled, open-label, parallel-group, multicenter, clinical trial included children (3 months–12 years) with acute gastroenteritis of infectious origin. Children were randomized to xyloglucan and ORS, or ORS only, for 5 days. Diarrheal symptoms, including stool number/characteristics, and safety were assessed at baseline and after 2 and 5 days and by fulfillment of a parent diary card. Results. Thirty-six patients (58.33% girls) were included (n = 18/group). Patients receiving xyloglucan and ORS had better symptom evolution than ORS-only recipients, with a faster onset of action. At 6 hours, xyloglucan produced a significantly greater decrease in the number of type 7 stools (0.11 versus 0.44; P = 0.027). At days 3 and 5, xyloglucan also produced a significantly greater reduction in types 6 and 7 stools compared with ORS alone. Xyloglucan plus ORS was safe and well tolerated. Conclusions. Xyloglucan is an efficacious and safe option for the treatment of acute gastroenteritis in children, with a rapid onset of action in reducing diarrheal symptoms. This study is registered with ISRCTN number 65893282. PMID:27212943

  18. Human bocavirus in acute gastroenteritis in children in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campos, Gubio Soares; Silva Sampaio, Madina Lyve; Menezes, Aline Dorea Luz; Tigre, Dellane Martins; Moura Costa, Lilia Ferreira; Chinalia, Fabio Alexandre; Sardi, Silvia Ines

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological surveillance for Human Bocavirus (HBoV) was conducted on 105 fecal specimens from children with acute gastroenteritis in Bahia, Brazil. Among of a total 105 stool samples, 44 samples were positive for HBoV as detected by nested-PCR. Of the 44 positive samples, co-infections with other enteric viruses (Norovirus, Adenovirus, and Rotavirus) were found in 12 pediatric patients. Mixed infections among HBoV with Norovirus were frequently observed in this population. The phylogenetic analysis identified the presence of HBoV-1, and HBoV 2A species. This study shows that HBoV is another viral pathogen in the etiology of acute gastroenteritis in children in Bahia, Brazil.

  19. [Loperamide for acute infectious diarrhoea].

    PubMed

    Douma, Joeri A J; Smulders, Yvo M

    2015-01-01

    Many physicians are resistant to the idea of prescribing loperamide for acute infectious traveller's diarrhoea and community-acquired diarrhoea because of the fear of possible adverse effects. Large randomized trials with loperamide, either alone or as an adjunct to antibiotic treatment, have in fact revealed positive rather than negative effects. International guidelines now often support the use of loperamide for the treatment of infectious diarrhoea without dysentery. There seems to be no reason to systematically avoid loperamide in patients with dysentery, but caution is advised. Loperamide can be used as monotherapy or as an adjunct to antibiotic treatment in immunocompetent adults with acute infectious traveller's diarrhoea or community-acquired diarrhoea without severe comorbidities. This can reduce both the frequency of diarrhoea and the time until the diarrhoea stops without the risk of severe complications.

  20. [Etiology of acute infantile gastroenteritis in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Gendrel, D; Sitbon, M; Richard-Lenoble, D; Galliot, A; Kombila, M; Ivanoff, B; Nardou, M; Gendrel, C; Kani, F

    1985-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the main etiology of acute diarrhoeas in gabonese children (11 to 30% according to age). Salmonellae (11.4%), Shigellae (7.1%) and E. histolytica (7.1%), isolated or associated with enterobacteria, E. coli (3%), Giardia and Strongyloides stercoralis (1.4%), Yersinia enterocolitica (1%) and Balantidium coli (0.5%) were also found, without cholera. PMID:2863005

  1. [THE ROLE OF BIOLOGICAL MEMBRANES IN DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF SALMONELLA AND ACUTE ALCOHOL GASTROENTERITIS].

    PubMed

    Makarov, V K; Makarov, P V

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of Salmonella infection and alcohol on biological membranes from the content of serum phospholipid fraction known to be a component ofenterocyte membranes. Any change of membrane phospholipid content leads to a change of their blood level. The study included 50 patients with acute alcohol gastroenteritis, 50 ones with salmonella gastroenteritis, and 50 healthy subjects. Both salmonellosis and alcohol caused differently directed changes in biological membranes. The mechanism of diarrhea in patients with salmonella and acute alcohol gastroenteritis is different. Diarrhea associated with alcohol gastroenteritis is due to enhanced viscosity of biomembranes that decreases in salmonella gastroenteritis. It suggests different approaches to the treatment of these conditions. The membrane destruction coefficient below 2 is an additional proof of alcoholic etiology of gastroenteritis whereas its value above 3 confirms the involvement of salmonellosis in pathogenesis of gastroenteritis.

  2. Aetiology of acute paediatric gastroenteritis in Bulgaria during summer months: prevalence of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Mladenova, Zornitsa; Steyer, Andrej; Steyer, Adela Fratnik; Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Petrov, Petar; Tchervenjakova, Tanja; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren

    2015-03-01

    Paediatric acute gastroenteritis is a global public health problem. Comprehensive laboratory investigation for viral, bacterial and parasitic agents is helpful for improving management of acute gastroenteritis in health care settings and for monitoring and controlling the spread of these infections. Our study aimed to investigate the role of various pathogens in infantile diarrhoea in Bulgaria outside the classical winter epidemics of rotavirus and norovirus. Stool samples from 115 hospitalized children aged 0-3 years collected during summer months were tested for presence of 14 infectious agents - group A rotavirus, astrovirus, Giardia, Cryptosporidium and Entamoeba using ELISAs; norovirus by real-time RT-PCR; picobirnavirus and sapovirus by RT-PCR; adenovirus using PCR, and Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia coli, Yersinia and Campylobacter using standard bacterial cultures. Infectious origin was established in a total of 92 cases and 23 samples remained negative. A single pathogen was found in 67 stools, of which rotaviruses were the most prevalent (56.7 %), followed by noroviruses (19.4 %), enteric adenoviruses (7.5 %), astroviruses (6.0 %), bacteria and parasites (4.5 % each) and sapoviruses (1.4 %). Rotavirus predominant genotypes were G4P[8] (46.3 %) and G2P[4] (21.4 %); for astroviruses, type 1a was the most common, while the GII.4/2006b variant was the most prevalent among noroviruses. Bacteria were observed in five cases, with Salmonella sp. as the most prevalent, while parasites were found in ten stool samples, with Giardia intestinalis in five cases. The results demonstrated high morbidity associated with viral infections and that rotavirus and norovirus remain the most common pathogens associated with severe gastroenteritis during summer months in Bulgaria, a country with a temperate climate, and significant molecular diversity among circulating virus strains.

  3. Nationwide variation in the effects of temperature on infectious gastroenteritis incidence in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-08-01

    Although several studies have investigated the effects of temperature on the incidence of infectious gastrointestinal disease in a single city or region, few have investigated variations in this association using nationwide data. We obtained weekly data, gathered between 2000 and 2012, pertaining to infectious gastroenteritis cases and weather variability in all 47 Japanese prefectures. A two-stage analysis was used to assess the nonlinear and delayed relationship between temperature and morbidity. In the first stage, a Poisson regression allowing for overdispersion in a distributed lag nonlinear model was used to estimate the prefecture-specific effects of temperature on morbidity. In the second stage, a multivariate meta-analysis was applied to pool estimates at the national level. The pooled overall relative risk (RR) was highest in the 59.9th percentile of temperature (RR, 1.08; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.15). Meta-analysis results also indicated that the estimated pooled RR at lower temperatures (25th percentile) began immediately but did not persist, whereas an identical estimate at a higher temperature (75th percentile) was delayed but persisted for several weeks. Our results suggest that public health strategies aimed at controlling temperature-related infectious gastroenteritis may be more effective when tailored according to region-specific weather conditions.

  4. Explosive outbreak of gastroenteritis on an aircraft carrier: an infectious disease mass casualty situation.

    PubMed

    Bohnker, B; McEwen, G; Feeks, E; Palombaro, J

    1993-07-01

    An aircraft carrier experienced 777 cases of acute gastroenteritis while deployed in the eastern Mediterranean over a 16-d period. These cases were noted in the 5,000-man crew, suggesting a cumulative incidence rate of 15%, though many sailors did not seek medical care for their symptoms. The onboard medical department response included epidemiological investigation with unique shipboard facility considerations, development of a treatment plan, and implementation of preventive/educational programs. Implications for nontrauma related mass casualty situations are discussed. Flight surgeons and operational medicine physicians must have a solid foundation in general preventive medicine to fulfill their responsibilities.

  5. Acute Nonbacterial Gastroenteritis in Hospitalized Children: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Shokrollahi, Mohammad Reza; Noorbakhsh, Samileh; Monavari, Hamid Reza; Ghavidel Darestani, Sahar; Vosoughi Motlagh, Ahmad; Javadi Nia, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Viral acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of morbidity in childhood and leads to hospitalization in developed countries, such as Iran. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and viral types (rotavirus, adenovirus, human parechoviruses-1, and human bocavirus) of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in hospitalized children. Patients and Materials: This was a across-sectional prospective study performed at the Pediatric Department of Rasoul Hospital, Tehran, Iran (2009-2011) on 80 hospitalized children with viral AGE. All Stool samples were collected on viral transport media. Human bocavirus (HBoV) was detected using the Real-time PCR TaqMan method. Molecular detection of human parechovirus type 1 (HPeV-1) RNA in stool samples was done using a specific nested reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Rota and adeno virus antigens were sought by rapid chromatographic tests. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Fever was determined in 47.5% of cases (38), nausea and vomiting in 42.5% (34), respiratory symptoms in 16.3% (13), abdominal pain in 76%. Duration of diarrhea was 1-30 days (mean = 6.3 + 4.3 days). No dehydration was observed in 43.5% of subjects, mild dehydration in 33.8%, moderate dehydration in 17.5% and severe dehydration in 5% of cases. Positive rotavirus was found in 48.8% of cases (39), adenovirus in 20% (16), HBoV in 8% (6) and HPeV-1 in 23.2% (19), and adeno and rotaviruses co-infection in 6% (4). The frequency of positive HBoV was significantly lower than adeno and rotaviruses infection (P value = 0.0001). Rotavirus was more frequent in males (P value = 0.003) and in young children (17.49 months vs. 21.44 months) [P value = 0.03, CI = -13.4, 5.5]. Rotavirus infection was related to the degree of dehydration (P value = 0.001) but was not related to the presence of vomiting or fever (P value > 0.5). Conclusions: This study indicates that viral agents, especially rotavirus (48

  6. Etiology and Risk Factors of Acute Gastroenteritis in a Taipei Emergency Department: Clinical Features for Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chao-Chih; Ji, Dar-Der; Wu, Fang-Tzy; Mu, Jung-Jung; Yang, Ji-Rong; Jiang, Donald Dah-Shyong; Lin, Wen-Yun; Chen, Wei-Ting; Yen, Muh-Yong; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Background The causative pathogen is rarely identified in the emergency department (ED), since the results of cultures are usually unavailable. As a result, antimicrobial treatment may be overused. The aim of our study was to investigate the pathogens, risk factors of acute gastroenteritis, and predictors of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the ED. Methods We conducted a matched case-control study of 627 stool samples and 612 matched pairs. Results Viruses (41.3%) were the leading cause of gastroenteritis, with noroviruses (32.2%) being the most prevalent, followed by bacteria (26.8%) and Giardia lamblia (12.4%). Taking antacids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.57–6.53), household members/classmates with gastroenteritis (aOR 4.69; 95% CI, 2.76–7.96), attending a banquet (aOR 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64–3.20), dining out (aOR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.13–2.54), and eating raw oysters (aOR 3.10; 95% CI, 1.61–5.94) were highly associated with gastroenteritis. Elders (aOR 1.04; 05% CI, 1.02–1.05), those with CRP >10 mg/L (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62), or those who were positive for fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62) or fecal occult blood (aOR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.03–3.77) were more likely to be hospitalized in ED. In addition, presence of fecal leukocytes (time ratio [TR] 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06–1.41), abdominal pain (TR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07–1.41), and frequency of vomiting (TR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.98) were significantly associated with the duration of acute gastroenteritis. Presence of fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.08; 95% CI, 1.42–3.05), winter season (aOR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28–0.74), frequency of diarrhea (aOR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.01–2.83), and eating shrimp or crab (aOR 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05–2.23) were highly associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the final model was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.55–0.63). Conclusions Acute bacterial gastroenteritis was highly associated with season

  7. Healthcare utilization and lost productivity due to infectious gastroenteritis, results from a national cross-sectional survey Australia 2008-2009.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Ford, L; Hall, G; Dobbins, T; Kirk, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the healthcare usage and loss of productivity due to gastroenteritis in Australia using the National Gastroenteritis Survey II. In 2008-2009, 7578 participants across Australia were surveyed about infectious gastroenteritis by telephone interview. A gastroenteritis case was defined as a person experiencing ⩾ 3 loose stools and/or ⩾ 2 vomits in a 24-h period, excluding cases with a non-infectious cause for their symptoms, such as pregnancy or consumption of alcohol. Lost productivity was considered any lost time from full- or part-time paid work due to having gastroenteritis or caring for someone with the illness. Interference with other daily activities was also examined along with predictors of healthcare-seeking practices using multivariable regression. Results were weighted to obtain nationally representative estimates using Stata v. 13·1. Of the 341 cases, 52 visited a doctor due to gastroenteritis, 126 reported taking at least one medication for their symptoms and 79 cases reported missing ⩾ 1 days' paid work due to gastroenteritis. Gastroenteritis results in a total of 13·1 million (95% confidence interval 6·7-19·5) days of missed paid work each year in Australia. The indirect costs of gastroenteritis are significant, particularly from lost productivity.

  8. Fecal contamination of drinking water supplies in and around Chandigarh and correlation with acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Taneja; Malkit, Singh; Pooja, Rao; Manisha, Biswal; Shiva, Priya; Ram, Chander; Meera, Sharma

    2012-12-01

    Acute gastroenteritis due to Vibrio cholerae and Enterotoxigenic E. coli is a common problem faced in the hot and humid summer months in north India. The study was undertaken to evaluate drinking water supplies for fecal coliforms, V. cholerae and Enterotoxigenic E. coli in urban, semiurban and rural areas in and around Chandigarh and correlate with occurrence of acute gastroenteritis occurring from the same region. Drinking water sample were collected from various sources from April to October 2004 from a defined area. Samples were tested for fecal coliforms and E. coli count. E. coli were screened for heat labile toxin (LT) also. Stool samples from cases of acute gastroenteritis from the same region and time were collected and processed for V. cholerae, Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and others like Salmonella, Shigella and Aeromonas spp. A total of 364 water samples were collected, (251 semi urban, 41 rural and 72 from urban areas). 116 (31.8%) samples were contaminated with fecal coliforms (58.5% rural, 33.4% semiurban and 11.1% of samples from urban areas). E. coli were grown from 58 samples. Ninety two isolates of E. coli were tested for enterotoxins of which 8 and 24 were positive for LT and ST respectively. V. cholerae were isolated from 2 samples during the outbreak investigation. Stored water samples showed a significantly higher level of contamination and most of Enterotoxigenic E. coli were isolated from stored water samples. A total of 780 acute gastroenteritis cases occurred; 445 from semiurban, 265 rural and 70 from urban areas. Out of 189 stool samples submitted, ETEC were the commonest (30%) followed by V. cholerae (19%), Shigellae (8.4%), Salmonellae (2.1%) and Aeromonas (2.6%). ST-ETEC (40/57) were commoner than LT-ETEC (17/57). In the present study, high levels of contamination of drinking water supplies (32.1%) correlated well with cases of acute gastroenteritis. Majority of cases of acute gastroenteritis occurred in the semi urban

  9. Acute Gastroenteritis and Campylobacteriosis in Swiss Primary Care: The Viewpoint of General Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Bless, Philipp J; Muela Ribera, Joan; Schmutz, Claudia; Zeller, Andreas; Mäusezahl, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AG) is frequently caused by infectious intestinal diseases (IID) including food- and waterborne pathogens of public health importance. Among these pathogens, Campylobacter spp. plays a major role. Many European countries monitor selected IIDs within disease surveillance systems. In Switzerland, the information on IIDs is restricted to limited surveillance data, while no data is available for AG. We conducted a qualitative study among Swiss general practitioners (GPs) to investigate the case management of AG and campylobacteriosis patients, the associated disease burden and the determinants leading to registration in the National Notification System for Infectious Diseases (NNSID). Interviews were conducted with a semi-structured questionnaire and underwent inductive content analysis based on Grounded Theory. The questionnaire was repeatedly adapted to capture emerging themes until the point of theoretical saturation. GPs perceived AG and campylobacteriosis of little relevance to their daily work and public health in general. According to GP self-estimates each consults about two cases of AG per week and diagnoses a median of five campylobacteriosis cases per year. A large proportion of AG cases receives telephone consultations only and gets medical advice from the practice nurse. Antibiotic therapy is considered useful and stool diagnostics are performed for about a fifth of consulting AG patients. Stool diagnostics ("test") and antibiotic therapy ("treat") are interrelated and follow four strategies: "Wait & See", "Treat & See", "Treat & Test", and "Test & See". AG case management is diverse and includes different triage steps. A small proportion of AG patients have stool diagnostics performed and only positive tested patients are reported to the NNSID. As a result severe cases and cases with a history of travel abroad are overrepresented in the NNSID. The use of multiplex PCR panels in routine diagnostics likely leads to improved case

  10. Acute Gastroenteritis and Campylobacteriosis in Swiss Primary Care: The Viewpoint of General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Bless, Philipp J.; Muela Ribera, Joan; Schmutz, Claudia; Zeller, Andreas; Mäusezahl, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AG) is frequently caused by infectious intestinal diseases (IID) including food- and waterborne pathogens of public health importance. Among these pathogens, Campylobacter spp. plays a major role. Many European countries monitor selected IIDs within disease surveillance systems. In Switzerland, the information on IIDs is restricted to limited surveillance data, while no data is available for AG. We conducted a qualitative study among Swiss general practitioners (GPs) to investigate the case management of AG and campylobacteriosis patients, the associated disease burden and the determinants leading to registration in the National Notification System for Infectious Diseases (NNSID). Interviews were conducted with a semi-structured questionnaire and underwent inductive content analysis based on Grounded Theory. The questionnaire was repeatedly adapted to capture emerging themes until the point of theoretical saturation. GPs perceived AG and campylobacteriosis of little relevance to their daily work and public health in general. According to GP self-estimates each consults about two cases of AG per week and diagnoses a median of five campylobacteriosis cases per year. A large proportion of AG cases receives telephone consultations only and gets medical advice from the practice nurse. Antibiotic therapy is considered useful and stool diagnostics are performed for about a fifth of consulting AG patients. Stool diagnostics (“test”) and antibiotic therapy (“treat”) are interrelated and follow four strategies: “Wait & See”, “Treat & See”, “Treat & Test”, and “Test & See”. AG case management is diverse and includes different triage steps. A small proportion of AG patients have stool diagnostics performed and only positive tested patients are reported to the NNSID. As a result severe cases and cases with a history of travel abroad are overrepresented in the NNSID. The use of multiplex PCR panels in routine diagnostics likely

  11. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis in 7 dogs from Saskatchewan.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Astrid B; Carr, Anthony P; Gaunt, M Casey

    2016-09-01

    Seven dogs diagnosed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis are described. Disease severity ranged from mild in adults to fatal disease in young dogs. Enteropathogenic E. coli infection should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in dogs with diarrhea. PMID:27587889

  12. Fecal contamination of drinking water supplies in and around Chandigarh and correlation with acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Neelam; Singh, Malkit; Rao, Pooja; Biswal, Manisha; Priya, Shiva; Chander, Ram; Sharma, Meera

    2011-09-01

    The study evaluated drinking water from localities in and around Chandigarh for fecal coliforms, V. cholerae and Enterotoxigenic E. coli and correlate with occurrence of acute gastroenteritis occurring from the same region. Drinking water sample were collected from various sources from the defined area. Samples were tested for fecal coliforms and E. coli count by multiple tube method and pathogens by membrane filtration technique. E. coli were screened for heat labile toxin (LT) by the reverse passive agglutination method and heat stable toxin (ST) by ELISA. Stool samples from cases of acute gastroenteritis from the same region and time were collected and processed for V. cholerae, Enterotoxigenic E coli (ETEC) and others like Salmonella, Shigella and Aeromonas spp. Of 364 water samples examined, 116 (31.8%) samples were contaminated with fecal coliforms (58.5% rural, 33.4% semi-urban and 11.1% from urban areas). E. coli were grown from 58 samples. Ninety-two isolates of E. coli were tested for enterotoxins of which 8 and 24 were positive for LT and ST respectively. V. cholerae were isolated from 2 samples during the outbreak investigation. Stored water samples showed a significantly higher level of contamination and most of Enterotoxigenic E. coli were isolated from stored water samples. A total of 780 acute gastroenteritis cases occurred; 445 from semi-urban, 265 rural and 70 from urban areas. Out of 189 stool samples submitted, ETEC were the commonest (30%) followed by V. cholerae (19%), Shigellae (8.4%), Salmonellae (2.1%) and Aeromonas (2.6%). ST-ETEC (40/57) were commoner than LT- ETEC(17/57). In the present study, high levels of contamination of drinking water supplies (32.1%) correlated well with cases of acute gastroenteritis. Majority of cases of acute gastroenteritis occurred in the semi-urban area corresponding with high level of contamination (33.4%/). The highest level of water contamination was seen in rural areas (58.5%) but the number of acute

  13. Molecular surveillance of non-polio enterovirus infections in patients with acute gastroenteritis in Western India: 2004-2009.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pooja R; Chitambar, Shobha D; Gopalkrishna, V

    2015-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. Rotavirus (RV) and Norovirus (NoV) are the leading cause of the disease. Despite the use of improved diagnostic methods a significant proportion of gastroenteritis cases remained undiagnosed. Though nonpolio enteroviruses (NPEVs) have been reported frequently in children with acute gastroenteritis, their etiologic role has not been established. To investigate the epidemiology of NPEVs in gastroenteritis cases which remained negative for leading causative agents, 955 RV and NoV negative stool specimens from children hospitalized for acute gastroenteritis were included in the study. A case control study was conducted which includes stool specimens from 450 children with gastroenteritis and 162 asymptomatic control subjects to determine the association of NPEVs with the disease. NPEV detection and typing was carried out by RT-PCR and sequencing. Presence of RV, NoV, Adenovirus, and Astrovirus was confirmed by ELISA or PCR/RT-PCR. Overall 14% NPEV prevalence was noted. The percentage of children with NPEV infection differed significantly between gastroenteritis and non-gastroenteritis patients (13.7% vs. 4.9%). NPEV was more prevalent among patients with gastroenteritis of undetectable etiology as compared to those detected positive for other viruses (17.9% vs. 7%) (P < 0.01). Genotyping of NPEV identified predominance of EV-B species (56.5%) followed by EV-C (16.7%), EV-A (13.8%) species and mixed NPEV infections (13%). These data support the association of NPEVs with acute gastroenteritis and highlights the clinical and epidemiological features of NPEV infections in patients with acute gastroenteritis from western India.

  14. The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in preventing acute gastroenteritis during rotavirus seasons among Polish children

    PubMed Central

    Kieltyka, Agnieszka; Majewska, Renata; Augustyniak, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rotavirus is the main etiological cause of intestinal infections in children. Voluntary rotavirus vaccines were included in the Polish vaccination schedule in 2007. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a completed rotavirus vaccination course in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish infants during their first five years of life. Material and methods This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in Lesser Poland (Malopolska Province). The sample population included a group of 303 children who received the completed rotavirus vaccination course and 303 children not vaccinated against rotavirus. The date of the child's acute gastroenteritis diagnosis and his or her vaccination history were extracted from the physicians’ records. Each kind of diagnosed acute gastroenteritis during winter-spring rotavirus seasons was treated as the endpoint. The relative risk of having gastrointestinal infection was assessed using the hazard ratio from the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results In the examined group, 96 (15.8%) children had winter-spring gastrointestinal infections. In the non-vaccinated children, the cumulative incidence of these infections in the first 5 years of life was 20.8%, whereas in the children vaccinated with Rotarix it was only 10.9%. Those who were vaccinated with Rotarix had a 44% reduction in the risk of a winter-spring acute gastroenteritis infection compared to those not vaccinated with Rotarix (p = 0.005). Birth weight less than 2500 g increased the risk of the infection twofold and also reached statistical significance (p = 0.044). Conclusions The results showed that Rotarix is effective in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish children during rotavirus seasons. PMID:27279856

  15. Salivirus in Children and Its Association with Childhood Acute Gastroenteritis: A Paired Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie-Mei; Ao, Yuan-Yun; Liu, Na; Li, Li-Li; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Salivirus was recently discovered in children with gastroenteritis and in sewage. Though a causative role for salivirus in childhood gastroenteritis was suggested in the previous study, the relationship between salivirus and acute gastroenteritis has not yet been clearly clarified. The sewage strain reported by Ng, although represented by incomplete genome sequencing data, was distinct from previously reported saliviruses, and had not previously been detected in humans. A case-control study examining 461 paired stool samples from children with diarrhea and healthy controls (1:1) was conducted in this study. Also, common diarrheal viruses were detected and complete genome of a salivirus was determined. Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups. Multivariate Cox regression revealed no association between salivirus and gastroenteritis (p=0.774). The data also demonstrated that salivirus infection did not exacerbate clinical symptoms of gastroenteritis in children. Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain. In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis. This study also demonstrated that all known saliviruses can be detected in the feces of children with or without gastroenteritis.

  16. Prevalence of Rotavirus, Adenovirus, and Astrovirus Infections among Patients with Acute Gastroenteritis in, Northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hamkar, R; Yahyapour, Y; Noroozi, M; Nourijelyani, K; Jalilvand, S; Adibi, L; Vaziri, S; Poor-Babaei, AA; Pakfetrat, A; Savad-Koohi, R

    2010-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis associated with diarrheal diseases in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran. Methods: A total of 400 symptomatic cases from patients with acute gastroenteritis from Mazandaran Province in Iran were screened using EIA method for the presence of rotavirus, adenovirus and astrovirus during 2005–2006. Chi-square tests were used for testing relationships between different variables. Results: Rotavirus, adenovirus and astrovirus were detected in 62%, 2.3%, and 3% of samples, respectively. The maximum rate of rotaviruses was detected in the <1-year-old age group, while minimum rate was found in the 10 years and older age group. Astrovirus and adenovirus were detected predominantly in the 2–5-year-old age group of children, with a prevalence of 8.3% and 3.5% respectively. All studied viral gastroenteritis peaked in the winter, and minimum rate were found in summer. Conclusion: Our statistical analyzes indicated that viral gastroenteritis, especially Rota-viral, had the highest number of occurrences in colder seasons notably in winter and more frequently were observed among younger children. PMID:23113006

  17. Multicenter Evaluation of the BioFire FilmArray Gastrointestinal Panel for Etiologic Diagnosis of Infectious Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Leber, Amy; Chapin, Kimberle; Fey, Paul D.; Bankowski, Matthew J.; Jones, Matthew K.; Rogatcheva, Margarita; Kanack, Kristen J.; Bourzac, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    The appropriate treatment and control of infectious gastroenteritis depend on the ability to rapidly detect the wide range of etiologic agents associated with the disease. Clinical laboratories currently utilize an array of different methodologies to test for bacterial, parasitic, and viral causes of gastroenteritis, a strategy that suffers from poor sensitivity, potentially long turnaround times, and complicated ordering practices and workflows. Additionally, there are limited or no testing methods routinely available for most diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains, astroviruses, and sapoviruses. This study assessed the performance of the FilmArray Gastrointestinal (GI) Panel for the simultaneous detection of 22 different enteric pathogens directly from stool specimens: Campylobacter spp., Clostridium difficile (toxin A/B), Plesiomonas shigelloides, Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp., Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolitica, enteroaggregative E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, Shiga-like toxin-producing E. coli (stx1 and stx2) (including specific detection of E. coli O157), Shigella spp./enteroinvasive E. coli, Cryptosporidium spp., Cyclospora cayetanensis, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, adenovirus F 40/41, astrovirus, norovirus GI/GII, rotavirus A, and sapovirus. Prospectively collected stool specimens (n = 1,556) were evaluated using the BioFire FilmArray GI Panel and tested with conventional stool culture and molecular methods for comparison. The FilmArray GI Panel sensitivity was 100% for 12/22 targets and ≥94.5% for an additional 7/22 targets. For the remaining three targets, sensitivity could not be calculated due to the low prevalences in this study. The FilmArray GI Panel specificity was ≥97.1% for all panel targets. The FilmArray GI Panel provides a comprehensive, rapid, and streamlined alternative to conventional methods for the etiologic diagnosis of infectious gastroenteritis in the laboratory setting. The potential

  18. Multicenter evaluation of the BioFire FilmArray gastrointestinal panel for etiologic diagnosis of infectious gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Buss, Sarah N; Leber, Amy; Chapin, Kimberle; Fey, Paul D; Bankowski, Matthew J; Jones, Matthew K; Rogatcheva, Margarita; Kanack, Kristen J; Bourzac, Kevin M

    2015-03-01

    The appropriate treatment and control of infectious gastroenteritis depend on the ability to rapidly detect the wide range of etiologic agents associated with the disease. Clinical laboratories currently utilize an array of different methodologies to test for bacterial, parasitic, and viral causes of gastroenteritis, a strategy that suffers from poor sensitivity, potentially long turnaround times, and complicated ordering practices and workflows. Additionally, there are limited or no testing methods routinely available for most diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains, astroviruses, and sapoviruses. This study assessed the performance of the FilmArray Gastrointestinal (GI) Panel for the simultaneous detection of 22 different enteric pathogens directly from stool specimens: Campylobacter spp., Clostridium difficile (toxin A/B), Plesiomonas shigelloides, Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp., Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolitica, enteroaggregative E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, Shiga-like toxin-producing E. coli (stx1 and stx2) (including specific detection of E. coli O157), Shigella spp./enteroinvasive E. coli, Cryptosporidium spp., Cyclospora cayetanensis, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, adenovirus F 40/41, astrovirus, norovirus GI/GII, rotavirus A, and sapovirus. Prospectively collected stool specimens (n = 1,556) were evaluated using the BioFire FilmArray GI Panel and tested with conventional stool culture and molecular methods for comparison. The FilmArray GI Panel sensitivity was 100% for 12/22 targets and ≥94.5% for an additional 7/22 targets. For the remaining three targets, sensitivity could not be calculated due to the low prevalences in this study. The FilmArray GI Panel specificity was ≥97.1% for all panel targets. The FilmArray GI Panel provides a comprehensive, rapid, and streamlined alternative to conventional methods for the etiologic diagnosis of infectious gastroenteritis in the laboratory setting. The potential

  19. Acute gastroenteritis outbreaks associated with ground-waterborne norovirus in South Korea during 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Cho, H G; Lee, S G; Kim, W H; Lee, J S; Park, P H; Cheon, D S; Jheong, W H; Jho, E H; Lee, J B; Paik, S Y

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiological and virological studies indicate that noroviruses-contaminated groundwater was the primary source of four acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in South Korea between 2008 and 2012. Furthermore, cabbage kimchi was first identified as the vehicle of transmission between groundwater and infected patients in an outbreak in 2011. The proper treatment of groundwater sources prior to use for drinking or in food preparation is necessary to prevent further outbreaks. PMID:24534556

  20. Recent viral pathogen in acute gastroenteritis: a retrospective study at a tertiary hospital for 1 year

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hye Il; Lee, Yoo Mi; Choi, You Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Viral gastroenteritis among children is mainly caused by rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, or adenovirus strains. However, changing socioeconomic conditions and a rotavirus vaccination program may be affecting the prevalence of these viral infections. Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the season-specific trends in viral infections for facilitating prophylaxis and surveillance in our region. Methods We evaluated 345 pediatric patients (203 males, 142 females; age, 1 month to 16 years) who visited the CHA Bundang Medical Center because of gastroenteric symptoms between June 2014 and May 2015. The specimens were simultaneously tested for norovirus, rotavirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus via multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed retrospectively. Results The most common virus was norovirus, followed by rotavirus, adenovirus, and astrovirus. Of all viral infections, 45.2% occurred mainly between 6 and 24 months of age; in particular, norovirus infection mostly occurred in all age groups except those below 6 months of age, when rotavirus was most prevalent. In addition, seasonal variation was observed, such as norovirus infection from December to February, rotavirus infection from February to April, and adenovirus infection from July to October. Conclusion Our results showed that the most common cause of acute pediatric viral gastroenteritis had changed from rotavirus to norovirus in our patients, because of effective rotaviral vaccination. We recommend the management of food and personal hygiene in accordance with age or seasons as well as active vaccination for preventing viral gastroenteritis. PMID:27186218

  1. Hyperuricemia in acute gastroenteritis is caused by decreased urate excretion via ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Ooyama, Keiko; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Tappei; Nakashima, Akio; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Higashino, Toshihide; Wakai, Kenji; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Hokari, Ryota; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Inui, Ayano; Fujimori, Shin; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the physiological and pathophysiological roles of intestinal urate excretion via ABCG2 in humans, we genotyped ABCG2 dysfunctional common variants, Q126X (rs72552713) and Q141K (rs2231142), in end-stage renal disease (hemodialysis) and acute gastroenteritis patients, respectively. ABCG2 dysfunction markedly increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels in 106 hemodialysis patients (P = 1.1 × 10−4), which demonstrated the physiological role of ABCG2 for intestinal urate excretion because their urate excretion almost depends on intestinal excretion via ABCG2. Also, ABCG2 dysfunction significantly elevated SUA in 67 acute gastroenteritis patients (P = 6.3 × 10−3) regardless of the degree of dehydration, which demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ABCG2 in acute gastroenteritis. These findings for the first time show ABCG2-mediated intestinal urate excretion in humans, and indicates the physiological and pathophysiological importance of intestinal epithelium as an excretion pathway besides an absorption pathway. Furthermore, increased SUA could be a useful marker not only for dehydration but also epithelial impairment of intestine. PMID:27571712

  2. Hyperuricemia in acute gastroenteritis is caused by decreased urate excretion via ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Ooyama, Keiko; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Tappei; Nakashima, Akio; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Higashino, Toshihide; Wakai, Kenji; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Hokari, Ryota; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Inui, Ayano; Fujimori, Shin; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the physiological and pathophysiological roles of intestinal urate excretion via ABCG2 in humans, we genotyped ABCG2 dysfunctional common variants, Q126X (rs72552713) and Q141K (rs2231142), in end-stage renal disease (hemodialysis) and acute gastroenteritis patients, respectively. ABCG2 dysfunction markedly increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels in 106 hemodialysis patients (P = 1.1 × 10(-4)), which demonstrated the physiological role of ABCG2 for intestinal urate excretion because their urate excretion almost depends on intestinal excretion via ABCG2. Also, ABCG2 dysfunction significantly elevated SUA in 67 acute gastroenteritis patients (P = 6.3 × 10(-3)) regardless of the degree of dehydration, which demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ABCG2 in acute gastroenteritis. These findings for the first time show ABCG2-mediated intestinal urate excretion in humans, and indicates the physiological and pathophysiological importance of intestinal epithelium as an excretion pathway besides an absorption pathway. Furthermore, increased SUA could be a useful marker not only for dehydration but also epithelial impairment of intestine. PMID:27571712

  3. Human bocavirus in hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis in Russia from 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Tymentsev, Alexander; Tikunov, Artem; Zhirakovskaia, Elena; Kurilschikov, Alexander; Babkin, Igor; Klemesheva, Vera; Netesov, Sergei; Tikunova, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) can cause respiratory diseases and is detectable in the stool samples of patients with gastroenteritis. To assess the prevalence of HBoV in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Novosibirsk, Russia, as well as its genetic diversity and the potential role in the etiology of gastroenteritis in this region, a total of 5502 stool samples from children hospitalized with gastroenteritis from 2010 to 2012, n=5250, and healthy children, n=252, were assayed for the presence of HBoV DNA by semi-nested PCR. The HBoV DNA was found in 1.2% of stool samples from children, with gastroenteritis varying from 0.5% in 2012 to 1.7% in 2011. The prevalence of HBoV in healthy children was 0.3%. HBoV strains were detected throughout the year with an increase in the fall-winter season. In 87% of cases, HBoV was detected in children before 1 year of age. All known HBoV genetic variants have been detected in Novosibirsk, although with different prevalences: HBoV2>HBoV1>HBoV4>HBoV3. At the beginning of 2011, HBoV2 replaced HBoV1 as the most prevalent variant. The median age of children with detected HBoV1 was 8.3months, and that with HBoV2 was 8.0 months. All HBoV-positive samples were assayed for the presence of the rotaviruses A and C, norovirus GII, astrovirus, enterovirus, adenovirus F, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Shigella spp., and EIEC. HBoV1 and HBoV2 as single agents were found in 45.8% and 60% samples, respectively, although this difference was not statistically significant. In the case of co-infections, HBoV was most frequently recorded with rotavirus A and norovirus GII. This study demonstrated that the detection rate of HBoV in stool samples from children with gastroenteritis was low, although both HBoV1 and HBoV2 could be found as the sole agents in children with gastroenteritis in Novosibirsk.

  4. [Acute renal failure due to obstructive ureteral stone associated with norovirus gastroenteritis in an infant with congenital solitary kidney].

    PubMed

    Kato, Taiki; Hamano, Atsushi; Kawamura, Hideki

    2014-10-01

    We report a 35 month-old boy with acute renal failure caused by an obstructive ureteral stone associated with norovirus gastroenteritis. He visited his family physician because of fever, abdominal pain and vomiting. He was diagnosed as acute gastroenteritis. The symptoms relieved once, but abdominal pain and vomiting recurred two days after the visit and the volume of urine decreased. He was diagnosed as norovirus gastoenteritis and acute renal failure which was unresponsive to fluid replacement. Ultrasound study of the abdomen showed a solitary kidney with mild hydronephrosis. He was then admitted to our hospital. He was finally diagnosed as acute postrenal failure due to obstructive ureteral stone with left solitary kidney by abdominal computer tomography (CT). We performed transurethral catheterization immediately. The creatinine and blood urea nitrogen returned to normal level in 2 days. The CT performed on the 28th day post operation showed disappearance of the stone after uric alkalization. Recently, some cases of postrenal failure due to bilateral obstructive ureteral stones, mainly ammonium acid urate stones, associated with viral gastroenteritis were reported. As clinical features, they are common in boys three years or younger after an episode of rotavirus gastroenteritis with high uric acid concentration. By far, the most common cause of acute renal failure in patients with severe gastroenteritis is prerenal failure resulting from hypovolemia. But postrenal cause due to bilateral obstructive stones should be taken in a consideration.

  5. Genetic Diversity of Human Adenovirus in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis, Albania, 2013-2015.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, G; Della Libera, S; Petricca, S; Iaconelli, M; Donia, D; Saccucci, P; Cenko, F; Xhelilaj, G; Divizia, M

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to assess the occurrence of human adenoviruses (HAdVs) in paediatric patients with gastroenteritis in Albania and to characterize HAdV strains. Faecal specimens from children admitted with acute gastroenteritis to the Paediatric Hospital in Tirana were screened for HAdV, using broad-range primers targeting the hexon gene, in combination with species-specific primers targeting the fiber gene. Phylogenetic analysis was then performed to assess the genetic relationships among the different sequences and between the sequences of the samples and those of the prototype strains. Adenovirus DNA was detected in 33/142 samples (23.2%); 14 belonged to species F (13 HAdV-41 and 1 HAdV-40), 13 to species C (1 HAdV-1, 8 HAdV-2, and 4 HAdV-5), 5 to species B (HAdV-3), and 1 to species A (HAdV-12). Rotavirus coinfection was present in 9/33 (27.2%) positive samples. In the remaining 24 positive samples (12 enteric--F species; 12 nonenteric--A, B, or C species), HAdVs were detected as unique viral pathogens, suggesting that HAdV may be an important cause of diarrhoea in children requiring hospitalization. This is the first study investigating the presence of human adenoviruses (species A-G) as etiologic agents of viral gastroenteritis in children in Albania. PMID:26339589

  6. Genetic Diversity of Human Adenovirus in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis, Albania, 2013-2015.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, G; Della Libera, S; Petricca, S; Iaconelli, M; Donia, D; Saccucci, P; Cenko, F; Xhelilaj, G; Divizia, M

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to assess the occurrence of human adenoviruses (HAdVs) in paediatric patients with gastroenteritis in Albania and to characterize HAdV strains. Faecal specimens from children admitted with acute gastroenteritis to the Paediatric Hospital in Tirana were screened for HAdV, using broad-range primers targeting the hexon gene, in combination with species-specific primers targeting the fiber gene. Phylogenetic analysis was then performed to assess the genetic relationships among the different sequences and between the sequences of the samples and those of the prototype strains. Adenovirus DNA was detected in 33/142 samples (23.2%); 14 belonged to species F (13 HAdV-41 and 1 HAdV-40), 13 to species C (1 HAdV-1, 8 HAdV-2, and 4 HAdV-5), 5 to species B (HAdV-3), and 1 to species A (HAdV-12). Rotavirus coinfection was present in 9/33 (27.2%) positive samples. In the remaining 24 positive samples (12 enteric--F species; 12 nonenteric--A, B, or C species), HAdVs were detected as unique viral pathogens, suggesting that HAdV may be an important cause of diarrhoea in children requiring hospitalization. This is the first study investigating the presence of human adenoviruses (species A-G) as etiologic agents of viral gastroenteritis in children in Albania.

  7. Fever without apparent source on clinical examination, lower respiratory infections in children, bacterial infections, and acute gastroenteritis and diarrhea of infancy and early childhood.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, P L; Bachman, D T; Shapiro, E D; Baron, M A

    1995-02-01

    This section focuses on issues in infectious disease that are commonly encountered in pediatric office practice. Paul McCarthy discusses recent literature regarding the evaluation and management of acute fevers without apparent source on clinical examination in infants and children and the evaluation of children with prolonged fevers of unknown origin. David Bachman reviews recent literature about lower respiratory tract infection in children and focuses on community-acquired lower respiratory infections and respiratory syncytial virus. Eugene Shapiro discusses literature concerning several infectious diseases commonly seen in office settings and concerning which recent developments are of interest: the hemolytic-uremic syndrome and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to penicillin, infections in day care centers, and new antimicrobial drugs. Michael Baron reviews recent literature about gastroenteritis and diarrhea of infancy and early childhood and discusses diagnosis, complications, pathogenesis and physiology, epidemiology, and treatment.

  8. Early Detection of Epidemic GII-4 Norovirus Strains in UK and Malawi: Role of Surveillance of Sporadic Acute Gastroenteritis in Anticipating Global Epidemics.

    PubMed

    Allen, David J; Trainor, Eamonn; Callaghan, Anna; O'Brien, Sarah J; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses are endemic in the human population, and are recognised as a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Although they are a highly diverse group of viruses, genogroup-II genotype-4 (GII-4) noroviruses are the most frequently identified strains worldwide. The predominance of GII-4 norovirus strains is driven by the periodic emergence of antigenic variants capable of evading herd protection. The global molecular epidemiology of emerging GII-4 strains is largely based on data from outbreak surveillance programmes, but the epidemiology of GII-4 strains among sporadic or community cases is far less well studied. To understand the distribution of GII-4 norovirus strains associated with gastroenteritis in the wider population, we characterised the GII-4 norovirus strains detected during studies of sporadic cases of infectious gastroenteritis collected in the UK and Malawi between 1993 and 2009. Our data shows that GII-4 norovirus strains that have emerged as strains of global epidemic importance have circulated in the community up to 18 years before their recognition as pandemic strains associated with increases in outbreaks. These data may suggest that more comprehensive surveillance programmes that incorporate strains associated with sporadic cases may provide a way for early detection of emerging strains with pandemic potential. This may be of particular relevance as vaccines become available.

  9. Early Detection of Epidemic GII-4 Norovirus Strains in UK and Malawi: Role of Surveillance of Sporadic Acute Gastroenteritis in Anticipating Global Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Anna; O’Brien, Sarah J.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses are endemic in the human population, and are recognised as a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Although they are a highly diverse group of viruses, genogroup-II genotype-4 (GII-4) noroviruses are the most frequently identified strains worldwide. The predominance of GII-4 norovirus strains is driven by the periodic emergence of antigenic variants capable of evading herd protection. The global molecular epidemiology of emerging GII-4 strains is largely based on data from outbreak surveillance programmes, but the epidemiology of GII-4 strains among sporadic or community cases is far less well studied. To understand the distribution of GII-4 norovirus strains associated with gastroenteritis in the wider population, we characterised the GII-4 norovirus strains detected during studies of sporadic cases of infectious gastroenteritis collected in the UK and Malawi between 1993 and 2009. Our data shows that GII-4 norovirus strains that have emerged as strains of global epidemic importance have circulated in the community up to 18 years before their recognition as pandemic strains associated with increases in outbreaks. These data may suggest that more comprehensive surveillance programmes that incorporate strains associated with sporadic cases may provide a way for early detection of emerging strains with pandemic potential. This may be of particular relevance as vaccines become available. PMID:27115152

  10. Domperidone with ORT in the treatment of pediatric acute gastroenteritis in Japan: a multicenter, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kita, Fumiyo; Hinotsu, Shiro; Yorifuji, Tohru; Urushihara, Hisashi; Shimakawa, Tetsuro; Kishida, Kenji; Wakazono, Yoshihiro; Yamauchi, Eiko; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Kawakami, Koji

    2015-03-01

    Domperidone is an antiemetic that is often prescribed for children with acute gastroenteritis in Japan. In this study, the authors assessed the efficacy of domperidone prescription in combination with oral rehydration treatment (ORT) in the treatment of vomiting during acute gastroenteritis in children during the early period. They performed a prospective multicenter randomized trial in Japan. Patients received either ORT or ORT and domperidone prescription. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who had vomiting during the first 2 hours after randomization. A total of 56 children were eligible; 24 received ORT alone, and 32 received ORT and prescribed domperidone suppository. Results showed that 27.3% of children in the ORT group vomited as compared with 20.7% of children in the ORT and domperidone group (P = .41). In this study, it appears that domperidone in combination with ORT in the treatment of acute gastroenteritis does not reduce vomiting in the early period.

  11. Importance of rotavirus and adenovirus types 40 and 41 in acute gastroenteritis in Korean children.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K H; Yang, J M; Joo, S I; Cho, Y G; Glass, R I; Cho, Y J

    1990-01-01

    To examine the role of rotavirus (Rv) and adenovirus types 40 and 41 (Ad40/41) in Korean children with acute gastroenteritis, we evaluated 345 children with acute gastroenteritis and 90 children without acute gastroenteritis in Seoul, Korea, during a 29-month period. Stools were tested for group A Rv antigen and for Ad40/41 by using monoclonal antibody (MAb)-based assays. Rv was found in 68% of the ill children and 19% of the controls (P less than 0.001), whereas Ad40/41 was detected in 9% of the ill children and 2% of the controls (P less than 0.05). Also, 6% of the ill children and 0.01% of the controls excreted Rv and Ad40/41 simultaneously. Among the ill children, 96% of children with Rv and 94% of those with Ad40/41 were younger than 24 months. Although a peak of Rv infection was detected in early winter in both years of the study, there was no apparent seasonal trend with Ad40/41. Diarrhea with more than 10 stools per day, vomiting, or fever was most strongly associated with Rv shedding, whereas the first two manifestations were associated with coinfection of Rv and Ad40/41. To investigate the genetic and serotypic diversity of Rv strains, we tested 195 and 144 fecal Rv specimens isolated from the gastroenteritis cases, respectively, by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the segmented RNA genome and by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with serotype-specific MAbs. Of the 195 specimens, 154 yielded RNA patterns characteristic of group A Rv: 18% had short electrophoretic migration patterns, 81% had long patterns, and 1% had a mixture of short and long patterns. Of the 144 specimens, serotype specificity was determined in 51%: 89% were serotype 1, 10% were serotype 2, and 1% were serotype 3. Analysis of the specimens for which electropherotypes and serotypes were available indicated that a given RNA pattern corresponded to a particular serotype, except in one strain that showed short patterns but serotype 1. We suggest that Rv and Ad40/41 in stools be

  12. Human bocavirus 1 and 3 infection in children with acute gastroenteritis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Teresinha Teixeira de; Souza, Menira; Fiaccadori, Fabíola Souza; Borges, Ana Maria Tavares; Costa, Paulo Sucasas da; Cardoso, Divina das Dôres de Paula

    2012-09-01

    To determine the positivity rate of human bocavirus (HBoV) 1 and 3 among children who presented with acute gastroenteritis symptoms during the period of 1994-2004 in the Central-West Region of Brazil, 762 faecal samples were tested using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of HBoV DNA. Primers for a segment of the non-structural viral protein 1 (NS1) gene of HBoV-1 and HBoV-3 were used. Twelve HBoV-positive samples were further characterised via genomic sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Of the samples tested, 5.8% (n = 44) were positive for HBoV-1 or HBoV-3 and co-infection was observed in 14 (31.8%) of the 44 HBoV-positive samples. Nine of the 14 samples were also positive for Rotavirus A and five were positive for Aichi virus. The genomic sequencing of the NS1 partial sequence of 12 HBoV-samples showed that 11 samples were characterised as HBoV-1 and that one was characterised as HBoV-3. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the HBoV-1 samples had a high sequence homology to others previously identified in China, Sweden and Brazil. This is the first study conducted in the Central-West Region of Brazil to detect HBoV-1 and HBoV-3 in faecal samples from children with acute gastroenteritis. Further studies are required to define the role of HBoVs as aetiological agents of gastroenteritis.

  13. Diapers in war zones: ethnomedical factors in acute childhood gastroenteritis in Peshawar, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Saira H; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    This article considers ethnomedical knowledge and practices among parents related to contraction of acute gastroenteritis among children in Peshawar, Pakistan. Research methods included analysis of the Emergency Pediatric Services' admission register, a structured interview administered to 47 parents of patients seen in the Khyber Medical College Teaching Hospital, semi-structured interviews of 12 staff, and four home visits among families with children treated at the hospital. The use of native research assistants and participant observation contributed to the reliability of the findings, though the ethnographic, home-visit sample is small. Our research indicated that infection rates are exacerbated in homes through two culturally salient practices and one socioeconomic condition. Various misconceptions propagate the recurrence or perserverance of acute gastroenteritis including assumptions about teething leading to poor knowledge of disease etiology, rehydration solutions leading to increased severity of disease, and diaper usage leading to the spread of disease. In our Discussion, we suggest how hospital structures of authority and gender hierarchy may impact hospital interactions, the flow of information, and its respective importance to the patient's parents leading to possible propagation of disease. These ethnographic data offer a relatively brief but targeted course of action to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment efforts.

  14. Diapers in War Zones: Ethnomedical Factors in Acute Childhood Gastroenteritis in Peshawar, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Saira H.; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    This article considers ethnomedical knowledge and practices among parents related to contraction of acute gastroenteritis among children in Peshawar, Pakistan. Research methods included analysis of the Emergency Pediatric Services’ admission register, a structured interview administered to 47 parents of patients seen in the Khyber Medical College Teaching Hospital, semi-structured interviews of 12 staff, and four home visits among families with children treated at the hospital. The use of native research assistants and participant observation contributed to the reliability of the findings, though the ethnographic, home-visit sample is small. Our research indicated that infection rates are exacerbated in homes through two culturally salient practices and one socioeconomic condition. Various misconceptions propagate the recurrence or perserverance of acute gastroenteritis including assumptions about teething leading to poor knowledge of disease etiology, rehydration solutions leading to increased severity of disease, and diaper usage leading to the spread of disease. In our Discussion, we suggest how hospital structures of authority and gender hierarchy may impact hospital interactions, the flow of information, and its respective importance to the patient’s parents leading to possible propagation of disease. These ethnographic data offer a relatively brief but targeted course of action to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment efforts. PMID:25768117

  15. Diapers in war zones: ethnomedical factors in acute childhood gastroenteritis in Peshawar, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Saira H; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    This article considers ethnomedical knowledge and practices among parents related to contraction of acute gastroenteritis among children in Peshawar, Pakistan. Research methods included analysis of the Emergency Pediatric Services' admission register, a structured interview administered to 47 parents of patients seen in the Khyber Medical College Teaching Hospital, semi-structured interviews of 12 staff, and four home visits among families with children treated at the hospital. The use of native research assistants and participant observation contributed to the reliability of the findings, though the ethnographic, home-visit sample is small. Our research indicated that infection rates are exacerbated in homes through two culturally salient practices and one socioeconomic condition. Various misconceptions propagate the recurrence or perserverance of acute gastroenteritis including assumptions about teething leading to poor knowledge of disease etiology, rehydration solutions leading to increased severity of disease, and diaper usage leading to the spread of disease. In our Discussion, we suggest how hospital structures of authority and gender hierarchy may impact hospital interactions, the flow of information, and its respective importance to the patient's parents leading to possible propagation of disease. These ethnographic data offer a relatively brief but targeted course of action to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment efforts. PMID:25768117

  16. Cases of acute gastroenteritis due to calicivirus in outbreaks: clinical differences by age and aetiological agent.

    PubMed

    Sala, M R; Broner, S; Moreno, A; Arias, C; Godoy, P; Minguell, S; Martínez, A; Torner, N; Bartolomé, R; de Simón, M; Guix, S; Domínguez, A

    2014-08-01

    The Caliciviridae family includes norovirus and sapovirus, which both cause acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Currently, norovirus is the most common cause of AGE in all age groups in many countries. We analysed clinical differences in reported cases of acute gastroenteritis caused by caliciviruses (AGC) by age group and agent involved. We conducted a descriptive study of AGE outbreaks reported to the Public Health Agency of Catalonia (Spain) in 2010 and 2011. The odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to estimate the association between clinical symptoms and age. Clinical differences between the <15 years and ≥15 years age groups were statistically significant: children more frequently presented with vomiting (OR, 3.25; 95% CI, 2.56-4.13), abdominal pain (OR, 3.27; 95% CI, 2.60-4.12), fever (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.17-1.96) and nausea (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.19-1.85). Comparing clinical manifestations of sapovirus and norovirus infection in children aged <15 years, cases caused by norovirus more frequently presented with vomiting and fever (p <0.001), and cases caused by sapovirus more frequently presented with diarrhoea (p 0.013). Determination of the clinical differences associated with cases in outbreaks according to the age of the majority of cases and the symptoms most frequently detected may aid decision making and guide aetiological investigations and the adoption of prevention and control measures.

  17. [Oral rehydration in acute gastroenteritis in infants and children--advantages of a standardized protocol].

    PubMed

    Weizman, Z; Weizman, A; Alsheikh, A; Herzog, L; Tal, A; Gorodischer, R

    2000-11-01

    Oral rehydration (OR) for acute gastroenteritis in infants and children has been shown to be as effective as IV therapy, with less discomfort and lower costs. In this retrospective study we compared 2 pediatric wards, in 1 of which only a standardized, simplified, bedside protocol, based on American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines, was used. There were no significant clinical characteristics in the 208 patients. In the ward which used the above protocol, OR utilization was significantly more frequent than in the other ward (48% versus 15%), thus saving equipment costs of nearly $1,000/3 months. There were no significant differences in outcome between the wards. We conclude that introducing a standardized management protocol may increase OR utilization in hospitalized children with acute diarrhea. PMID:11341212

  18. Acute Conditions Caused by Infectious Aortitis

    PubMed Central

    Molacek, Jiri; Treska, Vladislav; Baxa, Jan; Certik, Bohuslav; Houdek, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Infection of the aorta is rare but potentially very dangerous. Under normal circumstances the aorta is very resistant to infections. Following some afflictions, the infection can pass to the aorta from blood or the surrounding tissues. The authors present their 5-year experience with therapy of various types of infections of the abdominal aorta. Methods: In the 5-year period between January 2008 and December 2012, the Surgical Clinic of the University Hospital in Pilsen treated 17 patients with acute infection of the abdominal aorta. They included 9 males and 8 females. The mean age was 73.05 years (58-90). The most common pathogens were Salmonella (7), Staphylococcus aureus (2), Klebsiella pneumoniae (1), Listeria monocytogenes (1), and Candida albicans (1). Two cases included mixed bacteria and no infectious agent was cultured in three cases. In 14 cases (82.6%) we decided on an open surgical solution, i.e., resection of the affected abdominal aorta, extensive debridement, and vascular reconstruction. In all of these 14 cases we decided on in situ reconstruction. Twelve cases were treated using silver-impregnated prostheses. An antibiotic impregnated graft was used in one case and fresh aortic allograft in one case. In one case (5.9%) we decided on an endovascular solution, i.e., insertion of a bifurcation stent graft and prolonged antibiotic therapy. In two cases (11.8%) we decided on conservative treatment, as both patients refused any surgical therapy. Results: Morbidity was 47.2% (8 patients). In one case we had to perform reoperation of a patient on the 15th postoperative day to evacuate the postoperative hematoma. The 30-day mortality was 5.9% (1 patient). The hospital mortality was 11.8% (2 patients). One patient died on the 42nd postoperative day due to multiorgan failure following resection of perforated aortitis. During follow-up (average 3.5 years), we had no case of infection or thrombosis of the vascular prosthesis. Conclusion: Patients with mycotic

  19. Burden of acute gastroenteritis, norovirus and rotavirus in a managed care population.

    PubMed

    Karve, Sudeep; Krishnarajah, Girishanthy; Korsnes, Jennifer S; Cassidy, Adrian; Candrilli, Sean D

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed and described the episode rate, duration of illness, and health care utilization and costs associated with acute gastroenteritis (AGE), norovirus gastroenteritis (NVGE), and rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in physician office, emergency department (ED), and inpatient care settings in the United States (US). The retrospective analysis was conducted using an administrative insurance claims database (2006-2011). AGE episode rates were assessed using medical (ICD-9-CM) codes for AGE; whereas a previously published "indirect" method was used in assessing estimated episode rates of NVGE and RVGE. We calculated per-patient, per-episode and total costs incurred in three care settings for the three diseases over five seasons. For each season, we extrapolated the total economic burden associated with the diseases to the US population. The overall AGE episode rate in the physician office care setting declined by 15% during the study period; whereas the AGE episode rate remained stable in the inpatient care setting. AGE-related total costs (inflation-adjusted) per 100 000 plan members increased by 28% during the 2010-2011 season, compared with the 2006-2007 season ($832,849 vs. $1 068 116) primarily due to increase in AGE-related inpatient costs. On average, the duration of illness for NVGE and RVGE was 1 day longer than the duration of illness for AGE (mean: 2 days). Nationally, the average AGE-related estimated total cost was $3.88 billion; NVGE and RVGE each accounted for 7% of this total. The episodes of RVGE among pediatric populations have declined; however, NVGE, RVGE and AGE continue to pose a substantial burden among managed care enrollees. In conclusion, the study further reaffirms that RVGE has continued to decline in pediatric population post-launch of the rotavirus vaccination program and provides RVGE- and NVGE-related costs and utilization estimates which can serve as a resource for researchers and policy makers to conduct cost

  20. Efficacy and safety of gelatine tannate for the treatment of acute gastroenteritis in children: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Michałek, Dorota; Kołodziej, Maciej; Konarska, Zofia; Szajewska, Hania

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Worldwide, acute gastroenteritis in children, usually caused by viruses, leads to considerable morbidity and mortality. The treatment is aimed at preventing and treating dehydration, promoting weight gain after rehydration, and reducing the duration and severity of diarrhoea. Effective and inexpensive interventions that could add to the effect of oral rehydration therapy are of interest. Recently, in many European countries, gelatine tannate is being widely marketed for treating acute gastroenteritis. Gelatine tannate is a complex of tannic acid, which possesses astringent and anti-inflammatory properties, and a protective gelatine. Currently, there is no evidence to support the use of gelatine tannate for treating acute gastroenteritis in children and only scant evidence to support the use of gelatine tannate in adults. We aim to assess the efficacy of gelatine tannate for the treatment of acute gastroenteritis in children. Methods and analysis This will be a blind, placebo-controlled, randomised trial. Children younger than 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis defined as a change in stool consistency to loose or liquid form (according to the Bristol Stool Form scale or Amsterdam Stool Form scale) and/or an increase in the frequency of evacuations (typically ≥3 in 24 h), lasting for no longer than 5 days, will be recruited. A total of 158 children will be randomised to receive either gelatine tannate (children younger than 3 years of age will receive 250 mg, 4 times/day, and those older than 3 years of age will receive 500 mg, 4 times/day) or matching placebo for 5 days. The primary outcome measure is the duration of diarrhoea. Ethics and dissemination The Bioethics Committee approved the study protocol. The findings of this trial will be submitted to a peer-reviewed paediatric journal. Abstracts will be submitted to relevant national and international conferences. Trial registration number NCT02280759; Pre-results. PMID

  1. Acute gastroenteritis and video camera surveillance: a cruise ship case report.

    PubMed

    Diskin, Arthur L; Caro, Gina M; Dahl, Eilif

    2014-01-01

    A 'faecal accident' was discovered in front of a passenger cabin of a cruise ship. After proper cleaning of the area the passenger was approached, but denied having any gastrointestinal symptoms. However, when confronted with surveillance camera evidence, she admitted having the accident and even bringing the towel stained with diarrhoea back to the pool towels bin. She was isolated until the next port where she was disembarked. Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) caused by Norovirus is very contagious and easily transmitted from person to person on cruise ships. The main purpose of isolation is to avoid public vomiting and faecal accidents. To quickly identify and isolate contagious passengers and crew and ensure their compliance are key elements in outbreak prevention and control, but this is difficult if ill persons deny symptoms. All passenger ships visiting US ports now have surveillance video cameras, which under certain circumstances can assist in finding potential index cases for AGE outbreaks.

  2. Enteropathogenic and enteroaggregative E. coli in stools of children with acute gastroenteritis in Davidson County, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Foster, Monique A; Iqbal, Junaid; Zhang, Chengxian; McHenry, Rendie; Cleveland, Brent E; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia; Fonnesbeck, Chris; Payne, Daniel C; Chappell, James D; Halasa, Natasha; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2015-11-01

    This prospective acute gastroenteritis (AGE) surveillance was conducted in the inpatient and emergency room settings at a referral pediatric hospital to determine the prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) in children <12years of age with AGE in Davidson County, Tennessee. Subjects 15 days to 11 years of age, who presented with diarrhea and/or vomiting, were enrolled. Stool specimens were processed for detection of DEC using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. From December 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, a total of 79 (38%) out of 206 stool specimens from children with AGE tested positive for E. coli. A total of 12 (5.8%) out of 206 stool specimens from children with AGE were positive for a DEC. Eight (67%) out of these 12 were positive for enteropathogenic E. coli, and the remaining 4 were positive for enteroaggregative E. coli. DEC clinical isolates clustered with known E. coli enteropathogens according to multilocus sequencing typing.

  3. Burden and impact of acute gastroenteritis and foodborne pathogens in Trinidad and Tobago.

    PubMed

    Lakhan, Carelene; Badrie, Neela; Ramsubhag, Adash; Sundaraneedi, Kumar; Indar, Lisa

    2013-12-01

    Objectives of this study were to determine the burden and impact of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and foodborne pathogens in Trinidad and Tobago. A retrospective, cross-sectional population survey, based on self-reported cases of AGE, was conducted in November-December 2008 and May-June 2009 (high- and low-AGE season respectively) by face-to-face interviews. From 2,145 households selected to be interviewed, the response rate was 99.9%. Of those interviewed, 5.1% (n = 110; 95% CI 4.3-6.2) reported having AGE (3 or more loose watery stools in 24 hours) in the 28 days prior to the interview (0.67 episodes/person-year). Monthly prevalence of AGE was the highest among children aged < 5 years (1.3 episodes/year). Eighteen (16%) persons with AGE sought medical care (4 treated with oral rehydration salts and 6 with antibiotics), and 66% reported restricted activity [range 1-16 day(s)]. The mean duration of diarrhoea was 2.3 days (range 2-10 days). One case submitted a stool sample, and another was hospitalized. Overall, 56 (10%) AGE specimens tested positive for foodbome pathogens. It was estimated that 135,820 AGE cases occurred in 2009 (84% underreporting), and for every 1 AGE case reported, an additional 6.17 cases occurred in the community. The estimated economic cost of AGE ranged from US$ 27,331 to 19,736,344. Acute gastroenteritis, thus, poses a huge health and economic burden on Trinidad and Tobago.

  4. Norovirus Gastroenteritis Successfully Treated with Nitazoxanide

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Danish M.; Koo, Hoonmo L.; Adachi, Javier A.; Viola, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious and non-infectious diarrhea is a common occurrence in the immunosuppressed population. We present a 43-year-old individual with large-volume stool output Norovirus acute gastroenteritis in the setting of relapsed refractory acute myelogenous leukemia, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and biopsy-proven cutaneous and pulmonary graft-versus-host disease. Therapeutic options such as intravenous immunoglobulin or reduction of oral immunosuppressants were not a feasible choice. A prompt clinical cure was achieved with nitazoxanide, a broad spectrum antimicrobial agent. Nitazoxanide may be a safe therapeutic alternative, in which a reduction in immunosuppression is not a viable option. PMID:21839773

  5. Gastroenteritis exhumed.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mian Mujahid; Jan, Adil; Munawwar, Anjum Zia; Arif, Muhammad; Ahmed, Riaz

    2008-01-01

    Nature of presenting symptoms and even signs of disease can lead to a diagnosis that seems routine but is in fact erroneous because a sufficient index of suspicion is not generated in the mind of the physician dealing with the case. A young girl of about 16 years was brought to the Casualty Department, DHQ Hospital Bannu on 12 Sep 2004 with complains of severe vomiting and diarrhoea; the casualty medical officer diagnosed her as a case of acute gastroenteritis.

  6. Clinical characteristics and genetic diversity of noroviruses in adults with acute gastroenteritis in Beijing, China in 2008-2009.

    PubMed

    Tian, Geng; Jin, Miao; Li, Huiying; Li, Quanrui; Wang, Jing; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2014-07-01

    Norovirus (NoV) infections that cause acute gastroenteritis are commonly observed during colder months. This study was conducted to investigate the clinical features and molecular epidemiology of NoVs in adult outpatients with acute gastroenteritis in Beijing, China from August 2008 to July 2009. Five hundred nineteen patients were enrolled, their stool specimens were collected, and 136 (26.2%) were positive for NoV. The elderly were found to be more susceptible to NoVs than other age groups. The greatest number of gastroenteritis cases associated with occurred in October. Six GI and eleven GII NoV genotypes were isolated; among these, the GII.4 genotype was most prevalent (70/140 and 50% were the 2006b variant). The elderly were more susceptible to the GII.4 genotype than to other genotypes. Greater numbers of neutrophils in the peripheral blood were observed in the NoV infected group than in uninfected control group. However, the levels of neutrophils and leukocytes in the non-GII.4 patients infected with NoV were higher than those of the GII.4-infected patients. The data highlight the role of NoV as a primary agent responsible for gastroenteritis in adults in Beijing, China.

  7. Permeability of the small intestine to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in children with acute gastroenteritis or eczema

    SciTech Connect

    Forget, P.; Sodoyez-Goffaux, F.; Zappitelli, A.

    1985-06-01

    Increased gut permeability to macromolecules is thought to be an important factor in the development of food hypersensitivity. The latter can develop in the course of acute gastroenteritis and could play a role in infantile eczema. The authors studied gut permeability in 10 normal adults, 11 control children, 7 children with acute gastroenteritis, and 8 patients with infantile eczema, making use of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA as probe molecule. (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was given orally (50-100 microCi); 24-h urinary excretion of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the oral dose. Mean and standard error were 2.35 +/- 0.24, 2.51 +/- 0.21, 9.96 +/- 3.44, and 10.90 +/- 2.05 in normal adults, control children, and gastroenteritis and eczema patients, respectively. Differences between controls and either gastroenteritis (p less than 0.001) or eczema (p less than 0.001) patients are significant. The results support the hypothesis that increased gut permeability could play a role in food hypersensitivity.

  8. Detection of rotavirus and other enteropathogens in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Havana, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Ribas, María de Los Angeles; Tejero, Yahisel; Cordero, Yanislet; de Los Angeles León, María; Rodriguez, Misladys; Perez-Lastre, Jorge; Triana, Thelma; Guerra, Mabel; Ayllón, Lucía; Escalante, Gladys; Hadad, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to diagnose infections with rotavirus and other enteric pathogens in children under five years old with acute gastroenteritis and to identify the most common epidemiological and clinical characteristics of these pathogens. The study was conducted using 110 stool samples from the same number of children under five years old who were inpatients at three paediatric hospitals in Havana, Cuba, between October and December 2011. The samples were tested for rotavirus and other enteric pathogens using traditional and molecular microbiological methods. Pathogens were detected in 85 (77.3 %) of the children. Rotavirus was the most commonly found, appearing in 54.5 % of the children, followed by bacteria (29 %) and parasites (10.9 %). Other viral pathogens detected included adenovirus (6.4 %) and astrovirus (3.6 %). In rotavirus-positives cases, at least one other pathogen was detected, usually a bacterium (26.6 %). More than three episodes of watery diarrhea in 24 hours were observed in 78.3 % of the cases. Dehydration was found in 30 (50 %) rotavirus-positive children, of whom seven (11.6 %) were transferred to an intensive care unit due to complications of metabolic acidosis. Rotavirus was most commonly observed among children under 12 months old (65 %). The highest incidence of infection occurred in children who were under the care of a relative at home (78.3 %), had not been breastfed (65 %), or had been breastfed for less than six months (28.3 %). The genotype combinations most frequently found were G9P8 (28.3 %) and G1P8 (10 %). This study demonstrates the presence of rotavirus and other enteric pathogens as causes of gastroenteritis in hospitalized infants and young children in Cuba.

  9. Transmissible Gastroenteritis MECHANISMS RESPONSIBLE FOR DIARRHEA IN AN ACUTE VIRAL ENTERITIS IN PIGLETS

    PubMed Central

    Butler, D. G.; Gali, D. G.; Kelly, M. H.; Hamilton, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    We studied 3-wk-old piglets 40 h after experimental infection with transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus to identify the mechanisms of diarrhea in this disease and to better understand infectious diarrhea in humans. Using continuous segmental marker perfusion in four regions along the gut, we found significant increases in net intraluminal accumulation of water and electrolytes only in the proximal jejunum, the region infected by the virus. In this jejunal segment studied in vivo, unidirectional sodium flux, extracellular fluid (ECF) to lumen, significantly increased, lumen to ECF significantly decreased, compared with matchfed littermates. The standard perfusate rendered hypertonic by adding mannitol (450 mosmol/kg), in the same segment of normal pigs, caused only an increase in ECF to lumen flux of sodium. TGE did not alter gross villous structure or intraluminal bacteria, bile salts, lactate, pH, or osmolality. Epithelial cell migration was accelerated in the jejunum of infected pigs. Isolated in suspension, these cells from TGE pigs exhibited increased active and passive sodium efflux, cells from mannitol-perfused pigs exhibited only increased active sodium efflux. In this viral enteritis, altered sodium transport occurring in the jejunum, the region of the intestine infected appears to be associated with defective epithelial cell function. The precise nature of the abnormalities in sodium transport, their relationship to disturbances of transport of other solutes, and to virus epithelial cell interaction remain to be defined. Images PMID:4825228

  10. Prevalence and genetic diversity of noroviruses in adults with acute gastroenteritis in Huzhou, China, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaofang; Han, Jiankang; Chen, Liping; Xu, Deshun; Shen, Yuehua; Zha, Yunfeng; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Ji, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Norovirus (NoV) infection is the most common cause of nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis, which affects both adults and children. However, the molecular epidemiology of NoV in adults with acute gastroenteritis in China has not been investigated extensively. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of NoV infections and analyzed the genetic diversity of NoV in adults with acute gastroenteritis in Huzhou, China. A total of 796 fecal samples were collected from outpatients (≥16 years of age) between March 2013 and February 2014. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to detect NoV genogroups I (GI) and II (GII). For genotyping, the capsid and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) genes were partially amplified and sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. NoVs were detected in 26.51% (211/796) of the specimens, with GII being predominant, representing 96.20% of the NoV infections. At least nine genotypes were identified among GI and GII specimens, including GI.P2/GI.2, GI.P3/GI.3, GI.P4/GI.4, GII.Pe/GII.4 Sydney_2012, GII.P12/GII.3, GII.P7/GII.6, GII.P16/GII.13, GII.Pe, and GII.Pg (RdRp only). This is the first report of a GII.P16/GII.13 recombinant virus in adults in China. GII.Pe/GII.4 Sydney_2012 was the most prevalent genotype and the only GII.4 variant identified during the study period. Our findings suggested that NoV was a common causative agent of acute gastroenteritis in adults in Huzhou, China. During the study period, the NoVs circulating in adults in Huzhou were predominantly GII.4 Sydney_2012 variants and GII NoV recombinants.

  11. What is new on the term probiotics and the role of probiotics for the management of acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Szajewska, H

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in probiotics, and evidence of the effectiveness of probiotics in preventing or treating diarrhoeal diseases is also advancing. The purpose of this short opinion paper is to summarise two aspects of current development in regard to probiotics. First, it discusses what is new with regard to some key questions related to the term 'probiotic'. Second, recent, evidence-based, clinical practice guidelines on the use of probiotics for the management of acute gastroenteritis in children are presented.

  12. Prevalence of adenovirus and rotavirus infection in immunocompromised patients with acute gastroenteritis in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Joana; Ferreira, Delfim; Arrabalde, Célia; Almeida, Sandra; Baldaque, Inês; Sousa, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the prevalence of rotavirus (RV) and adenovirus (AdV) infections in immunocompromised patients with acute gastroenteritis. METHODS: The presence of RV and AdV (serotypes 40 and 41) was evaluated in 509 stool samples obtained between January 2009 and December 2010 from 200 immunocompromised patients (83 females and 117 males; median age 21 years old, range 0-72. The diagnosis of infection was performed as a routine procedure and the presence of RV and AdV (serotypes 40 and 41) was determined by immunochromatography using the RIDA® Quick Rota-Adeno-Kombi kit (r-Biopharm, Darmstadt, Germany). The data analysis and description of seasonal frequencies were performed using computer software IBM® SPSS® (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) Statistics version 20.0 for Mac. The frequencies of infection were compared into different age and gender groups by χ2 test. RESULTS: The study revealed 12.4% AdV positive samples and 0.8% RV positive samples, which correspond to a prevalence of 6.5% and 1.5%, respectively. AdV was more frequent between October 2009 and April 2010, while RV was identified in April 2010 and July 2010. The stool analysis revealed that from the 509 samples, 63 (12.4%) were positive for AdV and 4 (0.8%) positive for RV, which by resuming the information of each patient, lead to an overall prevalence of AdV and RV of 6.5% (13/200 patients) and 1.5% (3/200 patients), respectively. The stratification of the analysis regarding age groups showed a tendency to an increased prevalence of infection in paediatric patients between 0-10 years old. Considering the seasonal distribution of these infections, our study revealed that AdV infection was more frequent between October 2009 and April 2010, while RV infection was characterized by two distinct peaks (April 2010 and July 2010). CONCLUSION: The overall prevalence of AdV and RV infection in immunocompromised patients with acute gastroenteritis was 8% and AdV was the most prevalent agent

  13. Prospective evaluation of indirect costs due to acute rotavirus gastroenteritis in Spain: the ROTACOST study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The effect of rotavirus in developed countries is mainly economic. This study aimed to assess the indirect costs induced by rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RVAGE) in Spain. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted from October 2008 to June 2009. It included 682 children up to 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) who attended primary care (n = 18) and emergency room/hospital settings (n = 10), covering the regions of Galicia and Asturias (North-west Spain). All non-medical expenses incurred throughout the episode were recorded in detail using personal interviews and telephone contact. Results Among the 682 enrolled children, 207 (30.4%) were rotavirus positive and 170 (25%) had received at least one dose of rotavirus vaccine. The mean (standard deviation) indirect cost caused by an episode of AGE was estimated at 135.17 (182.70) Euros. Costs were 1.74-fold higher when AGE was caused by rotavirus compared with other etiologies: 192.7 (219.8) Euros vs. 111.6 (163.5) Euros (p < .001). The costs for absenteeism were the most substantial with a mean of 91.41 (134.76) Euros per family, resulting in a loss of 2.45 (3.17) days of work. In RVAGE patients, the absenteeism cost was 120.4 (154) Euros compared with 75.8 (123) for the other etiologies (p = .002), because of loss of 3.5 (3.6) vs 1.9 (2.9) days of work (p < .001). Meals costs were 2-fold-higher (48.5 (55) vs 24.3 (46) Euros, p < .001) and travel costs were 2.6-fold-higher (32 (92) vs 12.5 (21.1) Euros, p = .005) in RVAGE patients compared with those with other etiologies. There were no differences between RVAGE and other etiologies groups regarding costs of hiring of caregivers or purchase of material. Patients with RVAGE were admitted to hospital more frequently than those with other etiologies (47.8% vs 14%, p < .001). Conclusions Rotavirus generates a significant indirect economic burden. Our data should be considered in the decision-making process of the eventual inclusion

  14. Etiology of Sporadic Cases of Pediatric Acute Gastroenteritis in Asturias, Spain, and Genotyping and Characterization of Norovirus Strains Involved

    PubMed Central

    Boga, José Antonio; Melón, Santiago; Nicieza, Inés; de Diego, Isabel; Villar, Mercedes; Parra, Francisco; de Oña, María

    2004-01-01

    From November 2000 to October 2001, a reverse transcription-PCR using primers directed to the norovirus RNA polymerase coding region was included in a viral and bacterial routine screening to diagnose sporadic cases of acute gastroenteritis among children in Asturias, Spain. The role of noroviruses (8.6% of the positively diagnosed cases) as the cause of sporadic pediatric gastroenteritis was evaluated with respect to the detection rates of other gastroenteritis-associated viruses and bacteria. The results indicated that noroviruses were less common than rotaviruses (36.9%), Campylobacter spp. (28.8%), and Salmonella spp. (18.4%) but more frequent than astroviruses (4.3%), adenoviruses (3.8%), and Yersinia spp. (2.2%). Mixed infections involving noroviruses were rarely observed (0.5%). The presence of a norovirus-associated pediatric gastroenteritis peak in summer, as well as the complete absence of norovirus-associated cases in colder months, challenges the view that norovirus infections exclusively have wintertime seasonality. On the other hand, phylogenetic analysis of the amplified fragments showed that the norovirus strains responsible were closely related. A further study using the full-length capsid region showed that these strains could be included into genogroup II, Bristol/Lorsdale cluster, and were closely related to the 1995 and 1996 U.S. subset of strains associated with outbreaks recorded worldwide between 1995 and 1996. PMID:15184450

  15. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of norovirus infection in adults with acute gastroenteritis in Ji'nan, China.

    PubMed

    Sai, Lintao; Wang, Gang; Shao, Lihua; Liu, Haihong; Zhang, Yajun; Qu, Chunmei; Ma, Lixian

    2013-11-01

    Acute gastroenteritis caused by human noroviruses (NoVs) has become an important public health problem worldwide. This study was carried out to investigate the rates of NoV infections and the genetic characteristics of NoVs in adult outpatients with acute gastroenteritis in Ji'nan, a large eastern city in China. A total of 480 fecal samples were collected from outpatients at the Shandong University Qilu Hospital between June 2010 and May 2011. Of the collected samples, 42 (42/480, 8.75 %) were positive for NoVs by RT-PCR, and seven different genotypes were identified: GI-1, GI-4, GII-1, GII-3, GII-4, GII-6 and GII-13, of which GII-4 was the most prevalent (29/42, 69.0 %). Phylogenetic and Simplot analyses showed that three recombinant strains were detected: two GII-4 polymerase/GII-3 capsid recombinants and one GII-6 polymerase/GII-4 capsid recombinant. This study indicated that NoV was a common causative agent of sporadic acute gastroenteritis in adults in Ji'nan, China, and that NoV GII-4 was the predominant strain during this period. Three recombinant strains were identified in which GII-6 polymerase/GII-4 capsid was detected for the first time in China.

  16. No increase in drug dispensing for acute gastroenteritis after Storm Klaus, France 2009.

    PubMed

    Pirard, P; Goria, S; Nguengang Wakap, S; Galey, C; Motreff, Y; Guillet, A; Le Tertre, A; Corso, M; Beaudeau, P

    2015-09-01

    During the night of 23-24 January 2009, Storm Klaus hit south-western France and caused power outages affecting 1,700,000 homes and stopping numerous pumping and drinking water disinfection systems. In France, medicalized acute gastroenteritis (MAGE) outbreaks are monitored by analysing the daily amount of reimbursements of medical prescriptions, registered in the French National Health Insurance database, at the 'commune' administrative level. As AGE is suspected to be associated with perturbations to water supply systems as well as power outages, Storm Klaus provided an opportunity to test its influence on the incidence of MAGE in the communes of three affected French departments (administrative areas larger than communes). The geographical exposure indicator was built by using the mapping of the water distribution zones, the reported distribution/production stoppages and their duration. Irrespective of exposure class, a relative risk of MAGE of 0.86 (95% confidence 0.84-0.88) was estimated compared with the 'unexposed' reference level. Although these results must be considered with caution because of a potential marked decrease in global medical consultation probably due to impassable roads, they do not suggest a major public health impact of Klaus in terms of increased MAGE incidence. PMID:26322759

  17. No increase in drug dispensing for acute gastroenteritis after Storm Klaus, France 2009.

    PubMed

    Pirard, P; Goria, S; Nguengang Wakap, S; Galey, C; Motreff, Y; Guillet, A; Le Tertre, A; Corso, M; Beaudeau, P

    2015-09-01

    During the night of 23-24 January 2009, Storm Klaus hit south-western France and caused power outages affecting 1,700,000 homes and stopping numerous pumping and drinking water disinfection systems. In France, medicalized acute gastroenteritis (MAGE) outbreaks are monitored by analysing the daily amount of reimbursements of medical prescriptions, registered in the French National Health Insurance database, at the 'commune' administrative level. As AGE is suspected to be associated with perturbations to water supply systems as well as power outages, Storm Klaus provided an opportunity to test its influence on the incidence of MAGE in the communes of three affected French departments (administrative areas larger than communes). The geographical exposure indicator was built by using the mapping of the water distribution zones, the reported distribution/production stoppages and their duration. Irrespective of exposure class, a relative risk of MAGE of 0.86 (95% confidence 0.84-0.88) was estimated compared with the 'unexposed' reference level. Although these results must be considered with caution because of a potential marked decrease in global medical consultation probably due to impassable roads, they do not suggest a major public health impact of Klaus in terms of increased MAGE incidence.

  18. Detection of Rotavirus in children with acute gastroenteritis in Zagazig University Hospitals in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Salwa Badrelsabbah; El-Bialy, Abdallah Abdelkader; Mohammed, Mervat Soliman; El-Sheikh, Azza Omar; Elhewala, Ahmed; Bahgat, Shereen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and young children all over the world. The objective of the study was to compare different methods for detecting rotavirus and to assess the burden of rotavirus as a causative agent for AGE in children younger than five. Methods: This case control study included 65 children with AGE and 35 healthy control children. They were chosen from the Pediatric Department of Zagazig University Hospitals from October 2014 to March 2015. Stool samples were obtained and assayed for rotavirus by the immunochromatography test (ICT), enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qr RT-PCR). Results: Fifty out of the 65 patients (76.9%) were positive for qr RT-PCR. Forty-five (69.2%) and 44 (67.7%) were positive for ICT and ELISA, respectively. There was a significant association between the severity of the disease as determined by the Vesikari score and rotavirus infection. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that ICT is a useful method for the rapid screening of group A rotavirus in fecal specimens, because it is rapid, inexpensive, easy to perform, and requires very little equipment. In addition, this study highlights the substantial health burden of rotavirus AGE among children less than five. PMID:26435821

  19. Outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis associated with Norwalk-like viruses in campus settings.

    PubMed

    Moe, C L; Christmas, W A; Echols, L J; Miller, S E

    2001-09-01

    Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs) are transmitted by fecally contaminated food, water, fomites, and person-to-person contact. They are a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis epidemics in industrialized countries. NLV outbreaks are characterized by a 12- to 48-hour incubation period; nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea for 24 to 72 hours; and high secondary attack rates. NLV infections spread rapidly on college and university campuses because of close living quarters, shared bathrooms and common rooms, many food handlers, popular self-service salad bars in dining halls, and person-to-person contact through sports and recreational activities. The illness is generally mild and self-limited but an outbreak can strain the resources of campus health services and cause high absenteeism among both students and staff. Treatment is primarily through antiemetic medication and oral rehydration. Prevention and control of NLV outbreaks rests on promoting hand washing; enforcement of strict hygiene in all food preparation areas; and prompt, rigorous cleaning of potentially contaminated areas where someone has been ill.

  20. Distribution, burden, and impact of acute gastroenteritis in Dominica, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shalauddin; Ricketts, Paul; Bergeron, Marc; Jones, Walter; Indar, Lisa

    2013-12-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is an important public-health issue in Dominica. To determine the burden of AGE in Dominica, a retrospective, cross-sectional population survey was conducted in March-April 2009 and October 2010 (low- and-high-AGE seasons) and a laboratory survey from April 2009 to March 2010. The overall monthly prevalence of self-reported AGE was 8.6 % (95% CI 7.0-10.6); the incidence rate was 1.1 episodes/person-year and 79,157.1 episodes of AGE for the total population/year. Monthly prevalence of AGE was the highest in the 1-4 year(s) age-group (25.0%), higher in females (10.8%) and also varied by health district, with the highest monthly prevalence of AGE being reported in the Portsmouth district (13.1%). This difference in gender and across the health region was statistically significant. The estimated underreporting of syndromic AGE to the Ministry of Health was 83.3%. Furthermore, for every reported laboratory-confirmed case of AGE and foodbome disease (FBD), there was an estimated underreporting factor of 280. Overall, 47% of AGE specimens tested were positive for FBD pathogens. The predominant pathogens isolated were norovirus, followed by Giardia, Salmonella, and Shigella. The total annual estimated cost of AGE was US$ 1,371,852.92, and the total cost per capita due to AGE was US$ 19.06, indicating an economic burden of AGE-related illness on a small island of Dominica.

  1. Societal Burden and Correlates of Acute Gastroenteritis in Families with Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Pijnacker, Roan; Heusinkveld, Moniek; Enserink, Remko; Zuidema, Rody; Duizer, Erwin; Kortbeek, Titia; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infection morbidity remains high amongst preschool children in developed countries. We investigated the societal burden (incidence, healthcare utilization, and productivity loss) and correlates of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in families with preschoolers. Monthly for 25 months, 2000 families reported AGE symptoms and related care, productivity loss, and risk exposures for one preschooler and one parent. Amongst 8768 child-parent pairs enrolled, 7.3% parents and 17.4% children experienced AGE (0.95 episodes/parent-year and 2.25 episodes/child-year). Healthcare utilization was 18.3% (children) and 8.6% (parents), with 1.6% children hospitalized. Work absenteeism was 55.6% (median 1.5 days) and day-care absenteeism was 26.2% (median 1 day). Besides chronic enteropathies, antacid use, non-breastfeeding, and toddling age, risk factors for childhood AGE were having developmental disabilities, parental occupation in healthcare, multiple siblings, single-parent families, and ≤12-month day-care attendance. Risk factors for parental AGE were female gender, having multiple or developmentally-disabled day-care-attending children, antimicrobial use, and poor food-handling practices. Parents of AGE-affected children had a concurrent 4-fold increased AGE risk. We concluded that AGE-causing agents spread widely in families with preschool children, causing high healthcare-seeking behaviours and productivity losses. Modifiable risk factors provide targets for AGE-reducing initiatives. Children may acquire some immunity to AGE after one year of day-care attendance. PMID:26917406

  2. A microbiological investigation of acute summer gastroenteritis in Black South African infants

    PubMed Central

    Schoub, Barry D.; Greeff, A. S.; Lecatsas, G.; Prozesky, O. W.; Hay, I. T.; Prinsloo, J. G.; Ballard, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A microbiological investigation of Black infants suffering from severe acute summer gastroenteritis revealed enteropathogenic agents in 30 out of 37 patients (81%). Enterotoxigenic bacteria were isolated from 15 patients (41%). A total of 16 enterotoxigenic strains were isolated, comprising 9 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains secreting labile and stable toxin on their own and in combination, and labile-toxin secreting strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae (4), Enterobacter cloacae (2) and Proteus vulgaris (1). In the case of the latter three species, however, 6 out of the 7 strains were isolated from patients who were excreting other enteric pathogens, whereas only 2 out of 9 enterotoxigenic E. coli patients had concomitant infections with other pathogens. No invasive bacteria were isolated except for 2 shigella strains. Salmonella and shigella strains were found in four patients. No correlation was found between the enteropathogenicity of E. coli and its serotype. Rotavirus was observed by negative staining electron microscopy in only two patients (6%) but using a reverse complement fixation test rotavirus antigen was detected in the stool of 17 out of 35 patients (49%). The low EM detection rate may well be due to the patients being admitted for treatment late in the course of their illness when the degree of viral shedding has decreased below EM detectability. No significant difference in clinical presentation was noted between the various aetiological agents. Only one patient was being solely breast-fed compared to 16% of control non-diarrhoeic infants. Evidence of malnutrition was noted in over half of our patients. PMID:325127

  3. Emergence of Norovirus GII.17 Variants among Children with Acute Gastroenteritis in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Dang Thanh, Hien; Than, Van Thai; Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Lim, Inseok; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-01-01

    Of 1,050 fecal specimens collected from January 2013 to August 2015 from children with acute gastroenteritis, 149 (14.2%) were found to be positive for norovirus. Norovirus GII was the most predominant genogroup (98.65%; 147 of 149). The genotypes detected in this study were GI (2; 1.3%), GII.Pe-GII.4 (109; 73.1%), GII.P17-GII.17 (16; 10.7%), GII.P12-GII.3 (8; 5.4%), GII.P12-GII.12 (8; 5.4%), GII.P4-GII.4 (5; 3.4%), and the recombinant GII.Pe-GII.17 (1; 0.7%). Of these, the novel GII.17 strain was the second most predominant, and the number of affected children appeared to continuously increase over time (2013 [2; 4.4%], 2014 [4; 9.3%], and 2015 [10; 16.4%]). Phylogenetic analysis of the full genome and ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3 nucleotide sequences showed that GII.17 was grouped in cluster III with other strains isolated from 2013 to 2015 and had a different evolutionary history from strains collected in 1978 to 2002 and 2005 to 2009 formed clusters I and II. However, the phylogenetic trees also showed that cluster III was divided into subclusters IIIa (CAU-55 and CAU-85) and IIIb (Kawasaki 2014) (CAU-193, CAU-265, CAU-267, CAU-283, and CAU-289). Comparative analysis of the VP1 capsid protein using 15 complete amino acid sequences from noroviruses isolated from 1978 to 2015 showed 99 amino acid changes. These results could be helpful for epidemiological studies to understand circulating norovirus genotypes in population. PMID:27148739

  4. Societal Burden and Correlates of Acute Gastroenteritis in Families with Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Pijnacker, Roan; Heusinkveld, Moniek; Enserink, Remko; Zuidema, Rody; Duizer, Erwin; Kortbeek, Titia; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infection morbidity remains high amongst preschool children in developed countries. We investigated the societal burden (incidence, healthcare utilization, and productivity loss) and correlates of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in families with preschoolers. Monthly for 25 months, 2000 families reported AGE symptoms and related care, productivity loss, and risk exposures for one preschooler and one parent. Amongst 8768 child-parent pairs enrolled, 7.3% parents and 17.4% children experienced AGE (0.95 episodes/parent-year and 2.25 episodes/child-year). Healthcare utilization was 18.3% (children) and 8.6% (parents), with 1.6% children hospitalized. Work absenteeism was 55.6% (median 1.5 days) and day-care absenteeism was 26.2% (median 1 day). Besides chronic enteropathies, antacid use, non-breastfeeding, and toddling age, risk factors for childhood AGE were having developmental disabilities, parental occupation in healthcare, multiple siblings, single-parent families, and ≤ 12-month day-care attendance. Risk factors for parental AGE were female gender, having multiple or developmentally-disabled day-care-attending children, antimicrobial use, and poor food-handling practices. Parents of AGE-affected children had a concurrent 4-fold increased AGE risk. We concluded that AGE-causing agents spread widely in families with preschool children, causing high healthcare-seeking behaviours and productivity losses. Modifiable risk factors provide targets for AGE-reducing initiatives. Children may acquire some immunity to AGE after one year of day-care attendance. PMID:26917406

  5. The impact of acute gastroenteritis on haematological markers used for the athletes biological passport - report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Y O; Pottgiesser, T

    2011-02-01

    The haematological module of the "Athletes Biological Passport" (ABP) is used to detect blood doping through the longitudinal variation of blood variables, such as haemoglobin concentration (Hb). Sporting federations have opened disciplinary procedures against athletes based on ABP results. Suspicious athletes try to explain the variations in their blood values with dehydration caused by gastrointestinal (GI) problems. The aim of the present report is to describe haemoglobin concentration, a key variable of the ABP, during acute gastroenteritis in athletes. 5 athletes with severe gastroenteritis were studied in retrospective. Blood test results (Hb, white blood cell count (WBC) and differential, CRP) obtained on hospital admission for GI problems were compared to data obtained from the same athletes in states of good health on previous occasions. During GI problems, athletes displayed marked inflammatory constellations with increased CRP and typical WBC shifts. Hb was not affected and remained mostly unchanged. This is in line with basic physiologic fluid regulation, where plasma volume is kept constant, even under conditions of severe dehydration. It is therefore unlikely that fluid loss associated with gastroenteritis will cause athletes blood data to reach levels of abnormality that will be suspicious of blood doping.

  6. Impact of vaccination uptake on hospitalizations due to rotavirus acute gastroenteritis in 2 different socioeconomic areas of Spain.

    PubMed

    Giménez Sánchez, Francisco; Nogueira, Esperanza Jiménez; Sánchez Forte, Miguel; Ibáñez Alcalde, Mercedes; Cobo, Elvira; Angulo, Raquel; Garrido Fernández, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of hospitalization due to acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and toddlers. However, rotavirus vaccination has been associated with a decline in hospitalization rates due to rotavirus AGE. A descriptive retrospective study was conducted to analyze the impact of rotavirus vaccination on the rate of hospitalizations due to AGE among children ≤2 years old in 2 areas of the province of Almería, Spain. After eight years of rotavirus vaccination, rates of hospitalizations due to rotavirus AGE are diminished. This decline is closely related to vaccine coverage in the studied areas.

  7. Incidence of Norwalk-like viruses, rotavirus and adenovirus infection in patients with acute gastroenteritis in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Subekti, D; Lesmana, M; Tjaniadi, P; Safari, N; Frazier, E; Simanjuntak, C; Komalarini, S; Taslim, J; Campbell, J R; Oyofo, B A

    2002-03-25

    Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs), rotavirus and adenovirus are reportedly responsible from 4 to 42% of non-bacterial acute sporadic gastroenteritis. The incidence of NLVs, adenovirus and rotavirus infections in Indonesia is unclear. A total of 402 symptomatic cases from Indonesian patients with acute gastroenteritis and 102 asymptomatic controls that tested negative for bacteria and parasites were screened for the presence of NLVs, rotavirus and adenovirus using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Rotaclone kits and Adenoclone kits. Specific prototype probes were used to ascertain which NLV prototypes were present in the area. NLVs were detected in 45/218 (21%), rotavirus was detected in 170/402 (42%) and adenovirus was detected in 11/273 (4%) samples examined. Genetic analysis of the RT-PCR products using specific prototype probes for NLVs indicated that the prototypes were 42% Taunton agent and 58% Hawaii/Snow Mountain agent. Comparative data on patients showed that the incidence of rotavirus infections was two times greater than the NLVs infections, and that adenovirus infections were the least prevalent. All of the control samples tested were negative for NLVs and adenoviruses, however 8/70 (11%) of the samples were positive for rotaviruses. The high incidence of enteric viral-related infections is a threat among acute diarrheic patients in Jakarta, Indonesia. PMID:11985965

  8. Norovirus gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Goodgame, Richard

    2006-10-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that norovirus is one of the most frequent causes of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing are the means by which the hundreds of norovirus strains have been identified, named, and classified into genogroups and genetic clusters. They are also the means by which a particular strain is traced from the source of an outbreak throughout its spread. These molecular techniques have been combined with classic epidemiology to investigate norovirus outbreaks in diverse settings, including hospitals, nursing homes, dining locations, schools, daycare centers, and vacation venues. Outbreaks are difficult to control because of the apparent ease of transmission through food, water, person-to-person contact, and environmental surfaces. Almost all patients with norovirus gastroenteritis recover completely, but hospital and nursing home outbreaks have been associated with morbidity and mortality. The diagnostic and management approach to an individual patient is to use clinical and epidemiologic findings to rule out "not norovirus." At the first sign that there is an outbreak, strict compliance with cleaning, disinfection, and work release guidelines is important to prevent further spread.

  9. Acute Gastroenteritis and Recreational Water: Highest Burden Among Young US Children

    EPA Science Inventory

    OBJECT I VES : To provide summary estimates of gastroenteritis risks and illness burden associated with recreational water exposure and determine whether children have higher risks and burden.METHODS: We combined individual participant data from 13 prospective cohorts at marine a...

  10. Canine-origin G3P[3] rotavirus strain in child with acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    De Grazia, Simona; Martella, Vito; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Gòmara, Miren Iturriza; Ramirez, Stefania; Cascio, Antonio; Colomba, Claudia; Arista, Serenella

    2007-07-01

    Infection by an animal-like strain of rotavirus (PA260/97) was diagnosed in a child with gastroenteritis in Palermo, Italy, in 1997. Sequence analysis of VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4 genes showed resemblance to a G3P[3] canine strain identified in Italy in 1996. Dogs are a potential source of human viral pathogens. PMID:18214189

  11. Molecular characterization of norovirus GII.17 detected in healthy adult, intussusception patient, and acute gastroenteritis children in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Khamrin, Pattara; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Yodmeeklin, Arpaporn; Supadej, Kanittapon; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Thongprachum, Aksara; Okitsu, Shoko; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2016-10-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) have been recognized as a leading cause of sporadic cases and outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in all age groups. During the surveillance of NoVs in Chiang Mai, Thailand, four cases of the novel GII.17 NoVs were sporadically detected by RT-PCR in 2014-2015. The first case of GII.17 was detected in a healthy adult who worked for a restaurant. The second case was found in a pediatric patient who admitted to the hospital with intussusception. The third and fourth cases were found in acute gastroenteritis children. Phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated that GII.17 NoVs detected in this study were genetically closely related with the novel GII.17 Kawasaki reference strains. These four GII.17 NoV positive specimens were also tested by two immunochromatographic test kits in order to evaluate the sensitivity for GII.17 NoV detection. The viral loads in those specimens were determined by real-time RT-PCR. The sensitivity of GII.17 NoV detection varies by individual test kits and also depending on the amount of the viruses contained in the fecal specimens. In summary, our study reported the detection of novel GII.17 NoVs in a wide range of subjects with and without diarrhea. Therefore, continued comprehensive screening and genetic molecular characterization of NoV strains circulating in this area need to be further investigated. PMID:27469026

  12. Acute Gastroenteritis and Recreational Water: Highest Burden Among Young US Children

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Timothy J.; Benjamin-Chung, Jade; Schiff, Kenneth C.; Griffith, John F.; Dufour, Alfred P.; Weisberg, Stephen B.; Colford, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To provide summary estimates of gastroenteritis risks and illness burden associated with recreational water exposure and determine whether children have higher risks and burden. Methods. We combined individual participant data from 13 prospective cohorts at marine and freshwater beaches throughout the United States (n = 84 411). We measured incident outcomes within 10 days of exposure: diarrhea, gastrointestinal illness, missed daily activity (work, school, vacation), and medical visits. We estimated the relationship between outcomes and 2 exposures: body immersion swimming and Enterococcus spp. fecal indicator bacteria levels in the water. We also estimated the population-attributable risk associated with these exposures. Results. Water exposure accounted for 21% of diarrhea episodes and 9% of missed daily activities but was unassociated with gastroenteritis leading to medical consultation. Children aged 0 to 4 and 5 to 10 years had the most water exposure, exhibited stronger associations between levels of water quality and illness, and accounted for the largest attributable illness burden. Conclusions. The higher gastroenteritis risk and associated burden in young children presents important new information to inform future recreational water quality guidelines designed to protect public health. PMID:27459461

  13. Epidemiology of Rotavirus-Norovirus Co-Infection and Determination of Norovirus Genogrouping among Children with Acute Gastroenteritis in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nasab, Seyed Dawood Mousavi; Sabahi, Farzaneh; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Samiee, Siamak Mirab; Nadji, Seyed Alireza; Ravanshad, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enteric viruses, particularly human rotavirus and norovirus, have been shown to replace bacteria and parasites, as the most common pathogens responsible for acute diarrhea. However, there are still few epidemiological data on the simultaneous occurrence of these viruses in Iran. In this regard, the aim of this study was to assess the useful epidemiological data on the gastroenteritis associated with rotavirus-norovirus mixed infection and to examine the prevalence of norovirus genogrouping among children aged less than five years old in Iran. Methods: A total of 170 stool samples were collected from children under five years of age with the clinical signs and symptoms of acute gastroenteritis, from May 2013 to May 2014. For the detection of both rotavirus and norovirus, total RNA was extracted from all samples, followed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). For both detected rotaviruses and noroviruses, genogrouping was performed. Results: Of 170 samples, 49 (28.8%) and 15 (8.8%) samples were found to be positive for rotavirus and norovirus infections by RT-PCR. Interestingly, 6 (3.5%) patients were positive for both infections. Among the 15 norovirus-positive patients, 13 (86.6%) and 2 (13.3%) belonged to genogroups GII and GI. Conclusion: The norovirus genogroup GII and rotavirus lead to the serious infections in children with acute gastroenteritis. However, more well-designed studies are needed to further elucidate the role of other enteric viruses in acute gastroenteritis PMID:27137790

  14. Determining the community prevalence of acute gastrointestinal illness and gaps in surveillance of acute gastroenteritis and foodborne diseases in Guyana.

    PubMed

    Persuad, Shamdeo; Mohamed-Rambaran, Pheona; Wilson, Alexis; James, Colin; Indar, Lisa

    2013-12-01

    Guyana is an English-speaking country in South America and, culturally, it is part of the Caribbean. Objective of this study was to determine the community prevalence and true burden and economic impact of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and foodborne diseases (FBDs) in Guyana. A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted in 7 of the 10 regions in Guyana during August and November 2009 to capture the high- and low-AGE season respectively. Overall, 1,254 individual surveys were administered at a response rate of 96.5%. The overall monthly prevalence of self-reported cases of AGE was 7.7% (97 cases) (95% CI 6.3-9.3), and the yearly incidence was 1.0 episodes per person-year. The highest monthly prevalence of AGE was observed in region 4 (8.9%) and in children aged 1-4 year(s) (12.7%). Of the 97 AGE cases, 23% sought medical care; 65% reported spending time at home due to their illness [range 1-20 day(s), mean 2.7 days], of whom 51% required other individuals to look after them while ill. The maximum number of stools per 24 hours ranged from 3 to 9 (mean 4.5), and number of days an individual suffered from AGE ranged from 1 to 21 day(s) (mean 2.7 days). The burden of syndromic AGE cases in the population for 2009 was estimated to be 131,012 cases compared to the reported 30,468 cases (76.7% underreporting), which implies that, for every syndromic case of AGE reported, there were additional 4.3 cases occurring in the community. For every laboratory-confirmed case of FBD/AGE pathogen reported, it was estimated that approximately 2,881 more cases were occurring in the population. Giardia was the most common foodborne pathogen isolated. The minimum estimated annual cost associated with the treatment for AGE was US$ 2,358,233.2, showing that AGE and FBD pose a huge economic burden on Guyana. Underreporting of AGE and foodbome pathogens, stool collection, and laboratory capacity were major gaps, affecting the surveillance of AGE in Guyana.

  15. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis With Malabsorption, Acute Intestinal Obstruction, Ascites and Pleural Effusion: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Brasil, Aloisio Antonio Gomes; Bezerra, Luiza Neves Pinheiro; Bruno, Estela Lucena Alcantara; Carvalho, Danyelle Rolim; de Oliveira, Paulo Levi Pereira; Leite, Roana Lacerda Tavares

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 49-year-old male patient with abdominal distension and diffuse stomach cramps associated with peripheral eosinophilia. Treatment for eosinophilic parasitosis was not effective. After a few weeks, the patient developed acute obstructive abdomen with ascites, which was atypically improved with the use of antispasmodics and analgesics. Upper digestive endoscopy, colonoscopy and histopathologic examination of the gastric and intestinal mucosa did not show any significant changes. Video laparoscopic biopsy of the mesenteric lymph node and peritoneum revealed a nonspecific chronic inflammatory process with intense diffuse tissue eosinophilia. Complementary tests revealed right-sided pleural effusion and increased serum immunoglobulin E levels, with altered D-xylose absorption test results. The patient was treated with a hypoallergenic diet and an oral corticosteroid; the symptoms resolved and the laboratory test results improved. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare inflammatory disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical presentation varies according to the affected site and the depth and extent of digestive tract involvement. This case report, which presents the rare simultaneous involvement of the mucosal, muscular and serosal layers, aims to describe and discuss the clinical and therapeutic aspects of eosinophilic gastroenteritis as well as its progression.

  16. Anaphylactoid Purpura Manifested after Acute Gastroenteritis with Severe Dehydration in an 8-Year-Old Male Child: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Umang G; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2015-12-01

    Anaphylactoid purpura, also known as Henoch-Schönleinpurpura (HSP), is an IgA-mediated vasculitis that tends to be a benign disease of childhood. Up to 50% of cases are preceded by an upper tract respiratory infection caused by group-A beta-hemolytic streptococcus and present with the common tetrad of abdominal pain, arthritis, purpuric rash, and renal involvement. The majority of patients recover completely. Here we document a rare case of anaphylactoid purpura which manifested with skin lesions in the form of palpable purpura following about of acute gastroenteritis with severe dehydration; it was treated with a short regimen of steroid therapy, which resulted in the complete remission of the disease. We conclude that prompt diagnosis and multidisciplinary intervention will lead to appropriate management-consisting of the installation of early short-course steroid therapy and thus, prevent further complications and the recurrence of the disease. PMID:26602584

  17. Comparison of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and Immunochromatography for Rotavirus Detection in Children Below Five Years with Acute Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Bimla; Singh, Karnail; Devi, Pushpa

    2015-01-01

    Background Group-A rotaviruses are responsible for 30 to 60% of severe watery diarrhea cases in young children. Timely diagnosis of rotavirus infection helps to determine appropriate treatment and prevents unnecessary use of antibiotics. Aim To compare Immunochromatography (ICG) with standard ELISA test for diagnosis of and to determine incidence, clinical socio-epidemiological profile and possible risk factors associated with rotavirus infection in children below five years with acute gastroenteritis. Settings and Design A prospective study performed from February 2013 to April 2014 in Microbiology and Paediatrics Departments, Government Medical College, Amritsar, Punjab, India. Materials and Methods Hundred stool samples from children below five years diagnosed with acute gastroenteritis were taken and tested by ICG and standard ELISA test. Statistical analysis Performed using the SPSS software for Windows, version 17.0. P-values calculated using χ2 test for categorical variables. A p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Maximum cases with ICG showed a sensitivity of 95.24% and specificity of 97.47% when compared to ELISA. Incidence of rotavirus diarrhea was 21% using ELISA and 23% using ICG. With ELISA rotavirus infection was highest in age group 6 months to 24 months (83.3%) and in male (90.47%). The infection was maximum during November to April and presented with triad of diarrhea, vomiting, fever (76.2%). Majority of cases had watery diarrhea in high percentage (90.47%). Severe dehydration (76.19%), respiratory symptoms (38.09%), bottle feeding (52.38%), malnourished children (47.61%), children playing with toys (47.6%) and submersible water pump (61.95%) as a source of drinking water associated with rotavirus infection were found to statistically significant. Conclusion: ICG shows a good agreement with ELISA and has the advantage of being a quicker, cost-effective and useful for testing single specimen, convenient, not requiring additional equipment

  18. Management strategies in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarelli, Simona; Stolfi, Ilaria; Caramia, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis, characterized by the onset of diarrhea with or without vomiting, continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children in mostly resource-constrained nations. Although generally a mild and self-limiting disease, gastroenteritis is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and is associated with a substantial disease burden. Worldwide, up to 40% of children aged less than 5 years with diarrhea are hospitalized with rotavirus. Also, some microorganisms have been found predominantly in resource-constrained nations, including Shigella spp, Vibrio cholerae, and the protozoan infections. Prevention remains essential, and the rotavirus vaccines have demonstrated good safety and efficacy profiles in large clinical trials. Because dehydration is the major complication associated with gastroenteritis, appropriate fluid management (oral or intravenous) is an effective and safe strategy for rehydration. Continuation of breastfeeding is strongly recommended. New treatments such as antiemetics (ondansetron), some antidiarrheal agents (racecadotril), and chemotherapeutic agents are often proposed, but not yet universally recommended. Probiotics, also known as “food supplement,” seem to improve intestinal microbial balance, reducing the duration and the severity of acute infectious diarrhea. The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the European Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines make a stronger recommendation for the use of probiotics for the management of acute gastroenteritis, particularly those with documented efficacy such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Saccharomyces boulardii. To date, the management of acute gastroenteritis has been based on the option of “doing the least”: oral rehydration-solution administration, early refeeding, no testing, no unnecessary drugs. PMID:24194646

  19. Association Between Acute Infectious Mononucleosis and Vitamin D Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maghzi, Helia; Ataei, Behrooz; Khorvash, Farzin; Yaran, Majid; Maghzi, Amir-Hadi

    2016-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus and vitamin D both have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, especially multiple sclerosis (MS). Vitamin D influences both innate and adaptive immune responses and has been linked to increased susceptibility to other viral infections such as influenza. Here we aimed to examine the association between vitamin D and acute infectious mononucleosis (IM).This study is a case-control study that was conducted on IM patients and a control group of healthy individuals at infectious disease clinics of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Patients were recruited from January to December 2014. The viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgM titer and vitamin D levels were measured at the time of acute infection in IM patients. We also measured vitamin D levels in healthy controls recruited during the same period of time. A total number of 60 IM patients with the mean age of 23.26 ± 7.59 and a healthy control group with the mean age of 25.13 ± 6.72 were enrolled. In the IM patients, there was no significant association between 25(OH) D3 levels and VCA IgM titers (r = 0.190, p = 0.146). Mean 25(OH) D3 levels in IM patients were significantly lower than in the control group (15.61 ± 9.72 vs. 21.41 ± 12.64, p = 0.006). Our findings showed significantly lower vitamin D levels in IM patients at the time of infection than in the control group, providing some evidence that the two major risk factors for autoimmune diseases (e.g., MS) might not be independent risk factors. PMID:27505106

  20. An examination of co-infection in acute gastroenteritis and histo-blood group antigens leading to viral infection susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    FURUYA, KENTA; NAKAJIMA, HITOSHI; SASAKI, YOUSUKE; URITA, YOSHIHISA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate co-infection in the gastrointestinal tract in terms of viruses, bacteria and the ABO blood group. We hypothesized that a combination of norovirus (NV) and bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract could affect the likelihood of an individual to contracting NV. Histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are considered to act as receptors that can lead to NV susceptibility. In addition to genetics, co-infection in the gastrointestinal tract may be associated with this mechanism. A total of 370 patients with acute gastroenteritis presenting with diarrhea (14–89 years) were recruited. The male/female ratio was 20/17. Single infection (bacteria or virus), co-infection with two viruses, and co-infection with one virus and one bacterium were statistically analyzed. In total, 88 of the 376 subjects (23.4%) were positive for one virus, and 50 (13.3%) were positive for one bacterium. Co-transfection with bacteria and a virus were detected in 46 (47.9%) of the 96 bacterial gastroenteritis cases. Statistical analysis revealed that co-infection of bacteria and NV was not significant in all viral infections (P=0.768). In terms of the ABO histo-blood group type and NV infection, the frequency in the O type was not significantly increased (P=0.052). Co-infection of bacteria and a virus occurred frequently in the gastrointestinal tract. The ABO blood phenotype expression was not a significant factor in NV infection in the present case series and the results did not suggest an affinity of NV for specific bacteria. PMID:26998270

  1. [Incidence and symptoms of cow's milk protein intolerance following acute gastroenteritis in young infants. Effect of a hypoallergenic diet].

    PubMed

    Wolf, A; Leupold, D; Bürgin-Wolff, A; Kohne, E

    1989-11-01

    In a prospective randomized study we investigated in 28 mainly bottle-fed infants younger than 60 days whether in acute gastroenteritis a hypoallergenic formula could prevent the development of cow's milk protein intolerance. Group 1 (14 infants) was fed with a formula adapted to human milk, Group 2 (14 infants) got a semi-elementary formula (Alfaré). After 3 months group II was exposed to cow's milk protein with a standardized challenge and the incidence of CMPI in both groups was calculated. All cases with the acute form of CMPI occurred in group II (5/12) whereas in group I only one infant suffered from the protracted mild form of the disease. Inspite of the relatively small number of probands we conclude from our results that in infants who are not totally breast-fed in the post-enteritic period feeding with a formula adapted to human milk is preferable to hypoallergenic semi-elementary preparations. An allergen free period of 3 months seems to induce symptoms of cow's milk intolerance, probably as a booster-effect to early sensibilisation.

  2. Impact of genotype-specific herd immunity on the circulatory dynamism of norovirus: a 10-year longitudinal study of viral acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Sakon, Naomi; Yamazaki, Kenji; Nakata, Keiko; Kanbayashi, Daiki; Yoda, Tomoko; Mantani, Masanobu; Kase, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo; Komano, Jun

    2015-03-15

    Human norovirus is a major cause of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. However, the transition of endemic norovirus genotypes remains poorly understood. The characteristics of natural immunity against norovirus are unclear because few studies have been performed in the natural infection setting. This prospective 10-year surveillance study of acute gastroenteritis in the province of Osaka, Japan, revealed that norovirus spread shows temporal, geographic, and age group-specific features in the humans. Genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) was detected in most sporadic pediatric cases, as well as in foodborne and nursing home outbreaks, respectively. The dominant genotypes in outbreaks at childcare facilities and schools shifted every season and involved GI, GII.2, GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6. Evidence at both the facility and individual levels indicated that genotype-specific herd immunity lasted long enough to influence the endemic norovirus genotype in the next season. Thus, norovirus circulates through human populations in a uniquely dynamic fashion.

  3. Multiplex molecular testing for management of infectious gastroenteritis in a hospital setting: a comparative diagnostic and clinical utility study.

    PubMed

    Halligan, E; Edgeworth, J; Bisnauthsing, K; Bible, J; Cliff, P; Aarons, E; Klein, J; Patel, A; Goldenberg, S

    2014-08-01

    Laboratory diagnosis and clinical management of inpatients with diarrhoea is complex and time consuming. Tests are often requested sequentially and undertaken in different laboratories. This causes prolonged unnecessary presumptive isolation of patients, because most cases are non-infectious. A molecular multiplex test (Luminex(®) Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (GPP)) was compared with conventional testing over 8 months to determine diagnostic accuracy, turnaround times, laboratory costs, use of isolation facilities and user acceptability. A total of 262 (12%) patients had a pathogen detected by conventional methods compared with 483 (22.1%) by GPP. Most additional cases were detected in patients developing symptoms in the first 4 days of admission. Additional cases were detected because of presumed improved diagnostic sensitivity but also because clinicians had not requested the correct pathogen. Turnaround time (41.8 h) was faster than bacterial culture (66.5 h) and parasite investigation (66.5 h) but slower than conventional testing for Clostridium difficile (17.3 h) and viruses (27 h). The test could allow simplified requesting by clinicians and a consolidated laboratory workflow, reducing the overall number of specimens received by the laboratory. A total of 154 isolation days were saved at an estimated cost of £30 800. Consumables and labour were estimated at £150 641 compared with £63 431 for conventional testing. Multiplex molecular testing using a panel of targets allowed enhanced detection and a consolidated laboratory workflow. This is likely to be of greater benefit to cases that present within the first 4 days of hospital admission. PMID:24274687

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of probable non-human genes of group A rotaviruses isolated from children with acute gastroenteritis in Belém, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Régis Piloni; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; Neri, Darivaldo Luz; Soares, Luana da Silva; Guerra, Sylvia de Fatima Dos Santos; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; Farias, Yasmin Nascimento; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira

    2012-12-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are the main cause of acute viral gastroenteritis in both humans and young animals of various species such as calves, horses, pigs, dogs, cats, and birds. The genetic diversity of RVs is related to a variety of evolutionary mechanisms, including point mutation, and genome reassortment. The objective of this study was to characterize molecularly genes that encode structural and nonstructural proteins in unusual RV strains. The clinical specimens selected for this study were obtained from children and newborn with RV gastroenteritis, who participated in research projects on viral gastroenteritis conducted at the Evandro Chagas Institute. Structural (VP1-VP4, VP6, and VP7) and nonstructural (NSP1-NSP6) genes were amplified from stool samples by the polymerase chain reaction and subsequently sequenced. Eight unusual RV strains isolated from children and newborn with gastroenteritis were studied. Reassortment between genes of animal origin were observed in 5/8 (62.5%) strains analyzed. These results demonstrate that, although rare, interspecies (animal-human) transmission of RVs occurs in nature, as observed in the present study in strains NB150, HSP034, HSP180, HST327, and RV10109. This study is the first to be conducted in the Amazon region and supports previous data showing a close relationship between genes of human and animal origin, representing a challenge to the large-scale introduction of RV vaccines in national immunization programs. PMID:23080508

  5. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    O’Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  6. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni.

  7. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  8. Viral Gastroenteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. Several different viruses can cause viral gastroenteritis, which is highly contagious ... and last for 1 to 3 days. Some viruses cause symptoms that last longer. [ Top ] What are ...

  9. Molecular characterization of hepatitis A virus isolated from acute gastroenteritis patients in the Seoul region of Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, S-H; Kim, E-J; Lee, J-H; Choi, S-S; Kim, M-S; Jung, S-S; Han, G-Y; Yun, H-S; Chun, D-S; Oh, S-S; Kim, H-S

    2009-10-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a major public health problem throughout the world. As a result of declining HAV endemic in Korea, an increasing number of children and adolescents have become susceptible to HAV infection. HAV is related with sanitation conditions of the environment and is transmitted via the fecal-oral route, either through person-to-person contact or by contaminated water and food. The present study has been carried out to determine the phylogenetic analysis and circulating patterns of HAV strains detected from hospitalized patients with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in the Seoul region of Korea. In total, 2,782 stool specimens from hospitalized patients with AGE collected in October 2006 to September 2007 in Seoul were tested for HAV. A pair comparison of the nucleic acid sequence of a 159-bp base region at the putative VP1/2A junction of 85 Seoul isolates revealed that the most common HAV strain circulating in the region during 2006-2007 was subgenotype IA. HAV phylogenetic studies can provide important information on the genetic characteristics of HAV from AGE patients who may subsequently become the source of infection in Korea.

  10. Diarrhoeagenic microbes by real-time PCR in Rwandan children under 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Kabayiza, J-C; Andersson, M E; Nilsson, S; Baribwira, C; Muhirwa, G; Bergström, T; Lindh, M

    2014-12-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a main cause of disease and death among children in low-income countries. The causality rates and pathogenic characteristics of putative aetiological agents remain insufficiently known. We used real-time PCR targeting 16 diarrhoeagenic agents to analyse stool samples from children ≤5.0 years old with acute diarrhoea in Rwanda. Among the 880 children (median age 14.2 months; 41% female) at least one pathogen was detected in 92% and two or more agents in 63% of cases. Rotavirus was detected in 36.9%, adenovirus in 39.7%, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) with genes for labile (eltB) or stable (estA) toxin in 31.3% and 19.0%, E. coli with eae or bfpA genes in 25.2% and 14.2%, Shigella in 17.5% and Cryptosporidium in 7.8%. Rotavirus and ETEC-estA were associated with more severe dehydration than diarrhoea due to other causes. Shigella was associated with bloody stools and higher CRP. Microbial loads (Ct values) of rotavirus, ETEC-estA and Shigella were associated with severity of symptoms. Rotavirus, ETEC-estA and E. coli with bfpA were associated with younger age, Shigella with older age. Antibiotic treatment was given to 42% and was associated with dehydration, fever and CRP, but not with pathogen. We conclude that rotavirus and ETEC-estA were the most important causes of diarrhoea with dehydration, that Shigella caused bloody diarrhoea but less severe dehydration, that microbial loads of rotavirus, ETEC-estA and Shigella were associated with severity of symptoms, and that antibiotic use was frequent and in poor agreement with microbiological findings.

  11. Diarrhoeagenic microbes by real-time PCR in Rwandan children under 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Kabayiza, J-C; Andersson, M E; Nilsson, S; Baribwira, C; Muhirwa, G; Bergström, T; Lindh, M

    2014-12-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a main cause of disease and death among children in low-income countries. The causality rates and pathogenic characteristics of putative aetiological agents remain insufficiently known. We used real-time PCR targeting 16 diarrhoeagenic agents to analyse stool samples from children ≤5.0 years old with acute diarrhoea in Rwanda. Among the 880 children (median age 14.2 months; 41% female) at least one pathogen was detected in 92% and two or more agents in 63% of cases. Rotavirus was detected in 36.9%, adenovirus in 39.7%, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) with genes for labile (eltB) or stable (estA) toxin in 31.3% and 19.0%, E. coli with eae or bfpA genes in 25.2% and 14.2%, Shigella in 17.5% and Cryptosporidium in 7.8%. Rotavirus and ETEC-estA were associated with more severe dehydration than diarrhoea due to other causes. Shigella was associated with bloody stools and higher CRP. Microbial loads (Ct values) of rotavirus, ETEC-estA and Shigella were associated with severity of symptoms. Rotavirus, ETEC-estA and E. coli with bfpA were associated with younger age, Shigella with older age. Antibiotic treatment was given to 42% and was associated with dehydration, fever and CRP, but not with pathogen. We conclude that rotavirus and ETEC-estA were the most important causes of diarrhoea with dehydration, that Shigella caused bloody diarrhoea but less severe dehydration, that microbial loads of rotavirus, ETEC-estA and Shigella were associated with severity of symptoms, and that antibiotic use was frequent and in poor agreement with microbiological findings. PMID:24890572

  12. Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase deficiency presenting with acute liver failure following gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Santra, Saikat; Cameron, Jessie M; Shyr, Casper; Zhang, Linhua; Drögemöller, Britt; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Wevers, Ron A; Rodenburg, Richard J; Gupte, Girish; Preece, Mary Anne; van Karnebeek, Clara D

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient from a consanguineous family who presented with transient acute liver failure and biochemical patterns suggestive of disturbed urea cycle and mitochondrial function, for whom conventional genetic and metabolic investigations for acute liver failure failed to yield a diagnosis. Whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous 12-bp deletion in PCK1 (MIM 614168) encoding cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK); enzymatic studies subsequently confirmed its pathogenic nature. We propose that PEPCK deficiency should be considered in the young child with unexplained liver failure, especially where there are marked, accumulations of TCA cycle metabolites on urine organic acid analysis and/or an amino acid profile with hyperammonaemia suggestive of a proximal urea cycle defect during the acute episode. If suspected, intravenous administration of dextrose should be initiated. Long-term management comprising avoidance of fasting with the provision of a glucose polymer emergency regimen for illness management may be sufficient to prevent future episodes of liver failure. This case report provides further insights into the (patho-)physiology of energy metabolism, confirming the power of genomic analysis of unexplained biochemical phenotypes.

  13. Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase deficiency presenting with acute liver failure following gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Santra, Saikat; Cameron, Jessie M; Shyr, Casper; Zhang, Linhua; Drögemöller, Britt; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Wevers, Ron A; Rodenburg, Richard J; Gupte, Girish; Preece, Mary Anne; van Karnebeek, Clara D

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient from a consanguineous family who presented with transient acute liver failure and biochemical patterns suggestive of disturbed urea cycle and mitochondrial function, for whom conventional genetic and metabolic investigations for acute liver failure failed to yield a diagnosis. Whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous 12-bp deletion in PCK1 (MIM 614168) encoding cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK); enzymatic studies subsequently confirmed its pathogenic nature. We propose that PEPCK deficiency should be considered in the young child with unexplained liver failure, especially where there are marked, accumulations of TCA cycle metabolites on urine organic acid analysis and/or an amino acid profile with hyperammonaemia suggestive of a proximal urea cycle defect during the acute episode. If suspected, intravenous administration of dextrose should be initiated. Long-term management comprising avoidance of fasting with the provision of a glucose polymer emergency regimen for illness management may be sufficient to prevent future episodes of liver failure. This case report provides further insights into the (patho-)physiology of energy metabolism, confirming the power of genomic analysis of unexplained biochemical phenotypes. PMID:26971250

  14. The Usefulness of Clinical and Laboratory Parameters for Predicting Severity of Dehydration in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Hoxha, Teuta Faik; Azemi, Mehmedali; Avdiu, Muharrem; Ismaili-jaha, Vlora; Grajqevci, Violeta; Petrela, Ela

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: An accurate assessment of the degree of dehydration in infants and children is important for proper decision-making and treatment. This emphasizes the need for laboratory tests to improve the accuracy of clinical assessment of dehydration. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between clinical and laboratory parameters in the assessment of dehydration. Methods: We evaluated prospectively 200 children aged 1 month to 5 years who presented with diarrhea, vomiting or both. Dehydration assessment was done following a known clinical scheme. Results: We enrolled in the study 200 children (57.5% were male). The mean age was 15.62±9.03 months, with more than half those studied being under 24 months old. Overall, 46.5% (93) had mild dehydration, 34% (68) had moderate dehydration, 5.5% (11) had severe dehydration whereas, 14% (28) had no dehydration. Patients historical clinical variables in all dehydration groups did not differ significantly regarding age, sex, fever, frequency of vomiting, duration of diarrhea and vomiting, while there was a trend toward severe dehydration in children with more frequent diarrhea (p=0.004). Serum urea and creatinine cannot discriminate between mild and moderate dehydration but they showed a good specificity for severe dehydration of 99% and 100% respectively. Serum bicarbonates and base excess decreased significantly with a degree of dehydration and can discriminate between all dehydration groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: Blood gases were useful to diagnose the degree of dehydration status among children presenting with acute gastroenteritis. Serum urea and creatinine were the most specific tests for severe dehydration diagnosis. Historical clinical patterns apart from frequency of diarrhea did not correlate with dehydration status. Further studies are needed to validate our results. PMID:25568559

  15. Meta-analysis: Lactobacillus reuteri strain DSM 17938 (and the original strain ATCC 55730) for treating acute gastroenteritis in children.

    PubMed

    Szajewska, H; Urbańska, M; Chmielewska, A; Weizman, Z; Shamir, R

    2014-09-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 has been shown to provide a moderate clinical effect in the treatment of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children. However, as the L. reuteri ATCC 55730 strain was found to carry potentially transferable resistance traits for tetracycline and lincomycin, it was replaced by a new strain, L. reuteri DSM 17938, without unwanted plasmid-borne antibiotic resistance. Bioequivalence of the two strains has been suggested. We aimed to systematically evaluate data on the effectiveness of L. reuteri DSM 17938 and the original strain, L. reuteri ATCC 55730, in the treatment of AGE in children. The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases, reference lists, and abstract books of major scientific meetings were searched in August 2013, with no language restrictions, for relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Two RCTs (n=196) that evaluated L. reuteri DSM 17938 and three RCTs (n=156) that evaluated L. reuteri ATCC 55730, which involved hospitalised children aged 3 to 60 months, met the inclusion criteria. Compared with placebo or no treatment, DSM 17938 significantly reduced the duration of diarrhoea (mean difference -32 h, 95% confidence interval (CI): -41 to -24) and increased the chance of cure on day 3 (relative risk: 3.5, 95% CI: 1.2 to 10.8, random effects model). Similar results were obtained with the original strain, L. reuteri ATCC 55730. In conclusion, in hospitalised children, use of both strains of L. reuteri reduced the duration of diarrhoea, and more children were cured within 3 days. Data from outpatients and countryspecific cost-effectiveness analyses are needed. Given the limited data and the methodological limitations of the included trials, the evidence should be viewed with caution.

  16. The Impact of E-Learning on Adherence to Guidelines for Acute Gastroenteritis: A Single-Arm Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Nicastro, Emanuele; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Liguoro, Ilaria; Chmielewska, Anna; De Bruyn, Caroline; Dolinsek, Jernej; Doroshina, Elena; Fessatou, Smaragdi; Pop, Tudor Lucian; Prell, Christine; Tabbers, Merit Monique; Tavares, Marta; Urenden-Elicin, Pinar; Bruzzese, Dario; Zakharova, Irina; Sandhu, Bhupinder; Guarino, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Objective E-learning is a candidate tool for clinical practice guidelines (CPG) implementation due to its versatility, universal access and low costs. We aimed to assess the impact of a five-module e-learning course about CPG for acute gastroenteritis (AGE) on physicians’ knowledge and clinical practice. Study design This work was conceived as a pre/post single-arm intervention study. Physicians from 11 European countries registered for the online course. Personal data, pre- and post-course questionnaires and clinical data about 3 to 5 children with AGE managed by each physician before and after the course were collected. Primary outcome measures included the proportion of participants fully adherent to CPG and number of patients managed with full adherence. Results Among the 149 physicians who signed up for the e-learning course, 59 took the course and reported on their case management of 519 children <5 years of age who were referred to their practice because of AGE (281 and 264 children seen before and after the course, respectively). The course improved knowledge scores (pre-course 8.6 ± 2.7 versus post-course 12.8 ± 2.1, P < 0.001), average adherence (from 87.0 ± 7.7% to 90.6 ± 7.1%, P = 0.001) and the number of patients managed in full adherence with the guidelines (from 33.6 ± 31.7% to 43.9 ± 36.1%, P = 0.037). Conclusions E-learning is effective in increasing knowledge and improving clinical practice in paediatric AGE and is an effective tool for implementing clinical practice guidelines. PMID:26148301

  17. Performance of Clinical Signs in the Diagnosis of Dehydration in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Hoxha, Teuta; Xhelili, Luan; Azemi, Mehmedali; Avdiu, Muharrem; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Efendija-Beqa, Urata; Grajcevci-Uka, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute evaluation and treatment of children presenting with dehydration represent one of the most common situation in the pediatric emergency department. To identify dehydration in infants and children before treatment, a number of symptoms and clinical signs have been evaluated. The aim of the study was to describe the performance of clinical signs in detecting dehydration in children. Methods: Two hundred children aged 1 month to 5 year were involved in our prospective study. The clinical assessment consisted of the ten clinical signs of dehydration, including those recommended by WHO (World Health Organization), heart rate, and capillary refill time. Results: Two hundred patients with diarrhea were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 15.62±9.03 months and 57.5% were male. Of these 121 had a fluid deficit of < 5%, 68 had a deficit of 5 to 9% and 11(5.5%) had a deficit of 10% or more. Patients classified as having no or mild, moderate, and severe dehydration were found to have the following respective gains in percent weight at the end of illness: 2.44±0.3, 6.05± 1.01 and, 10.66± 0.28, respectively. All clinical signs were found more frequently with increasing amounts of dehydration(p<0.001, One–way ANOVA). The median number of findings among subjects with no or mild dehydration (deficit <5%) was 3; among those with moderate dehydration (deficit 5% to 9%) was 6.5 and among those with severe dehydration (deficit >10%) the median was 9 (p<0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Using stepwise linear regression and a p value of <0.05 for entry into the model, a four-variable model including sunken eyes, skin elasticity, week radial pulse, and general appearance was derived. Conclusion: None of the 10 findings studied, is sufficiently accurate to be used in isolation. When considered together, sunken eyes, decreased skin turgor, weak pulse and general appearance provide the best explanatory power of the physical signs considered. PMID:25870468

  18. Human viral gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, M L

    1989-01-01

    During the last 15 years, several different groups of fastidious viruses that are responsible for a large proportion of acute viral gastroenteritis cases have been discovered by the electron microscopic examination of stool specimens. This disease is one of the most prevalent and serious clinical syndromes seen around the world, especially in children. Rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, and fastidious fecal adenoviruses account for much of the viral gastroenteritis in infants and young children, whereas the small caliciviruses and unclassified astroviruses, and possibly enteric coronaviruses, are responsible for significantly fewer cases overall. In addition to electron microscopy, enzyme immunoassays and other rapid antigen detection systems have been developed to detect rotaviruses and fastidious fecal adenoviruses in the stool specimens of both nonhospitalized patients and those hospitalized for dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Experimental rotavirus vaccines have also been developed, due to the prevalence and seriousness of rotavirus infection. The small, unclassified Norwalk virus and morphologically similar viruses are responsible for large and small outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in older children, adolescents, and adults. Hospitalization of older patients infected with these viruses is usually not required, and their laboratory diagnoses have been limited primarily to research laboratories. Images PMID:2644024

  19. Initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score versus Simplified Acute Physiology score to analyze multiple organ dysfunction in infectious diseases in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Remyasri; Bhandary, Nithish M.; D’Souza, Ashton D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To investigate initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), who were diagnosed with infectious disease, as an indicator of multiple organ dysfunction and to examine if initial SOFA score is a better mortality predictor compared to Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS). Materials and Methods: Hospital-based study done in medical ICU, from June to September 2014 with a sample size of 48. Patients aged 18 years and above, diagnosed with infectious disease were included. Patients with history of chronic illness (renal/hepatic/pulmonary/  cardiovascular), diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart disease, those on immunosuppressive therapy/chemoradiotherapy for malignancy and patients in immunocompromised state were excluded. Blood investigations were obtained. Six organ dysfunctions were assessed using initial SOFA score and graded from 0 to 4. SAPS was calculated as the sum of points assigned to each of the 17 variables (12 physiological, age, type of admission, and three underlying diseases). The outcome measure was survival status at ICU discharge. Results: We categorized infectious diseases into dengue fever, leptospirosis, malaria, respiratory tract infections, and others which included undiagnosed febrile illness, meningitis, urinary tract infection and gastroenteritis. Initial SOFA score was both sensitive and specific; SAPS lacked sensitivity. We found no significant association between age and survival status. Both SAPS and initial SOFA score were found to be statistically significant as mortality predictors. There is significant association of initial SOFA score in analyzing organ dysfunction in infectious diseases (P < 0.001). SAPS showed no statistical significance. There was statistically significant (P = 0.015) percentage of nonsurvivors with moderate and severe dysfunction, based on SOFA score. Nonsurvivors had higher SAPS but was not statistically significant (P

  20. Immune Response and Intestinal Permeability in Children With Acute Gastroenteritis Treated With Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sindhu, Kulandaipalayam N. C.; Sowmyanarayanan, Thuppal V.; Paul, Anu; Babji, Sudhir; Ajjampur, Sitara S. R.; Priyadarshini, Sophia; Sarkar, Rajiv; Balasubramanian, K. A.; Wanke, Christine A.; Ward, Honorine D.; Kang, Gagandeep

    2014-01-01

    Background. Probiotics have a possible role in the treatment of pediatric acute gastroenteritis. We report the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on intestinal function, immune response, and clinical outcomes in Indian children with cryptosporidial or rotavirus diarrhea. Methods. Children with gastroenteritis aged 6 months to 5 years, testing positive for either rotavirus or Cryptosporidium species in stool (coinfections were excluded), were randomized to LGG (ATCC 53103) or placebo, once daily for 4 weeks. Baseline demographic and clinical details were obtained. Sera were tested for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies to Cryptosporidium and rotavirus, and the lactulose to mannitol ratio for intestinal permeability was determined at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Results. Of the 124 children enrolled, 82 and 42 had rotavirus and cryptosporidial diarrhea, respectively. Median diarrheal duration was 4 days; one-third of the children had severe diarrhea. Baseline and clinical parameters were comparable between children receiving LGG and placebo. At the end of follow-up, fewer children with rotavirus diarrhea on LGG had repeated diarrheal episodes (25% vs 46%; P = .048) and impaired intestinal function (48% vs 72%; P = .027). Significant increase in IgG levels postintervention (456 vs 2215 EU; P = .003) was observed in children with rotavirus diarrhea receiving LGG. Among children with cryptosporidial diarrhea, those receiving LGG showed significant improvement in intestinal permeability. Conclusions. LGG has a positive immunomodulatory effect and may be useful in decreasing repeated episodes of rotavirus diarrhea. Improvement in intestinal function in children with rotavirus and cryptosporidial gastroenteritis emphasizes the role of probiotics in treating intestinal impairment after infection. Clinical Trials Registration. CTRI/2010/091/000339. PMID:24501384

  1. Prospective investigation of pituitary functions in patients with acute infectious meningitis: is acute meningitis induced pituitary dysfunction associated with autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, F; De Bellis, A; Teksahin, H; Alp, E; Bizzarro, A; Sinisi, A A; Bellastella, G; Paglionico, V A; Bellastella, A; Unluhizarci, K; Doganay, M; Kelestimur, F

    2012-12-01

    Previous case reports and retrospective studies suggest that pituitary dysfunction may occur after acute bacterial or viral meningitis. In this prospective study we assessed the pituitary functions, lipid profile and anthropometric measures in adults with acute bacterial or viral meningitis. Moreover, in order to investigate whether autoimmune mechanisms could play a role in the pathogenesis of acute meningitis-induced hypopituitarism we also investigated the anti-pituitary antibodies (APA) and anti-hypothalamus antibodies (AHA) prospectively. Sixteen patients (10 males, 6 females; mean ± SD age 40.9 ± 15.9) with acute infectious meningitis were included and the patients were evaluated in the acute phase, and at 6 and 12 months after the acute meningitis. In the acute phase 18.7% of the patients had GH deficiency, 12.5% had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. At 12 months after acute meningitis 6 of 14 patients (42.8%) had GH deficiency, 1 of 14 patients (7.1%) had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. Two of 14 patients (14.3%) had combined hormone deficiencies and four patients (28.6%) had isolated hormone deficiencies at 12 months. Four of 9 (44.4%) hormone deficiencies at 6 months were recovered at 12 months, and 3 of 8 (37.5%) hormone deficiencies at 12 months were new-onset hormone deficiencies. At 12 months there were significant negative correlations between IGF-I level vs. LDL-C, and IGF-I level vs. total cholesterol. The frequency of AHA and APA positivity was substantially high, ranging from 35 to 50% of the patients throughout the 12 months period. However there were no significant correlations between AHA or APA positivity and hypopituitarism. The risk of hypopituitarism, GH deficiency in particular, is substantially high in the acute phase, after 6 and 12 months of the acute infectious meningitis. Moreover we found that 6th month after meningitis is too early to make a decision for pituitary dysfunction and these patients should be screened for at least 12 months

  2. [Relationship between child day-care attendance and acute infectious disease. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Ochoa Sangrador, Carlos; Barajas Sánchez, M Verisima; Muñoz Martín, Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    Child day-care attendance is considered to be an acute early childhood disease risk factor, the studies available however not affording the possibility of fully quantifying this risk. A systematic review of clinical trials and cohort studies was conducted, in which the effects child day-care attendance had on the health of young children based on the Cochrane Collaboration, PubMed and Spanish Medical Index databases, without any time or language-related limits, were analyzed and rounded out with analyses of referenced works and an additional EMBASE search. The methodological quality was evaluated by means of personalized criteria. Pooling measures (relative risks, incidence density ratios and weighted mean differences) were calculated with their confidence intervals, assuming random effects models. A significant increase was found to exist of a risk consistent over time and among different social and geographical environments. Considering the most methodologically-stringent studies with adjusted effect estimates, child day-care attendance was related to an increased risk of upper respiratory tract infection (RR=1,88), acute otitis media (RR=1,58), otitis media with fluid draining (RR=2,43), lower respiratory tract infections (overall RR=210; acute pneumonia RR=1.70; broncholitis RR=1,80; bronchitis RR=2,10) and gastroenteritis (RR=1,40). Child day-care attendance could be responsible for 33%-50% of the episodes of respiratory infection and gastroenteritis among the exposed population. In conclusion, it can be said that the risk for childhood health attributable to the child day-care attendance is discreet but of high-impact. This information has some major implications for research, clinical practice, healthcare authorities and society as a whole.

  3. The Role of Human Coronaviruses in Children Hospitalized for Acute Bronchiolitis, Acute Gastroenteritis, and Febrile Seizures: A 2-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jevšnik, Monika; Steyer, Andrej; Pokorn, Marko; Mrvič, Tatjana; Grosek, Štefan; Strle, Franc; Lusa, Lara; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are associated with a variety of clinical presentations in children, but their role in disease remains uncertain. The objective of our prospective study was to investigate HCoVs associations with various clinical presentations in hospitalized children up to 6 years of age. Children hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis (AB), acute gastroenteritis (AGE), or febrile seizures (FS), and children admitted for elective surgical procedures (healthy controls) were included in the study. In patients with AB, AGE, and FS, a nasopharyngeal (NP) swab and blood sample were obtained upon admission and the follow-up visit 14 days later, whereas in children with AGE a stool sample was also acquired upon admission; in healthy controls a NP swab and stool sample were taken upon admission. Amplification of polymerase 1b gene was used to detect HCoVs in the specimens. HCoVs-positive specimens were also examined for the presence of several other viruses. HCoVs were most often detected in children with FS (19/192, 9.9%, 95% CI: 6–15%), followed by children with AGE (19/218, 8.7%, 95% CI: 5.3–13.3%) and AB (20/308, 6.5%, 95% CI: 4.0–9.8%). The presence of other viruses was a common finding, most frequent in the group of children with AB (19/20, 95%, 95% CI: 75.1–99.8%), followed by FS (10/19, 52.6%, 95% CI: 28.9–75.6%) and AGE (7/19, 36.8%, 95% CI: 16.3–61.6%). In healthy control children HCoVs were detected in 3/156 (1.9%, 95% CI: 0.4–5.5%) NP swabs and 1/150 (0.7%, 95% CI: 0.02–3.3%) stool samples. It seems that an etiological role of HCoVs is most likely in children with FS, considering that they had a higher proportion of positive HCoVs results than patients with AB and those with AGE, and had the highest viral load; however, the co-detection of other viruses was 52.6%. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00987519 PMID:27171141

  4. The impact of childhood acute rotavirus gastroenteritis on the parents’ quality of life: prospective observational study in European primary care medical practices

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rotavirus (RV) is the commonest cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide. A Quality of Life study was conducted in primary care in three European countries as part of a larger epidemiological study (SPRIK) to investigate the impact of paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) on affected children and their parents. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was linguistically validated in Spanish, Italian and Polish. The questionnaire was included in an observational multicentre prospective study of 302 children aged <5 years presenting to a general practitioner or paediatrician for RVGE at centres in Spain, Italy or Poland. RV infection was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing (n = 264). The questionnaire was validated and used to assess the emotional impact of paediatric RVGE on the parents. Results Questionnaire responses showed that acute RVGE in a child adversely affects the parents’ daily life as well as the child. Parents of children with RVGE experience worry, distress and impact on their daily activities. RVGE of greater clinical severity (assessed by the Vesikari scale) was associated with higher parental worries due to symptoms and greater changes in the child’s behaviour, and a trend to higher impact on parents’ daily activities and higher parental distress, together with a higher score on the symptom severity scale of the questionnaire. Conclusions Parents of a child with acute RVGE presenting to primary care experience worry, distress and disruptions to daily life as a result of the child’s illness. Prevention of this disease through prophylactic vaccination will improve the daily lives of parents and children. PMID:22650611

  5. Clinical presentation and management of acute gastro-enteritis in in-patient children at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, A M

    1990-01-01

    In a retrospective survey, case notes of all children with acute gastro-enteritis (AGE) admitted to our hospital between 1984 and 1988 were reviewed. The total number of cases was 300. The mean age was 14 months (range 1-60 mths): 67% of cases were boys and 33% girls. Eleven per cent were exclusively breastfed. The clinical presentation was diarrhoea and vomiting in 81%, diarrhoea alone in 15%, and vomiting primarily in 4%. All children had good nutritional status, i.e. both their height and weight were between the 5th and 90th percentile for their age and none showed signs of marasmus or kwashiorkor. Forty-six per cent of the children had AGE without dehydration. Mild, moderate and severe dehydration was present in 41%, 10% and 3% of cases, respectively. Isotonic, hypotonic and hypernatraemic dehydration was present in 95%, 3% and 2% of cases of dehydration, respectively. Sixty-five per cent of cases were given intravenous (IV) fluids. The mean duration of IV administration was 1 day, with a range of 1-7 days. Twenty-two per cent of the children were given oral rehydration solution (ORS) initially, and 13% were given IV plus ORS. None of the children died of gastro-enteritis. It is concluded that there was excessive use of IV fluids, and that there is an urgent need to encourage the use of ORS.

  6. Characterization of GII.4 noroviruses circulating among children with acute gastroenteritis in Pune, India: 2005-2013.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ruta; Patel, Amit; Bhalla, Shilpa; Chhabra, Preeti; Cherian, Sarah; Chitambar, Shobha D

    2016-01-01

    Genogroup II genotype 4 noroviruses (GII.4 NoVs), an important cause of sporadic childhood gastroenteritis worldwide, undergo continuous evolution leading to the periodic emergence of novel variants. The present study was undertaken for surveillance of GII.4 NoVs and identification and characterization of GII.4 variants circulating among children with sporadic gastroenteritis in Pune, India during 2005-2013. Among the 12 GII genotypes detected in the study, GII.4 was predominant. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of ORF2 (major capsid protein VP1 gene) of the GII.4 NoVs revealed circulation of seven GII.4 variants, Hunter_2004 (2005-2007), Yerseke_2006a (2006), DenHaag_2006b (2007), Osaka_2007 (2007-2009), Apeldoorn_2007 (2008), New Orleans_2009 (2008-2012) and Sydney_2012 (2013), with the Pune strains grouping with the contemporary global reference strains. The Hunter_2004, Osaka_2007 and New Orleans_2009 variants showed prolonged circulation, with the Hunter_2004 and New Orleans_2009 variants differentiating into temporally separated sub-clusters. Analysis of VP1 sequences and predicted structures of the GII.4 variants identified variant specific amino acid positions, particularly in and near (within 8A(°)) the epitopes A-E, displaying differences in the sequence and physicochemical characteristics of the different variants. Comparison with the reference strains of each of the GII.4 variants revealed up to 11 amino acid substitutions at the variant specific positions in the GII.4 strains from Pune. Amino acid variations were also noted among the strains of the same GII.4 variant in Pune. The strains of different sub-clusters identified in the Hunter_2004 and New Orleans_2009 variants showed differences in sequence and physicochemical properties of either or all of the epitopes A, C and E. The study thus describes the temporal variations and diversity of the GII.4 strains in Pune and emphasizes continuous monitoring and analysis of the GII.4 variants.

  7. The prevalence of norovirus, astrovirus and adenovirus infections among hospitalised children with acute gastroenteritis in Porto Velho, state of Rondônia, western Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Maria Sandra Costa; Estevam, Grecy Kelli; Penatti, Marilene; Lafontaine, Roger; Lima, Ian Carlos Gomes; Spada, Paula Katharine Pontes; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Matos, Najla Benevides

    2015-01-01

    Although viruses are well-established causes of acute gastroenteritis, few data on the circulation of these pathogens in Porto Velho, state of Rondônia, Brazil, are available. Thus, faecal samples from hospitalised diarrhoeic children, under six years of age, were collected and tested for the presence of norovirus (NoV), adenovirus (AdV) and astrovirus (AstV) from February 2010-February 2012. Specimens were screened by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and viruses were found in 10.7% (63/591) of the cases. NoV, AdV and AstV were detected in 7.8%, 2% and 0.8% of the samples, respectively. NoV infection was observed at all ages and was most prevalent in zero-18-month-old children (84.7%; p = 0.002). A higher incidence of NoV was detected from February-April 2010, when it was found in 52.2% of the cases. Co-infections involving these viruses, rotavirus and enteropathogenic bacteria were detected in 44.4% (28/63) of the children with viral diarrhoea. Nosocomial infections were demonstrated in 28.6% (18/63) of the cases in which viruses were detected. The present paper reports, for the first time, the circulation of NoV and AstV among the paediatric population of Porto Velho and it contributes to our understanding of the roles of these pathogens in gastrointestinal infections. PMID:25946245

  8. [The Ross procedure in the acute phase of infectious endocarditis in childhood].

    PubMed

    Di Filippo, S; Bozio, A; Champsaur, G; Sassolas, F; Debost, B; Perroux, V

    1999-05-01

    The Ross procedure of aortic valve replacement with a pulmonary autograft has several advantages in childhood over mechanical prostheses or homografts, especially in infectious endocarditis requiring early surgery. Between January 1997 and July 1998, 3 children with no known previous cardiac disease, aged 14 months, 10 and 11 years, had aortic valve infectious endocarditis. The causal organism was not identified in 1 case and the other two were due to staphylococcus aureus and corynebacterium diphteriae. All children had severe, rapidly progressive aortic regurgitation complicated by pulmonary oedema in the baby and systemic emboli in the two older children. Surgery was performed within 9 days, 1.5 month and 2 months after the onset of the disease. The postoperative course was uncomplicated in the 3 cases. Postoperative Doppler echocardiography showed absence of autograft dysfunction or stenosis, with the presence of pulmonary regurgitation in 1 case. Pulmonary autograft has the advantages of not requiring anticoagulation, of allowing growth of the aortic ring, of not being limited by the age of the patient and of having a low risk of degeneration and infectious endocarditis. Therefore, it seems particularly indicated for cases of complicated infectious endocarditis requiring early aortic valve replacement. The early (4.8%) and late (4.3%) mortality rates were comparable to those of other techniques and are lower than those associated with valve replacement with mechanical prostheses in cases of endocarditis (8.5% versus 40%). The secondary morbidity is 18.8% with dysfunction of the autograft and/or stenosis of the pulmonary homograft. Despite a limited follow-up, aortic valve replacement by a pulmonary homograft seems better than aortic valve replacement with a homograft or mechanical prosthesis, especially in cases of complicated infectious endocarditis requiring surgery in the acute phase. Further studies are required to confirm these encouraging results.

  9. [Noroviruses: leading cause of gastroenteritis].

    PubMed

    Delacour, H; Dubrous, P; Koeck, J L

    2010-04-01

    Although noroviruses were the first viral agents to be linked to gastrointestinal disease, they were long considered a secondary cause far behind rotaviruses. Development of molecular-based diagnostic techniques has provided clearer insight into the epidemiological impact of noroviruses that are now recognized not only as the leading cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks but also as an important cause of sporadic gastroenteritis in both children and adults. Norovirus infection is generally characterized by mild acute vomiting and diarrhea usually lasting for only a few days, but it can lead to more severe and potentially life-threatening symptoms in high-risk groups such as young children, elderly, and immunodeficient persons. It has been demonstrated that they are present in tropical countries. Molecular epidemiological studies have documented the great genetic diversity of noroviruses with regular emergence of variants. Since no vaccine is available, prevention on norovirus infection depends mainly on strict personal and community hygiene measures.

  10. CMV - gastroenteritis/colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Colitis - cytomegalovirus; Gastroenteritis - cytomegalovirus; Gastrointestinal CMV disease ... or after bone marrow or organ transplant Ulcerative colitis or Crohn disease Rarely, serious CMV infection involving ...

  11. Epidemiology of Acute Gastroenteritis Outbreaks Caused by Human Calicivirus (Norovirus and Sapovirus) in Catalonia: A Two Year Prospective Study, 2010-2011

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ana; Moreno, Antonio; Camps, Neus

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of cases of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) of viral etiology is a relevant public health issue. Due to underreporting, the study of outbreaks is an accepted approach to investigate their epidemiology. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiological characteristics of AGE outbreaks due to norovirus (NoV) and sapovirus (SV) in Catalonia. Material and Methods Prospective study of AGE outbreaks of possible viral etiology notified during two years in Catalonia. NoV and SV were detected by real time reverse transcription polymerase (RT-PCR). Results A total of 101 outbreaks were registered affecting a total of 2756 persons and 12 hospitalizations (hospitalization rate: 0.8x1,000,000 persons-year); 49.5% of outbreaks were foodborne, 45.5% person to person and 5% waterborne. The distribution of outbreaks according to the setting showed a predominance of catering services (39.6%), nursing homes and long term care facilities (26.8%) and schools (11.9%). The median number of cases per outbreak was 17 (range 2–191). The total Incidence rate (IR) was 18.3 per 100,000 persons-years (95%CI: 17.6–19.0). The highest IR was in persons aged ≥65 years (43.6x100,000 (95% CI: 41.0–46.2)) (p<0.001). A total of 1065 samples were analyzed with a positivity rate of 60.8%. 98% of positive samples were NoV (GII 56.3%; GI 4.2%; GII+GI 4.2%; non- typable 33.0%). SV was identified in two person-to-person transmission outbreaks in children. Conclusions These results confirm the relevance of viral AGE outbreaks, both foodborne and person-to-person, especially in institutionalized persons. SV should be taken into account when investigating viral AGE outbreaks. PMID:27120472

  12. Global Economic Burden of Norovirus Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Sarah M.; Lopman, Benjamin A.; Ozawa, Sachiko; Hall, Aron J.; Lee, Bruce Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite accounting for approximately one fifth of all acute gastroenteritis illnesses, norovirus has received comparatively less attention than other infectious pathogens. With several candidate vaccines under development, characterizing the global economic burden of norovirus could help funders, policy makers, public health officials, and product developers determine how much attention and resources to allocate to advancing these technologies to prevent and control norovirus. Methods We developed a computational simulation model to estimate the economic burden of norovirus in every country/area (233 total) stratified by WHO region and globally, from the health system and societal perspectives. We considered direct costs of illness (e.g., clinic visits and hospitalization) and productivity losses. Results Globally, norovirus resulted in a total of $4.2 billion (95% UI: $3.2–5.7 billion) in direct health system costs and $60.3 billion (95% UI: $44.4–83.4 billion) in societal costs per year. Disease amongst children <5 years cost society $39.8 billion, compared to $20.4 billion for all other age groups combined. Costs per norovirus illness varied by both region and age and was highest among adults ≥55 years. Productivity losses represented 84–99% of total costs varying by region. While low and middle income countries and high income countries had similar disease incidence (10,148 vs. 9,935 illness per 100,000 persons), high income countries generated 62% of global health system costs. In sensitivity analysis, the probability of hospitalization had the largest impact on health system cost estimates ($2.8 billion globally, assuming no hospitalization costs), while the probability of missing productive days had the largest impact on societal cost estimates ($35.9 billion globally, with a 25% probability of missing productive days). Conclusions The total economic burden is greatest in young children but the highest cost per illness is among older age

  13. Infectious dengue vesicles derived from CD61+ cells in acute patient plasma exhibited a diaphanous appearance

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Alan Yi-Hui; Wu, Shang-Rung; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chen, Po-Lin; Chen, Ya-Ping; Chen, Tsai-Yun; Lo, Yu-Chih; Ho, Tzu-Chuan; Lee, Meed; Chen, Min-Ting; Chiu, Yen-Chi; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2015-01-01

    The levels of neutralizing antibody to a pathogen are an effective indicator to predict efficacy of a vaccine in trial. And yet not all the trial vaccines are in line with the theory. Using dengue virus (DENV) to investigate the viral morphology affecting the predictive value, we evaluated the viral morphology in acute dengue plasma compared to that of Vero cells derived DENV. The virions in plasma were infectious and heterogeneous in shape with a “sunny-side up egg” appearance, viral RNA was enclosed with CD61+ cell-derived membrane interspersed by the viral envelope protein, defined as dengue vesicles. The unique viral features were also observed from ex vivo infected human bone marrow. Dengue vesicles were less efficiently neutralized by convalescent patient serum, compared to virions produced from Vero cells. Our results exhibit a reason why potencies of protective immunity fail in vivo and significantly impact dengue vaccine and drug development. PMID:26657027

  14. Infectious dengue vesicles derived from CD61+ cells in acute patient plasma exhibited a diaphanous appearance.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Alan Yi-Hui; Wu, Shang-Rung; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chen, Po-Lin; Chen, Ya-Ping; Chen, Tsai-Yun; Lo, Yu-Chih; Ho, Tzu-Chuan; Lee, Meed; Chen, Min-Ting; Chiu, Yen-Chi; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2015-12-11

    The levels of neutralizing antibody to a pathogen are an effective indicator to predict efficacy of a vaccine in trial. And yet not all the trial vaccines are in line with the theory. Using dengue virus (DENV) to investigate the viral morphology affecting the predictive value, we evaluated the viral morphology in acute dengue plasma compared to that of Vero cells derived DENV. The virions in plasma were infectious and heterogeneous in shape with a "sunny-side up egg" appearance, viral RNA was enclosed with CD61+ cell-derived membrane interspersed by the viral envelope protein, defined as dengue vesicles. The unique viral features were also observed from ex vivo infected human bone marrow. Dengue vesicles were less efficiently neutralized by convalescent patient serum, compared to virions produced from Vero cells. Our results exhibit a reason why potencies of protective immunity fail in vivo and significantly impact dengue vaccine and drug development.

  15. Bilingual aphasia due to spontaneous acute subdural haematoma from a ruptured intracranial infectious aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Vajramani, Girish V; Akrawi, Hawar; McCarthy, Rosaleen A; Gray, William P

    2008-09-01

    We report a case of spontaneous subdural haematoma due to ruptured intracranial infectious aneurysm, presenting with bilingual aphasia and illustrating differential language recovery. A 62-year-old right-handed bilingual gentleman, with a diagnosis of infective endocarditis, developed headache and became expressively aphasic in the English language. Three days later he was receptively and expressively aphasic in both English and Arabic. Cranial MRI scans showed a left-sided acute subdural haematoma with mass effect and midline shift. Contrast CT brain scans showed an enhancing speck adjacent to the clot and cerebral angiogram confirmed a distal middle cerebral artery aneurysm. He underwent image-guided craniotomy, evacuation of the subdural haematoma and excision of the aneurysm. Histopathological examination was consistent with an infectious intracranial aneurysm. Postoperatively his aphasia did not improve immediately. He had widened pulse pressure due to severe aortic regurgitation, confirmed on echocardiography. He underwent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair, following which his aphasia recovered gradually. Initially the recovery of his language was limited to Arabic. About a week later he recovered his English language as well. At 3-year follow-up he is doing well and has no neurological deficits. His aphasia has recovered completely. The present case is unique because of (a) presence of pure subdural haematoma, and (b) the differential susceptibility and recovery of native (L1) and acquired language (L2) in presence of a common pathology. The neurology of language in a bilingual is analysed and possible mechanisms discussed.

  16. Risk of infectious gastroenteritis in young children living in Québec rural areas with intensive animal farming: results of a case-control study (2004-2007).

    PubMed

    Levallois, P; Chevalier, P; Gingras, S; Déry, P; Payment, P; Michel, P; Rodriguez, M

    2014-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the epidemiology of severe gastroenteritis in children living in Québec rural areas with intensive livestock activities. From September 2005 through June 2007, 165 cases of gastroenteritis in children aged from 6 months to 5 years, hospitalized or notified to the public health department were enrolled, and 326 eligible controls participated. The parents of cases and controls were asked questions about different gastroenteritis risk factors. The quality of the drinking water used by the participants was investigated for microbial indicators as well as for four zoonotic bacterial pathogens (Campylobacter spp, Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp and Yersinia spp) and two enteric parasites (Cryptosporidium spp and Giardia spp). From 134 stool specimen analysed, viruses were detected in 82 cases (61%), while 28 (21%) were found with at least one of the bacteria investigated, and five cases were infected by parasites. Campylobacteriosis was the main bacterial infection (n = 15), followed by Salmonella sp (n = 7) and E. coli O157:H7 (n = 5) among cases with bacterial gastroenteritis. No significant difference was found between cases and controls regarding the quality of water consumed; the frequency of faecal contamination of private wells was also similar between cases and controls. Considering the total cases (including those with a virus), no link was found between severe gastroenteritis and either being in contact with animals or living in a municipality with the highest animal density (4th quartile). However, when considering only cases with a bacterial or parasite infection (n = 32), there was a weak association with pig density that was not statistically significant after adjusting for potential confounders. Contact with domestic, zoo or farm animals were the only environmental factor associated with the disease.

  17. Incidence of Norovirus and Other Viral Pathogens That Cause Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE) among Kaiser Permanente Member Populations in the United States, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Grytdal, Scott P; DeBess, Emilio; Lee, Lore E; Blythe, David; Ryan, Patricia; Biggs, Christianne; Cameron, Miriam; Schmidt, Mark; Parashar, Umesh D; Hall, Aron J

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses and other viral pathogens are increasingly recognized as frequent causes of acute gastroenteritis (AGE). However, few laboratory-based data are available on the incidence of AGE caused by viral pathogens in the U.S. This study examined stool specimens submitted for routine clinical diagnostics from patients enrolled in Kaiser Permanente (KP) health plans in metro Portland, OR, and the Maryland, District of Columbia, and northern Virginia geographic areas to estimate the incidence of viral enteropathogens in these populations. Over a one-year study period, participating laboratories randomly selected stools submitted for routine clinical diagnostics for inclusion in the study along with accompanying demographic and clinical data. Selected stools were tested for norovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus using standardized real-time RT-PCR protocols. Each KP site provided administrative data which were used in conjunction with previously published data on healthcare utilization to extrapolate pathogen detection rates into population-based incidence rates. A total of 1,099 specimens collected during August 2012 to September 2013 were included. Mean age of patients providing stool specimens was 46 years (range: 0-98 years). Noroviruses were the most common viral pathogen identified among patients with AGE (n = 63 specimens, 6% of specimens tested). In addition, 22 (2%) of specimens were positive for rotavirus; 19 (2%) were positive for sapovirus; and 7 (1%) were positive for astrovirus. Incidence of norovirus-associated outpatient visits was 5.6 per 1,000 person-years; incidence of norovirus disease in the community was estimated to be 69.5 per 1,000 person-years. Norovirus incidence was highest among children <5 years of age (outpatient incidence = 25.6 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 152.2 per 1,000 person-years), followed by older adults aged >65 years (outpatient incidence = 7.8 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 75.8 per 1

  18. Platelets from thrombocytopenic ponies acutely infected with equine infectious anemia virus are activated in vivo and hypofunctional.

    PubMed

    Russell, K E; Perkins, P C; Hoffman, M R; Miller, R T; Walker, K M; Fuller, F J; Sellon, D C

    1999-06-20

    Thrombocytopenia is a consistent finding and one of the earliest hematological abnormalities in horses acutely infected with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus closely related to human immunodeficiency virus. Multifactorial mechanisms, including immune-mediated platelet destruction and impaired platelet production, are implicated in the pathogenesis of EIAV-associated thrombocytopenia. This study was undertaken to investigate whether regenerative thrombopoiesis and platelet destruction occurred in ponies acutely infected with EIAV. Circulating large, immature platelets were increased in ponies acutely infected with EIAV late in the infection when platelet count was at a nadir. Morphometric analysis of bone marrow from acutely infected ponies revealed significant increased in megakaryocyte area and megakaryocyte nuclear area. A trend toward increased numbers of megakaryocytes was also observed. Platelets from acutely infected ponies had increased surface-bound fibrinogen and ultrastructural changes consistent with in vivo platelet activation. Platelets also had hypofunctional aggregation responses to three agonists in vitro. We conclude that thrombocytopenia in ponies acutely infected with EIAV is regenerative and suggest that bone marrow platelet production is not severely compromised in these ponies. Our findings reveal that in vivo platelet activation occurs in ponies acutely infected with EIAV, and as a result platelets are hypofunctional in vitro. Activation of platelets in vivo may cause platelet degranulation or formation of platelet aggregates, which would result in removal of these damages platelets from circulation. This may represent a form of nonimmune-mediated platelet destruction in ponies acutely infected with EIAV.

  19. Probiotics for infectious diseases: more drugs, less dietary supplementation.

    PubMed

    Kotzampassi, Katerina; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2012-10-01

    According to current definitions, probiotics are live microorganisms that, when ingested in adequate quantities, exert a health benefit to the host. The action of probiotics in the host is exerted by three mechanisms: modulation of the content of gut microbiota; maintenance of the integrity of the gut barrier and prevention of bacterial translocation; and modulation of the local immune response by the gut-associated immune system. Regarding their role for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases, adequate evidence coming from randomised clinical trials (RCTs) is available for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD), Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), acute gastroenteritis and infectious complications following admission to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Existing evidence supports their role for decreasing the incidence of AAD and CDI when administered in parallel with antimicrobials. They also shorten the duration of symptoms when administered in paediatric populations with acute gastroenteritis, particularly of rotavirus aetiology. Available evidence is not sufficient to support administration for the management of CDI. Regarding populations of critically ill patients, data from many RCTs suggest a decrease of infectious complications by starting feeding with probiotics following ICU admission, with the exception of patients suffering from severe pancreatitis. However, it should be underscored that all analysed RCTs are characterised by marked heterogeneity regarding the type of administered probiotic species, precluding robust recommendations.

  20. [Gastroenteritis eosinofílica].

    PubMed

    Garibay-Vargas, Ondina Marlene; Soto-Candía, Diego; Coria-Ramírez, Erika; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel; Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Ramos-Acosta, Gabriel; Salamanca-García, Moisés; Guido-Bayardo, Ricardo Leopoldo

    2014-01-01

    The eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a disease of unknown etiopathogenesis and rare presentation, with several clinical symptoms, ranging from mild episodes until nonspecific abdominal acute episodes of intestinal obstruction, which some times make it necessary urgent surgical treatment. This wide symptomatic range seems to be conditioned by the degree of eosinophilic infiltration of the intestinal wall and the number of layers involved. This paper reports the case of a patient who, due to the diagnosis difficulties, illustrates in a single patient the intestinal and respiratory anatomo-clinical diversity and the evolution of the eosinophilia both intestinal and peripheral. Patient was sent to our service with diagnoses of bronchial asthma, chronic allergic rhinitis and chronic anemia.

  1. Awake video-assisted thoracic surgery in acute infectious pulmonary destruction

    PubMed Central

    Egorov, Vladimir; Deynega, Igor; Ionov, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Background Many of thoracic minimally invasive interventions have been proven to be possible without general anesthesia. This article presents results of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) application under local anesthesia in patients with lung abscesses and discusses its indications in detail. Methods The study involved prospective analysis of treatment outcomes for all acute infectious pulmonary destruction (AIPD) patients undergoing VATS under local anesthesia and sedation since January 1, 2010, till December 31, 2013. Patients with pulmonary destruction cavity at periphery of large size (>5 cm) underwent non-intubated video abscessoscopy (NIVAS). Patients with pyopneumothorax (lung abscess penetration into pleural cavity) underwent non-intubated video thoracoscopy (NIVTS). Indications for NIVAS and NIVTS were as follows: cavity debridement and washing, necrotic sequestra removal, adhesion split, biopsy. All interventions were done under local anesthesia and sedation without trachea intubation and epidural anesthesia. Results Sixty-five enrolled patients had 42 NIVAS and 32 NIVTS interventions, nine patients underwent two surgeries. None of the patients required trachea intubation or epidural anesthesia. In none of our cases with conversion to thoracotomy was required. Post-surgical complications developed after 11 interventions (13%): subcutaneous emphysema (five cases), chest wall phlegmon (three cases), pulmonary bleeding (two cases), and pneumothorax (one case). One patient died due to the main disease progression. In 50 patients NIVAS and NIVTS were done within 5 to 8 days after abscess/pleural cavity draining, while in other 15 patients—immediately prior to draining; both pulmonary bleeding episodes and all cases of chest wall phlegmon took place in the latter group. Conclusions NIVAS and NIVTS under local anesthesia and sedation are well tolerated by patients, safe and should be used more often in AIPD cases. Timing of NIVAS and NIVTS procedures

  2. Prebiotics in healthy infants and children for prevention of acute infectious diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lohner, Szimonetta; Küllenberg, Daniela; Antes, Gerd; Decsi, Tamás; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2014-08-01

    Prebiotics, defined as nondigestible dietary ingredients resistant to gastric acidity and fermented by the intestinal flora, are used to positively influence the composition of intestinal flora, thereby promoting health benefits. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the efficacy of prebiotics in the prevention of acute infectious diseases in children. A systematic literature search was conducted using the Ovid Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library's Central databases. Finally, five randomized controlled trials, all of them investigating infants and children 0-24 months of age, were included in the review. Pooled estimates from three studies revealed a statistically significant decrease in the number of infectious episodes requiring antibiotic therapy in the prebiotic group as compared with the placebo group (rate ratio 0.68; 95% confidence interval 0.61-0.77). Studies available indicate that prebiotics may also be effective in decreasing the rate of overall infections in infants and children 0-24 months of age. Further studies in the age group 3-18 years are required to determine whether prebiotics can be considered for the prevention of acute infectious diseases in the older pediatric population.

  3. [Hospitalisation associated with Rotavirus gastroenteritis in Italy, 2001-2003, evaluated by means of ICD9-CM diagnostic codes].

    PubMed

    Marocco, Alessia; Assael, Baroukh; Gabutti, Giovanni; Guarino, Alfredo; Lopalco, Pier Luigi; Marchetti, Federico; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Titone, Lucina; Tozzi, Alberto Eugenio; Vitali Rosati, Giovanni; Zotti, Carla; Franco, Elisabetta

    2006-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RV) are the most common etiological agents in acute gastroenteritis (GE) in children in the first years of life. Data from the national scientific literature show that RV is responsible of 26% of all cases of hospitalisation for diarrea in children, resulting the most frequently identified agent. The Italian database of hospital discharge, freely available from the web site of the national Ministry of Health, was searched to investigate the epidemiology of RV gastroenteritis. The mean number of hospitalisation for RV enteritis in children in the first 4 years of live was 4.758 in the years 2001, 2002 and 2003, representing 84% of viral enteritis. RV was identified as agent in 17% of all intestinal infectious diseases in this age group. This percentage shows the important role of RV in severe gastrointestinal infections; it is however much lower than the value expected from specifically performed surveys. This underestimation may be attributed to the high number of undefined gastroenteritis found in the database (54%), to the scarce sensitivity of the hospital discharge code, and to the fact that the analysis was performed using only the principal diagnosis. A specific immunisation strategy, safe, effective, cost-effective and easy to perform, could have a great impact on the incidence of the disease and on the associated costs.

  4. Postdischarge mortality in children with acute infectious diseases: derivation of postdischarge mortality prediction models

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, M O; Kumbakumba, E; Larson, C P; Ansermino, J M; Singer, J; Kissoon, N; Wong, H; Ndamira, A; Kabakyenga, J; Kiwanuka, J; Zhou, G

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To derive a model of paediatric postdischarge mortality following acute infectious illness. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 2 hospitals in South-western Uganda. Participants 1307 children of 6 months to 5 years of age were admitted with a proven or suspected infection. 1242 children were discharged alive and followed up 6 months following discharge. The 6-month follow-up rate was 98.3%. Interventions None. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was postdischarge mortality within 6 months following the initial hospital discharge. Results 64 children died during admission (5.0%) and 61 died within 6 months of discharge (4.9%). Of those who died following discharge, 31 (51%) occurred within the first 30 days. The final adjusted model for the prediction of postdischarge mortality included the variables mid-upper arm circumference (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.94 to 0.97, per 1 mm increase), time since last hospitalisation (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.93, for each increased period of no hospitalisation), oxygen saturation (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.93 to 0·99, per 1% increase), abnormal Blantyre Coma Scale score (OR 2.39, 95% CI 1·18 to 4.83), and HIV-positive status (OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.36 to 6.53). This model produced a receiver operating characteristic curve with an area under the curve of 0.82. With sensitivity of 80%, our model had a specificity of 66%. Approximately 35% of children would be identified as high risk (11.1% mortality risk) and the remaining would be classified as low risk (1.4% mortality risk), in a similar cohort. Conclusions Mortality following discharge is a poorly recognised contributor to child mortality. Identification of at-risk children is critical in developing postdischarge interventions. A simple prediction tool that uses 5 easily collected variables can be used to identify children at high risk of death after discharge. Improved discharge planning and care could be provided for high-risk children. PMID

  5. Norwalk-like viral gastroenteritis outbreak in U.S. Army trainees.

    PubMed Central

    Arness, M. K.; Feighner, B. H.; Canham, M. L.; Taylor, D. N.; Monroe, S. S.; Cieslak, T. J.; Hoedebecke, E. L.; Polyak, C. S.; Cuthie, J. C.; Fankhauser, R. L.; Humphrey, C. D.; Barker, T. L.; Jenkins, C. D.; Skillman, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    An outbreak of acute gastroenteritis hospitalized 99 (12%) of 835 U. S. Army trainees at Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas, from August 27 to September 1, 1998. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction tests for Norwalk-like virus were positive for genogroup 2. Gastroenteritis was associated with one post dining facility and with soft drinks. PMID:10756159

  6. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis with Eosinophilic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joung Il; Joo, Kwang Ro; Shin, Hyun Phil

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the bowel wall and variable gastrointestinal manifestations. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for EG when faced with gastrointestinal symptoms and peripheral eosinophilia to avoid incorrect diagnosis and inappropriate treatments. A 24-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of acute right lower quadrant abdominal pain and a laparoscopic appendectomy performed for a presumed diagnosis of an acute appendicitis. However, the procedure revealed bowel edema and a moderate amount of ascites without evidence of a suppurative appendicitis. Postoperatively, she showed persistent and progressive eosinophilia, exudative eosinophilic ascites, eosinophilic infiltration of the resected appendix wall, and eosinophilic infiltration of gastroduodenal mucosa. A punch biopsy of the abdominal skin also revealed inflammation with marked eosinophilic infiltration of the skin. She recovered after the treatment with a low dose of steroid for the EG with eosinophilic dermatitis. EG with eosinophilic dermatitis has not been reported yet and is considered fortuitous in this case. PMID:20046530

  7. Epidemiology of gastroenteritis viruses in Japan: Prevalence, seasonality, and outbreak.

    PubMed

    Thongprachum, Aksara; Khamrin, Pattara; Maneekarn, Niwat; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Acute gastroenteritis has been recognized as one of the most common diseases in humans and continues to be a major public health problem worldwide. Several groups of viruses have been reported as the causative agents of acute gastroenteritis, including rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus, human astrovirus, adenovirus, and an increasing number of others which have been reported more recently. The epidemiology, prevalence, seasonality, and outbreaks of these viruses have been reviewed in a number of studies conducted in Japan over three decades. Rotavirus and norovirus were the two most common viruses detected almost equally in children under 5 years of age who were suffering from acute gastroenteritis. Like many other countries, the main rotavirus strains circulating in pediatric patients in Japan are G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], and G9P[8]. Norovirus GII.4 was involved in most outbreaks in Japan and found to be associated with the emergence of new variants Sydney_2012. The classic human astrovirus, MLB, and VA clades astroviruses were also commonly found in pediatric patients with acute diarrhea. The sapovirus and adenovirus have been identified as the minor viral causative agents for acute gastroenteritis in Japan.

  8. Infectious Aortitis.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, F Daniel; Jamison, Bruce M; Hibbert, Benjamin

    2016-09-28

    Aortitis is broadly divided into infectious and non-infectious etiologies, each with distinct treatment implications. We present the case of a patient who sustained a type A aortic dissection during urgent coronary angiography for acute coronary syndrome. Clinical findings and events during the procedure raised suspicion for an underlying vascular disorder; however, the diagnosis of staphylococcal aortitis was not made until pathological examination of resected tissue. Clues to the diagnosis of infectious aortitis noted throughout the patient's clinical course are detailed as are potential consequences of diagnostic delays and treatment decisions, underscoring the difficulties in recognizing and managing the condition. In addition, we describe a previously unreported complication of cardiac catheterization in the setting of an infectious aortopathy.

  9. A possible association between acute infectious diarrhoea in pregnant women and congenital abnormalities in their offspring--a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Acs, Nándor; Bánhidy, Ferenc; Puhó, Erzsébet H; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2010-05-01

    The possible association between Salmonella gastroenteritis (SGE) and infectious diarrhoea in pregnancy (IDP) and structural birth defects, i.e. congenital abnormalities (CA) in the offspring, has not been studied. The dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996 was evaluated. There were 15 (0.07%) and 82 (0.36%) out of 22,843 cases and 23 (0.06%) and 70 (0.18%) out of 38,151 (0.34%) controls with mothers who had medically recorded SGE and IDP, respectively. There was no association of SGE and a higher risk of CA. However, a higher risk of cleft lip +/- palate, congenital limb deficiencies, multiple CAs and cardiovascular CAs was found in the offspring of mothers with IDP. A possible explanation for the association of IDP with higher risk for some specific CAs may be the high fever in IDP.

  10. The effect of antiemetics in childhood gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diarrheal diseases are the second leading cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in developing countries and an important cause of malnutrition. An estimated 0.75 million children below 5 years of age die from diarrhea. Vomiting associated with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a distressing symptom and limits the success of oral rehydration in AGE leading to an increased use of intravenous rehydration, prolonged emergency department stay and hospitalization. In this review we estimate the effect of antiemetics in gastroenteritis in children. Methods We conducted a systematic review of all the efficacy and effectiveness studies. We used a standardized abstraction and grading format and performed meta-analyses for all outcomes with more than two studies. The estimated effect of antiemetics was determined by applying the standard Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG) rules. Results We included seven studies in the review. Antiemetics significantly reduced the incidence of vomiting and hospitalization by 54%. Antiemetics also significantly reduced the intravenous fluid requirements by 60%, while it had a non-significant effect on the ORT tolerance and revisit rates. Conclusion Antiemetics are effective for the management of gastroenteritis in children and have the potential to decrease morbidity and mortality burden due to diarrhea, when introduced and scaled up. PMID:24564795

  11. [Extraperitoneal ligation herniorraphy by the acute infectious diseases of the abdominal cavity in children].

    PubMed

    Ignat'ev, R O; Bataev, S M

    2012-01-01

    Surgery on the reason of the "acute abdomen" in children often reveals the persisting vaginal peritoneal defects, which further lead to hernia formation. 23 children (aged 4-15 years) were operated on the acute uncomplicated appendicitis (n=10), acute mesadenitis (n=3), appendicular local and pelvioperitonitis (n=9) and ovary apoplexia (n=1). Inguinal hernia was revealed in all patients during laparoscopy. After videoendoscopic sanation of the abdomen and appendectomy (if it was necessary) the extraperitoneal ligation herniorraphy in author's modification was performed. The were no cases of abdominal complications as well as hernia recurrence among the treated patients.

  12. WATERBORNE OUTBREAK OF GASTROENTERITIS ASSOCIATED WITH A NOROVIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Wyoming Department of Health investigated an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis among persons who dined at a tourist saloon in central Wyoming during October 2001. Human caliciviruses (HuCVs) were suspected as the etiological agent of the outbreak based upon the incubation ...

  13. Honey in the treatment of infantile gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Haffejee, I E; Moosa, A

    1985-06-22

    A clinical study was undertaken using honey in oral rehydration solution in infants and children with gastroenteritis. The aim was to evaluate the influence of honey on the duration of acute diarrhoea and its value as a glucose substitute in oral rehydration. The results showed that honey shortens the duration of bacterial diarrhoea, does not prolong the duration of non-bacterial diarrhoea, and may safely be used as a substitute for glucose in an oral rehydration solution containing electrolytes. The correct dilution of honey, as well as the presence of electrolytes in the oral rehydration solution, however, must be maintained.

  14. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    PubMed

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms. PMID:26819502

  15. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms. PMID:26819502

  16. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    PubMed

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms.

  17. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis: an update.

    PubMed

    Lucendo, Alfredo J; Arias, Angel

    2012-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) is characterized by dense eosinophilic inflammation of one or several digestive tract sections. The symptoms include abdominal pain, weight loss, vomiting and diarrhea. Biopsy samples taken during endoscopic examination allows the diagnosis of the disease. An infiltration of >30 eosinophils per high-power field in at least five high-power fields, exhibiting signs of eosinophilic degranulation and extending to the muscularis mucosa or submucosa are all histological indications of EGE. EGE is traditionally classified into three forms depending on the depth of inflammation in the wall (mucosal, muscular or serosal). This, together with the digestive tract segments involved, determines the clinical presentation. The natural history of EGE includes three different evolutionary patterns, since patients may suffer a single outbreak, a recurrent course or even chronic disease. Corticosteroids are the most frequently used therapy for EGE; dietary treatments should be also considered. Surgery has been limited to solving obstruction and small bowel perforation.

  18. Hyperglycemia during induction therapy is associated with increased infectious complications in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are at high risk for developing hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemic adult ALL patients have shorter remissions, more infections, and increased mortality. No corresponding data are available in children. We hypothesized that children with ALL who become hypergl...

  19. Acalculous cholecystitis: an unusual presentation of acute Q fever masquerading as infectious endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ergas, David; Abdul-Hai, Ali; Sthoeger, Zev Moshe

    2008-10-01

    We report here a patient with acute Q fever-related acalculous cholecystitis, who presented with prolonged fever, valvular abnormalities, and positive serology for Q fever phase 1 antigens, features suggesting chronic Q fever endocarditis. The pathogenesis of this rare presentation of Q fever is discussed. PMID:18854682

  20. Acute undifferentiated neonatal diarrhea in beef calves. I. Occurence and distribution of infectious agents.

    PubMed Central

    Acres, S D; Laing, C J; Saunders, J R; Radostits, O M

    1975-01-01

    loop dilating strain of Citrobacter was isolated from one diarrheic calf. There was no consistent pattern of onset or duration of diarrhea in calves which excreted different infectious agents. Salmonella species, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, parvovirus, adenoviruses, parainfluenza-3 virus, and Chlamydia species could not be demonstrated in any of the calves or their dams. No potentially enteropathogenic agents could be demonstrated in 11 of the 32 calves which scoured. These findings emphasize the complexity of the infectious aspect of the neonatal diarrhea syndrome and illustrate the difficulty in making an etiological diagnosis in field outbreaks of the calf scours complex. PMID:1092438

  1. A proposed emergency management program for acute care facilities in response to a highly virulent infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Petinaux, Bruno; Ferguson, Brandy; Walker, Milena; Lee, Yeo-Jin; Little, Gary; Parenti, David; Simon, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To address the organizational complexities associated with a highly virulent infectious disease (HVID) hazard, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), an acute care facility should institute an emergency management program rooted in the fundamentals of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This program must address all known facets of the care of a patient with HVID, from unannounced arrival to discharge. The implementation of such a program not only serves to mitigate the risks from an unrecognized exposure but also serves to prepare the organization and its staff to provide for a safe response, and ensure a full recovery. Much of this program is based on education, training, and infection control measures along with resourcing for appropriate personal protective equipment which is instrumental in ensuring an organized and safe response of the acute care facility in the service to the community. This emergency management program approach can serve as a model in the care of not only current HVIDs such as EVD but also future presentations in our healthcare setting.

  2. A proposed emergency management program for acute care facilities in response to a highly virulent infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Petinaux, Bruno; Ferguson, Brandy; Walker, Milena; Lee, Yeo-Jin; Little, Gary; Parenti, David; Simon, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To address the organizational complexities associated with a highly virulent infectious disease (HVID) hazard, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), an acute care facility should institute an emergency management program rooted in the fundamentals of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This program must address all known facets of the care of a patient with HVID, from unannounced arrival to discharge. The implementation of such a program not only serves to mitigate the risks from an unrecognized exposure but also serves to prepare the organization and its staff to provide for a safe response, and ensure a full recovery. Much of this program is based on education, training, and infection control measures along with resourcing for appropriate personal protective equipment which is instrumental in ensuring an organized and safe response of the acute care facility in the service to the community. This emergency management program approach can serve as a model in the care of not only current HVIDs such as EVD but also future presentations in our healthcare setting. PMID:26963227

  3. Clinical usefulness of oral immunoglobulins in lung transplant recipients with norovirus gastroenteritis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Gairard-Dory, A-C; Dégot, T; Hirschi, S; Schuller, A; Leclercq, A; Renaud-Picard, B; Gourieux, B; Kessler, R

    2014-12-01

    Viral gastroenteritis causing diarrhea is a common complication observed in lung transplant recipients. Differently from the mild and typically self-limited disease seen in immunocompetent subjects, immunocompromised patients frequently have a more severe course. Norovirus and rotavirus are among the leading causes of severe gastroenteritis in transplant recipients. Specific treatment is unavailable, although good supportive treatment can significantly reduce morbidity. Previous studies have suggested that oral immunoglobulins may be used for the treatment of acute viral gastroenteritis after solid-organ transplantation. Herein, we conducted a retrospective chart review of 12 lung transplant recipients with norovirus-induced gastroenteritis who were treated with oral immunoglobulins for 2 days. Eleven patients were successfully treated, whereas 1 subject was only mildly improved. Four patients had at least 1 recurrence. No significant adverse effects were observed. We conclude that oral immunoglobulins may be clinically useful for lung transplant recipients with norovirus-induced gastroenteritis.

  4. Infectious Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illness among Patients Seeking Health Care in South-Central Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Matthew R.; Blair, Patrick J.; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L.; Burgess, Timothy H.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Putnam, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations. PMID:22302857

  5. Infectious etiologies of acute febrile illness among patients seeking health care in south-central Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Matthew R; Blair, Patrick J; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L; Burgess, Timothy H; Wierzba, Thomas F; Putnam, Shannon D

    2012-02-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations.

  6. [Acute rheumatic fever and infectious-inflammatory diseases of the pharynx: the relationship, treatment, and prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Belov, B S

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between pharyngeal infections, such as tonsillitis and pharyngitis, caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (BHSA) and acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is a well-established fact confirmed by numerous studies carried out along the following lines: epidemiological, immunological, therapeutic, and prophylactic. The currently available data provide an opportunity to discuss the existence of «rheumatogenic» BHSA strains exhibiting a number of characteristic clinical and morphological properties. According to the current recommendations penicillins remain the means of first-line therapy for the treatment of acute forms of BHSA-induced tonsillitis and pharyngitis, whereas the macrolides should be applied only as the alternative medications in the patients with intolerance to beta-lactam antibiotics. This article contains characteristics of BHSA-carrier state and the principal indications for the prescription of antibiotics to the patients with these conditions. The key principle of secondary medicamental prophylaxis of acute respiratory infections are expounded along with the main fines of future research on the problems associated with BHSA-induced pharyngeal infections. PMID:26870861

  7. The Prevalence of Rotavirus and Adenovirus in the Childhood Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Ozsari, Tamer; Bora, Gulhan; Kaya, Bulent; Yakut, Kahraman

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute gastroenteritis stemming from viral causes is very common during the childhood period. Rotavirus and enteric adenovirus are the most common factors of acute gastroenteritis encountered in infants and children. However, the epidemiology of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus gastroenteritis in the east Anatolia region is not well-known. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the relationship between the distribution of antigen positivity in rotavirus and enteric adenovirus antigen tests required cases and demographic data retrospectively in pediatric patients admitted to our hospital. Patients and Methods The records of stool sample analyses for 1154 patients admitted to our hospital from June 2011 to December 2011 with complaints of diarrhea were retrospectively examined. The presence of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus antigens in stool specimens was investigated by means of an immunochromatographic test. Results Viral antigens were detected in 327 (28.3%) stool specimens out of 1154. Among the positive results, the frequency was 73.7% for rotavirus and 26.2% for adenovirus. While the detected rotavirus antigen rate was high for all age groups, it was highest for children under the age of 2, with a rate of 57.1%. Moreover, the rotavirus infections were observed at a rate of 44.3% in winter and of 24.6% in autumn. Conclusions The most important factor in childhood acute gastroenteritis in east Anatolia is the rotavirus. Rotavirus and adenovirus antigens should be routinely investigated as a factor in fresh stool samples for the accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteritis in children in the winter and autumn months. PMID:27635215

  8. A Rapid Method for Viral Particle Detection in Viral-Induced Gastroenteritis: A TEM Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, M. John; Barrish, James P.; Hayes, Elizabeth S.; Leer, Laurie C.; Estes, Mary K.; Cubitt, W. D.

    1995-10-01

    Infectious gastroenteritis is a common cause of hospitalization in the pediatric population. The most frequent cause of gastroenteritis is viral in origin. The purpose of this study was to compare a rapid modified negative-staining TEM method with the conventional pseudoreplica technique in detection of viral particles in fecal samples from children with viral gastroenteritis. The modified negative-staining method resulted in a significantly higher (2.5 ± 0.5, p = 0.02) viral rating score than that for the conventional pseudoreplica technique (1.7 ± 0.4). In addition, the preparation time for the negative-staining method was approximately one fifth that for the conventional pseudoreplica technique. Rapid diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis may be made by ultrastructural detection of viral particles in fecal samples using the negative staining technique.

  9. Acute hepatitis due to hepatitis A virus subgenotype IA as an imported infectious disease from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takako; Yano, Yoshihiko; Amin, Mochamad; Lusida, Maria I; Soetjipto; Hotta, Hak; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2014-10-01

    A 25-year-old Japanese man was admitted with general malaise and fever, which had developed 12 days after coming back to Japan from Indonesia. Blood examination revealed elevated transaminase levels and positivity for the IgM anti-HAV antibody; therefore, he was diagnosed with acute hepatitis A. HAV-RNA was detected in his serum and phylogenetically classified as subgenotype IA. The partial genome in the VP1/P2A region was consistent with the strain recently isolated from Surabaya, which indicated that he had been infected during his stay in Indonesia. Thus, HAV vaccination is recommended before visiting HAV-endemic countries for a long period of time.

  10. Diagnostic value of the Vesikari Scoring System for predicting the viral or bacterial pathogens in pediatric gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Dong Ho; Kim, Dong Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic value of the Vesikari Scoring System (VSS) as an early predictor of pathogens in children with acute gastroenteritis (AG). Methods In this retrospective study, the VSS score, absolute neutrophil count (ANC), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were analyzed in 107 hospitalized children with AG, aged 6 months to 17 years. Patients were divided into nonspecific, viral, and bacterial groups according to the pathogens detected using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. Results Patients in the bacterial group had significantly higher CRP values and VSS scores compared to those in the viral group and significantly higher VSS scores compared to those in the nonspecific group (P<0.05). Patients in the viral group had significantly higher VSS scores than those in the nonspecific group (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that VSS was the most effective diagnostic tool for predicting the type of pathogen (P<0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of VSS was significantly greater than that for ANC and CRP (P<0.05). At a cutoff point of 10 in the VSS, an acceptable diagnostic accuracy could be achieved for distinguishing between bacterial and viral pathogens in AG. Conclusion VSS can be considered a useful and reliable infectious marker for pediatric gastroenteritis. VSS may be a good early predictor of the type of pathogen, enabling development of a treatment plan before results from a stool culture or PCR test are available. PMID:27186219

  11. Antibiotic use and clinical outcomes in the acute setting under management by an infectious diseases acute physician versus other clinical teams: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nicola; Mistry, Vikash; Crook, Derrick; Peto, Tim; Walker, A Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the magnitude of difference in antibiotic use between clinical teams in the acute setting and assess evidence for any adverse consequences to patient safety or healthcare delivery. Design Prospective cohort study (1 week) and analysis of linked electronic health records (3 years). Setting UK tertiary care centre. Participants All patients admitted sequentially to the acute medical service under an infectious diseases acute physician (IDP) and other medical teams during 1 week in 2013 (n=297), and 3 years 2012–2014 (n=47 585). Primary outcome measure Antibiotic use in days of therapy (DOT): raw group metrics and regression analysis adjusted for case mix. Secondary outcome measures 30-day all-cause mortality, treatment failure and length of stay. Results Antibiotic use was 173 vs 282 DOT/100 admissions in the IDP versus non-IDP group. Using case mix-adjusted zero-inflated Poisson regression, IDP patients were significantly less likely to receive an antibiotic (adjusted OR=0.25 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.84), p=0.03) and received shorter courses (adjusted rate ratio (RR)=0.71 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.93), p=0.01). Clinically stable IDP patients of uncertain diagnosis were more likely to have antibiotics held (87% vs 55%; p=0.02). There was no significant difference in treatment failure or mortality (adjusted p>0.5; also in the 3-year data set), but IDP patients were more likely to be admitted overnight (adjusted OR=3.53 (95% CI 1.24 to 10.03), p=0.03) and have longer length of stay (adjusted RR=1.19 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.36), p=0.007). Conclusions The IDP-led group used 30% less antibiotic therapy with no adverse clinical outcome, suggesting antibiotic use can be reduced safely in the acute setting. This may be achieved in part by holding antibiotics and admitting the patient for observation rather than prescribing, which has implications for costs and hospital occupancy. More information is needed to indicate whether any such longer admission will

  12. Ethical and legal challenges posed by severe acute respiratory syndrome: implications for the control of severe infectious disease threats.

    PubMed

    Gostin, Lawrence O; Bayer, Ronald; Fairchild, Amy L

    2003-12-24

    The appearance and spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on a global level raised vital legal and ethical issues. National and international responses to SARS have profound implications for 3 important ethical values: privacy, liberty, and the duty to protect the public's health. This article examines, through legal and ethical lenses, various methods that countries used in reaction to the SARS outbreak: surveillance and contact tracing, isolation and quarantine, and travel restrictions. These responses, at least in some combination, succeeded in bringing the outbreak to an end. The article articulates a set of legal and ethical recommendations for responding to infectious disease threats, seeking to reconcile the tension between the public's health and individual rights to privacy, liberty, and freedom of movement. The ethical values that inform the recommendations include the precautionary principle, the least restrictive/intrusive alternative, justice, and transparency. Development of a set of legal and ethical recommendations becomes even more essential when, as was true with SARS and will undoubtedly be the case with future epidemics, scientific uncertainty is pervasive and urgent public health action is required.

  13. Infectious complications in children with acute myeloid leukemia: decreased mortality in multicenter trial AML-BFM 2004

    PubMed Central

    Bochennek, K; Hassler, A; Perner, C; Gilfert, J; Schöning, S; Klingebiel, T; Reinhardt, D; Creutzig, U; Lehrnbecher, T

    2016-01-01

    Infections are an important cause for morbidity and mortality in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We therefore characterized infectious complications in children treated according to the trial AML-BFM 2004. Patients with Down syndrome were excluded from the analysis. Data were gathered from the medical records in the hospital where the patients were treated. A total of 405 patients (203 girls; median age 8.4 years) experienced 1326 infections. Fever without identifiable source occurred in 56.1% of the patients and clinically and microbiologically documented infections in 17.5% and 32.4% of the patients, respectively. In all, 240 Gram-positive (112 viridans group streptococci) and 90 Gram-negative isolates were recovered from the bloodstream. Invasive fungal infection was diagnosed in 3% of the patients. Three children each died of Gram-negative bacteremia and invasive aspergillosis, respectively. As compared with the results of AML-BFM 93 with lower dose intensity, infection-related morbidity was slightly higher in AML-BFM 2004 (3.3. versus 2.8 infections per patient), whereas infection-related mortality significantly decreased (1.5% versus 5.4% P=0.003). Specific anti-infective recommendations included in the treatment protocol, regular training courses for pediatric hematologists and increasing experience may be the reason for reduced infection-related mortality in children with AML. Further studies are needed to decrease infection-related morbidity. PMID:26771808

  14. Absence of Intestinal PPARγ Aggravates Acute Infectious Colitis in Mice through a Lipocalin-2–Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Parag; Ling, Teo Wei; Korecka, Agata; Li, Yinghui; D'Arienzo, Rossana; Bunte, Ralph M.; Berger, Thorsten; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Chambon, Pierre; Mak, Tak Wah; Wahli, Walter; Pettersson, Sven

    2014-01-01

    To be able to colonize its host, invading Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium must disrupt and severely affect host-microbiome homeostasis. Here we report that S. Typhimurium induces acute infectious colitis by inhibiting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) expression in intestinal epithelial cells. Interestingly, this PPARγ down-regulation by S. Typhimurium is independent of TLR-4 signaling but triggers a marked elevation of host innate immune response genes, including that encoding the antimicrobial peptide lipocalin-2 (Lcn2). Accumulation of Lcn2 stabilizes the metalloproteinase MMP-9 via extracellular binding, which further aggravates the colitis. Remarkably, when exposed to S. Typhimurium, Lcn2-null mice exhibited a drastic reduction of the colitis and remained protected even at later stages of infection. Our data suggest a mechanism in which S. Typhimurium hijacks the control of host immune response genes such as those encoding PPARγ and Lcn2 to acquire residence in a host, which by evolution has established a symbiotic relation with its microbiome community to prevent pathogen invasion. PMID:24465207

  15. Active Hemovigilance Significantly Improves Reporting of Acute Non-infectious Adverse Reactions to Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Naveen; Agnihotri, Ajju

    2016-09-01

    One of the key purposes of a hemovigilance program is to improve reporting of transfusion related adverse events and subsequent data-driven improvement in blood transfusion (BT) practices. We conducted a study over 3 years to assess the impact of healthcare worker training and an active feedback programme on reporting of adverse reactions to BTs. All hospitalized patients who required a BT were included in the study. Healthcare workers involved in BT to patients were sensitized and trained in adverse reaction reporting by conducting training sessions and meetings. All the transfused patients were 'actively' monitored for any acute adverse reaction by using a uniquely coded blood issue form. A total of 18,914 blood components transfused to 5785 different patients resulted in 61 adverse reaction episodes. This incidence of 0.32 % in our study was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.005) than that reported from the same region in the past. Red blood cell units were the most frequently transfused component and thus most commonly involved in an adverse reaction (42.6 %), however apheresis platelets had the highest chance of reaction per unit transfused (0.66 %). There was no mortality associated with the BT during the study period. An active surveillance program significantly improves reporting and management of adverse reactions to BTs. PMID:27429527

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin and presepsin for infectious disease in patients with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Gaku; Shibata, Shigehiro; Fukui, Yasuo; Okamura, Yoshikazu; Inoue, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) and presepsin (PSEP) are sepsis markers, but their diagnostic accuracy may be compromised in acute kidney injury (AKI). We evaluated their diagnostic accuracy in patients with/without AKI. This retrospective study comprised 91 patients with at least one criterion of systematic inflammatory response syndrome. AKI markers plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), plasma cystatin C (CysC), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were measured upon hospital admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Patients were divided into non-AKI and AKI groups. APACHE II severity scores were determined. PCT and PSEP levels were increased significantly in non-AKI and AKI patients with infection. NGAL, CysC, and eGFR in patients with infection were associated with PCT, PSEP, and APACHE II score, and levels of PCT and PSEP were correlated significantly with disease severity. PCT and PSEP are useful markers of bacterial infections in AKI but different thresholds should be applied. PMID:27489118

  17. Infectious Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Infectious uveitis is one of the most common and visually devastating causes of uveitis in the US and worldwide. This review provides a summary of the identification, treatment, and complications associated with certain forms of viral, bacterial, fungal, helminthic, and parasitic uveitis. In particular, this article reviews the literature on identification and treatment of acute retinal necrosis due to herpes simplex virus, varicella virus, and cytomegalovirus. While no agreed-upon treatment has been identified, the characteristics of Ebola virus panuveitis is also reviewed. In addition, forms of parasitic infection such as Toxoplasmosis and Toxocariasis are summarized, as well as spirochetal uveitis. Syphilitic retinitis is reviewed given its increase in prevalence over the last decade. The importance of early identification and treatment of infectious uveitis is emphasized. Early identification can be achieved with a combination of maintaining a high suspicion, recognizing certain clinical features, utilizing multi-modal imaging, and obtaining specimens for molecular diagnostic testing. PMID:26618074

  18. Escherichia coli Meningitis after Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Vermezoglu, Oznur; Ocal Topcu, Didem; Karbuz, Adem; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Although rotavirus gastroenteritis is quite common in the pediatric population, secondary bacterial sepsis following rotavirus infection is a rare clinical entity. Gram-negative bacilli are the fifth most common cause of meningitis in infants but this infection rarely occurs after gastroenteritis. Here, we report a 2.5-month-old infant who developed Escherichia coli (E. coli) meningitis after acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. The 2.5-month-old male infant with fever, vomiting, and watery diarrhea that started 1 day earlier was admitted to the hospital. Rotavirus antigen in stool sample was positive. He was hospitalized, and fever was measured at 39.5°C on the second day. Lumbar puncture was done for suspicion of meningitis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings suggested meningitis. Intravenous vancomycin and cefotaxime were started empirically. Since E. coli reproduction was seen in blood culture and CSF culture, treatment was continued with cefotaxime. The patient was discharged with minimal midlevel hydrocephalus findings in cranial ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging following 21 days of antibiotics treatment. Septicemia development following rotavirus gastroenteritis is an extremely rare clinical condition. It is vital to start prompt antibiotic treatment as soon as the diagnosis of secondary bacterial infection is made because of high mortality and morbidity rates. PMID:27738536

  19. Molecular epidemiology and surveillance of circulating rotavirus and adenovirus in Congolese children with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Mayindou, Gontran; Ngokana, Berge; Sidibé, Anissa; Moundélé, Victoire; Koukouikila-Koussounda, Felix; Christevy Vouvoungui, Jeannhey; Kwedi Nolna, Sylvie; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Ntoumi, Francine

    2016-04-01

    Infectious Diarrhea caused by rotavirus and adenovirus, is a leading cause of death in children in sub-Sahara Africa but there is limited published data on the diverse rotavirus genotypes and adenovirus serotypes circulating in the Republic of Congo. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of severe diarrhea caused by rotavirus A (RVA) and Adenovirus serotype 40 and 41 in Congolese children hospitalized with severe gastroenteritis. Stool samples were collected from 655 Congolese children less than 60 months of age hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis between June 2012 and June 2013. Rotavirus and adenovirus antigens were tested using commercially available ELISA kits and the RVA G- and P- genotypes were identified by seminested multiplex RT-PCR. Three hundred and four (46.4%) children were tested positive for RVA. Adenovirus infection was found in 5.5% of the 564 tested children. Rotavirus infection was frequently observed in children between 6-12 months (55.9%). The dry season months recorded increased RVA infection while no seasonality of adenovirus infection was demonstrated. The most common RVA genotypes were G1 (57.5%), G2 (6.4%), G1G2 mixture (15.5%), P[8] (58%), P[6] (13.2%), and P[8]P[6] mixture (26%). Additionally, the genotype G12P[6] was significantly associated with increased vomiting. This first study on Congolese children demonstrates a high prevalence and clinical significance of existing rotavirus genotypes. Adenovirus prevalence is similar to that of other Central African countries. This baseline epidemiology and molecular characterization study will contribute significantly to the RVA surveillance after vaccine implementation in the country.

  20. Gastroenteritis: A Grass Root Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dure-Samin, Akram; Mubina, Agboatwalla

    1992-01-01

    In Karachi, Pakistan, 4 resource personnel disseminated information about sanitation and breastfeeding in the prevention of gastroenteritis to 100 households. Compared to 100 that did not receive health information, the intervention group had less incidence of diarrhea and better use of oral rehydration salt. (SK)

  1. Hospitalizations associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis in Spain, 2001–2005

    PubMed Central

    López-de-Andrés, Ana; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Alvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Galarza, Patricia Graciela; de Miguel, Ángel Gil

    2008-01-01

    Background This study aims to describe and analyze hospital admissions in Spain due to rotavirus infections among children aged 5 years or under during the period 2001–2005, along with the associated health cost. Methods To update estimates of rotavirus hospitalizations rates in Spain, we conducted a retrospective study of 5 years of national hospitalization data associated with acute gastroenteritis using the Minimum Basic Data Set. Results During the study period, a total of 17.1% of all admissions due to acute gastroenteritis of any etiology in children aged ≤ 5 years were attributable to rotavirus infection as determined by the rotavirus-specific International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, Clinical Modification code. A mean incidence of 135 hospital admissions attributable to rotavirus per 100,000 children aged ≤ 5 years was found. Hospitalizations associated with rotavirus had a marked winter-time seasonality. The estimated cost of hospital admission attributable to rotavirus has risen from 3 million euros estimated for 2001 to almost 7 million euros estimated in 2005. Conclusion Rotavirus gastroenteritis remains an important cause of hospitalizations in Spanish children, mostly during the winter season. PMID:18397512

  2. Laboratory Diagnosis of Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Romney M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial gastroenteritis is a disease that is pervasive in both the developing and developed worlds. While for the most part bacterial gastroenteritis is self-limiting, identification of an etiological agent by bacterial stool culture is required for the management of patients with severe or prolonged diarrhea, symptoms consistent with invasive disease, or a history that may predict a complicated course of disease. Importantly, characterization of bacterial enteropathogens from stool cultures in clinical laboratories is one of the primary means by which public health officials identify and track outbreaks of bacterial gastroenteritis. This article provides guidance for clinical microbiology laboratories that perform stool cultures. The general characteristics, epidemiology, and clinical manifestations of key bacterial enteropathogens are summarized. Information regarding optimal specimen collection, transport, and processing and current diagnostic tests and testing algorithms is provided. This article is an update of Cumitech 12A (P. H. Gilligan, J. M. Janda, M. A. Karmali, and J. M. Miller, Cumitech 12A, Laboratory diagnosis of bacterial diarrhea, 1992). PMID:25567220

  3. Gastroenteric tube feeding: techniques, problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Blumenstein, Irina; Shastri, Yogesh M; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-07-14

    Gastroenteric tube feeding plays a major role in the management of patients with poor voluntary intake, chronic neurological or mechanical dysphagia or gut dysfunction, and patients who are critically ill. However, despite the benefits and widespread use of enteral tube feeding, some patients experience complications. This review aims to discuss and compare current knowledge regarding the clinical application of enteral tube feeding, together with associated complications and special aspects. We conducted an extensive literature search on PubMed, Embase and Medline using index terms relating to enteral access, enteral feeding/nutrition, tube feeding, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy, endoscopic nasoenteric tube, nasogastric tube, and refeeding syndrome. The literature showed common routes of enteral access to include nasoenteral tube, gastrostomy and jejunostomy, while complications fall into four major categories: mechanical, e.g., tube blockage or removal; gastrointestinal, e.g., diarrhea; infectious e.g., aspiration pneumonia, tube site infection; and metabolic, e.g., refeeding syndrome, hyperglycemia. Although the type and frequency of complications arising from tube feeding vary considerably according to the chosen access route, gastrointestinal complications are without doubt the most common. Complications associated with enteral tube feeding can be reduced by careful observance of guidelines, including those related to food composition, administration rate, portion size, food temperature and patient supervision.

  4. Gastroenteric tube feeding: Techniques, problems and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Blumenstein, Irina; Shastri, Yogesh M; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteric tube feeding plays a major role in the management of patients with poor voluntary intake, chronic neurological or mechanical dysphagia or gut dysfunction, and patients who are critically ill. However, despite the benefits and widespread use of enteral tube feeding, some patients experience complications. This review aims to discuss and compare current knowledge regarding the clinical application of enteral tube feeding, together with associated complications and special aspects. We conducted an extensive literature search on PubMed, Embase and Medline using index terms relating to enteral access, enteral feeding/nutrition, tube feeding, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy, endoscopic nasoenteric tube, nasogastric tube, and refeeding syndrome. The literature showed common routes of enteral access to include nasoenteral tube, gastrostomy and jejunostomy, while complications fall into four major categories: mechanical, e.g., tube blockage or removal; gastrointestinal, e.g., diarrhea; infectious e.g., aspiration pneumonia, tube site infection; and metabolic, e.g., refeeding syndrome, hyperglycemia. Although the type and frequency of complications arising from tube feeding vary considerably according to the chosen access route, gastrointestinal complications are without doubt the most common. Complications associated with enteral tube feeding can be reduced by careful observance of guidelines, including those related to food composition, administration rate, portion size, food temperature and patient supervision. PMID:25024606

  5. Multiplex PCR Tests for Detection of Pathogens Associated with Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei; Morrison, Scott; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis A wide range of enteric pathogens can cause infectious gastroenteritis. Conventional diagnostic algorithms including culture, biochemical identification, immunoassay and microscopic examination are time consuming and often lack sensitivity and specificity. Advances in molecular technology have as allowed its use as clinical diagnostic tools. Multiplex PCR based testing has made its way to gastroenterology diagnostic arena in recent years. In this article we present a review of recent laboratory developed multiplex PCR tests and current commercial multiplex gastrointestinal pathogen tests. We will focus on two FDA cleared commercial syndromic multiplex tests: Luminex xTAG GPP and Biofire FimArray GI test. These multiplex tests can detect and identify multiple enteric pathogens in one test and provide results within hours. Multiplex PCR tests have shown superior sensitivity to conventional methods for detection of most pathogens. The high negative predictive value of these multiplex tests has led to the suggestion that they be used as screening tools especially in outbreaks. Although the clinical utility and benefit of multiplex PCR test are to be further investigated, implementing these multiplex PCR tests in gastroenterology diagnostic algorithm has the potential to improve diagnosis of infectious gastroenteritis. PMID:26004652

  6. Acute parvovirus B19 infection causes nonspecificity frequently in Borrelia and less often in Salmonella and Campylobacter serology, posing a problem in diagnosis of infectious arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Tuuminen, Tamara; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Seppälä, Ilkka

    2011-01-01

    Several infectious agents may cause arthritis or arthropathy. For example, infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, may in the late phase manifest as arthropathy. Infections with Campylobacter, Salmonella, or Yersinia may result in a postinfectious reactive arthritis. Acute infection with parvovirus B19 (B19V) may likewise initiate transient or chronic arthropathy. All these conditions may be clinically indistinguishable from rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we present evidence that acute B19V infection may elicit IgM antibodies that are polyspecific or cross-reactive with a variety of bacterial antigens. Their presence may lead to misdiagnosis and improper clinical management, exemplified here by two case descriptions. Further, among 33 subjects with proven recent B19V infection we found IgM enzyme immunoassay (EIA) positivity for Borrelia only; for Borrelia and Salmonella; for Borrelia and Campylobacter; and for Borrelia, Campylobacter, and Salmonella in 26 (78.7%), 1 (3%), 2 (6%), and 1 (3%), respectively; however, when examined by Borrelia LineBlot, all samples were negative. These antibodies persisted over 3 months in 4/13 (38%) patients tested. Likewise, in a retrospective comparison of the results of a diagnostic laboratory, 9/11 (82%) patients with confirmed acute B19V infection showed IgM antibody to Borrelia. However, none of 12 patients with confirmed borreliosis showed any serological evidence of acute B19V infection. Our study demonstrates that recent B19V infection can be misinterpreted as secondary borreliosis or enteropathogen-induced reactive arthritis. To obtain the correct diagnosis, we emphasize caution in interpretation of polyreactive IgM and exclusion of recent B19V infection in patients examined for infectious arthritis or arthropathy.

  7. Respiratory symptoms and the case definition of gastroenteritis: an international analysis of the potential impact on burden estimates.

    PubMed

    Hall, G; McDonald, L; Majowicz, S E; Scallan, E; Kirk, M; Sockett, P; Angulo, F J

    2010-01-01

    Estimates of the burden of foodborne disease rely on attributing a proportion of syndromic gastroenteritis to foodborne transmission. Persons with syndromic diarrhoea/vomiting can also present with concurrent respiratory symptoms that could be due to respiratory infections, gastrointestinal infections, or both. This distinction is important when estimating the foodborne disease burden but has rarely been considered. Using data from population surveys from Australia, Canada and the USA we describe the effect of excluding persons with respiratory and associated symptoms from the case definition of gastroenteritis. Excluding persons first with respiratory symptoms, or second with respiratory symptoms plus fever and headache, resulted in a decrease in the weighted estimates of acute gastroenteritis of about 10-50% depending on the exclusion criteria. This has the potential to have a very significant impact on estimates of the burden of foodborne infections using syndromic case definitions of acute gastroenteritis.

  8. Infectious Mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Dunmire, Samantha K.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Balfour, Henry H.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is a clinical entity characterized by sore throat, cervical lymph node enlargement, fatigue and fever most often seen in adolescents and young adults and lasting several weeks. It can be caused by a number of pathogens, but this chapter only discusses infectious mononucleosis due to primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. EBV is a γ-herpesvirus that infects at least 90% of the population worldwide. The virus is spread by intimate oral contact among teenagers and young adults. How preadolescents acquire the virus is not known. A typical clinical picture with a positive heterophile test is usually sufficient to make the diagnosis, but heterophile antibodies are not specific and do not develop in some patients. EBV-specific antibody profiles are the best choice for staging EBV infection. In addition to causing acute illness, there can also be long-term consequences as the result of acquisition of the virus. Several EBV related illnesses occur including certain cancers and autoimmune diseases, as well as complications of primary immunodeficiency in persons with the certain genetic mutations. A major obstacle to understanding these sequelae has been the lack of an efficient animal model for EBV infection, although progress in primate and mouse models has recently been made. Key future challenges are to develop protective vaccines and effective treatment regimens. PMID:26424648

  9. Use of Population-based Surveillance to Determine the Incidence of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Urban Slum and a Rural Setting in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Breiman, Robert F.; Cosmas, Leonard; Audi, Allan; Mwiti, William; Njuguna, Henry; Bigogo, Godfrey M.; Olack, Beatrice; Ochieng, John B.; Wamola, Newton; Montgomery, Joel M.; Williamson, John; Parashar, Umesh D.; Burton, Deron C.; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Feikin, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a major cause of mortality among children <2 years of age. Disease burden data are important for introducing and sustaining new rotavirus vaccines in immunization programs. Methods We analyzed population-based infectious disease surveillance data from 2007 to 2010 from Kenyan sites in rural and urban slum areas. Stool specimens were collected from patients of all ages presenting to study clinics with diarrheal disease and tested for rotavirus by enzyme immunoassay. Incidence rates were adjusted using data on healthcare utilization (from biweekly home visits) and proportion of stools collected at study clinics from patients meeting case definitions. Results Rotavirus was detected in 285 (9.0%) of 3174 stools tested, including 122 (11.9%) from children <5 years of age and 162 (7.6%) from participants ≥5 years of age. Adjusted incidence rates for infants were 13,419 and 12,135 per 100,000 person-years of observation in rural and urban areas, respectively. Adjusted incidence rates were high in adults across age ranges. The rates suggest that annually, among children <5 years of age, there are >54,500 cases of rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis in rural Nyanza Province and >16,750 cases in Nairobi urban slums. Conclusions Community-based surveillance in urban and rural Kenya suggests that rotavirus plays an important role as a cause of acute gastroenteritis in adults, as well as in children. In addition to substantially preventing illness and complications from diarrheal disease in children, rotavirus infant immunization has the potential of indirectly preventing diarrheal disease in older children and adults, assuming children are the predominant sources of transmission. PMID:24343615

  10. [A Case of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis During Infectious Mononucleosis Caused by the Epstein-Barr Virus in a Young Woman].

    PubMed

    Ono, Shiro; Kobayashi, Tadanao; Nishio, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a common disease and is mainly asymptomatic during childhood, whereas infectious mononucleosis with clinical signs such as fever, pharyngitis, lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly often occurs in adolescents and adults with primary infection. Acalculous cholecystitis has been reported as a rare complication. We report herein a case of acalculous cholecystitis accompanied by infectious mononucleosis by EBV, which was treated successfully by medical treatment. A 33-year-old woman who had been admitted by fever, pharyngitis and lymphadenopathy developed a right upper quadrant pain, that was diagnosed as acalculous cholecystitis based on an imaging study. Antibiotic treatment did not resolve the symptoms, and surgical intervention was considered. We diagnosed her as having infectious mononucleosis based on a typical physical presentation and seropositivity for the EBV viral capsid antigen, suggesting that the acalculous cholecystatis might have been a complication of the EBV infection. After the administration of glucocorticoid and acyclovir, the patient became afebrile and the abdominal pain disappeared. Though acalculous cholecystitis rarely accompanies infectious mononucleosis caused by EBV, clinicians should be aware of this complication to avoid unnecessary cholecystectomy. PMID:27529970

  11. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  12. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients’ medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients’ outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  13. A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT TO IDENTIFY THE CAUSATIVE AGENT OF TWO WATERBORNE OUTBREAKS OF GASTROENTERITIS IN WYOMING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis were reported to the Wyoming Department of Health in 2001. The first was reported in February from recent vacationers of a snowmobile lodge. The second was in October among diners of a tourist saloon. The duration and type of symptoms exhibi...

  14. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ... from another part of the body. Symptoms of infectious arthritis include Intense pain in the joint Joint redness ...

  15. Waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with a norovirus.

    PubMed

    Parshionikar, Sandhya U; Willian-True, Sandra; Fout, G Shay; Robbins, David E; Seys, Scott A; Cassady, Joslyn D; Harris, Richard

    2003-09-01

    The Wyoming Department of Health investigated an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis among persons who dined at a tourist saloon in central Wyoming during October 2001. Human caliciviruses (HuCVs) were suspected as the etiological agent of the outbreak based on the incubation period, duration of illness, and symptoms observed in ill patrons. A retrospective cohort study demonstrated that ill patrons were 4.5 times more likely to have exposure to drinking water and/or ice than nonill patrons. No food items were associated with illness. An environmental investigation gave evidence that the saloon's groundwater was contaminated with sewage. Water from the saloon's only well was processed for viruses. The processed water sample and stool samples collected from three ill patrons were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for the presence of HuCV. All positive RT-PCR results were confirmed by sequence and phylogenetic analyses of cloned RT-PCR products. A genogroup I, subtype 3, HuCV stain was found to be present in the well water sample and two stool samples. In addition, a genogroup II, subtype 6, strain was detected in one stool sample. The identification of the same HuCV strain in both the well water and stool samples strongly suggests a link between exposure to well water and the outbreak of gastroenteritis. The presence of a genogroup II, subtype 6, strain in one of the stool samples suggests that multiple HuCV strains may have been involved in this outbreak. The laboratory isolation of HuCV strains from outbreak-associated drinking water is relatively novel in the United States. This investigation outlines the procedure for virus isolation and illustrates the utility of RT-PCR for the identification of HuCV in large volumes of water and stool samples obtained during outbreaks of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis.

  16. An outbreak of food-borne gastroenteritis due to sapovirus among junior high school students.

    PubMed

    Usuku, Shuzo; Kumazaki, Makoto; Kitamura, Katsuhiko; Tochikubo, Osamu; Noguchi, Yuzo

    2008-11-01

    The human sapovirus (SaV) causes acute gastroenteritis mainly in infants and young children. A food-borne outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with SaV occurred among junior high school students in Yokohama, Japan, during and after a study trip. The nucleotide sequences of the partial capsid gene derived from the students exhibited 98% homology to a SaV genogroup IV strain, Hu/Angelholm/SW278/2004/SE, which was isolated from an adult with gastroenteritis in Solna, Sweden. An identical nucleotide sequence was detected from a food handler at the hotel restaurant, suggesting that the causative agent of the outbreak was transmitted from the food handler. This is the first description of a food-borne outbreak associated with the SaV genogroup IV strain in Japan. PMID:19050349

  17. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Barbie, David A; Mangi, Abeel A; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2004-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease with an obscure etiology, although associations with allergy, the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome, and connective tissue disease have been reported. We present the case of a 37-year-old woman with a history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura who presented with refractory nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Imaging studies were significant for bowel wall thickening and ascites, while laboratory studies revealed a positive antinuclear antibody (ANA), a positive anti-double stranded (DS) DNA antibody, low complement, and proteinuria. Exploratory laparotomy with gastric and small bowel biopsies established the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis. In addition, the patient met clinical criteria for the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Previous studies have described eosinophilic gastroenteritis in patients with scleroderma, polymyositis, or dermatomyositis. This is the first report to our knowledge of an individual with eosinophilic gastroenteritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:15492606

  18. [Outbreak of non-bacterial gastroenteritis in a school].

    PubMed

    Gaulin, C; Lévesque, B; Gauvin, D; Krizanorv, V

    1996-01-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred in a school affecting more than 30% of its 535 students. An epidemiological survey questionnaire was given to all students as well as staff and maintenance personnel. Stool cultures and electronic microscopy were used to detect the presence of a Norwalk-like virus. Several analyses of water samples were also done. This outbreak occurred simultaneously in the two wings of the school (East and South). Those who used the East wing were most affected by the disease (RR = 1.45, CI 95%: 1,14-1,85). There was no indication of food or water supply contamination. A Norwalk-like virus was identified in the stool sample of one child. This along with the clinical characteristics strongly suggested that the pathogen was indeed a Norwalk-like virus. The analysis suggests transmission via contaminated surfaces but also via airborne transport of the infectious agent.

  19. The IL-23 axis in Salmonella gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Godinez, Ivan; Keestra, A Marijke; Spees, Alanna; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2011-11-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serotypes cause a localized gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals. In contrast, primary immunodeficiencies that impair interleukin-23 (IL-23)-dependent pathways are associated in humans with disseminated NTS bloodstream infections (bacteraemia). The recent use of animal models has helped to define the role the IL-23 axis plays during NTS gastroenteritis, but additional work is needed to elucidate how this host defence pathway prevents NTS bacteraemia. PMID:21740501

  20. Viral gastroenteritis in children in Colorado 2006-2009.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Christina M; Montano, Aaron C; Robinson, Christine C; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Dominguez, Samuel R

    2015-06-01

    Acute gastroenteritis accounts for a significant burden of medically attended illness in children under the age of five. For this study, four multiplex reverse transcription PCR assays were used to determine the incidence of adenovirus, astrovirus, coronavirus, norovirus GI and GII, rotavirus, and sapovirus in stool samples submitted for viral electron microscopy (EM) to the Children's Hospital Colorado. Of 1105 stool samples available, viral RNA/DNA was detected in 247 (26.2%) of 941 pediatric samples (median age = 2.97 years, 54% male) with 28 (3.0%) positive for more than one virus. Adenovirus, astrovirus, norovirus GI, norovirus GII, rotavirus, and sapovirus were detected in 95 (10.0%), 33 (3.5%), 8 (0.9%), 90 (9.6%), 49 (5.2%), and 2 (0.2%) of the pediatric samples, respectively. No coronaviruses were identified. Sequencing of norovirus positive samples indicated an outbreak of norovirus strain GII.4 in 2006 with evidence of numerous circulating strains. Multiple samples from the same immunocompromised patients demonstrated symptomatic shedding of norovirus for up to 32 weeks and astrovirus for 12 weeks. RT-PCR detected 99 of 111 (89%) adenovirus-positive samples versus 12 (11%) by EM, and 186 of 192 (97%) sapovirus/astrovirus/norovirus-positive samples versus 21 (11%) by EM. Noroviruses and adenoviruses are common causes of gastroenteritis in children. Immunocompromised patients can be infected with multiple viruses and shed viruses in their stools for prolonged periods. This data support the superiority of RT-PCR compared to EM for diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis.

  1. Infectious disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on infectious disease. It addresses their major concern over outbreaks of infectious disease that could jeopardize the health, safety and/or performance of crew members engaged in long duration space missions. The Antarctic environment is seen as an analogous location on Earth and a good place to carry out such infectious disease studies and methods for proposed studies as suggested.

  2. Acute BVDV-2 infection in beef calves delays humoral responses to a non-infectious antigen challenge

    PubMed Central

    McCorkell, Robert; Horsman, Shawn R.; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Muench, Greg; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia; Waeckerlin, Regula; Eschbaumer, Michael; Dardari, Rkia; Chaiyakul, Mark; Gajda, Pawel; Czub, Markus; van der Meer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive effects of an intranasal challenge with non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) 2a (strain 1373) were assessed through acquired and innate immune system responses to ovalbumin (OVA). Concurrent BVDV infection was hypothesized to delay and reduce the humoral response to ovalbumin (administered on days 3 and 15 post-inoculation). Infected animals followed the expected clinical course. BVDV titers, and anti-BVDV antibodies confirmed the course of infection and were not affected by the administration of OVA. Both the T-helper (CD4+) and B-cell (CD20+) compartments were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in infected animals, while the gamma-delta T-cell population (Workshop cluster 1+, WC1+) decreased slightly in numbers. Infection with BVDV delayed the increase in OVA IgG by approximately 3 d from day 12 through day 21 post-inoculation. Between days 25 and 37 post-inoculation following BVDV infection the IgM concentration in the BVDV− group decreased while the OVA IgM titer still was rising in the BVDV+ animals. Thus, active BVDV infection delays IgM and IgG responses to a novel, non-infectious antigen. PMID:26483584

  3. [Interest of ambulatory simplified acute physiology score (ASAPS) applied to patients admitted in an intensive care unit of an infectious diseases unit in Dakar].

    PubMed

    Dia, N M; Diallo, I; Manga, N M; Diop, S A; Fortes-Deguenonvo, L; Lakhe, N A; Ka, D; Seydi, M; Diop, B M; Sow, P S

    2015-08-01

    The evaluation of patients by a scale of gravity allows a better categorization of patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU). Our study had for objective to estimate interest of Ambulatory Simplified Acute Physiologic Score (ASAPS) applied to patients admitted in ICU of infectious diseases department of FANN hospital. It was about a descriptive and analytical retrospective study, made from the data found in patients' files admitted into the USI infectious diseases department of FANN hospital in Dakar, from January 1(st), 2009 till December 31st, 2009.The data of 354 patients' files were analyzed. The sex-ratio was 1.77 with an average age of 37.6 years ± 19.4 years old [5-94 years]. The majority of the patients were unemployed paid (39.6%). The most frequent failures were the following ones: neurological (80.5%), cardio-respiratory (16.7%). The average duration of stay was 6.2 days ± 8.2 days going of less than 24 hours to more than 10 weeks. The deaths arose much more at night (53.1%) than in the daytime (46.9%) and the strongest rate of death was recorded in January (61.5%), most low in October (26.7%). The global mortality was 48.3%. The rate of lethality according to the highest main diagnosis was allocated to the AIDS (80.5%). The average ambulatory simplified acute physiology score was 5.3 ± 3.6 with extremes of 0 and 18. The deaths in our series increased with this index (p = 0.000005). The female patients had a rate of lethality higher than that of the men people, 55.5% against 44.2% (p = 0.03). In spite of a predictive score of a high survival (ASAPS < 8), certain number of patients died (n = 105) that is 61.4% of the deaths. The metabolic disturbances, hyperleukocytosis or leukopenia when realised, the presence of a chronic disease, seemed also to influence this lethality. ASAPS only, although interesting, would not good estimate the gravity of patients, where from the necessity thus of a minimum biological balance sheet. It seems better adapted

  4. Structural basis of glycan interaction in gastroenteric viral pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, B.V. Venkataram; Shanker, Sreejesh; Hu, Liya; Choi, Jae-Mun; Crawford, Sue E; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; Atmar, Robert L; Estes, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    A critical event in the life cycle of a virus is its initial attachment to host cells. This involves recognition by the viruses of specific receptors on the cell surface, including glycans. Viruses typically exhibit strain-dependent variations in recognizing specific glycan receptors, a feature that contributes significantly to cell tropism, host specificity, host adaptation and interspecies transmission. Examples include influenza viruses, noroviruses, rotaviruses, and parvoviruses. Both rotaviruses and noroviruses are well known gastroenteric pathogens that are of significant global health concern. While rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, are the major causative agents of life-threatening diarrhea in children, noroviruses, which belong to Caliciviridae family, cause epidemic and sporadic cases of acute gastroenteritis across all age groups. Both exhibit enormous genotypic and serotypic diversity. Consistent with this diversity each exhibits strain-dependent variations in the types of glycans they recognize for cell attachment. This chapter reviews current status of the structural biology of such strain-dependent glycan specificities in these two families of viruses. PMID:25073118

  5. Changes in some acute phase protein and immunoglobulin concentrations in cats affected by feline infectious peritonitis or exposed to feline coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Giordano, A; Spagnolo, V; Colombo, A; Paltrinieri, S

    2004-01-01

    The possible role of some acute phase proteins (APPs) and immunoglobulins in both the pathogenesis and diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) has been investigated. Serum protein electrophoresis and the concentration of haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP), IgG and IgM were evaluated in cats exposed to feline coronavirus (FCoV) and in cats with FIP. The highest concentration of APPs was detected in affected cats, confirming the role of these proteins in supporting a clinical diagnosis of FIP. Repeated samplings from both FIP affected and FCoV-exposed cats showed that when FIP appeared in the group, all the cats had increased APP levels. This increase persisted only in cats that developed FIP (in spite of a decrease in alpha(2)-globulins) but it was only transient in FCoV-exposed cats, in which a long lasting increase in alpha(2)-globulins was observed. These results suggest that changes in the electrophoretic motility of APPs or APPs other than Hp, SAA and AGP might be involved in the pathogenesis of FIP or in protecting cats from the disease.

  6. Acute diffuse proliferative post-infectious glomerulonephritis in renal allograft--a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Alsaad, Khaled O; Aloudah, Nourah; Alhamdan, Hanouf M; Alamir, Abdulrahman; Fakeeh, Khalid

    2014-05-01

    PVN is a well-known cause of renal allograft dysfunction and failure. The diagnosis is established by examination of tissue from the renal graft, and confirmed by immunohistochemical or in situ hybridization techniques. Electron microscopy can be utilized as an ancillary modality to identify the viral particles ultrastructurally. The tubular epithelial cells are the primary target of PV cytopathic effect; however, PV-associated glomerular changes have also been described. Immune-type electron-dense deposits in the TBMs have been described in the setting of PVN, and rarely, likewise have glomerular subepithelial hump-like deposits. Diffuse immune-mediated proliferative glomerulonephritis in the setting of PVN has not been reported before. In this report, we describe an 11-yr-old kidney transplant recipient boy who developed immune-mediated glomerulonephritis with light microscopic, immunofluorescence, and ultrastructural features compatible with acute PIGN superimposing chronic PVN, discuss this unusual association and the possible mechanisms of antigen clearance in PVN and present a literature review. PMID:24506276

  7. Household Catastrophic Healthcare Expenditure and Impoverishment Due to Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Requiring Hospitalization in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background While healthcare costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization may be burdensome on households in Malaysia, exploration on the distribution and catastrophic impact of these expenses on households are lacking. Objectives We assessed the economic burden, levels and distribution of catastrophic healthcare expenditure, the poverty impact on households and inequities related to healthcare payments for acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia. Methods A two-year prospective, hospital-based study was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in an urban (Kuala Lumpur) and rural (Kuala Terengganu) setting in Malaysia. All children under the age of 5 years admitted for acute gastroenteritis were included. Patients were screened for rotavirus and information on healthcare expenditure was obtained. Results Of the 658 stool samples collected at both centers, 248 (38%) were positive for rotavirus. Direct and indirect costs incurred were significantly higher in Kuala Lumpur compared with Kuala Terengganu (US$222 Vs. US$45; p<0.001). The mean direct and indirect costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis consisted 20% of monthly household income in Kuala Lumpur, as compared with only 5% in Kuala Terengganu. Direct medical costs paid out-of-pocket caused 141 (33%) households in Kuala Lumpur to experience catastrophic expenditure and 11 (3%) households to incur poverty. However in Kuala Terengganu, only one household (0.5%) experienced catastrophic healthcare expenditure and none were impoverished. The lowest income quintile in Kuala Lumpur was more likely to experience catastrophic payments compared to the highest quintile (87% vs 8%). The concentration index for out-of-pocket healthcare payments was closer to zero at Kuala Lumpur (0.03) than at Kuala Terengganu (0.24). Conclusions While urban households were wealthier, healthcare expenditure due to gastroenteritis had more catastrophic and poverty impact on the urban poor. Universal rotavirus vaccination

  8. The control of rotavirus gastroenteritis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Glass, Roger I; Parashar, Umesh; Patel, Manish; Tate, Jacqueline; Jiang, Baoming; Gentsch, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Since 2006, two new vaccines have been licensed to prevent rotavirus, the cause of 20% to 50% of severe acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. These vaccines have been implemented in national immunization programs in about 30 high- and middle-income countries, including the United States, and vaccine use has led to substantial decreases in diarrhea-related health care visits. In addition to reductions in diarrhea burden in vaccinated children, decreases have been observed in older, unvaccinated age groups in many settings, suggesting indirect benefits (i.e., herd immunity) from vaccination. Although the efficacy of these oral rotavirus vaccines is expectedly lower in developing countries in Asia and Africa, the public health benefits of vaccination in these settings, where more than 90% of the estimated 453,000 annual deaths from rotavirus occur, are likely to be substantial. Efforts continue to develop alternative rotavirus vaccines that could have a better efficacy and safety profile and may be less expensive.

  9. [Arsenic poisoning: a special gastroenteritis...].

    PubMed

    Ganster, F; Kuteifan, K; Mootien, Y; Harry, P; Guiot, P

    2009-06-01

    Arsenic (As) intoxication is nowadays extremely rare. Two cases of acute and chronic As criminal poisoning leading to death of a couple of retired people, are reported. Clinical presentation was simulating a gastro-enteritidis with fast evolution to refractory shock. Toxicological analysis confirmed this diagnostic, with respectively blood As concentrations at 579 and 21 765 microg/l for our two patients.

  10. Bee honey added to the oral rehydration solution in treatment of gastroenteritis in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Abdulrhman, Mamdouh Abdulmaksoud; Mekawy, Mohamed Amin; Awadalla, Maha Mohamed; Mohamed, Ashraf Hassan

    2010-06-01

    Among honey's benefits are its anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects. Because gastroenteritis is an acute inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract that may be caused by a variety of microbes, the aim of the present study was to verify whether the addition of honey in oral rehydration solution (ORS) could affect the duration of symptoms of acute gastroenteritis in infants and children. One hundred infants and children with acute gastroenteritis were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, each consisting of 50 patients: Group I received ORS for rehydration (control), and Group II received ORS with honey. The mean ages of patients of Groups I and II were 1.5 +/- 1.2 and 1.1 +/- 0.8 years, respectively. In the honey-treated group the frequencies of vomiting and diarrhea were significantly reduced compared to the control group (P < .001 and P < .05, respectively). Also, the recovery time, defined as the number of hours from initiation of treatment to when normal soft stools are passed, with the patient showing normal hydration and satisfactory weight gain, was significantly shortened after honey ingestion (P < .001). In conclusion, honey added to ORS promoted rehydration of the body and sped recovery from vomiting and diarrhea.

  11. Viral gastroenteritis associated with genogroup II norovirus among U.S. military personnel in Turkey, 2009.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salwa F; Klena, John D; Mostafa, Manal; Dogantemur, Jessica; Middleton, Tracy; Hanson, James; Sebeny, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that multiple NoV genotypes belonging to genogroup II contributed to an acute gastroenteritis outbreak at a US military facility in Turkey that was associated with significant negative operational impact. Norovirus (NoV) is an important pathogen associated with acute gastroenteritis among military populations. We describe the genotypes of NoV outbreak occurred at a United States military facility in Turkey. Stool samples were collected from 37 out of 97 patients presenting to the clinic on base with acute gastroenteritis and evaluated for bacterial and viral pathogens. NoV genogroup II (GII) was identified by RT-PCR in 43% (16/37) stool samples. Phylogenetic analysis of a 260 base pair fragment of the NoV capsid gene from ten stool samples indicated the circulation of multiple and rare genotypes of GII NoV during the outbreak. We detected four GII.8 isolates, three GII.15, two GII.9 and a sole GII.10 NoV. Viral sequences could be grouped into four clusters, three of which have not been previously reported in Turkey. The fact that current NoV outbreak was caused by rare genotypes highlights the importance of norovirus strain typing. While NoV genogroup II is recognized as causative agent of outbreak, circulation of current genotypes has been rarely observed in large number of outbreaks.

  12. Gastroenteritis outbreak at holiday resort, central Italy.

    PubMed

    Migliorati, Giacomo; Prencipe, Vincenza; Ripani, Alessandro; Di Francesco, Cristina; Casaccia, Claudia; Crudeli, Silvia; Ferri, Nicola; Giovannini, Armando; Marconi, Maria Maddalena; Marfoglia, Cristina; Melai, Valeria; Savini, Giovanni; Scortichini, Giampiero; Semprini, Primula; Ruggeri, Franco Maria

    2008-03-01

    During the summer of 2003, a gastroenteritis outbreak spread throughout a holiday resort in central Italy. Fecally contaminated groundwater and seawater were leaking into the non-drinking-water system, which was found to be connected to the drinking-water system of a large resort. This contamination had a primary role in the onset of the outbreak and spread of the infection.

  13. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction tests for detection of pathogens associated with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongwei; Morrison, Scott; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2015-06-01

    A wide range of enteric pathogens can cause infectious gastroenteritis. Conventional diagnostic algorithms are time-consuming and often lack sensitivity and specificity. Advances in molecular technology have provided new clinical diagnostic tools. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based testing has been used in gastroenterology diagnostics in recent years. This article presents a review of recent laboratory-developed multiplex PCR tests and current commercial multiplex gastrointestinal pathogen tests. It focuses on two commercial syndromic multiplex tests: Luminex xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel and BioFire FilmArray gastrointestinal test. Multiplex PCR tests have shown superior sensitivity to conventional methods for detection of most pathogens.

  14. Campylobacter concisus pathotypes are present at significant levels in patients with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Alexander P; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Sodhi, Nidhi; Merif, Juan; Seah Lee, Way; Riordan, Stephen M; Rawlinson, William D; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2016-03-01

    Given that Campylobacter jejuni is recognized as the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, recent findings showing comparable levels of Campylobacter concisus in patients with gastroenteritis would suggest that this bacterium is clinically important. The prevalence and abundance of Campylobacter concisus in stool samples collected from patients with acute gastroenteritis was examined using quantitative real-time PCR. The associated virulence determinants exotoxin 9 and zonula occludens toxin DNA were detected for Campylobacter concisus-infected samples using real-time PCR. Campylobacter concisus was detected at high prevalence in patients with gastroenteritis (49.7 %), higher than that observed for Campylobacter jejuni (∼5 %). The levels of Campylobacter concisus were putatively classified into clinically relevant and potentially transient subgroups based on a threshold developed using Campylobacter jejuni levels, as the highly sensitive real-time PCR probably detected transient passage of the bacterium from the oral cavity. A total of 18 % of patients were found to have clinically relevant levels of Campylobacter concisus, a significant number of which also had high levels of one of the virulence determinants. Of these patients, 78 % were found to have no other gastrointestinal pathogen identified in the stool, which strongly suggests a role for Campylobacter concisus in the aetiology of gastroenteritis in these patients. These results emphasize the need for diagnostic laboratories to employ identification protocols for emerging Campylobacter species. Clinical follow-up in patients presenting with high levels of Campylobacter concisus in the intestinal tract is needed, given that it has been associated with more chronic sequelae. PMID:26698172

  15. Campylobacter concisus pathotypes are present at significant levels in patients with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Alexander P; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Sodhi, Nidhi; Merif, Juan; Seah Lee, Way; Riordan, Stephen M; Rawlinson, William D; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2016-03-01

    Given that Campylobacter jejuni is recognized as the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, recent findings showing comparable levels of Campylobacter concisus in patients with gastroenteritis would suggest that this bacterium is clinically important. The prevalence and abundance of Campylobacter concisus in stool samples collected from patients with acute gastroenteritis was examined using quantitative real-time PCR. The associated virulence determinants exotoxin 9 and zonula occludens toxin DNA were detected for Campylobacter concisus-infected samples using real-time PCR. Campylobacter concisus was detected at high prevalence in patients with gastroenteritis (49.7 %), higher than that observed for Campylobacter jejuni (∼5 %). The levels of Campylobacter concisus were putatively classified into clinically relevant and potentially transient subgroups based on a threshold developed using Campylobacter jejuni levels, as the highly sensitive real-time PCR probably detected transient passage of the bacterium from the oral cavity. A total of 18 % of patients were found to have clinically relevant levels of Campylobacter concisus, a significant number of which also had high levels of one of the virulence determinants. Of these patients, 78 % were found to have no other gastrointestinal pathogen identified in the stool, which strongly suggests a role for Campylobacter concisus in the aetiology of gastroenteritis in these patients. These results emphasize the need for diagnostic laboratories to employ identification protocols for emerging Campylobacter species. Clinical follow-up in patients presenting with high levels of Campylobacter concisus in the intestinal tract is needed, given that it has been associated with more chronic sequelae.

  16. Molecular Epidemiology of Enteric Adenovirus Gastroenteritis in under-Five-Year-Old Children in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Ghahremani, Pedram; Hashempoor, Tayebeh; Karimi, Abdollah

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute gastroenteritis is one of the major sources of morbidity and mortality among young children in developed and developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of human adenovirus- (HAdV-) 40 and HAdV-41 in children hospitalized with gastroenteritis in five different health centers of Iran. Methods. In a cross-sectional epidemiological study, we studied 2682 fecal specimens that were collected from children under the age of 5 years in five educational and therapeutic pediatric centers in Iran from February 2012 to February 2013. Samples were tested for HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, using a specific pair of primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Results. HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 were detected in 132 (5.18%) of the patients with diarrhea. A significantly higher prevalence of HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 (58.3%) was observed in children under 12 months of age, compared to other age groups. The male to female ratio was 1.7. Conclusion. The results of this study demonstrated that HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 could be considered etiological agents for acute gastroenteritis among children in Iran. The PCR as a rapid test may increase the chance for a relatively mild course of the disease followed by a complete recovery and avoiding administration of unnecessary antibiotics. PMID:26880883

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of Enteric Adenovirus Gastroenteritis in under-Five-Year-Old Children in Iran.

    PubMed

    Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Ghahremani, Pedram; Hashempoor, Tayebeh; Karimi, Abdollah

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute gastroenteritis is one of the major sources of morbidity and mortality among young children in developed and developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of human adenovirus- (HAdV-) 40 and HAdV-41 in children hospitalized with gastroenteritis in five different health centers of Iran. Methods. In a cross-sectional epidemiological study, we studied 2682 fecal specimens that were collected from children under the age of 5 years in five educational and therapeutic pediatric centers in Iran from February 2012 to February 2013. Samples were tested for HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, using a specific pair of primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Results. HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 were detected in 132 (5.18%) of the patients with diarrhea. A significantly higher prevalence of HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 (58.3%) was observed in children under 12 months of age, compared to other age groups. The male to female ratio was 1.7. Conclusion. The results of this study demonstrated that HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 could be considered etiological agents for acute gastroenteritis among children in Iran. The PCR as a rapid test may increase the chance for a relatively mild course of the disease followed by a complete recovery and avoiding administration of unnecessary antibiotics. PMID:26880883

  18. Analysis of the Salmonella typhimurium Proteome through Environmental Response toward Infectious Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Joshua N.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Gustin, Jean K.; Rue, Joanne; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (aka, S. typhimurium) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes ~40,000 reported cases of acute gastroenteritis and diarrhea a year in the United States. To develop a deeper understanding of the infectious state of S. typhimurium, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based “bottom-up” proteomics was used to globally analyze the proteins present under specific growth conditions. Salmonella typhimurium LT2 strain cells were grown in contrasting culture conditions that mimicked both natural free-living conditions and an infectious state, i.e., logarithm phase, stationary phase and Mg-depleted medium growth. Initial comparisons of the LT2 strain protein abundances among cell culture conditions indicate that the majority of proteins do not change significantly. Not unexpectedly, cells grown in Mg-depleted medium conditions had a higher abundance of Mg2+ transport proteins than found in other growth conditions. A second more virulent Salmonella typhimurium strain (14028) was also studied with these growth conditions and used to directly compare to the LT2 strain. The strain comparison offers a unique opportunity to compare and contrast observations in these closely related bacteria. One particular protein family, propanediol utilization proteins, was drastically more abundant in the 14028 strain than in the LT2 strain, and may be a contributor to increased pathogenicity in the 14028 strain.

  19. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    PubMed

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  20. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    PubMed

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months.

  1. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    PubMed

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months. PMID:26508422

  2. Infectious Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Piquet, Amanda L; Lyons, Jennifer L

    2016-08-01

    The clinician who is evaluating a patient with a suspected central nervous system infection often faces a large differential diagnosis. There are several signs, symptoms, geographical clues, and diagnostic testing, such as cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, which can be helpful in identifying the etiological agent. By taking a systematic approach, one can often identify life-threatening, common, and/or treatable etiologies. Here the authors describe some of the pearls and pitfalls in diagnosing and treating acute infectious meningitis and encephalitis. PMID:27643906

  3. Telephone advice nursing: parents' experiences of monitoring calls in children with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Elisabeth Kvilén; Sandelius, Susanna; Wahlberg, Anna Carin

    2015-06-01

    A common reason for calling a telephone advice nurse is gastroenteritis symptoms in children. A monitoring call is a follow-up call from the telephone nurse to the care seeker in order to follow up on given advice and make a new assessment. The aim of the study was to describe the parents' experiences of monitoring calls in telephone advice nursing in children with gastroenteritis. A qualitative interview method was chosen and data were analysed inductively with a qualitative latent content analysis. Ten parents, nine mothers and one father were interviewed. Four main categories and 13 subcategories were identified and described as useful, and the main categories were convenience - parents found it convenient to get access to self-care advice at home, confirmation - the interaction between the telephone nurse and the parent seemed to become deeper and closer as a result of the monitoring call, support - in a vulnerable situation receiving further information and an opportunity to let the telephone nurse monitor the sick child and guidance - to be guided through the most acute phase in the child's gastroenteritis symptoms. Monitoring calls seemed to be experienced as a security enhancing, positive opportunity and a robust complement to seeking care at a healthcare facility. The results of the study indicate how inhabitants can receive expert advice, support and guidance for care and provide a useful basis for Swedish Healthcare Direct (SHD) to develop the modalities for monitoring calls. PMID:25236581

  4. Hypoglycemia: a factor associated with low survival rate of neonatal piglets infected with transmissible gastroenteritis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, R; Morin, M; Fontaine, M

    1984-01-01

    The main purpose of this work was to study changes in the balance of fluids, electrolytes and blood metabolites in neonatal piglets with severe transmissible gastroenteritis. Six two day old conventional piglets were infected with transmissible gastroenteritis virus while six others were used as normal controls. Blood samples were collected in heparin when the infected piglets were moribund. The following variables were measured: packed red cell volume, total plasma protein and bicarbonate, blood pH, blood urea nitrogen and plasma glucose, creatinine, chloride, inorganic phosphorus, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium. Vomiting and diarrhea appeared 12 to 24 hours postinoculation in the infected piglets and they were moribund one or two days later. Before becoming moribund, most of the piglets fell rapidly into a lethargic and comatose state. The most evident changes in their blood variables were an increase in packed cell volume, total protein, blood urea nitrogen, phosphorus and magnesium levels and a decrease in pH and bicarbonate concentration as well as a severe hypoglycemia. The results suggest that severe hypoglycemia coupled with metabolic acidosis and dehydration might be an important factor contributing to the high mortality rates caused by transmissible gastroenteritis in neonatal piglets. The hypoglycemia results from a combination of the inadequate glucose metabolism inherent to neonatal piglets and the acute maldigestion and malabsorption resulting from the diffuse and severe villous atrophy induced by the virus. PMID:6478297

  5. Association of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis with Histo-blood Group Antigens.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, E; Dwibedi, B; Kar, S K; Pandey, R M

    2016-07-01

    Association of rotavirus gastroenteritis with histo-blood group antigens in children younger than 5 years admitted with diarrhea (n=389) was studied. Distribution of blood groups in rotavirus positive (n=96) and rotavirus negative (n=51) diarrhea gastroenteritis cases did not show any susceptibility to any blood group; blood group O seemed to be protective. PMID:27508550

  6. Gastroenteritis in sentinel general practices,The Netherlands.

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, M. A.; Koopmans, M. P.; Kortbeek, L. M.; van Leeuwen, N. J.; Bartelds, A. I.; van Duynhoven, Y. T.

    2001-01-01

    From 1996 to 1999, the incidence of gastroenteritis in general practices and the role of a broad range of pathogens in the Netherlands were studied. All patients with gastroenteritis who had visited a general practitioner were reported. All patients who had visited a general practitioner for gastroenteritis (cases) and an equal number of patients visiting for nongastrointestinal symptoms (controls) were invited to participate in a case-control study. The incidence of gastroenteritis was 79.7 per 10,000 person years. Campylobacter was detected most frequently (10% of cases), followed by Giardia lamblia (5%), rotavirus (5%), Norwalk-like viruses (5%) and Salmonella (4%). Our study found that in the Netherlands (population 15.6 million), an estimated 128,000 persons each year consult their general practitioner for gastroenteritis, slightly less than in a comparable study in 1992 to 1993. A pathogen could be detected in almost 40% of patients (bacteria 16%, viruses 15%, parasites 8%). PMID:11266298

  7. The global burden of nontyphoidal Salmonella gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Majowicz, Shannon E; Musto, Jennie; Scallan, Elaine; Angulo, Frederick J; Kirk, Martyn; O'Brien, Sarah J; Jones, Timothy F; Fazil, Aamir; Hoekstra, Robert M

    2010-03-15

    To estimate the global burden of nontyphoidal Salmonella gastroenteritis, we synthesized existing data from laboratory-based surveillance and special studies, with a hierarchical preference to (1) prospective population-based studies, (2) "multiplier studies," (3) disease notifications, (4) returning traveler data, and (5) extrapolation. We applied incidence estimates to population projections for the 21 Global Burden of Disease regions to calculate regional numbers of cases, which were summed to provide a global number of cases. Uncertainty calculations were performed using Monte Carlo simulation. We estimated that 93.8 million cases (5th to 95th percentile, 61.8-131.6 million) of gastroenteritis due to Salmonella species occur globally each year, with 155,000 deaths (5th to 95th percentile, 39,000-303,000 deaths). Of these, we estimated 80.3 million cases were foodborne. Salmonella infection represents a considerable burden in both developing and developed countries. Efforts to reduce transmission of salmonellae by food and other routes must be implemented on a global scale.

  8. A Foodborne Outbreak of Gastroenteritis Caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Norovirus through Non-Seafood Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenfeng; Liu, Jianping; Ma, Xiaowei; Xie, Chaojun; Zheng, Chuangliang; Zhuo, Li; Cao, Xianbang; Tan, Hailing; Li, Baisheng; Xie, Huaping; Liu, Yufei; Ip, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne outbreaks caused by a mixed infection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and norovirus have rarely been described. We reported a mixed outbreak of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and norovirus causing acute gastroenteritis in 99 staff members of a company in Guangdong, China, in May 2013, following consumption of roasted duck, an uncommon non-seafood vehicle for such mixed infection, in one meal served in the company's catering service. Epidemiological and laboratory findings indicated that a single asymptomatic food handler was the source of both pathogens, and the high rate of infection of both pathogens was exacerbated by the setting’s suboptimal food hygiene practice. PMID:26376317

  9. Diversity of rotavirus serotypes in Mexican infants with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Noriega, L; Arias, C F; López, S; Puerto, F; Snodgrass, D R; Taniguchi, K; Greenberg, H B

    1990-01-01

    One hundred thirty-two stool specimens from infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalized in two Mexican cities (Mexico City and Mérida) were examined by serotype- and subgroup-specific enzyme immunoassays. Among them, 38 (29%) were serotype 1, 15 (11%) were serotype 2, 13 (10%) were serotype 3, 22 (17%) were serotype 4, none was serotype 5 or 6, and 44 (33%) could not be serotyped. By subgrouping, 121 specimens were characterized as follows: 24 (18%) were subgroup 1, 97 (74%) were subgroup 2, and none had both subgroup specificities. While serotype 1 rotavirus predominated in the Mexico City area for 4 consecutive years (1984 to 1987), serotype 4 predominated in Mérida during the single epidemic season studied (1985). These data demonstrate that all four primary human rotavirus serotypes circulated in Mexico, with serotype 1 being the most prevalent. The seroneutralization responses of 14 of the 22 patients infected with serotype 4 strains had been previously studied. Of these 14 infants, 11 appeared to have primary infections, as indicated by absence of neutralizing antibodies in the acute-phase sera and their young age (8 months on average) at the time of illness. Seven patients seroresponded to serotypes 1 and 4; two seroresponded to serotypes 1, 3, and 4; three seroresponded to serotype 1; and two had low-level seroresponses to serotype 3 or 4. These data indicate that heterotypic neutralizing antibody responses occur frequently following infection with serotype 4 rotaviruses. PMID:2166073

  10. Infectious tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, S; Waldmann, H

    1998-10-01

    Infectious tolerance can be induced in many ways, does not require a thymus or clonal deletion and can spread to third-party antigens linked on the same antigen-presenting cell-the process being variously described as linked-, bystanderor epitope-suppression. We here review the evidence concerning the mechanisms involved and attempt to make a consistent hypothesis, that during tolerance induction in the Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases and transplantation systems there would seem to be a phase of immune deviation towards Th2 cytokines, like IL-4 and IL-10; however, this may lead to an IL-10-induced form of anergy or nonresponsiveness and generation of the recently characterized Th3/T-regulatory-1 CD4+ T cell subset which is thought to downregulate the antigen-presenting cell, possibly via transforming growth factor beta. PMID:9794831

  11. [Clinical pathways in acute pancreatitis: recommendations for early multidisciplinary management. Scientific Committee of the SEMICYUC. Working Group on Infectious Diseases (GTEI-SEMICYUC)].

    PubMed

    Maraví Poma, E; Laplaza Santos, C; Gorraiz López, B; Albeniz Arbizu, E; Zubia Olascoaga, F; Petrov, M S; Morales, F A; Aizcorbe Garralda, M; Casi Villaroya, M; Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J A; López Camps, V; Regidor Sanz, E; Loinaz Bordonabe, M; do Pico, J L

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that early management of patients with acute pancreatitis may alter the natural course of disease and improve outcomes of patients. The aim of this paper is to optimize the management of patients with acute pancreatitis during the first 72 h after hospital admission by proposing several clinical care pathways. The proposed pathways are based on the SEMICYUC 2005 Recommendations with incorporation of the latest developments in the field, particularly the determinants-based classification of acute pancreatitis severity. The pathways also incorporate the "alarm signs", the use of therapeutic modalities known as PANCREAS, and the "call to ICU" criteria. Further studies will need to assess whether the adoption of these pathway reduces mortality and morbidity in patients with acute pancreatitis. The previous SEMICYUC guidelines on management of patients with acute pancreatitis in Intensive Care will need to be revised to reflect the recent developments in the field. PMID:22564789

  12. Prevalence of Astrovirus Infection among Chilean Children with Acute Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Gaggero, Aldo; O’Ryan, Miguel; Noel, Jacqueline S.; Glass, Roger I.; Monroe, Stephan S.; Mamani, Nora; Prado, Valeria; Avendaño, Luis F.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency of astrovirus infection in 456 Chilean children with diarrhea was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, reverse transcriptase PCR, and cell culture. Astrovirus was detected in 16.5% of rotavirus-negative and 7% of rotavirus-positive samples obtained from emergency rooms or hospitals and in 11% of samples from day care centers. HAst-1 was the predominant serotype identified. PMID:9817899

  13. Water-borne outbreak of campylobacter gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Palmer, S R; Gully, P R; White, J M; Pearson, A D; Suckling, W G; Jones, D M; Rawes, J C; Penner, J L

    1983-02-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis affecting 234 pupils and 23 staff at a boarding school occurred over a period of 8 weeks. Campylobacter spp. were isolated from pupils and staff, and from two samples of cold water taken from an open-topped storage tank which supplied predominantly unchlorinated water to the main school building. The two isolates from water were of the same serotype. This serotype was the commonest of the three serotypes of Campylobacter jejuni detected in isolates from pupils and staff. There was a highly significant association between consumption of water from the cold water storage tank and reported illness in staff. Attack rates in pupils corresponded closely with the extent of distribution of this water-supply to the main residential houses. Contamination of water by faecal material from birds or bats was the most likely source of infection.

  14. Studies on Transmissible Gastroenteritis of Swine

    PubMed Central

    McClurkin, A W.; Norman, James O.

    1966-01-01

    Five cell culture isolates from transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) of swine have been studied. There is a cytopathogenic virus common to all of these isolates. Some of the characteristics of this virus, such as its size, approximately 100 mµ, its relative sensitivity to ether, lability at pH 2, pH 3, and pH 10, and its heat lability suggest that it may be a member of the myxovirus class. Concurrent research in this laboratory indicates that this cytopathogenic virus is not the only virus involved in the etiology of TGE, but it appears to be associated with many of the outbreaks of TGE which have been studied by this laboratory. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8.Fig. 9.Fig. 11. PMID:4224292

  15. Socio-demographic, Clinical and Laboratory Features of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children Treated in Pediatric Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Avdiu, Muharrem; Jakupi, Xhevat; Hoxha, Rina; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work was presentation of several socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. The examinees and methods: The examinees were children under the age of five years treated at the Pediatric Clinic due to acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. Rotavirus is isolated by method chromatographic immunoassay by Cer Test Biotec. Results: From the total number of patients (850) suffering from acute gastroenteritis, feces test on bacteria, viruses. protozoa and fungi was positive in 425 (49.76%) cases. From this number the test on bacteria was positive in 248 (58.62%) cases, on viruses it was positive in 165 (39.0%), on protozoa in 9 (2.12%) cases and on fungi only one case. Rotavirus was the most frequent one in viral test, it was isolated in 142 (86.06%) cases, adenoviruses were found in 9 (5.45%) cases and noroviruses in only one case. The same feces sample that contained rotavirus and adenoviruses were isolated in five cases, whereas rotavirus with bacteria was isolated in the same feces sample in five cases. The biggest number of cases 62 (43.66%) were of the age 6-12 months, whereas the smallest number 10 (7.04%) cases were of the age 37-60 months. There were 76 (53.52%) of cases of male gender, from rural areas there were 81 (57.04%) cases and there were 58 (40.80%) cases during the summer period. Among the clinical symptoms the most prominent were diarrhea, vomiting, high temperature, whereas the different degree of dehydration were present in all cases (the most common one was moderate dehydration). The most frequent one was isonatremic dehydration in 91 (64.08%) cases, less frequent one was hypernatremic dehydration in 14 (9.85%) cases. The majority of cases (97.89%) had lower blood pH values, whereas 67 (47.17%) cases had pH values that varied from 7.16 -7.20 (curve peak), normal values were registered in only 3 (2.11%) cases. Urea values were increased in 45 (31.07%) cases (the maximum value

  16. Molecular epidemiology of noroviruses associated with sporadic gastroenteritis in children in Novosibirsk, Russia, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    Zhirakovskaia, Elena V; Tikunov, Artem Yu; Bodnev, Sergey A; Klemesheva, Vera V; Netesov, Sergey V; Tikunova, Nina V

    2015-05-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are an important cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. To monitor the molecular epidemiology of NoVs genogroup II (GII) in Novosibirsk, Russia, a total of 10,198 stool samples from young children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis and two asymptomatic comparison groups were collected from 2003 to 2012. All samples were screened for the presence of NoV GII, rotavirus, and astrovirus by RT-PCR. The prevalence of NoV in gastroenteritis cases was 13.1%, varying from 7.1% to 21.3% in different seasons. Rotavirus and/or astrovirus were detectable in 25% of the NoV-positive samples. NoV was detected throughout the year with a seasonal increase during winter months. Based on sequence analysis of regions D and/or C within the VP1 gene, 892 identified NoV strains were divided into nine genotypes—GII.3 (51%), GII.4 (44%), GII.6 (2%), as well as GII.1, GII.2, GII.5, GII.7, GII.16, and GII.21 (totally, 3%). The prevalence of NoV in the comparison groups was considerably lower (∼2.5%); only GII.4 (n = 6), GII.21 (n = 2) and GII.1 (n = 1) genotypes were revealed. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the ORF1/ORF2 junction region sequences, GII.P21/GII.3 recombinant and GII.P4/GII.4 were prevalent genotypes (totally, 93%) and their ratio changed every season. The median age of children with NoV infection was 6.6 months (range, <1-35 months), but it was different depending on NoV genotype. Children infected with the NoV GII.3 were younger (median 6.2 months) than GII.4-positive patients (median 9.1 months). This is the first long-term systematic study of NoV molecular epidemiology in Russia.

  17. An outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis associated with a secondary water supply system in a factory in south China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Between September 17 and October 3, 2009, hundreds of workers employed in a manufacturing factory in Shenzhen, a city in south China developed a sudden onset of acute gastroenteritis. A retrospective cohort study is designed to identify the risk factors and control this outbreak. Methods Information on demographic characteristics, working place, the history of contact with a person having diarrhea and/or vomiting, drink water preference and frequency, eating in the company cafeteria or outside the company, hand-washing habits and eating habits is included. Furthermore, in order to find the contamination source, we investigated the environment around the underground reservoir and collected water samples from the junction between municipal supply water system and underground reservoir to test potential bacteria and virus, examine the seepage tracks on the wall of the underground reservoir from the side of septic tank, and check the integrity and attitude of this lid. Relative risk was presented and Chi-square test was performed. All the analyses were performed with OpenEpi software version 2.3.1 online. Results The cohort study demonstrated that the workers who had direct drink water were 3.0 fold more likely to suffer from acute gastroenteritis than those who consumed commercial bottled water. The direct drinking water, water of the tank of buildings, and the underground reservoir were positive only for norovirus. Norovirus was also detected from stool and rectal swab samples from patients with acute gastroenteritis. The underground reservoir was found to be the primary contamination source. Further environmental investigation showed that the norovirus contaminated substance entered into the underground reservoir via access holes in lid covering this underground reservoir. Conclusion This acute gastroenteritis outbreak was caused by the secondary supply system contaminated by norovirus in this factory. The outbreak of gastroenteritis cases caused by

  18. Direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness of the rotavirus vaccines for the prevention of gastroenteritis hospitalizations in privately insured US children, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Catherine A; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Pate, Virginia; Weber, David J; Jonsson Funk, Michele; Stürmer, Til; Brookhart, M Alan

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate how direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness estimates and absolute benefits of rotavirus vaccines vary through the years following vaccine introduction. Privately insured US children in a large claims database were followed from age 8 months until they 1) experienced a hospitalization for rotavirus or acute gastroenteritis; 2) lost continuous health plan enrollment; 3) turned 20 months of age; or 4) reached the end of the study period. Vaccine effectiveness estimates in preventing rotavirus and acute gastroenteritis hospitalizations were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression, stratified by calendar year and adjusted for birth month. Incidence rate differences were estimated to determine the absolute number of gastroenteritis hospitalizations prevented in the cohort. Among 905,718 children, 51%, 66%, 80%, and 86% received 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in each year from 2007 to 2010. The direct vaccine effectiveness of 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalizations ranged from 87% to 92% each year. Accounting for indirect protection increased estimates of vaccine effectiveness by an additional 3%-8% among those vaccinated. Failing to account for population-level vaccine benefits in 2010, when circulation of rotavirus was low, could underestimate the sustained impact of the vaccine program.

  19. Direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness of the rotavirus vaccines for the prevention of gastroenteritis hospitalizations in privately insured US children, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Catherine A; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Pate, Virginia; Weber, David J; Jonsson Funk, Michele; Stürmer, Til; Brookhart, M Alan

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate how direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness estimates and absolute benefits of rotavirus vaccines vary through the years following vaccine introduction. Privately insured US children in a large claims database were followed from age 8 months until they 1) experienced a hospitalization for rotavirus or acute gastroenteritis; 2) lost continuous health plan enrollment; 3) turned 20 months of age; or 4) reached the end of the study period. Vaccine effectiveness estimates in preventing rotavirus and acute gastroenteritis hospitalizations were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression, stratified by calendar year and adjusted for birth month. Incidence rate differences were estimated to determine the absolute number of gastroenteritis hospitalizations prevented in the cohort. Among 905,718 children, 51%, 66%, 80%, and 86% received 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in each year from 2007 to 2010. The direct vaccine effectiveness of 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalizations ranged from 87% to 92% each year. Accounting for indirect protection increased estimates of vaccine effectiveness by an additional 3%-8% among those vaccinated. Failing to account for population-level vaccine benefits in 2010, when circulation of rotavirus was low, could underestimate the sustained impact of the vaccine program. PMID:24578359

  20. Direct, Indirect, Total, and Overall Effectiveness of the Rotavirus Vaccines for the Prevention of Gastroenteritis Hospitalizations in Privately Insured US Children, 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Panozzo, Catherine A.; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Pate, Virginia; Weber, David J.; Jonsson Funk, Michele; Stürmer, Til; Brookhart, M. Alan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate how direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness estimates and absolute benefits of rotavirus vaccines vary through the years following vaccine introduction. Privately insured US children in a large claims database were followed from age 8 months until they 1) experienced a hospitalization for rotavirus or acute gastroenteritis; 2) lost continuous health plan enrollment; 3) turned 20 months of age; or 4) reached the end of the study period. Vaccine effectiveness estimates in preventing rotavirus and acute gastroenteritis hospitalizations were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression, stratified by calendar year and adjusted for birth month. Incidence rate differences were estimated to determine the absolute number of gastroenteritis hospitalizations prevented in the cohort. Among 905,718 children, 51%, 66%, 80%, and 86% received 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in each year from 2007 to 2010. The direct vaccine effectiveness of 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalizations ranged from 87% to 92% each year. Accounting for indirect protection increased estimates of vaccine effectiveness by an additional 3%–8% among those vaccinated. Failing to account for population-level vaccine benefits in 2010, when circulation of rotavirus was low, could underestimate the sustained impact of the vaccine program. PMID:24578359

  1. Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in preventing severe gastroenteritis in young children according to socioeconomic status

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, Virginie; Généreux, Mélissa; Gagneur, Arnaud; Petit, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 2011, the monovalent rotavirus vaccine was introduced into a universal immunization program in Quebec (Canada). This retrospective cohort study assessed vaccine effectiveness (VE) in preventing acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) hospitalizations among children <3 y living in the Quebec Eastern Townships region according to socioeconomic status (SES). Data were gathered from a tertiary hospital database paired with a regional immunization registry. Three cohorts of children were followed: (1) vaccinated children born in post-universal vaccination period (2011–2013, n = 5,033), (2) unvaccinated children born in post-universal vaccination period (n = 1,239), and (3) unvaccinated children born in pre-universal vaccination period (2008–2010, n = 6,436). In each cohort, AGE and RVGE hospitalizations were identified during equivalent follow-up periods to calculate VE globally and according to neighborhood-level SES. Using multivariable logistic regression, adjusted odds ratios (OR) were computed to obtain VE (1-OR). Adjusted VE of 2 doses was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37%–77%) and 94% (95%CI: 52%–99%) in preventing AGE and RVGE hospitalization, respectively. Stratified analyses according to SES showed that children living in neighborhoods with higher rates of low-income families had significantly lower VE against AGE hospitalizations compared to neighborhoods with lower rates of low-income families (30% vs. 78%, p = 0.027). Our results suggest that the rotavirus vaccine is highly effective in preventing severe gastroenteritis in young children, particularly among the most well-off. SES seems to influence rotavirus VE, even in a high-income country like Canada. Further studies are needed to determine factors related to lower rotavirus VE among socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. PMID:27367155

  2. Molecular characterization of Sapovirus detected in a gastroenteritis outbreak at a wedding hall.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasutaka; Ootsuka, Yuka; Kondo, Reiko; Oseto, Mitsuaki; Doi, Mitsunori; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Ueda, Tetsuroo; Kondo, Hirokazu; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Wakita, Takaji; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Naokazu; Oka, Tomoichiro

    2010-04-01

    Sapovirus (SaV) is an important pathogen of human acute gastroenteritis. A gastroenteritis outbreak occurred at a wedding hall in October 2007 in Ehime Prefecture, Japan. One hundred nine people who had either attended wedding parties or had eaten a box lunch at a conference held at the same hall complained of gastroenteritis symptoms. Among these 109 people, stool specimens from 56 patients were available for pathogen screening, and 20 (35.7%) of these specimens were positive for SaV, of whom 18 showed symptoms. The numbers of cDNA copies of the specimens ranged from 2.36 x 10(6) to 3.03 x 10(10) for symptomatic patients, and 2.19 x 10(6) and 1.18 x 10(9) per gram of stool for two asymptomatic food handlers. The incubation periods of the 18 symptomatic patients ranged from 14.5 to 99.5 hr. Identical nucleotide sequence types of SaV; that is, a single synonymous nucleotide difference (transition) or microheterogeneity, was detected in stool specimens from the symptomatic patients and the asymptomatic food handlers, with the direct nucleotide sequence of approximately 2.3 kb 3' end of the genome. Based on the phylogenetic analysis with the complete capsid nucleotide sequence, these strains were clustered into genogroup IV. This outbreak was thought to be caused by a single source, and underscores the importance of proper hygiene in the environment and/or in food-handling practices to control SaV outbreaks. PMID:20166168

  3. Infectious Risks of Air Travel.

    PubMed

    Mangili, Alexandra; Vindenes, Tine; Gendreau, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Infectious diseases are still among the leading causes of death worldwide due to their persistence, emergence, and reemergence. As the recent Ebola virus disease and MERS-CoV outbreaks demonstrate, the modern epidemics and large-scale infectious outbreaks emerge and spread quickly. Air transportation is a major vehicle for the rapid spread and dissemination of communicable diseases, and there have been a number of reported outbreaks of serious airborne diseases aboard commercial flights including tuberculosis, severe acute respiratory syndrome, influenza, smallpox, and measles, to name a few. In 2014 alone, over 3.3 billion passengers (a number equivalent to 42% of the world population) and 50 million metric tons of cargo traveled by air from 41,000 airports and 50,000 routes worldwide, and significant growth is anticipated, with passenger numbers expected to reach 5.9 billion by 2030. Given the increasing numbers of travelers, the risk of infectious disease transmission during air travel is a significant concern, and this chapter focuses on the current knowledge about transmission of infectious diseases in the context of both transmissions within the aircraft passenger cabin and commercial aircraft serving as vehicles of worldwide infection spread. PMID:26542037

  4. Infectious Risks of Air Travel.

    PubMed

    Mangili, Alexandra; Vindenes, Tine; Gendreau, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Infectious diseases are still among the leading causes of death worldwide due to their persistence, emergence, and reemergence. As the recent Ebola virus disease and MERS-CoV outbreaks demonstrate, the modern epidemics and large-scale infectious outbreaks emerge and spread quickly. Air transportation is a major vehicle for the rapid spread and dissemination of communicable diseases, and there have been a number of reported outbreaks of serious airborne diseases aboard commercial flights including tuberculosis, severe acute respiratory syndrome, influenza, smallpox, and measles, to name a few. In 2014 alone, over 3.3 billion passengers (a number equivalent to 42% of the world population) and 50 million metric tons of cargo traveled by air from 41,000 airports and 50,000 routes worldwide, and significant growth is anticipated, with passenger numbers expected to reach 5.9 billion by 2030. Given the increasing numbers of travelers, the risk of infectious disease transmission during air travel is a significant concern, and this chapter focuses on the current knowledge about transmission of infectious diseases in the context of both transmissions within the aircraft passenger cabin and commercial aircraft serving as vehicles of worldwide infection spread.

  5. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis associated with multiple gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Otowa, Yasunori; Mitsutsuji, Masaaki; Urade, Takeshi; Chono, Teruhiro; Morimoto, Haruki; Yokoyama, Kunio; Hirata, Kenro; Kawamura, Shiro; Shimada, Etsuji; Fujita, Masayuki

    2012-06-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is an inflammation of the digestive tract that is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration. There are no specific symptoms, and are related to the layer in which eosinophilic infiltration is observed. A 69-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a history of general malaise, diarrhea, and dysgeusia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed reddish elevated lesions that were edematous all over the gastric mucosa. In addition, three tumors were also observed. The biopsies of the reddish elevated mucosa revealed eosinophilic infiltration and tubular adenocarcinoma from the tumors. Colonoscopy showed abnormal reddish elevated mucosa. The biopsies from the reddish elevated mucosa showed eosinophilic infiltration. From the abdominal contrast computed tomography scan, tumor stain was seen in the anterior wall of the gastric body. No ascites, intestinal wall thickening, or lymph node swelling were found. A slight elevation in the serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), 480 IU/ml, was found from the laboratory test results; other laboratory results were within normal limits including the number of peripheral eosinophils. No specific allergen was found from the multiple antigen simultaneous test and from the skin patch test. The parasitic immunodiagnosis was negative. He was diagnosed with EG associated with gastric cancer and underwent total gastrectomy, regional lymph node dissection with reconstruction by a Roux-en-Y method. He was prescribed prednisolone after the operation and showed a good clinical response. There are many case reports on EG, but none of them were associated with cancer. We encountered a case of EG associated with multiple gastric cancer; the patient underwent total gastrectomy.

  6. Norovirus Gastroenteritis Outbreak with a Secretor-independent Susceptibility Pattern, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Johan; Kindberg, Elin; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Matussek, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is recognized as the commonest cause of acute gastroenteritis among adults. Susceptibility to disease has been associated with histo-blood group antigens and secretor status; nonsecretors are almost completely resistant to disease. We report a foodborne outbreak of GI.3 NoV gastroenteritis that affected 33/83 (40%) persons. Symptomatic disease was as likely to develop in nonsecretors as in secretors (odds ratio [OR] 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46–4.36 vs. OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.23–2.18, p = 0.57). Moreover, no statistical difference in susceptibility was found between persons of different Lewis or ABO phenotypes. The capsid gene of the outbreak strain shares high amino acid homology with the Kashiwa645 GI.3 strain, previously shown to recognize nonsecretor saliva, as well as synthetic Lewis a. This norovirus outbreak affected persons regardless of secretor status or Lewis or ABO phenotypes. PMID:20031047

  7. Epidemiologic Association Between FUT2 Secretor Status and Severe Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Daniel C.; Currier, Rebecca L.; Staat, Mary A.; Sahni, Leila C.; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Halasa, Natasha B.; Englund, Janet A.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Boom, Julie A.; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Klein, Eileen J.; Chappell, James; Harrison, Christopher J.; Davidson, Barbara S.; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Moffatt, Mary D.; McNeal, Monica; Wikswo, Mary; Bowen, Michael D.; Morrow, Ardythe L.; Parashar, Umesh D.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE A genetic polymorphism affecting FUT2 secretor status in approximately one-quarter of humans of European descent affects the expression of histo-blood group antigens on the mucosal epithelia of human respiratory, genitourinary, and digestive tracts. These histo-blood group antigens serve as host receptor sites necessary for attachment and infection of some pathogens, including norovirus. OBJECTIVE We investigated whether an association exists between FUT2 secretor status and laboratory-confirmed rotavirus infections in US children. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Multicenter case-control observational study involving active surveillance at 6 US pediatric medical institutions in the inpatient and emergency department clinical settings. We enrolled 1564 children younger than 5 years with acute gastroenteritis (diarrhea and/or vomiting) and 818 healthy controls frequency matched by age and month, from December 1, 2011, through March 31, 2013. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Paired fecal-saliva specimens were tested for rotavirus and for secretor status. Comparisons were made between rotavirus test–positive cases and healthy controls stratified by ethnicity and vaccination status. Adjusted multivariable analyses assessed the preventive association of secretor status against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. RESULTS One (0.5%) of 189 rotavirus test–positive cases was a nonsecretor, compared with 188 (23%) of 818 healthy control participants (P < .001). Healthy control participants of Hispanic ethnicity were significantly less likely to be nonsecretors (13%) compared with healthy children who were not of Hispanic ethnicity (25%) (P < .001). After controlling for vaccination and other factors, children with the nonsecretor FUT2 polymorphism appeared statistically protected (98% [95% CI, 84%–100%]) against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Severe rotavirus gastroenteritis was virtually absent among US children who had a genetic

  8. Norovirus Recombinant Strains Isolated from Gastroenteritis Outbreaks in Southern Brazil, 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Fumian, Tulio Machado; da Silva Ribeiro de Andrade, Juliana; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized as one of the leading causes of viral acute gastroenteritis, responsible for almost 50% of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. The positive single-strand RNA genome of noroviruses presents a high mutation rate and these viruses are constantly evolving by nucleotide mutation and genome recombination. Norovirus recombinant strains have been detected as causing acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in several countries. However, in Brazil, only one report of a norovirus recombinant strain (GII.P7/GII.20) has been described in the northern region so far. For this study, 38 norovirus strains representative of outbreaks, 11 GII.4 and 27 non-GII.4, were randomly selected and amplified at the ORF1/ORF2 junction. Genetic recombination was identified by constructing phylogenetic trees of the polymerase and capsid genes, and further SimPlot and Bootscan analysis of the ORF1/ORF2 overlap. Sequence analysis revealed that 23 out of 27 (85%) non-GII.4 noroviruses were recombinant strains, characterized as: GII.P7/GII.6 (n = 9); GIIP.g/GII.12 (n = 4); GII.P16/GII.3 (n = 4); GII.Pe/GII.17 (n = 2); GII.P7/GII.14 (n = 1); GII.P13/GII.17 (n = 1); GII.P21/GII.3 (n = 1); and GII.P21/GII.13 (n = 1). On the other hand, among the GII.4 variants analyzed (Den Haag_2006b and New Orleans_2009) no recombination was observed. These data revealed the great diversity of norovirus recombinant strains associated with outbreaks, and describe for the first time these recombinant types circulating in Brazil. Our results obtained in southern Brazil corroborate the previous report for the northern region, demonstrating that norovirus recombinant strains are circulating more frequently than we expected. In addition, these results emphasize the relevance of including ORF1/ORF2-based analysis in surveillance studies as well as the importance of characterizing strains from other Brazilian regions to obtain epidemiological data for norovirus recombinant strains circulating in the

  9. Norovirus Recombinant Strains Isolated from Gastroenteritis Outbreaks in Southern Brazil, 2004–2011

    PubMed Central

    Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized as one of the leading causes of viral acute gastroenteritis, responsible for almost 50% of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. The positive single-strand RNA genome of noroviruses presents a high mutation rate and these viruses are constantly evolving by nucleotide mutation and genome recombination. Norovirus recombinant strains have been detected as causing acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in several countries. However, in Brazil, only one report of a norovirus recombinant strain (GII.P7/GII.20) has been described in the northern region so far. For this study, 38 norovirus strains representative of outbreaks, 11 GII.4 and 27 non-GII.4, were randomly selected and amplified at the ORF1/ORF2 junction. Genetic recombination was identified by constructing phylogenetic trees of the polymerase and capsid genes, and further SimPlot and Bootscan analysis of the ORF1/ORF2 overlap. Sequence analysis revealed that 23 out of 27 (85%) non-GII.4 noroviruses were recombinant strains, characterized as: GII.P7/GII.6 (n = 9); GIIP.g/GII.12 (n = 4); GII.P16/GII.3 (n = 4); GII.Pe/GII.17 (n = 2); GII.P7/GII.14 (n = 1); GII.P13/GII.17 (n = 1); GII.P21/GII.3 (n = 1); and GII.P21/GII.13 (n = 1). On the other hand, among the GII.4 variants analyzed (Den Haag_2006b and New Orleans_2009) no recombination was observed. These data revealed the great diversity of norovirus recombinant strains associated with outbreaks, and describe for the first time these recombinant types circulating in Brazil. Our results obtained in southern Brazil corroborate the previous report for the northern region, demonstrating that norovirus recombinant strains are circulating more frequently than we expected. In addition, these results emphasize the relevance of including ORF1/ORF2-based analysis in surveillance studies as well as the importance of characterizing strains from other Brazilian regions to obtain epidemiological data for norovirus recombinant strains circulating in the

  10. [Comparative study of two antitussive drugs in the treatment of acute dry cough of infectious origin (prospective, randomized, single blind study)].

    PubMed

    Pujet, J C; Keddad, K; Sévenier, F; Jolivet-Landreau, I

    2002-01-01

    The objective was to compare, during a 5-day therapy, the efficacy and tolerability of an antihistaminic antitussive syrup, oxomemazine, combining a small quantity of guaifenesine (T), with a centrally acting antitussive, clobutinol (S), in adult patients aged from 18 to 70 years and presenting with a dry cough of infectious origin. This study was performed by 22 general practitioners and 130 ambulatory patients were enrolled. The primary criterion of this multicenter, randomized, single blind study was to compare the evolution of cough intensity using a Visual Analog Squale (VAS) graduated from 0 to 10 cm. Nine secondary criteria including tolerability were also assessed. With regard to cough intensity, the treatments were not equivalent. A greater reduction was observed with T (-5.2 +/- 2.3 versus -4.3 +/- 2.3). This result was confirmed by a further reduction in cough intensity at days: 2 (p = 0.04), 4 (p = 0.05), and 5 (p = 0.02). The frequency of cough disappearance before the end of the study was significantly greater for T than for S: 46% versus 29% (p = 0.05). The time before disappearance of the cough was 4.0 + 1.1 days for both medicines. Induction of sleep and the frequency of nocturnal wakening were significantly better for T from day 4 (p = 0.02). The drowsiness induced by T meant that diurnal quality of life was better with S on days 1 (p = 0.002) and 2 (p = 0.01). Tolerability was similar for both medicines. In conclusion, as a symptomatic treatment of dry cough, T is efficient and well tolerated. Moreover, we have observed a tendency towards superior efficacy of T than S. T is therefore a useful alternative in the therapeutic armamentarium available to the general practitioner.

  11. [Comparative study of two antitussive drugs in the treatment of acute dry cough of infectious origin (prospective, randomized, single blind study)].

    PubMed

    Pujet, J C; Keddad, K; Sévenier, F; Jolivet-Landreau, I

    2002-01-01

    The objective was to compare, during a 5-day therapy, the efficacy and tolerability of an antihistaminic antitussive syrup, oxomemazine, combining a small quantity of guaifenesine (T), with a centrally acting antitussive, clobutinol (S), in adult patients aged from 18 to 70 years and presenting with a dry cough of infectious origin. This study was performed by 22 general practitioners and 130 ambulatory patients were enrolled. The primary criterion of this multicenter, randomized, single blind study was to compare the evolution of cough intensity using a Visual Analog Squale (VAS) graduated from 0 to 10 cm. Nine secondary criteria including tolerability were also assessed. With regard to cough intensity, the treatments were not equivalent. A greater reduction was observed with T (-5.2 +/- 2.3 versus -4.3 +/- 2.3). This result was confirmed by a further reduction in cough intensity at days: 2 (p = 0.04), 4 (p = 0.05), and 5 (p = 0.02). The frequency of cough disappearance before the end of the study was significantly greater for T than for S: 46% versus 29% (p = 0.05). The time before disappearance of the cough was 4.0 + 1.1 days for both medicines. Induction of sleep and the frequency of nocturnal wakening were significantly better for T from day 4 (p = 0.02). The drowsiness induced by T meant that diurnal quality of life was better with S on days 1 (p = 0.002) and 2 (p = 0.01). Tolerability was similar for both medicines. In conclusion, as a symptomatic treatment of dry cough, T is efficient and well tolerated. Moreover, we have observed a tendency towards superior efficacy of T than S. T is therefore a useful alternative in the therapeutic armamentarium available to the general practitioner. PMID:12611200

  12. Three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Miura, Hiroki; Mori, Yuji; Sugata, Ken; Nakajima, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide in children. We report three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by various severity of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two patients (cases 1 and 2) recovered completely without any specific treatments. One patient (case 3) died despite extensive treatments including a red blood cell transfusion and endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Rotavirus genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8] were detected in cases 2 and 3, respectively. Rotavirus antigenemia levels were not high at the onset of melena, suggesting that systemic rotaviral infection does not play an important role in causing melena.

  13. Groundwater quality assessment and its correlation with gastroenteritis using GIS: a case study of Rawal Town, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Syed Umair; Iqbal, Javed; Hasnain, Ghalib

    2014-11-01

    Majority of the people of Pakistan get drinking water from groundwater source. Nearly 40 % of the total ailments reported in Pakistan are the result of dirty drinking water. Every summer, thousands of patients suffer from acute gastroenteritis in the Rawal Town. Therefore, a study was designed to generate a water quality index map of the Rawal Town and identify the relationship between bacteriological water quality and socio-economic indicators with gastroenteritis in the study area. Water quality and gastroenteritis patient data were collected by surveying the 262 tubewells and the major hospitals in the Rawal Town. The collected spatial data was analyzed by using ArcGIS spatial analyst (Moran's I spatial autocorrelation) and geostatistical analysis tools (inverse distance weighted, radial basis function, kriging, and cokriging). The water quality index (WQI) for the study area was computed using pH, turbidity, total dissolved solids, calcium, hardness, alkalinity, and chloride values of the 262 tubewells. The results of Moran's I spatial autocorrelation showed that the groundwater physicochemical parameters were clustered. Among IDW, radial basis function, and kriging and cokriging interpolation techniques, cokriging showed the lowest root mean square error. Cokriging was used to make the spatial distribution maps of water quality parameters. The WQI results showed that more than half of the tubewells in the Rawal Town were providing "poor" to "unfit" drinking water. The Pearson's coefficient of correlation for gastroenteritis with fecal coliform was found significant (P < 0.05) in Water and Sanitation Agency (WASA) zone 2, and with shortage of toilets, it was significant (P < 0.05) in WASA zones 1 and 3. However, it was significantly (P < 0.01) inversely related with literacy rate in WASA zones 1, 2, and 3.

  14. Outbreaks of gastroenteritis due to infections with Norovirus in Switzerland, 2001-2003.

    PubMed Central

    Fretz, R.; Svoboda, P.; Lüthi, T. M.; Tanner, M.; Baumgartner, A.

    2005-01-01

    Viral infections, especially those with noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in Europe. To obtain information about the epidemic situation of noroviruses in Switzerland, an initial study was launched in the German-speaking part of the country to systematically compile Norovirus outbreak information between 2001 and 2003. In total, 73 outbreaks were registered. Most affected were closed settings, e.g. nursing homes (34%) and hospitals (25%). Transmission pathways were identified in 74% of Norovirus outbreaks. In 81% of these cases person-to-person transmission was the primary route of infection and on seven occasions (13%), a foodborne transmission was the possible cause. Furthermore, Norovirus outbreak characteristics of epidemiological importance are highlighted with a discussion of four selected events. PMID:15962549

  15. Effects of Dietary Honey andArdehCombination on Chemotherapy- Induced Gastrointestinal and Infectious Complications in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Allahyari, Abolghasem; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Hesam, Hesam; Hosseini, Golkoo; Karimi, Mohammad; Rezaiean, Amin; Kazemi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of dietary combination of honey and Ardeh on chemotherapy-induced complications in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A total of 107 AML patients who underwent chemotherapy for at least 30 consecutive dayswere recruited to this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical-trial which was conducted in the Imam Reza and Ghaem teaching hospitals (Mashhad, Iran). They weredivided into two age and sex-matched groups: 58 treated and 49 untreated patients. A combination of 50 grams of honey and 150 grams of Ardehwas added to the treated group's diet for 30consecutive days, three times each day; while the untreated group received their regular diet.Both groups received their standard medication for AML as well. After one month, they were all examined and lab tests were done on them by an internist and laboratory technicians who were blinded to the subject allocations. Mean value of WBC count in treated group was significantly lower than that of untreated group. Duration of fever and admission in the hospital due to fever were both significantly lower in the treated group (P=0.014, P=0.032 respectively). Total gastrointestinal complications were significantly less in the treated group one month after therapy with the special honey and Ardeh compound.No unusual or unexpected side effects were observed. Honey and Ardehare easily accessible materials that can be helpfully administered in AML patientsreceiving chemotherapy, since their useful effects in ameliorating gastrointestinal complications and reducingfever and neutropenia in AML patients have been shown. PMID:27642340

  16. Effects of Dietary Honey andArdehCombination on Chemotherapy- Induced Gastrointestinal and Infectious Complications in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Allahyari, Abolghasem; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Hesam, Hesam; Hosseini, Golkoo; Karimi, Mohammad; Rezaiean, Amin; Kazemi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of dietary combination of honey and Ardeh on chemotherapy-induced complications in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A total of 107 AML patients who underwent chemotherapy for at least 30 consecutive dayswere recruited to this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical-trial which was conducted in the Imam Reza and Ghaem teaching hospitals (Mashhad, Iran). They weredivided into two age and sex-matched groups: 58 treated and 49 untreated patients. A combination of 50 grams of honey and 150 grams of Ardehwas added to the treated group’s diet for 30consecutive days, three times each day; while the untreated group received their regular diet.Both groups received their standard medication for AML as well. After one month, they were all examined and lab tests were done on them by an internist and laboratory technicians who were blinded to the subject allocations. Mean value of WBC count in treated group was significantly lower than that of untreated group. Duration of fever and admission in the hospital due to fever were both significantly lower in the treated group (P=0.014, P=0.032 respectively). Total gastrointestinal complications were significantly less in the treated group one month after therapy with the special honey and Ardeh compound.No unusual or unexpected side effects were observed. Honey and Ardehare easily accessible materials that can be helpfully administered in AML patientsreceiving chemotherapy, since their useful effects in ameliorating gastrointestinal complications and reducingfever and neutropenia in AML patients have been shown. PMID:27642340

  17. Sentinel Hospital-Based Surveillance for Assessment of Burden of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kazi, Abdul Momin; Warraich, Gohar Javed; Qureshi, Shahida; Qureshi, Huma; Khan, Muhammad Mubashir Ahmad; Zaidi, Anita Kaniz Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the burden and molecular epidemiology of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children hospitalized with severe acute watery diarrhea in Pakistan prior to introduction of rotavirus vaccine. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out over a period of two years from 2006 – 2008 at five sentinel hospitals in the cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, and Peshawar. Stool samples collected from children under five years of age hospitalized with severe acute watery diarrhea were tested for rotavirus antigen via enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (IDEA REF K6020 Oxoid Ltd (Ely), Cambridge, United Kingdom). A subset of EIA positive stool samples were further processed for genotyping. Results 6679 children were enrolled and stool specimens of 2039 (30.5%) were positive for rotavirus. Rotavirus positivity ranged from 16.3% to 39.4% in the 5 hospitals with highest positivity in Lahore. 1241 (61%) of all rotavirus cases were in infants under one year of age. Among the strains examined for G-serotypes, the occurrence of G1, G2, G9 and G4 strains was found to be 28%, 24%, 14% and 13%, respectively. Among P-types, the most commonly occurring strains were P6 (31.5%) followed by P8 (20%) and P4 (12%). Prevalent rotavirus genotype in hospitalized children of severe diarrhea were G1P[8] 11.6% (69/593), followed by G2P[4] 10.4% (62/593), and G4P[6] 10.1% (60/593). Conclusions Approximately one third of children hospitalized with severe gastroenteritis in urban centers in Pakistan have rotavirus. Introduction of rotavirus vaccine in Pakistan's national immunization program could prevent many severe episodes and diarrheal deaths. PMID:25295613

  18. Infectious illnesses in the first two years of life.

    PubMed

    Fosarelli, P D; DeAngelis, C; Winkelstein, J; Mellits, E D

    1985-01-01

    The number and types of infectious illnesses experienced in 1 year by 279 inner city infants younger than 12 months were examined and correlated with some personal and social attributes and the children. Only 24 (8.6%) infants incurred no infectious illnesses in 12 months. The children experienced an average of one episode of otitis media (OM), one upper respiratory illness and three total illnesses during the year. Only 7.5 and 2.2% of the children experienced more than two episodes of upper respiratory illnesses and gastroenteritis, respectively, but 19% of the infants incurred more than two episodes of OM. The months with the highest number of illnesses for both the entire cohort and the infants who were enrolled at 1 month or less of life were March-April and October-November. The months in which the fewest illnesses occurred were August-September for both groups. The only variable associated with an increased number of total illnesses was a personal history of eczema or allergy (P less than 0.01). No variables were found to be associated with the occurrences of pneumonia, gastroenteritis or upper respiratory illnesses. Multiple episodes of OM during the study period were associated with male sex (P less than 0.01), bottle feeding (p less than 0.05) and a history of OM before the onset of the study (P less than 0.01).

  19. Rotavirus and Norovirus in Pediatric Healthcare-Associated Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jumi; Sederdahl, Bethany K.; Wahl, Kelly; Jerris, Robert R.; Kraft, Colleen S.; McCracken, Courtney; Gillespie, Scott; Kirby, Amy E.; Shane, Andi L.; Moe, Christine L.; Anderson, Evan J.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus and norovirus are important etiologies of gastroenteritis among hospitalized children. During 2012–2013, we tested 207 residual stool specimens from children with healthcare-associated vomiting and/or diarrhea for rotavirus and norovirus. Twenty (10%) were rotavirus positive, and 3 (3%) were norovirus positive, stressing the importance of these pathogens in hospitalized children. PMID:27807589

  20. The impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis on the family

    PubMed Central

    Mast, T Christopher; DeMuro-Mercon, Carla; Kelly, Claudia M; Floyd, Leigh Ellen; Walter, Emmanuel B

    2009-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young children and causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Although the clinical aspects have been well described, little information is available regarding the emotional, social, and economic impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis on the family of a sick child. The objectives of this study were to: 1) assess the family impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis through qualitative interviews with parents; 2) compare the clinical severity of rotavirus-positive and negative gastroenteritis; 3) test a questionnaire asking parents to rank the importance of various factors associated with a case of rotavirus gastroenteritis. Methods The study enrolled parents and children (2–36 months of age) brought to one of the study sites (outpatient clinic or ER) if the child experienced ≥ 3 watery or looser-than normal stools and/or forceful vomiting within any 24-hour period within the prior 3 days. The clinical severity of each child's illness was rated using a clinical scoring system and stool samples were tested for rotavirus antigen. Parents of rotavirus-positive children were invited to participate in focus group or individual interviews and subsequently completed a questionnaire regarding the impact of their child's illness. Results Of 62 enrolled children, 43 stool samples were collected and 63% tested positive for rotavirus. Illness was more severe in children with rotavirus-positive compared to rotavirus-negative gastroenteritis (92% vs. 37.5% rated as moderate/severe). Seventeen parents of rotavirus-positive children participated in the interviews and completed the written questionnaire. Parents were frightened by the severity of vomiting and diarrhea associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis, and noted that family life was impacted in several ways including loss of sleep, missed work, and an inability to complete normal household tasks. They expressed frustration at the lack of a specific medication and the

  1. Help Desk Answers: Are IV fluids better than oral rehydration for children with acute diarrhea and vomiting?

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Suvag; Nanda, Mitali; Tiburicio, Jose

    2016-04-01

    Intravenous fluid therapy (IVF) has a slightly lower failure rate than oral replacement therapy (ORT) in children with acute gastroenteritis, but the clinical significance is questionable. IVF takes longer to initiate than ORT and lengthens the hospital stay. PMID:27262252

  2. Prevalence and Phylogenetic Analysis of Human Bocaviruses 1-4 in Pediatric Patients with Various Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Zhu, Runan; Qian, Yuan; Deng, Jie; Wang, Fang; Sun, Yu; Dong, Huijin; Liu, Liying; Jia, Liping; Zhao, Linqing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Viral infections caused by human bocaviruses 1–4 (HBoV1-4) are more complicated than previously believed. A retrospective, large-scale study was undertaken to explore the prevalence of HBoV1-4 in pediatric patients with various infectious diseases and delineate their phylogenetic characteristics. Methods Clinical samples from four specimen types, including 4,941 respiratory, 2,239 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), 2,619 serum, and 1,121 fecal specimens, collected from pediatric patients with various infectious diseases were screened for HBoV1-4. A 690-nt fragment in each specimen was then amplified and sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. Clinical characteristics of HBoV-positive patients with different specimen types available were evaluated. Results Approximately 1.2% of patients were confirmed as HBoV-positive, with the highest positive rate in patients with gastrointestinal infection (2.2%), followed by respiratory (1.65%), central nervous system (0.8%), and hematological infections (0.2%). A single genetic lineage of HBoV1 circulated among children over the 8-year period, while a new cluster of HBoV2, via intra-genotype recombination between HBoV2A and HBoV2B, was prevalent. Some patients had HBoV1-positive respiratory and serum specimens or fecal specimens. Several cases became HBoV1-positive following the appearance of respiratory infection, while several cases were positive for HBoV2 only in CSF and serum specimens, rather than respiratory specimens. Conclusions A single genetic lineage of HBoV1 is speculated as a viral pathogen of respiratory infection and causes both comorbid infection and acute gastroenteritis. Additionally, a new cluster of HBoV2 is prevalent in China, which may infect the host through sites other than the respiratory tract. PMID:27490242

  3. Acute Myositis Associated with Concurrent Infection of Rotavirus and Norovirus in a 2-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kei; Fukuda, Seiji; Mushimoto, Yuichi; Minami, Noriaki; Kanai, Rie; Tsukamoto, Kazuki; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus and norovirus are common pathogens associated with gastroenteritis in children. Although rotavirus occasionally induces central nervous system disease, only 3 cases with rotavirus-induced acute myositis have been reported in the English literature. We recently treated a female patient with acute myositis associated with gastroenteritis induced by concurrent infection with rotavirus and norovirus. Having suffered from gastroenteritis for 3 days, she suddenly developed myositis affecting her lower extremities with concomitant creatine kinase elevation. Herein, we present our patient and review the previous cases including those reported in the Japanese literature. PMID:26500744

  4. Overview of Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Overview of Infectious Diseases Page Content Article Body I nfectious diseases are ... worms Last Updated 11/21/2015 Source Immunizations & Infectious Diseases: An Informed Parent's Guide (Copyright © 2006 American Academy ...

  5. [Infectious diseases research].

    PubMed

    Carratalà, Jordi; Alcamí, José; Cordero, Elisa; Miró, José M; Ramos, José Manuel

    2008-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in research activity into infectious diseases in Spain in the last few years. The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) currently has ten study groups, with the cooperation of infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists from different centres, with significant research activity. The program of Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa en Salud (Special Topics Cooperative Health Research Networks) is an appropriate framework for the strategic coordination of research groups from the Spanish autonomous communities. The Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) and the Network for Research in AIDS (RIS) integrate investigators in Infectious Diseases from multiple groups, which continuously perform important research projects. Research using different experimental models in infectious diseases, in numerous institutions, is an important activity in our country. The analysis of the recent scientific production in Infectious Diseases shows that Spain has a good position in the context of the European Union. The research activity in Infectious Diseases carried out in our country is a great opportunity for the training of specialists in this area of knowledge. PMID:19195467

  6. [Infectious diseases research].

    PubMed

    Carratalà, Jordi; Alcamí, José; Cordero, Elisa; Miró, José M; Ramos, José Manuel

    2008-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in research activity into infectious diseases in Spain in the last few years. The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) currently has ten study groups, with the cooperation of infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists from different centres, with significant research activity. The program of Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa en Salud (Special Topics Cooperative Health Research Networks) is an appropriate framework for the strategic coordination of research groups from the Spanish autonomous communities. The Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) and the Network for Research in AIDS (RIS) integrate investigators in Infectious Diseases from multiple groups, which continuously perform important research projects. Research using different experimental models in infectious diseases, in numerous institutions, is an important activity in our country. The analysis of the recent scientific production in Infectious Diseases shows that Spain has a good position in the context of the European Union. The research activity in Infectious Diseases carried out in our country is a great opportunity for the training of specialists in this area of knowledge.

  7. Recent Progress in the Research of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Oshima, Naoki; Mikami, Hironobu; Okimoto, Eiko; Jiao, Di Jin; Ishihara, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and gastroenteritis are allergic gastrointestinal diseases mainly caused by food allergens. The number of patients with EoE is rapidly increasing in both Western and Asian countries. Basic knowledge of these diseases has mainly come from studies of EoE and Th2 type allergic reactions, including IL-5, IL-13, and IL-15, thymic stromal protein, and eotaxin 3, which are considered to have important roles. For a diagnosis of EoE, endoscopic abnormalities and histological confirmation of dense eosinophile infiltration in the esophageal epithelial layer are important, in addition to identifying dysphagia symptoms. As for eosinophilic gastroenteritis, blood test findings are more useful and the role of an endoscopic examination is reduced. For both diseases, the infection rate of Helicobacter pylori is lower than in healthy controls. Glucocorticoid administration is standard treatment for these diseases, while proton pump inhibitors are frequently effective for EoE. PMID:26789117

  8. Surveillance of pathogens causing gastroenteritis and characterization of norovirus and sapovirus strains in Shenzhen, China, during 2011.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Hai-long; Xian, Hui-Xia; Yao, Xiang-Jie; Zhao, De-Jian; Chen, Long; Shu, Bai-hua; Zhou, Yi-kai; He, Ya-Qing

    2014-08-01

    Viral gastroenteritis is one of the most common diseases in humans, and it is primarily caused by rotaviruses (RVs), astroviruses (AstVs), adenoviruses (AdVs), noroviruses (NoVs), and sapoviruses (SaVs). In this study, we determined the distribution of viral gastroenteritis and human calicivirus (HuCVs) in acute gastroenteritis patients in Shenzhen, China, during 2011. Real-time RT-PCR was used to detect norovirus (NoV), group A rotavirus (RV), adenovirus (AdV), and astrovirus (AstV). From a total of 983 fecal samples, NoV was detected in 210 (21.4 %); RoV in 173 (17.6 %); AstV in 10 (1.0 %); and AdV in 15 (1.5 %). Mixed infections involving two NoVs were found in 21 of the 387 pathogen-positive stool specimens. NoV and SaV genotypes were further tested using RT-PCRs and molecular typing and phylogenetic analysis were then performed based on the ORF1-ORF2 region for NoV and a conserved nucleotide sequence in the capsid gene for SaV. Of the 68 typed strains that were sequenced and genotyped, five were NoV G1 (7.5 %) and 63 were NoV GII (96.6 %). GII strains were clustered into five genotypes, including GII.4 (65.1 %; 36 GII.4 2006b and five GII.4 New Orleans), GII.3 (28.6 %), GII.2 (3.2 %), GII.6 (1.6 %), and GII.1 (1.6 %). While all fecal specimens were tested for SaVs, 15 (1.5 %) were positive, and of these, 12 isolates belonged to G1.2, and the remaining three SaV strains belonged to the SaV GII genogroup. Although various HuCVs were detected in acute gastroenteritis patients, NoV GII.4 2006b was more prevalent than the other HuCVs. PMID:24610551

  9. A common, symptom-based case definition for gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    MAJOWICZ, S. E.; HALL, G.; SCALLAN, E.; ADAK, G. K.; GAUCI, C.; JONES, T. F.; O'BRIEN, S.; HENAO, O.; SOCKETT, P. N.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY National studies determining the burden of gastroenteritis have defined gastroenteritis by its clinical picture, using symptoms to classify cases and non-cases. The use of different case definitions has complicated inter-country comparisons. We selected four case definitions from the literature, applied these to population data from Australia, Canada, Ireland, Malta and the United States, and evaluated how the epidemiology of illness varied. Based on the results, we developed a standard case definition. The choice of case definition impacted on the observed incidence of gastroenteritis, with a 1·5–2·1 times difference between definitions in a given country. The proportion of cases with bloody diarrhoea, fever, and the proportion who sought medical care and submitted a stool sample also varied. The mean age of cases varied by <5 years under the four definitions. To ensure comparability of results between studies, we recommend a standard symptom-based case definition, and minimum set of results to be reported. PMID:17686196

  10. A waterborne norovirus gastroenteritis outbreak in a school, eastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, N; Zhang, H; Lin, X; Hou, P; Wang, S; Tao, Z; Bi, Z; Xu, A

    2016-04-01

    In late 2014, a gastroenteritis outbreak occurred in a school in Shandong Province, eastern China. Hundreds of individuals developed the symptoms of diarrhoea and vomiting. Epidemiological investigation showed that food consumption was not linked to this outbreak, and unboiled direct drinking water was identified as the independent risk factor with a relative risk of 1·37 (95% confidence interval 1·03-1·83). Furthermore, examination of common bacterial and viral gastroenteritis pathogens was conducted on different specimens. Norovirus GI.1, GI.2, GI.6, GII.4, GII.6 and GII.13 were detected in clinical specimens and a water sample. GII.4 sequences between clinical specimens and the water sample displayed a close relationship and belonged to GII.4 variant Sydney 2012. These results indicate that direct drinking water contaminated by norovirus was responsible for this gastroenteritis outbreak. This study enriches our knowledge of waterborne norovirus outbreaks in China, and presents valuable prevention and control practices for policy-makers. In future, strengthened surveillance and supervision of direct drinking-water systems is needed.

  11. Diagnosis of Noncultivatable Gastroenteritis Viruses, the Human Caliciviruses

    PubMed Central

    Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.

    2001-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is one of the most common illnesses of humans, and many different viruses have been causally associated with this disease. Of those enteric viruses that have been established as etiologic agents of gastroenteritis, only the human caliciviruses cannot be cultivated in vitro. The cloning of Norwalk virus and subsequently of other human caliciviruses has led to the development of several new diagnostic assays. Antigen detection enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) using polyclonal hyperimmune animal sera and antibody detection EIAs using recombinant virus-like particles have supplanted the use of human-derived reagents, but the use of these assays has been restricted to research laboratories. Reverse transcription-PCR assays for the detection of human caliciviruses are more widely available, and these assays have been used to identify virus in clinical specimens as well as in food, water, and other environmental samples. The application of these newer assays has significantly increased the recognition of the importance of human caliciviruses as causes of sporadic and outbreak-associated gastroenteritis. PMID:11148001

  12. Absence of E protein arrests transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus maturation in the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ortego, Javier; Ceriani, Juan E.; Patino, Cristina; Plana, Juan; Enjuanes, Luis

    2007-11-25

    A recombinant transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (rTGEV) in which E gene was deleted (rTGEV-{delta}E) has been engineered. This deletion mutant only grows in cells expressing E protein (E{sup +} cells) indicating that E was an essential gene for TGEV replication. Electron microscopy studies of rTGEV-{delta}E infected BHK-pAPN-E{sup -} cells showed that only immature intracellular virions were assembled. These virions were non-infectious and not secreted to the extracellular medium in BHK-pAPN-E{sup -} cells. RNA and protein composition analysis by RNase-gold and immunoelectron microscopy showed that rTGEV-{delta}E virions contained RNA and also all the structural TGEV proteins, except the deleted E protein. Nevertheless, full virion maturation was blocked. Studies of the rTGEV-{delta}E subcellular localization by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy in infected E{sup -} cells showed that in the absence of E protein virus trafficking was arrested in the intermediate compartment. Therefore, the absence of E protein in TGEV resulted in two actions, a blockade of virus trafficking in the membranes of the secretory pathway, and prevention of full virus maturation.

  13. FastStats: Infectious Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Infectious Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Health, United States trend tables with data on infectious disease Seroprevalence of six infectious diseases among adults in ...

  14. [A case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis accompanied with fasciitis of the extremities].

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tomoharu; Yamade, Mihoko; Matsushita, Naoya; Kawasaki, Shinsuke; Terai, Tomohiro; Uotani, Takahiro; Takayanagi, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Kodaira, Chise; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Furuta, Takahisa; Sugimoto, Ken; Osawa, Satoshi; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro

    2011-03-01

    We encountered a very rare case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis accompanied with fasciitis of the extremities. The patient was a 28-year-old woman with epigastralgia, eosinophilia plus leukocytosis, massive pleural effusion and ascites, and thickening of the walls of the intestine. Increase of the eosinophilic fraction in her ascites led to a diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis. She soon developed resting pain in all limbs and MRI revealed fasciitis. Prednisolone was effective in treating both gastroenteritis and fasciitis. PMID:21389666

  15. Mushroom toxicosis in dogs in general practice causing gastroenteritis, ptyalism and elevated serum lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Hall, J; Barton, L

    2013-05-01

    Mushroom toxicosis is rarely diagnosed in dogs and is poorly reported in the veterinary literature. This report suggests that mushroom toxicosis is a potentially under-diagnosed condition in first opinion practice in the UK. Nine dogs with clinical signs consistent with mushroom toxicosis were identified from the records of an out-of-hours emergency service between August 2010 and January 2011. Four dogs were later excluded because of clinical inconsistencies. Clinical signs included acute profuse ptyalism (5/5), diarrhoea (5/5), vomiting (4/5), hypovolaemia (4/5), stuporous (3/5) or obtunded mentation (1/5), miosis (2/5) and hypothermia (2/5). Serum lipase activity was elevated in 4/4 dogs; canine-specific pancreatic lipase was elevated in the remaining dog. Four dogs recovered with aggressive intravenous fluid therapy, analgesia and supportive care; the remaining dog was euthanased due to severe clinical signs and financial constraints. Mushroom toxicosis is an important differential diagnosis for acute gastroenteritis and one possible cause of some cases of "Seasonal Canine Illness". Affected dogs may demonstrate elevated pancreatic enzymes and mushroom toxicosis should be considered in cases of elevated lipase or abnormal semi-quantitative canine-specific pancreatic lipase activities.

  16. Community-Acquired Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Compared with Adenovirus and Norovirus Gastroenteritis in Italian Children: A Pedianet Study

    PubMed Central

    Donà, D.; Mozzo, E.; Scamarcia, A.; Picelli, G.; Villa, M.; Cantarutti, L.; Giaquinto, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus (RV) is the commonest pathogen in the hospital and primary care settings, followed by Adenovirus (AV) and Norovirus (NV). Only few studies that assess the burden of RV gastroenteritis at the community level have been carried out. Objectives. To estimate incidence, disease characteristics, seasonal distribution, and working days lost by parents of RV, AV, and NV gastroenteritis leading to a family pediatrician (FP) visit among children < 5 years. Methods. 12-month, observational, prospective, FP-based study has been carried out using Pedianet database. Results. RVGE incidence was 1.04 per 100 person-years with the highest incidence in the first 2 years of life. Incidences of AVGEs (1.74) and NVGEs (1.51) were slightly higher with similar characteristics regarding age distribution and symptoms. Risk of hospitalisation, access to emergency room (ER), and workdays lost from parents were not significantly different in RVGEs compared to the other viral infections. Conclusions. Features of RVGE in terms of hospitalisation length and indirect cost are lower than those reported in previous studies. Results of the present study reflect the large variability of data present in the literature. This observation underlines the utility of primary care networks for AGE surveillance and further studies on community-acquired gastroenteritis in children. PMID:26884770

  17. Detection and genetic characterization of human enteric viruses in oyster-associated gastroenteritis outbreaks between 2001 and 2012 in Osaka City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Iritani, Nobuhiro; Kaida, Atsushi; Abe, Niichiro; Kubo, Hideyuki; Sekiguchi, Jun-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Seiji P; Goto, Kaoru; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Noda, Mamoru

    2014-12-01

    Enteric viruses are an important cause of viral food-borne disease. Shellfish, especially oysters, are well recognized as a source of food-borne diseases, and oyster-associated gastroenteritis outbreaks have on occasion become international occurrences. In this study, 286 fecal specimens from 88 oyster-associated gastroenteritis outbreaks were examined for the presence of 10 human enteric viruses using antigenic or genetic detection methods in order to determine the prevalence of these infections. All virus-positive patients were over 18 years old. The most common enteric virus in outbreaks (96.6%) and fecal specimens (68.9%) was norovirus (NoV), indicating a high prevalence of NoV infection associated with the consumption of raw or under-cooked oysters. Five other enteric viruses, aichiviruses, astroviruses, sapoviruses, enteroviruses (EVs), and rotavirus A, were detected in 30.7% of outbreaks. EV strains were characterized into three rare genotypes, coxsackievirus (CV) A1, A19, and EV76. No reports of CVA19 or EV76 have been made since 1981 in the Infectious Agents Surveillance Report by the National Infectious Diseases Surveillance Center, Japan. Their detection suggested that rare types of EVs are circulating in human populations inconspicuously and one of their transmission modes could be the consumption of contaminated oysters. Rapid identification of pathogens is important for the development of means for control and prevention. The results of the present study will be useful to establish an efficient approach for the identification of viral pathogens in oyster-associated gastroenteritis in adults.

  18. Modeling Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... MIDAS models require a breadth of knowledge, the network draws together an interdisciplinary team of researchers with expertise in epidemiology, infectious diseases, computational biology, statistics, social sciences, physics, computer sciences and informatics. In 2006, MIDAS modelers simulated ...

  19. Ethics and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Selgelid, Michael J

    2005-06-01

    Bioethics apparently suffers from a misdistribution of research resources analogous to the '10/90' divide in medical research. Though infectious disease should be recognized as a topic of primary importance for bioethics, the general topic of infectious disease has received relatively little attention from the discipline of bioethics in comparison with things like abortion, euthanasia, genetics, cloning, stem cell research, and so on. The fact that the historical and potential future consequences of infectious diseases are almost unrivalled is one reason that the topic of infectious disease warrants more attention from bioethicists. The 'Black Death' eliminated one third of the European population during the 14th Century; the 1989 flu killed between 20 and 100 million people; and, in the 20th Century smallpox killed perhaps three times more people than all the wars of that period. In the contemporary world, epidemics (AIDS, multi-drug resistant turberculosis, and newly emerging infectious diseases such as SARS) continue to have dramatic consequences. A second reason why the topic of infectious disease deserves further attention is that it raises difficult ethical questions of its own. While infected individuals can threaten the health of other individuals and society as a whole, for example, public health care measures such as surveillance, isolation, and quarantine can require the infringement of widely accepted basic human rights and liberties. An important and difficult ethical question asks how to strike a balance between the utilitarian aim of promoting public health, on the one hand, and libertarian aims of protecting privacy and freedom of movement, on the other, in contexts involving diseases that are--to varying degrees--contagious, deadly, or otherwise dangerous. Third, since their burden is most heavily shouldered by the poor (in developing countries), infectious diseases involve issues of justice--which should be a central concern of ethics. I conclude

  20. Presumed infectious mononucleosis in a college basketball player.

    PubMed

    Greenslade, R A

    2000-06-01

    A 20-year-old college basketball player was diagnosed as having acute infectious mononucleosis and was withheld from championship competition. Subsequent clinical, laboratory, and serologic evaluation revealed that he, in fact, had a latent infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a current viral syndrome, and a false-positive Monospot test. This case demonstrates the need to consider obtaining specific serologic titers for EBV to confirm a diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis and establish eligibility for return to play.

  1. Epidemiological investigation of two parallel gastroenteritis outbreaks in school settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Two parallel gastroenteritis outbreaks occurred in an elementary school and a neighboring kindergarten in Kilkis, Northern Greece in 2012. The aim of the study was the investigation of these two parallel outbreaks as well as their possible source. Methods Two retrospective cohort studies were performed to identify the mode and the vehicle of transmission as well as the possible connection between them. Results Elementary school and kindergarten populations of 79.9% (119/149) and 51.1% (23/45) respectively, participated in the study. Case definition was satisfied by 65 pupils from the elementary school and 14 from the kindergarten. For elementary school, 53 cases were considered primary cases of the outbreak and were included in the analysis. Based on the results of the multivariate analysis, consumption of tap water was the only statistically significant independent risk factor of gastroenteritis (RR = 2.34, 95% C.I.: 1.55-3.53).; a finding supported by the shape of the epidemic curve which referred to a common point source outbreak with secondary cases. For kindergarten, no statistically significant risk factor was identified, and the epidemic curve supported a person-to-person transmission according univariate analysis. Norovirus GI and GII and human Adenovirus were detected by Real Time PCR in stool samples from seven children of elementary school, but stool samples were not collected by children of the kindergarten. Conclusions Even though the etiological agent of the outbreak was not verified, combined epidemiological and laboratory results were in favor of a waterborne viral gastroenteritis outbreak at the elementary school, followed by a person to person spread at the kindergarten. PMID:23510408

  2. Honey: its antibacterial action in the treatment of gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    1985-01-01

    The results of several recent "in vitro" studies using honey in oral rehydration solutions (ORS) givien to infants and children with gastroenteritis showed that the use of honey had caused a reduction in the duration of bacterial diarrhea, and it had worked well as a substitute for glucose in an oral rehydration solution containing electrolytes. Studies have confirmed that honey shortens the duration of diarrhea in patients with bacterial gastroenteritis through its antibacterial properties. In nonbacterial gastroenteritis, honey had the same effect as glucose on the duration of the diarrhea. In a recent study, the antibacterial effect of pure honey was evaluated through testing the growth of an array of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in media containing varying concentrations of honey. It was found that most pathogenic bacteria failed to grow in honey at a concentration of 40% and above. Similar studies have shown that organisms such as Staphylococcus aureua, Proteus mirabilis, and Candida albicans failed to grow in the presence of undiluted honey in in vitro experiments. In experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of honey in inhibiting the growth of various bacteria, it was found that all bacteria grew well on their respective control plates having different growth media, while in honey-agar all intestinal bacterial pathogens failed to grow at a concentration of 40% and above of pure honey. Since honey has a high sugar content it could be used to promote sodium and water absorption from the bowel in a manner similar to the use of oral rice water and sucrose. Findings from studies on honey have thus shown that when given with an ORS it shortens the duration of bacterial diarrhea and may safely be used as a substitute for glucose, provided that the solution contains electrolytes.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacteria that cause gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Romney M; Schuetz, Audrey N

    2015-06-01

    Gastroenteritis due to enteric pathogens is generally a self-limiting disease for which antimicrobial treatment is not required. However, treatment should be considered for cases of severe or prolonged diarrhea, extraintestinal isolation of bacteria, or diarrhea in immunocompromised hosts, the elderly, and infants. Various resistance trends and current issues concerning antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enteric pathogens are reviewed in this article, including Campylobacter, Salmonella, Shigella, Vibrio, Aeromonas, Plesiomonas, and Clostridium difficile. Updated interpretive criteria from breakpoint-setting organizations are reviewed, along with explanations for recent changes in antimicrobial breakpoints.

  4. Identification and Type Distribution of Astroviruses among Children with Gastroenteritis in Colombia and Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Sandra M.; Gutierrez, María F.; Liprandi, Ferdinando; Ludert, Juan E.

    2000-01-01

    Astrovirus infections were detected by enzyme immunoassay in 12 (5%) of 251 stool samples from children with gastroenteritis from Bogota, Colombia. In addition, astroviruses were detected by reverse transcription-PCR in 3 (10%) of 29 stool samples negative for other enteric pathogens collected in Caracas, Venezuela, from children with gastroenteritis. Astrovirus type 1 was the most frequently detected virus. PMID:10970410

  5. Irreversible Loss of Vision in a Child due to Occipital Infarction after Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Hasbini, Dana; Younis, Muhammad H; Bhatti, M Tariq

    2015-01-01

    A 2½-year-old girl developed a bilateral occipital infarct following severe gastroenteritis with bilateral vision of light perception. Evaluations for sickle cell anemia, hemolytic anemia and coagulopathies were negative. Cortical blindness is an uncommon but dramatic complication of gastroenteritis, hence the need of prompt hydration and other supportive measures to avoid irreversible visual loss or mental sequela.

  6. Irreversible Loss of Vision in a Child due to Occipital Infarction after Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Hasbini, Dana; Younis, Muhammad H.; Bhatti, M. Tariq

    2015-01-01

    A 2½-year-old girl developed a bilateral occipital infarct following severe gastroenteritis with bilateral vision of light perception. Evaluations for sickle cell anemia, hemolytic anemia and coagulopathies were negative. Cortical blindness is an uncommon but dramatic complication of gastroenteritis, hence the need of prompt hydration and other supportive measures to avoid irreversible visual loss or mental sequela. PMID:25960732

  7. Emergent Infectious Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Khairallah, Moncef; Jelliti, Bechir; Jenzeri, Salah

    2009-01-01

    Infectious causes should always be considered in all patients with uveitis and it should be ruled out first. The differential diagnosis includes multiple well-known diseases including herpes, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, tuberculosis, bartonellosis, Lyme disease, and others. However, clinicians should be aware of emerging infectious agents as potential causes of systemic illness and also intraocular inflammation. Air travel, immigration, and globalization of business have overturned traditional pattern of geographic distribution of infectious diseases, and therefore one should work locally but think globally, though it is not possible always. This review recapitulates the systemic and ocular mainfestations of several emergent infectious diseases relevant to the ophthalmologist including Rickettsioses, West Nile virus infection, Rift valley fever, dengue fever, and chikungunya. Retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis, and optic nerve involvement have been associated with these emergent infectious diseases. The diagnosis of any of these infections is usually based on pattern of uveitis, systemic symptoms and signs, and specific epidemiological data and confirmed by detection of specific antibody in serum. A systematic ocular examination, showing fairly typical fundus findings, may help in establishing an early clinical diagnosis, which allows prompt, appropriate management. PMID:20404989

  8. Infectious Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sumit; Grammer, Leslie C; Peters, Anju T

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a persistent inflammatory disease that affects a multitude of people worldwide. The pathogenesis of CRS involves many factors including genetics, status of the sinonasal microbiome, infections, and environmental influences. Comorbidities associated with CRS include asthma, allergic rhinitis, bronchiectasis, and certain kinds of immunodeficiency. CRS can be divided into different subtypes based on endotypes and phenotypes. Infectious CRS is one such category. The etiology of infectious CRS is usually secondary to chronic bacterial infection that commonly begins with a viral upper respiratory tract infection. Humoral antibody deficiencies can underlie difficult-to-treat or recurrent CRS. Infectious CRS can be treated with antimicrobials, topical or oral corticosteroids, and nasal saline irrigations. Patients with CRS and humoral immunodeficiency may require an aggressive treatment approach including immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Despite advancements in the field of CRS, targeted therapies and reliable biomarkers are still lacking. PMID:27393772

  9. Forecasting Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic models of infectious disease systems abound and are used to study the epidemiological characteristics of disease outbreaks, the ecological mechanisms affecting transmission, and the suitability of various control and intervention strategies. The dynamics of disease transmission are non-linear and consequently difficult to forecast. Here, we describe combined model-inference frameworks developed for the prediction of infectious diseases. We show that accurate and reliable predictions of seasonal influenza outbreaks can be made using a mathematical model representing population-level influenza transmission dynamics that has been recursively optimized using ensemble data assimilation techniques and real-time estimates of influenza incidence. Operational real-time forecasts of influenza and other infectious diseases have been and are currently being generated.

  10. Infectious waste feed system

    DOEpatents

    Coulthard, E. James

    1994-01-01

    An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

  11. Detection of multiple enteric virus strains within a foodborne outbreak of gastroenteritis: an indication of the source of contamination.

    PubMed

    Gallimore, C I; Pipkin, C; Shrimpton, H; Green, A D; Pickford, Y; McCartney, C; Sutherland, G; Brown, D W G; Gray, J J

    2005-02-01

    An outbreak of acute gastroenteritis of suspected viral aetiology occurred in April 2003 in the British Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship (RFA) Argus deployed in the Northern Arabian Gulf. There were 37 cases amongst a crew of 400 personnel. Of 13 samples examined from cases amongst the crew, six enteric viruses were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Five different viruses were identified including, three norovirus genotypes, a sapovirus and a rotavirus. No multiple infections were detected. A common food source was implicated in the outbreak and epidemiological analysis showed a statistically significant association with salad as the source of the outbreak, with a relative risk of 3.41 (95% confidence interval of 1.7-6.81) of eating salad on a particular date prior to the onset of symptoms. Faecal contamination of the salad at source was the most probable explanation for the diversity of viruses detected and characterized. PMID:15724709

  12. Detection of multiple enteric virus strains within a foodborne outbreak of gastroenteritis: an indication of the source of contamination.

    PubMed

    Gallimore, C I; Pipkin, C; Shrimpton, H; Green, A D; Pickford, Y; McCartney, C; Sutherland, G; Brown, D W G; Gray, J J

    2005-02-01

    An outbreak of acute gastroenteritis of suspected viral aetiology occurred in April 2003 in the British Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship (RFA) Argus deployed in the Northern Arabian Gulf. There were 37 cases amongst a crew of 400 personnel. Of 13 samples examined from cases amongst the crew, six enteric viruses were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Five different viruses were identified including, three norovirus genotypes, a sapovirus and a rotavirus. No multiple infections were detected. A common food source was implicated in the outbreak and epidemiological analysis showed a statistically significant association with salad as the source of the outbreak, with a relative risk of 3.41 (95% confidence interval of 1.7-6.81) of eating salad on a particular date prior to the onset of symptoms. Faecal contamination of the salad at source was the most probable explanation for the diversity of viruses detected and characterized.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of human group C rotavirus in hospitalized children with gastroenteritis in Belém, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Patrícia dos Santos; Guerra, Sylvia de Fátima dos Santos; Siqueira, Jones Anderson Monteiro; Soares, Luana da Silva; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Linhares, Alexandre C; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira

    2016-04-01

    Group C rotavirus (RVC) is potentially an important pathogen associated with acute gastroenteritis (AG), especially in outbreaks. This study aims to detect and molecularly characterize RVC in hospitalized children with AG in Belém, Brazil. From May 2008 to April 2011, 279 stools were subjected to reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction targeting VP7, VP6, VP4, and NSP4 genes. RVC positivity rate was 2.1% (6/279) and phylogenetic analysis of positive samples yields genotype G4-P[2]-I2-E2. No evidence of zoonotic transmission and VP7 gene demonstrated close relationship with Asian strains. RVC surveillance is worth to expand information on evolutionary and epidemiological features of this virus.

  14. High prevalence of community-acquired norovirus gastroenteritis among hospitalized children: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Galan, V; Sánchez-Fauqier, A; Obando, I; Montero, V; Fernandez, M; Torres, M J; Neth, O; Aznar-Martin, J

    2011-12-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) causes significant morbidity, especially in young children, and frequently requires hospitalization even in developed countries. Surveillance studies of AGE are important to determine the prevalence and variety of bacterial and viral pathogens, to initiate targeted preventive measures, such as vaccine programmes, and to monitor its impact. A prospective study was conducted in children <5 years old, admitted with AGE between April 2006 and April 2007 to the Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, Seville, Spain. Demographic and clinical data were collected and patients followed-up after hospital discharge. A stool sample from each child was screened for enteropathogenic bacteria and tested by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for rotavirus, astrovirus, norovirus and sapovirus and by the immunochromatographic method for enteric adenoviruses. Norovirus was the most common pathogen in hospitalized children, being detected in 27%, followed by rotavirus 21%. Mixed infection occurred in nearly 20% of all norovirus infections and was most commonly associated with Salmonella spp. Rotavirus infection was associated with an overall higher severe clinical score compared with norovirus infection. Lactose intolerance was observed in 29 children (7.5%) and most commonly due to rotavirus infection (p <0.001). Seizures were reported in four children. Norovirus was the commonest cause of AGE in hospitalized children <5 years during 2006-2007 in Seville, Spain. The use of these molecular techniques should be included routinely for the surveillance of sporadic cases and outbreaks of norovirus AGE in children attending hospitals as well as healthcare centres.

  15. Characterisation of bubaline coronavirus strains associated with gastroenteritis in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) calves.

    PubMed

    Decaro, Nicola; Cirone, Francesco; Mari, Viviana; Nava, Donatella; Tinelli, Antonella; Elia, Gabriella; Di Sarno, Alessandra; Martella, Vito; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Aprea, Giuseppe; Tempesta, Maria; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2010-10-26

    Recently, a coronavirus strain (179/07-11) was isolated from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and the virus which displayed a strict genetic and biological relatedness with bovine coronavirus (BCoV) was referred to as bubaline coronavirus (BuCoV). Here, we report the characterisation of four BuCoVs strains identified in the faeces or intestinal contents of water buffalo calves with acute gastroenteritis. Single BuCoV infections were detected in all but one cases from which two clostridia species were also isolated. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the 5' end of the spike-protein gene showed that three BuCoVs were closely related to the prototype strain 179/07-11, whereas the fourth isolate (339/08-C) displayed a higher genetic identity to recent BCoV reference strains. Three strains adapted to the in vitro grow on human rectal tumour cells were also evaluated for their ability to replicate in a bovine cell line (Madin Darby bovine kidney) and to cause haemagglutination of chicken erythrocytes and all displayed biological properties similar to those already described for the prototype BuCoV. The present report shows that albeit genetically heterogeneous, the different BuCoV strains possess a common biological pattern which is different from most BCoV and BCoV-like isolates.

  16. A foodborne outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis associated with a Christmas dinner in Porto, Portugal, December 2008.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, J R; Nascimento, M S J

    2009-01-01

    An outbreak of acute norovirus gastroenteritis was detected and epidemiologically linked to a Christmas dinner reunion of 22 recent graduate students in a restaurant in Porto, Portugal, in December 2008. A retrospective cohort study was carried out using online standardised questionnaires. Sixteen primary and three secondary cases were identified and the risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals for each food item were calculated. The response rate to the online questionnaires was 96%. The outbreak met all four Kaplan s criteria and the attack rate was 73%. Norovirus GII.4 2006b was detected in stools and emesis samples of two primary cases. The ingestion of soup and lettuce salad was considered a risk factor for this norovirus outbreak, as determined by statistical analysis. Our investigation demonstrated two routes of transmission of norovirus starting with foodborne exposure followed by secondary person-to-person spread. To our knowledge this is the first study identifying norovirus as the causative agent of a foodborne outbreak in Portugal.

  17. Dynamics of infectious diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, Kat; Brand, Sam; Moir, Jo; Keeling, Matt J.

    2014-02-01

    Modern infectious disease epidemiology has a strong history of using mathematics both for prediction and to gain a deeper understanding. However the study of infectious diseases is a highly interdisciplinary subject requiring insights from multiple disciplines, in particular a biological knowledge of the pathogen, a statistical description of the available data and a mathematical framework for prediction. Here we begin with the basic building blocks of infectious disease epidemiology—the SIS and SIR type models—before considering the progress that has been made over the recent decades and the challenges that lie ahead. Throughout we focus on the understanding that can be developed from relatively simple models, although accurate prediction will inevitably require far greater complexity beyond the scope of this review. In particular, we focus on three critical aspects of infectious disease models that we feel fundamentally shape their dynamics: heterogeneously structured populations, stochasticity and spatial structure. Throughout we relate the mathematical models and their results to a variety of real-world problems.

  18. Controlling Infectious Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Wm. Lane; Fidler, David P.

    1997-01-01

    Advocates establishing programs to educate the public about the growing threat of communicable diseases and to promote effective strategies. Utilizes recent successes and failures to formulate those strategies. Profiles three recent infectious disease outbreaks that illustrate some of the current problems. Identifies four ways that lawyers can…

  19. [Feline infectious peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lutz, H; Hauser, B; Horzinek, M C

    1985-11-15

    This paper gives a summary of our present-day knowledge concerning etiology, clinical aspects, diagnosis, pathology and pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis. Special emphasis is given to the participation of the immune system in the development of lesions. A therapy protocol is proposed and an extensive list of original literature for further study is given.

  20. Eosinophilia in Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Elise M.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    In determining the etiology of eosinophilia, it is necessary to consider the type of patient, including previous travel and exposure history, comorbidities, and symptoms. In this review, we discuss the approach to the patient with eosinophilia from an infectious diseases perspective based on symptom complexes. PMID:26209897

  1. Case-control comparison of bacterial and protozoan microorganisms associated with gastroenteritis: application of molecular detection.

    PubMed

    Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, L E S; Dullaert-de Boer, M; Ruijs, G J H M; van der Reijden, W A; van der Zanden, A G M; Weel, J F L; Schuurs, T A

    2015-06-01

    The introduction of molecular detection of infectious organisms has led to increased numbers of positive findings, as observed for pathogens causing gastroenteritis (GE). However, because little is known about the prevalence of these pathogens in the healthy asymptomatic population, the clinical value of these additional findings is unclear. A case-control study was carried out in a population of patients served by general practitioners in the Netherlands. A total of 2710 fecal samples from case and matched control subjects were subjected to multiplex real-time PCR for the 11 most common bacterial and four protozoal causes of GE. Of 1515 case samples, 818 (54%) were positive for one or more target organisms. A total of 49% of the controls were positive. Higher positivity rates in cases compared to controls were observed for Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Clostridium difficile, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli/Shigella spp., enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteroaggregative E. coli, atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis, and Giardia lamblia. However, Dientamoeba fragilis and Shiga-like toxigenic E. coli were detected significantly less frequent in cases than in controls, while no difference in prevalence was found for typical EPEC and enterohemorrhagic E. coli. The association between the presence of microorganisms and GE was the weakest in children aged 0 to 5 years. Higher relative loads in cases further support causality. This was seen for Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., enterotoxigenic E. coli, and C. parvum/hominis, and for certain age categories of those infected with C. difficile, enteroaggregative E. coli, and atypical EPEC. For D. fragilis and Shiga-like toxigenic E. coli/enterohemorrhagic E. coli, pathogen loads were lower in cases. Application of molecular diagnostics in GE is rapid, sensitive and specific, but results should be interpreted with care, using clinical and additional background information.

  2. Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this: Main Content Area Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases NIAID conducts and supports basic research to better ... diagnose, treat, and prevent a wide range of infectious diseases, whether those diseases emerge naturally or are deliberately ...

  3. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis: a challenge to diagnose and treat.

    PubMed

    Phaw, Naw April; Tsai, Her Hsin

    2016-01-01

    The patient presented with bloody diarrhoea, and crampy abdominal pains. She was diagnosed with eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) after the finding of persistently high peripheral eosinophil counts and histology of endoscopic biopsies. She responded to steroids but became dependent on it and her symptoms recurred on steroid tapering. There was little improvement with alternative treatment such as budesonides, azathioprine and montelukast. Surprisingly her symptoms improved significantly after she was treated with clarithromycin for chest infection and she was continued on clarithromycin. Her eosinophil counts fell dramatically and follow-up CT (thorax, abdomen and pelvic) scan showed the mucosal thickening had improved. She became completely free of the symptoms since she was on clarithromycin and her eosinophils counts fell within the normal range during the follow-up. PMID:27613263

  4. [Cryptosporidium parvum Gastroenteritis in a Patient with Renal Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Çetinkaya, Ülfet; Dursun, İsmail; Kuk, Salih; Şahin, İzzet; Yazar, Süleyman

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a case who starting abundant watery diarrhea on the 14th day of renal transplantation is presented. Stool sample was analyzed for Cryptosporidium spp. by carbol fuchsin staining method, copro-ELISA and nested polimeraze chain reaction (PCR). From sample found positive by Carbol-fuchsin staining method and Copro-ELISA, DNA sequence analysis was performed, gel-purified from amplicon obtained by nested PCR. As a result of DNA sequence analysis was determined to be Cryptosporidium parvum. Although C. parvum is a rare causative agent of gastroenteritis it can be cause serious clinical diarrhea solid organ transplantation patient. As a result, also C.parvum must be considered as a causative agent of diarrhea occurring after organ transplantation. PMID:26470932

  5. Infectious panniculitides: an update.

    PubMed

    Perasole, A

    2013-08-01

    Very few areas in the realm of diagnostic dermatopathology may be so challenging both for the dermatologist and the histopathologist as are those related to panniculitis, because of their frequent overlapping microscopical patterns and uncertain etiology. Classically, a dicotomic taxonomy key has been proposed according the prevalent involvement of subcutaneous septa or lobules of the inflammation, presence or absence of vasculitis and type of vessel involved, but exceptions to this approach do occur and overlapping forms are sometimes encountered. Infectious panniculitides have also been traditionally approached according to this schema, and their microscopic diagnosis may be even more complex when the causative agent is unknown and underrepresented in the specimen. Many types of pathogens are capable to evoke protean clinical manifestations, which range from organism-specific to aspecific pictures. For this reason a tissue biopsy is always mandatory to ascertain the type of lesion and differentiate an infectious process from its many other mimickers essentially represented by reactive-based panniculitides. Recognition of morphologic changes which characterize distinct infections in the subcutis often needs a complete clinical history, physical examination and laboratory studies, especially when few microorganisms if any are found. This review will be focussed on the pathophysiology of the adipose tissue in relation to immunity and mechanisms of host reaction. The most frequent infectious panniculitides will then be discussed with special reference to their microscopic pictures, to provide clues to their specific diagnosis and the use of immunohistochemistry and molecular biology techniques as ancillary techniques. PMID:23900164

  6. Immunoserology of infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    James, K

    1990-01-01

    The immune response to microorganisms not only participates in the elimination of unwanted organisms from the body, but also assists in diagnosis of infectious diseases. The nonspecific immune response is the first line of defense, assisting the body until the specific immune response can be mobilized to provide protective mechanisms. The specific immune response involves humoral or cell-mediated immunity or both, dependent on the nature of the organism and its site of sequestration. A variety of test systems have been developed to identify the causative organisms of infectious diseases. Test systems used in immunoserology have classically included methods of detecting antigen-antibody reactions which range from complement fixation to immunoassay methods. Relevant test systems for detecting antigens and antibodies are described. With numerous test systems available to detect antigens and antibodies, there can be confusion regarding selection of the appropriate system for each application. Methods for detecting antibody to verify immunity differ from immunologic methods to diagnose disease. Techniques to detect soluble antigens present in active infectious states may appear similar to those used to detect antibody, but their differences should be appreciated. PMID:2187592

  7. Protection against gastroenteritis in US households with children who received rotavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Margaret M; Dahl, Rebecca Moritz; Curns, Aaron T; Parashar, Umesh D

    2015-02-15

    We used Truven Health Marketscan claims database (2008-2011) to compare gastroenteritis rates during January-June among households whose child had received rotavirus vaccine with those whose child did not receive vaccine. Statistically significantly lower rates of hospitalization with a rotavirus gastroenteritis or unspecified-gastroenteritis discharge code occurred in vaccinated households among persons 20-29 years and females 20-29 years (2008/2009), and males 30-39 years (2009/2010). Lower emergency department gastroenteritis rates occurred in vaccinated households among females 20-29 years (2009/2010) and individuals 5-19 years (2010/2011). These data suggest rotavirus vaccination of infants provides indirect protection against moderate-to-severe rotavirus disease in young parents and older siblings.

  8. Radioimmunotherapy of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    The need for novel approaches to treat infectious diseases is obvious and urgent. This situation has renewed interest in using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in therapy of infectious diseases. During the last 5 years radioimmunotherapy (RIT), a modality developed for cancer treatment, has been successfully adapted for the treatment of experimental fungal (C. neoformans and H. capsulatum), bacterial (S. pneumoniae and B. anthracis) and viral (HIV-1) infections. RIT produced none or only transient hematological toxicity in experimental animals. Investigation of radiobiological mechanisms of RIT of infections showed that microbial cells are killed by both "direct hit" and "cross-fire" radiation. MAbs radiolabeled with either alpha- or beta-emitters stimulated apoptosis-like cell death, while only mAbs radiolabeled with alpha-emitter 213Bi also decreased the metabolic activity of microbial cells. The success of this approach in laboratory studies combined with earlier nuclear medicine experience on pre-clinical and clinical studies utilizing radiolabeled organism-specific antibodies for imaging of infections provides encouragement for feasibility of therapeutically targeting microbes with labeled antibodies. We envision that first the organism-specific mAbs will be radiolabeled with imaging radionuclides such as 99mTc or 111In to localize the sites of infection with SPECT followed by RIT with 188Re- or 90Y-labeled mAb, respectively. Also, immunoPET might be utilized for imaging of infection before treatment if such positron-emitting radionuclides as 86Y (matching pair for 90Y) or 124I (matching pair for 131I) are available. It might be possible to create a so-called “pan-antibody” which would recognize an antigen shared by a particular class of human pathogens such as fungi, for example. The availability of such antibodies would eliminate the necessity of having antibodies specific for each particular microorganism and would enormously enhance the development of RIT

  9. Spatial dynamics of airborne infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Marguerite; Stilianakis, Nikolaos I; Drossinos, Yannis

    2012-03-21

    Disease outbreaks, such as those of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in 2003 and the 2009 pandemic A(H1N1) influenza, have highlighted the potential for airborne transmission in indoor environments. Respirable pathogen-carrying droplets provide a vector for the spatial spread of infection with droplet transport determined by diffusive and convective processes. An epidemiological model describing the spatial dynamics of disease transmission is presented. The effects of an ambient airflow, as an infection control, are incorporated leading to a delay equation, with droplet density dependent on the infectious density at a previous time. It is found that small droplets (∼0.4μm) generate a negligible infectious force due to the small viral load and the associated duration they require to transmit infection. In contrast, larger droplets (∼4μm) can lead to an infectious wave propagating through a fully susceptible population or a secondary infection outbreak for a localized susceptible population. Droplet diffusion is found to be an inefficient mode of droplet transport leading to minimal spatial spread of infection. A threshold air velocity is derived, above which disease transmission is impaired even when the basic reproduction number R(0) exceeds unity.

  10. [Infectious aortitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Zizi, O; Jiber, H; Bouarhroum, A

    2016-02-01

    Infectious aortitis is a rare clinical entity that most often manifests itself by an aortic aneurysm. The syphilitic or tubercular forms can be subacute. When it is caused by Salmonella sp., Staphylococcus sp. or Streptococcus pneumoniae, the aortitis is acute with alarming symptoms. Germs found in most cases are Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus. S. pneumoniae rarely causes infectious aortitis. We report the case of a 75-year-old patient seen in an emergency setting for sudden-onset abdominal pain with fever. An abdominal angio-computed tomography (CT) scan showed a sacciform infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, with an inflammatory aspect and periaortic hematoma. Surgical cure was undertaken because of the impending rupture. An interposition aortic replacement graft was implanted. Blood cultures and bacteriological study of the aortic wall isolated a S. pneumoniae. The anatomical pathology study reported fibrin clot leukocyte remodeling of the aortic wall. An intravenous antibiotic regimen was started. Several organisms, including Streptococcus, can cause infectious aortitis. We found 36 cases described in the literature in addition to our patient. PMID:26775836

  11. Spatial dynamics of airborne infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Marguerite; Stilianakis, Nikolaos I; Drossinos, Yannis

    2012-03-21

    Disease outbreaks, such as those of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in 2003 and the 2009 pandemic A(H1N1) influenza, have highlighted the potential for airborne transmission in indoor environments. Respirable pathogen-carrying droplets provide a vector for the spatial spread of infection with droplet transport determined by diffusive and convective processes. An epidemiological model describing the spatial dynamics of disease transmission is presented. The effects of an ambient airflow, as an infection control, are incorporated leading to a delay equation, with droplet density dependent on the infectious density at a previous time. It is found that small droplets (∼0.4μm) generate a negligible infectious force due to the small viral load and the associated duration they require to transmit infection. In contrast, larger droplets (∼4μm) can lead to an infectious wave propagating through a fully susceptible population or a secondary infection outbreak for a localized susceptible population. Droplet diffusion is found to be an inefficient mode of droplet transport leading to minimal spatial spread of infection. A threshold air velocity is derived, above which disease transmission is impaired even when the basic reproduction number R(0) exceeds unity. PMID:22207025

  12. Rotavirus gastroenteritis in children less than five years of age in primary care settings in Bulgaria: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Tiholova, Mayda; Gopala, Kusuma; Berberova, Magda; Strokova-Stoilova, Margarita; Tafalla, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Background Rotavirus (RV) causes a high proportion of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) cases, especially among children under the age of five years old. This surveillance study was undertaken to study the incidence and severity of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in primary care settings in Bulgaria over a one-year period. Methods In this prospective, observational study of AGE cases in children under five years of age presenting in the primary care setting over a one year period, stool samples were collected and tested for RV using a rapid visual immunochromatographic test kit. After the first visit, parents monitored their child for about two weeks and reported the symptoms experienced by the child during the follow-up period to the physician in a follow-up phone call. The percentage of RVGE cases among AGE was calculated and the severity of AGE (according to the 20-point Vesikari scale) was assessed by the physician based on the symptoms reported by the parents. The seasonality of RVGE was also studied. Results The proportion of RVGE among the 624 AGE cases examined was 25.5%. Severe AGE was experienced by 81.8% RV-positive and 54.6% RV-negative children (p-value <0.001) and a third of all severe AGE cases occurred in RV-positive patients. A multivariate logistic regression analysis of the determinants of hospitalization indicated that severity of disease and RV-positivity were the statistically significant variables explaining hospitalization of AGE cases; even controlling for severity, RV-positive patients were more often hospitalized than RV-negative ones. RVGE cases occurred throughout the year, with peaks during August and September. Conclusion Our study emphasizes that RV is an important cause of AGE in children under five presenting in primary care settings in Bulgaria and a disproportionately high proportion of severe AGE cases may be attributed to RV infections. Trial registration number NCT01733849

  13. Rapid detection of norovirus in naturally contaminated food: foodborne gastroenteritis outbreak on a cruise ship in Brazil, 2010.

    PubMed

    Morillo, Simone Guadagnucci; Luchs, Adriana; Cilli, Audrey; do Carmo Sampaio Tavares Timenetsky, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a prevalent pathogen of foodborne diseases; however, its detection in foods other than shellfish is often time consuming and unsuccessful. In 2010, an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis occurred on a cruise ship in Brazil, and NoV was the etiologic agent suspected. The objectives of this study were to report that a handy in-house methodology was suitable for NoV detection in naturally contaminated food, and perform the molecular characterization of food strains. Food samples (blue cheese, Indian sauce, herbal butter, soup, and white sauce) were analyzed by ELISA, two methods of RNA extraction, TRIzol(®) and QIAamp(®), following conventional RT-PCR. The qPCR was used in order to confirm the NoV genogroups. GI and GII NoV genogroups were identified by conventional RT-PCR after RNA extraction by means of the TRIzol(®) method. Two GII NoV samples were successfully sequenced, classified as GII.4; and they displayed a genetic relationship with strains from the Asian continent also isolated in 2010. GII and GI NoV were identified in distinct food matrices suggesting that it was not a common source of contamination. TRIzol(®) extraction followed by conventional RT-PCR was a suitable methodology in order to identify NoV in naturally contaminated food. Moreover, food samples could be processed within 8 h indicating the value of the method used for NoV detection, and its potential to identify foodborne gastroenteritis outbreaks in food products other than shellfish. This is the first description in Brazil of NoV detection in naturally contaminated food other than shellfish involved in a foodborne outbreak.

  14. Molecular detection of three gastroenteritis viruses in urban surface waters in Beijing and correlation with levels of fecal indicator bacteria.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoqing; Wei, Yumei; Cheng, Li; Zhang, Deyou; Wang, Zijian

    2012-09-01

    To assess the presence of three gastroenteritis viruses responsible for human acute gastroenteritis in surface water, a 1-year study was carried out in the city of Beijing, China. A total of 108 urban surface water samples were collected from nine collection sites which were defined with a global positioning system in rivers or lakes from September 2006 to August 2007. The water samples were subjected to virus concentration using an HA electronegative filter, followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for rotavirus (RV) astrovirus (AV), and norovirus (NV). It showed that the number of viruses detected in water samples from different sites was variable, totaling 63 virus strains, with rotavirus (48.1%) verified as the most prevalent detected, followed by astrovirus (AV, 5.6%), and norovirus (NV, 4.6%). RV was also quantified by real-time PCR and the concentration of RV ranged from 0 to 18.27 genome copies·L(-1). And the distributions of RV in surface water were abundant in cold weather (from September to February) while less prevailing in warm weather (from March to August). The high detection rate of RV we encountered in this study provided convincing evidence that RV circulated at a certain frequency in the Beijing population. There was no statistically significant correlation between RV levels and both fecal coliform (R (2) = 0.02) and Enterococcus faecalis (R (2) = 0.02) densities. Our study suggests prolonged virus persistence in aquatic environments and emphasizes the enteric virus group as the most reliable for environmental monitoring. PMID:21915594

  15. Rotavirus gastroenteritis in children less than five years of age in primary care settings in Bulgaria: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Tiholova, Mayda; Gopala, Kusuma; Berberova, Magda; Strokova-Stoilova, Margarita; Tafalla, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Background Rotavirus (RV) causes a high proportion of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) cases, especially among children under the age of five years old. This surveillance study was undertaken to study the incidence and severity of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in primary care settings in Bulgaria over a one-year period. Methods In this prospective, observational study of AGE cases in children under five years of age presenting in the primary care setting over a one year period, stool samples were collected and tested for RV using a rapid visual immunochromatographic test kit. After the first visit, parents monitored their child for about two weeks and reported the symptoms experienced by the child during the follow-up period to the physician in a follow-up phone call. The percentage of RVGE cases among AGE was calculated and the severity of AGE (according to the 20-point Vesikari scale) was assessed by the physician based on the symptoms reported by the parents. The seasonality of RVGE was also studied. Results The proportion of RVGE among the 624 AGE cases examined was 25.5%. Severe AGE was experienced by 81.8% RV-positive and 54.6% RV-negative children (p-value <0.001) and a third of all severe AGE cases occurred in RV-positive patients. A multivariate logistic regression analysis of the determinants of hospitalization indicated that severity of disease and RV-positivity were the statistically significant variables explaining hospitalization of AGE cases; even controlling for severity, RV-positive patients were more often hospitalized than RV-negative ones. RVGE cases occurred throughout the year, with peaks during August and September. Conclusion Our study emphasizes that RV is an important cause of AGE in children under five presenting in primary care settings in Bulgaria and a disproportionately high proportion of severe AGE cases may be attributed to RV infections. Trial registration number NCT01733849 PMID:27622162

  16. A phase trial of the oral Lactobacillus casei vaccine polarizes Th2 cell immunity against transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinpeng; Hou, Xingyu; Tang, Lijie; Jiang, Yanping; Ma, Guangpeng; Li, Yijing

    2016-09-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) is a member of the genus Coronavirus, family Coronaviridae, order Nidovirales. TGEV is an enteropathogenic coronavirus that causes highly fatal acute diarrhoea in newborn pigs. An oral Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) vaccine against anti-transmissible gastroenteritis virus developed in our laboratory was used to study mucosal immune responses. In this L. casei vaccine, repetitive peptides expressed by L. casei (specifically the MDP and tuftsin fusion protein (MT)) were repeated 20 times and the D antigenic site of the TGEV spike (S) protein was repeated 6 times. Immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus is crucial for investigations of the effect of immunization, such as the first immunization time and dose. The first immunization is more important than the last immunization in the series. The recombinant Lactobacillus elicited specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. Recombinant L. casei had a strong potentiating effect on the cellular immunity induced by the oral L. casei vaccine. However, during TGEV infection, the systemic and local immune responses switched from Th1 to Th2-based immune responses. The systemic humoral immune response was stronger than the cellular immune response after TGEV infection. We found that the recombinant Lactobacillus stimulated IL-17 expression in both the systemic and mucosal immune responses against TGEV infection. Furthermore, the Lactobacillus vaccine stimulated an anti-TGEV infection Th17 pathway. The histopathological examination showed tremendous potential for recombinant Lactobacillus to enable rapid and effective treatment for TGEV with an intestinal tropism in piglets. The TGEV immune protection was primarily dependent on mucosal immunity. PMID:27020282

  17. Globalization and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Frenk, Julio; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio; Knaul, Felicia M

    2011-09-01

    This article discusses the nature of the health challenges created by globalization and proposes new forms of international cooperation to confront them. The discussion of global health challenges includes both the transfer of health risks, with an emphasis on infectious diseases, and the international dissemination of health opportunities, including the transfer of knowledge and technology. The authors argue that the health-related challenges and opportunities of an increasingly interdependent world demand new forms of international cooperation. The authors suggest the promotion of 3 elements that, in their essence, contain the idea of collaboration: exchange, evidence, and empathy.

  18. Feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2005-01-01

    The article discusses feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), an important disease frequently seen in veterinary practice. FIP causes many problems to the veterinarian as it can be difficult to definitively diagnose the disease, as there is no effective treatment, and as prophylactic interventions are not very successful. Although intense research has created a lot of new knowledge about this disease in the last years, there are still many unanswered questions. The objective of this article is to review recent knowledge and to increase understanding of the complex pathogenesis of FIP.

  19. Feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Teresa; Randell, Susan; Moore, Lisa

    2009-10-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) frequently results in death in cats. It is caused by a mutated, highly contagious coronavirus, and it is more common in indoor cats in multicat households. A complex interaction between the coronavirus and the feline immune system causes disseminated vasculitis, which is the hallmark of FIP. New tests are being developed, but the antemortem diagnosis of FIP continues to be difficult and frustrating. Current treatments are crude and involve supportive care and immunosuppression. Minimizing exposure is the best method of preventing infection.

  20. Feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Andrew, S E

    2000-09-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis is a noncurable viral disease affecting cats worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that the FIPV has evolved as a deletion mutation of FECV. Immune complex deposition and vasculitis with pyogranulomatous lesions are the hallmark of FIP. The only definitive antemortem diagnostic test for FIP is histopathologic examination of tissue. Ocular manifestations occur commonly with noneffusive FIP. The most common clinical sign is a bilateral granulomatous anterior uveitis often accompanied by chorioretinitis. Treatment of ocular FIP is symptomatic, and the mainstay of palliative therapy is topical or systemic corticosteroids or both.

  1. Early management of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Nicolien J; Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J; Bruno, Marco J

    2013-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to prevent or treat organ failure and to reduce infectious complications. This review addresses the management of acute pancreatitis in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms, including fluid therapy, nutrition and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. This review also discusses the recently revised Atlanta classification which provides new uniform terminology, thereby facilitating communication regarding severity and complications of pancreatitis.

  2. Norovirus Gastroenteritis in a Birth Cohort in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Vipin Kumar; George, Santosh; Sarkar, Rajiv; Giri, Sidhartha; Samuel, Prasanna; Vivek, Rosario; Saravanabavan, Anuradha; Liakath, Farzana Begum; Ramani, Sasirekha; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren; Gray, James J.; Brown, David W.; Estes, Mary K.; Kang, Gagandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background Noroviruses are an important cause of gastroenteritis but little is known about disease and re-infection rates in community settings in Asia. Methods Disease, re-infection rates, strain prevalence and genetic susceptibility to noroviruses were investigated in a birth cohort of 373 Indian children followed up for three years. Stool samples from 1856 diarrheal episodes and 147 vomiting only episodes were screened for norovirus by RT-PCR. Norovirus positivity was correlated with clinical data, secretor status and ABO blood group. Results Of 1856 diarrheal episodes, 207 (11.2%) were associated with norovirus, of which 49(2.6%) were norovirus GI, 150(8.1%) norovirus GII, and 8 (0.4%) were mixed infections with both norovirus GI and GII. Of the 147 vomiting only episodes, 30 (20.4%) were positive for norovirus in stool, of which 7 (4.8%) were norovirus GI and 23 (15.6%) GII. At least a third of the children developed norovirus associated diarrhea, with the first episode at a median age of 5 and 8 months for norovirus GI and GII, respectively. Norovirus GI.3 and GII.4 were the predominant genotypes (40.3% and 53.0%) with strain diversity and change in the predominant sub-cluster over time observed among GII viruses. A second episode of norovirus gastroenteritis was documented in 44/174 (25.3%) ever-infected children. Children with the G428A homozygous mutation for inactivation of the FUT2 enzyme (se428se428) were at a significantly lower risk (48/190) of infection with norovirus (p = 0.01). Conclusions This is the first report of norovirus documenting disease, re-infection and genetic susceptibility in an Asian birth cohort. The high incidence and apparent lack of genogroupII specific immunity indicate the need for careful studies on further characterization of strains, asymptomatic infection and shedding and immune response to further our understanding of norovirus infection and disease. PMID:27284939

  3. Multiple outbreaks of Norwalk-like virus gastro-enteritis associated with a Mediterranean-style restaurant.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J A; Yuen, L K; Catton, M G; Gunesekere, I C; Wright, P J; Bettelheim, K A; Griffith, J M; Lightfoot, D; Hogg, G G; Gregory, J; Wilby, R; Gaston, J

    2001-02-01

    The role of diverse infectious agents, particularly Norwalk-like viruses (NLV), in three successive gastro-enteritis outbreaks in one setting (a restaurant) was evaluated. Methods included standard bacteriological tests, specific tests for Escherichia coli, tests for verocytotoxins, electron microscopy (EM) for viruses and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) methodology for NLV. No pathogenic bacteria were detected. Verocytotoxin genes, although detected by PCR in the first outbreak, could not be confirmed in the E. coli isolated, so they did not appear to be of significance. NLV was the main agent detected in each of the three outbreaks. DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the amplified products obtained from the RT-PCR positive specimens indicated that only one NLV strain was involved in each outbreak, but the NLV strains responsible for the three outbreaks were different from each other. PCR technology for detection of NLV proved highly sensitive, but failed to detect one specimen which was positive by EM. The restaurant associated with the outbreaks is a Mediterranean-style restaurant where food from a common platter is typically eaten with fingers. The findings indicate that NLV was introduced by guests or staff and was not due to a long-term reservoir within the setting.

  4. Multiprefectural spread of gastroenteritis outbreaks attributable to a single genogroup II norovirus strain from a tourist restaurant in Nagasaki, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hirakata, Yoichi; Arisawa, Kokichi; Nishio, Osamu; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2005-03-01

    A series of gastroenteritis outbreaks caused by noroviruses (NVs) among tourist groups from several prefectures was associated with eating a lunch prepared by a restaurant in Nagasaki City, Japan, on 18 and 19 November 2003. A retrospective cohort study was performed to estimate the magnitude of the outbreak and identify the source of infection. Epidemiological information was obtained through the local public health centers in the areas where the illness occurred. Stool and vomit specimens and food and environmental samples were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR with genogroup-specific primers. Positive samples were sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. Of 1,492 tourists who ate a lunch prepared by the restaurant during the 2-day period, 660 (44.2%) developed illness, with an average incubation time of 31.2 h. Whereas NVs were not detected in any food samples, identical sequences most closely related to the Mexico genotype of genogroup II NV were found in specimens from case patients, restaurant staff, and the kitchen table. Food handlers were concluded to be the source of the outbreak as a result of the contamination of several meals. The series of outbreaks described here exemplifies the role of tourism as a contemporary way to distribute a single infectious agent to multiple and geographically remote areas.

  5. Multiprefectural Spread of Gastroenteritis Outbreaks Attributable to a Single Genogroup II Norovirus Strain from a Tourist Restaurant in Nagasaki, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hirakata, Yoichi; Arisawa, Kokichi; Nishio, Osamu; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2005-01-01

    A series of gastroenteritis outbreaks caused by noroviruses (NVs) among tourist groups from several prefectures was associated with eating a lunch prepared by a restaurant in Nagasaki City, Japan, on 18 and 19 November 2003. A retrospective cohort study was performed to estimate the magnitude of the outbreak and identify the source of infection. Epidemiological information was obtained through the local public health centers in the areas where the illness occurred. Stool and vomit specimens and food and environmental samples were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR with genogroup-specific primers. Positive samples were sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. Of 1,492 tourists who ate a lunch prepared by the restaurant during the 2-day period, 660 (44.2%) developed illness, with an average incubation time of 31.2 h. Whereas NVs were not detected in any food samples, identical sequences most closely related to the Mexico genotype of genogroup II NV were found in specimens from case patients, restaurant staff, and the kitchen table. Food handlers were concluded to be the source of the outbreak as a result of the contamination of several meals. The series of outbreaks described here exemplifies the role of tourism as a contemporary way to distribute a single infectious agent to multiple and geographically remote areas. PMID:15750067

  6. Studies on Infectious Mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Joncas, J.; Chagnon, A.; Pavilanis, V.

    1966-01-01

    Viral studies were carried out on throat swabs, rectal swabs and washed white blood cells from 27 cases of infectious mononucleosis (positive Paul-Bunnell-David-sohn test), and from 22 controls. Four cytopathic agents were isolated in the test group, two of which were readily subcultured for at least three successive passages. Three cytopathic agents were recovered in the control group, two of which have been identified as adenovirus type 5 and adenovirus type 3. The unidentified agents tested so far are sensitive to ether and to pH 3. The results of acridine-orange staining and the immunofluorescence technique, using a conjugated control serum and two conjugated convalescent infectious mononucleosis sera, indicate that the isolated agent or agents in the test group are RNA-type agents with a cytoplasmic cycle of development. The overall results of this study lead the authors to suspect a respiratory syncytial-like myxovirus as the as yet unidentified agent which they recovered. ImagesFig. 1aFig. 1bFig. 1cFig. 1dFig. 2aFig. 2bFig. 2cFig. 2dFig. 3aFig. 3bFig. 3cFig. 3dFig. 3eFig. 3f PMID:4952899

  7. Mitigating Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, Victoria

    The emergence of new, transmissible infections poses a significant threat to human populations. As the 2009 novel influenza A/H1N1 pandemic and the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic demonstrate, we have observed the effects of rapid spread of illness in non-immune populations and experienced disturbing uncertainty about future potential for human suffering and societal disruption. Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of a newly emerged infectious organism are usually gathered in retrospect as the outbreak evolves and affects populations. Knowledge of potential effects of outbreaks and epidemics and most importantly, mitigation at community, regional, national and global levels is needed to inform policy that will prepare and protect people. Study of possible outcomes of evolving epidemics and application of mitigation strategies is not possible in observational or experimental research designs, but computational modeling allows conduct of `virtual' experiments. Results of well-designed computer simulations can aid in the selection and implementation of strategies that limit illness and death, and maintain systems of healthcare and other critical resources that are vital to public protection. Mitigating Infectious Disease Outbreaks.

  8. Nutritional modulation of resistance to infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Klasing, K C

    1998-08-01

    Dietary characteristics can modulate a bird's susceptibility to infectious challenges and subtle influences due to the level of nutrients or the types of ingredients may at times be of critical importance. This review considers seven mechanisms for nutritional modulation of resistance to infectious disease in poultry. 1) Nutrition may impact the development of the immune system, both in ovo and in the first weeks posthatch. Micronutrient deficiencies that affect developmental events, such as the seeding of lymphoid organs and clonal expansion of lymphocyte clones, can negatively impact the immune system later in life. 2) A substrate role of nutrients is necessary for the immune response so that responding cells can divide and synthesize effector molecules. The quantitative need for nutrients for supporting a normal immune system, as well as the proliferation of leukocytes and the production of antibodies during an infectious challenge, is very small relative to uses for growth or egg production. It is likely that the systemic acute phase response that accompanies most infectious challenges is a more significant consumer of nutrients than the immune system itself. 3) The low concentration of some nutrients (e.g., iron) in body fluids makes them the limiting substrates for the proliferation of invading pathogens and the supply of these nutrients is further limited during the immune response. 4) Some nutrients (e.g., fatty acids and vitamins A, D, and E) have direct regulatory actions on leukocytes by binding to intracellular receptors or by modifying the release of second messengers. 5) The diet may also have indirect regulatory effects that are mediated by the classical endocrine system. 6) Physical and chemical aspects of the diet can modify the populations of microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract, the capacity of pathogens to attach to enterocytes, and the integrity of the intestinal epithelium.

  9. Foodborne gastroenteritis due to Norwalk virus in a Winnipeg hotel.

    PubMed Central

    Sekla, L; Stackiw, W; Dzogan, S; Sargeant, D

    1989-01-01

    Within 1 week four separate incidents of gastroenteritis presumed to be foodborne were reported by guests of a Winnipeg hotel. Investigation revealed poor food-handling practices and illness among the kitchen staff. Elevated bacterial counts and Escherichia coli were found in 15 of 24 samples of food tested, and Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from 2 pastry samples. Culture of 14 stool samples for bacteria yielded Clostridium perfringens in 1 sample from a staff member and coagulase-positive S. aureus in 2 samples from staff members and 3 from guests. All of the S. aureus isolates were nonenterotoxigenic and had three different phage patterns. Electron microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy revealed the prototype Norwalk virus in five (56%) of nine stool samples; four samples were from guests, and one was from a kitchen employee. The employee had had diarrhea 24 hours before the first outbreak and was thus believed to be the source of the virus infection, possibly through food handling. This is the first report of Norwalk virus isolation and the first of foodborne Norwalk virus transmission in Canada. A review of foodborne Norwalk virus infections is presented. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2541881

  10. Intestinal microbiota are transiently altered during Salmonella-induced gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Deanna L; Vallance, Bruce A

    2008-08-01

    The mammalian GI tract contains a large and diverse ecosystem of microorganisms that play a profound role in our development and physiology. Interestingly, the microbial make-up within the intestine has been found to be altered in many clinically important diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, Types 1 and 2 diabetes, and obesity. Barman et al. used a Salmonella-induced murine model of gastroenteritis to show that the intestinal microbiota are transiently altered during the host inflammatory response to infection. These findings are of interest as understanding how the microbiota are altered during disease states may offer insight into which microbial populations are important in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Recently, probiotics have been shown to modulate the mucosal immune system and improve intestinal barrier function, validating their potential as therapeutics for gastrointestinal-associated diseases. As we begin to understand the benefits conferred to the intestine by microbiota, the use of probiotics to modify its composition is an attractive option to improve human health. PMID:19072400

  11. Risk factors for gastroenteritis in child day care.

    PubMed

    Enserink, R; Mughini-Gras, L; Duizer, E; Kortbeek, T; Van Pelt, W

    2015-10-01

    The child day-care centre (DCC) is often considered as one risk factor for gastroenteritis (GE) rather than a complex setting in which the interplay of many factors may influence the epidemiology of GE. This study aimed to identify DCC-level risk factors for GE and major enteropathogen occurrence. A dynamic network of 100 and 43 DCCs participated in a syndromic and microbiological surveillance during 2010-2013. The weekly incidence of GE events and weekly prevalence of five major enteropathogens (rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium hominis/parvum) were modelled per DCC using mixed-effects negative binomial/Poisson regression models. Sixteen hundred children were surveyed up to 3 years, during which 1829 GE episodes were reported and 5197 faecal samples were analysed. Identified risk factors were: large DCC capacity, crowding, having animals, nappy changing areas, sandpits, paddling pools, cleaning potties in normal sinks, cleaning vomit with paper towels (but without cleaner), mixing of staff between child groups, and staff members with multiple daily duties. Protective factors were: disinfecting fomites with chlorine, cleaning vomit with paper towels (and cleaner), daily cleaning of bed linen/toys, cohorting and exclusion policies for ill children and staff. Targeting these factors may reduce the burden of DCC-related GE. PMID:25592679

  12. Reducing Non-Infectious Risks of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.; Gropper, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, non-infectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion respectively. These complications and others are reviewed here and several controversial methods for prevention of non-infectious complications of transfusion are discussed; universal leukoreduction of red cell units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of red cell storage age. PMID:21792054

  13. Sports: The Infectious Hazards.

    PubMed

    Minooee, Arezou; Wang, Jeff; Gupta, Geeta K

    2015-10-01

    Although the medical complications of sports are usually traumatic in nature, infectious hazards also arise. While blood-borne pathogens such as HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C, cause significant illness, the risk of acquiring these agents during sporting activities is minimal. Skin infections are more commonplace, arising from a variety of microbial agents including bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens. Sports involving water contact can lead to enteric infections, eye infections, or disseminated infections such as leptospirosis. Mumps, measles, and influenza are vaccine-preventable diseases that have been transmitted during sporting events, both in players and in spectators. Prevention is the key to many of these infections. Players should be vaccinated and should not participate in sports if their infection can be spread by contact, airborne, or droplet transmission.

  14. Report of data on children with non-typhi Salmonella gastroenteritis in a three-year period.

    PubMed

    Küçük, Öznur; Biçer, Suat; Ugraş, Meltem; Çöl, Defne; Giray, Tuba; Çiler Erdag, Gülay; Gürol, Yeşim; Yilmaz, Gülden; Yalvaç, Zerrin; Vitrinel, Ayça; Kaspar, Çigdem

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory data of children with acute gastroenteritis caused by non-typhoid Salmonella spp. infections. Clinical (demographic data, symptoms and findings) and laboratory data (stool microscopy, rapid antigen tests, culture, multiplex polymerase chain reaction and blood test results) of children with acute gastroenteritis caused by non-typhoid Salmonella spp. between January 2010 and October 2012 were evaluated. Differences between the groups for categorical variables were estimated with a chi-square or Fisher exact test; for continuous variables with two independent samples a t test was used. P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Sixty-seven children, 39 (58.2%) males and 28 (41.8%) females aged between 1 - 16 years (mean ± SD: 4.64 ± 2.91), were diagnosed with acute bacterial gastroenteritis caused by non-typhoid Salmonella spp. The main serotypes are Salmonella enteritidis (85%) and Salmonella typhimurium (7.5%). The presenting symptoms were diarrhoea (95.5%), fever (61.1%), vomiting (34.3%), abdominal pain (32.8%), loss of appetite (7.4%) and malaise (7.4%). Fever and dehydration (moderate and/or severe) were detected in 11 (16.4%) patients. The mean leukocyte count was 10.930/μL [95% confidence interval (CI), SD: ± 5.710/μL], neutrophil count was 7.880/μL (95% CI, SD: ± 4.960/μL), CRP was 64.16 mg/L (95% CI, SD: ± 76.24 mg/L), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 34.72 mm/hour (95% CI, SD: ± 13.64 mm/h). Stool microscopy was positive for leukocytes in 18 patients (26.8%). The definitive diagnosis was made with positive stool culture (n = 65) and/or PCR test (n = 4). Viral antigen positivity was detected in 10 patients (14.9%), evaluated as viral co-infection and false positive results. Antibiotic therapy and hospitalization were required in 26 (38.8%) and 23 (34.3%) patients, respectively. Salmonella carriage was detected in one patient (1.5%). Bloody diarrhoea

  15. 76 FR 39041 - Infectious Diseases

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ...-596, 84 STAT. 1590 (29 U.S.C. 653, 655, 657), Secretary of Labor's Order No. 4-2010 (75 FR 55355 (Sept... Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1910 RIN 1218-AC46 Infectious Diseases AGENCY... exposure to infectious diseases. OSHA plans to use the information gathered at these meetings to...

  16. Infectious Diseases in Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleator, Esther K.

    Discussed in this publication are infectious illnesses for which children attending day care appear to be at special risk. Also covered are the common cold, some infectious disease problems receiving media attention, and some other annoying but not serious diseases, such as head lice, pinworms, and contagious skin conditions. Causes,…

  17. Neuroimaging of Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases of the Pediatric Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Cerebellar involvement by infectious-inflammatory conditions is rare in children. Most patients present with acute ataxia, and are typically previously healthy, young (often preschool) children. Viral involvement is the most common cause and ranges from acute postinfectious ataxia to acute cerebellitis MR imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of patients suspected of harboring inflammatory-infectious involvement of the cerebellum and brainstem. Knowledge of the imaging features of these disorders and technical competence on pediatric MR imaging are necessary for a correct interpretation of findings, which in turn prompts further management.

  18. Neuroimaging of Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases of the Pediatric Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Cerebellar involvement by infectious-inflammatory conditions is rare in children. Most patients present with acute ataxia, and are typically previously healthy, young (often preschool) children. Viral involvement is the most common cause and ranges from acute postinfectious ataxia to acute cerebellitis MR imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of patients suspected of harboring inflammatory-infectious involvement of the cerebellum and brainstem. Knowledge of the imaging features of these disorders and technical competence on pediatric MR imaging are necessary for a correct interpretation of findings, which in turn prompts further management. PMID:27423804

  19. Multilevel analysis of childhood nonviral gastroenteritis associated with environmental risk factors in Quebec, 1999-2006.

    PubMed

    Kaboré, Henri; Lebel, Alexandre; Levallois, Patrick; Michel, Pascal; Payment, Pierre; Déry, Pierre; Lebel, Germain

    2013-10-01

    Childhood nonviral gastroenteritis is a priority for various public health authorities. Given that waterborne transmission is sometimes incriminated during investigation of gastroenteritis outbreaks, the authors hypothesized that watershed characteristics may influence the occurrence of this disease and could contribute additional insights for better prevention and control. The study described here aimed to investigate watershed characteristics in relation to nonviral gastroenteritis and specifically three bacterial and parasitic forms of childhood gastroenteritis to assess their relative importance in the province of Quebec, Canada. Information on children aged 0-4 years with bacterial or parasitic enteric infections reported through ongoing surveillance between 1999 and 2006 in the province of Quebec was collected. Factors measured at the municipal and watershed levels were analyzed using multilevel models with a Poisson distribution and log link function. Childhood nonviral gastroenteritis, giardiasis, and campylobacteriosis were positively associated with small ruminants and cattle density. Childhood salmonellosis was positively associated with cattle density. Also, childhood campylobacteriosis incidence was positively associated with larger watershed agricultural surface. In addition to local agroenvironmental factors, this analysis revealed an important watershed effect.

  20. Change in incidence of clinic visits for all-cause and rotavirus gastroenteritis in young children following the introduction of universal rotavirus vaccination in Israel.

    PubMed

    Muhsen, Khitam; Chodick, Gabriel; Goren, Sophy; Anis, Emilia; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Shalev, Varda; Cohen, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Both rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq and Rotarix were efficacious against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in clinical trials; yet real-world data on the effect of rotavirus vaccines on mild to moderate disease are limited. We used a large computerised database of Maccabi Health Services Health Maintenance Organisation (HMO), the second largest HMO in Israel covering 25% of the Israeli population, to compare the incidence of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) clinic visits in community settings (n=302,445) before (2005-10) and after (2011-13) the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation in Israel. We retrieved laboratory results of rotavirus antigen tests (n=18,133) and using a weighted analysis, we estimated the impact of rotavirus immunisation on the disease burden of rotavirus AGE clinic visits. Following the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation, the typical winter peaks of rotavirus AGE were substantially lower and significant reductions of 14.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.5-16.1) in all-cause AGE clinic visits and of 59.7% (95% CI: 59.8-62.6) in rotavirus AGE clinic visits were observed. The decrease was observed in all age groups, but it was greater in children aged 0 to 23 months than those aged 24 to 59 months. Continued rotavirus laboratory surveillance is warranted to monitor the sustainability of these changes.

  1. Change in incidence of clinic visits for all-cause and rotavirus gastroenteritis in young children following the introduction of universal rotavirus vaccination in Israel.

    PubMed

    Muhsen, Khitam; Chodick, Gabriel; Goren, Sophy; Anis, Emilia; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Shalev, Varda; Cohen, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Both rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq and Rotarix were efficacious against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in clinical trials; yet real-world data on the effect of rotavirus vaccines on mild to moderate disease are limited. We used a large computerised database of Maccabi Health Services Health Maintenance Organisation (HMO), the second largest HMO in Israel covering 25% of the Israeli population, to compare the incidence of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) clinic visits in community settings (n=302,445) before (2005-10) and after (2011-13) the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation in Israel. We retrieved laboratory results of rotavirus antigen tests (n=18,133) and using a weighted analysis, we estimated the impact of rotavirus immunisation on the disease burden of rotavirus AGE clinic visits. Following the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation, the typical winter peaks of rotavirus AGE were substantially lower and significant reductions of 14.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.5-16.1) in all-cause AGE clinic visits and of 59.7% (95% CI: 59.8-62.6) in rotavirus AGE clinic visits were observed. The decrease was observed in all age groups, but it was greater in children aged 0 to 23 months than those aged 24 to 59 months. Continued rotavirus laboratory surveillance is warranted to monitor the sustainability of these changes. PMID:26538450

  2. Infectious diseases following natural disasters: prevention and control measures.

    PubMed

    Kouadio, Isidore K; Aljunid, Syed; Kamigaki, Taro; Hammad, Karen; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Natural disasters may lead to infectious disease outbreaks when they result in substantial population displacement and exacerbate synergic risk factors (change in the environment, in human conditions and in the vulnerability to existing pathogens) for disease transmission. We reviewed risk factors and potential infectious diseases resulting from prolonged secondary effects of major natural disasters that occurred from 2000 to 2011. Natural disasters including floods, tsunamis, earthquakes, tropical cyclones (e.g., hurricanes and typhoons) and tornadoes have been secondarily described with the following infectious diseases including diarrheal diseases, acute respiratory infections, malaria, leptospirosis, measles, dengue fever, viral hepatitis, typhoid fever, meningitis, as well as tetanus and cutaneous mucormycosis. Risk assessment is essential in post-disaster situations and the rapid implementation of control measures through re-establishment and improvement of primary healthcare delivery should be given high priority, especially in the absence of pre-disaster surveillance data. PMID:22149618

  3. Gallstone disease. The clinical manifestations of infectious stones.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Stewart, L; Fine, R; Pellegrini, C A; Way, L W

    1989-05-01

    Gallstones from 82 patients were examined under a scanning electron microscope for evidence of bacteria, and the findings were compared with the clinical manifestations of the disease. Bacteria were present in 68% of pigment stones and the pigment portions of 80% of composite stones. These gallstones were referred to as infectious stones. No bacteria were found in cholesterol gallstones. Acute cholangitis was diagnosed in 52% of patients with infectious stones and in 18% of patients with noninfectious stones. Over half of the patients with noninfectious stones presented with mild symptoms. Infectious stones were more often associated with a previous common duct exploration, an urgent operation, infected bile, a common duct procedure, and complications. These data show that gallstone disease is more virulent in patients whose gallstones contain bacteria.

  4. Infectious diseases following natural disasters: prevention and control measures.

    PubMed

    Kouadio, Isidore K; Aljunid, Syed; Kamigaki, Taro; Hammad, Karen; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Natural disasters may lead to infectious disease outbreaks when they result in substantial population displacement and exacerbate synergic risk factors (change in the environment, in human conditions and in the vulnerability to existing pathogens) for disease transmission. We reviewed risk factors and potential infectious diseases resulting from prolonged secondary effects of major natural disasters that occurred from 2000 to 2011. Natural disasters including floods, tsunamis, earthquakes, tropical cyclones (e.g., hurricanes and typhoons) and tornadoes have been secondarily described with the following infectious diseases including diarrheal diseases, acute respiratory infections, malaria, leptospirosis, measles, dengue fever, viral hepatitis, typhoid fever, meningitis, as well as tetanus and cutaneous mucormycosis. Risk assessment is essential in post-disaster situations and the rapid implementation of control measures through re-establishment and improvement of primary healthcare delivery should be given high priority, especially in the absence of pre-disaster surveillance data.

  5. What Is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... teen years. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialists Have? Pediatric infectious diseases specialists are medical ...

  6. NON-INFECTIOUS DISORDERS OF WARMWATER FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compared with infectious diseases and disorders, few non-infectious diseases and disorders in cultured fish have severe biologic or economic impact. Culture practices, however, often establish environments that promote infectious disease by weakening the immune response or by pro...

  7. A community waterborne outbreak of gastro-enteritis attributed to Shigella sonnei.

    PubMed Central

    Alamanos, Y.; Maipa, V.; Levidiotou, S.; Gessouli, E.

    2000-01-01

    An outbreak of gastro-enteritis occurred in a community of 2213 persons located near the city of Ioannina, in North-western Greece. Two hundreds and eighty-eight inhabitants of the village of Eleoussa, suffered from gastro-enteritis between 11 and 22 October. The peak of the epidemic occurred during the first 3 days (11-13 October). The highest risk of developing gastro-enteritis was observed in the age group 0-14 years (41.4%) and decreased significantly with age (P < 0.01). Patients over 65 years were more frequently hospitalized than those in other age groups (P < 0.05). Shigella sonnei was isolated from both, water samples and faeces of patients. Control measures were implemented on the second day of the outbreak. Environmental conditions suggest that contaminationof the water system occurred by groundwater. PMID:11218200

  8. An indirect fluorescent antibody test for antibodies to transmissible gastroenteritis of swine.

    PubMed

    Benfield, D A; Haelterman, E O; Burnstein, T

    1978-10-01

    The indirect fluorescent antibody test was modified to provide a rapid technique for the detection, screening and titration of antibodies to transmissible gastroenteritis of pigs. Large numbers of slides containing transmissible gastroenteritis antigen were prepared by planting mixtures of infected and uninfected swine testicular cells onto multiwelled teflon-coated slides. After overnight incubation, about one-half of the cells in each well were infected which provided contrast to aid in detecting specific fluorescence in the presence of varying degrees of background staining. Following fixation, antigen slides were stored at -20 degrees C until used. The indirect fluorescent antibody test was compared to the virus neutralization test in both the screening and titration of swine sera containing transmissible gastroenteritis antibodies. The test was found to be sensitive and reliable and to offer certain advantages over the virus neutralization test.

  9. Comprehensive Analysis of a Norovirus-Associated Gastroenteritis Outbreak, from the Environment to the Consumer▿

    PubMed Central

    Le Guyader, Françoise S.; Krol, Joanna; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Ruvoen-Clouet, Nathalie; Desaubliaux, Benedicte; Parnaudeau, Sylvain; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Ponge, Agnès; Pothier, Pierre; Atmar, Robert L.; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses have been recognized to be the predominant agents of nonbacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks in humans, and their transmission via contaminated shellfish consumption has been demonstrated. Norovirus laboratory experiments, volunteer challenge studies, and community gastroenteritis outbreak investigations have identified human genetic susceptibility factors related to histo-blood group antigen expression. Following a banquet in Brittany, France, in February 2008, gastroenteritis cases were linked to oyster consumption. This study identified an association of the norovirus illnesses with histo-blood group expression, and oyster contamination with norovirus was confirmed by qualitative and quantitative analyses. The secretor phenotype was associated with illness, especially for the non-A subgroup. The study showed that, in addition to accidental climatic events that may lead to oyster contamination, illegal shellfish collection and trading are also risk factors associated with outbreaks. PMID:20053852

  10. Prioritising Infectious Disease Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, David M.; Howes, Rosalind E.; Wiebe, Antoinette; Battle, Katherine E.; Golding, Nick; Gething, Peter W.; Dowell, Scott F.; Farag, Tamer H.; Garcia, Andres J.; Kimball, Ann M.; Krause, L. Kendall; Smith, Craig H.; Brooker, Simon J.; Kyu, Hmwe H.; Vos, Theo; Murray, Christopher J. L.; Moyes, Catherine L.; Hay, Simon I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing volumes of data and computational capacity afford unprecedented opportunities to scale up infectious disease (ID) mapping for public health uses. Whilst a large number of IDs show global spatial variation, comprehensive knowledge of these geographic patterns is poor. Here we use an objective method to prioritise mapping efforts to begin to address the large deficit in global disease maps currently available. Methodology/Principal Findings Automation of ID mapping requires bespoke methodological adjustments tailored to the epidemiological characteristics of different types of diseases. Diseases were therefore grouped into 33 clusters based upon taxonomic divisions and shared epidemiological characteristics. Disability-adjusted life years, derived from the Global Burden of Disease 2013 study, were used as a globally consistent metric of disease burden. A review of global health stakeholders, existing literature and national health priorities was undertaken to assess relative interest in the diseases. The clusters were ranked by combining both metrics, which identified 44 diseases of main concern within 15 principle clusters. Whilst malaria, HIV and tuberculosis were the highest priority due to their considerable burden, the high priority clusters were dominated by neglected tropical diseases and vector-borne parasites. Conclusions/Significance A quantitative, easily-updated and flexible framework for prioritising diseases is presented here. The study identifies a possible future strategy for those diseases where significant knowledge gaps remain, as well as recognising those where global mapping programs have already made significant progress. For many conditions, potential shared epidemiological information has yet to be exploited. PMID:26061527

  11. Conflict and Emerging Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Legros, Dominique; Formenty, Pierre; Connolly, Maire A.

    2007-01-01

    Detection and control of emerging infectious diseases in conflict situations are major challenges due to multiple risk factors known to enhance emergence and transmission of infectious diseases. These include inadequate surveillance and response systems, destroyed infrastructure, collapsed health systems and disruption of disease control programs, and infection control practices even more inadequate than those in resource-poor settings, as well as ongoing insecurity and poor coordination among humanitarian agencies. This article outlines factors that potentiate emergence and transmission of infectious diseases in conflict situations and highlights several priority actions for their containment and control. PMID:18217543

  12. Bacillus cereus bacteremia in an adult with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Funada, H; Uotani, C; Machi, T; Matsuda, T; Nonomura, A

    1988-03-01

    Bacillus cereus, which used to be considered non-pathogenic, was isolated from the blood of a patient with acute leukemia who was receiving intensive chemotherapy. Fatal bacteremia developed with a clinical syndrome of acute gastroenteritis, followed by both meningoencephalitis with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple liver abscesses probably caused by infective vasculitis. Surveillance stool cultures revealed colonization with the organism prior to the onset of diarrhea, and repetitive blood cultures were found to be positive. Thus, this case suggested some new important clinicopathologic features of true B. cereus bacteremia complicating acute leukemia.

  13. Development of a high throughput TaqMan assay for the detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus in vector vaccinated chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) causes an acute, highly contagious upper-respiratory disease of chickens. Sensitive detection of the causative alphaherpesvirus is important in clinical investigations and experimental studies. In particular, it is essential to quantify the viral genome co...

  14. Diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis: limits and potential of currently available procedures.

    PubMed

    Sidoti, Francesca; Rittà, Massimo; Costa, Cristina; Cavallo, Rossana

    2015-06-01

    The diagnostic approaches to viral gastroenteritis have evolved substantially over the past decades because of the advances in detection methods, the emergence of new pathogens, and the increase in diarrhea hospitalizations attributed to viruses, especially in young children in non-industrialized countries. Overall, these factors have lead to a relevant improvement of types and operating characteristics of diagnostic methods (including sensitivity and specificity), as well as turnaround time. In this review, clinical and laboratory approaches to the diagnosis of viruses causing gastroenteritis are presented; in particular, specimen collection and detection methods are reviewed and discussed, taking into account performance and limitations.

  15. Quantity and variation in morbidity: THAID-analysis of the occurrence of gastroenteritis among Ethiopan children.

    PubMed

    Freij, L; Wall, S

    1979-12-01

    Morbidity figures from a one-year longitudinal child health study comprising 749 children in an urban area in Ethiopia are reported. Aggregated morbidity measures, based on frequency distributions according to morbidity level, demonstrate gastroenteritis among infants and young preschool children as a quantitatively important morbidity problem. Variation in the occurrence of gastroenteritis is studied among 390 children under 5 years by means of a multi-variate method, THAID-analysis, designed for a categorical or, as in this study, a categorized criterion variable. The results indicate that variables expressing nutrition, housing, hygiene and sanitation are dominating predictors of childhood diarrhoeal disease.

  16. [Acute gastroenteritis by Cambylobacter spp: a retrospective study of a paediatric emergency department].

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana Teresa; Couto, Catarina; Romão, Patrícia; Melo, Isabel Saraiva de; Braga, Manuela; Diogo, José; Calhau, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: A infeção por Campylobacter é a principal causa de gastroenterite aguda bacteriana pediátrica na União Europeia.Objetivos: Conhecer a prevalência de isolamento deste agente nas crianças admitidas na urgência com gastroenterite aguda que realizaram coprocultura, caracterizando a microbiologia, epidemiologia, clínica, terapêutica e complicações associadas.Material e Métodos: Casuística por consulta dos processos dos doentes admitidos na Urgência Pediátrica dum hospital distrital, durante 30 meses, com o diagnóstico de gastroenterite aguda e isolamento em coprocultura de Campylobacter.Resultados: Das 216 coproculturas efetuadas, 98 (45%) foram positivas. Identificámos Campylobacter spp. em 49 (50%) doentes. Destes, 30 (61%) eram do género feminino. A mediana de idades foi 23 meses. Catorze doentes tinham idade inferior a um ano, 25 entre um e cinco anos e 10 idade superior a cinco anos. Verificámos diarreia aquosa em cinco (10%) doentes, diarreia com sangue em 44 (90%), sangue e muco em 14 (29%), febre em 23 (47%), dor abdominal em 14 (29%) e vómitos em 11 (22%). Registámos um caso de sépsis. Internámos cinco doentes. Oito doentes foram medicados com azitromicina.Discussão: Esta é a maior casuística nacional publicada de gastroenterite aguda a Campylobacter em idade pediátrica e a primeira no sul do país. Campylobacter foi a principal bactéria identificada, associada maioritariamente a doença auto-limitada. Contudo, há a considerar formas de infeção graves. O aumento da resistência às quinolonas é preocupante.Conclusão: A utilização criteriosa da coprocultura permite a identificação etiológica na gastrenterite aguda bacteriana. O crescente aumento dos casos de Campylobacter diagnosticados reforça a necessidade de maior controlo das medidas de higiene na manipulação dos alimentos.

  17. Infectious causes of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cassell, G. H.

    1998-01-01

    Powerful diagnostic technology, plus the realization that organisms of otherwise unimpressive virulence can produce slowly progressive chronic disease with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and disease outcomes, has resulted in the discovery of new infectious agents and new concepts of infectious diseases. The demonstration that final outcome of infection is as much determined by the genetic background of the patient as by the genetic makeup of the infecting agent is indicating that a number of chronic diseases of unknown etiology are caused by one or more infectious agents. One well-known example is the discovery that stomach ulcers are due to Helicobacter pylori. Mycoplasmas may cause chronic lung disease in newborns and chronic asthma in adults, and Chlamydia pneumoniae, a recently identified common cause of acute respiratory infection, has been associated with atherosclerosis. A number of infectious agents that cause or contribute to neoplastic diseases in humans have been documented in the past 6 years. The association and causal role of infectious agents in chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer have major implications for public health, treatment, and prevention. PMID:9716980

  18. Infectious Diseases, Urbanization and Climate Change: Challenges in Future China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Michael Xiaoliang; Hansen, Alana; Hanson-Easey, Scott; Cameron, Scott; Xiang, Jianjun; Liu, Qiyong; Sun, Yehuan; Weinstein, Philip; Han, Gil-Soo; Williams, Craig; Bi, Peng

    2015-09-01

    China is one of the largest countries in the world with nearly 20% of the world's population. There have been significant improvements in economy, education and technology over the last three decades. Due to substantial investments from all levels of government, the public health system in China has been improved since the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. However, infectious diseases still remain a major population health issue and this may be exacerbated by rapid urbanization and unprecedented impacts of climate change. This commentary aims to explore China's current capacity to manage infectious diseases which impair population health. It discusses the existing disease surveillance system and underscores the critical importance of strengthening the system. It also explores how the growing migrant population, dramatic changes in the natural landscape following rapid urbanization, and changing climatic conditions can contribute to the emergence and re-emergence of infectious disease. Continuing research on infectious diseases, urbanization and climate change may inform the country's capacity to deal with emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in the future. PMID:26371017

  19. Infectious Diseases, Urbanization and Climate Change: Challenges in Future China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Michael Xiaoliang; Hansen, Alana; Hanson-Easey, Scott; Cameron, Scott; Xiang, Jianjun; Liu, Qiyong; Sun, Yehuan; Weinstein, Philip; Han, Gil-Soo; Williams, Craig; Bi, Peng

    2015-09-07

    China is one of the largest countries in the world with nearly 20% of the world's population. There have been significant improvements in economy, education and technology over the last three decades. Due to substantial investments from all levels of government, the public health system in China has been improved since the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. However, infectious diseases still remain a major population health issue and this may be exacerbated by rapid urbanization and unprecedented impacts of climate change. This commentary aims to explore China's current capacity to manage infectious diseases which impair population health. It discusses the existing disease surveillance system and underscores the critical importance of strengthening the system. It also explores how the growing migrant population, dramatic changes in the natural landscape following rapid urbanization, and changing climatic conditions can contribute to the emergence and re-emergence of infectious disease. Continuing research on infectious diseases, urbanization and climate change may inform the country's capacity to deal with emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in the future.

  20. Infectious Diseases, Urbanization and Climate Change: Challenges in Future China

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Michael Xiaoliang; Hansen, Alana; Hanson-Easey, Scott; Cameron, Scott; Xiang, Jianjun; Liu, Qiyong; Sun, Yehuan; Weinstein, Philip; Han, Gil-Soo; Williams, Craig; Bi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    China is one of the largest countries in the world with nearly 20% of the world’s population. There have been significant improvements in economy, education and technology over the last three decades. Due to substantial investments from all levels of government, the public health system in China has been improved since the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. However, infectious diseases still remain a major population health issue and this may be exacerbated by rapid urbanization and unprecedented impacts of climate change. This commentary aims to explore China’s current capacity to manage infectious diseases which impair population health. It discusses the existing disease surveillance system and underscores the critical importance of strengthening the system. It also explores how the growing migrant population, dramatic changes in the natural landscape following rapid urbanization, and changing climatic conditions can contribute to the emergence and re-emergence of infectious disease. Continuing research on infectious diseases, urbanization and climate change may inform the country’s capacity to deal with emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in the future. PMID:26371017

  1. Genetic evolution and tropism of transmissible gastroenteritis coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, C M; Gebauer, F; Suñé, C; Mendez, A; Dopazo, J; Enjuanes, L

    1992-09-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is an enteropathogenic coronavirus isolated for the first time in 1946. Nonenteropathogenic porcine respiratory coronaviruses (PRCVs) have been derived from TGEV. The genetic relationship among six European PRCVs and five coronaviruses of the TGEV antigenic cluster has been determined based on their RNA sequences. The S protein of six PRCVs have an identical deletion of 224 amino acids starting at position 21. The deleted area includes the antigenic sites C and B of TGEV S glycoprotein. Interestingly, two viruses (NEB72 and TOY56) with respiratory tropism have S proteins with a size similar to the enteric viruses. NEB72 and TOY56 viruses have in the S protein 2 and 15 specific amino acid differences with the enteric viruses. Four of the residues changed (aa 219 of NEB72 isolate and aa 92, 94, and 218 of TOY56) are located within the deletion present in the PRCVs and may be involved in the receptor binding site (RBS) conferring enteric tropism to TGEVs. A second RBS used by the virus to infect ST cells might be located in a conserved area between sites A and D of the S glycoprotein, since monoclonal antibodies specific for these sites inhibit the binding of the virus to ST cells. An evolutionary tree relating 13 enteric and respiratory isolates has been proposed. According to this tree, a main virus lineage evolved from a recent progenitor virus which was circulating around 1941. From this, secondary lineages originated PUR46, NEB72, TOY56, MIL65, BR170, and the PRCVs, in this order. Least squares estimation of the origin of TGEV-related coronaviruses showed a significant constancy in the fixation of mutations with time, that is, the existence of a well-defined molecular clock. A mutation fixation rate of 7 +/- 2 x 10(-4) nucleotide substitutions per site and per year was calculated for TGEV-related viruses. This rate falls in the range reported for other RNA viruses. Point mutations and probably recombination events have

  2. Emerging infectious diseases: vulnerabilities, contributing factors and approaches.

    PubMed

    Lashley, Felissa R

    2004-04-01

    We live in an ever more connected global village linked through international travel, politics, economics, culture and human-human and human-animal interactions. The realization that the concept of globalization includes global exposure to disease-causing agents that were formerly confined to small, remote areas and that infectious disease outbreaks can have political, economic and social roots and effects is becoming more apparent. Novel infectious disease microbes continue to be discovered because they are new or newly recognized, have expanded their geographic range, have been shown to cause a new disease spectrum, have jumped the species barrier from animals to humans, have become resistant to antimicrobial agents, have increased in incidence or have become more virulent. These emerging infectious disease microbes may have the potential for use as agents of bioterrorism. Factors involved in the emergence of infectious diseases are complex and interrelated and involve all classifications of organisms transmitted in a variety of ways. In 2003, outbreaks of interest included severe acute respiratory syndrome, monkeypox and avian influenza. Information from the human genome project applied to microbial organisms and their hosts will provide new opportunities for detection, diagnosis, treatment, prevention, control and prognosis. New technology related not only to genetics but also to satellite and monitoring systems will play a role in weather, climate and the approach to environmental manipulations that influence factors contributing to infectious disease emergence and control. Approaches to combating emerging infectious diseases include many disciplines, such as animal studies, epidemiology, immunology, ecology, environmental studies, microbiology, pharmacology, other sciences, health, medicine, public health, nursing, cultural, political and social studies, all of which must work together. Appropriate financial support of the public health infrastructure

  3. Infectious diseases and impaired consciousness.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael R; Roos, Karen L

    2011-11-01

    Any of a number of neuroinfectious diseases can cause a disorder of consciousness. The priority in the care of the patient is to identify an infectious disease that is treatable. This article examines disorders of consciousness that may be caused by a septic encephalopathy, bacterial meningoencephalitis, viral encephalitis, tick-borne bacterial disease, fungal meningitis, tuberculous meningitis, a focal infectious mass lesion, such as a brain abscess, or an autoimmune-mediated disorder as a complication of infection. PMID:22032667

  4. Temporal distribution of human rotavirus serotypes 1,2,3, and 4 in Venezuelan children with gastroenteritis during 1979-1989.

    PubMed

    White, L; García, D; Boher, Y; Blanco, M; Pérez, M; Romer, H; Flores, J; Pérez-Schael, I

    1991-06-01

    The temporal distribution and clinical severity of rotavirus VP7 serotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4 recovered from 427 Venezuelan children with acute gastroenteritis over a period of 11 years were studied. Rotavirus VP7 serotype was established by ELISA serotyping in 298 (69.78%) of the specimens while the serotype of the remaining 129 (30.21%) samples could not be determined. Of the specimens typed, 85 (19.90% of the total) were serotype 1, 43 (10.07%) were serotype 2, 105 (24.59%) were serotype 3, and 65 (15.22%) were serotype 4. Yearly changes in the frequency of individual serotypes were observed. The predominance of a single serotype with minor contribution from others was noted every year. In this study, serotype 1 appears to induce a less severe illness in comparison with serotypes 2, 3, and 4. No apparent association between the proportion of each serotype and the children's age were found.

  5. Emergence and serovar profiling of non-typhoidal Salmonellae (NTS) isolated from gastroenteritis cases-A study from South India.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Mamatha; Devadas, Suganthi Martena; Shetty, Vignesh; Bangera, Sohan Rodney; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Sarkar, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Human infection with non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars is often a neglected and undiagnosed infection in the developing world. Invasive NTS is now being established as having a new and emerging pathogenic role. There is not sufficient data on the prevalence of NTS serovars and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern from India. Faecal specimens collected from patients with acute gastroenteritis were processed to isolate Salmonella according to the standard protocol for a period from January 2011-December 2014. Salmonella isolates were serotyped and tested for antibiotic susceptibility. Of the total 320 (10.04%) bacterial enteric pathogens isolated, 64 (20%) were non-typhoidal Salmonella. Among the serogroup, O:4 (B) (n = 26; 40.6%) was found to be the commonest followed by O:7 (C1) (n = 11; 17.1%) and O:3,10 (E1) (n = 11; 17.1%). NTS infection in cancer patients could also be termed as nosocomial NTS diarrhoea due to primary community infection with prolonged incubation periods, consumption of contaminated food during hospital stay or Nosocomially acquired infection. Serovar Oslo has been predominant (9/17) in NTS isolates from cancer patients, whereas serovars Bovismorbificans, Wangata and Schleissheim have been reported for the first time in the country. The isolates were mostly susceptible to antibiotics except Salmonella ser Kentucky, which showed resistance to ciprofloxacin is reported for the first time in the country. Continuous surveillance is required to monitor resistance of NTS isolates. PMID:27300440

  6. A time series study of gastroenteritis and tap water quality in the Nantes area, France, 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    Beaudeau, Pascal; Zeghnoun, Abdelkrim; Corso, Magali; Lefranc, Agnès; Rambaud, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    In the Nantes area, 410,000 inhabitants are supplied with water pumped from the Loire River. The treatment of this water is carried out through a process of complete clarification and disinfection. During the study period (2002-07), the quality of drinking water complied with European microbial standards and mean turbidity in finished water was 0.05 NTU (nephelometric turbidity units). We aimed to characterize the link between produced water turbidity and other operational data and the incidence of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in the Nantes area. The daily number of medical prescriptions for AGE was drawn from the French national health insurance system's drug reimbursement data. We modeled this time series using Poisson regression within the framework of a Generalized Additive Model. We showed that an interquartile range turbidity degradation (0.042-0.056 NTU) was connected to a 4.2% (CI95=(1.5%; 6.9%)) increase in the risk of AGE in children and a 2.9% (CI95=(0.5%; 5.4%)) increase in adults. The slope of the turbidity risk function was higher during both high- and low-water conditions of the river. High values of daily flow of produced water were also associated with higher endemic levels of AGE.

  7. Emergence and serovar profiling of non-typhoidal Salmonellae (NTS) isolated from gastroenteritis cases-A study from South India.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Mamatha; Devadas, Suganthi Martena; Shetty, Vignesh; Bangera, Sohan Rodney; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Sarkar, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Human infection with non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars is often a neglected and undiagnosed infection in the developing world. Invasive NTS is now being established as having a new and emerging pathogenic role. There is not sufficient data on the prevalence of NTS serovars and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern from India. Faecal specimens collected from patients with acute gastroenteritis were processed to isolate Salmonella according to the standard protocol for a period from January 2011-December 2014. Salmonella isolates were serotyped and tested for antibiotic susceptibility. Of the total 320 (10.04%) bacterial enteric pathogens isolated, 64 (20%) were non-typhoidal Salmonella. Among the serogroup, O:4 (B) (n = 26; 40.6%) was found to be the commonest followed by O:7 (C1) (n = 11; 17.1%) and O:3,10 (E1) (n = 11; 17.1%). NTS infection in cancer patients could also be termed as nosocomial NTS diarrhoea due to primary community infection with prolonged incubation periods, consumption of contaminated food during hospital stay or Nosocomially acquired infection. Serovar Oslo has been predominant (9/17) in NTS isolates from cancer patients, whereas serovars Bovismorbificans, Wangata and Schleissheim have been reported for the first time in the country. The isolates were mostly susceptible to antibiotics except Salmonella ser Kentucky, which showed resistance to ciprofloxacin is reported for the first time in the country. Continuous surveillance is required to monitor resistance of NTS isolates.

  8. Characterization of RotaTeq® vaccine-derived rotaviruses in South Korean infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Than, Van Thai; Jeong, Sunyoung; Kim, Wonyong

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping of human rotaviruses was performed in 191 rotavirus-positive fecal samples collected from infants with acute gastroenteritis, 3 years after the introduction of two rotavirus vaccines in South Korea. Among these samples, the most prevalent rotavirus genotype was G3P[8] (30.9%), followed by G1P[8] (27.7%), G4P[6] (15.2%), and G9P[8] (5.8%). Sequence analysis identified RotaTeq® vaccine-derived strains in 12 samples (6.3%), comprising 11 G1P[8] human-bovine double reassortant rotaviruses and 1 G1P[5] human-bovine single reassortant rotavirus. It is of note that cross-reactivity between the current G4-specific typing primer and RotaTeq®-specific G1 genotypes was found. A trace of the clinical and environmental routes of the rotavirus vaccine strains revealed unexpected complexity, and the diagnostic protocol for rotaviruses may require modification by using either another typing primer set or nucleotide sequence analysis.

  9. Analysis of outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease in Ireland: 1998 and 1999.

    PubMed

    Bonner, C; Foley, B; Wall, P; Fitzgerald, M

    2001-05-01

    Surveillance of general outbreaks of infectious gastroenteritis was introduced in 1998 by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI), in co-operation with the eight health boards. A total of 67 general outbreaks of gastroenteritis in Ireland were reported to the FSAI in 1998 and 1999. Over 1900 people were ill as a result of these outbreaks. Four percent required hospitalisation and there were two deaths. The duration of the outbreaks varied between one day and 38 days. Salmonellae (44%) and small round structured viruses (SRSV) (12%) were the most commonly reported pathogens. In 25% of the outbreaks the aetiology was unknown. The commonest settings were restaurants, hotels and take-aways, which accounted for 45% (30/67) of all outbreaks. Sixteen percent of all outbreaks occurred in hospitals and residential institutions. Over half of the outbreaks were reported to be foodborne, 63% of which were due to various serotypes of Salmonella enterica. Eggs were implicated as the vehicle of infection in 13% of all outbreaks. An infected food handler was identified in almost one third of outbreaks, although it could not be established if this had contributed directly to the outbreak. PMID:11474854

  10. A Novel Pore-Forming Toxin in Type A Clostridium perfringens Is Associated with Both Fatal Canine Hemorrhagic Gastroenteritis and Fatal Foal Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Nowell, Victoria J.; Nicholson, Vivian M.; Oliphant, Kaitlyn; Prescott, John F.

    2015-01-01

    A role for type A Clostridium perfringens in acute hemorrhagic and necrotizing gastroenteritis in dogs and in necrotizing enterocolitis of neonatal foals has long been suspected but incompletely characterized. The supernatants of an isolate made from a dog and from a foal that died from these diseases were both found to be highly cytotoxic for an equine ovarian (EO) cell line. Partial genome sequencing of the canine isolate revealed three novel putative toxin genes encoding proteins related to the pore-forming Leukocidin/Hemolysin Superfamily; these were designated netE, netF, and netG. netE and netF were located on one large conjugative plasmid, and netG was located with a cpe enterotoxin gene on a second large conjugative plasmid. Mutation and complementation showed that only netF was associated with the cytotoxicity. Although netE and netG were not associated with cytotoxicity, immunoblotting with specific antisera showed these proteins to be expressed in vitro. There was a highly significant association between the presence of netF with type A strains isolated from cases of canine acute hemorrhagic gastroenteritis and foal necrotizing enterocolitis. netE and netF were found in all cytotoxic isolates, as was cpe, but netG was less consistently present. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that netF-positive isolates belonged to a clonal population; some canine and equine netF-positive isolates were genetically indistinguishable. Equine antisera to recombinant Net proteins showed that only antiserum to rNetF had high supernatant cytotoxin neutralizing activity. The identifica-tion of this novel necrotizing toxin is an important advance in understanding the virulence of type A C. perfringens in specific enteric disease of animals. PMID:25853427

  11. Generation of a replication-competent, propagation-deficient virus vector based on the transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus genome.

    PubMed

    Ortego, Javier; Escors, David; Laude, Hubert; Enjuanes, Luis

    2002-11-01

    Replication-competent propagation-deficient virus vectors based on the transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) genome that are deficient in the essential E gene have been developed by complementation within E(+) packaging cell lines. Cell lines expressing the TGEV E protein were established using the noncytopathic Sindbis virus replicon pSINrep21. In addition, cell lines stably expressing the E gene under the CMV promoter have been developed. The Sindbis replicon vector and the ectopic TGEV E protein did not interfere with the rescue of infectious TGEV from full-length cDNA. Recombinant TGEV deficient in the nonessential 3a and 3b genes and the essential E gene (rTGEV-Delta3abDeltaE) was successfully rescued in these cell lines. rTGEV-Delta3abDeltaE reached high titers (10(7) PFU/ml) in baby hamster kidney cells expressing porcine aminopeptidase N (BHK-pAPN), the cellular receptor for TGEV, using Sindbis replicon and reached titers up to 5 x 10(5) PFU/ml in cells stably expressing E protein under the control of the CMV promoter. The virus titers were proportional to the E protein expression level. The rTGEV-Delta3abDeltaE virions produced in the packaging cell line showed the same morphology and stability under different pHs and temperatures as virus derived from the full-length rTGEV genome, although a delay in virus assembly was observed by electron microscopy and virus titration in the complementation system in relation to the wild-type virus. These viruses were stably grown for >10 passages in the E(+) packaging cell lines. The availability of packaging cell lines will significantly facilitate the production of safe TGEV-derived vectors for vaccination and possibly gene therapy.

  12. Molecular characterization of noroviruses and rotaviruses involved in a large outbreak of gastroenteritis in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Monini, Marina; Losio, Marina Nadia; Pavoni, Enrico; Lavazza, Antonio; Ruggeri, Franco Maria

    2011-08-01

    Noroviruses and rotaviruses from a gastroenteritis outbreak affecting >300 people near Garda Lake (Northern Italy) in 2009 were investigated. Characterization of viruses from 40 patient stool samples and 5 environmental samples identified three distinct rotavirus and five norovirus genotypes; two of the latter were detected in both patient and environmental samples.

  13. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  14. Mutation distribution in the NSP4 protein in rotaviruses isolated from Mexican children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Guadalupe; Menchaca, Griselda E; Hernández, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Cristina; Tamez, Reyes S; Contreras, Juan F

    2013-03-11

    The NSP4 protein is a multifunctional protein that plays a role in the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of the rotavirus. Although NSP4 is considered an enterotoxin, the relationship between gastroenteritis severity and amino acid variations in NSP4 of the human rotavirus remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the sequence diversity of NSP4 and the severity of gastroenteritis of children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis. The rotavirus-infected children were hospitalized before the rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico. All children had diarrhea within 1-4 days, 44 (88%) were vomiting and 35 (70%) had fevers. The severity analysis showed that 13 (26%) cases had mild gastroenteritis, 23 (46%) moderate gastroenteritis and 14 (28%) severe. NSP4 phylogenetic analysis showed three clusters within the genotype E1. Sequence analysis revealed similar mutations inside each cluster, and an uncommon variation in residue 144 was found in five of the Mexican NSP4 sequences. Most of the amino acid variations were located in the VP4 and VP6 binding site domains, with no relationship to different grades of gastroenteritis. This finding indicates that severe gastroenteritis caused by the rotavirus appears to be related to diverse viral or cellular factors instead of NSP4 activity as a unique pathogenic factor.

  15. Norovirus genotype diversity in community-based sporadic gastroenteritis incidents: a five-year study.

    PubMed

    Bruggink, Leesa D; Dunbar, Natalie L; Marshall, John A

    2015-06-01

    Although norovirus is a known cause of sporadic gastroenteritis, the incidence and genotypes of norovirus associated with sporadic community-based gastroenteritis are poorly understood. The current study examined this issue by using material from alleged food poisoning incidents in the state of Victoria, Australia, for the period 2008-2012. Norovirus was identified, by either ORF (open reading frame) 1 or ORF 2 RT-PCR methodology, in 159 of 379 (42.0%) sporadic gastroenteritis incidents, thereby showing that norovirus was an important cause of sporadic gastroenteritis. The number of sporadic norovirus incidents did not vary significantly from year to year, indicating that the pool of circulating norovirus remained constant. Norovirus ORF 1 genotypes identified included GI.1, GI.2, GI.3, GI.4, GI.b, GI.d, GII.2, GII.4 (including variants 2006a, 2006b, 2007, and 2009), GII.16, GII.22, GII.b, GII.e, and GII.g. Norovirus ORF 2 genotypes identified included GI.1, GI.2, GI.3, GI.4, GI.6, GII.2, GII.3, GII.4 (variants 2006b, 2009, 2009-like, 2012, and "unknown"), GII.6, GII.7, GII.9, GII.12, and GII.13. Five ORF 1/ORF 2 norovirus recombinant forms were confirmed: GII.b/GII.3, GII.e/GII.4 (2012), GII.e/GII.4 (unknown), GII.g/GII.12 and GII.16/GII.2. Although the incidence of ORF 2 GI.3 was significantly higher in children than in adults, this was not the case for other major ORF 2 genotypes (GII.2, GII.4, and GII.6) which occurred equally in all age groups. The findings demonstrate the importance and diverse nature of norovirus in sporadic community-based gastroenteritis incidents and indicate that the development of successful vaccine strategies may be difficult.

  16. Norovirus genotype diversity in community-based sporadic gastroenteritis incidents: a five-year study.

    PubMed

    Bruggink, Leesa D; Dunbar, Natalie L; Marshall, John A

    2015-06-01

    Although norovirus is a known cause of sporadic gastroenteritis, the incidence and genotypes of norovirus associated with sporadic community-based gastroenteritis are poorly understood. The current study examined this issue by using material from alleged food poisoning incidents in the state of Victoria, Australia, for the period 2008-2012. Norovirus was identified, by either ORF (open reading frame) 1 or ORF 2 RT-PCR methodology, in 159 of 379 (42.0%) sporadic gastroenteritis incidents, thereby showing that norovirus was an important cause of sporadic gastroenteritis. The number of sporadic norovirus incidents did not vary significantly from year to year, indicating that the pool of circulating norovirus remained constant. Norovirus ORF 1 genotypes identified included GI.1, GI.2, GI.3, GI.4, GI.b, GI.d, GII.2, GII.4 (including variants 2006a, 2006b, 2007, and 2009), GII.16, GII.22, GII.b, GII.e, and GII.g. Norovirus ORF 2 genotypes identified included GI.1, GI.2, GI.3, GI.4, GI.6, GII.2, GII.3, GII.4 (variants 2006b, 2009, 2009-like, 2012, and "unknown"), GII.6, GII.7, GII.9, GII.12, and GII.13. Five ORF 1/ORF 2 norovirus recombinant forms were confirmed: GII.b/GII.3, GII.e/GII.4 (2012), GII.e/GII.4 (unknown), GII.g/GII.12 and GII.16/GII.2. Although the incidence of ORF 2 GI.3 was significantly higher in children than in adults, this was not the case for other major ORF 2 genotypes (GII.2, GII.4, and GII.6) which occurred equally in all age groups. The findings demonstrate the importance and diverse nature of norovirus in sporadic community-based gastroenteritis incidents and indicate that the development of successful vaccine strategies may be difficult. PMID:25784155

  17. An elevated IgG4 response in chronic infectious aortitis is associated with aortic atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Siddiquee, Zakir; Smith, R Neal; Stone, James R

    2015-11-01

    Recently, it was shown that infectious bacterial aortitis can stimulate an elevated IgG4⁺ plasma cell response in the vessel wall, which could mimic IgG4 aortitis/periaortitis. However, the factors that are associated with an elevated IgG4⁺ plasma cell response in infectious aortitis are unclear. To ascertain these factors, 17 cases of infectious aortitis and 6 cases of non-infectious severe abdominal aortic atherosclerosis were assessed for the magnitude of IgG4⁺ plasma cell response. The degree of IgG4⁺ plasma cell infiltration was determined by immunohistochemistry. Infectious cases were subcharacterized as chronic (>3 weeks duration) or acute (<3 weeks duration) based on the duration of symptoms, and as involving either the ascending aorta or the distal aorta, ie, the descending thoracic and/or abdominal aorta. There was a 5-16-fold greater degree of IgG4⁺ plasma cell infiltration in the chronic distal infectious aortitis group compared with the other three infectious aortitis groups (P ≤ 0.0007), and compared with non-infectious severe abdominal aortic atherosclerosis (P<0.0008). This resulted in a greater IgG4/IgG ratio in the chronic distal infectious aortitis group compared with the acute ascending and acute distal infectious aortitis groups (P<0.03). The degree of IgG4⁺ plasma cell infiltration in chronic distal infectious aortitis overlaps with that seen in the aortitis and periaortitis of IgG4-related disease. In the chronic infectious aortitis cases, the degree of IgG4⁺ plasma cell infiltration was more intense in patients with moderate to severe aortic atherosclerosis compared with those patients with less aortic atherosclerosis (P=0.007). These findings indicate that an elevated IgG4⁺ plasma cell response occurs in the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta in the setting of chronic bacterial infectious aortitis and pre-existing atherosclerosis. This inflammatory response to chronic infection in atherosclerosis-laden aortas may have

  18. Infectious disease, endangerment, and extinction.

    PubMed

    Macphee, Ross D E; Greenwood, Alex D

    2013-01-01

    Infectious disease, especially virulent infectious disease, is commonly regarded as a cause of fluctuation or decline in biological populations. However, it is not generally considered as a primary factor in causing the actual endangerment or extinction of species. We review here the known historical examples in which disease has, or has been assumed to have had, a major deleterious impact on animal species, including extinction, and highlight some recent cases in which disease is the chief suspect in causing the outright endangerment of particular species. We conclude that the role of disease in historical extinctions at the population or species level may have been underestimated. Recent methodological breakthroughs may lead to a better understanding of the past and present roles of infectious disease in influencing population fitness and other parameters. PMID:23401844

  19. Human migration and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Soto, S M

    2009-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EID) are defined as diseases that have appeared recently or that have recently increased in their frequency, geographical distribution or both. Commercial globalisation, population movements and environmental changes are the main factors favouring the international spread of microorganisms. Transport and communication development constitutes also a remarkable factor in the worldwide dispersion of microorganisms. The mass movement of large numbers of people creates new opportunities for the spread and establishment of common or novel infectious diseases. A surveillance system to detect emergent and re-emergent infections, a rapid responsiveness of healthcare systems and laboratories, vector control, and the provision of healthcare education programmes to inform the population of how to avoid infections are needed in order to stop the spread of infectious diseases. PMID:19220349

  20. Human migration and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Soto, S M

    2009-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EID) are defined as diseases that have appeared recently or that have recently increased in their frequency, geographical distribution or both. Commercial globalisation, population movements and environmental changes are the main factors favouring the international spread of microorganisms. Transport and communication development constitutes also a remarkable factor in the worldwide dispersion of microorganisms. The mass movement of large numbers of people creates new opportunities for the spread and establishment of common or novel infectious diseases. A surveillance system to detect emergent and re-emergent infections, a rapid responsiveness of healthcare systems and laboratories, vector control, and the provision of healthcare education programmes to inform the population of how to avoid infections are needed in order to stop the spread of infectious diseases.

  1. Norovirus and FRNA bacteriophage determined by RT-qPCR and infectious FRNA bacteriophage in wastewater and oysters.

    PubMed

    Flannery, John; Keaveney, Sinéad; Rajko-Nenow, Paulina; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Doré, William

    2013-09-15

    Norovirus (NoV), the leading cause of adult non-bacterial gastroenteritis can be commonly detected in wastewater but the extent of NoV removal provided by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is unclear. We monitored a newly commissioned WWTP with UV disinfection on a weekly basis over a six month period for NoV using RT-qPCR and for FRNA bacteriophage GA using both RT-qPCR (total concentration) and a plaque assay (infectious concentration). Mean concentrations of NoV GI and GII in influent wastewater were reduced by 0.25 and 0.41 log10 genome copies 100 ml(-1), respectively by the WWTP. The mean concentration of total FRNA bacteriophage GA was reduced by 0.35 log genome copies 100 ml(-1) compared to a reduction of infectious FRNA bacteriophage GA of 2.13 log PFU 100 ml(-1). A significant difference between concentrations of infectious and total FRNA bacteriophage GA was observed in treated, but not in untreated wastewaters. We conclude that RT-qPCR in isolation underestimates the reduction of infectious virus during wastewater treatment. We further compared the concentrations of infectious virus in combined sewer overflow (CSO) and UV treated effluents using FRNA bacteriophage GA. A greater percentage (98%) of infectious virus is released in CSO discharges than UV treated effluent (44%). Following a CSO discharge, concentrations of NoV GII and infectious FRNA bacteriophage GA in oysters from less than the limit of detection to 3150 genome copies 100 g(-1) and 1050 PFU 100 g(-1) respectively.

  2. Deaths following acute diarrhoeal diseases among hospitalised infants in Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Lee, W S; Ooi, T L

    1999-09-01

    The risk factors and modes of death following acute diarrhoeal illness in children admitted to University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur between 1982 and 1997 were studied retrospectively. Among 4,689 cases of acute gastroenteritis admitted, ten deaths were noted. The case mortality rate was 2.1/1000 admissions. All deaths were infants below one year, with eight females and two males. Acute renal failure and acute pulmonary oedema were common preceding events. Female sex, infants less than twelve months, the presence of hyper or hyponatraemia and moderate to severe dehydration on admission were risk factors for deaths.

  3. Norwalk virus: How infectious is it?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noroviruses are major agents of viral gastroenteritis worldwide. The infectivity of Norwalk virus, the prototype norovirus, has been studied in susceptible human volunteers. A new variant of the hit theory model of microbial infection was developed to estimate the variation in No...

  4. Investigation of Stilbenoids as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Rotavirus Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Ball, Judith M; Medina-Bolivar, Fabricio; Defrates, Katelyn; Hambleton, Emily; Hurlburt, Megan E; Fang, Lingling; Yang, Tianhong; Nopo-Olazabal, Luis; Atwill, Richard L; Ghai, Pooja; Parr, Rebecca D

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) infections cause severe diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Vaccines are available but cost prohibitive for many countries and only reduce severe symptoms. Vaccinated infants continue to shed infectious particles, and studies show decreased efficacy of the RV vaccines in tropical and subtropical countries where they are needed most. Continuing surveillance for new RV strains, assessment of vaccine efficacy, and development of cost effective antiviral drugs remain an important aspect of RV studies. This study was to determine the efficacy of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory stilbenoids to inhibit RV replication. Peanut (A. hypogaea) hairy root cultures were induced to produce stilbenoids, which were purified by high performance countercurrent chromatography (HPCCC) and analyzed by HPLC. HT29.f8 cells were infected with RV in the presence stilbenoids. Cell viability counts showed no cytotoxic effects on HT29.f8 cells. Viral infectivity titers were calculated and comparatively assessed to determine the effects of stilbenoid treatments. Two stilbenoids, trans-arachidin-1 and trans-arachidin-3, show a significant decrease in RV infectivity titers. Western blot analyses performed on the infected cell lysates complemented the infectivity titrations and indicated a significant decrease in viral replication. These studies show the therapeutic potential of the stilbenoids against RV replication.

  5. Incubation periods of viral gastroenteritis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate knowledge of incubation period is important to investigate and to control infectious diseases and their transmission, however statements of incubation period in the literature are often uncited, inconsistent, and/or not evidence based. Methods In a systematic review of the literature on five enteric viruses of public health importance, we found 256 articles with incubation period estimates, including 33 with data for pooled analysis. Results We fit a log-normal distribution to pooled data and found the median incubation period to be 4.5 days (95% CI 3.9-5.2 days) for astrovirus, 1.2 days (95% CI 1.1-1.2 days) for norovirus genogroups I and II, 1.7 days (95% CI 1.5-1.8 days) for sapovirus, and 2.0 days (95% CI 1.4-2.4 days) for rotavirus. Conclusions Our estimates combine published data and provide sufficient quantitative detail to allow for these estimates to be used in a wide range of clinical and modeling applications. This can translate into improved prevention and control efforts in settings with transmission or the risk of transmission. PMID:24066865

  6. Acute kidney injury with hypoxic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Zachary; Hoffmann, Paul; Owshalimpur, David

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old Caucasian man was transferred from a remote clinic with acute kidney injury for the prior 7–10 days preceded by gastroenteritis. His kidney biopsy showed non-specific mesangiopathic glomerular changes, minimal tubulointerstitial disease without sclerosis, crescents, nor evidence of vasculitis. On his third hospital day, he developed acute hypoxic respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Pulmonary renal syndromes ranked highest on his differential diagnosis. He was extubated after 2 days of mechanical ventilation and after pulse dose steroids. His lung biopsy showed pulmonary capillaritis. Our case describes a patient with clinically appearing renopulmonary syndrome, but found to have pulmonary capillaritis, a rare form of lung disease that may also cause acute kidney injury. PMID:25246473

  7. Emerging infectious diseases in southeast Asia: regional challenges to control.

    PubMed

    Coker, Richard J; Hunter, Benjamin M; Rudge, James W; Liverani, Marco; Hanvoravongchai, Piya

    2011-02-12

    Southeast Asia is a hotspot for emerging infectious diseases, including those with pandemic potential. Emerging infectious diseases have exacted heavy public health and economic tolls. Severe acute respiratory syndrome rapidly decimated the region's tourist industry. Influenza A H5N1 has had a profound effect on the poultry industry. The reasons why southeast Asia is at risk from emerging infectious diseases are complex. The region is home to dynamic systems in which biological, social, ecological, and technological processes interconnect in ways that enable microbes to exploit new ecological niches. These processes include population growth and movement, urbanisation, changes in food production, agriculture and land use, water and sanitation, and the effect of health systems through generation of drug resistance. Southeast Asia is home to about 600 million people residing in countries as diverse as Singapore, a city state with a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$37,500 per head, and Laos, until recently an overwhelmingly rural economy, with a GDP of US$890 per head. The regional challenges in control of emerging infectious diseases are formidable and range from influencing the factors that drive disease emergence, to making surveillance systems fit for purpose, and ensuring that regional governance mechanisms work effectively to improve control interventions. PMID:21269678

  8. Emerging infectious diseases in southeast Asia: regional challenges to control.

    PubMed

    Coker, Richard J; Hunter, Benjamin M; Rudge, James W; Liverani, Marco; Hanvoravongchai, Piya

    2011-02-12

    Southeast Asia is a hotspot for emerging infectious diseases, including those with pandemic potential. Emerging infectious diseases have exacted heavy public health and economic tolls. Severe acute respiratory syndrome rapidly decimated the region's tourist industry. Influenza A H5N1 has had a profound effect on the poultry industry. The reasons why southeast Asia is at risk from emerging infectious diseases are complex. The region is home to dynamic systems in which biological, social, ecological, and technological processes interconnect in ways that enable microbes to exploit new ecological niches. These processes include population growth and movement, urbanisation, changes in food production, agriculture and land use, water and sanitation, and the effect of health systems through generation of drug resistance. Southeast Asia is home to about 600 million people residing in countries as diverse as Singapore, a city state with a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$37,500 per head, and Laos, until recently an overwhelmingly rural economy, with a GDP of US$890 per head. The regional challenges in control of emerging infectious diseases are formidable and range from influencing the factors that drive disease emergence, to making surveillance systems fit for purpose, and ensuring that regional governance mechanisms work effectively to improve control interventions.

  9. Recovery from infectious mononucleosis: a case for more than symptomatic therapy? A systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Candy, Bridget; Chalder, Trudie; Cleare, Anthony J; Wessely, Simon; White, Peter D; Hotopf, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is usually an acute, transiently incapacitating condition, but for some sufferers it precipitates chronic illness. It is unclear which patients are at risk of a prolonged state of illness following onset of infectious mononucleosis and if there are any useful preventive measures that would facilitate recovery. The aim of this study was to review all cohort studies and intervention trials that provide information on: (a) the longitudinal course of ill health subsequent to the onset of infectious mononucleosis; (b) the relationship between psychosocial and clinical factors and recovery rate; and (c) the effect of interventions on recovery. A systematic review was conducted, based on a search of the PSYCHINFO, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINHAL databases up to October 2001, and ISI Science and Social Sciences Citation Indices up to 22 November 2001. Eight papers were identified that gave data on illness following onset of infectious mononucleosis. The best evidence concluded that there is a distinct fatigue syndrome after infectious mononucleosis. Eight papers explored risk factors for prolonged illness following acute infectious mononucleosis. Results varied on the association of acute illness characteristics and psychological features with prolonged ill health. Poor physical functioning, namely lengthy convalescence and being less fit or active, consistently predicted chronic ill health. Three trials reported on interventions that aimed to shorten the time taken to resolve symptoms after uncomplicated infectious mononucleosis. None of the drug trials found any evidence that drug therapy shortens recovery time. The trial that compared the effect of activity with imposed bed rest, found that those patients allowed out of bed as soon as they felt able reported a quicker recovery. More information is needed on the course of ill health subsequent to the onset of infectious mononucleosis. Certain risk factors associated with delay may be amenable to a

  10. Medical treatment of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Julia; Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M

    2004-12-01

    Eighty percent of all cases of acute pancreatitis are linked etiologically to gallstone disease or caused by immoderate alcohol consumption. No specific causal treatment for acute pancreatitis exists. Early prognostic factors that indicate severe disease are three or more signs on organ failure scores according to Ranson, Imrie, or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) 11, extrapancreatic complications of the disease, or the detection of pancreatic necrosis on CT scans. Elevated CRP levels above 130 mg/L can also predict a severe course of acute pancreatitis. The essential medical treatment for acute pancreatitis is the correction of hypovolemia. Moreover, relief of often severe visceral pain is a high priority. Prophylactic antibiotics should be restricted to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, infected necrosis, or other infectious complications. Enteral nutrition has no adverse effect compared with parenteral nutrition during the course of acute pancreatitis, and is probably beneficial in regard to outcome.

  11. Surveillance for outbreaks of gastroenteritis in elderly long-term care facilities in France, November 2010 to May 2012.

    PubMed

    Barret, A S; Jourdan-da Silva, N; Ambert-Balay, K; Delmas, G; Bone, A; Thiolet, J M; Vaillant, V

    2014-07-24

    This article describes outbreaks of gastroenteritis in elderly long-term care facilities (LTCF) in France from November 2010 to May 2012 reported through the surveillance system for gastroenteritis outbreaks in LTCF. A total of 1,072 outbreaks were reported, causing 26,551 episodes of illness and 60 deaths. The median attack rate (AR) among residents was 32%. Norovirus and person-to-person transmission were the most frequently reported aetiology and mode of transmission. Control measures were implemented in 1,054 (98%) outbreaks and for 928 outbreaks, the timing of such measures could be inferred. Of these, 799 (86%) had put control measures into effect within three days of the occurrence of the first case. Outbreaks of gastroenteritis in LTCF cause substantial morbidity and mortality among elderly people in France. LTCF are encouraged to develop infection prevention and control plans and to notify any gastroenteritis outbreak to health authorities to ensure rapid control.

  12. Deforestation and avian infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, R. N. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this time of unprecedented global change, infectious diseases will impact humans and wildlife in novel and unknown ways. Climate change, the introduction of invasive species, urbanization, agricultural practices and the loss of biodiversity have all been implicated in increasing the spread of infectious pathogens. In many regards, deforestation supersedes these other global events in terms of its immediate potential global effects in both tropical and temperate regions. The effects of deforestation on the spread of pathogens in birds are largely unknown. Birds harbor many of the same types of pathogens as humans and in addition can spread infectious agents to humans and other wildlife. It is thought that avifauna have gone extinct due to infectious diseases and many are presently threatened, especially endemic island birds. It is clear that habitat degradation can pose a direct threat to many bird species but it is uncertain how these alterations will affect disease transmission and susceptibility to disease. The migration and dispersal of birds can also change with habitat degradation, and thus expose populations to novel pathogens. Some recent work has shown that the results of landscape transformation can have confounding effects on avian malaria, other haemosporidian parasites and viruses. Now with advances in many technologies, including mathematical and computer modeling, genomics and satellite tracking, scientists have tools to further research the disease ecology of deforestation. This research will be imperative to help predict and prevent outbreaks that could affect avifauna, humans and other wildlife worldwide. PMID:20190120

  13. Diagnostic vitrectomy for infectious uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Jeroudi, Abdallah; Yeh, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The identification of an infectious or noninfectious uveitis syndrome is important to determine the range of therapeutic and prognostic implications of that disease entity. Diagnostic dilemmas arise with atypical history, atypical clinical presentations, inconclusive diagnostic workup, and persistent or worsened inflammation despite appropriate immunosuppression. More invasive intraocular testing is indicated in these situations particularly in infectious uveitis where a delay in treatment may result in worsening of the patient’s disease and a poor visual outcome. Laboratory analysis of vitreous fluid via diagnostic pars plana vitrectomy is an important technique in the diagnostic armamentarium, but the most important aspects of sample collection include rapid processing, close coordination with an ophthalmic pathology laboratory, and directed testing on this limited collected sample. Culture and staining has utility in bacterial, fungal, and nocardial infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis has shown promising results for bacterial endophthalmitis and infection with mycobacterium tuberculosis whereas PCR testing for viral retinitides and ocular toxoplasmosis has a more established role. Antibody testing is appropriate for toxoplasmosis and toxocariasis, and may be complementary to PCR for viral retinitis. Masquerade syndromes represent neoplastic conditions that clinically appear as infectious or inflammatory conditions and should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis. Diagnostic vitrectomy and chorioretinal biopsy are thus critical tools for the management of patients in whom an infectious etiology of uveitis is suspected. PMID:24613892

  14. Preventing Infectious Disease in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Warren B.

    2003-01-01

    Preventing infectious disease in sports is fundamental to maintaining team effectiveness and helping athletes avoid the adverse effects of illness. Good hygiene, immunization, minimal exposure to specific diseases, and certain prophylactic measures are essential. Teammates, coaches, trainers, officials, healthcare providers, and community public…

  15. Deforestation and avian infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, R N M

    2010-03-15

    In this time of unprecedented global change, infectious diseases will impact humans and wildlife in novel and unknown ways. Climate change, the introduction of invasive species, urbanization, agricultural practices and the loss of biodiversity have all been implicated in increasing the spread of infectious pathogens. In many regards, deforestation supersedes these other global events in terms of its immediate potential global effects in both tropical and temperate regions. The effects of deforestation on the spread of pathogens in birds are largely unknown. Birds harbor many of the same types of pathogens as humans and in addition can spread infectious agents to humans and other wildlife. It is thought that avifauna have gone extinct due to infectious diseases and many are presently threatened, especially endemic island birds. It is clear that habitat degradation can pose a direct threat to many bird species but it is uncertain how these alterations will affect disease transmission and susceptibility to disease. The migration and dispersal of birds can also change with habitat degradation, and thus expose populations to novel pathogens. Some recent work has shown that the results of landscape transformation can have confounding effects on avian malaria, other haemosporidian parasites and viruses. Now with advances in many technologies, including mathematical and computer modeling, genomics and satellite tracking, scientists have tools to further research the disease ecology of deforestation. This research will be imperative to help predict and prevent outbreaks that could affect avifauna, humans and other wildlife worldwide.

  16. Facts about Infectious Diseases (ID)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and influenza. Travelers to foreign countries may require vaccinations against yellow fever, cholera, typhoid fever or hepatitis ... 1300 Wilson Boulevard Suite 300 Arlington, VA 22209 | Phone: (703) 299-0200 | Fax: (703) 299-0204 For ... | HIVMA | Contact Us © Copyright IDSA 2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America Full Site Mobile Site

  17. Prevalence of Norwalk-like virus infections in cases of viral gastroenteritis among children in Osaka City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Iritani, Nobuhiro; Seto, Yoshiyuki; Kubo, Hideyuki; Murakami, Tsukasa; Haruki, Kosuke; Ayata, Minoru; Ogura, Hisashi

    2003-04-01

    Surveillance of Norwalk-like virus (NLV) infections in cases of pediatric gastroenteritis between April 1996 and March 2000 showed that NLVs were an important causative agent in viral gastroenteritis cases among children between November and January in those years. The predominant type of NLV was closely related to Lordsdale virus in genogroup 2. During the 1999-2000 season, Arg320-like strains, which may be genetic recombinants, suddenly appeared and spread. PMID:12682179

  18. Prevalence of Norwalk-like virus infections in cases of viral gastroenteritis among children in Osaka City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Iritani, Nobuhiro; Seto, Yoshiyuki; Kubo, Hideyuki; Murakami, Tsukasa; Haruki, Kosuke; Ayata, Minoru; Ogura, Hisashi

    2003-04-01

    Surveillance of Norwalk-like virus (NLV) infections in cases of pediatric gastroenteritis between April 1996 and March 2000 showed that NLVs were an important causative agent in viral gastroenteritis cases among children between November and January in those years. The predominant type of NLV was closely related to Lordsdale virus in genogroup 2. During the 1999-2000 season, Arg320-like strains, which may be genetic recombinants, suddenly appeared and spread.

  19. Prevalence of Norwalk-Like Virus Infections in Cases of Viral Gastroenteritis among Children in Osaka City, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Iritani, Nobuhiro; Seto, Yoshiyuki; Kubo, Hideyuki; Murakami, Tsukasa; Haruki, Kosuke; Ayata, Minoru; Ogura, Hisashi

    2003-01-01

    Surveillance of Norwalk-like virus (NLV) infections in cases of pediatric gastroenteritis between April 1996 and March 2000 showed that NLVs were an important causative agent in viral gastroenteritis cases among children between November and January in those years. The predominant type of NLV was closely related to Lordsdale virus in genogroup 2. During the 1999-2000 season, Arg320-like strains, which may be genetic recombinants, suddenly appeared and spread. PMID:12682179

  20. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis: Case Report and Review in Search for Diagnostic Key Points

    PubMed Central

    López-Medina, Guillermo; Gallo, Manuel; Prado, Alejandro; Vicuña-Honorato, Iliana; Castillo Díaz de León, Roxana

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is considered an uncommon disease with a low incidence rate that remains as a diagnostic challenge for the clinician, in spite of the fact that seventy years have passed since its original description. Hereby we present the case of a 29-year-old male without history of allergies who was evaluated for unspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, without relevant findings on physical examination and presenting an initial complete blood count (CBC) with severe eosinophilia. The patient was evaluated and the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis was confirmed by histopathological findings. The relevance of the case resides in highlighting the lack of guidelines or consensus for histological diagnosis being virtually the only one available. To a similar extent, treatment evidence is based on case series with a reasonable number of patients and case reports. PMID:26075112

  1. The effect of rotavirus immunization on rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalization rates in military dependents.

    PubMed

    Eberly, Matthew D; Gorman, Greg H; Eide, Matilda B; Olsen, Cara H; Rajnik, Michael

    2011-01-17

    We conducted a retrospective review of all U.S. military dependents less than 5 years old hospitalized with rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis from July 2003 to June 2009. The two post-vaccine seasons showed a significant reduction of 62.4% (95% CI, 58.6-65.8, P<0.001) in rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalization rate compared to the three pre-vaccine seasons. Infants less than 12 months old showed the greatest reduction in incidence at 75.3%. A substantial decrease was also seen in unvaccinated children as well. Vaccine efficacy against hospitalization was 86.0% (95% CI, 77.7-91.3) after just a single dose. The overwhelming majority of children hospitalized for rotavirus since the introduction of the vaccine (ranging from 91.8 to 100% per season) had not received any of the rotavirus vaccine series.

  2. Use of monoclonal antibodies in blocking ELISA detection of transmissible gastroenteritis virus in faeces of piglets.

    PubMed

    Rodák, L; Smíd, B; Nevoránková, Z; Valícek, L; Smítalová, R

    2005-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) nucleoprotein (N) and membrane protein (M) were prepared and used for the comparative assessment of three blocking ELISA variants to detect TGEV. The competitive blocking ELISA format showed the highest sensitivity, allowing detection of 10(3) TCID50 TGEV/ml in culture medium. Ninety-nine porcine field faecal samples obtained from 37 herds affected with diarrhoea were examined, and various TGEV levels were found in nine samples from six herds. However, only in three samples were significant TGEV concentrations demonstrated. The relationship between incidence of TGEV gastroenteritis and the spread of porcine respiratory coronavirus infection in pig farms is discussed.

  3. (+)-Catechin inhibition of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus in swine testicular cells is involved its antioxidation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wulong; He, Lei; Ning, Pengbo; Lin, Jihui; Li, Helin; Lin, Zhi; Kang, Kai; Zhang, Yanming

    2015-12-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) causes transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE), especially in newborn piglets, which severely threatens the worldwide pig industry. In this study, (+)-catechin was evaluated for its antiviral effect against TGEV in vitro. Viability assays revealed that (+)-catechin treatment exerted a dose-dependent rescue effect in TGEV-infected ST cells, and this result was only obtained with the post-treatment application of (+)-catechin. The viral yields in (+)-catechin-treated cultures were reduced by almost three log10 units. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the TGEV genome revealed that TGEV RNA replication was restricted after (+)-catechin treatment. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection showed that (+)-catechin alleviated ROS conditions induced by TGEV infection. Our results showed that (+)-catechin exerts an inhibitory effect on TGEV proliferation in vitro and is involved its antioxidation. PMID:26679792

  4. Vibrio gastroenteritis in the US Gulf of Mexico region: the role of raw oysters.

    PubMed

    Altekruse, S F; Bishop, R D; Baldy, L M; Thompson, S G; Wilson, S A; Ray, B J; Griffin, P M

    2000-06-01

    We examined clinical and epidemiological features of 575 laboratory-confirmed cases of vibrio gastroenteritis in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Texas from 1988 to 1997 (the US Gulf of Mexico Regional Vibrio Surveillance System). Illnesses occurred year round, with peaks in spring and autumn. Illnesses lasted a median of 7 days and included fever in half of patients and bloody stools in 25% of patients with relevant information. Seventy-two percent of patients reported no underlying illnesses. In the week before onset, 236 (53%) of 445 patients for whom data were available ate raw oysters, generally at a restaurant or bar. Educational efforts should address the risk of vibrio gastroenteritis for raw oyster consumers, including healthy individuals. Further studies should examine environmental conditions affecting vibrio counts on seafood and processing technologies to enhance the safety of raw oysters. PMID:10982073

  5. Aerosol stability of infectious and potentially infectious reovirus particles.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D J; Spendlove, J C; Spendlove, R S; Barnett, B B

    1982-01-01

    The aerosol stability of two particle forms, infectious and potentially infectious, of reovirus were examined under static conditions for a range of relative humidities at 21 and 24 degrees C. Virus aerosolization efficiency was determined for two methods of dissemination: Collison nebulizer and Chicago atomizer. Suspensions of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores were added to reovirus preparations that included both particle forms and disseminated into a dynamic aerosol toroid to estimate the physical decay of the aerosols. At 90 to 100% relative humidity, both reovirus particle forms showed less than 10-fold loss of infectivity after 12 h of aging. At lower relative humidities the aerosol decay curve showed rapid initial decay followed by a markedly lower decay rate. Our findings reveal that reovirus particles are relatively stable in the airborne state. PMID:7149719

  6. Emerging and Re-Emerging Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Emerging Infectious Diseases/Pathogens Research Introduction and Goals Despite remarkable advances ... medical research and treatments during the 20th century, infectious diseases remain among the leading causes of death worldwide. ...

  7. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events. PMID:27462899

  8. Comparison of frequency of inflammatory bowel disease and noninfectious gastroenteritis among statin users versus nonusers.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Dina; Boktor, Moheb; Mortensen, Eric M; Frei, Christopher R; Mansi, Ishak

    2015-05-15

    Conflicting data exist regarding the effects of statin therapy on the prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases. We aimed to examine the association of statin therapy with diagnoses of inflammatory bowel diseases and noninfectious gastroenteritis. This is a retrospective study using data of a military health care system from October 1, 2003, to March 1, 2012. Based on medication fills during fiscal year 2005, patients were divided into: (1) statin users (received at least 90-day supply of statin) and (2) nonusers (never received a statin). A propensity score-matched cohort of statin users and nonusers was created using 80 variables. Primary analysis examined the risks of being diagnosed with inflammatory bowel diseases and noninfectious gastroenteritis between statin users and nonusers in the propensity score-matched cohort. Secondary analyses examined the risk of outcomes in the whole cohort and in patients with no comorbidities according to Charlson Comorbidity Index. Of 43,438 patients meeting study criteria (13,626 statin users and 29,812 nonusers), we propensity score matched 6,342 statin users with 6,342 nonusers. For our primary analysis, 93 statin users and 92 nonusers were diagnosed with inflammatory bowel diseases (odds ratio = 1.01, 95% confidence interval = 0.76 to 1.35), and 632 statin users and 619 nonusers were diagnosed of noninfectious gastroenteritis (odds ratio = 1.02, 95% confidence interval = 0.91 to 1.15). In conclusion, the risks of inflammatory bowel diseases and noninfectious gastroenteritis among statin users and nonusers are similar after adjusting for other potential confounding factors.

  9. Prevalence of enteric pathogen-associated community gastroenteritis among kindergarten children in Gaza.

    PubMed

    Laham, Nahed Al; Elyazji, Mansour; Al-Haddad, Rohaifa; Ridwan, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is considered as one of the leading causes of illness and death in children under 5 years age, especially in developing countries. It is one of the major public health problems among childhood in Gaza strip, Palestine. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of enteric pathogen-associated community gastroenteritis among kindergarten children in Gaza. A total of 150 stool samples were collected and investigated for parasitic, viral and bacterial pathogens at Al Azhar microbiology laboratories by using standard microbiological and serological procedures. Out of the 150 study samples, the overall percentage of positive stool samples with a known enteric pathogen was 60.6%. The prevalence of different enteric pathogens causing community gastroenteritis among symptomatic cases (88.5%) was significantly higher than the prevalence in asymptomatic carriage (11.1%). The most prevalent isolated enteric pathogens were Entamoeba histolytica (28.0%) and Giardia lamblia (26.7%). Rotavirus was found in 3.1% of symptomatic cases but not detected in asymptomatic carriage. However, adenovirus type 40 and 41 were not detected in any of the study samples. The bacterial enteric pathogens Shigella and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) have comparable occurrence as rotavirus (3.1%), meanwhile, Salmonella was not isolated. Mixed infection with more than 1 pathogen was found (11.4%) only among symptomatic cases. Children aged 3-year-old showed the highest prevalence of community gastroenteritis. This study demonstrates a high prevalence of parasitic enteropathogens and a relatively low prevalence of bacterial and viral enteropathogens among kindergarten children living in Gaza city, moreover, children aged 3 years old showed the highest prevalence of isolated enteropathogens.

  10. Factors affecting prevention and control of viral gastroenteritis outbreaks in care homes.

    PubMed

    Vivancos, R; Trainor, E; Oyinloye, A; Keenan, A

    2012-10-01

    We assess the effect of key care quality indicators on viral gastroenteritis outbreaks and control in care homes using mandatory inspection data collected by a non-departmental public body. Outbreak occurrence was associated with care home size but not with overall quality or individual environmental standards. Care home size, hygiene and infection control standard scores were inversely associated with attack rate in residents, whereas delayed reporting to the local public health agency was associated with higher attack rates.

  11. Norovirus genotype diversity associated with gastroenteritis outbreaks in Victoria in 2013.

    PubMed

    Bruggink, Leesa D; Dunbar, Natalie L; Catton, Michael G; Marshall, John A

    2015-03-31

    The noroviruses are now considered a leading cause of outbreaks of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Vaccine strategies against norovirus are currently under consideration but depend on a detailed knowledge of the capsid genotypes. This study examined the incidence of norovirus outbreaks in Victoria over 1 year (2013) and documented the genotypes occurring in the different outbreak settings (healthcare and non-healthcare) and age groups. It was found that 63.1% of gastroenteritis outbreaks were associated with norovirus, thereby showing norovirus to be the major viral cause of illness in gastroenteritis outbreaks. Sixteen capsid genotypes were identified and included GI.2, GI.3, GI.4, GI.6, GI.7, GI.8, GI.9, GII.1, GII.2, GII.3, GII.4, GII.5, GII.6, GII.7, GII.13 and an as yet unclassified GII genotype. All genotypes found in the study, with the exception of GI.9, were detected in the elderly, indicating prior exposure to a norovirus genotype did not appear to confer long term immunity in many cases. The incidence of genotypes GII.1, GII.4 and GII.7 was linked with setting and age. As setting and age were correlated it was not possible to determine which variable was critical with the exception of GII.7, which appeared to be linked to age. The findings indicate that norovirus vaccine strategies should encompass a broad range of genotypes and, as setting or age may be important in determining genotype incidence, this should be taken into account as well.

  12. A large waterborne gastroenteritis outbreak in central Greece, March 2012: challenges for the investigation and management.

    PubMed

    Mellou, K; Katsioulis, A; Potamiti-Komi, M; Pournaras, S; Kyritsi, M; Katsiaflaka, A; Kallimani, A; Kokkinos, P; Petinaki, E; Sideroglou, T; Georgakopoulou, T; Vantarakis, A; Hadjichristodoulou, C

    2014-01-01

    In March 2012, there was an unusual increase of gastroenteritis cases in a district with 37,264 inhabitants in central Greece. It was estimated that more than 3600 people developed symptoms. A 1:1 case-control study showed that consumption of tap water was a risk factor for acquiring infection [odds ratio (OR) 2.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-4.28]. Descriptive data, low gastroenteritis incidence in adjacent areas with different water supply systems, and water-quality data further supported the hypothesis of a waterborne outbreak. Thirty-eight stool samples were positive for rotavirus. Bacterial indicators of recent faecal contamination were detected in samples from the water source and ice cubes from a local production enterprise. Molecular epidemiology of rotavirus strains, apart from the common strain, G3[P8], identified the unusual G/P combination G2P[8]. Water sanitation measures contributed to the control of the outbreak. This outbreak demonstrated the need for the cooperation of laboratories with different expertise and the importance of early notification of waterborne gastroenteritis outbreaks. PMID:23632123

  13. A Waterborne Gastroenteritis Outbreak Caused by Norovirus GII.17 in a Hotel, Hebei, China, December 2014.

    PubMed

    Qin, Meng; Dong, Xiao-Gen; Jing, Yan-Yan; Wei, Xiu-Xia; Wang, Zhao-E; Feng, Hui-Ru; Yu, Hong; Li, Jin-Song; Li, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is responsible for an estimated 90 % of all epidemic nonbacterial outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide. Waterborne outbreaks of NoV are commonly reported. A novel GII.17 NoV strain emerged as a major cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks in China during the winter of 2014/2015. During this time, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred at a hotel in a ski park in Hebei Province, China. Epidemiological investigations indicated that one water well, which had only recently been in use, was the probable source. GII.17 NoV was detected by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction from samples taken from cases, from concentrated water samples from water well, and from the nearby sewage settling tank. Nucleotide sequences of NoV extracted from clinical and water specimens were genetically identical and had 99 % homology with Beijing/CHN/2015. All epidemiological data indicated that GII.17 NoV was responsible for this outbreak. This is the first reported laboratory-confirmed waterborne outbreak caused by GII.17 NoV genotype in China. Strengthening management of well drinking water and systematica monitoring of NoV is essential for preventing future outbreaks. PMID:27084118

  14. Metagenomic analysis of viruses in feces from unsolved outbreaks of gastroenteritis in humans.

    PubMed

    Moore, Nicole E; Wang, Jing; Hewitt, Joanne; Croucher, Dawn; Williamson, Deborah A; Paine, Shevaun; Yen, Seiha; Greening, Gail E; Hall, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of an outbreak of gastroenteritis in humans cannot always be determined, and ∼25% of outbreaks remain unsolved in New Zealand. It is hypothesized that novel viruses may account for a proportion of unsolved cases, and new unbiased high-throughput sequencing methods hold promise for their detection. Analysis of the fecal metagenome can reveal the presence of viruses, bacteria, and parasites which may have evaded routine diagnostic testing. Thirty-one fecal samples from 26 gastroenteritis outbreaks of unknown etiology occurring in New Zealand between 2011 and 2012 were selected for de novo metagenomic analysis. A total data set of 193 million sequence reads of 150 bp in length was produced on an Illumina MiSeq. The metagenomic data set was searched for virus and parasite sequences, with no evidence of novel pathogens found. Eight viruses and one parasite were detected, each already known to be associated with gastroenteritis, including adenovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and Dientamoeba fragilis. In addition, we also describe the first detection of human parechovirus 3 (HPeV3) in Australasia. Metagenomics may thus provide a useful audit tool when applied retrospectively to determine where routine diagnostic processes may have failed to detect a pathogen.

  15. Metagenomic Analysis of Viruses in Feces from Unsolved Outbreaks of Gastroenteritis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Nicole E.; Wang, Jing; Hewitt, Joanne; Croucher, Dawn; Williamson, Deborah A.; Paine, Shevaun; Yen, Seiha; Greening, Gail E.

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of an outbreak of gastroenteritis in humans cannot always be determined, and ∼25% of outbreaks remain unsolved in New Zealand. It is hypothesized that novel viruses may account for a proportion of unsolved cases, and new unbiased high-throughput sequencing methods hold promise for their detection. Analysis of the fecal metagenome can reveal the presence of viruses, bacteria, and parasites which may have evaded routine diagnostic testing. Thirty-one fecal samples from 26 gastroenteritis outbreaks of unknown etiology occurring in New Zealand between 2011 and 2012 were selected for de novo metagenomic analysis. A total data set of 193 million sequence reads of 150 bp in length was produced on an Illumina MiSeq. The metagenomic data set was searched for virus and parasite sequences, with no evidence of novel pathogens found. Eight viruses and one parasite were detected, each already known to be associated with gastroenteritis, including adenovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and Dientamoeba fragilis. In addition, we also describe the first detection of human parechovirus 3 (HPeV3) in Australasia. Metagenomics may thus provide a useful audit tool when applied retrospectively to determine where routine diagnostic processes may have failed to detect a pathogen. PMID:25339401

  16. Mutated G4P[8] rotavirus associated with a nationwide outbreak of gastroenteritis in Nicaragua in 2005.

    PubMed

    Bucardo, Filemon; Karlsson, Beatrice; Nordgren, Johan; Paniagua, Margarita; González, Alcides; Amador, Juan Jose; Espinoza, Felix; Svensson, Lennart

    2007-03-01

    During February and March 2005, one of the largest national recorded outbreaks of severe acute gastroenteritis occurred in Nicaragua, affecting >or=64,000 individuals and causing >or=56 deaths, predominantly in children under 5 years of age. Through a nationwide laboratory-based study, stool samples were collected and investigated for rotavirus. Of 108 stool samples examined, 72 (67%) were positive for rotavirus. While 69% (50/72) of the positive samples were found in children less than 2 years of age, 50% (6/12) of the adult samples were positive. A mutated G4P[8] strain was the most commonly recognized strain (85%), followed by mixed G strains (8%) and G9P[8] (7%) strains. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 gene revealed that the G4 strains belonged to the emerging lineage Ic and was distantly related to the ST3 and VA70 G4 strains. Secondary structure predictions of the VP7 G4 protein revealed an insert of an asparagine residue in position 76, which, combined with additional mutations, surprisingly modified two downstream beta-sheets at amino acid positions 80 to 85 and 115 to 119. The 2005 G4P[8] strain compared to a G4P[8] strain from 2002 had a substitution of an asparagine residue for threonine (Asn-->Thr) at position 96 within antigenic region A, thus eliminating a potential glycosylation site. The mutated G4 virus was introduced in Nicaragua after 2002 and probably emerged from Brazil, Argentina, or Uruguay.

  17. Mutated G4P[8] Rotavirus Associated with a Nationwide Outbreak of Gastroenteritis in Nicaragua in 2005▿

    PubMed Central

    Bucardo, Filemon; Karlsson, Beatrice; Nordgren, Johan; Paniagua, Margarita; González, Alcides; Amador, Juan Jose; Espinoza, Felix; Svensson, Lennart

    2007-01-01

    During February and March 2005, one of the largest national recorded outbreaks of severe acute gastroenteritis occurred in Nicaragua, affecting ≥64,000 individuals and causing ≥56 deaths, predominantly in children under 5 years of age. Through a nationwide laboratory-based study, stool samples were collected and investigated for rotavirus. Of 108 stool samples examined, 72 (67%) were positive for rotavirus. While 69% (50/72) of the positive samples were found in children less than 2 years of age, 50% (6/12) of the adult samples were positive. A mutated G4P[8] strain was the most commonly recognized strain (85%), followed by mixed G strains (8%) and G9P[8] (7%) strains. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 gene revealed that the G4 strains belonged to the emerging lineage Ic and was distantly related to the ST3 and VA70 G4 strains. Secondary structure predictions of the VP7 G4 protein revealed an insert of an asparagine residue in position 76, which, combined with additional mutations, surprisingly modified two downstream β-sheets at amino acid positions 80 to 85 and 115 to 119. The 2005 G4P[8] strain compared to a G4P[8] strain from 2002 had a substitution of an asparagine residue for threonine (Asn→Thr) at position 96 within antigenic region A, thus eliminating a potential glycosylation site. The mutated G4 virus was introduced in Nicaragua after 2002 and probably emerged from Brazil, Argentina, or Uruguay. PMID:17229854

  18. Norwalk-like virus and bacterial pathogens associated with cases of gastroenteritis onboard a US Navy ship.

    PubMed

    Oyofo, B A; Soderquist, R; Lesmana, M; Subekti, D; Tjaniadi, P; Fryauff, D J; Corwin, A L; Richie, E; Lebron, C

    1999-12-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a potential cause of substantial morbidity in U.S. military personnel during deployment. This study investigated the microbial causes of diarrhea in U.S. troops on exercises in Southeast Asia aboard the U.S.S. Germantown from March through May 1996. A total of 49 (7%) patients with diarrhea reported to sick call during a 3-month deployment involving 721 personnel. Diarrheal samples from 49 patients were subjected to bacterial and parasitologic examination, but sufficient samples from only 47 of 49 were available for analysis of the presence of Norwalk-like virus (NLV). Of the 49 diarrhea cases, 10 (20.4%) appeared to be due to bacterial etiology alone, 10 (20.4%) due to bacteria and the prototype Taunton agent (TNA), 11 (22.4%) due to TNA only, and 4 (8.0%) due to parasites. Norwalk-like virus RNA was present in 21 (45%) of 47 stool samples from the diarrhea cases, 10 with bacterial etiologies and 11 without bacterial or parasitic etiologies. No pathogen was detected in 14 (29%) of the cases. Four of the controls showed the presence of parasitic organisms. Of the 11 cases in which enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was isolated, 8 were positive for colonization factor antigen (CFA/IV), and 3 were CFA-negative. The bacterial pathogens tested were all susceptible to gentamicin, and furadantin, but were resistant to ceftriaxone and norfloxacin, including 75% of the Campylobacter spp. These data support the view that the major cause of diarrhea for troops deployed in this geographic area is most likely NLVs.

  19. Infectious pathogens and bronchiolitis outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Camargo, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Bronchiolitis is a common early childhood illness and an important cause of morbidity, it is the number one cause of hospitalization among US infants. Bronchiolitis is also an active area of research, and recent studies have advanced our understanding of this illness. Although it has long been the conventional wisdom that the infectious etiology of bronchiolitis does not affect outcomes, a growing number of studies have linked specific pathogens of bronchiolitis (e.g., rhinovirus) to short- and long-term outcomes, such as future risk of developing asthma. The authors review the advent of molecular diagnostic techniques that have demonstrated diverse pathogens in bronchiolitis, and they review recent studies on the complex link between infectious pathogens of bronchiolitis and the development of childhood asthma.

  20. [Alzheimer's disease: the infectious hypothesis].

    PubMed

    Roubaud Baudron, Claire; Varon, Christine; Mégraud, Francis; Salles, Nathalie

    2015-12-01

    Several hypotheses are proposed for understanding the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathological mechanisms, mainly the amyloid theory, but the process inducing Aß peptide deposit, tau protein degeneration, and ultimately neuronal loss, is still to be elucidated. Alteration of the blood-brain barrier and activation of neuroinflammation seem to play an important role in AD neurodegeneration, especially in the decrease of Aß peptide clearance, therefore suggesting a role of infectious agents. Epidemiological and experimental studies on cellular or murine models related to herpes simplex virus (HSV), spirochetes, Chlamydia pneumoniae or Borrelia, and systemic inflammation are reviewed. Aß peptide or tau protein could also behave like a prion protein. Infectious agents could thus have an impact on AD by direct interaction with neurotropism or systemic inflammation. Although the results of these studies are not conclusive, they may contribute to the understanding of AD pathology. PMID:26707559

  1. Biomechanical Analysis of Infectious Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Head, David

    2016-01-01

    The removal of infectious biofilms from tissues or implanted devices and their transmission through fluid transport systems depends in part of the mechanical properties of their polymeric matrix. Linking the various physical and chemical microscopic interactions to macroscopic deformation and failure modes promises to unveil design principles for novel therapeutic strategies targeting biofilm eradication, and provide a predictive capability to accelerate the development of devices, water lines, etc, that minimise microbial dispersal. Here, our current understanding of biofilm mechanics is appraised from the perspective of biophysics , with an emphasis on constitutive modelling that has been highly successful in soft matter. Fitting rheometric data to viscoelastic models has quantified linear and nonlinear stress relaxation mechanisms, how they vary between species and environments, and how candidate chemical treatments alter the mechanical response. The rich interplay between growth, mechanics and hydrodynamics is just becoming amenable to computational modelling and promises to provide unprecedented characterisation of infectious biofilms in their native state. PMID:27193540

  2. [Investigation of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 incidence in gastroenteritis patients].

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Haluk; Levent, Belkıs; Erdoğan, Aşkın; Güleşen, Revasiye; Arslan, Hande

    2011-07-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is the most common serotype among verotoxigenic E.coli (VTEC) strains that cause haemolytic uremic syndrome. Although sporadic VTEC cases originating from Turkey and small outbreaks have been reported from our country, VTEC has not been routinely investigated in most of the diagnostic microbiology laboratories in Turkey and studies related to this topic are limited. In this study, the incidence of E.coli O157:H7 in patients who were admitted to Alanya Research and Application Hospital of Baskent University with the complaints of acute gastroenteritis between September 2005 and September 2008, was investigated. Stool samples collected from 1815 diarrheal patients (of them 50.5% were male; 49.3% were ? 5 years old; 10.2% were tourists) were evaluated initially by direct microscopy and then inoculated to hectoen enteric agar, EMB agar, Skirrow agar and cefixime tellurite sorbitol MacConkey (CT-SMC) agar media for cultivation. The sorbitol-negative colonies which were compatible with E.coli according to the conventional methods were tested with E.coli polyvalent and 0157 and H7 monovalent antisera and agglutination positive strains were also investigated for verotoxin production in Vero cell cultures. VTEC RPLA toxin detection kit (Oxoid, UK) was used for further identification of toxin type of verotoxin positive strains. Fecal leukocytes were detected in 41.3% of the samples in direct microscopy, while 27% (173/639) of the samples were also found positive for amoeba antigen, 6% (24/396) for rotavirus antigen, 1.2% (22/1815) for Salmonella spp., 0.6% (11/1815) for Shigella spp., 0.2% (4/1815) for Giardia trophozoites and 0.06% (1/1815) for Campylobacter jejuni. The isolation rate of sorbitol-negative E.coli strains was %0.8 (14/1815), and two of them were identified as E.coli O157:H7 by monovalent antisera, and both of them were determined as verotoxin-producers in cell culture. Verotoxin types of those isolates were found as verotoxin 1 in one

  3. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  4. A gastrointestinal anti-infectious biotherapeutic agent: the heat-treated Lactobacillus LB

    PubMed Central

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Experimental in vitro and in vivo studies support the hypothesis that heat-treated, lyophilized Lactobacillus acidophilus LB cells and concentrated, neutralized spent culture medium conserve the variety of pharmacological, antimicrobial activities of the live probiotic strain against several infectious agents involved in well-established acute and persistent watery diarrhoea and gastritis. Heat-treated cells and heat-stable secreted molecules trigger multiple strain-specific activities explaining the therapeutic efficacy of L. acidophilus LB. This review discusses the current body of knowledge on the antimicrobial mechanisms of action exerted by L. acidophilus LB demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo experimental studies, and the evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of this anti-infectious biotherapeutic agent proved in randomized clinical trials for the treatment of acute and persistent watery diarrhoea associated with several intestinal infectious diseases in humans. PMID:26770268

  5. [Infectious diseases and climate change].

    PubMed

    Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Glismann, Steffen Offersen; Mølbak, Kåre

    2009-10-26

    Climate changes will likely have an impact on the spectrum of infectious diseases in Europe. We may see an increase in vector-borne diseases, diseases spread by rodents such as Hantavirus, and food- and water-borne diseases. As the effects of climate changes are likely to occur gradually, a modern industrialised country such as Denmark will have the opportunity to adapt to the expected changes.

  6. Generation of Newcastle diease virus (NDV) recombinants expressing the infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) glycoprotein gB or gD as dual vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious acute respiratory disease of chickens caused by infection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). The current commercial ILT vaccines are either not safe or less effective. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop safer and more...

  7. Dodging a Bullet: WHO, SARS, and the Successful Management of Infectious Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, Evan S.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the policy decisions made by the World Health Organization (WHO) in working to fight the spread of the first truly global infectious disease, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), of the 21st century. In particular, the author pays attention to the WHO's Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network…

  8. 77 FR 10541 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases... Development of Biomarkers for Acute and Delayed Radiation Injuries. Date: March 15-16, 2012. Time: 8 a.m. to...

  9. Global warming and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Khasnis, Atul A; Nettleman, Mary D

    2005-01-01

    Global warming has serious implications for all aspects of human life, including infectious diseases. The effect of global warming depends on the complex interaction between the human host population and the causative infectious agent. From the human standpoint, changes in the environment may trigger human migration, causing disease patterns to shift. Crop failures and famine may reduce host resistance to infections. Disease transmission may be enhanced through the scarcity and contamination of potable water sources. Importantly, significant economic and political stresses may damage the existing public health infrastructure, leaving mankind poorly prepared for unexpected epidemics. Global warming will certainly affect the abundance and distribution of disease vectors. Altitudes that are currently too cool to sustain vectors will become more conducive to them. Some vector populations may expand into new geographic areas, whereas others may disappear. Malaria, dengue, plague, and viruses causing encephalitic syndromes are among the many vector-borne diseases likely to be affected. Some models suggest that vector-borne diseases will become more common as the earth warms, although caution is needed in interpreting these predictions. Clearly, global warming will cause changes in the epidemiology of infectious diseases. The ability of mankind to react or adapt is dependent upon the magnitude and speed of the change. The outcome will also depend on our ability to recognize epidemics early, to contain them effectively, to provide appropriate treatment, and to commit resources to prevention and research.

  10. [Respiratory infectious diseases in horses].

    PubMed

    Mayr, A

    1987-01-01

    Among all infectious diseases affecting horses, respiratory disease pose the greatest threat to horses kept in stables, horses used for breeding and race horses. Here a distinction should be made between the so-called monocausal infectious diseases (so-called Henle-Koch postulates) and multicausal infectious diseases which are the result of the synergistic interaction of different processes, that alone do not lead to disease. There is no clearcut distinction between the two groups. The most important monocausal respiratory infections of horses are caused by equine influenza virus (subtypes 1 and 2), equine rhinopneumonitis virus (equine herpes-virus type 1), equine arteritis virus and partially by Reoviruses. In addition, streptococcus equi (strangles, adenitis equorum, coryza contagiosa equorum) and mycobacteria tuberculosis can cause monocausal diseases. In multicausal infections, the first step usually is a virus infection. This is the basis for secondary infection by widespread, opportunistic agents such as bacteria, mycoplasms or fungi which lead to clinical disease. The method of choice for controlling monocausal respiratory infections of horses is prophylactic vaccination and chemotherapy. Measures to control multicausal infections include: vaccination with functional-synergistic combined vaccines; the use of herd-specific vaccines; medical stimulation of the non-specific part of immunity (immunmodulation, paramunization). Paramunization is a new concept in the prophylaxis and therapy of respiratory infections of horses and can be combined with prophylactic vaccination as well as with chemotherapy. In severe cases of respiratory disease paramunization can also be combined with corticosteroids.

  11. [Investigation of seven different RNA viruses associated with gastroenteritis in children under five years old].

    PubMed

    Akhter, Shamim; Turegun, Buse; Kiyan, Mehmet; Gerceker, Devran; Guriz, Haluk; Sahin, Fikret

    2014-04-01

    Viruses are the most frequently detected etiologic agents of gastroenteritis seen in small children. In addition to classical gastroenteritis viruses namely rotavirus, norovirus, adenovirus type 40/41, astrovirus and sapovirus, some novel picornaviruses (Aichi virus, parechovirus, enterovirus) that have been identified in parallel to the developments in molecular diagnostic methods, thought to be associated with diarrhea in humans. However, the data are not enough to prove their actual roles in the pathogenesis of gastroenteritis. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus, astrovirus, Aichi virus, parechovirus and enterovirus in the stool samples of children with diarrhoea by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A total of 50 samples from children admitted to our hospital with diarrhoea between June-December 2012 were included in the study. All the patients were under 5 years of age. Routine bacteriological and parasitological examinations of the patients' stool samples were negative. Total RNAs were extracted from each of the samples and cDNAs were obtained by reverse transcription. All cDNAs were investigated first with the internal control (IC) using PCR. Thirty-one of the 50 cDNAs (62%) were found IC positive. Those 31 samples were further investigated in terms of rotavirus group A and C, norovirus (NoV) genogroup GI and GII, sapovirus, astrovirus, Aichi virus, parechovirus and enterovirus by PCR using specific primer pairs. The predicted sized PCR products obtained were cloned into the pBSK cloning vector and were sequenced. Sequences obtained were subjected to a BLAST search with registered sequences in the GenBank database for the confirmation of the PCR product. Out of 31 RNA positive stool specimens, 12 (38.7%) were found positive for five types of the target viruses. NoV GII (6/31, 19.3%) were detected as the most prevalent virus, followed by NoV GI (2/31, 6.5%), rotavirus group A (2

  12. Infectious keratitis with corneal perforation associated with corneal hydrops and contact lens wear in keratoconus.

    PubMed Central

    Donnenfeld, E D; Schrier, A; Perry, H D; Ingraham, H J; Lasonde, R; Epstein, A; Farber, B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Corneal perforation is an uncommon complication associated with keratoconus. The first cases of infectious keratitis and corneal perforation associated with corneal hydrops and contact lens wear are reported in two keratoconus patients. METHODS: A retrospective chart review and histopathological examination were carried out. RESULTS: Both patients progressed to corneal perforation and emergency penetrating keratoplasty. One patient cultured Fusarium and the second patient Serratia marcesens. Both patients wore contact lenses against medical advice. CONCLUSIONS: The tear in Descement's membrane, stromal oedema, and epithelial bedewing associated with corneal hydrops results in loss of the epithelial-endothelial barrier of the cornea, creating a conduit for infectious organisms through the cornea. Acute hydrops associated with epithelial keratitis, stromal swelling, and a Descement's membrane tear may be a significant risk factor for infectious keratitis and corneal perforation. Contact lenses should not be worn during an active corneal hydrops owing to the increased risk for severe infectious keratitis and corneal perforation. Images PMID:8695560

  13. The occurrence of autoantibodies in infectious mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, R. N. P.; Emond, R. T. D.; Thomas, D. B.; Doniach, D.

    1974-01-01

    Autoantibodies were looked for by immunofluorescence (IFL) in seventy-seven cases of infectious mononucleosis (IM) at the onset of symptoms and on recovery, to determine the time of appearance, duration and range of these responses, and to correlate them with serum immunoglobulin and EB virus antibody titres. Antibodies to lymphocyte membrane demonstrated by IFL, now identified with lymphocytotoxins, were present in 46% of patients in the acute stage, persisting for less than 7 weeks. Antibodies to smooth muscle (SMA) or to contractile fibres in other tissue cells including human thyroid and rat hepatocytes, were present in over 70% of cases, some being entirely of IgM class. The highest titres occurred soon after onset and these antibodies also disappeared during convalescence. By contrast ANA, mitochondrial, microsomal and reticulin antibodies, also thyroid and gastric organ-specific reactivity were seen only occasionally owing to the young age group of the patients. In individual cases there was no correlation between the appearance of lymphocyte antibodies and SMA, or between these and the EB virus antibody titres. The autoantibodies produced in this disease are highly selected. It is suggested that clones of B cells are stimulated to make these antibodies by virtue of being infected with EB virus, and that the T-cell clones in the circulation are more likely expanded in order to terminate the infection. PMID:4619789

  14. Infectious Entry Pathway of Enterovirus B Species

    PubMed Central

    Marjomäki, Varpu; Turkki, Paula; Huttunen, Moona

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus B species (EV-B) are responsible for a vast number of mild and serious acute infections. They are also suspected of remaining in the body, where they cause persistent infections contributing to chronic diseases such as type I diabetes. Recent studies of the infectious entry pathway of these viruses revealed remarkable similarities, including non-clathrin entry of large endosomes originating from the plasma membrane invaginations. Many cellular factors regulating the efficient entry have recently been associated with macropinocytic uptake, such as Rac1, serine/threonine p21-activated kinase (Pak1), actin, Na/H exchanger, phospholipace C (PLC) and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Another characteristic feature is the entry of these viruses to neutral endosomes, independence of endosomal acidification and low association with acidic lysosomes. The biogenesis of neutral multivesicular bodies is crucial for their infection, at least for echovirus 1 (E1) and coxsackievirus A9 (CVA9). These pathways are triggered by the virus binding to their receptors on the plasma membrane, and they are not efficiently recycled like other cellular pathways used by circulating receptors. Therefore, the best “markers” of these pathways may be the viruses and often their receptors. A deeper understanding of this pathway and associated endosomes is crucial in elucidating the mechanisms of enterovirus uncoating and genome release from the endosomes to start efficient replication. PMID:26690201

  15. The global burden of major infectious complications following prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H Y; Roberts, M J; Doi, S A R; Gardiner, R A

    2016-06-01

    We present a systematic review providing estimates of the overall and regional burden of infectious complications following prostate biopsy. A directly standardized prevalence estimate was used because it reflects the burden of disease more explicitly. Complications included sepsis, hospitalization, bacteraemia, bacteriuria, and acute urinary retention after biopsy. There were 165 articles, comprising 162 577 patients, included in the final analysis. Our findings demonstrate that transrectal biopsy was associated with a higher burden of hospitalization (1·1% vs. 0·9%) and sepsis (0·8% vs. 0·1%) compared to transperineal biopsy, while acute urinary retention was more prevalent after transperineal than transrectal biopsy (4·2% vs. 0·9%). The differences were statistically non-significant because of large heterogeneity across countries. We also demonstrate and discuss regional variations in complication rates, with Asian studies reporting higher rates of sepsis and hospitalization.

  16. The global burden of major infectious complications following prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H Y; Roberts, M J; Doi, S A R; Gardiner, R A

    2016-06-01

    We present a systematic review providing estimates of the overall and regional burden of infectious complications following prostate biopsy. A directly standardized prevalence estimate was used because it reflects the burden of disease more explicitly. Complications included sepsis, hospitalization, bacteraemia, bacteriuria, and acute urinary retention after biopsy. There were 165 articles, comprising 162 577 patients, included in the final analysis. Our findings demonstrate that transrectal biopsy was associated with a higher burden of hospitalization (1·1% vs. 0·9%) and sepsis (0·8% vs. 0·1%) compared to transperineal biopsy, while acute urinary retention was more prevalent after transperineal than transrectal biopsy (4·2% vs. 0·9%). The differences were statistically non-significant because of large heterogeneity across countries. We also demonstrate and discuss regional variations in complication rates, with Asian studies reporting higher rates of sepsis and hospitalization. PMID:26645476

  17. Infectious and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Tohidi, Mohammad; Sabouri, Amin; Ramezani-Binabaj, Mahdi; Sadeghi-Ghahrodi, Mohsen; Einollahi, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atherosclerotic event is one of the most causes of death in the world. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one manifestation of atherosclerosis. It is well-known that several risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking, hypertension (HTN), have effects on it. It is proposed that infection can lead to atherosclerosis or even make its process faster. Here, we discuss about the effect of some of infectious agents on the atherosclerosis and CAD. METHODS In this study, first we did a comprehensive search in PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct using some related keywords such as atherosclerosis, CAD, myocardial infarction (MI), infection, and name of viruses and bacteria. After finding the related papers, we reviewed the correlation between some microbial agents and risk of CAD. RESULTS Literature has reported several infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, and parasites) that can be associated with risk of CAD. This association for some of them like Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), Chlamydia pneumonia (C. pneumoniae), and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a very strong. On the other hand, there are some other agents like influenza that still need to be more investigated through original studies. Furthermore, different mechanisms (general and special) have been reported for the association of each agent with CAD. CONCLUSION Based on the studies in databases and our literature review, it is so clear that some microbes and infectious agents can be involved in the process of atherosclerosis. Therefore, controlling each type of infections especially among people with a traditional risk factor for atherosclerosis should be taken into account for reducing the risk of CAD and atherosclerosis. PMID:27114736

  18. Iron and its relation to immunity and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, S J

    2001-02-01

    The continuing unresolved debate over the interaction of iron and infection indicates a need for quantitative review of clinical morbidity outcomes. Iron deficiency is associated with reversible abnormalities of immune function, but it is difficult to demonstrate the severity and relevance of these in observational studies. Iron treatment has been associated with acute exacerbations of infection, in particular, malaria. Oral iron has been associated with increased rates of clinical malaria (5 of 9 studies) and increased morbidity from other infectious disease (4 of 8 studies). In most instances, therapeutic doses of oral iron were used. No studies in malarial regions showed benefits. Knowledge of local prevalence of causes of anemia including iron deficiency, seasonal malarial endemicity, protective hemoglobinopathies and age-specific immunity is essential in planning interventions. A balance must be struck in dose of oral iron and the timing of intervention with respect to age and malaria transmission. Antimalarial intervention is important. No studies of oral iron supplementation clearly show deleterious effects in nonmalarious areas. Milk fortification reduced morbidity due to respiratory disease in two very early studies in nonmalarious regions, but this was not confirmed in three later fortification studies, and better morbidity rates could be achieved by breast-feeding alone. One study in a nonmalarious area of Indonesia showed reduced infectious outcome after oral iron supplementation of anemic schoolchildren. No systematic studies report oral iron supplementation and infectious morbidity in breast-fed infants in nonmalarious regions.

  19. CKD and Infectious Diseases in Asia Pacific: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jha, Vivekanand; Prasad, Narayan

    2016-07-01

    The exact number of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Asia Pacific is uncertain. In numeric terms, the region is home to the largest population of patients with untreated chronic kidney failure. The climatic, geographic, social, cultural, economic, and environmental diversity within this region is higher than in any other part of the world. Large parts of the region face a climate-related burden of infectious diseases. Infections contribute to the development and progression of CKD and complicate the course of patients with pre-existing CKD (especially those on dialysis therapy or who are immunosuppressed), increase the cost of CKD care, and contribute to mortality and morbidity. Kidney involvement is a feature of several infectious diseases prevalent in Asia Pacific. Examples include malaria, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, tuberculosis, hepatitis B and C virus, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and Hantaan virus infections. The contribution of infection-associated acute kidney injury to the overall burden of CKD has not been evaluated systematically. Research is needed to quantify the impact of infections on kidney health by undertaking prospective studies. Nephrologists need to work with infectious disease research groups and government infection surveillance and control programs.

  20. CKD and Infectious Diseases in Asia Pacific: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jha, Vivekanand; Prasad, Narayan

    2016-07-01

    The exact number of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Asia Pacific is uncertain. In numeric terms, the region is home to the largest population of patients with untreated chronic kidney failure. The climatic, geographic, social, cultural, economic, and environmental diversity within this region is higher than in any other part of the world. Large parts of the region face a climate-related burden of infectious diseases. Infections contribute to the development and progression of CKD and complicate the course of patients with pre-existing CKD (especially those on dialysis therapy or who are immunosuppressed), increase the cost of CKD care, and contribute to mortality and morbidity. Kidney involvement is a feature of several infectious diseases prevalent in Asia Pacific. Examples include malaria, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, tuberculosis, hepatitis B and C virus, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and Hantaan virus infections. The contribution of infection-associated acute kidney injury to the overall burden of CKD has not been evaluated systematically. Research is needed to quantify the impact of infections on kidney health by undertaking prospective studies. Nephrologists need to work with infectious disease research groups and government infection surveillance and control programs. PMID:26943982

  1. [Current therapeutics in infectious dermatology].

    PubMed

    Lascaux, A S; Chosidow, O

    NEW AGENTS: Among new treatments used for infectious dermatology diseases, new agents for genital herpes, valaciclovir and famciclovir, have greatly simplified therapeutic schemes. Cidofovir has also been shown to be effective against aciclovir-resistant cutaneous and mucosal herpetic lesions and for the treatment of molluscum contagiosum. NEW ADMINISTRATION ROUTES: For genital papillomavirus infections, trials using systemic or intralesional administered interferon have not provided conclusive evidence but imiquimode appears to be quite promising. Itaconazole and fluconazole are effective for onchomycoses. NEW POSSIBILITIES: Ivermectine is effective against scabies, but must be reserved for particularly severe forms. Finally, the emergence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains resistant to fluoroquinolones is disquieting. PMID:10874915

  2. Oral rehydration versus intravenous therapy for treating dehydration due to gastroenteritis in children: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Bellemare, Steven; Hartling, Lisa; Wiebe, Natasha; Russell, Kelly; Craig, William R; McConnell, Don; Klassen, Terry P

    2004-01-01

    Background Despite treatment recommendations from various organizations, oral rehydration therapy (ORT) continues to be underused, particularly by physicians in high-income countries. We conducted a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to compare ORT and intravenous therapy (IVT) for the treatment of dehydration secondary to acute gastroenteritis in children. Methods RCTs were identified through MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, authors and references of included trials, pharmaceutical companies, and relevant organizations. Screening and inclusion were performed independently by two reviewers in order to identify randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing ORT and IVT in children with acute diarrhea and dehydration. Two reviewers independently assessed study quality using the Jadad scale and allocation concealment. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second. The primary outcome measure was failure of rehydration. We analyzed data using standard meta-analytic techniques. Results The quality of the 14 included trials ranged from 0 to 3 (Jadad score); allocation concealment was unclear in all but one study. Using a random effects model, there was no significant difference in treatment failures (risk difference [RD] 3%; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0, 6). The Mantel-Haenzsel fixed effects model gave a significant difference between treatment groups (RD 4%; 95% CI: 2, 5) favoring IVT. Based on the four studies that reported deaths, there were six in the IVT groups and two in ORT. There were no significant differences in total fluid intake at six and 24 hours, weight gain, duration of diarrhea, or hypo/hypernatremia. Length of stay was significantly shorter for the ORT group (weighted mean difference [WMD] -1.2 days; 95% CI: -2.4,-0.02). Phlebitis occurred significantly more often with IVT (number needed to treat [NNT] 33; 95% CI: 25,100); paralytic ileus occurred more often with ORT (NNT 33; 95% CI: 20,100). These results

  3. Microbial signatures in post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome – toward patient stratification for improved diagnostics and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jalanka, Jonna; Salonen, Anne; Fuentes, Susana; de Vos, Willem M

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifactorial and heterogeneous disorder estimated to affect over 10% of the Western population. A subset of the patients reports the start of the disease after an episode of gastroenteritis. The alterations in the intestinal microbiota of the post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) patients were recently investigated in a British cohort and shown to differentiate from the healthy controls and resemble that of diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) patients. The altered 27 genus-like groups created a microbial signature, which could be used to objectively stratify patients and healthy controls. In this addendum, we combine the microbiota data derived from the British cohort with that of a recently reported Swedish PI-IBS cohort. Remarkably, robust and reproducible microbiota signatures were observed in these PI-IBS patients. We discuss these results with attention on the emerging role of microbiota in the classification, development and treatment of PI-IBS. PMID:26512631

  4. Assessment of gastroenteric viruses from wastewater directly discharged into Uruguay River, Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Victoria, M; Tort, L F L; García, M; Lizasoain, A; Maya, L; Leite, J P G; Miagostovich, M P; Cristina, J; Colina, R

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the viral contamination of group A rotavirus (RVA), norovirus (NoV), and human astrovirus (HAstV) in sewage directly discharged into Uruguay River and to characterize RVA genotypes circulating in Uruguay. For this purpose, sewage samples (n = 96) were collected biweekly from March 2011 to February 2012 in four Uruguayan cities: Bella Unión, Salto, Paysandú, and Fray Bentos. Each sample was concentrated by ultracentrifugation method. Qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR for RVA, NoV, and HAstV were performed. A wide dissemination of gastroenteric viruses was observed in the sewage samples analyzed with 80% of positivity, being NoV (51%) the most frequently detected followed by RVA with a frequency of 49% and HAstV with 45%. Genotypes of RVA were typed using multiplex semi-nested RT-PCR as follows: P[8] (n = 15), P[4] (n = 8), P[10] (n = 1), P[11] (n = 1), G2 (n = 29), and G3 (n = 2). The viral load ranged from 10(3) to 10(7) genomic copies/liter, and they were detected roughly with the same frequency in all participant cities. A peak of RVA and HAstV detection was observed in colder months (June to September), whereas no seasonality was observed for NoV. This study demonstrates for the first time, the high degree of gastroenteric viral contamination in the country; highlighting the importance of developing these analyses as a tool to determine the viral contamination in this hydrographic boundary region used by the local populations for recreation and consumption, establishing an elevated risk of gastroenteric diseases for human health. PMID:24777819

  5. Human adenovirus spread, rainfalls, and the occurrence of gastroenteritis cases in a Brazilian basin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Manoela Tressoldi; Henzel, Andréia; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; de Quevedo, Daniela Muller; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa; do Nascimento, Carlos Augusto; Spilki, Fernando Rosado

    2015-11-01

    Climate variables may interfere with the environmental persistence and spread of pathogenic microorganisms. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of human adenovirus (HAdV) and total and thermotolerant coliforms in treated and untreated water and report gastroenteritis cases in seven cities located in the hydrographic basin of the Sinos River (HBSR), Southern Brazil. The data on water quality from samples collected at catchment areas of HBSR from March to December 2011 were compared with precipitation records, virus detection rates and viral loads, and information on enteric diseases among residents of the region. There was a marked increase in precipitation intensity in April, July, and August and a decrease in May and November. The number of HAdV genome copies (gc) in untreated water ranged from 2.1×10(8) gc/L in June to 7.8×10(1) gc/L in December, and in treated water, from 6.3×10(4) gc/L in September to 4.1×10(1) gc/L in November. The most probable number (MPN) of total coliforms ranged from 5×10(1) MPN/100 mL in December to 2.4×10(5) MPN/100 mL in July, and thermotolerant coliforms ranged from 1×10(1) MPN/100 mL in August to 6.9×10(4) MPN/100 mL in July. A total of 79 hospital admissions due to gastroenteritis were registered in the cities studied. The results for coliforms in untreated water demonstrate deficits in sanitation and wastewater treatment. These findings also indicate a possible relationship between the occurrence of rainfalls after dry periods and an increase in the number of gastroenteritis cases and in HAdV load quantified in surface water collected for conventional potabilization.

  6. Assessment of gastroenteric viruses from wastewater directly discharged into Uruguay River, Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Victoria, M; Tort, L F L; García, M; Lizasoain, A; Maya, L; Leite, J P G; Miagostovich, M P; Cristina, J; Colina, R

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the viral contamination of group A rotavirus (RVA), norovirus (NoV), and human astrovirus (HAstV) in sewage directly discharged into Uruguay River and to characterize RVA genotypes circulating in Uruguay. For this purpose, sewage samples (n = 96) were collected biweekly from March 2011 to February 2012 in four Uruguayan cities: Bella Unión, Salto, Paysandú, and Fray Bentos. Each sample was concentrated by ultracentrifugation method. Qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR for RVA, NoV, and HAstV were performed. A wide dissemination of gastroenteric viruses was observed in the sewage samples analyzed with 80% of positivity, being NoV (51%) the most frequently detected followed by RVA with a frequency of 49% and HAstV with 45%. Genotypes of RVA were typed using multiplex semi-nested RT-PCR as follows: P[8] (n = 15), P[4] (n = 8), P[10] (n = 1), P[11] (n = 1), G2 (n = 29), and G3 (n = 2). The viral load ranged from 10(3) to 10(7) genomic copies/liter, and they were detected roughly with the same frequency in all participant cities. A peak of RVA and HAstV detection was observed in colder months (June to September), whereas no seasonality was observed for NoV. This study demonstrates for the first time, the high degree of gastroenteric viral contamination in the country; highlighting the importance of developing these analyses as a tool to determine the viral contamination in this hydrographic boundary region used by the local populations for recreation and consumption, establishing an elevated risk of gastroenteric diseases for human health.

  7. Human adenovirus spread, rainfalls, and the occurrence of gastroenteritis cases in a Brazilian basin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Manoela Tressoldi; Henzel, Andréia; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; de Quevedo, Daniela Muller; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa; do Nascimento, Carlos Augusto; Spilki, Fernando Rosado

    2015-11-01

    Climate variables may interfere with the environmental persistence and spread of pathogenic microorganisms. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of human adenovirus (HAdV) and total and thermotolerant coliforms in treated and untreated water and report gastroenteritis cases in seven cities located in the hydrographic basin of the Sinos River (HBSR), Southern Brazil. The data on water quality from samples collected at catchment areas of HBSR from March to December 2011 were compared with precipitation records, virus detection rates and viral loads, and information on enteric diseases among residents of the region. There was a marked increase in precipitation intensity in April, July, and August and a decrease in May and November. The number of HAdV genome copies (gc) in untreated water ranged from 2.1×10(8) gc/L in June to 7.8×10(1) gc/L in December, and in treated water, from 6.3×10(4) gc/L in September to 4.1×10(1) gc/L in November. The most probable number (MPN) of total coliforms ranged from 5×10(1) MPN/100 mL in December to 2.4×10(5) MPN/100 mL in July, and thermotolerant coliforms ranged from 1×10(1) MPN/100 mL in August to 6.9×10(4) MPN/100 mL in July. A total of 79 hospital admissions due to gastroenteritis were registered in the cities studied. The results for coliforms in untreated water demonstrate deficits in sanitation and wastewater treatment. These findings also indicate a possible relationship between the occurrence of rainfalls after dry periods and an increase in the number of gastroenteritis cases and in HAdV load quantified in surface water collected for conventional potabilization. PMID:26514803

  8. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP.

  9. Infectious Considerations in Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddon, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Slightly more than 500 people have flown in space, most of them for short periods of time. The total number of person years in space is small. Given this fact, and given rigorous astronaut screening, it is not surprising that the accumulated infectious disease experience in space is also small, and mostly, theoretical. As the human space presence expands, we may expect mission length, total accumulated person years and the environmental complexity to increase. Add to the mix both changes in human immunity and microbial virulence, and it becomes realistic to consider infectious scenarios and the means to mitigate them. This lecture will cover the inhabited space environment from the perspective of host-microbe interactions, current relevant research, and the current countermeasures used. Future challenges will be discussed and there will be opportunity to ask questions about Space Operations. The audience is encouraged to think about what medical tools you would choose to have in different types of mission, what you would be willing to leave behind, and how you would compensate for the necessary trade offs in mission design.

  10. Interleukin-12 in infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Romani, L; Puccetti, P; Bistoni, F

    1997-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a potent immunoregulatory cytokine that is crucially involved in a wide range of infectious diseases. In several experimental models of bacterial, parasitic, viral, and fungal infection, endogenous IL-12 is required for early control of infection and for generation and perhaps maintenance of acquired protective immunity, directed by T helper type 1 (Th1) cells and mediated by phagocytes. Although the relative roles of IL-12 and gamma interferon in Th1-cell priming may be to a significant extent pathogen dependent, common to most infections is that IL-12 regulates the magnitude of the gamma interferon response at the initiation of infection, thus potentiating natural resistance, favoring Th1-cell development; and inhibiting Th2 responses. Treatment of animals with IL-12, either alone or as a vaccine adjuvant, has been shown to prevent disease by many of the same infectious agents, by stimulating innate resistance or promoting specific reactivity. Although IL-12 may enhance protective memory responses in vaccination or in combination with antimicrobial chemotherapy, it is yet unclear whether exogenous IL-12 can alter established responses in humans. Continued investigation into the possible application of IL-12 therapy to human infections is warranted by the role of the cytokine in inflammation, immunopathology, and autoimmunity. PMID:9336665

  11. Livestock infectious diseases and zoonoses

    PubMed Central

    Tomley, Fiona M.; Shirley, Martin W.

    2009-01-01

    Infectious diseases of livestock are a major threat to global animal health and welfare and their effective control is crucial for agronomic health, for safeguarding and securing national and international food supplies and for alleviating rural poverty in developing countries. Some devastating livestock diseases are endemic in many parts of the world and threats from old and new pathogens continue to emerge, with changes to global climate, agricultural practices and demography presenting conditions that are especially favourable for the spread of arthropod-borne diseases into new geographical areas. Zoonotic infections that are transmissible either directly or indirectly between animals and humans are on the increase and pose significant additional threats to human health and the current pandemic status of new influenza A (H1N1) is a topical example of the challenge presented by zoonotic viruses. In this article, we provide a brief overview of some of the issues relating to infectious diseases of livestock, which will be discussed in more detail in the papers that follow. PMID:19687034

  12. Genome of infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Lomniczi, B; Kennedy, I

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are described for the growth and rapid purification of the avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). Purified IBV has a sedimentation coefficient of 320S and a buoyant density of 1.22 g/ml in sucrose-deuterium oxide equilibrium gradients. IBV RNA extracted by proteinase K in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and further purified by phenol extraction and gradient centrifugation is single stranded and has a sedimentation coefficient of 64S, as determined by isokinetic gradient centrifugation. Analysis on sucrose gradients under both aqueous and denaturing conditions together with agarose gel electrophoresis in the presence of the chaotropic agent methylmercuric hydroxide gave a value of 8 X 10(6) for the moleclar weight of IBV RNA. This value was confirmed by RNase T1 fingerprinting, which also indicated that IBV RNA is haploid. No evidence was found of subunit structure in IBV RNA. From these results together with the recently reported observation that IBV RNA is infectious and contains a tract of polyadenylic acid (Lomniczi, J. Gen. Virol., in press), we conclude that the genome of the coronaviruses is a single continuous chain of about 23,000 mononucleotides that is of messenger polarity. Images PMID:198590

  13. A mathematical model of detection and dynamics of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hone, J.

    1994-01-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) is a viral disease causing dehydration, diarrhoea and death in pigs. The disease is widespread in pig-producing areas of the world but does not occur in Australia. A mathematical model of TGE spread within a pig herd is proposed and calibrated by reference to published data. The model is then applied to two situations of special interest; first to estimate the delay before detection of TGE (6 to over 30 days) when infection is first introduced into a herd of domestic or feral pigs, and second the effect of the disease in a population of feral pigs (could become endemic if transmission is high). PMID:8062875

  14. Pediatric in-Hospital Death from Infectious Disease in Uganda: Derivation of Clinical Prediction Models

    PubMed Central

    Lowlaavar, Nasim; Larson, Charles P.; Kumbakumba, Elias; Zhou, Guohai; Ansermino, J. Mark; Singer, Joel; Kissoon, Niranjan; Wong, Hubert; Ndamira, Andrew; Kabakyenga, Jerome; Kiwanuka, Julius; Wiens, Matthew O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pediatric hospital mortality from infectious diseases in resource constrained countries remains unacceptably high. Improved methods of risk-stratification can assist in referral decision making and resource allocation. The purpose of this study was to create prediction models for in-hospital mortality among children admitted with suspected infectious diseases. Methods This two-site prospective observational study enrolled children between 6 months and 5 years admitted with a proven or suspected infection. Baseline clinical and laboratory variables were collected on enrolled children. The primary outcome was death during admission. Stepwise logistic regression minimizing Akaike’s information criterion was used to identify the most promising multivariate models. The final model was chosen based on parsimony. Results 1307 children were enrolled consecutively, and 65 (5%) of whom died during their admission. Malaria, pneumonia and gastroenteritis were diagnosed in 50%, 31% and 8% of children, respectively. The primary model included an abnormal Blantyre coma scale, HIV and weight-for-age z-score. This model had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85 (95% CI, 0.80–0.89) with a sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 76%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 15% and 99%, respectively. Two alternate models with similar performance characteristics were developed withholding HIV and weight-for-age z-score, for use when these variables are not available. Conclusions Risk stratification of children admitted with infectious diseases can be calculated based on several easily measured variables. Risk stratification at admission can be used for allocation of scarce human and physical resources and to guide referral among children admitted to lower level health facilities. PMID:26963914

  15. Infectious entry pathway of adenovirus type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Varga, M J; Weibull, C; Everitt, E

    1991-01-01

    Internalization of the infectious fraction of human adenovirus type 2 into HeLa cells was followed by a quantitative internalization assay. Treatments known to selectively block receptor-mediated endocytosis reduced the internalization of infectious virus to an extent close to the reduction of endocytosis of transferrin. This suggests that one of the first steps in the infectious cycle of adenovirus type 2 is internalization by the coated-pit and -vesicle pathway. Images PMID:1920625

  16. Infectious diseases in disaster areas/catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Benca, J; Kalavsky, E; Miklosko, Jozef; Rudinsky, B; Taziarova, M; McKenzie, F

    2007-06-01

    There is very little data and no prospective research possible in the field of catastrophic medicine (disaster medicine) including infectious diseases. This minireview tries to contribute to the pathogenesis and outcome of infectious diseases in areas after anthropogenic (war, genocide, terrorist attack, industrial disasters) and non anthropogenic (natural) catastrophes (earthquake, floods, tsunamis, hurricanes, volcano eruptions). Therefore ISC received a proposal to create a working group on infectious diseases in areas after catastrophes, better to understand epidemiology, prevention and therapy of infectious diseases occurring in conjunction to various anthropogenic and non anthropogenic (natural) disasters.

  17. A Case Report of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis and Acute Hemorrhagic Cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Beyazal Polat, Hatice; Beyazal Çeliker, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi are a rare condition. A 24-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with abdominal pain, nausea, fever, headache, urinary burning, and bloody urine. Based on clinical, laboratory, and radiological evaluations, the patient was diagnosed with acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi. The patient was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for two weeks. After the treatment, the patient's clinical and laboratory findings improved. Acute acalculous cholecystitis due to Salmonella Typhi concomitant with acute hemorrhagic cystitis is very rare and might be difficult to diagnose. Infectious agents such as Salmonella Typhi should be considered when acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis are detected in adult patients with no underlying diseases. PMID:25161668

  18. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  19. Infectious cDNA clones of the DA strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, R P; Stein, S; Ohara, Y; Fu, J L; Semler, B L

    1989-01-01

    The DA strain and other members of the TO subgroup of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis viruses cause a persistent demyelinating infection, whereas the GDVII strain and other GDVII subgroup strains cause an acute lethal polioencephalomyelitis. We generated an infectious DA cDNA clone inserted into a transcription vector. Virus derived from transfection of transcripts produced a demyelinating disease indistinguishable from that of wild-type virus. The infectious clone provides a critical reagent for the production of interstrain recombinant viruses to help identify genetic loci responsible for the biological activities of the strains. Images PMID:2555569

  20. Incidence, risk factors, and outcome of cytomegalovirus viremia and gastroenteritis in patients with gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Divaya; Dyson, Gregory; Manasa, Richard; Deol, Abhinav; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Ayash, Lois; Abidi, Muneer; Lum, Lawrence G; Al-Kadhimi, Zaid; Uberti, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In addition, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection of the gastrointestinal tract can complicate the post-transplantation course of these patients and it can be difficult to differentiate the 2 diagnoses given that they can present with similar symptoms. We retrospectively analyzed 252 patients who were diagnosed with GI GVHD to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of CMV viremia and CMV gastroenteritis in these patients. The median age at the time of transplantation was 51 years, 35% were related donor transplantations, and 65% were unrelated donor transplantations. A total of 114 (45%) patients developed CMV viremia at a median of 34 days (range, 14 to 236 days) after transplantation. Only recipient CMV IgG serostatus was significantly associated with development of CMV viremia (P < .001). The incidence of CMV viremia with relation to donor (D) and recipient (R) CMV serostatus subgroups was as follows: D+/R+, 73%; D-/R+, 67%; D+/R-, 19%; and D-/R-, 0. A total of 31 patients were diagnosed with a biopsy-proven CMV gastroenteritis; 2 patients had evidence of CMV gastroenteritis and GVHD on the first biopsy and 29 on the second biopsy. Median time to development of CMV gastroenteritis was 52 days (range, 19 to 236 days) after transplantation. Using death as a competing risk, the cumulative incidence of CMV gastroenteritis at 1 year was 16.4%. The incidence of CMV gastroenteritis in relation to the donor/recipient serostatus was as follows: D+/R+, 22%; D-/R+, 31%; D+/R-, 12%; and D-/R-, 0. Median follow-up time for the 252 patients was 35.4 (95% CI 23.8 to 44.8) months. The estimated overall survival rate at 1 and 2 years was .45 (95% confidence interval [CI], .39 to .52) and .39 (95% CI, .33 to .46), respectively. Of the examined variables, those related to the overall survival were maximal clinical

  1. A Systematic Review of Methodology: Time Series Regression Analysis for Environmental Factors and Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Chisato; Hashizume, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: Time series analysis is suitable for investigations of relatively direct and short-term effects of exposures on outcomes. In environmental epidemiology studies, this method has been one of the standard approaches to assess impacts of environmental factors on acute non-infectious diseases (e.g. cardiovascular deaths), with conventionally generalized linear or additive models (GLM and GAM). However, the same analysis practices are often observed with infectious diseases despite of the substantial differences from non-infectious diseases that may result in analytical challenges. Methods: Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, systematic review was conducted to elucidate important issues in assessing the associations between environmental factors and infectious diseases using time series analysis with GLM and GAM. Published studies on the associations between weather factors and malaria, cholera, dengue, and influenza were targeted. Findings: Our review raised issues regarding the estimation of susceptible population and exposure lag times, the adequacy of seasonal adjustments, the presence of strong autocorrelations, and the lack of a smaller observation time unit of outcomes (i.e. daily data). These concerns may be attributable to features specific to infectious diseases, such as transmission among individuals and complicated causal mechanisms. Conclusion: The consequence of not taking adequate measures to address these issues is distortion of the appropriate risk quantifications of exposures factors. Future studies should pay careful attention to details and examine alternative models or methods that improve studies using time series regression analysis for environmental determinants of infectious diseases. PMID:25859149

  2. Infectious diseases associated with caves.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Ricardo Pereira

    2011-06-01

    In recent times, caving has become increasingly popular, with almost 2 million people visiting national park caves each year in the United States. Although the 2 million tourist visits are extremely low risk, smaller numbers of sport cavers are at risk for some high risk conditions, and expedition cavers are at risk for some obscure infections. Infectious diseases like histoplasmosis, rabies, leptospirosis, and tick-borne relapsing fever may be transmitted by the underground fauna. To reduce the risk of illness or injury while caving, knowledge of potential risks before engaging in this activity is important. Caving preparation needs to be carefully planned and executed, including vaccinations, prophylactic medications, and advice regarding safe conduct and behaviors. PMID:21664559

  3. [Frequent infectious diseases in migrants].

    PubMed

    Stich, A

    2016-05-01

    The current influx of refugees and the high rate of immigration increase the rate and impact of infectious diseases in Europe. Infections can be detected at the initial examination of arriving refugees as a result of systematic screening or within the framework of general medical care. Diagnosis and treatment require special expertise and in some cases special precautions. The spectrum of infections is determined by the country of origin of migrants and the conditions experienced on fleeing to Germany. In this article the diagnostics and treatment of the most important infections are presented. As far as infections are concerned refugees and migrants do not represent a threat to the general population but instead have to be perceived as a highly vulnerable group. PMID:27142435

  4. Thermal inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gosting, L.; Gould, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A plaque assay was used to follow the inactivation kinetics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in cell culture media at various temperatures. Inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a visceral organ slurry was compared with that in culture media.

  5. 78 FR 7674 - Foreign Quarantine; Import Regulations for Infectious Biological Agents, Infectious Substances...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... small if its annual revenue ranges between $2.5 to $21.5 million for services provided or the number of... concerning the packaging, labeling, and shipment of infectious substances. (c) If noted as a condition of the... replacing the definition of ``infectious material'' with an ``infectious substance''......

  6. Gastroenteritis in a regional hospital in Kuwait: some aspects of the disease.

    PubMed

    Khuffash, F A; Majeed, H A; Sethi, S K; Al-Nakib, W

    1982-09-01

    A review of the clinical course of gastroenteritis in 274 hospitalized children revealed a severe form of the disease. Eight-eight per cent were aged 12 months or under and 20% had severe associated malnutrition. The commonest clinical manifestations were diarrhoea (100%), dehydration (98.9%), vomiting (81.4%) and fever (77.7%). Pathogens were isolated from 75.2% of cases (rotavirus 24.5%, Escherichia coli 20.8%, salmonellae 20%, shigellae 6.2%, campylobacter 2.2% and Yersinia enterocolitica in 1.5%). Septicaemia was confirmed in 12 patients (4.4%) and strong clinical evidence of septicaemia was present in 36 more cases (13%). Dehydration was isonatraemic in 68%, hyponatraemic in 21% and hypernatraemic in 11% of cases. There was a clear association between septicaemia and hyponatraemia. The overall mortality rate was 1.8%. Data from our study show that the use of intravenous hyperalimentation, and/or antibiotics in the management of gastroenteritis in selected patients, can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality.

  7. Fluid therapy trials in neonatal piglets infected with transmissible gastroenteritis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, R; Morin, M; Fontaine, M

    1985-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an oral fluid therapy alone or combined with parenteral administration of a 5% dextrose solution to attenuate the clinical signs and the pathophysiological consequences of transmissible gastroenteritis in neonatal piglets. Eighteen two day old conventional piglets were infected with transmissible gastroenteritis virus while six others were used as controls (Group 1). At the onset of diarrhea, infected piglets were divided into three groups of six (Groups 2, 3 and 4). Piglets in group 2 were not treated and were fed a milk replacer ad libitum. Piglets in group 3 were removed from the milk replacer and placed on an oral glucose-glycine-electrolyte solution ad libitum. Those in group 4 were placed on oral fluid therapy and received a 5% dextrose solution intraperitoneally at the rate of 25 mL/kg of body weight once a day. Blood samples were collected in heparin within minutes after the infected piglets became comatose and from the controls at four or five days of age. The following variables were measured: packed red cell volume, blood pH, total plasma protein and bicarbonate, blood urea nitrogen, and plasma glucose, creatinine, chloride, inorganic phosphorus, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium. Vomiting and diarrhea appeared 12 to 24 hours postinoculation in the infected piglets. There was a sudden and rapid progression into a comatose and moribund state one or two days later whether the infected piglets were treated or not.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4075236

  8. Outbreak of hospital-acquired gastroenteritis and invasive infection caused by Listeria monocytogenes, Finland, 2012.

    PubMed

    Jacks, A; Pihlajasaari, A; Vahe, M; Myntti, A; Kaukoranta, S-S; Elomaa, N; Salmenlinna, S; Rantala, L; Lahti, K; Huusko, S; Kuusi, M; Siitonen, A; Rimhanen-Finne, R

    2016-10-01

    During one week in July 2012, two patients from the same ward at the municipal hospital in Vaasa, Finland, were diagnosed with septicaemia caused by Listeria monocytogenes. An outbreak investigation revealed eight concomitant cases of febrile gastroenteritis caused by L. monocytogenes on the same ward. Median age of the cases was 82 years and median incubation time for listerial gastroenteritis was 21 h (range 9-107). An additional 10 cases of invasive listeriosis caused by the same outbreak strain were identified across the whole country during the summer of 2012. Environmental investigation at the affected municipal hospital ward revealed ready-sliced meat jelly as the suspected source of the infection. During inspection of the meat jelly production plant, one pooled sample taken from a floor drain and a trolley wheel in the food processing environment was positive for the outbreak strain of L. monocytogenes. After the producer stopped the production of meat jelly, no further cases of listeriosis with the outbreak strain were identified via nationwide surveillance.

  9. Outbreak of hospital-acquired gastroenteritis and invasive infection caused by Listeria monocytogenes, Finland, 2012.

    PubMed

    Jacks, A; Pihlajasaari, A; Vahe, M; Myntti, A; Kaukoranta, S-S; Elomaa, N; Salmenlinna, S; Rantala, L; Lahti, K; Huusko, S; Kuusi, M; Siitonen, A; Rimhanen-Finne, R

    2016-10-01

    During one week in July 2012, two patients from the same ward at the municipal hospital in Vaasa, Finland, were diagnosed with septicaemia caused by Listeria monocytogenes. An outbreak investigation revealed eight concomitant cases of febrile gastroenteritis caused by L. monocytogenes on the same ward. Median age of the cases was 82 years and median incubation time for listerial gastroenteritis was 21 h (range 9-107). An additional 10 cases of invasive listeriosis caused by the same outbreak strain were identified across the whole country during the summer of 2012. Environmental investigation at the affected municipal hospital ward revealed ready-sliced meat jelly as the suspected source of the infection. During inspection of the meat jelly production plant, one pooled sample taken from a floor drain and a trolley wheel in the food processing environment was positive for the outbreak strain of L. monocytogenes. After the producer stopped the production of meat jelly, no further cases of listeriosis with the outbreak strain were identified via nationwide surveillance. PMID:26493730

  10. An Interdisciplinary Perspective: Infectious Diseases and History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turco, Jenifer; Byrd, Melanie

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the course "Infectious Diseases and History" which is designed for freshman and sophomore students. Aims to teach about infectious diseases, develop skills of using libraries and computer resources, and develop oral and written communication skills. Focuses on tuberculosis as an example of an instructional approach and explains its…

  11. 25 CFR 140.26 - Infectious plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Infectious plants. 140.26 Section 140.26 Indians BUREAU... Infectious plants. Traders shall not introduce into, sell, or spread within Indian reservations any plant, plant product, seed, or any type of vegetation, which is infested, or infected or which might act as...

  12. 25 CFR 140.26 - Infectious plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Infectious plants. 140.26 Section 140.26 Indians BUREAU... Infectious plants. Traders shall not introduce into, sell, or spread within Indian reservations any plant, plant product, seed, or any type of vegetation, which is infested, or infected or which might act as...

  13. 25 CFR 140.26 - Infectious plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Infectious plants. 140.26 Section 140.26 Indians BUREAU OF... Infectious plants. Traders shall not introduce into, sell, or spread within Indian reservations any plant, plant product, seed, or any type of vegetation, which is infested, or infected or which might act as...

  14. 25 CFR 140.26 - Infectious plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Infectious plants. 140.26 Section 140.26 Indians BUREAU... Infectious plants. Traders shall not introduce into, sell, or spread within Indian reservations any plant, plant product, seed, or any type of vegetation, which is infested, or infected or which might act as...

  15. 25 CFR 140.26 - Infectious plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infectious plants. 140.26 Section 140.26 Indians BUREAU... Infectious plants. Traders shall not introduce into, sell, or spread within Indian reservations any plant, plant product, seed, or any type of vegetation, which is infested, or infected or which might act as...

  16. Evolutionary Response to Human Infectious Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armelagos, George J.; Dewey, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Gives an overview of human history, relating cultural changes with resulting changes in population density and in ecological balance to patterns of infectious diseases in man. Discusses mechanisms of evolution of resistance. Suggests that in populations where infectious diseases can be controlled, attention should shift to degenerative diseases…

  17. How infectious disease outbreaks affect community-based primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkimainen, R. Liisa; Bondy, Susan J.; Parkovnick, Meredith; Barnsley, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare how the infectious disease outbreaks H1N1 and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) affected community-based GPs and FPs. Design A mailed survey sent after the H1N1 outbreak compared with the results of similar survey completed after the SARS outbreak. Setting Greater Toronto area in Ontario. Participants A total of 183 randomly selected GPs and FPs who provided office-based care. Main outcome measures The perceptions of GPs and FPs on how serious infectious disease outbreaks affected their clinical work and personal lives; their preparedness for a serious infectious disease outbreak; and the types of information they want to receive and the sources they wanted to receive information from during a serious infectious disease outbreak. The responses from this survey were compared with the responses of GPs and FPs in the greater Toronto area who completed a similar survey in 2003 after the SARS outbreak. Results After the H1N1 outbreak, GPs and FPs still had substantial concerns about the effects of serious infectious disease outbreaks on the health of their family members. Physicians made changes to various office practices in order to manage and deal with patients with serious infectious diseases. They expressed concerns about the effects of an infectious disease on the provision of health care services. Also, physicians wanted to quickly receive accurate information from the provincial government and their medical associations. Conclusion Serious community-based infectious diseases are a personal concern for GPs and FPs, and have considerable effects on their clinical practice. Further work examining the timely flow of relevant information through different health care sectors and government agencies still needs to be undertaken. PMID:25316747

  18. [Acute transverse myelitis in a traveler].

    PubMed

    García Allende, Natalia; García Posada, Mara J; Radosta, Mariana F; Sánchez, Ana V; Mayer Wolf, Micaela; Rodríguez, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Acute transverse myelitis is defined as an acquired neuroimmune disorder of the spinal cord, which occurs as a consequence of a primary event, or directly related to an autoimmune inflammatory disease, an infectious or post-infectious disease. Amongst infectious etiologies, Borrelia spp., a tick-bourne anthropozoonosis of the ixodidae family, prevails. Approximately 10 to 15% of patients with Lyme disease undergo neurologic manifestations, with an assorted and uncertain array of clinical syndromes. Transverse myelitis accounts for up to 5% of Lyme neuroborreliosis. We describe the case of a traveler from endemic zone for Lyme disease, with encephalomyelitis secondary to acute infection by Borrelia burgderfori, with complete resolution of symptoms after concluding adequate antibiotic treatment. PMID:27576284

  19. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at picnics, school cafeterias, large social gatherings, or restaurants. The germs may get into your food (called ... handling or preparation may occur in grocery stores, restaurants, or homes. Food poisoning often occurs from eating ...

  20. Molecular Characterization of Noroviruses and Rotaviruses Involved in a Large Outbreak of Gastroenteritis in Northern Italy ▿

    PubMed Central

    Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Monini, Marina; Losio, Marina Nadia; Pavoni, Enrico; Lavazza, Antonio; Ruggeri, Franco Maria

    2011-01-01

    Noroviruses and rotaviruses from a gastroenteritis outbreak affecting >300 people near Garda Lake (Northern Italy) in 2009 were investigated. Characterization of viruses from 40 patient stool samples and 5 environmental samples identified three distinct rotavirus and five norovirus genotypes; two of the latter were detected in both patient and environmental samples. PMID:21666024

  1. Phage-display for identifying peptides that bind the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus and possess diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spike (S) protein is a key structural protein of coronaviruses including, the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). The S protein is a type I membrane glycoprotein located in the viral envelope and is responsible for mediating the binding of viral particles to specific cell recepto...

  2. Orexins and receptor OX2R in the gastroenteric apparatus of two teleostean species: Dicentrarchus labrax and Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Livia; Castaldo, Luciana; de Girolamo, Paolo; Lucini, Carla; Paolucci, Marina; Pelagalli, Alessandra; Varricchio, Ettore; Arcamone, Nadia

    2016-08-01

    Orexin A and B peptides and the receptor OX2R were studied in sea bass and goldfish gastroenteric tract by immunoblotting combined with densitometric analysis using NIH Image J software and immunohistochemical techniques. These teleost species present a different gut organization and diverse feeding habits. Immunoblotting experiments showed one band of 16 kDa corresponding to prepro-orexin, and one band of 38 kDa corresponding to the OX2R receptor. Immunohistochemical localization of OXA and OXB was observed in the enteric nervous system throughout the gastroenteric tract of both species. OXA and OXB immunoreactive cells were found in the gastric and intestinal regions of sea bass, and were mainly found in the basal region of folds in intestinal bulb, and in the midgut and hindgut of goldfish. The distribution of OX2R was mainly detected in the mucosa of the gastroenteric tract of sea bass and goldfish. This distribution suggests an endocrine action of OXA and OXB in the gastrointestinal tract as well as involvement in the peripheral control of food intake and digestive processes in both species. This study might also serve to determine the productive factors in breeding and as a baseline for future experimental studies on the regulation of the gastroenteric functions in non-mammalian vertebrates. Anat Rec, 299:1121-1129, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223125

  3. Is racecadotril effective for acute diarrhea in children? -First update.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Josefina; Cifuentes, Lorena

    2016-05-06

    This article updates the December 2015 Living FRISBEE (Living FRISBEE: Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos), based on the detection of two systematic reviews not identified in the previous version. Gastroenteritis or acute watery diarrhea is usually a self-limited disease, but it is still associated to substantial healthcare costs and remains a frequent demand for medical care. Racecadotril, an intestinal enkephalinase inhibitor, has been used as treatment because it would decrease the duration of acute diarrhea and fluid loss. However there is still no evidence supporting its routine use. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including nine randomized trials relevant for our question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded racecadotril probably reduces the duration of acute diarrhea in pediatric patients, without increasing adverse effects.

  4. Is racecadotril effective for acute diarrhea in children? -First update.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Josefina; Cifuentes, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    This article updates the December 2015 Living FRISBEE (Living FRISBEE: Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos), based on the detection of two systematic reviews not identified in the previous version. Gastroenteritis or acute watery diarrhea is usually a self-limited disease, but it is still associated to substantial healthcare costs and remains a frequent demand for medical care. Racecadotril, an intestinal enkephalinase inhibitor, has been used as treatment because it would decrease the duration of acute diarrhea and fluid loss. However there is still no evidence supporting its routine use. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including nine randomized trials relevant for our question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded racecadotril probably reduces the duration of acute diarrhea in pediatric patients, without increasing adverse effects. PMID:26731112

  5. 76 FR 27070 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel,...

  6. Oral Ondansetron Administration in Emergency Departments to Children with Gastroenteritis: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Stephen B.; Steiner, Michael J.; Chan, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of antiemetics for children with vomiting is one of the most controversial decisions in the treatment of gastroenteritis in developed countries. Ondansetron, a selective serotonin receptor antagonist, has been found to be effective in improving the success of oral rehydration therapy. However, North American and European clinical practice guidelines continue to recommend against its use, stating that evidence of cost savings would be required to support ondansetron administration. Thus, an economic analysis of the emergency department administration of ondansetron was conducted. The primary objective was to conduct a cost analysis of the routine administration of ondansetron in both the United States and Canada. Methods and Findings A cost analysis evaluated oral ondansetron administration to children presenting to emergency departments with vomiting and dehydration secondary to gastroenteritis from a societal and health care payer's perspective in both the US and Canada. A decision tree was developed that incorporated the frequency of vomiting, intravenous insertion, hospitalization, and emergency department revisits. Estimates of the monetary costs associated with ondansetron use, intravenous rehydration, and hospitalization were derived from administrative databases or emergency department use. The economic burden in children administered ondansetron plus oral rehydration therapy was compared to those not administered ondansetron employing deterministic and probabilistic simulations. We estimated the costs or savings to society and health care payers associated with the routine administration of ondansetron. Sensitivity analyses considered variations in costs, treatment effects, and exchange rates. In the US the administration of ondansetron to eligible children would prevent approximately 29,246 intravenous insertions and 7,220 hospitalizations annually. At the current average wholesale price, its routine administration to eligible children

  7. Infectious Diseases at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Buddha; Starling, Jennifer M

    2015-08-01

    Travel to elevations above 2,500 m is an increasingly common activity undertaken by a diverse population of individuals. These may be trekkers, climbers, miners in high-altitude sites in South America, and more recently, soldiers deployed for high-altitude duty in remote areas of the world. What is also being increasingly recognized is the plight of the millions of pilgrims, many with comorbidities, who annually ascend to high-altitude sacred areas. There are also 400 million people who reside permanently in high mountain ranges, which cover one-fifth of the Earth's surface. Many of these high-altitude areas are in developing countries, for example, the Himalayan range in South Asia. Although high-altitude areas may not harbor any specific infectious disease agents, it is important to know about the pathogens encountered in the mountains to be better able to help both the ill sojourner and the native high-altitude dweller. Often the same pathogens prevalent in the surrounding lowlands are found at high altitude, but various factors such as immunomodulation, hypoxia, poor physiological adaptation, and harsh environmental stressors at high altitude may enhance susceptibility to these pathogens. Against this background, various gastrointestinal, respiratory, dermatological, neurological, and other infections encountered at high altitude are discussed.

  8. [Genetic predisposition to infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Dessein, A

    1997-01-01

    At the present time more is known about barriers to transmission of infectious agents between species than barriers to transmission within the same species. However differences in resistance to infection have been well-established within given species of various plants and domestic farm animals. Unsurprisingly several similar mechanisms have been observed in humans. A well-known human example of genetic protection is resistance to malaria in endemic areas which has been associated with polymorphism in alpha and beta chain globulin genes, cytoskeleton proteins, and protein/receptors on the surface of red blood cells. Studies regarding infection by Schistosoma mansoni show that the extent of infection depends largely on each individual's intrinsic resistance under the control of a single major gene which has now been located on q31-33 locus of the long arm of chromosome 5. This locus harbors several genes involved in differentiation of auxiliary T lymphocytes. With regard to HIV infection it has been known for several years that a small but significant number of individuals are relatively resistant. This resistance has been attributed to deletion of the gene coding for the chemokine receptor used by the virus as a co-receptor to infect macrophage.

  9. Imported infectious diseases and surveillance in Japan.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Kiyosu; Yoshida, Makiko; Sunagawa, Tomimasa; Tada, Yuki; Okabe, Nobuhiko

    2008-11-01

    Surveillance of imported infectious diseases is important because of the need for early detection of outbreaks of international concern as well as information of risk to the travelers. This paper attempts to review how the Japanese surveillance system deals with imported infectious diseases and reviews the trend of these diseases. The cases of acquired infection overseas were extracted from the surveillance data in 1999-2008. The incidence and rate of imported cases of a series of infectious diseases with more than one imported case were observed by the year of diagnosis and place of acquired infection. During the period 10,030 cases that could be considered to be imported infectious diseases were identified. Shigellosis ranked as the most common imported disease, followed by amebiasis, malaria, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, typhoid fever, dengue fever, hepatitis A, giardiasis, cholera, and paratyphoid fever. The annual trends of these diseases always fluctuated but not every change was investigated. The study reveals that the situation of imported infectious diseases can be identified in the current Japanese surveillance system with epidemiologic features of both temporal and geographic distribution of cases of imported infectious diseases. However, further timely investigation for unusual increase in infectious diseases is needed. PMID:18984479

  10. Management of infectious waste by US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rutala, W A; Odette, R L; Samsa, G P

    In July 1987 and January 1988, forty-six percent (441/955) of randomly selected US hospitals responded to a questionnaire intended to identify their waste disposal practices. Survey responses were received from hospitals in 48 states. United States hospitals generated a median of 6.93 kg of hospital waste per patient per day and infectious waste made up 15% of the total hospital waste. Most hospitals (greater than 90%) considered blood, microbiology, "sharps," communicable disease isolation, pathology, autopsy, and contaminated animal carcass waste as infectious. Other sources of hospital waste that were commonly (greater than 80%) designated infectious were surgical, dialysis, and miscellaneous laboratory waste. The infectious waste was normally (80%) treated via incineration or steam sterilization before disposal, whereas noninfectious waste was discarded directly in a sanitary landfill. Eight-two percent of these US hospitals are discarding blood, microbiology, sharps, pathology, and contaminated animal carcass waste in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control's recommendations, while the compliance rate for the Environmental Protection Agency's recommendations (excluding optional waste) is 75%. No hospital could identify an infection problem (excluding needle-stick injuries) that was attributable to the disposal of infectious waste. While the management of infectious waste by US hospitals is generally consistent with the Centers for Disease Control's guidelines, many hospitals employ overly inclusive definitions of infectious waste.

  11. Imported infectious diseases and surveillance in Japan.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Kiyosu; Yoshida, Makiko; Sunagawa, Tomimasa; Tada, Yuki; Okabe, Nobuhiko

    2008-11-01

    Surveillance of imported infectious diseases is important because of the need for early detection of outbreaks of international concern as well as information of risk to the travelers. This paper attempts to review how the Japanese surveillance system deals with imported infectious diseases and reviews the trend of these diseases. The cases of acquired infection overseas were extracted from the surveillance data in 1999-2008. The incidence and rate of imported cases of a series of infectious diseases with more than one imported case were observed by the year of diagnosis and place of acquired infection. During the period 10,030 cases that could be considered to be imported infectious diseases were identified. Shigellosis ranked as the most common imported disease, followed by amebiasis, malaria, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, typhoid fever, dengue fever, hepatitis A, giardiasis, cholera, and paratyphoid fever. The annual trends of these diseases always fluctuated but not every change was investigated. The study reveals that the situation of imported infectious diseases can be identified in the current Japanese surveillance system with epidemiologic features of both temporal and geographic distribution of cases of imported infectious diseases. However, further timely investigation for unusual increase in infectious diseases is needed.

  12. Infectious Chikungunya Virus in the Saliva of Mice, Monkeys and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Joy; Rudd, Penny A.; Prow, Natalie A.; Belarbi, Essia; Roques, Pierre; Larcher, Thibaut; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Schroder, Wayne A.; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging, ordinarily mosquito-transmitted, alphavirus that occasionally produces hemorrhagic manifestations, such as nose bleed and bleeding gums, in human patients. Interferon response factor 3 and 7 deficient (IRF3/7-/-) mice, which are deficient for interferon α/β responses, reliably develop hemorrhagic manifestations after CHIKV infection. Here we show that infectious virus was present in the oral cavity of CHIKV infected IRF3/7-/- mice, likely due to hemorrhagic lesions in the olfactory epithelium that allow egress of infected blood into the nasal, and subsequently, oral cavities. In addition, IRF3/7-/- mice were more susceptible to infection with CHIKV via intranasal and oral routes, with IRF3/7-/- mice also able to transmit virus mouse-to-mouse without an arthropod vector. Cynomolgus macaques often show bleeding gums after CHIKV infection, and analysis of saliva from several infected monkeys also revealed the presence of viral RNA and infectious virus. Furthermore, saliva samples collected from several acute CHIKV patients with hemorrhagic manifestations were found to contain viral RNA and infectious virus. Oral fluids can therefore be infectious during acute CHIKV infections, likely due to hemorrhagic manifestations in the oral/nasal cavities. PMID:26447467

  13. Infectious Chikungunya Virus in the Saliva of Mice, Monkeys and Humans.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Joy; Rudd, Penny A; Prow, Natalie A; Belarbi, Essia; Roques, Pierre; Larcher, Thibaut; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Schroder, Wayne A; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging, ordinarily mosquito-transmitted, alphavirus that occasionally produces hemorrhagic manifestations, such as nose bleed and bleeding gums, in human patients. Interferon response factor 3 and 7 deficient (IRF3/7-/-) mice, which are deficient for interferon α/β responses, reliably develop hemorrhagic manifestations after CHIKV infection. Here we show that infectious virus was present in the oral cavity of CHIKV infected IRF3/7-/- mice, likely due to hemorrhagic lesions in the olfactory epithelium that allow egress of infected blood into the nasal, and subsequently, oral cavities. In addition, IRF3/7-/- mice were more susceptible to infection with CHIKV via intranasal and oral routes, with IRF3/7-/- mice also able to transmit virus mouse-to-mouse without an arthropod vector. Cynomolgus macaques often show bleeding gums after CHIKV infection, and analysis of saliva from several infected monkeys also revealed the presence of viral RNA and infectious virus. Furthermore, saliva samples collected from several acute CHIKV patients with hemorrhagic manifestations were found to contain viral RNA and infectious virus. Oral fluids can therefore be infectious during acute CHIKV infections, likely due to hemorrhagic manifestations in the oral/nasal cavities.

  14. After 2015: infectious diseases in a new era of health and development

    PubMed Central

    Dye, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Running over timescales that span decades or centuries, the epidemiological transition provides the central narrative of global health. In this transition, a reduction in mortality is followed by a reduction in fertility, creating larger, older populations in which the main causes of illness and death are no longer acute infections of children but chronic diseases of adults. Since the year 2000, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have provided a framework for accelerating the decline of infectious diseases, backed by a massive injection of foreign investment to low-income countries. Despite the successes of the MDGs era, the inhabitants of low-income countries still suffer an enormous burden of disease owing to diarrhoea, pneumonia, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other pathogens. Adding to the predictable burden of endemic disease, the threat of pandemics is ever-present and global. With a view to the future, this review spotlights five aspects of the fight against infection beyond 2015, when the MDGs will be replaced by a new set of goals for poverty reduction and sustainable development. These aspects are: exploiting the biological links between infectious and non-infectious diseases; controlling infections among the new urban majority; enhancing the response to international health threats; expanding childhood immunization programmes to prevent acute and chronic diseases in adults; and working towards universal health coverage. By scanning the wider horizon now, infectious disease specialists have the chance to shape the post-2015 era of health and development. PMID:24821913

  15. Prevention of infectious diseases in athletes.

    PubMed

    Luke, Anthony; d'Hemecourt, Pierre

    2007-07-01

    The sports medicine physician may face challenging issues regarding infectious diseases when dealing with teams or highly competitive athletes who have difficulties taking time off to recover. One must treat the individual sick athlete and take the necessary precautions to contain the spread of communicable disease to the surrounding team, staff, relatives, and other contacts. This article reviews preventive strategies for infectious disease in athletes, including immunization recommendations and prophylaxis guidelines, improvements in personal hygiene and prevention of spread of infectious organisms by direct contact, insect-borne disease precautions, and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. A special emphasis on immunizations focuses on pertussis, influenza, and meningococcal prophylaxis.

  16. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis isolated in a gastroenteritis outbreak investigation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S G; Goodbrand, R B; Ahmed, R; Kasatiya, S

    1995-08-01

    During investigation of a gastroenteritis outbreak in a chronic care institution, Norwalk virus was found in stool specimens from two individuals and bacterial isolates presumptively identified as Bacillus cereus were isolated from four individuals (including one with Norwalk virus) and spice. Phage typing confirmed all Bacillus clinical isolates were phage type 2. All clinical isolates were subsequently identified as B. thuringiensis when tested as a result of a related study (L. Leroux, personal communication). Eight of 10 spice isolates were phage type 4. All B. cereus and B. thuringiensis isolates showed cytotoxic effects characteristic of enterotoxin-producing B. cereus. An additional 20 isolates each of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis from other sources were tested for cytotoxicity. With the exception of one B. cereus, all showed characteristic cytotoxic patterns.

  17. Gastroenteritis among children in Riyadh: a prospective analysis of 254 hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Karrar, Z A; Abdullah, M A

    1981-06-01

    A prospective study was undertaken of 254 infants and children admitted with gastroenteritis to the Children's Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during the period 1 September 1980 to 1 February 1981. Analysis of data showed that 80% of the admissions were less than one year of age. The peak incidence occurred in the 0-five months age group. 65.4% were on bottle feeding. The incidence of second- and third-degree malnutrition was 38.9%. Marasmus was the commonest type of severe malnutrition seen. Hypernatraemic dehydration occurred in 12.6% of the cases. The parasitic and bacterial isolation rate was 23.8%, salmonella and entero-pathogenic E. coli being the commonest organisms. The mortality rate was 9.1% and was higher among malnourished patients, those with hypernatraemia and in the younger age groups.

  18. Herd immunity after two years of the universal mass vaccination program against rotavirus gastroenteritis in Austria.

    PubMed

    Paulke-Korinek, Maria; Kundi, Michael; Rendi-Wagner, Pamela; de Martin, Alfred; Eder, Gerald; Schmidle-Loss, Birgit; Vecsei, Andreas; Kollaritsch, Herwig

    2011-03-24

    Austria was the first country in Europe implementing a universal mass vaccination program against rotavirus gastroenteritis (RV-GE) for all infants nationwide. Epidemiological data from a hospital based surveillance system show that incidence rates of children hospitalized with RV-GE decreased in 2009 compared to 2008 and compared to the prevaccination period 2001-2005. Decreasing hospitalization-rates from RV-GE were observed in children of all age groups, even in those not eligible for vaccination according to their age, suggesting herd immunity induced by universal mass vaccination against RV-GE. In 2009 the disease burden was highest in children below three months of age stressing the importance of the early start of the immunization course.

  19. Epidemiological applications: a case report of a village epidemic of gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Asuzu, M C; Singh, N

    2001-03-01

    This is a case report of an epidemic of gastroenteritis which was investigated and controlled by epidemiological methods only, before laboratory investigations could be done to confirm the original epidemiological conclusions--from contaminated home made ice-cubes. The case and process are reported in order to encourage similar uses of epidemiology by field public health practitioners, especially within the district or primary health care systems and particularly in places where laboratory support are difficult to avail. The case is used also to discuss the equipments and facilities that ought to be part of the support system for every modern field public health practitioner. These should include computers, modern communication facilities and epidemiological support systems, especially senior epidemiologists; as such senior personnel are available to junior colleagues in the other areas of specialist medical practice. PMID:12017811

  20. A case of Salmonella gastroenteritis following ingestion of raw venison sashimi.

    PubMed

    Madar, Cristian S; Cardile, Anthony P; Cunningham, Scott; Magpantay, Gil; Finger, David

    2012-02-01

    An interesting case of gastroenteritis due to Salmonella Birkenhead following ingestion of raw venison sashimi is described. A 65-year-old man presented with diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. On exam he was hypotensive, tachycardic, with evidence of severe dehydration following ingestion of raw venison sashimi produced with game meat hunted on the Hawaiian island of Lana'i. He responded rapidly to vigorous volume resuscitation, and stool cultures later were positive for Salmonella Birkenhead. Non-typhoidal Salmonella is the most frequently identified cause of foodborne illness in the United States. Clinicians in the state of Hawai'i should be alert and aware of the potential for the local deer population to be an unusual source of foodborne illness, especially given the prevalence of consumption of raw foods in the local cuisine.