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Sample records for acute inflammatory arthritis

  1. Development of a new humanized mouse model to study acute inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Substantial advances have been generated in understanding the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Current murine models of RA-like disease have provided great insights into the molecular mechanism of inflammatory arthritis due to the use of genetically deficient or transgenic mice. However, these studies are limited by differences that exist between human and murine immune systems. Thus, the development of an animal model that utilizes human immune cells, will afford the opportunity to study their function in the initiation and propagation of inflammatory arthritis. Methods One to two-day old irradiated NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice were reconstituted with human CD34+ cord blood stem cells. Leukocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry and circulating antibodies were determined by ELISA. Arthritis was induced by injecting complete Freund’s adjuvant into knee or ankle joints. Mice were also treated with the TNF inhibitor, Etanercept, or PBS and joints were analyzed histologically. Results Humanized mice were established with high reconstitution rates and were able to spontaneously produce human immunoglobulins as well as specific IgG in response to immunization. Intraperitoneal injection of thioglycolate or injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant into joints resulted in migration of human immune cells to the injected sites. Arthritic humanized mice treated with Etanercept had markedly less inflammation, which was associated with decreased total numbers of human CD45+ cells, including human lymphocytes and neutrophils. Conclusions The humanized mouse model is a new model to study inflammatory arthritis disease using human leukocytes without rejection of engrafted tissue. Future studies may adapt this system to incorporate RA patient cord blood and develop a chimeric animal model of inflammatory arthritis using genetically predisposed immune cells. PMID:22974474

  2. Acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shirtliff, Mark E; Mader, Jon T

    2002-10-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection.

  3. Colchicine-responsive protracted gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Fumiaki; Migita, Kiyoshi; Haramura, Tomoko; Sumiyoshi, Remi; Kawakami, Atsushi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2014-05-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is a severe but self-limiting arthritis caused by inflammatory responses to urate crystals. Oral colchicines are effective for initial stages or prophylaxis, but generally, colchicines are ineffective for established gouty arthritis. We describe an unusual case of gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions, including high fever and polymyalgia. Refractory polyarthritis and high fever were eradicated by colchicine treatment. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation in exon 2 of the MEFV gene (E148Q). This case underscores the possibility that MEFV gene mutations may modify the phenotype of gouty arthritis.

  4. Targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines following joint injury: acute intra-articular inhibition of interleukin-1 following knee injury prevents post-traumatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Post-traumatic arthritis (PTA) is a progressive, degenerative response to joint injury, such as articular fracture. The pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin 1(IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), are acutely elevated following joint injury and remain elevated for prolonged periods post-injury. To investigate the role of local and systemic inflammation in the development of post-traumatic arthritis, we targeted both the initial acute local inflammatory response and a prolonged 4 week systemic inflammatory response by inhibiting IL-1 or TNF-α following articular fracture in the mouse knee. Methods Anti-cytokine agents, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) or soluble TNF receptor II (sTNFRII), were administered either locally via an acute intra-articular injection or systemically for a prolonged 4 week period following articular fracture of the knee in C57BL/6 mice. The severity of arthritis was then assessed at 8 weeks post-injury in joint tissues via histology and micro computed tomography, and systemic and local biomarkers were assessed in serum and synovial fluid. Results Intra-articular inhibition of IL-1 significantly reduced cartilage degeneration, synovial inflammation, and did not alter bone morphology following articular fracture. However, systemic inhibition of IL-1, and local or systemic inhibition of TNF provided no benefit or conversely led to increased arthritic changes in the joint tissues. Conclusion These results show that intra-articular IL-1, rather than TNF-α, plays a critical role in the acute inflammatory phase of joint injury and can be inhibited locally to reduce post-traumatic arthritis following a closed articular fracture. Targeted local inhibition of IL-1 following joint injury may represent a novel treatment option for PTA. PMID:24964765

  5. Inflammatory arthritis in children with osteochondrodysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scuccimarri, R.; Azouz, E; Duffy, K.; Fassier, F.; Duffy, C.

    2000-01-01

    Osteochondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of genetic skeletal dysplasias. Patients with these diseases commonly develop an early degenerative arthritis or osteoarthritis. Occasional observations of inflammatory arthritis have been made in this population but such observations are based on clinical grounds alone without confirmatory imaging studies. Four patients followed up in a paediatric rheumatology clinic with three different skeletal dysplasias, who had both clinical and radiological evidence of an inflammatory arthritis and coexistent degenerative arthritis, are described.

 PMID:11053062

  6. Reactive arthritis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Trabulo, D; Mangualde, J; Cremers, I; Oliveira, A P

    2014-01-01

    Reactive arthritis comprises a subgroup of infection-associated arthritis which occurs after genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract infection in genetically susceptible hosts. Studies have proposed Salmonella, Shigella or Yersinia infection as the microorganisms responsible for the post-dysenteric form. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is a well recognised best-known predisposing factor. We report a case of HLA-B27-associated reactive arthritis after Salmonella goldcoast enteritis, mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis.

  7. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  8. Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 Promotes Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Duffau, Pierre; Menn-Josephy, Hanni; Cuda, Carla M.; Dominguez, Salina; Aprahamian, Tamar R.; Watkins, Amanda A.; Yasuda, Kei; Monach, Paul; Lafyatis, Robert; Rice, Lisa M.; Haines, G. Kenneth; Gravallese, Ellen M.; Baum, Rebecca; Richez, Christophe; Perlman, Harris; Bonegio, Ramon G.; Rifkin, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Polymorphisms in the transcription factor IRF5 are associated with an increased risk of developing RA. This study was done to determine the role of IRF5 in arthritis development. Methods K/BxN serum transfer arthritis was induced in mice deficient in IRF5, or lacking IRF5 only in myeloid cells, and arthritis severity was evaluated. K/BxN arthritis was also induced in mice deficient in TRIF, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4 and TLR7 to determine pathways through which IRF5 might promote arthritis. In-vitro studies were performed to determine the role of IRF5 in IL-1 receptor and TLR signaling. Results Arthritis severity was reduced in IRF5-deficient, TRIF-deficient, TLR3-deficient and TLR7-deficient mice. The expression of multiple genes regulating neutrophil recruitment or function and bioactive IL-1β formation was reduced in the joints during active arthritis in IRF5-deficient mice. In vitro studies showed that TLR7 and the TRIF-dependent TLR3 pathway induce pro-inflammatory cytokine production in disease relevant cell types in an IRF5-dependent manner. Conclusion IRF5 contributes to disease pathogenesis in inflammatory arthritis. This is likely due at least in part to the role of IRF5 in mediating pro-inflammatory cytokine production downstream of TLR7 and TLR3. As TLR7 and TLR3 are both RNA-sensing TLRs, this suggests that endogenous RNA ligands present in the inflamed joint promote arthritis development. These findings may be relevant to human RA as RNA capable of activating TLR7 and TLR3 is present in synovial fluid and TLR7 and TLR3 are upregulated in the joints of RA patients. PMID:26315890

  9. Clinical approaches to early inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Dijkmans, Ben A C

    2009-11-01

    Several advances have been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis, as well as in the clinical evaluation and treatment, of early inflammatory arthritis. The presence of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) has emerged as a major new biomarker for use in clinical practice. The presence of ACPAs can be used to divide patients with early arthritis into subsets that are phenotypically similar but have varying pathogenetic and prognostic features. Although the detection of ACPAs is a major development in the diagnosis and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), prediction of the outcome of arthritis at the individual level can still be much improved. For patients diagnosed with RA, and who have active polyarthritis, treatment is not dependent on the assessment of prognostic factors, as these patients are best treated with combination therapy; over 40% of these patients achieve remission with such treatment. In patients who present with oligoarthritis, however, management should be based on the assessment of prognostic factors. The success of early treatment of inflammatory arthritis and the recognition of a measurable preclinical phase of RA offer hope that treating the disease before it becomes clinically active might be possible.

  10. Treatment of acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, Markus; Peltola, Heikki

    2013-06-01

    Acute septic arthritis is a rare, but potentially devastating disease. The treatment is initiated intravenously, but can be safely switched to oral after 2-4 days providing large doses of a well-absorbing antibiotic and, for time-dependent antibiotics, 4 times-a-day administration are used. Empiric treatment should always cover Staphylococcus aureus and common respiratory pathogens, whereas Kingella kingae and Salmonella are important only regionally. Studies conducted by our group have shown that a total course of 10 days may suffice for previously healthy children in a Western setting. Treatment of neonates, patients with immunodeficiency or cases caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus, may deserve a different approach.

  11. Effect and Treatment of Chronic Pain in Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pain is the most common reason patients with inflammatory arthritis see a rheumatologist. Patients consistently rate pain as one of their highest priorities, and pain is the single most important determinant of patient global assessment of disease activity. Although pain is commonly interpreted as a marker of inflammation, the correlation between pain intensity and measures of peripheral inflammation is imperfect. The prevalence of chronic, non-inflammatory pain syndromes such as fibromyalgia is higher among patients with inflammatory arthritis than in the general population. Inflammatory arthritis patients with fibromyalgia have higher measures of disease activity and lower quality of life than inflammatory patients who do not have fibromyalgia. This review article focuses on current literature involving the effects of pain on disease assessment and quality of life for patients with inflammatory arthritis. It also reviews non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic options for treatment of pain for patients with inflammatory arthritis, focusing on the implications of comorbidities and concurrent disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy. Although several studies have examined the effects of reducing inflammation for patients with inflammatory arthritis, very few clinical trials have examined the safety and efficacy of treatment directed specifically towards pain pathways. Most studies have been small, have focused on rheumatoid arthritis or mixed populations (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis plus osteoarthritis), and have been at high risk of bias. Larger, longitudinal studies are needed to examine the mechanisms of pain in inflammatory arthritis and to determine the safety and efficacy of analgesic medications in this specific patient population. PMID:23292816

  12. In Vitro TNF-α Inhibitory Activity of Brazilian Plants and Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Stryphnodendron adstringens in an Acute Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Bárbara O.; Corrêa, Olívia; Azevedo, Elaine Patrícia C.; Pádua, Rodrigo M.; de Oliveira, Vívian Louise S.; Oliveira, Thiago Henrique C.; Boff, Daiane; Dias, Ana Carolina F.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Castilho, Rachel O.

    2016-01-01

    Stryphnodendron species, popularly named “barbatimão,” are traditionally used in Brazil as anti-inflammatory agents. This study aimed to investigate the effect of barbatimão and 11 other species on the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated THP-1 cells, as well as their anti-arthritis activity. The extracts of Stryphnodendron adstringens, Stryphnodendron obovatum, Campomanesia lineatifolia, and Terminalia glabrescens promoted a concentration-dependent inhibition of TNF-α. Mice injected with LPS in the knee joint were treated per os with fractions from the selected extracts. Both the organic (SAO) and the aqueous (SAA) fractions of S. adstringens promoted a dose-dependent reduction of leukocyte migration and neutrophil accumulation into the joint, but none of them reduced CXCL1 concentration in the periarticular tissue. In contrast, treatment with C. lineatifolia and T. glabrescens fractions did not ameliorate the inflammatory parameters. Analyses of SAO by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) led to the identification of gallic acid along with 11 prodelphinidins, characterized as monomers and dimers of the B-type. Our findings contribute to some extent to corroborating the traditional use of S. adstringens as an anti-inflammatory agent. This activity is probably related to a decrease of leukocyte migration into the inflammatory site. Polyphenols like gallic acid and prodelphinidins, identified in the active fraction, may contribute to the observed activity. PMID:27867403

  13. Managing cardiovascular risk in patients with inflammatory arthritis: practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Tournadre, Anne; Mathieu, Sylvain; Soubrier, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis, have higher rates of cardiovascular mortality. While the increased cardiovascular risk is only explained to some extent, a lot of research is currently conducted to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis, risk stratification, and optimal cardiovascular risk management. This review sought to report epidemiological data pertaining to the cardiovascular disease burden in patients with inflammatory arthritis, underlying mechanisms accounting for excessive cardiovascular risk, along with recommendations regarding risk assessment and management in this patient population. PMID:27721904

  14. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2–eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2–eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  15. Morin, a dietary bioflavonol suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in an animal model of acute gouty arthritis with reference to NLRP3 inflammasome, hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase, and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-09-05

    The anti-inflammatory effect of morin, a dietary bioflavanol was explored on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Morin treatment (30mg/kg b.wt) significantly attenuated the ankle swelling and the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and articular elastase along with an increased anti-oxidant status (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) in the joint homogenate of MSU crystal-induced rats. Histological assessment revealed that morin limited the diffusion of joint space, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrations. The mRNA expression of NLRP3 (nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome, caspase-1, pro-inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1, inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was found downregulated and HPRT (hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase) mRNA expression was upregulated in morin treated MSU crystal-induced rats. In addition, morin treatment reduced the protein expression of NF-κB p65, p-NF-κB p65, iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated that morin exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect on MSU crystal-induced inflammation in rats.

  16. Viscosupplementation of the knee: Three cases of acute Pseudoseptic Arthritis with painful and irritating complications and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Murat; Arıkan, Murat; Toğral, Güray; Varış, Onur; Aydın, Güle

    2017-01-01

    Acute pseudoseptic arthritis is a very rare complication that is associated with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections, which normally involve minimal risk. The most common adverse events that are caused by hyaluronic acid injections are inflammatory reactions or flares at the injection site. In this study, we described three cases of acute pseudoseptic arthritis that was caused by hyaluronic acid; the symptoms in these cases were reminiscent of acute septic arthritis. Moreover, we performed a literature review on pseudoseptic arthritis following hyaluronic acid injections to determine the manner in which this condition can be described, diagnosed, and treated. PMID:28293455

  17. Viscosupplementation of the knee: Three cases of acute Pseudoseptic Arthritis with painful and irritating complications and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Murat; Arıkan, Murat; Toğral, Güray; Varış, Onur; Aydın, Güle

    2017-03-01

    Acute pseudoseptic arthritis is a very rare complication that is associated with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections, which normally involve minimal risk. The most common adverse events that are caused by hyaluronic acid injections are inflammatory reactions or flares at the injection site. In this study, we described three cases of acute pseudoseptic arthritis that was caused by hyaluronic acid; the symptoms in these cases were reminiscent of acute septic arthritis. Moreover, we performed a literature review on pseudoseptic arthritis following hyaluronic acid injections to determine the manner in which this condition can be described, diagnosed, and treated.

  18. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  19. Septic versus inflammatory arthritis: discriminating the ability of serum inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Talebi-Taher, Mahshid; Shirani, Fatemeh; Nikanjam, Najmeh; Shekarabi, Mehdi

    2013-02-01

    Early diagnosis of septic arthritis is very important. Few studies showed diagnostic accuracy of serum inflammatory markers in septic arthritis. The aim of our study was to compare the serum and synovial fluid markers [procalcitonin, serum IL-6, TNF-α, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, synovial fluid white blood cell counts and PMN percentage] in septic and inflammatory arthritis. Seventy-five patients, including 25 and 50 septic and non-septic arthritis, were enrolled in the study. The serum and synovial fluid markers [procalcitonin, serum IL-6, TNF-α, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, synovial fluid white blood cell counts, and PMN percentage] were compared in septic and inflammatory arthritis. Patients with septic arthritis had significantly elevated levels of procalcitonin, serum TNF-α, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, synovial fluid white blood cell counts, and PMN percentage in comparison with the inflammatory arthritis group (P < 0.00). Serum IL-6 level does not differ among the two groups. In a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, synovial fluid WBC counts, PMN percentage, TNF-α, ESR, and serum PCT preformed best in distinguishing between septic and non-septic arthritis. Our study suggests that PCT can be used to diagnose the septic arthritis, but more studies warranted in order to determine the specificity and sensitivity of the test.

  20. Venipuncture Induced Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Presenting as Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pramod; Mittal, Manoj; Nair, Anugrah; Sultana, Waqia

    2016-01-01

    Venipuncture is one of the most commonly done medical procedures. We report a unique case of a 23-year-old young male who presented with features suggestive of inflammatory arthritis. The symptoms, which initially started on the right side, also involved the other side after a few weeks. Although the patient's symptoms and signs were simulating inflammatory arthritis, he had atypical features like poor response to anti-inflammatory medicines and normal laboratory parameters. His musculoskeletal ultrasonography was also not suggestive of arthritis. His history was reviewed and on direct questioning he revealed a history of venipuncture for blood sample withdrawal, done from right antecubital region for routine health check on the day prior to the onset of symptoms. Complex regional pain syndrome was suspected and triple-phase radioisotope bone scan was done which was highly suggestive of this diagnosis. The patient was managed with multidimensional approach and responded very well to the treatment. Complex regional pain syndrome is usually not thought of in the initial differential diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis. In this report we highlight the need to elicit the often overlooked history of trivial trauma like venipuncture, especially in atypical cases of arthritis. Also the role of newer diagnostic modalities in such cases is emphasized. PMID:27891152

  1. Urinary proteomics can define distinct diagnostic inflammatory arthritis subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Stefan; Porter, Duncan; Paterson, Caron; Hampson, Rosie; Gaya, Daniel; Latosinska, Agnieszka; Mischak, Harald; Schanstra, Joost; Mullen, William; McInnes, Iain

    2017-01-01

    Current diagnostic tests applied to inflammatory arthritis lack the necessary specificity to appropriately categorise patients. There is a need for novel approaches to classify patients with these conditions. Herein we explored whether urinary proteomic biomarkers specific for different forms of arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), osteoarthritis (OA)) or chronic inflammatory conditions (inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)) can be identified. Fifty subjects per group with RA, PsA, OA or IBD and 50 healthy controls were included in the study. Two-thirds of these populations were randomly selected to serve as a training set, while the remaining one-third was reserved for validation. Sequential comparison of one group to the other four enabled identification of multiple urinary peptides significantly associated with discrete pathological conditions. Classifiers for the five groups were developed and subsequently tested blind in the validation test set. Upon unblinding, the classifiers demonstrated excellent performance, with an area under the curve between 0.90 and 0.97 per group. Identification of the peptide markers pointed to dysregulation of collagen synthesis and inflammation, but also novel inflammatory markers. We conclude that urinary peptide signatures can reliably differentiate between chronic arthropathies and inflammatory conditions with discrete pathogenesis. PMID:28091549

  2. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  3. Agmatine ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis and inflammatory cachexia in rats.

    PubMed

    Taksande, Brijesh G; Gawande, Dinesh Y; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the pharmacological effect of agmatine in Complete Freud Adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis and cachexia in rats. The rats were injected with CFA (0.1ml/rat) to induced symptoms of arthritis. Day 8 onwards of CFA administration, rats were injected daily with agmatine for next 7days, and arthritis score, body weights and food intake were monitored daily (g). Since cachexia is known to produce severe inflammation, malnutrition and inhibition of albumin gene expression, we have also monitored the total proteins, albumin, TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritic rats and its modulation by agmatine. In the present study, CFA treated rats showed a progressive reduction in both food intake and body weight. In addition analysis of blood serum of arthritis animals showed a significant reduction in proteins and albumin and significant elevation in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and Interleukins (IL)-6. Chronic agmatine (20-40mg/kg, ip) treatment not only attenuated the signs of arthritis but also reverses anorexia and body weight loss in CFA treated rats. In addition, agmatine restored total protein and albumin and reduces TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritis rats. These results suggest that agmatine administration can prevent the body weights loss and symptoms of arthritis via inhibition of inflammatory cytokines.

  4. Divergent T-Cell Cytokine Patterns in Inflammatory Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. K.; Seipelt, E.; Sieper, J.

    1994-08-01

    A major immunoregulatory mechanism in inflammatory infections and allergic diseases is the control of the balance of cytokines secreted by Th1/Th2 subsets of T helper (Th) cells. This might also be true in autoimmune diseases; a Th2 pattern that prevents an effective immune response in infections with intracellular bacteria may favor immunosuppression in autoimmune diseases. The pattern of cytokine expression was compared in the synovial tissue from patients with a typical autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and with a disorder with similar synovial pathology but driven by persisting exogenous antigen, reactive arthritis. We screened 12 rheumatoid and 9 reactive arthritis synovial tissues by PCR and in situ hybridization for their expression of T-cell cytokines. The cytokine pattern differs significantly between the two diseases; rheumatoid arthritis samples express a Th1-like pattern whereas in reactive arthritis interferon γ expression is accompanied by that of interleukin 4. Studying the expression of cytokines by in situ hybridization confirmed the results found by PCR; they also show an extremely low frequency of cytokine-transcribing cells. In a double-staining experiment, it was demonstrated that interleukin 4 is made by CD4 cells. These experiments favor the possibility of therapeutic intervention in inflammatory rheumatic diseases by means of inhibitory cytokines.

  5. The Discovery of Novel Experimental Therapies for Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Malemud, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    Conventional and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs have revolutionized the medical therapy of inflammatory arthritis. However, it remains unclear as to what can be done to treat immune-mediated chronic inflammation after patients become refractory to these therapies or develop serious side-effects and/or infections forcing drug withdrawal. Because of these concerns it is imperative that novel targets be continuously identified and experimental strategies designed to test potential arthritis interventions in vitro, but more importantly, in well-validated animal models of inflammatory arthritis. Over the past few years, sphingosine-1-phosphate, interleukin-7 receptor, spleen tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase 5/p38 kinase regulated/activated protein kinase, micro-RNAs, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand and the polyubiquitin-proteasome pathway were identified as promising novel targets for potential antiarthritis drug development. Indeed several experimental compounds alter the biological activity of these targets and have shown clinical efficacy in animal models of arthritis. A few of them have even entered the first phase of human clinical trials. PMID:20339519

  6. Distinguishing inflammatory from noninflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, and dactylitis in psoriatic arthritis: a report from the GRAPPA 2010 annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Mease, Philip J

    2012-02-01

    The most widely applied criteria for classifying psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are the CASPAR (ClASsification of Psoriatic ARthritis) criteria. A patient who fulfills the CASPAR criteria must have evidence of inflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, or spondylitis, and may have an inflammatory musculoskeletal component, dactylitis. Although the criteria were developed by rheumatologists, not all patients with PsA are seen by rheumatologists. Thus, it is important for clinicians such as dermatologists, primary care providers, physiatrists, and orthopedists, and patients themselves, to be able to recognize the presence of inflammatory musculoskeletal disease and distinguish it from degenerative or traumatic musculoskeletal disease. At their 2010 annual meeting, members of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) discussed the steps they are taking to define the key variables that must be present to distinguish inflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, and dactylitis from degenerative, traumatic, mechanical, or infectious forms of these conditions.

  7. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints Infection, most often by bacteria or virus Crystals such as uric acid or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate ... common types of inflammatory arthritis include: Ankylosing ... calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease Juvenile rheumatoid ...

  8. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis has been reinforced by large epidemiological studies. It is still uncertain whether disease specific determinants or phenotypic or treatment related characteristics increase likelihood of lymphomagenesis in these patients. For example, recent literature has indicated a positive correlation between severity of inflammation and risk of lymphomas among RA and Sjögren's syndrome patients. It is also debated whether specific lymphoma variants are more commonly seen in accordance with certain chronic autoimmune arthritis. Previous studies have revealed a higher incidence of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in RA and SLE patients, whereas pSS has been linked with increased risk of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. This review summarizes recent literature evaluating risk of lymphomas in arthritis patients and disease specific risk determinants. We also elaborate on the association of autoimmune arthritis with specific lymphoma variants along with genetic, environmental, and therapeutic risk factors. PMID:27429984

  9. Gram staining in the diagnosis of acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Faraj, A A; Omonbude, O D; Godwin, P

    2002-10-01

    This study aimed at determining the sensitivity and specificity of Gram staining of synovial fluid as a diagnostic tool in acute septic arthritis. A retrospective study was made of 22 patients who had arthroscopic lavage following a provisional diagnosis of acute septic arthritis of the knee joint. Gram stains and cultures of the knee aspirates were compared with the clinical and laboratory parameters, to evaluate their usefulness in diagnosing acute arthritis. All patients who had septic arthritis had pain, swelling and limitation of movement. CRP was elevated in 90% of patients. The incidence of elevated white blood cell count was higher in the group of patients with a positive Gram stain study (60%) as compared to patients with a negative Gram stain study (33%). Gram staining sensitivity was 45%. Its specificity was however 100%. Gram staining is an unreliable tool in early decision making in patients requiring urgent surgical drainage and washout.

  10. Photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis in human joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Marquardt, April; Francis, Sheeja; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Dhanuj; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2016-02-01

    The ducal imaging with photoacoustic imaging (PAI) that is an emerging technology and clinical ultrasound imaging that is an established modality is developed for the imaging of early inflammatory arthritis. PAI is sensitive to blood volume, not limited by flow like ultrasound, holding great promise for the earliest detection of increase in blood volume and angiogenesis - a key early finding inflammation PAI has the capability of assessing inflammation in superficial human soft tissues, offering potential benefits in diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. PAI combined with ultrasonography (US), is a real time dual-modality system developed and tested to identify active synovitis in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of 10 arthritis patients and 10 normal volunteers. Photoacoustic images of the joints were acquired at 580-nm laser wavelength, which provided the desired balance between the optical contrast of hemoglobin over bone cortex and the imaging depth. Confirmed by US Doppler imaging, the results from ten patients and ten normal volunteers demonstrated satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing enhanced blood flow due to active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that photoacoustic imaging, by identifying early increase in blood volume, related to increased vascularity, a hallmark of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US.

  11. K/BxN Serum-Transfer Arthritis as a Model for Human Inflammatory Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anne D; Haase, Claus; Cook, Andrew D; Hamilton, John A

    2016-01-01

    The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA) model is a murine model in which the immunological mechanisms occurring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other arthritides can be studied. To induce K/BxN STA, serum from arthritic transgenic K/BxN mice is transferred to naive mice and manifestations of arthritis occur a few days later. The inflammatory response in the model is driven by autoantibodies against the ubiquitously expressed self-antigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI), leading to the formation of immune complexes that drive the activation of different innate immune cells such as neutrophils, macrophages, and possibly mast cells. The pathogenesis further involves a range of immune mediators including cytokines, chemokines, complement factors, Toll-like receptors, Fc receptors, and integrins, as well as factors involved in pain and bone erosion. Hence, even though the K/BxN STA model mimics only the effector phase of RA, it still involves a wide range of relevant disease mediators. Additionally, as a murine model for arthritis, the K/BxN STA model has some obvious advantages. First, it has a rapid and robust onset of arthritis with 100% incidence in genetically identical animals. Second, it can be induced in a wide range of strain backgrounds and can therefore also be induced in gene-deficient strains to study the specific importance of disease mediators. Even though G6PI might not be an essential autoantigen, for example, in RA, the K/BxN STA model is a useful tool to understand how autoantibodies, in general, drive the progression of arthritis by interacting with downstream components of the innate immune system. Finally, the model has also proven useful as a model wherein arthritic pain can be studied. Taken together, these features make the K/BxN STA model a relevant one for RA, and it is a potentially valuable tool, especially for the preclinical screening of new therapeutic targets for RA and perhaps other forms of inflammatory arthritis. Here, we

  12. K/BxN Serum-Transfer Arthritis as a Model for Human Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Anne D.; Haase, Claus; Cook, Andrew D.; Hamilton, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA) model is a murine model in which the immunological mechanisms occurring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other arthritides can be studied. To induce K/BxN STA, serum from arthritic transgenic K/BxN mice is transferred to naive mice and manifestations of arthritis occur a few days later. The inflammatory response in the model is driven by autoantibodies against the ubiquitously expressed self-antigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI), leading to the formation of immune complexes that drive the activation of different innate immune cells such as neutrophils, macrophages, and possibly mast cells. The pathogenesis further involves a range of immune mediators including cytokines, chemokines, complement factors, Toll-like receptors, Fc receptors, and integrins, as well as factors involved in pain and bone erosion. Hence, even though the K/BxN STA model mimics only the effector phase of RA, it still involves a wide range of relevant disease mediators. Additionally, as a murine model for arthritis, the K/BxN STA model has some obvious advantages. First, it has a rapid and robust onset of arthritis with 100% incidence in genetically identical animals. Second, it can be induced in a wide range of strain backgrounds and can therefore also be induced in gene-deficient strains to study the specific importance of disease mediators. Even though G6PI might not be an essential autoantigen, for example, in RA, the K/BxN STA model is a useful tool to understand how autoantibodies, in general, drive the progression of arthritis by interacting with downstream components of the innate immune system. Finally, the model has also proven useful as a model wherein arthritic pain can be studied. Taken together, these features make the K/BxN STA model a relevant one for RA, and it is a potentially valuable tool, especially for the preclinical screening of new therapeutic targets for RA and perhaps other forms of inflammatory arthritis. Here, we

  13. Inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: a multicenter retrospective study and literature review of 68 cases.

    PubMed

    Mekinian, Arsène; Braun, Thorsten; Decaux, Olivier; Falgarone, Géraldine; Toussirot, Eric; Raffray, Loic; Omouri, Mohamed; Gombert, Bruno; De Wazieres, Benoit; Buchdaul, Anne-Laure; Ziza, Jean-Marc; Launay, David; Denis, Guillaume; Madaule, Serge; Rose, Christian; Grignano, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Fain, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characteristics and outcome of inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in a French multicenter retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with MDS (median age, 77.5 yr [interquartile range, 69-81]; 10 women) were included. Inflammatory arthritis presented as polyarthritis in 17 cases (77%) and with symmetric involvement in 15 cases (68%). At diagnosis, the median disease activity score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) was 4.5 [2-6.5]. Two patients had anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and 1 had radiologic erosions. The median time between the diagnoses of arthritis and MDS was 10 months [6-42], with a median articular symptom duration of 3 months [2-8]. The diagnosis of both diseases was concomitant in 6 cases (27%); arthritis preceded MDS in 12 cases (55%), and occurred after MDS in 4 (18%). While the number of swollen and tender joints significantly decreased during follow-up, as did the median DAS28-CRP (from 4.3 [3.8-4.6] at baseline to 2.9 [1.75-3.3]; p < 0.05), CRP remained elevated (CRP >20 mg/L) in 8 patients (42%). Nevertheless, radiographic progression and new ACPA positivity were not observed during a median follow-up of 29 months [9-76]. While most of the patients were treated with steroids (n = 16) for arthritis, additional treatment was administered in only 4 patients (hydroxychloroquine, n = 2; sulfasalazine [Salazopyrin] and etanercept, n = 1, respectively). Eleven patients died during follow-up from acute myeloid leukemia (n = 5); infections (n = 3); or cerebral bleeding, cardiorespiratory failure, or undetermined cause (n = 1, respectively). Inflammatory arthritis associated with MDS can have various presentations and is often seronegative and nonerosive. Steroids alone are the most common treatment in MDS-associated arthritis, but that treatment is insufficient to control arthritis. Steroid-sparing strategies need to be identified.

  14. DEK-targeting DNA aptamers as therapeutics for inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mor-Vaknin, Nirit; Saha, Anjan; Legendre, Maureen; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Amin, M Asif; Rabquer, Bradley J.; Gonzales-Hernandez, Marta J.; Jorns, Julie; Mohan, Smriti; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Pai, Dave A.; Angevine, Kristine; Almburg, Shelley J.; Knight, Jason S.; Adams, Barbara S.; Koch, Alisa E.; Fox, David A.; Engelke, David R.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Markovitz, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Novel therapeutics are required for improving the management of chronic inflammatory diseases. Aptamers are single-stranded RNA or DNA molecules that have recently shown utility in a clinical setting, as they can specifically neutralize biomedically relevant proteins, particularly cell surface and extracellular proteins. The nuclear chromatin protein DEK is a secreted chemoattractant that is abundant in the synovia of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Here, we show that DEK is crucial to the development of arthritis in mouse models, thus making it an appropriate target for aptamer-based therapy. Genetic depletion of DEK or treatment with DEK-targeted aptamers significantly reduces joint inflammation in vivo and greatly impairs the ability of neutrophils to form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). DEK is detected in spontaneously forming NETs from JIA patient synovial neutrophils, and DEK-targeted aptamers reduce NET formation. DEK is thus key to joint inflammation, and anti-DEK aptamers hold promise for the treatment of JIA and other types of arthritis. PMID:28165452

  15. Inflammatory Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Nevius, Erin; Gomes, Ana Cordeiro; Pereira, João P

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that primarily affects the joints. Self-reactive B and T lymphocytes cooperate to promote antibody responses against self proteins and are major drivers of disease. T lymphocytes also promote RA independently of B lymphocytes mainly through the production of key inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17, that promote pathology. While the innate signals that initiate self-reactive adaptive immune responses are poorly understood, the disease is predominantly caused by inflammatory cellular infiltration and accumulation in articular tissues, and by bone erosions driven by bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are giant multinucleated cells formed by the fusion of multiple myeloid cells that require short-range signals, such as the cytokines MCSF and RANKL, for undergoing differentiation. The recruitment and positioning of osteoclast precursors to sites of osteoclast differentiation by chemoattractants is an important point of control for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Recently, the GPCR EBI2 and its oxysterol ligand 7a, 25 dihydroxycholesterol, were identified as important regulators of osteoclast precursor positioning in proximity to bone surfaces and of osteoclast differentiation under homeostasis. In chronic inflammatory diseases like RA, osteoclast differentiation is also driven by inflammatory cytokines such as TNFa and IL-1, and can occur independently of RANKL. Finally, there is growing evidence that the chemotactic signals guiding osteoclast precursors to inflamed articular sites contribute to disease and are of great interest. Furthering our understanding of the complex osteoimmune cell interactions should provide new avenues of therapeutic intervention for RA.

  16. Prolactin promotes cartilage survival and attenuates inflammation in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Adán, Norma; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G.; Perales-Canales, Sonia I.; Quintanar-Stéphano, Andrés; López-Barrera, Fernando; Méndez, Isabel; Moreno-Carranza, Bibiana; Triebel, Jakob; Binart, Nadine; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Thebault, Stéphanie; Clapp, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the only cells in cartilage, and their death by apoptosis contributes to cartilage loss in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A putative therapeutic intervention for RA is the inhibition of apoptosis-mediated cartilage degradation. The hormone prolactin (PRL) frequently increases in the circulation of patients with RA, but the role of hyperprolactinemia in disease activity is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that PRL inhibits the apoptosis of cultured chondrocytes in response to a mixture of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) by preventing the induction of p53 and decreasing the BAX/BCL-2 ratio through a NO-independent, JAK2/STAT3–dependent pathway. Local treatment with PRL or increasing PRL circulating levels also prevented chondrocyte apoptosis evoked by injecting cytokines into the knee joints of rats, whereas the proapoptotic effect of cytokines was enhanced in PRL receptor–null (Prlr–/–) mice. Moreover, eliciting hyperprolactinemia in rats before or after inducing the adjuvant model of inflammatory arthritis reduced chondrocyte apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokine expression, pannus formation, bone erosion, joint swelling, and pain. These results reveal the protective effect of PRL against inflammation-induced chondrocyte apoptosis and the therapeutic potential of hyperprolactinemia to reduce permanent joint damage and inflammation in RA. PMID:23908112

  17. Canakinumab: a guide to its use in acute gouty arthritis flares.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2013-08-01

    Canakinumab (Ilaris®), an anti-interleukin-1β monoclonal antibody, is a novel approach to treat acute gouty arthritis flares in a targeted population of patients in whom treatment options are limited. Relative to on-demand treatment with intramuscular triamcinolone acetonide 40 mg, on-demand treatment with subcutaneous canakinumab 150 mg significantly relieved the pain and inflammation of a new gout flare, and reduced the risk of new flares in patients with acute gouty arthritis flares in whom standard treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatories and/or colchicine was inappropriate. Canakinumab has an acceptable tolerability profile in this difficult-to-treat population. The increased risk of infections and neutropenia associated with canakinumab treatment can be minimized by following the recommended precautions.

  18. Gouty Arthritis: A Review of Acute Management and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Liza; Saseen, Joseph J

    2016-08-01

    Gouty arthritis is one of the most common rheumatic diseases. The clinical burden of gouty arthritis has historically been well recognized; however, gout is often misdiagnosed and mismanaged. The prevalence of gout is rising and is likely attributed to several factors including increased incidence of comorbidities, lifestyle factors, and increased use of causative medications. With the increasing prevalence, there have been several innovations and evidence-based updates related to the diagnosis and management of gout. Acute gouty arthritis should be treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), colchicine, or corticosteroids, or a combination of two agents. Xanthine oxidase inhibitor therapy remains the consensus first-line treatment option for the prevention of recurrent gout. Add-on therapies that reduce serum urate concentration include traditional uricosuric agents and a novel uric acid reabsorption inhibitor. Prophylaxis of acute gout with NSAIDs, colchicine, or corticosteroids is universally recommended when initiating any urate-lowering therapy in order to prevent acute gouty arthritis for a period of at least 6 months. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and risk factors for gouty arthritis and evaluate diagnostic strategies and therapeutic regimens for the management of gout, including a new drug approval.

  19. [Vaccines and preventive activities in patients with inflammatory arthritis].

    PubMed

    Casals-Sánchez, J L; Casals Vázquez, C; Vázquez Sánchez, M Á; Giménez Basallote, S

    2013-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis and eligible for immunosuppressive therapy account for more than 1% of general population, and represents a significant workload on family doctors. They are prone to other comorbidities, with an increased cardiovascular risk and a higher incidence of infections than the general population, especially skin infections and pneumonitis. This comorbidity can be considered vulnerable to a prevention program-prevention of cardiovascular risk, cancer screening, vaccination schedule for adults. As for prevention through vaccination, importance should be given to pneumococcal infection - significant in adults aged 50 or over, especially amongst immunosuppressed patients. The 13-valent conjugate vaccine, which has been recently approved for adults, must be considered. An attempt has been made to write a simple, applicable document on preventive measures that should be implemented both at primary and secondary care level for those adults.

  20. Mechanistic aspects of inflammation and clinical management of inflammation in acute gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cronstein, Bruce N; Sunkureddi, Prashanth

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that interleukin 1β (IL-1β) plays a central role in monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation and that the NALP3 inflammasome plays a major role in IL-1β production. These discoveries have offered new insights into the pathogenesis of acute gouty arthritis. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which monosodium urate crystals induce acute inflammation and examine the mechanisms of action (MOAs) of traditional anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g., nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine, and glucocorticoids) and biologic agents (e.g., the IL-1β antagonists anakinra, rilonacept, and canakinumab) to understand how their MOAs contribute to their safety profiles. Traditional anti-inflammatory agents may act on the IL-1β pathway at some level; however, their MOAs are broad-ranging, unspecific, and biologically complex. This lack of specificity may explain the range of systemic adverse effects associated with them. The therapeutic margins of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine, and glucocorticoids are particularly low in elderly patients and in patients with cardiovascular, metabolic, or renal comorbidities that are frequently associated with gouty arthritis. In contrast, the IL-1β antagonists act on very specific targets of inflammation, which may decrease the potential for systemic adverse effects, although infrequent but serious adverse events (including infection and administration reactions) have been reported. Because these IL-1β antagonists target an early event immediately downstream from NALP3 inflammasome activation, they may provide effective alternatives to traditional agents with minimal systemic adverse effects. Results of ongoing trials of IL-1β antagonists will likely provide clarification of their potential role in the management of acute gouty arthritis.

  1. Is it easy to clinically distinguish inflammatory arthritis of bacterial origin from monoarthritis attacks of gout disease?

    PubMed

    Atik, O Şahap; Ergişi, Yılmaz; Ayanoğlu, Tacettin; Tokgöz, Mehmet Ali; Sezgin, Erdem Aras; Göçün, Pınar Uyar

    2016-12-01

    Acute monoarthritis is a common situation in orthopedic emergency where the patient presents with typical inflamed joint. It is hard to clinically distinguish inflammatory arthritis of bacterial origin from monoarthritis attacks of gout disease. If these two situations, which are the most common causes of acute monoarthritis, are misdiagnosed, outcomes might be catastrophic and costly. Synovial fluid analysis is the most reliable method for confirming the diagnosis although it might not always lead to definitive diagnosis. If there is clinical suspicion for crystal arthropathy, repeated examinations may provide benefits for confirming the diagnosis.

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Rheumatoid Arthritis Small Text Medium Text Large Text Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease affecting about ...

  3. Cutaneous abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis compared with non‐inflammatory rheumatic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, K M J; Ladoyanni, E; Treharne, G J; Hale, E D; Erb, N; Kitas, G D

    2006-01-01

    Background Cutaneous abnormalities are common in rheumatoid arthritis, but exact prevalence estimates are yet to be established. Some abnormalities may be independent and coincidental, whereas others may relate to rheumatoid arthritis or its treatment. Objectives To determine the exact nature and point prevalence of cutaneous abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with those in patients with non‐inflammatory rheumatic disease. Methods 349 consecutive outpatients for rheumatology (205 with rheumatoid arthritis and 144 with non‐inflammatory rheumatic conditions) were examined for skin and nail signs by a dermatologist. Histories of rheumatology, dermatology, drugs and allergy were noted in detail. Results Skin abnormalities were reported by more patients with rheumatoid arthritis (61%) than non‐inflammatory controls (47%). More patients with rheumatoid arthritis (39%) than controls (10%) attributed their skin abnormality to drugs. Cutaneous abnormalities observed by the dermatologist were also more common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (76%) than in the group with non‐inflammatory disease (60%). Specifically, bruising, athlete's foot, scars, rheumatoid nodules and vasculitic lesions were more common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in controls. The presence of bruising was predicted only by current steroid use. The presence of any other specific cutaneous abnormalities was not predicted by any of the variables assessed. In the whole group, current steroid use and having rheumatoid arthritis were the only important predictors of having any cutaneous abnormality. Conclusions Self‐reported and observed cutaneous abnormalities are more common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in controls with non‐inflammatory disease. These include cutaneous abnormalities related to side effects of drugs or to rheumatoid arthritis itself and other abnormalities previously believed to be independent but which may be of clinical

  4. Protective effects of a blueberry extract in acute inflammation and collagen-induced arthritis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Maria-Eduardo; Oliveira, Mónica; Direito, Rosa; Rocha, João; Alves, Paula; Serra, Ana-Teresa; Duarte, Catarina; Bronze, Rosário; Fernandes, Adelaide; Brites, Dora; Freitas, Marisa; Fernandes, Eduarda; Sepodes, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Here we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of a blueberry extract in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model and collagen-induced arthritis model, both in rats. Along with the chemical characterization of the phenolic content of the fruits and extract, the antioxidant potential of the extract, the cellular antioxidant activity and the effects over neutrophils' oxidative burst, were studied in order to provide a mechanistic insight for the anti-inflammatory effects observed. The extract significantly inhibited paw edema formation in an acute model the rat. Our results also demonstrate that the standardized extract had pharmacological activity when administered orally in the collagen-induced arthritis model in the rat and was able to significantly reduce the development of clinical signs of arthritis and the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, consequently improving articular function in treated animals.

  5. Characterization and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis by photoacoustic imaging: a study on adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Shao, Xia; Chamberland, David L.; Girish, Gandikota

    2014-03-01

    Neovascularity also known as angiogenesis is an early feature of inflammatory arthritis disease. Therefore, identifying the development of neovascularity is one way to potentially detect and characterize arthritis. Laser-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which may aid in detection of both early and continued development of neovascularity. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of PAI to measure angiogenesis, for the purpose of evaluating and monitoring inflammatory arthritis after treatment. The imaging results on an arthritis rat model demonstrate that 1) there is noticeable enhancement in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints when compared to the normal joints, and 2) there is noticeable decrease in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints after treatment when compared to the untreated arthritic joints. In order to validate the findings from PAI, we performed positron emission tomography (PET) and histology on the same joints. The diameters of the ankle joints, as a clinical score of the arthritis, were also measured at each time point.

  6. Update on interleukin-17: a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis and implication for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Miossec, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17A) is a cytokine critical for the acute defence against extracellular bacterial and fungal infections. Excess production during chronic inflammation has been associated with many inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. The present review describes the key molecules of the IL-17 pathway, which are or could be targeted for treatment. Since targeting of IL-17A may affect defence mechanisms, the pathogenesis of such possible adverse events is analysed. Then the contributions of IL-17 to bone changes in various forms of arthritis are discussed. Finally, the results of current inhibitors of the IL-17 pathway in clinical trials are detailed. IL-17A inhibition has been first registered for the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. Other therapeutic options are now tested in a long list of diseases. PMID:28243466

  7. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effect of an extract of Coccidioides posadasii in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ana Carolina Matias Dinelly; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Sidrim, José Julio Costa; Leite, Ana Karine Rocha de Melo; Leite, Ana Caroline Rocha de Melo; Girão, Virgínia Cláudia Carneiro; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Cunha, Fernando de Queiroz; Rocha, Francisco Airton Castro

    2013-04-01

    Trying to surpass host defenses, fungal infections alter the immune response. Components from nonpathogenic fungi present therapeutic anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating activities. This study reveals that proteins present in a Coccidioides posadasii extract provide anti-inflammatory benefit in experimental arthritis. Zymosan was given intra-articularly to rats and mice, and groups were pretreated with C. posadasii extract either per os or intraperitoneally. Controls received the vehicle. Acute hypernociception was evaluated using articular incapacitation and von Frey methods. Cell influx and cytokine levels were assessed in joint exudates. Joint damage was evaluated by histopathology and determination of glycosaminoglycan content of the cartilage. Synovia was evaluated for cell death and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression using TUNEL and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Pretreatment with C. posadasii extract significantly inhibited acute and chronic cell influx, hypernociception, and provoked reduction of glycosaminoglycan loss while reducing chronic synovitis, cell death, and iNOS expression. Reduction/alkylation of C. posadasii extract abrogated these effects. C. posadasii administration did not alter TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, and γ-interferon levels, whereas IL-10 levels were significantly reduced. Data reveal that a C. posadasii extract reduces iNOS expression that is associated with inhibition of synovial apoptosis and decrease in IL-10 levels released into zymosan-inflamed joints. Characterization of active components excluded charged carbohydrates while pointing to a protein as responsible for these effects. In summary, systemic administration of components from a pathogenic fungus provides anti-inflammatory effects, being species-independent and orally active. Besides adding to understand host response against fungi, the results may lead to therapeutic implications.

  8. Application of a Novel Diagnostic Rule in the Differential Diagnosis between Acute Gouty Arthritis and Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Choi, Sang-Tae; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Joo-Hyun; Yoon, Bo-Young

    2015-06-01

    Septic arthritis and gout are major diseases that should be suspected in patients with acute monoarthritis. These two diseases are clinically similar and often indistinguishable without the help of synovial fluid analysis. Recently, a novel diagnostic rule for gout without synovial fluid analysis was developed and showed relevant performances. This study aimed to determine whether this diagnostic rule could perform well in distinguishing gout from septic arthritis. The diagnostic rule comprises 7 clinical and laboratory variables, each of which is given a specified score. The probability of gout is classified into 3 groups according to the sum of the scores: high (≥ 8), intermediate (> 4 to < 8) and low probability (≤ 4). In this retrospective study, we applied this diagnostic rule to 136 patients who presented as acute monoarthritis and were subsequently diagnosed as acute gout (n = 82) and septic arthritis (n = 54) based on synovial fluid analysis. The mean sum of scores of acute gout patients was significantly higher than that of those with septic arthritis (8.6 ± 0.2 vs. 3.6 ± 0.32, P < 0.001). Patients with acute gout had significantly more 'high', and less 'low' probabilities compared to those with septic arthritis (Eta[η]: 0.776). The prevalence of acute gouty arthritis, as confirmed by the presence of monosodium crystal, was 95.5% (61/64), 57.5% (19/33), and 5.1% (2/39) in high, intermediate and low probability group, respectively. The recently introduced diagnostic rule properly discriminates acute gout from septic arthritis. It may help physicians diagnose gout in cases difficult to be differentiated from septic arthritis.

  9. Autologous tolerogenic dendritic cells for rheumatoid and inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G M; Anderson, A E; Diboll, J; Reece, R; Eltherington, O; Harry, R A; Fouweather, T; MacDonald, C; Chadwick, T; McColl, E; Dunn, J; Dickinson, A M; Hilkens, C M U; Isaacs, John D

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the safety of intra-articular (IA) autologous tolerogenic dendritic cells (tolDC) in patients with inflammatory arthritis and an inflamed knee; to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the approach and to assess potential effects on local and systemic disease activities. Methods An unblinded, randomised, controlled, dose escalation Phase I trial. TolDC were differentiated from CD14+ monocytes and loaded with autologous synovial fluid as a source of autoantigens. Cohorts of three participants received 1×106, 3×106 or 10×106 tolDC arthroscopically following saline irrigation of an inflamed (target) knee. Control participants received saline irrigation only. Primary outcome was flare of disease in the target knee within 5 days of treatment. Feasibility was assessed by successful tolDC manufacture and acceptability via patient questionnaire. Potential effects on disease activity were assessed by arthroscopic synovitis score, disease activity score (DAS)28 and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ). Immunomodulatory effects were sought in peripheral blood. Results There were no target knee flares within 5 days of treatment. At day 14, arthroscopic synovitis was present in all participants except for one who received 10×106 tolDC; a further participant in this cohort declined day 14 arthroscopy because symptoms had remitted; both remained stable throughout 91 days of observation. There were no trends in DAS28 or HAQ score or consistent immunomodulatory effects in peripheral blood. 9 of 10 manufactured products met quality control release criteria; acceptability of the protocol by participants was high. Conclusion IA tolDC therapy appears safe, feasible and acceptable. Knee symptoms stabilised in two patients who received 10×106 tolDC but no systemic clinical or immunomodulatory effects were detectable. Trial registration number NCT01352858. PMID:27117700

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines.

  12. Elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takuya; Yagi, Hirohisa; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Acute leukemia in children presents with various clinical manifestations that mimic orthopaedic conditions. The association of septic arthritis of the elbow with acute leukemia is very rare, and the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia is often established only after treatment of the septic arthritis. In this article, we present a three-year-old child patient with elbow septic arthritis related to acute leukemia, diagnosed promptly by bone marrow aspiration on the same day as emergency surgical debridement of the septic elbow joint due to the maintenance of a high index of suspicion, and treated with chemotherapy as soon as possible. The emergency physician and orthopaedist must recognize unusual patterns of presentation like this. Since delay in initiating treatment of septic arthritis may result in growth disturbance, elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia must be treated promptly and appropriately. Early diagnosis is a good prognostic feature of childhood acute leukemia.

  13. Improving inflammatory arthritis management through tighter monitoring of patients and the use of innovative electronic tools

    PubMed Central

    van Riel, Piet; Combe, Bernard; Abdulganieva, Diana; Bousquet, Paola; Courtenay, Molly; Curiale, Cinzia; Gómez-Centeno, Antonio; Haugeberg, Glenn; Leeb, Burkhard; Puolakka, Kari; Ravelli, Angelo; Rintelen, Bernhard; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2016-01-01

    Treating to target by monitoring disease activity and adjusting therapy to attain remission or low disease activity has been shown to lead to improved outcomes in chronic rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Patient-reported outcomes, used in conjunction with clinical measures, add an important perspective of disease activity as perceived by the patient. Several validated PROs are available for inflammatory arthritis, and advances in electronic patient monitoring tools are helping patients with chronic diseases to self-monitor and assess their symptoms and health. Frequent patient monitoring could potentially lead to the early identification of disease flares or adverse events, early intervention for patients who may require treatment adaptation, and possibly reduced appointment frequency for those with stable disease. A literature search was conducted to evaluate the potential role of patient self-monitoring and innovative monitoring of tools in optimising disease control in inflammatory arthritis. Experience from the treatment of congestive heart failure, diabetes and hypertension shows improved outcomes with remote electronic self-monitoring by patients. In inflammatory arthritis, electronic self-monitoring has been shown to be feasible in patients despite manual disability and to be acceptable to older patients. Patients' self-assessment of disease activity using such methods correlates well with disease activity assessed by rheumatologists. This review also describes several remote monitoring tools that are being developed and used in inflammatory arthritis, offering the potential to improve disease management and reduce pressure on specialists. PMID:27933206

  14. Improving inflammatory arthritis management through tighter monitoring of patients and the use of innovative electronic tools.

    PubMed

    van Riel, Piet; Alten, Rieke; Combe, Bernard; Abdulganieva, Diana; Bousquet, Paola; Courtenay, Molly; Curiale, Cinzia; Gómez-Centeno, Antonio; Haugeberg, Glenn; Leeb, Burkhard; Puolakka, Kari; Ravelli, Angelo; Rintelen, Bernhard; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2016-01-01

    Treating to target by monitoring disease activity and adjusting therapy to attain remission or low disease activity has been shown to lead to improved outcomes in chronic rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Patient-reported outcomes, used in conjunction with clinical measures, add an important perspective of disease activity as perceived by the patient. Several validated PROs are available for inflammatory arthritis, and advances in electronic patient monitoring tools are helping patients with chronic diseases to self-monitor and assess their symptoms and health. Frequent patient monitoring could potentially lead to the early identification of disease flares or adverse events, early intervention for patients who may require treatment adaptation, and possibly reduced appointment frequency for those with stable disease. A literature search was conducted to evaluate the potential role of patient self-monitoring and innovative monitoring of tools in optimising disease control in inflammatory arthritis. Experience from the treatment of congestive heart failure, diabetes and hypertension shows improved outcomes with remote electronic self-monitoring by patients. In inflammatory arthritis, electronic self-monitoring has been shown to be feasible in patients despite manual disability and to be acceptable to older patients. Patients' self-assessment of disease activity using such methods correlates well with disease activity assessed by rheumatologists. This review also describes several remote monitoring tools that are being developed and used in inflammatory arthritis, offering the potential to improve disease management and reduce pressure on specialists.

  15. Early identification of 'acute-onset' chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Park, Susanna B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Distinguishing patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy prior to relapse is often challenging at the onset of their clinical presentation. In the present study, nerve excitability tests were used in conjunction with the clinical phenotype and disease staging, to differentiate between patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy at an early stage, with the aim to better guide treatment. Clinical assessment, staging and nerve excitability tests were undertaken on patients initially fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy soon after symptom onset and their initial presentation. Patients were subsequently followed up for minimum of 12 months to determine if their clinical presentations were more consistent with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Clinical severity as evaluated by Medical Research Council sum score and Hughes functional grading scale were not significantly different between the two cohorts. There was no difference between the time of onset of initial symptoms and nerve excitability test assessment between the two cohorts nor were there significant differences in conventional nerve conduction study parameters. However, nerve excitability test profiles obtained from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy demonstrated abnormalities in the recovery cycle of excitability, including significantly reduced superexcitability (P < 0.001) and prolonged relative refractory period (P < 0.01), without changes in threshold electrotonus. In contrast, in patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, a different pattern occurred with the recovery cycle shifted downward (increased superexcitability, P < 0.05; decreased subexcitability, P < 0.05) and increased

  16. Therapeutic Effects of Acetone Extract of Saraca asoca Seeds on Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Attenuating Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mradu; Sasmal, Saumyakanti; Mukherjee, Arup

    2014-01-01

    Saraca asoca has been traditionally used in Indian system for treatment of uterine, genital, and other reproductive disorders in women, fever, pain, and inflammation. The hypothesis of this study is that acetone extract of Saraca asoca seeds is an effective anti-inflammatory treatment for arthritis in animal experiments. The antiarthritic effect of its oral administration on Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis has been studied in Wistar albino rats after acute and subacute toxicities. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of high concentrations of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids and tannins, while no mortality or morbidity was observed up to 1000 mg/kg dose during acute and subacute toxicity assessments. Regular treatment up to 21 days of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats with Saraca asoca acetone extract (at 300 and 500 mg/kg doses) increases RBC and Hb, decreases WBC, ESR, and prostaglandin levels in blood, and restores body weight when compared with control (normal saline) and standard (Indomethacin) groups. Significant (P < 0.05) inhibitory effect was observed especially at higher dose on paw edema, ankle joint inflammation, and hydroxyproline and glucosamine concentrations in urine. Normal radiological images of joint and histopathological analysis of joint, liver, stomach, and kidney also confirmed its significant nontoxic, antiarthritic, and anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:24729890

  17. Uveitis in spondyloarthritis including psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, James T

    2015-06-01

    Uveitis is a common complication of spondyloarthritis. The "phenotype" of the uveitis characteristic of ankylosing spondylitis (sudden onset, anterior, unilateral, recurrent, more often male) may differ from the phenotype often seen with either psoriatic arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease (insidious onset, anterior and intermediate, bilateral, chronic, and/or more often female). The frequency of uveitis is also much greater in association with ankylosing spondylitis than with either inflammatory bowel disease or psoriasis. Uveitis may affect the choice of therapy and can rarely be a complication of therapy. Uveitis and arthritis also co-exist in several animal models.

  18. Protective effect of taraxasterol against rheumatoid arthritis by the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Hua; Ping, Li-Feng; Sun, Feng-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Sun, Zhi-Juan

    2016-12-01

    Taraxasterol is an effective component of dandelion that has anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro. The present study was performed to explore whether taraxasterol exhibits a protective effect against rheumatoid arthritis through the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice. Eight-week-old CCR9-deficient mice were injected with a collagen II monoclonal antibody cocktail to create a rheumatoid arthritis model. In the experimental group, arthritic model mice were treated with 10 mg/kg taraxasterol once per day for 5 days. Treatment with taraxasterol significantly increased the pain thresholds and reduced the clinical arthritic scores of the mice in the experimental group compared with those of the model group. Furthermore, treatment with taraxasterol significantly suppressed tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and nuclear factor-κB protein expression levels compared with those in the rheumatoid arthritis model mice. Taraxasterol treatment also significantly reduced nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels compared with those in the rheumatoid arthritis model group. These observations indicate that the protective effect of taraxasterol against rheumatoid arthritis is mediated via the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice.

  19. Pro-apoptotic Bid is required for the resolution of the effector phase of inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scatizzi, John C; Hutcheson, Jack; Bickel, Emily; Haines, G Kenneth; Perlman, Harris

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by hyperplasia of the synovial lining and destruction of cartilage and bone. Recent studies have suggested that a lack of apoptosis contributes to the hyperplasia of the synovial lining and to the failure in eliminating autoreactive cells. Mice lacking Fas or Bim, two pro-apoptotic proteins that mediate the extrinsic and intrinsic death cascades, respectively, develop enhanced K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis. Since the pro-apoptotic protein Bid functions as an intermediate between the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, we examined the role that it plays in inflammatory arthritis. Mice deficient in Bid (Bid-/-) show a delay in the resolution of K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis. Bid-/- mice display increased inflammation, bone destruction, and pannus formation compared to wild-type mice. Furthermore, Bid-/- mice have elevated levels of CXC chemokine and IL-1β in serum, which are associated with more inflammatory cells throughout the arthritic joint. In addition, there are fewer apoptotic cells in the synovium of Bid-/- compared to Wt mice. These data suggest that extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways cooperate through Bid to limit development of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:17509138

  20. Protective effect of taraxasterol against rheumatoid arthritis by the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Hua; Ping, Li-Feng; Sun, Feng-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Sun, Zhi-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Taraxasterol is an effective component of dandelion that has anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro. The present study was performed to explore whether taraxasterol exhibits a protective effect against rheumatoid arthritis through the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice. Eight-week-old CCR9-deficient mice were injected with a collagen II monoclonal antibody cocktail to create a rheumatoid arthritis model. In the experimental group, arthritic model mice were treated with 10 mg/kg taraxasterol once per day for 5 days. Treatment with taraxasterol significantly increased the pain thresholds and reduced the clinical arthritic scores of the mice in the experimental group compared with those of the model group. Furthermore, treatment with taraxasterol significantly suppressed tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and nuclear factor-κB protein expression levels compared with those in the rheumatoid arthritis model mice. Taraxasterol treatment also significantly reduced nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels compared with those in the rheumatoid arthritis model group. These observations indicate that the protective effect of taraxasterol against rheumatoid arthritis is mediated via the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice. PMID:28101182

  1. Lithothamnion muelleri treatment ameliorates inflammatory and hypernociceptive responses in antigen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Vivian V; Amaral, Flavio A; Coelho, Fernanda M; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Malagoli, Bruna G; Gomes, Jose Hugo S; Lopes, Fernando; Silveira, Kátia D; Sachs, Daniela; Fagundes, Caio T; Tavares, Lívia D; Pinho, Vanessa; Silva, Tarcilia A; Teixeira, Mauro M; Braga, Fernão C; Souza, Danielle G

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease characterized by persistent inflammation and pain. Alternative therapies to reduce these symptoms are needed. Marine algae are valuable sources of diverse bioactive compounds. Lithothamnion muelleri (Hapalidiaceae) is a marine algae with anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and immunomodulatory properties. Here, we investigated the potential anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of L. muelleri in a murine model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in mice. Our results demonstrate that treatment with L. muelleri prevented inflammation and hypernociception in arthritic mice. Mechanistically, the crude extract and the polysaccharide-rich fractions of L. muelleri may act impairing the production of the chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, and consequently inhibit neutrophil influx to the knee joint by dampening the adhesion step of leukocyte recruitment in the knee microvessels. Altogether our results suggest that treatment with L.muelleri has a potential therapeutic application in arthritis treatment.

  2. Lithothamnion muelleri Treatment Ameliorates Inflammatory and Hypernociceptive Responses in Antigen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Vivian V.; Amaral, Flavio A.; Coelho, Fernanda M.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Malagoli, Bruna G.; Gomes, Jose Hugo S.; Lopes, Fernando; Silveira, Kátia D.; Sachs, Daniela; Fagundes, Caio T.; Tavares, Lívia D.; Pinho, Vanessa; Silva, Tarcilia A.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Braga, Fernão C.; Souza, Danielle G.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease characterized by persistent inflammation and pain. Alternative therapies to reduce these symptoms are needed. Marine algae are valuable sources of diverse bioactive compounds. Lithothamnion muelleri (Hapalidiaceae) is a marine algae with anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and immunomodulatory properties. Here, we investigated the potential anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of L. muelleri in a murine model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in mice. Our results demonstrate that treatment with L. muelleri prevented inflammation and hypernociception in arthritic mice. Mechanistically, the crude extract and the polysaccharide-rich fractions of L. muelleri may act impairing the production of the chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, and consequently inhibit neutrophil influx to the knee joint by dampening the adhesion step of leukocyte recruitment in the knee microvessels. Altogether our results suggest that treatment with L.muelleri has a potential therapeutic application in arthritis treatment. PMID:25793994

  3. Folate-targeted nanoparticles show efficacy in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Thommey P.; Goonewardena, Sascha N.; Majoros, Istvan; Kotlyar, Alina; Cao, Zhengyi; Leroueil, Pascale R.; Baker, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the uptake of a poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (generation 5 (G5)) nanoparticle covalently conjugated to polyvalent folic acid (FA) as the targeting ligand into macrophages, and the activity of a FA- and methotrexate-conjugated dendrimer (G5-FA-MTX) as a therapeutic for the inflammatory disease of arthritis. Methods In vitro studies were performed in macrophage cell lines and in isolated mouse macrophages to check the cellular uptake of fluorescently tagged G5-FA nanoparticles, using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. In vivo studies were conducted in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis to evaluate the therapeutic potential of G5-FA-MTX. Results Folate targeted dendrimer bound and internalized in a receptor-specific manner into both folate receptor β-expressing macrophage cell lines and primary mouse macrophages. The G5-FA-MTX acts as a potent anti-inflammatory agent and reduces arthritis-induced inflammatory parameters such as ankle swelling, paw volume, cartilage damage, bone resorption and body weight decrease. Conclusion The use of folate-targeted nanoparticles to specifically target MTX into macrophages may provide an effective clinical approach for anti-inflammatory therapy in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:21618461

  4. Photoacoustic tomography to identify angiogenesis for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Girish, Gandikota; Chamberland, David

    2013-03-01

    Identifying neovascularity, i.e. angiogenesis, as a feature of inflammatory arthritis, can help in early diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), as a hybrid imaging modality, relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. In this study, we used PAT to identify the changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis, through the study on a well-established adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, revealed that there was a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histological analysis of both the normal and the arthritic rats correlated well with the imaging findings. The results from this study suggest that the emerging PAT technology could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory joint diseases.

  5. Boswellia serrata extract attenuates inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sadiq; Umar, Khalid; Sarwar, Abu Hasnath Md Golam; Khan, Altaf; Ahmad, Niyaz; Ahmad, Sayeed; Katiyar, Chandra Kant; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Khan, Haider A

    2014-05-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease which leads to destruction of joints. Current treatment modalities for RA either produce symptomatic relief (NSAIDs) or modify the disease process (DMARDs). Though effective, their use is also limited by their side effects. As a result, the interest in alternative, well tolerated anti-inflammatory remedies has re-emerged. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant and antiarthritic activity of Boswellia serrata gum resin extract (BSE) in collagen induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by collagen induced arthritis (CIA) method. BSE was administered at doses of 100 and 200mg/kg body weight once daily for 21 days. The effects of treatment in the rats were assessed by biochemical (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO), inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, IFN-γ and PGE2), and histological studies in joints. BSE was effective in bringing significant changes on all the parameters (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO) studied. Oral administration of BSE resulted in significantly reduced levels of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and PGE2), and increased level of IL-10. The protective effects of BSE against RA were also evident from the decrease in arthritis scoring and bone histology. The abilities to inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and modulation of antioxidant status suggest that the protective effect of Boswellia serrata extract on arthritis in rats might be mediated via the modulation of immune system.

  6. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests.

  7. Protective effects of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil in animal models of acute inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Sepodes, B; Rocha, J; Direito, R; Fernandes, A; Brites, D; Freitas, M; Fernandes, E; Bronze, M R; Figueira, M E

    2015-04-01

    Virgin olive oil is the primary source of fat in the Mediterranean diet, and its beneficial health effects have been related with oleic acid and phenolic compounds content. Hydroxytyrosol, a typical virgin olive oil phenolic compound, has beneficial antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as previously reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg in a rodent model of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis was induced by intradermic administration, in male Wistar rats, of Freund's adjuvant with collagen type II on days 1 and 21. Hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils were administrated by gavage from day 23 until day 35. The treatment at 5-mg/kg dose significantly decreased paw edema (P<.01), histological damage, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and markedly reduced the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, improving articular function in treated animals. Acute inflammation, induced by carrageenan, was also evaluated for hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg. Both doses significantly reduced paw edema (P<.001). Our results suggest that the supplementation of refined olive oil with hydroxytyrosol may be advantageous in rheumatoid arthritis with significant impact not only on chronic inflammation but also on acute inflammatory processes.

  8. MACROPHAGE MIGRATION INHIBITORY FACTOR REGULATES NEUTROPHIL CHEMOTACTIC RESPONSES IN INFLAMMATORY ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Leilani L.; Fan, Huapeng; Hall, Pam; Ngo, Devi; Mackay, Charles R.; Fingerle-Rowson, Gunter; Bucala, Richard; Hickey, Michael J.; Morand, Eric F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) facilitates multiple aspects of inflammatory arthritis, the pathogenesis of which is significantly contributed to by neutrophils. The effects of MIF on neutrophil recruitment are unknown. We investigated the contribution of MIF to the regulation of neutrophil chemotactic responses. Methods K/BxN serum transfer arthritis was induced in wild-type (WT), MIF -/-, and MCP1 (CCL2)-deficient mice, and in WT mice treated with anti-KC (CXCL1) mAb. In vivo leukocyte trafficking was examined using intravital microscopy, and in vitro neutrophil function was examined using migration chambers and MAP kinase activation. Results K/BxN serum transfer arthritis was markedly attenuated in MIF-/- mice, with reductions in clinical and histological severity as well as synovial expression of KC and IL-1. Arthritis was also reduced by anti-KC antibody treatment, but not in MCP-1-deficient mice. In vivo neutrophil recruitment responses to KC were reduced in MIF-/- mice. Similarly, MIF-/-neutrophils exhibited reduced in vitro chemotactic responses to KC, despite unaltered chemokine receptor expression. Reduced chemotactic responses in MIF-/- neutrophils were associated with reduced phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. Conclusion These data suggest MIF promotes neutrophil trafficking in inflammatory arthritis via facilitation of chemokine-induced migratory responses and MAP kinase activation. Therapeutic MIF inhibition could limit synovial neutrophil recruitment. PMID:21452319

  9. CD11c-mediated deletion of Flip promotes autoreactivity and inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi-Quan; Perlman, Harris; Birkett, Robert; Doyle, Renee; Fang, Deyu; Haines, G Kenneth; Robinson, William; Datta, Syamal; Huang, Zan; Li, Quan-Zhen; Phee, Hyewon; Pope, Richard M

    2015-05-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical for immune homeostasis. To target DCs, we generated a mouse line with Flip deficiency in cells that express cre under the CD11c promoter (CD11c-Flip-KO). CD11c-Flip-KO mice spontaneously develop erosive, inflammatory arthritis, resembling rheumatoid arthritis, which is dramatically reduced when these mice are crossed with Rag(-/-) mice. The CD8α(+) DC subset is significantly reduced, along with alterations in NK cells and macrophages. Autoreactive CD4(+) T cells and autoantibodies specific for joint tissue are present, and arthritis severity correlates with the number of autoreactive CD4(+) T cells and plasmablasts in the joint-draining lymph nodes. Reduced T regulatory cells (Tregs) inversely correlate with arthritis severity, and the transfer of Tregs ameliorates arthritis. This KO line identifies a model that will permit in depth interrogation of the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including the role of CD8α(+) DCs and other cells of the immune system.

  10. [The systemic inflammatory response syndrome correction in acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Agapov, M A; Khoreva, M V; Gorskiĭ, V A

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease of variable severity. In which some patients experience mild, self-limited attacks while others manifest a severe, highly morbid, and frequently lethal attack. The exact mechanisms by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. Recent studies have established the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In our research we have estimated influence of not steroid anti-inflammatory preparation on synthesis pro-and anti-inflammatory Cytokines at healthy donors and at patients with Acute pancreatitis.

  11. Acute clinical onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Molín, Jéssica; Márquez, Mercedes; Raurell, Xavier; Matiasek, Kaspar; Ferrer, Isidre; Pumarola, Martí

    2011-09-01

    We report a case of acute-onset ambulatory paraparesis with electrophysiological abnormalities compatible with axonal and demyelinating lesions in a Rottweiler dog. Although the clinical findings were compatible with acute canine idiopathic polyneuropathy, postmortem investigations revealed a chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy affecting the nerve roots. Due to the combination of acute clinical presentation and chronic pathologic features, this case is consistent with the acute-onset form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (A-CIDP).

  12. CD44 Antibodies and Immune Thrombocytopenia in the Amelioration of Murine Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Patrick J.; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies to CD44 have been used to successfully ameliorate murine models of autoimmune disease. The most often studied disease model has been murine inflammatory arthritis, where a clear mechanism for the efficacy of CD44 antibodies has not been established. We have recently shown in a murine passive-model of the autoimmune disease immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) that some CD44 antibodies themselves can induce thrombocytopenia in mice, and the CD44 antibody causing the most severe thrombocytopenia (IM7), also is known to be highly effective in ameliorating murine models of arthritis. Recent work in the K/BxN serum-induced model of arthritis demonstrated that antibody-induced thrombocytopenia reduced arthritis, causing us to question whether CD44 antibodies might primarily ameliorate arthritis through their thrombocytopenic effect. We evaluated IM7, IRAWB14.4, 5035-41.1D, KM201, KM114, and KM81, and found that while all could induce thrombocytopenia, the degree of protection against serum-induced arthritis was not closely related to the length or severity of the thrombocytopenia. CD44 antibody treatment was also able to reverse established inflammation, while thrombocytopenia induced by an anti-platelet antibody targeting the GPIIbIIIa platelet antigen, could not mediate this effect. While CD44 antibody-induced thrombocytopenia may contribute to some of its therapeutic effect against the initiation of arthritis, for established disease there are likely other mechanisms contributing to its efficacy. Humans are not known to express CD44 on platelets, and are therefore unlikely to develop thrombocytopenia after CD44 antibody treatment. An understanding of the relationship between arthritis, thrombocytopenia, and CD44 antibody treatment remains critical for continued development of CD44 antibody therapeutics. PMID:23785450

  13. VDIPEN, a metalloproteinase-generated neoepitope, is induced and immunolocalized in articular cartilage during inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, I I; Kawka, D W; Bayne, E K; Donatelli, S A; Weidner, J R; Williams, H R; Ayala, J M; Mumford, R A; Lark, M W; Glant, T T

    1995-01-01

    The destruction of articular cartilage in immune inflammatory arthritic disease involves the proteolytic degradation of its extracellular matrix. The role of activated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the chondrodestructive process was studied by identifying a selective cleavage product of aggrecan in murine arthritis models initiated by immunization with either type II collagen or proteoglycan. We conducted semiquantitative immunocytochemical studies of VDIPEN341 using a monospecific polyclonal antibody requiring the free COOH group of the COOH-terminal Asn for epitope detection. This antibody recognizes the aggrecan G1 domain fragment generated by MMP [i.e., stromelysin (SLN) or gelatinase A] cleavage of aggrecan between Asn341-Phe342 but does not recognize intact aggrecan. VDIPEN was undetectable in normal mouse cartilage but was observed in the articular cartilage (AC) of mice with collagen-induced arthritis 10 d after immunization, without histological damage and clinical symptoms. This aggrecan neoepitope was colocalized with high levels of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in pericellular matrices of AC chondrocytes but was not seen at the articular surface at this early time. Digestion of normal (VDIPEN negative) mouse paw cryosections with SLN also produced heavy pericellular VDIPEN labeling. Computer-based image analysis showed that the amount of VDIPEN expression increased dramatically by 20 d (70% of the SLN maximum) and was correlated with GAG depletion. Both infiltration of inflammatory cells into the synovial cavity and early AC erosion were also very prominent at this time. Analysis of adjacent sections showed that both induction of VDIPEN and GAG depletion were strikingly codistributed within sites of articular cartilage damage. Similar results occurred in proteoglycan-induced arthritis, a more progressive and chronic model of inflammatory arthritis. These studies demonstrate for the first time the MMP-dependent catabolism of aggrecan at sites of

  14. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Potential of the New Ganghwaljetongyeum on Adjuvant-Induced Inflammatory Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wangin; Park, Sangbin; Kim, Youg Ran; Shin, Wook; Lee, Yumi; Choi, Donghee; Kim, Mirae; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Seonjong; Na, Changsu

    2016-01-01

    Ganghwaljetongyeum (GHJTY) has been used as a standard treatment for arthritis for approximately 15 years at the Korean Medicine Hospital of Dongshin University. GHJTY is composed of 18 medicinal herbs, of which five primary herbs were selected and named new Ganghwaljetongyeum (N-GHJTY). The purpose of the present study was to observe the effect of N-GHJTY on arthritis and to determine its mechanism of action. After confirming arthritis induction using complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in rats, N-GHJTY (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg/day) was administered once a day for 10 days. In order to determine pathological changes, edema of the paws and weight were measured before and for 10 days after N-GHJTY administration. Cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) levels and histopathological lesions in the knee joint were also examined. Edema in the paw and knee joint of N-GHJTY-treated rats was significantly decreased at 6, 8, and 10 days after administration, compared to that in the CFA-control group, while weight consistently increased. Rats in N-GHJTY-treated groups also recovered from the CFA-induced pathological changes and showed a significant decline in cytokine levels. Taken together, our results showed that N-GHJTY administration was effective in inhibiting CFA-induced arthritis via anti-inflammatory effects while promoting cartilage recovery by controlling cytokine levels. PMID:27382402

  15. Cytokines as therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Stefan; Tsoukas, Alexander; Robertson, Jamie; McInnes, Iain

    2015-01-01

    The human immune system involves highly complex and coordinated processes in which small proteins named cytokines play a key role. Cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokines are therefore attractive therapeutic targets in these conditions. Anticytokine therapy for inflammatory diseases became a clinical reality with the introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors for the treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis. Although these therapies have transformed the treatment of patients with severe inflammatory arthritis, there remain significant limiting factors: treatment failure is commonly seen in the clinic; safety concerns remain; there is uncertainty regarding the relevance of immunogenicity; the absence of biomarkers to direct therapy decisions and high drug costs limit availability in some healthcare systems. In this article, we provide an overview of the key efficacy and safety trials for currently approved treatments in rheumatoid arthritis and review the major lessons learned from a decade of use in clinical practice, focusing mainly on anti-TNF and anti-interleukin (IL)-6 agents. We also describe the clinical application of anticytokine therapies for other inflammatory diseases, particularly within the spondyloarthritis spectrum, and highlight differential responses across diseases. Finally, we report on the current state of trials for newer therapeutic targets, focusing mainly on the IL-17 and IL-23 pathways.

  16. The impact of endogenous annexin A1 on glucocorticoid control of inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hetal B; Kornerup, Kristin N; Sampaio, Andre' LF; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Seed, Michael P; Girol, Ana Paula; Gray, Mohini; Pitzalis, Costantino; Oliani, Sonia M; Perretti, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To establish the role and effect of glucocorticoids and the endogenous annexin A1 (AnxA1) pathway in inflammatory arthritis. Methods Ankle joint mRNA and protein expression of AnxA1 and its receptors were analysed in naive and arthritic mice by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Inflammatory arthritis was induced with the K/BxN arthritogenic serum in AnxA1+/+ and AnxA1−/− mice; in some experiments, animals were treated with dexamethasone (Dex) or with human recombinant AnxA1 or a protease-resistant mutant (termed SuperAnxA1). Readouts were arthritic score, disease incidence, paw oedema and histopathology, together with pro-inflammatory gene expression. Results All elements of the AnxA1 pathway could be detected in naive joints, with augmentation during ongoing disease, due to the infiltration of immune cells. No difference in arthritis intensity of profile could be observed between AnxA1+/+ and AnxA1−/− mice. Treatment of mice with Dex (10 µg intraperitoneally daily from day 2) afforded potent antiarthritic effects highly attenuated in the knockouts: macroscopic changes were mirrored by histopathological findings and pro-inflammatory gene (eg, Nos2) expression. Presence of proteinase 3 mRNA in the arthritic joints led the authors to test AnxA1 and the mutant SuperAnxA1 (1 µg intraperitoneally daily in both cases from day 2), with the latter one being able to accelerate the resolving phase of the disease. Conclusion AnxA1 is an endogenous determinant for the therapeutic efficacy of Dex in inflammatory arthritis. Such an effect can be partially mimicked by application of SuperAnxA1 which may represent the starting point for novel antiarthritic therapeutic strategies. PMID:22562975

  17. An improved acute gouty arthritis rat model and therapeutic effect of rhizoma Dioscoreae nipponicae on acute gouty arthritis based on the protein-chip methods.

    PubMed

    Yao, Li; Dong, Wanru; Lu, Fang; Liu, Shumin

    2012-01-01

    Rhizoma Dioscoreae nipponicae (RDN) is an herbal medicine. In the theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the function of RDN is to expel wind and remove dampness. Inflammatory mechanisms play an important role in the pathological process and prognosis of acute gouty arthritis (AGA). The aim of this study was to determine the specially expressed proteins through testing the proteins of the synovium in rats with AGA. The animal model of AGA was set up by Monosodium urate crystal (MSU) combined with hypoxanthine (HX), which was ameliorated in our previous experiment. Blood samples for measurement of serum uric acid were collected prior to sacrifice. Outcomes were assessed (two days after injection) by histological stain and protein quantitation. Three chips of RayBio® Human Label-based Antibody Array I were applied to detect 90 proteins in the synovium tissue of AGA rats. 14 differently expressed proteins were found in the synovium of AGA rats, and nine of them were first found in this model. There were seven up-regulated and seven down-regulated proteins, both TRAIL and Neuropilin-2 could be identified as key contributors to the pathomechanism of AGA.

  18. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  19. [CT - diagnosis and differential diagnosis of inflammatory acute intestinal conditions].

    PubMed

    Wiesner, W

    2011-08-24

    Multidetector-row CT has shown over the past years that it is able to provide reliable diagnoses in various acute intestinal conditions. The presented article provides an overview of primary and secondary inflammatory acute intestinal pathologies and their differential diagnoses.

  20. Significance of Anti-cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Autoantibodies in Immune-mediated Inflammatory Skin Disorders with and without Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Chander; Kashyap, Bineeta; Daulatabad, Deepashree; Dhawan, Amit; Kaur, Iqbal R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCPs) are autoantibodies directed against citrullinated peptides. Rheumatoid factor (RF), an antibody against the Fc portion of IgG, is known to form immune complexes and contribute to the etiopathogenesis of various skin disorders. C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute-phase protein, increases following secretion of interleukin-6 from macrophages and T cells. Anti-CCP, RF, and CRP are well-established immune-markers, their diagnostic potential in immune-mediated skin disorders remains less widely studied. Aims and Objectives: To determine the correlation between anti-CCP, RF, and CRP in immune-mediated inflammatory skin diseases. Materials and Methods: About 61 clinically diagnosed cases of various immune-mediated skin diseases (psoriasis [n = 38], connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis [n = 14], and immunobullous disorders including pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus [n = 9]) were included in the study. These patients were subclassified on the basis of presence or absence of arthritis. Arthritis was present in nine cases of psoriasis and seven connective tissue disorder patients. Detection of serum anti-CCP was done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas CRP and RF levels were detected using latex agglutination technique. Results: Of the 61 specimens, 14.75% had elevated serum anti-CCP levels. RF and CRP levels were elevated in 18.03% and 39.34% specimens, respectively. RF was elevated in 13.16% of inflammatory and 42.88% of connective tissue disorders, whereas anti-CCP was raised in 10.53% of inflammatory and 35.71% of connective tissue disorders. CRP positivity was highest in connective tissue disorders (50%), followed by 39.47% in inflammatory and 22.22% in immunobullous conditions. In none of the immunobullous patients, anti-CCP or RF levels were found to be elevated. Association of the presence of arthritis with elevated anti-CCP was found to be

  1. Interleukin-27 inhibits ectopic lymphoid-like structure development in early inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bombardieri, Michele; Greenhill, Claire J.; McLeod, Louise; Nerviani, Alessandra; Rocher-Ros, Vidalba; Cardus, Anna; Williams, Anwen S.; Pitzalis, Costantino; Jenkins, Brendan J.

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic lymphoid-like structures (ELSs) reminiscent of secondary lymphoid organs often develop at sites of chronic inflammation where they contribute to immune-mediated pathology. Through evaluation of synovial tissues from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, we now show that low interleukin-27 (IL-27) expression corresponds with an increased incidence of ELS and gene signatures associated with their development and activity. The presence of synovial ELS was also noted in mice deficient in the IL-27 receptor (IL-27R) after the onset of inflammatory arthritis. Here, pathology was associated with increased synovial expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, homeostatic chemokines, and transcriptional regulators linked with lymphoid neogenesis. In both clinical and experimental RA, synovial ELS coincided with the heightened local expression of cytokines and transcription factors of the Th17 and T follicular helper (Tfh) cell lineages, and included podoplanin-expressing T cells within lymphoid aggregates. IL-27 inhibited the differentiation of podoplanin-expressing Th17 cells, and an increased number of these cells were observed in IL-27R–deficient mice with inflammatory arthritis. Thus, IL-27 appears to negatively regulate ELS development in RA through control of effector T cells. These studies open new opportunities for patient stratification and treatment. PMID:26417004

  2. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  3. Anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic effects of piperine in human interleukin 1β-stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes and in rat arthritis models

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jun Soo; Oh, Da Hee; Choi, Hyun Mi; Sur, Bong-Jun; Lim, Sung-Jig; Kim, Jung Yeon; Yang, Hyung-In; Yoo, Myung Chul; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Kyoung Soo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to determine the anti-inflammatory, nociceptive, and antiarthritic effects of piperine, the active phenolic component in black pepper extract. Methods The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of piperine was tested on interleukin 1β (IL1β)-stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes derived form patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The levels of IL6, matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were investigated by ELISA and RT-PCR analysis. The analgesic and antiarthritic activities of piperine were investigated on rat models of carrageenan-induced acute paw pain and arthritis. The former were evaluated with a paw pressure test, and the latter by measuring the squeaking score, paw volume, and weight distribution ratio. Piperine was administrated orally to rats at 20 and 100 mg/kg/day for 8 days. Results Piperine inhibited the expression of IL6 and MMP13 and reduced the production of PGE2 in a dose dependant manner at concentrations of 10 to 100 μg/ml. In particular, the production of PGE2 was significantly inhibited even at 10 μg/ml of piperine. Piperine inhibited the migration of activator protein 1 (AP-1), but not nuclear factor (NF)κB, into the nucleus in IL1β-treated synoviocytes. In rats, piperine significantly reduced nociceptive and arthritic symptoms at days 8 and 4, respectively. Histological staining showed that piperine significantly reduced the inflammatory area in the ankle joints. Conclusions These results suggest that piperine has anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, and antiarthritic effects in an arthritis animal model. Thus, piperine should be further studied with regard to use either as a pharmaceutical or as a dietary supplement for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:19327174

  4. Are bacterial load and synovitis related in dogs with inflammatory stifle arthritis?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Zeev; Zitzer, Nina C; Racette, Molly A; Manley, Paul A; Schaefer, Susan L; Markel, Mark D; Hao, Zhengling; Holzman, Gerianne; Muir, Peter

    2011-03-24

    It has been proposed that small quantities of microbial material within synovial joints may act as a trigger for development of synovitis. We have previously identified an association between intra-articular bacteria and development of inflammatory stifle arthritis and cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs, and now wished to quantify bacterial load and markers of synovitis in dogs with and without stifle arthritis and CCLR. Joint tissues were collected from dogs with CCLR (n=51) and healthy dogs with normal stifles (n=9). Arthritis was assessed radiographically in CCLR dogs. Bacterial load was assessed using qPCR and broad-ranging 16S rRNA primers. qRT-PCR was used to estimate expression of the T lymphocyte antigen receptor (TCR Vβ), CD3ɛ, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), IL-4, IL-17, and TNF-α genes. Severity of synovitis was assessed histologically. Bacterial load was increased in arthritic stifles, when compared with healthy stifles. Histologic synovitis in arthritic stifles was mononuclear and was significantly correlated with bacterial load (1 of 2 primer sets) (S(R)=0.49, p<0.001). In arthritic stifles, expression of TRAP in synovium was increased relative to healthy stifles. Expression of pro-inflammatory genes was not correlated with bacterial load, histologic inflammation, or radiographic arthritis. Translocation of bacterial material to the canine stifle is related to the presence of joint inflammation. The lack of a strong positive correlation suggests that bacterial load is unlikely to be a primary pro-inflammatory factor. However, dysregulation of immune responses within synovial tissues may be dependent upon an environmental microbial trigger.

  5. Post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis complicated by gouty arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuniyoshi, Yasutaka; Kamura, Azusa; Yasuda, Sumie; Tashiro, Makoto

    2015-06-17

    Gouty arthritis is uncommon in childhood and adolescence. On the other hand, there has been no report of cases with development of gouty arthritis with post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (PSAGN) in pediatric patients. Here we report the case of a mildly obese 12-year-old boy with PSAGN complicated by gouty arthritis of the left first metatarsophalangeal joint. On follow-up, it was confirmed that as serum C3 level returned to normal, urinary excretion of uric acid increased and serum uric acid level decreased, thereby resolving the burning pain of the left big toe. In this case, not only did renal insufficiency associate with PSAGN but also mild obesity may have led to hyperuricemia and gouty arthritis. In conclusion, clinicians should be aware that PSAGN may be complicated by gouty arthritis in obese pediatric patients.

  6. Inhibition of CDK9 as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hellvard, Annelie; Zeitlmann, Lutz; Heiser, Ulrich; Kehlen, Astrid; Niestroj, André; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Koziel, Joanna; Delaleu, Nicolas; Jan Potempa; Mydel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by synovial inflammation and proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes. The induction of apoptosis has long been proposed as a target for proliferative autoimmune diseases, and has further been shown to act as a successful treatment of experimental models of arthritis, such as collagen-induced arthritis. Here we examined the effects of specific oral small-molecule inhibitors of the transcription regulating cyclin-dependent kinase 9 on the development and progression of collagen-induced arthritis. DBA/1 mice were immunised with bovine collagen type II and treated orally with specific CDK9 inhibitors. The effects of CDK9 inhibition on RNA levels and protein expression, apoptosis induction, caspase activation and lymphocyte phenotype were further analysed. Mice showed a significant delay in disease onset and a reduction in disease severity following treatment with CDK9 inhibitors. Inhibiting CDK9 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in the loss of Mcl-1 expression at both the protein and RNA levels, along with a subsequent increase in apoptosis. CDK9 specific inhibitors may be a potential alternative treatment not only of cancer, but also for autoimmune- and inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results show that transient inhibition of CDK9 induces apoptosis in leukocyte subsets and modulates the immune response. PMID:27511630

  7. Lactobacillus casei reduces the inflammatory joint damage associated with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) by reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokines: Lactobacillus casei: COX-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Amdekar, Sarika; Singh, Vinod; Singh, Rambir; Sharma, Poonam; Keshav, Poonam; Kumar, Avnish

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of Lactobacillus casei in treating rheumatoid arthritis using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) animal model. Healthy female Wistar rats (weight-180-200 g) were included in this study. Oral administration of L. casei was started on the same day. Indomethacin was used as standard reference drug. Serum level of IL-6, α-TNF, and IL-10 were observed. Four-point arthritis indexes were also assessed at the end of week for 28th day. L. casei-treated rats had shown normal histopathology without any synovial infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage, and bone destruction. Arthritis score was also lower for the group treated with L. casei. Oral administration of L. casei significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines. Present study suggests that L. casei has potent antiarthritic effect in CIA model. Inhibition of COX-2 via inhibiting the pro-inflammatory cytokines is an understanding of the complex interactions involved in these pathways.

  8. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, a swollen joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such as your eyes or skin. Types of arthritis include Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It's ...

  9. Proresolving and cartilage-protective actions of resolvin D1 in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Norling, Lucy V.; Headland, Sarah E.; Arnardottir, Hildur H.; Haworth, Oliver; Jones, Hefin R.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating disease characterized by persistent accumulation of leukocytes within the articular cavity and synovial tissue. Metabololipidomic profiling of arthritic joints from omega-3 supplemented mice identified elevated levels of specialized proresolving lipid mediators (SPM) including resolvin D1 (RvD1). Profiling of human RA synovial fluid revealed physiological levels of RvD1, which — once applied to human neutrophils — attenuated chemotaxis. These results prompted analyses of the antiarthritic properties of RvD1 in a model of murine inflammatory arthritis. The stable epimer 17R-RvD1 (100 ng/day) significantly attenuated arthritis severity, cachexia, hind-paw edema, and paw leukocyte infiltration and shortened the remission interval. Metabololipidomic profiling in arthritic joints revealed 17R-RvD1 significantly reduced PGE2 biosynthesis, while increasing levels of protective SPM. Molecular analyses indicated that 17R-RvD1 enhanced expression of genes associated with cartilage matrix synthesis, and direct intraarticular treatment induced chondroprotection. Joint protective actions of 17R-RvD1 were abolished in RvD1 receptor–deficient mice termed ALX/fpr2/3–/–. These investigations open new therapeutic avenues for inflammatory joint diseases, providing mechanistic substance for the benefits of omega-3 supplementation in RA. PMID:27158677

  10. Clinical and electrophysiological parameters distinguishing acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Annie; Nicolle, Michael W; Hahn, Angelika F

    2010-02-01

    Up to 16% of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) patients may present acutely. We performed a retrospective chart review on 30 acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and 15 acute-onset CIDP (A-CIDP) patients looking for any clinical or electrophysiological parameters that might differentiate AIDP from acutely presenting CIDP. A-CIDP patients were significantly more likely to have prominent sensory signs. They were significantly less likely to have autonomic nervous system involvement, facial weakness, a preceding infectious illness, or need for mechanical ventilation. With regard to electrophysiological features, neither sural-sparing pattern, sensory ratio >1, nor the presence of A-waves was different between the two groups. This study suggests that patients presenting acutely with a demyelinating polyneuropathy and the aforementioned clinical features should be closely monitored as they may be more likely to have CIDP at follow-up.

  11. GPR91 senses extracellular succinate released from inflammatory macrophages and exacerbates rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Kneuer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    When SUCNR1/GPR91-expressing macrophages are activated by inflammatory signals, they change their metabolism and accumulate succinate. In this study, we show that during this activation, macrophages release succinate into the extracellular milieu. They simultaneously up-regulate GPR91, which functions as an autocrine and paracrine sensor for extracellular succinate to enhance IL-1β production. GPR91-deficient mice lack this metabolic sensor and show reduced macrophage activation and production of IL-1β during antigen-induced arthritis. Succinate is abundant in synovial fluids from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and these fluids elicit IL-1β release from macrophages in a GPR91-dependent manner. Together, we reveal a GPR91/succinate-dependent feed-forward loop of macrophage activation and propose GPR91 antagonists as novel therapeutic principles to treat RA. PMID:27481132

  12. DMSO Represses Inflammatory Cytokine Production from Human Blood Cells and Reduces Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Elisia, Ingrid; Nakamura, Hisae; Lam, Vivian; Hofs, Elyse; Cederberg, Rachel; Cait, Jessica; Hughes, Michael R.; Lee, Leora; Jia, William; Adomat, Hans H.; Guns, Emma S.; McNagny, Kelly M.; Samudio, Ismael; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is currently used as an alternative treatment for various inflammatory conditions as well as for cancer. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of data regarding its safety and efficacy as well as its mechanism of action in human cells. Herein, we demonstrate that DMSO has ex-vivo anti-inflammatory activity using Escherichia coli- (E. coli) and herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1)-stimulated whole human blood. Specifically, we found that between 0.5%– 2%, DMSO significantly suppressed the expression of many pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, a significant reduction in monocyte viability was also observed at 2% DMSO, suggesting a narrow window of efficacy. Anti-inflammatory concentrations of DMSO suppressed E. coli-induced ERK1/2, p38, JNK and Akt phosphorylation, suggesting DMSO acts on these signaling pathways to suppress inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production. Although DMSO induces the differentiation of B16/F10 melanoma cells in vitro, topical administration of DMSO to mice subcutaneously implanted with B16 melanoma cells was ineffective at reducing tumor growth, DMSO was also found to block mouse macrophages from polarizing to either an M1- or an M2-phenotype, which may contribute to its inability to slow tumor growth. Topical administration of DMSO, however, significantly mitigated K/BxN serum-induced arthritis in mice, and this was associated with reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joints and white blood cell levels in the blood. Thus, while we cannot confirm the efficacy of DMSO as an anti-cancer agent, the use of DMSO in arthritis warrants further investigation to ascertain its therapeutic potential. PMID:27031833

  13. Fibrin(ogen) mediates acute inflammatory responses to biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Although "biocompatible" polymeric elastomers are generally nontoxic, nonimmunogenic, and chemically inert, implants made of these materials may trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. Early interactions between implants and inflammatory cells are probably mediated by a layer of host proteins on the material surface. To evaluate the importance of this protein layer, we studied acute inflammatory responses of mice to samples of polyester terephthalate film (PET) that were implanted intraperitoneally for short periods. Material preincubated with albumin is "passivated," accumulating very few adherent neutrophils or macrophages, whereas uncoated or plasma- coated PET attracts large numbers of phagocytes. Neither IgG adsorption nor surface complement activation is necessary for this acute inflammation; phagocyte accumulation on uncoated implants is normal in hypogammaglobulinemic mice and in severely hypocomplementemic mice. Rather, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to be critical: (a) PET coated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma attracts as few phagocytes as does albumin-coated material; (b) in contrast, PET preincubated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma containing physiologic amounts of fibrinogen elicits "normal" phagocyte recruitment; (c) most importantly, hypofibrinogenemic mice do not mount an inflammatory response to implanted PET unless the material is coated with fibrinogen or the animals are injected with fibrinogen before implantation. Thus, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to initiate the acute inflammatory response to an implanted polymer, suggesting an interesting nexus between two major iatrogenic effects of biomaterials: clotting and inflammation. PMID:8245787

  14. Inflammatory arthritis in caspase-1 gene deficient mice: Contribution of proteinase 3 for caspase-1-independent production of bioactive IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Joosten, Leo A.B.; Netea, Mihai G.; Fantuzzi, Giamila; Koenders, Marije I.; Helsen, Monique M.A.; Sparrer, Helmut; Pham, Christine T.; van der Meer, Jos W.M.; Dinarello, Charles A.; van den Berg, Wim B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Caspase-1 is a known cysteine proteases and is a critical component of the inflammasome. Caspase-1 and neutrophil serine proteases, such as proteinase 3 (PR3) can process pro-IL-1β a crucial cytokine linked to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, but their relative importance is unknown. Methods To this end we induced acute and chronic arthritis in caspase-1−/− mice and investigated the lack of caspase-1 on joint swelling, cartilage metabolism and joint pathology. In addition, caspase-1 activity was inhibited in mice lacking active cysteine proteases and evaluated the effect of dual blockade of caspase-1 and serine proteinase on arthritis severity and joint pathology. Results Surprisingly, caspase-1−/− mice developed joint swelling similar to wild-type mice in models of neutrophil-dominated arthritis. Joint fluid concentrations of bioactive IL-1β were comparable in caspase-1−/− mice and controls. In contrast, induction of chronic arthritis with minimal numbers of neutrophils in caspase-1−/− mice lead to reduced joint inflammation and cartilage damage, implying caspase-1 dependence. In mice lacking neutrophil serine PR3, inhibition caspase-1 activity results in decreased bioactive IL-1β concentrations in synovial tissue and less suppression of chondrocyte anabolic function. In addition, dual blockade of both PR-3 and caspase-1 lead to protection against cartilage and bone destruction. Conclusions We conclude that caspase-1 deficiency does not affect neutrophil-dominated joint inflammation, whereas in chronic arthritis the lack of caspase-1 results in reduced joint pathology. This study implies that caspase-1 inhibitors are not able to interfere with the whole spectrum of IL-1β production and hence may be of therapeutic value only in inflammatory conditions where limited numbers of neutrophils are present. PMID:19950280

  15. Appearance of acute gouty arthritis on indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Vega, A.; Kim, C.K.; Swyer, A.J.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 66-yr-old male with polyarticular acute gouty arthritis. Images revealed intense labeled leukocyte accumulation in a pattern indistinguishable from septic arthritis, in both knees and ankles, and the metatarsophalangeal joint of both great toes, all of which were involved in the acute gouty attack. Joint aspirate as well as blood cultures were reported as no growth; the patient was treated with intravenous colchicine and ACTH for 10 days with dramatic improvement noted. Labeled leukocyte imaging, repeated 12 days after the initial study, revealed near total resolution of joint abnormalities, concordant with the patient's clinical improvement. This case demonstrates that while acute gouty arthritis is a potential pitfall in labeled leukocyte imaging, in the presence of known gout, it may provide a simple, objective, noninvasive method of evaluating patient response to therapy.

  16. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  17. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 positively affects both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent-induced gastrointestinal lesions and adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevic, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagic, V; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Zoricic, I; Konjevoda, P; Perovic, D; Simicevic, V; Separovic, J; Hanzevacki, M; Ljubanovic, D; Artukovic, B; Bratulic, M; Tisljar, M; Rekic, B; Gjurasin, M; Miklic, P; Buljat, G

    1997-01-01

    Besides a superior protection of the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (an essential fragment of an organoprotective gastric juice peptide BPC) against different gastrointestinal and liver lesions, an acute anti-inflammatory and analgetic activity was also noted. Consequently, its effect on chronic inflammation lesions, such as adjuvant arthritis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIAs)-induced gastrointestinal lesions was simultaneously studied in rats. In gastrointestinal lesions (indomethacin (30 mg/kg s.c.), aspirin (400 mg/kg i.g.) and diclofenac (125 mg/kg i.p.) studies, BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.) was regularly given simultaneously and/or 1 h prior to drug application (indomethacin). In the adjuvant arthritis (tail-application of 0.2 mL of Freund's adjuvant) studies (14 days, 30 days, 1 year) BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.), it was given as a single application (at 1 h either before or following the application of Freund's adjuvant) or in a once daily regimen (0-14th day, 14-30th day, 14th day-1 year). Given with the investigated NSAIAs, BPC 157 consistently reduced the otherwise prominent lesions in the stomach of the control rats, as well as the lesions in the small intestine in the indomethacin groups. In the adjuvant arthritis studies, the lesion's development seems to be considerably reduced after single pentadecapeptide medication, and even more attenuated in rats daily treated with BPC 157. As a therapy of already established adjuvant arthritis, its salutary effect consistently appeared already after 2 weeks of medication and it could be clearly seen also after 1 year of application. Taking together all these results, the data likely point to a special anti-inflammatory and mucosal integrity protective effect.

  18. An intra-articular salmon calcitonin-based nanocomplex reduces experimental inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sinéad M; McMorrow, Jason; Umerska, Anita; Patel, Hetal B; Kornerup, Kristin N; Tajber, Lidia; Murphy, Evelyn P; Perretti, Mauro; Corrigan, Owen I; Brayden, David J

    2013-04-28

    Prolonged inappropriate inflammatory responses contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to aspects of osteoarthritis (OA). The orphan nuclear receptor, NR4A2, is a key regulator and potential biomarker for inflammation and represents a potentially valuable therapeutic target. Both salmon calcitonin (sCT) and hyaluronic acid (HA) attenuated activated mRNA expression of NR4A1, NR4A2, NR4A3, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 1, 3 and 13 in three human cell lines: SW1353 chondrocytes, U937 and THP-1 monocytes. Ad-mixtures of sCT and HA further down-regulated expression of NR4A2 compared to either agent alone at specific concentrations, hence the rationale for their formulation in nanocomplexes (NPs) using chitosan. The sCT released from NP stimulated cAMP production in human T47D breast cancer cells expressing sCT receptors. When NP were injected by the intra-articular (I.A.) route to the mouse knee during on-going inflammatory arthritis of the K/BxN serum transfer model, joint inflammation was reduced together with NR4A2 expression, and local bone architecture was preserved. These data highlight remarkable anti-inflammatory effects of sCT and HA at the level of reducing NR4A2 mRNA expression in vitro. Combining them in NP elicits anti-arthritic effects in vivo following I.A. delivery.

  19. Prednisolone reduces experimental arthritis, and inflammatory tissue destruction in SCID mice infected with Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Hurtenbach, U; Böggemeyer, E; Stehle, T; Museteanu, C; Del Pozo, E; Simon, M M

    1996-05-01

    Glucocorticosteroids (GC) are widely used as anti-inflammatory agents. The effects of Prednisolone on the development of Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi-induced clinical arthritis and organ inflammation was studied in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. The drug was administered orally at a dose of 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, starting shortly before experimental infection of the mice. A dose dependent inhibition of arthritic joint swelling was observed. Full protection was obtained with 30 mg/kg until 21 days after infection, subsequently, mild joint swelling developed but progression and severity of the disease was considerably less than in the other treated as well as in the untreated mice. Inhibition of clinical arthritis coincided with reduction of inflammatory cell infiltration in the joints, liver and muscle. Prednisolone was ineffective when application was initiated after arthritis was fully developed, i.e., 22 days after infection. Since the activated endothelium plays a critical role in development of inflammatory lesions, the expression of the cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) E-selectin, P-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 was determined in vitro using the bEnd3 endothelial cell line. Stimulation with a sonicated B. burgdorferi preparation in the presence of the water-soluble compound Prednisolone-21-hemisuccinate considerably reduced expression of ICAM-1, and marginally also of E-selectin, whereas the level of P-selectin and VCAM-1 remained unaltered. Thus, downregulation of ICAM-1 might be a critical factor in Prednisolone-mediated inhibition of B. burgdorferi-induced inflammation; the flare up of the disease after the initial protection indicates that additional therapy, e.g. with antibiotics, is necessary.

  20. Inflammatory spinal disease in psoriatic arthritis: a report from the GRAPPA 2010 annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Gladman, Dafna D

    2012-02-01

    Diagnosing axial disease in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has been largely dependent on identifying inflammatory back pain (IBP), which itself has been difficult to define. We review the criteria used to identify IBP in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other forms of spondyloarthritis. Recently, the Ankylosing SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS) developed a list of clinical and radiographic criteria for identifying IBP in patients with AS. However, it is more difficult to identify IBP in patients with PsA because generally they have less pain than patients with rheumatoid arthritis or AS. Further, PsA patients may have clinical symptoms of pain but negative radiographs. It may be more useful to identify sacroiliitis or syndesmophytes by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), since MRI identifies lesions in the sacroiliac joints and the spine much earlier than can be detected on radiographs. In summary, all patients with PsA should be assessed for axial involvement with history, physical examination, and imaging. Patients with psoriasis whose history includes onset of back pain before age 40 years, the presence of night pain, and improvement with exercise but not with rest, or who have limited neck or back mobility, should be referred to a rheumatologist.

  1. Regulation of autoimmune arthritis by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eugene Y; Chi, Howard H; Bouziane, Mohammed; Gaur, Amitabh; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2008-04-01

    The pathogenesis of T cell-mediated diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has typically been explained in the context of the Th1-Th2 paradigm: the initiation/propagation by pro-inflammatory cytokines, and downregulation by Th2 cytokines. However, in our study based on the adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model of RA, we observed that Lewis (LEW) (RT.1(l)) rats at the recovery phase of AA showed the highest level of IFN-gamma in recall response to mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65), whereas AA-resistant Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) (RT.1(l)) rats secreted high levels of IFN-gamma much earlier following disease induction. However, no significant secretion of IL-10 or TGF-beta was observed in either strain. Furthermore, pre-treatment of LEW rats with a peptide of self (rat) hsp65 (R465), which induced T cells secreting predominantly IFN-gamma, afforded protection against AA and decreased IL-17 expression by the arthritogenic epitope-restimulated T cells. These results provide a novel perspective on the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis.

  2. Is the risk of cardiovascular disease altered with anti-inflammatory therapies? Insights from rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kraakman, Michael J; Dragoljevic, Dragana; Kammoun, Helene L; Murphy, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Atherosclerosis is the most common form of CVD, which is complex and multifactorial with an elevated risk observed in people with either metabolic or inflammatory diseases. Accumulating evidence now links obesity with a state of chronic low-grade inflammation and has renewed our understanding of this condition and its associated comorbidities. An emerging theme linking disease states with atherosclerosis is the increased production of myeloid cells, which can initiate and exacerbate atherogenesis. Although anti-inflammatory drug treatments exist and have been successfully used to treat inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a commonly observed side effect is dyslipidemia, inadvertently, a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. The mechanisms leading to dyslipidemia associated with anti-inflammatory drug use and whether CVD risk is actually increased by this dyslipidemia are of great therapeutic importance and currently remain poorly understood. Here we review recent data providing links between inflammation, hematopoiesis, dyslipidemia and CVD risk in the context of anti-inflammatory drug use. PMID:27350883

  3. Herbal medicinal products target defined biochemical and molecular mediators of inflammatory autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Berman, Brian M.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by synovial inflammation, damage to cartilage and bone, and deformities of the joints. Several drugs possessing anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties are being used in the conventional (allopathic) system of medicine to treat RA. However, the long-term use of these drugs is associated with harmful side effects. Therefore, newer drugs with low or no toxicity for the treatment of RA are actively being sought. Interestingly, several herbs demonstrate anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity. In this review, we describe the role of the major biochemical and molecular mediators in the pathogenesis of RA, and highlight the sites of action of herbal medicinal products that have anti-arthritic activity. With the rapidly increasing use of CAM products by patients with RA and other inflammation-related disorders, our review presents timely information validating the scientific rationale for the use of natural therapeutic products. PMID:21115252

  4. Imaging of inflammatory arthritis with technetium-99m-labeled IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Breedveld, F.C.; van Kroonenburgh, M.J.; Camps, J.A.; Feitsma, H.I.; Markusse, H.M.; Pauwels, E.K. )

    1989-12-01

    The accumulation of nonspecific polyclonal human immunoglobulin G (IgG) radiolabeled with 99mTc was compared to that of (99mTc)albumin and (99mTc)nanocolloid in rats with collagen induced arthritis. Serial scintigrams were acquired directly, 4 and 24 hr after injection. A clearly discernable image of the site of synovitis was seen with (99mTc)IgG as early as 4 hr postinjection. The relative intensity of the inflammatory lesion was maximal at 24 hr. Discrimination between arthritic and nonarthritic joints as well as correlations between the relative intensity of the arthritic joint and clinical indices of joint inflammation were superior with IgG compared to albumin or nanocolloid. These studies show that localization and severity of inflammatory joint disease can be detected with radiolabeled nonspecific IgG.

  5. Non-inflammatory Causes of Pain in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boyden, Sean D; Hossain, Imtiyaz N; Wohlfahrt, Alyssa; Lee, Yvonne C

    2016-06-01

    Although pain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is frequently thought to be inflammatory in nature, the association between measures of inflammation and pain intensity is low. This observation is likely due to the multifactorial nature of pain. In addition to pain from joint inflammation, RA patients may also have pain due to structural damage or central etiologies, such as aberrancies in the central nervous system (CNS) pain regulatory pathways. These CNS pathways include mechanisms that facilitate pain, as well as mechanisms that inhibit pain. Other factors, such as sleep disturbances, depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing, may also impact the perception of pain in RA patients. Since pain is frequently used as a proxy for inflammation in the assessment of RA disease activity, it is important that patients and physicians recognize that not all pain is inflammatory, and alternative management strategies, other than escalating disease-modifying antirheumatic drug treatment, may need to be considered.

  6. Mast cells contribute to autoimmune inflammatory arthritis via their tryptase•heparin complexes1

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kichul; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Crish, James; Boilard, Eric; McNeil, H. Patrick; Larabee, Katherine S.; Adachi, Roberto; Gurish, Michael F.; Gobezie, Reuben; Stevens, Richard L.; Lee, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Although mast cells (MCs) often are abundant in the synovial tissues of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MC’s contribution to joint inflammation and cartilage loss remains poorly understood. MC-restricted tryptase•heparin complexes have pro-inflammatory activity, and significant amounts of hTryptase-β are present in RA synovial fluid. Mouse MC protease-6 (mMCP-6) is the ortholog of hTryptase-β, and this serine protease is abundant in the synovium of arthritic mice. We now report that C57BL/6 (B6) mice lacking their tryptase•heparin complexes have attenuated arthritic responses, with mMCP-6 as the dominant tryptase responsible for augmenting neutrophil infiltration in the K/B×N mouse serum-transfer arthritis model. While inflammation in this experimental arthritis model was not dependent on protease activated receptor-2, it was dependent on the chemokine receptor CXCR2. In support of the latter data, exposure of synovial fibroblasts to hTryptase-β•heparin or mMCP-6•heparin complexes resulted in expression of the neutrophil chemotactic factors CXCL1/KC, CXCL5/LIX, and CXCL8/IL-8. Our proteomics, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry data also revealed substantial loss of cartilage-derived aggrecan proteoglycans in the arthritic joints of wild-type B6 mice but not mMCP-6-null B6 mice. These observations demonstrate the functional contribution of MC-restricted tryptase•heparin complexes in the K/B×N mouse arthritis model and connect our mouse findings with RA pathophysiology. PMID:19109198

  7. Glucocorticoids and endothelial function in inflammatory diseases: focus on rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Frank; Prati, Clément; Maguin-Gaté, Katy; Wendling, Daniel; Demougeot, Céline

    2016-11-05

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common systemic autoimmune disease characterized by articular and extra-articular manifestations involving cardiovascular (CV) diseases. RA increases the CV mortality by up to 50 % compared with the global population and CV disease is the leading cause of death in patients with RA. There is growing evidence that RA favors accelerated atherogenesis secondary to endothelial dysfunction (ED) that occurs early in the course of the disease. ED is a functional and reversible alteration of endothelial cells, leading to a shift of the actions of the endothelium towards reduced vasodilation, proinflammatory state, proliferative and prothrombotic properties. The mechanistic links between RA and ED have not been fully explained, but growing evidence suggests a role for traditional CV factors, auto-antibodies, genetic factors, oxidative stress, inflammation and iatrogenic interventions such as glucocorticoids (GCs) use. GCs have been used in RA for several decades. Whilst their deleterious CV side effects were described in the 1950s, their effect on CV risk associated with inflammatory arthritis remains subject for debate. GC might induce negative effects on endothelial function, via a direct effect on endothelium or via increasing CV risk factors. Conversely, they might actually improve endothelial function by decreasing systemic and/or vascular inflammation. The present review summarizes the available data on the impact of GCs on endothelial function, both in normal and inflammatory conditions, with a special focus on RA patients.

  8. Optimizing the optical wavelength for the photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Hu, Jack; Francis, Sheeja; Marquardt, April; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    With the capability of assessing high resolution optical information in soft tissues at imaging depth up to several centimeters, innovative biomedical photoacoustic imaging (PAI) offers benefits to diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis, particularly in combination with more established ultrasonography (US). In this work, a PAI and US dual-modality system facilitating both imaging functions in a real-time fashion was developed and initially tested for its clinical performance on patients with active inflammatory arthritis. Photoacoustic (PA) images of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were acquired at 580-nm wavelength that provides a desired balance between optical absorption of blood and attenuation in background tissue. The results from six patients and six normal volunteers used as a control demonstrated the satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing the physiological changes in the joints, specifically enhanced blood flow as a result of active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that PAI, by revealing vascular features suggestive of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US for rheumatology clinic.

  9. Focal bone involvement in inflammatory arthritis: the role of IL17.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Maurizio; Viapiana, Ombretta; Adami, Silvano; Idolazzi, Luca; Fracassi, Elena; Gatti, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA, such as psoriatic arthritis, PsA, and ankylosing spondylitis, AS) are characterized by an imbalance between osteoclast (OC) bone resorption and osteoblast (OB) bone formation. The two conditions present substantial differences in bone involvement, which is probably related to the different expression of IL17 and TNFα, two cytokines that strongly promote osteoclastogenesis and focal bone erosions. TNFα is the major inflammatory cytokine in RA. It acts by both triggering OC bone erosion via the RANK-RANKL system, and suppressing OB bone formation through the overexpression of DKK1, a powerful inhibitor of the WNT bone anabolic signaling pathway. Differing from TNFα, IL17 promotes also osteogenesis, particularly at inflamed sites undergoing mechanical stress, such as entheses. Therefore, in RA, where overexpression of TNFα is higher than IL17, OC bone resorption largely prevails upon bone formation. In PsA and AS, the prevailing inflammatory cytokine is IL17, which promotes also osteogenesis. Given the prevalent involvement of entheses poor of OC, excess bone formation may even prevail over excess bone resorption. The results of clinical trials support the different pathophysiology of bone involvement in chronic arthritis. Inflammation control through anti-TNFα agents has not resulted in incomparable effects on radiographic progression and excess bone formation in both AS and PsA. Clinical trials investigating IL17 inhibitors, such as secukinumab, in patients with psoriatic disease are underway. The preliminary results on inflammation and symptoms appear positive, while long-term studies are required to demonstrate an effect on excess bone formation.

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of intravenous methotrexate associated with lipid nanoemulsions on antigen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Suzana B V; Tavares, Elaine R; Guido, Maria Carolina; Bonfá, Eloisa; Maranhão, Raul C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that intravenous use of methotrexate associated with lipid nanoemulsions can achieve superior anti-inflammatory effects in the joints of rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis compared with commercial methotrexate. METHODS: Arthritis was induced in New Zealand rabbits sensitized with methylated bovine serum albumin and subsequently intra-articularly injected with the antigen. A nanoemulsion of methotrexate labeled with 3H-cholesteryl ether (4 mg/kg methotrexate) was then intravenously injected into four rabbits to determine the plasma decaying curves and the biodistribution of the methotrexate nanoemulsion by radioactive counting. Additionally, the pharmacokinetics of the methotrexate nanoemulsion were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Twenty-four hours after arthritis induction, the animals were allocated into three groups, with intravenous injection with saline solution (n=9), methotrexate nanoemulsion (0.5 µmol/kg methotrexate, n=7), or commercial methotrexate (0.5 µmol/kg, n=4). The rabbits were sacrificed 24 h afterward. Synovial fluid was then collected for protein leakage and cell content analyses and synovial membranes were collected for histopathological analysis. RESULTS: The methotrexate nanoemulsion was taken up mainly by the liver and the uptake by arthritic joints was two-fold greater than that by control joints. The methotrexate nanoemulsion treatment reduced leukocyte influx into the synovial fluid by nearly 65%; in particular, mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells were reduced by 47 and 72%, respectively. In contrast, cell influx was unaffected following treatment with commercial methotrexate. Protein leakage into the arthritic knees of the rabbits was also more limited following methotrexate nanoemulsion treatment than following commercial methotrexate treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The intravenous methotrexate nanoemulsion showed anti-inflammatory effects on the synovia of arthritic joints that were

  11. Betahistine attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 cell responses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kuo-Tung; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lim, Yun-Ping; Chen, Yi-Ming; Li, Yi-Rong; Yang, Deng-Ho; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. CIA was induced in DBA/1 male mice by primary immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml chicken type II collagen (CII) mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in an 1:1 ratio, and booster immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml CII mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) in an 1:1 ratio. Immunization was performed subcutaneously at the base of the tail. After being boosted on day 21, betahistine (1 and 5mg/kg) was orally administered daily for 2weeks. The severity of CIA was determined by arthritic scores and assessment of histopathological joint destruction. Expression of cytokines in the paw and anti-CII antibodies in the serum was evaluated by ELISA. The proliferative response against CII in the lymph node cells was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. The frequencies of different CII specific CD4(+) T cell subsets in the lymph node were determined by flow-cytometric analysis. Betahistine treatment attenuated the severity of arthritis and reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A, in the paw tissues of CIA mice. Lymph node cells from betahistine-treated mice showed a decrease in proliferation, as well as a lower frequency of Th17 cells. In vitro, betahistine suppressed CD4(+) T cell differentiation into Th17 cells. These results indicate that betahistine is effective in suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses in mouse CIA and that it may have therapeutic value as an adjunct treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous fruit pulp extract of Hunteria umbellata K. Schum in acute and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Igbe, Ighodaro; Ching, Fidelis P; Eromon, Aigbe

    2010-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of the aqueous fruit pulp extract of Hunteria umbellata K. Schum (Apocynaceae) was evaluated using the carrageenan- and dextran-induced rat paw edema, xylene-induced ear edema and formalin-induced arthritis inflammation tests. Oral administration of the extract produced significant (p < 0.05) antiedematogenic effect with a dose of 500 mg/kg throughout the period of the experiment in the dextran induced paw edema and at the 3 h in the carrageenan model. The extract (250 and 500 mg/kg) exhibited a dose-related and significant (p < 0.01) inhibition of xylene induced ear edema and the effect was similar to that produced by dexamethasone (1 mg/kg). In the chronic inflammation (formalin induced arthritis) the extract did not show any significant anti-inflammatory activity. Oral acute toxicity assays did not show any mortality at 15 g/kg of the plant extract. The results indicate that the aqueous extract of H. umbellata possesses acute inflammatory activity which may be mediated by either inhibition or by blocking the release of prostaglandins and histamine, thus supporting the usage of the plant in traditional medicine treatment of inflammation.

  13. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of TRAF-Interacting Protein in Rheumatoid Arthritis Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, synovial inflammation, and cartilage destruction. Proliferative fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) play crucial roles in both propagation of inflammation and joint damage because of their production of great amount of proinflammatory cytokines and proteolytic enzymes. In this study, we investigate the role of TRAF-interacting protein (TRIP) in regulating inflammatory process in RA-FLS. TRIP expression was attenuated in RA-FLS compared with osteoarthritis- (OA-) FLS. Overexpression of TRIP significantly inhibited the activation of NF-κB signaling and decreased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in TNFα-stimulated RA-FLS. Furthermore, TRIP was found to interact with transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and promoting K48-linked polyubiquitination of TAK1 in RA-FLS. Our results demonstrate that TRIP has anti-inflammatory effects on RA-FLS and suggest TRIP as a potential therapeutic target for human RA. PMID:27847407

  14. TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boyi; Fan, Lu; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Sui, Aiwei; Morris, John B; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2013-10-01

    Menthol, the cooling natural product of peppermint, is widely used in medicinal preparations for the relief of acute and inflammatory pain in sports injuries, arthritis, and other painful conditions. Menthol induces the sensation of cooling by activating TRPM8, an ion channel in cold-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons. Recent studies identified additional targets of menthol, including the irritant receptor, TRPA1, voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors. It remains unclear which of these targets contribute to menthol-induced analgesia, or to the irritating side effects associated with menthol therapy. Here, we use genetic and pharmacological approaches in mice to probe the role of TRPM8 in analgesia induced by L-menthol, the predominant analgesic menthol isomer in medicinal preparations. L-menthol effectively diminished pain behavior elicited by chemical stimuli (capsaicin, acrolein, acetic acid), noxious heat, and inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant). Genetic deletion of TRPM8 completely abolished analgesia by L-menthol in all these models, although other analgesics (acetaminophen) remained effective. Loss of L-menthol-induced analgesia was recapitulated in mice treated with a selective TRPM8 inhibitor, AMG2850. Selective activation of TRPM8 with WS-12, a menthol derivative that we characterized as a specific TRPM8 agonist in cultured sensory neurons and in vivo, also induced TRPM8-dependent analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. L-menthol- and WS-12-induced analgesia was blocked by naloxone, suggesting activation of endogenous opioid-dependent analgesic pathways. Our data show that TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. In contrast to menthol, selective TRPM8 agonists may produce analgesia more effectively, with diminished side effects.

  15. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and other inflammatory demyelinating variants.

    PubMed

    Scolding, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated inflammatory central nervous system disorder characterized by acute or subacute onset of multifocal neurologic deficits with headache and impaired conscious level. Acute haemorrhagic leuoko-encephalitis (AHEM) is a more sever, often fatal variant. These disorders often follows a viral illness or vaccination, and are usually monophasic, though (probably more commonly in childhood) a multiphasic variant of ADEM is recognized. Because of the relative non-specificity of the clinical presentation (a sub-acute encephalopathy with focal signs), the differential diagnosis is wide; and distinction from the first episode of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis can occasionally be difficult. Here the clinical and investigational features of these disorders and their treatment are discussed.

  16. The application of dual-energy computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huaxiang; Xue, Jing; Ye, Lu; Zhou, Qijing; Shi, Dan; Xu, Rongzhen

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of dual-energy computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute gouty arthritis, and the related risk factors for urate crystal deposition. One hundred ninety-one patients (143 with acute gouty arthritis and 48 with other arthritic conditions) were studied. All patients had acute arthritic attack in the recent 15 days and underwent dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) scan with the affected joints. The urate volume was calculated by DECT and the basic information of these patients was recorded at the same time. Uric acid crystals were identified with DECT in 140 of 143 (97.9 %) gout patients and 6 of 48 (12.5 %) of nongout patients, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of DECT in the diagnosis of acute gouty arthritis were 97.9, 87.5, 95.9, and 93.3 %, respectively. The urate volumes were ranged from 0.57 to 54,543.27 mm(3) with a mean volume of 1,787.81 ± 7,181.54 mm(3). Interestingly, urate volume was correlated with the disease duration, serum uric acid levels, the presence of tophi, and bone erosion. Two-year follow-up data was available in one patient with recurrent gouty arthritis, whose urate volume was gradually reduced in size by DECT detection after urate-lowering therapies. DECT showed high sensitivity and specificity for the identification of urate crystals and diagnosis of acute gout. The risk factors for uric acid deposition include the disease duration, serum uric acid levels, the presence of tophi, and bone erosion. DECT has an important role in the differential diagnosis of arthritis, and also could be served as a follow-up tool.

  17. A pilot evaluation of Arthritis Self-Management Program by lay leaders in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ying-Ying; Kwan, Jackie; Chan, Patsy; Poon, Peter K K; Leung, Christine; Tam, Lai-Shan; Li, Edmund K; Kwok, Anna

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this paper are to evaluate the efficacy of a community-based lay-led Arthritis Self-Management Program (ASMP) among patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and evaluate the effectiveness of "shared care collaboration" between hospital and community. We trained 17 lay leaders and recruited patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis via a new shared-care model between hospital rheumatology centers and community organizations. Participants were allocated to interventional group or a wait list control group. Evaluations were completed before, after (6 weeks), and 3 months after ASMP. We performed analysis of covariance with adjustment with age, sex, marital status, education, employment, duration of illness, and disability at baseline. A total of 65 participants and 32 controls completed the study. The mean (SD) age and duration of illness were 52.0 (11.4) and 5.6 (7.3) years, 90.7 % were female, 80.4 % had rheumatoid arthritis; 25.8, 53.6, and 12.4 % referrals were from hospitals, community organizations, and patient self-help groups, respectively. The interventional group had significantly less pain (p = 0.049 at 6 weeks), used more cognitive coping methods (p = 0.008 at 6 weeks, p = 0.041 at 3 months) and practiced more aerobic exercise (p = 0.049 at 6 weeks, p = 0.008 at 3 months) after adjustment of covariance. The interventional group had a trend of improvement in self-efficacy, fatigue, self-rated health, and health distress. A community-based lay-led ASMP showed positive beneficial effects on participants with chronic inflammatory arthritis. Shared-care collaboration between hospitals, community organizations, and patient self-help groups was demonstrated.

  18. Marked QTc Prolongation and Torsades de pointes in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Capecchi, Pier Leopoldo; Bertolozzi, Iacopo; Morozzi, Gabriella; Lorenzini, Sauro; Simpatico, Antonella; Selvi, Enrico; Bacarelli, Maria Romana; Acampa, Maurizio; Lazaro, Deana; El-Sherif, Nabil; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Laghi-Pasini, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that in chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIA), QTc prolongation is frequent and correlates with systemic inflammatory activation. Notably, basic studies demonstrated that inflammatory cytokines induce profound changes in potassium and calcium channels resulting in a prolonging effect on cardiomyocyte action potential duration, thus on the QT interval on the electrocardiogram. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, the risk of sudden cardiac death is significantly increased when compared to non-RA subjects. Conversely, to date no data are available about torsades de pointes (TdP) prevalence in CIA, and the few cases reported considered CIA only an incidental concomitant disease, not contributing factor to TdP development. We report three patients with active CIA developing marked QTc prolongation, in two cases complicated with TdP degenerating to cardiac arrest. In these patients, a blood sample was obtained within 24 h from TdP/marked QTc prolongation occurrence, and levels of IL-6, TNFα, and IL-1 were evaluated. In all three cases, IL-6 was markedly elevated, ~10 to 100 times more than reference values. Moreover, one patient also showed high circulating levels of TNFα and IL-1. In conclusion, active CIA may represent a currently overlooked QT-prolonging risk factor, potentially contributing in the presence of other “classical” risk factors to TdP occurrence. In particular, a relevant role may be played by elevated circulating IL-6 levels via direct electrophysiological effects on the heart. This fact should be carefully kept in mind, particularly when recognizable risk factors are already present and/or the addition of QT-prolonging drugs is required. PMID:27703966

  19. Urinalysis for interleukin-8 in the non-invasive diagnosis of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Taha, A; Grant, V; Kelly, R

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: Given its role in mediating inflammation, the use of urinary interleukin-8 (IL-8) was assessed in the non-invasive diagnosis of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Methods: IL-8 was measured by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in random urine samples (1 ml each) carrying code numbers and taken from 208 patients: 177 adults and 31 children presenting with a range of active or inactive inflammatory conditions. Results: In the appropriate controls and in patients with inactive inflammation, the median urinary IL-8 levels ranged from 7–12 pg/ml, compared with 104 pg/ml in active ulcerative colitis (p = 0.002), 54 in active Crohn's disease (p = 0.025), 93 in active rheumatoid arthritis (p = 0.001), 107 in acute cholecystitis (p<0.0001), 127 in acute appendicitis (p = 0.0001), and 548 pg/ml in urinary tract infection (p<0.0001). Children with non-viral inflammation/infection also had higher IL-8 values (median, 199 pg/ml; p = 0.0001) than those with viral infection (median, 7 pg/ml) or non-specific conditions (median, 10 pg/ml). In the study group as a whole urinary IL-8 values correlated positively with peripheral blood white cell count (r = 0.32; p < 0.001), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r = 0.41; p<0.001), and C-reactive protein (r = 0.33; p<0.001). Conclusion: Taking the appropriate clinical situation into account, urinary IL-8 measurement helps in the non-invasive assessment of active inflammation in at least a number of common acute and chronic conditions. PMID:12697917

  20. [Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children: one year experience].

    PubMed

    Timsit, S; Pannier, S; Glorion, C; Chéron, G

    2005-01-01

    To describe bacteriologic epidemiology of bone and joint infections, a total of 52 osteomyelitis, 52 arthritis and 20 osteoarthritis of children aged one month to 15 years during a one-year period (2001) were included in a retrospective unicentric review. The mean age was 3,9 +/-3,6 years. Fever and pain were the most common clinical symptoms. The site of infection was single in 95%, involving lower extremities in 80%. Bone scintigraphy was abnormal in 71% of osteomyelitis. Positive cultures was obtained in 29% of all cases (blood cultures: 20%, aspiration cultures: 29%), but in 42% of cases which have both blood and aspiration cultures. Thirty-six bacteria were identified: 19 Staphylococcus (14 aureus), ten Streptococcus (four pneumoniae), three Salmonella, three Kingella kingae, one Moraxella. All the isolates were susceptible to the empiric antibiotic therapy. Outcome was good in 100% of osteomyelitis and in 96% of arthritis.

  1. Smac127 Has Proapoptotic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects on Rheumatoid Arthritis Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, D; Gualtierotti, R; Crotta, K; Seneci, P; Ingegnoli, F; Corradini, C; Viganò, R; Marelli, O; Casnici, C

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by synovial inflammation and hyperplasia. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) are apoptosis-resistant and contribute to the pathogenesis of RA by producing cytokines and proteolytic enzymes, which degrade the extracellular matrix. We evaluated the proapoptotic and anti-inflammatory activity of the small molecule Smac127 on RA-FLSs cultured in synovial fluid (SF), in order to reproduce the physiopathological environmental characteristic of RA joints. In this context, Smac127 induces apoptosis by inhibiting apoptosis proteins (IAPs). This inhibition activates caspase 3 and restores the apoptotic pathway. In addition, Smac127 induces a significant inhibition of the secretion of IL-15 and IL-6, stimulation of pannus formation, and damage of bone and cartilage in RA. Also the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 is dramatically increased in the presence of Smac127. The cartilage destruction in RA patients is partly mediated by metalloproteinases; here we show that the MMP-1 production by fibroblasts cultured in SF is significantly antagonized by Smac127. Conversely, this molecule has no significant effects on RANKL and OPG production. Our observations demonstrate that Smac127 has beneficial regulatory effects on inflammatory state of RA-FLSs and suggest a potential use of Smac127 for the control of inflammation and disease progression in RA.

  2. Acute coronary syndromes as auto-inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    From the onset to the healing stage of acute coronary syndromes, an endless inflammation has been presented with complex, multiple cross-talk mechanisms at the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. Even though the early reperfusion treatment either by thrombolysis or percutaneous coronary intervention provides the excellent clinical benefits in patients with acute coronary syndromes, ischemia/ reperfusion injury may somewhat offset those great advantages. Inflammation, although potentially protective, has been deeply associated with those detrimental conditions. The hexagonal vascular inflammatory network which is composed of activated various leukocytes, vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, platelets, excess reactive oxygen species, and cholesterol may contribute these vicious circles. To address these complex syndromes with more benefits regarding the prevention and treatment, this review comprehensively updates the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes from the view points of vascular inflammation.

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of heel pain in chronic inflammatory arthritis using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, G; Brophy, D P; Gibney, R G; FitzGerald, O

    1996-06-01

    The authors examined the role of ultrasound (US) in diagnosis and management of heel pain in chronic inflammatory arthritis. Nineteen patients underwent US examination. Eight patients (2 with previously unsuccessful nonguided injections), had 11 US-guided corticosteroid injections for treatment of retrocalcaneal bursitis (n = 6), plantar fasciitis (n = 3), and posterior tibial tenosynovitis (n = 2). US-demonstrated Achilles tendon rupture (n = 2), Achilles tendinitis (n = 8), posterior tibial tenosynovitis (n = 6), peroneus longus tenosynovitis (n = 2), retrocalcaneal bursitis (n = 13), and plantar fasciitis (n = 4). Loss of smooth bone contour (n = 13) correlated with bone erosions on plain radiographs in all but one case. Ten of 11 guided injections resulted in full resolution of heel pain. The diverse causes of heel pain are highlighted, and the ability of US to provide information with management implications is confirmed. US-guided corticosteroid injection is beneficial, especially after failure of nonguided injection.

  4. Dipeptidyl peptidase I activates neutrophil-derived serine proteases and regulates the development of acute experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Adkison, April M.; Raptis, Sofia Z.; Kelley, Diane G.; Pham, Christine T.N.

    2002-01-01

    Leukocyte recruitment in inflammation is critical for host defense, but excessive accumulation of inflammatory cells can lead to tissue damage. Neutrophil-derived serine proteases (cathepsin G [CG], neutrophil elastase [NE], and proteinase 3 [PR3]) are expressed specifically in mature neutrophils and are thought to play an important role in inflammation. To investigate the role of these proteases in inflammation, we generated a mouse deficient in dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) and established that DPPI is required for the full activation of CG, NE, and PR3. Although DPPI–/– mice have normal in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis and in vivo neutrophil accumulation during sterile peritonitis, they are protected against acute arthritis induced by passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies against type II collagen. Specifically, there is no accumulation of neutrophils in the joints of DPPI–/– mice. This protective effect correlates with the inactivation of neutrophil-derived serine proteases, since NE–/– × CG–/– mice are equally resistant to arthritis induction by anti-collagen antibodies. In addition, protease-deficient mice have decreased response to zymosan- and immune complex–mediated inflammation in the subcutaneous air pouch. This defect is accompanied by a decrease in local production of TNF-α and IL-1β. These results implicate DPPI and polymorphonuclear neutrophil–derived serine proteases in the regulation of cytokine production at sites of inflammation. PMID:11827996

  5. Immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol extracted from Garcinia mangostana L. against collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanxia; Zhou, Hailing; Wang, Mengqi; Cen, Juren; Wei, Qun

    2014-05-07

    Isogarcinol is a natural compound that we extracted from Garcinia mangostana L., and we were the first to report that it is a new immunosuppressant. In the present study, we investigated the immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explored its potential mechanism in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The oral administration of isogarcinol significantly reduced clinical scores, alleviated cartilage and bone erosion, and reduced the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in CIA mice. Isogarcinol inhibited xylene-induced mouse ear edema in vivo. In vitro, isogarcinol decreased iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression and NO content by inhibiting NF-κB expression. Furthermore, isogarcinol decreased the activity of NFAT and inhibited IL-2 expression. The mechanism of action of isogarcinol is associated with down-regulation of both autoimmune and inflammatory reactions.

  6. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in radiological studies. Part I: Formation of inflammatory infiltrates within the synovial membrane.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Maśliński, Włodzimierz; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Warczyńska, Agnieszka

    2012-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a multifactorial etiology and varied course, which in the majority of patients leads to partial disability or to permanent handicap. Its characteristic trait is a persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane and the formation of an invasive synovial tissue, called the pannus, which in time leads to destruction of the cartilage, subchondral bone tissue, and the soft tissue of the affected joint(s). The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis is complex and involves cells of both innate and adaptive immunity, a network of various cytokines and an immunoregulatory dysfunction. An important role in the discovery of rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis was played by magnetic resonance imaging, which showed the disease process to extend beyond the synovium into the bone marrow. Many studies have shown a strict correlation between the vascularity of the synovium (assessed through the power Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations), bone marrow edema and the clinical, laboratory and histopathological parameters of rheumatoid arthritis. From the current understanding of rheumatoid arthritis, bone erosions could occur from two directions: from the joint cavity and from the bone marrow. With power Doppler ultrasound, as well as in magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to visualize the well-vascularized pannus and its destructive effects on joint structures and ligaments. In addition, the magnetic resonance study shows inflammatory and destructive changes within the bone marrow (bone marrow edema, inflammatory cysts, and erosions). Bone marrow edema occurs in 68-75% of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and is considered to be a predictor of rapid disease progression.

  7. The impact of inflammatory rheumatic diseases on the presentation, severity, and outcome of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Goldenberg, Ilan; Matetzky, Shlomi; Grossman, Chagai; Elis, Avishay; Gavrielov-Yusim, Natalie; Livneh, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD) have a high burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), leading to increased mortality and morbidity. However, it is not clear whether increased CVD mortality in IRD is due to a higher incidence or worse outcome of cardiovascular events (higher case fatality). In this observational case-control study, we assessed the outcome of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with IRDs compared to matched controls without IRD, using data from the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey (ACSIS), a large, national, real-life registry detailing the extent, severity, and outcome of ACS. Of 2,193 subjects enrolled to the ACSIS, 20 (nine men) were identified with IRD, including 11 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), three patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and one patient with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The study patients were compared to 120 matched control patients (adjusted for age and risk factors for CVD) without IRD. Compared to controls, IRD patients had similar clinical presentation and similar type of ACS and received identical initial treatment at the ER. The two groups had comparable rates of complications including major adverse cardiovascular events (death, recurrent myocardial infarction, stroke, major bleeding, and definite stent thrombosis) (10 vs. 11.7% in the study and control group, respectively, p > 0.05), re-hospitalization (20 vs. 21.1%, respectively, p > 0.05), and severe congestive heart failure (7.7 vs. 6.9%, respectively, p > 0.05) within 30 days. The outcome and prognosis of ACS in patients with IRD is not worse than that of control, supporting the higher prevalence of CVD in this population as the cause for their excess mortality.

  8. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Isaria sinclairii Glycosaminoglycan in an Adjuvant-treated Arthritis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Sang Duck; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) derived from Isaria sinclairii (IS) and of IS extracts were investigated in a complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-treated chronic arthritis rat model. Groups of rats were treated orally with 30 mg/kg one of the following: [1] saline control, extracts of [2] water-IS, [3] methanol-IS, [4] butanol-IS, [5] ethyl acetate-IS, or [6] Indomethacin® as the positive control for a period of two weeks. The anti-paw edema effects of the individual extracts were in the following order: water-IS ex. > methanol ex. > butanol ex. > ethyl acetate ex. The water/methanol extract from I. sinclairii remarkably inhibited UV-mediated upregulation of NF-κB activity in transfected HaCaT cells. GAG as a water-soluble alcohol precipitated fraction also produced a noticeable anti-edema effect. This GAG also inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels of prostaglandin E2-stimulated lipopolysaccharide in LAW 264.7 cells, cytokine TNF-α production in splenocytes, and atherogenesis cytokine levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in HUVEC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In the histological analysis, the LV dorsal root ganglion, including the articular cartilage, and linked to the paw-treated IS GAG, was repaired against CFA-induced cartilage destruction. Combined treatment with Indomethacin® (5 mg/kg) and IS GAG (10 mg/kg) also more effectively inhibited CFA-induced paw edema at 3 hr, 24 hr, and 48 hr to levels comparable to the anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin. Thus, the IS GAG described here holds great promise as an anti-inflammatory drug in the future. PMID:24386520

  9. Peripheral nerve proteins as potential autoantigens in acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jia Pei; Devaux, Jérôme; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and acute motor axonal neuropathy. Whereas autoantibodies to GM1 or GD1a induce the development of acute motor axonal neuropathy, pathogenic autoantibodies have yet to be identified in acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. This review highlights the importance of autoantibodies to peripheral nerve proteins in the physiopathology of acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies. Moreover, we listed up other potential antigens, which may become helpful biomarkers for acquired, dysimmune demyelinating neuropathies based on their critical functions during myelination and their implications in hereditary demyelinating neuropathies.

  10. Robust Therapeutic Efficacy of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2-Cleavable Fas-1-RGD Peptide Complex in Chronic Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Keum Hee; Sung, Shijin; Park, Jae Yong; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, In San; Kang, Young Mo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Therapeutic agents that are transformable via introducing cleavable linkage by locally enriched MMP-2 within inflamed synovium would enhance therapeutic efficacy on chronic inflammatory arthritis. Transforming growth factor-β-inducible gene-h3 (βig-h3), which consists of four fas-1 domains and an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif, intensifies inflammatory processes by facilitating adhesion and migration of fibroblast-like synoviocyte in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to investigate whether a MMP-2-cleavable peptide complex consisting of a fas-1 domain and an RGD peptide blocks the interaction between βig-h3 and resident cells and leads to the amelioration of inflammatory arthritis. Methods We designed βig-h3-derivatives, including the fourth fas-1 domain truncated for H1 and H2 sequences of mouse (MFK00) and MMP-2-cleavable peptide complex (MFK902). MMP-2 selectivity was examined by treatment with a series of proteases. MFK902 efficacy was determined by the adhesion and migration assay with NIH3T3 cells in vitro and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model using male DBA/1J mice in vivo. The mice were treated intraperitoneally with MFK902 at different dosages. Results MFK902 was specifically cleaved by active MMP-2 in a concentration-dependent manner, and βig-h3-mediated adhesion and migration were more effectively inhibited by MFK902, compared with RGD or MFK00 peptides. The arthritis activity of murine CIA, measured by clinical arthritis index and incidence of arthritic paws, was significantly ameliorated after treatment with all dosages of MFK902 (1, 10, and 30 mg/kg). MFK902 ameliorated histopathologic deterioration and reduced the expression of inflammatory mediators simultaneously with improvement of clinical features. In addition, a favorable safety profile of MFK902 was demonstrated in vivo. Conclusion The present study revealed that MMP-2-cleavable peptide complex based on βig-h3 structure is a potent and safe

  11. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Zerumbone against Mono-Iodoacetate-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chien, Ting-Yi; Huang, Steven Kuan-Hua; Lee, Chia-Jung; Tsai, Po-Wei; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2016-02-18

    The fresh rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet Smith (Zingiberaceae) is used as a food flavoring and also serves as a folk medicine as an antipyretic and for analgesics in Taiwan. Zerumbone, a monocyclic sesquiterpene was isolated from the rhizome of Z. zerumbet and is the major active compound. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of zerumbone on arthritis were explored using in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that zerumbone inhibited inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expressions, and NO and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production, but induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. When zerumbone was co-treated with an HO-1 inhibitor (tin protoporphyrin (SnPP)), the NO inhibitory effects of zerumbone were recovered. The above results suggest that zerumbone inhibited iNOS and COX-2 through induction of the HO-1 pathway. Moreover, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and COX-2 expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes were inhibited by zerumbone. In an in vivo assay, an acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice was significantly reduced by treatment with zerumbone. Furthermore, zerumbone reduced paw edema and the pain response in a mono-iodoacetate (MIA)-induced rat osteoarthritis model. Therefore, we suggest that zerumbone possesses anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects which indicate zerumbone could be a potential candidate for osteoarthritis treatment.

  12. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Zerumbone against Mono-Iodoacetate-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ting-Yi; Huang, Steven Kuan-Hua; Lee, Chia-Jung; Tsai, Po-Wei; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2016-01-01

    The fresh rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet Smith (Zingiberaceae) is used as a food flavoring and also serves as a folk medicine as an antipyretic and for analgesics in Taiwan. Zerumbone, a monocyclic sesquiterpene was isolated from the rhizome of Z. zerumbet and is the major active compound. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of zerumbone on arthritis were explored using in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that zerumbone inhibited inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expressions, and NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, but induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. When zerumbone was co-treated with an HO-1 inhibitor (tin protoporphyrin (SnPP)), the NO inhibitory effects of zerumbone were recovered. The above results suggest that zerumbone inhibited iNOS and COX-2 through induction of the HO-1 pathway. Moreover, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and COX-2 expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes were inhibited by zerumbone. In an in vivo assay, an acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice was significantly reduced by treatment with zerumbone. Furthermore, zerumbone reduced paw edema and the pain response in a mono-iodoacetate (MIA)-induced rat osteoarthritis model. Therefore, we suggest that zerumbone possesses anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects which indicate zerumbone could be a potential candidate for osteoarthritis treatment. PMID:26901193

  13. Success rates of first-line antibiotics for culture-negative sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chuckpaiwong, Bavornrit; Phoompoung, Saravut

    2014-09-01

    A combination of surgical and medical treatment is normally required for patients with septic arthritis. Antibiotics selected for use on these patients are normally based on tissue culture results. However, in sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis cases, the results of the culture are usually negative as a result of prior treatment. The present study will investigate the incidence of culture-negative septic arthritis and the outcomes based on the use of first-line drug antibiotics for the treatment of sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis. For the present study, the authors retrospectively reviewed medical records of surgically treated septic arthritis cases over the past 10 years at Siriraj Hospital. The patient culture results, the antibiotics used, and the results of treatment were all recorded and analyzed. One hundredfifty-three septic arthritis patients were reviewed. Sixty-two patients were classified as having been diagnosed with either sub-acute or chronic septic arthritis. Thirty-six of 62 patients (58.1%) had a negative culture result. In the culture-positive patients, 42.3% had Streptococcus, 26.9% had Staphylococcus aureus, 11.5% had other gram positive bacteria, 15.4% had gram-negative bacteria, and 3.8% had tuberculus infection. In the culture-negative sub-acute and chronic group (36 of 62), 23 patients received Cefazolin, nine patients received Cloxacillin, and four patients received Clindamycin. Successful results were 69.9%, 66.7% and 75%, respectively. The present study reflects that the incidence ofculture-negative, sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis is approximately 58.1%. The first-line class of antibiotics remains the appropriate antibiotic choice for these patients because they are still effective for treatment of septic arthritis in up to 70% of all cases.

  14. Polyphenolics isolated from virgin coconut oil inhibits adjuvant induced arthritis in rats through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Vysakh, A; Ratheesh, M; Rajmohanan, T P; Pramod, C; Premlal, S; Girish kumar, B; Sibi, P I

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the protective efficacy of the polyphenolic fraction from virgin coconut oil (PV) against adjuvant induced arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. The activities of inflammatory, antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation were estimated. PV showed high percentage of edema inhibition at a dose of 80mg/kg on 21st day of adjuvant arthritis and is non toxic. The expression of inflammatory genes such as COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were decreased by treatment with PV. Antioxidant enzymes were increased and on treatment with PV. The increased level of total WBC count and C-reactive protein in the arthritic animals was reduced in PV treated rats. Synovial cytology showed that inflammatory cells and reactive mesothelial cells were suppressed by PV. Histopathology of paw tissue showed less edema formation and cellular infiltration on supplementation with PV. Thus the results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of PV on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats and the mechanism behind this action is due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  15. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Orally Administrated Denatured Naja Naja Atra Venom on Murine Rheumatoid Arthritis Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kou-Zhu; Liu, Yan-Li; Gu, Jin-Hua; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the denatured Naja Naja atra venom (NNAV) in rheumatoid arthritis-associated models, the denatured NNAV (heat treated; 30, 90, 270 μg/kg), the native NNAV (untreated with heat; 90 μg/kg), and Tripterygium wilfordii polyglycoside (TWP, 15 mg/kg) were administrated orally either prophylactically or therapeutically. We measured time of licking the affected paw in formaldehyde-induced inflammatory model, paw volume in egg-white-induced inflammation, and granuloma weight in formalin-soaked filter paper-induced granuloma. For adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats, paw edema, mechanical withdrawal threshold, serum levels of TNF-α and IL-10, and histopathological changes of the affected paw were assessed. We found that the denatured NNAV (90, 270 μg/kg) significantly reduced time of licking paw, paw volume, and granuloma weight in above inflammatory models and also attenuated paw edema, mechanical hyperalgesia, and histopathology changes in AIA rats. Additionally, the increase in serum TNF-α and the decrease in serum IL-10 in AIA rats were reversed by the denatured NNAV. Although the native NNAV and TWP rendered the similar pharmacological actions on the above four models with less potency than that of the denatured NNAV, these findings demonstrate that oral administration of the denatured NNAV produces antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23634171

  16. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: Modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, Hany H.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10 mg/kg/day p.o. for 21 days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5 mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4}) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids. - Highlights: ► Carvedilol possesses promising anti-arthritic properties. ► It markedly suppressed inflammation in adjuvant arthritis and air pouch edema. ► It abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates and linings. ► It reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers in sera and exudates of

  17. 78 FR 36305 - Proposed Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ..., Crystalline and Infectious Arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... disability benefits related to a claimant's diagnosis of a non-degenerative arthritis or osteonecrosis... ] Osteonecrosis Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. During the comment period,...

  18. Activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory system by nicotine attenuates arthritis via suppression of macrophage migration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Ben; Zhou, Yaou; Zhang, Huali; Li, Tong; Zuo, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP), which relies on the alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, has been reported to reduce proinflammatory cytokine levels in experimental arthritis. To gain more insight regarding the role of the CAP in the pathogenesis of arthritis, the present study focused on the modulation of macrophage infiltration. In a mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), nicotine and vagotomy were used to stimulate and inhibit the CAP, respectively. Subsequently, arthritic scores were measured and histopathological assessment of joint sections was conducted. Cluster of differentiation (CD)11b-positive macrophages in the synovium were studied by immunofluorescence histochemistry. The serum levels of chemokines, including macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and MIP-2 were evaluated by ELISA. Furthermore, the expression levels of C-C chemokine receptor (CCR)2 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 in the synovium were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. The results indicated that treatment with nicotine significantly attenuated the clinical and histopathological changes associated with arthritis, reduced CD11b-positive macrophages in the synovium, and downregulated the serum expression levels of MIP-1α and MCP-1. Conversely, vagotomy aggravated arthritis and upregulated the expression levels of MCP-1. However, MIP-2 expression did not differ among the control, CIA, vagotomy and nicotine groups. In addition, the expression levels of CCR2 were reduced in the nicotine group; however, they were increased in the vagotomy group compared with in the untreated CIA group. The expression levels of ICAM-1 in the synovium were also influenced by activation of the CAP. Taken together, the present results indicated that nicotine-induced activation of the CAP in mice with CIA may reduce the number of macrophages in the synovium, which may serve a role in alleviating

  19. Meaningful patient engagement in inflammatory arthritis: development of the Patient Motivation Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    El Miedany, Y; El Gaafary, Maha; Youssef, Sally; El Aroussy, Nadia

    2017-04-05

    The objective of this study is to develop a questionnaire for evaluating the patient's "motivation" and assess the psychometric properties of that measure in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis. Using Rasch analysis and questions item pool, content analysis, and semi-structured group discussion, the questionnaire was developed including 10-item scale (0-10 on VAS scale). Construct validity was assessed by correlating the questionnaire score to parameters of disease activity (DAS-28, ASDAS, and DAPSA scores), functional disability, quality of life, patient self-helplessness measure, as well as the patients' compliance to therapy. Reliability and comprehensibility and sensitivity to change were also assessed. The questionnaire was assessed in 432 RA, 415 psoriatic arthritis patients, and 232 ankylosing spondylitis patients. Dimensionality analysis revealed a 1-factor solution, explaining 98% of the total variance. It showed acceptable validity as it correlated significantly with disease activity measures: DAS-28: r = -0.85, ASDAS: r = -0.86, and DAPSA: r = -0.89. It also correlated significantly with functional disability score: r = -0.91, QoL: r = -0.90, as well as patient self-helplessness: r = -0.88. The questionnaire was reliable (Cronbach's alpha 0.958) and had no misfitting items. In addition, it was comprehensible (9.4) and sensitive to change (p < 0.01). The patient motivation score showed significant (p < 0.01) variation with the medication compliance. The measure is a patient-reported tool that is valid, reliable, comprehensible, and unidimensional scale that reflects the patients' motivation and engagement. The measure has good psychometric properties indicating that it can be used at the individual patient level to tailor management and monitor changes.

  20. [Incidence of acute pancreatitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Stawarski, Andrzej; Iwańczak, Franciszek

    2004-07-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate the frequency of acute pancreatitis and the frequency of increased activity of pancreatic enzymes in serum of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Analysis comprises 101 children aged from 3 to 18-years treated because of IBD in the period of 1998-2002: 79 children with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 22 children Crohn's disease (CD). The authors analyzed together 191 admissions because of UC and 51 because of CD. Acute pancreatitis was observed in 4.5% of children with CD and in 5.1% of children with UC. Significantly more often acute pancreatitis was recognized in children with moderate and severe stage of UC. Hyperamylasemia was observed in 27.3% of children with CD and in 12.7% of children with UC. Hyperlipasemia was observed only in children with UC (3.8%), elevated urinary amylase was observed in 4.5% of children with CD and in 8.86% children with UC. No correlations between the frequency of acute pancreatitis and medication were observed.

  1. Pellegrini-Stieda syndrome mimicking acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scheib, J S; Quinet, R J

    1989-01-01

    This case illustrates the potential severity of an uncommon and generally benign condition of the knee--the Pellegrini-Stieda syndrome. The regional bone scan clearly showed the etiologic role of the inflamed ligamentous attachment site. Therapy should include joint rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, and possibly ice for symptomatic relief.

  2. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Polyphenolic-Enriched Red Raspberry Extract in an Antigen Induced Arthritis Rat Model†

    PubMed Central

    Jean-Gilles, Dinorah; Li, Liya; Ma, Hang; Yuan, Tao; Chichester, Clinton O.; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2011-01-01

    The red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) fruit contains bioactive polyphenols including anthocyanins and ellagitannins with reported anti-inflammatory properties. Here we sought to investigate the cartilage protecting and anti-inflammatory effects of a polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract (RRE; standardized to total polyphenol, anthocyanin, and ellagitannin contents) using: 1) an in vitro bovine nasal explant cell culture model and, 2) an in vivo adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. RRE contained 20% total polyphenols (as gallic acid equivalents), 5% anthocyanins (as cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents) and 9.25% ellagitannins (as ellagic acid equivalents). In the in vitro studies, bovine nasal explants were stimulated with 10 ng/mL IL-1β to induce the release of proteoglycan and type II collagen. On treatment with RRE (50 μg/mL), there was a decrease in the rate of degradation of both proteoglycan and type II collagen. In the in vivo antigen-induced arthritis rat model, animals were gavaged daily with RRE (at doses of 30 and 120 mg/Kg, respectively) for 30 days after adjuvant injection (750 μg of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suspension in squalene). At the higher dose, animals treated with RRE had a lower incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control animals. Also, histological analyses revealed significant inhibition of inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage damage, and bone resorption by RRE. This study suggests that red raspberry polyphenols may afford cartilage protection and/or modulate the onset and severity of arthritis. PMID:22111586

  3. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut . E-mail: jaeschke@email.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose.

  4. Power Doppler ultrasound phenotyping of expanding versus collapsed popliteal lymph nodes in murine inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bouta, Echoe M; Ju, Yawen; Rahimi, Homaira; de Mesy-Bentley, Karen L; Wood, Ronald W; Xing, Lianping; Schwarz, Edward M

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease manifested by episodic flares in affected joints that are challenging to predict and treat. Longitudinal contrast enhanced-MRI (CE-MRI) of inflammatory arthritis in tumor necrosis factor-transgenic (TNF-Tg) mice has demonstrated that popliteal lymph nodes (PLN) increase in volume and contrast enhancement during the pre-arthritic "expanding" phase of the disease, and then suddenly "collapse" during knee flare. Given the potential of this biomarker of arthritic flare, we aimed to develop a more cost-effective means of phenotyping PLN using ultrasound (US) imaging. Initially we attempted to recapitulate CE-MRI of PLN with subcutaneous footpad injection of US microbubbles (DEFINITY®). While this approach allowed for phenotyping via quantification of lymphatic sinuses in PLN, which showed a dramatic decrease in collapsed PLN versus expanding or wild-type (WT) PLN, electron microscopy demonstrated that DEFINITY® injection also resulted in destruction of the lymphatic vessels afferent to the PLN. In contrast, Power Doppler (PD) US is innocuous to and efficiently quantifies blood flow within PLN of WT and TNF-Tg mice. PD-US demonstrated that expanding PLN have a significantly higher normalized PD volume (NPDV) versus collapsed PLN (0.553 ± 0.007 vs. 0.008 ± 0.003; p<0.05). Moreover, we define the upper (>0.030) and lower (<0.016) quartile NPDVs in this cohort of mice, which serve as conservative thresholds to phenotype PLN as expanding and collapsed, respectively. Interestingly, of the 12 PLN phenotyped by the two methods, there was disagreement in 4 cases in which they were determined to be expanding by CE-MRI and collapsed by PD-US. Since the adjacent knee had evidence of synovitis in all 4 cases, we concluded that the PD-US phenotyping was correct, and that this approach is currently the safest and most cost-effective in vivo approach to phenotype murine PLN as a biomarker of arthritic flare.

  5. Yohimbine hydrochloride ameliorates collagen type-II-induced arthritis targeting oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Neha; Ansari, Md Meraj; Khan, Haider A

    2017-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common type of chronic inflammatory disease which is triggered by dysfunction in the immune system which in turn affects synovial joints. Current treatment of RA with NSAIDs and DMRDs is limited by their side effect. As a result, the interest in alternative, well tolerated anti-inflammatory remedies has re-emerged. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities underlying the anti-RA effect of Yohimbine hydrochloride (YCL) in collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in Wistar rats. The YCL was administered at doses of 5 and 10 mg kg(-1) body weight once daily for 28 days. The effects of treatment in the rats were assessed by biochemical parameter (articular elastase, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD), hematological parameter (ESR, WBC, C-reactive protein (CRP), immunohistochemical expression (COX2, TNF-α, and NF-κB), and histological changes in joints. YCL showed anti-RA efficacy as it significantly reduced articular elastase, LPO and catalase level and ameliorates histological changes. This is in addition to its antioxidant efficacy as YCL shown a significant increase in GSH and SOD level. Also, YCL showed effective anti-inflammatory activity as it significantly decreased the expression of COX-2, TNF-α, and NF-ĸB. The therapeutic effect of YCL against RA was also evident from lower arthritis scoring and reduced hematological parameter (ESR, WBC, and C-reactive protein level). The abilities to inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and modulation of antioxidant states that the protective effect of YCL on arthritis rats might be mediated via the modulation of the immune system. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 619-629, 2017.

  6. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing.

  7. A novel anti-inflammatory role for secretory phospholipase A2 in immune complex-mediated arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Lai, Ying; Larabee, Katherine; Balestrieri, Barbara; Ghomashchi, Farideh; Fujioka, Daisuke; Gobezie, Reuben; Coblyn, Jonathan S; Weinblatt, Michael E; Massarotti, Elena M; Thornhill, Thomas S; Divangahi, Maziar; Remold, Heinz; Lambeau, Gérard; Gelb, Michael H; Arm, Jonathan P; Lee, David M

    2010-05-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) catalyses the release of arachidonic acid for generation of lipid mediators of inflammation and is crucial in diverse inflammatory processes. The functions of the secretory PLA2 enzymes (sPLA2), numbering nine members in humans, are poorly understood, though they have been shown to participate in lipid mediator generation and the associated inflammation. To further understand the roles of sPLA2 in disease, we quantified the expression of these enzymes in the synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis and used gene-deleted mice to examine their contribution in a mouse model of autoimmune erosive inflammatory arthritis. Contrary to expectation, we find that the group V sPLA2 isoform plays a novel anti-inflammatory role that opposes the pro-inflammatory activity of group IIA sPLA2. Mechanistically, group V sPLA2 counter-regulation includes promotion of immune complex clearance by regulating cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis. These observations identify a novel anti-inflammatory function for a PLA2 and identify group V sPLA2 as a potential biotherapeutic for treatment of immune-complex-mediated inflammation.

  8. A novel anti-inflammatory role for secretory phospholipase A2 in immune complex-mediated arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Boilard, Eric; Lai, Ying; Larabee, Katherine; Balestrieri, Barbara; Ghomashchi, Farideh; Fujioka, Daisuke; Gobezie, Reuben; Coblyn, Jonathan S; Weinblatt, Michael E; Massarotti, Elena M; Thornhill, Thomas S; Divangahi, Maziar; Remold, Heinz; Lambeau, Gérard; Gelb, Michael H; Arm, Jonathan P; Lee, David M

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) catalyses the release of arachidonic acid for generation of lipid mediators of inflammation and is crucial in diverse inflammatory processes. The functions of the secretory PLA2 enzymes (sPLA2), numbering nine members in humans, are poorly understood, though they have been shown to participate in lipid mediator generation and the associated inflammation. To further understand the roles of sPLA2 in disease, we quantified the expression of these enzymes in the synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis and used gene-deleted mice to examine their contribution in a mouse model of autoimmune erosive inflammatory arthritis. Contrary to expectation, we find that the group V sPLA2 isoform plays a novel anti-inflammatory role that opposes the pro-inflammatory activity of group IIA sPLA2. Mechanistically, group V sPLA2 counter-regulation includes promotion of immune complex clearance by regulating cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis. These observations identify a novel anti-inflammatory function for a PLA2 and identify group V sPLA2 as a potential biotherapeutic for treatment of immune-complex-mediated inflammation. PMID:20432503

  9. Rutoside decreases human macrophage-derived inflammatory mediators and improves clinical signs in adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, Tina; Moynet, Daniel; Rambert, Jérôme; Al-Kharrat, Abir; Brajot, Stephane; Thiolat, Denis; Ennemany, Rachid; Fawaz, Fawaz; Mossalayi, M Djavad

    2008-01-01

    Background Dietary flavonols may play an important role in the adjunct therapy of chronic inflammation. The availability of therapeutic formulations of pentahydroxyflavone glycoside, rutoside (RU), led us to investigate the ability of this molecule to modulate the release of various proinflammatory mediators from human activated macrophages in vitro and to ameliorate arthritic markers in a rat model. Methods RU was added simultaneously to human macrophages during their activation. Cells were then analyzed for inflammation-related gene expression using a specific array, and cell supernatants were collected to measure inflammatory mediators. RU was also injected into adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, and disease progression and body weight were evaluated until 50 days after injection. Sera and peritoneal macrophages were also collected to quantify the RU effect on various inflammatory markers. Results RU inhibited inflammation-related gene expression in activated human macrophages and the release of nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6 from these cells. In a rat model, RU inhibited clinical signs of chronic arthritis, correlating with decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines detected in rat sera and macrophage supernatants. Conclusion Thus, RU may have clinical value in reducing inflammatory manifestations in human arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:18252009

  10. Early identification of ‘acute-onset’ chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Park, Susanna B.; Kiernan, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy prior to relapse is often challenging at the onset of their clinical presentation. In the present study, nerve excitability tests were used in conjunction with the clinical phenotype and disease staging, to differentiate between patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy at an early stage, with the aim to better guide treatment. Clinical assessment, staging and nerve excitability tests were undertaken on patients initially fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy soon after symptom onset and their initial presentation. Patients were subsequently followed up for minimum of 12 months to determine if their clinical presentations were more consistent with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Clinical severity as evaluated by Medical Research Council sum score and Hughes functional grading scale were not significantly different between the two cohorts. There was no difference between the time of onset of initial symptoms and nerve excitability test assessment between the two cohorts nor were there significant differences in conventional nerve conduction study parameters. However, nerve excitability test profiles obtained from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy demonstrated abnormalities in the recovery cycle of excitability, including significantly reduced superexcitability (P < 0.001) and prolonged relative refractory period (P < 0.01), without changes in threshold electrotonus. In contrast, in patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, a different pattern occurred with the recovery cycle shifted downward (increased superexcitability, P < 0.05; decreased subexcitability, P < 0.05) and increased

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis – inflammatory and infectious connections. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rutger Persson, G.

    2012-01-01

    An association between oral disease/periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been considered since the early 1820s. The early treatment was tooth eradication. Epidemiological studies suggest that the prevalence of RA and periodontitis may be similar and about 5% of the population are aged 50 years or older. RA is considered as an autoimmune disease whereas periodontitis has an infectious etiology with a complex inflammatory response. Both diseases are chronic and may present with bursts of disease activity. Association studies have suggested odds ratios of having RA and periodontitis varying from 1.8:1 (95% CI: 1.0–3.2, NS) to 8:1 (95% CI: 2.9–22.1, p<0.001). Genetic factors are driving the host responses in both RA and periodontitis. Tumor necrosis factor-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, regulates a cascade of inflammatory events in both RA and periodontitis. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a common pathogen in periodontal infection. P. gingivalis has also been identified in synovial fluid. The specific abilities of P. gingivalis to citrullinate host peptides by proteolytic cleavage at Arg-X peptide bonds by arginine gingipains can induce autoimmune responses in RA through development of anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. In addition, P. gingivalis carries heat shock proteins (HSPs) that may also trigger autoimmune responses in subjects with RA. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Conclusions Periodontal infection (P. gingivalis) carries a unique risk for development of autoimmune antibodies associated with RA. Patients with RA have either lost many teeth or usually have severe periodontitis. Additional research, both in regards to basic mechanisms as well as clinical studies, are necessary before it can be said that there are causative links between RA and periodontitis. Cross-disciplinary research in well-defined populations should be performed to further enhance knowledge and

  12. Genetic linkage of familial granulomatous inflammatory arthritis, skin rash, and uveitis to chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Ala-Kokko, L.

    1996-11-01

    Blau syndrome (MIM 186580), first described in a large, three-generation kindred, is an autosomal, dominantly inherited disease characterized by multiorgan, tissue-specific inflammation. Its clinical phenotype includes granulomatous arthritis, skin rash, and uveitis and probably represents a subtype of a group of clinical entities referred to as {open_quotes}familial granulomatosis.{close_quotes} It is the sole human model with recognizably Mendelian inheritance for a variety of multisystem inflammatory diseases affecting a significant percentage of the population. A genomewide search for the Blau susceptibility locus was undertaken after karyotypic analysis revealed no abnormalities. Sixty-two of the 74-member pedigree were genotyped with dinucleotide-repeat markers. Linkage analysis was performed under dominant model of inheritance with reduced penetrance. The marker D16S298 gave a maximum LOD score of 3.75 at {theta} = .04, with two-point analysis. LOD scores for flanking markers were consistent and placed the Blau susceptibility locus within the 16p12-q21 interval. 46 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Newer, safer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Rational NSAID selection for arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Bensen, W.; Zizzo, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize current evidence that three new additions to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) offer comparable efficacy with fewer adverse effects than established NSAIDs. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: No large randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have compared all important NSAIDs. Several RCTs have shown that H2 antagonists do not protect against NSAID side effects, but some RCTs compared the protective effect of misoprostol (Cytotec) used with other NSAIDs; others have compared etodolac (Ultradol) or nabumetone (Relafen) with placebo and naproxen (eg, Naprosyn). Postmarketing surveys have been used to support claims that the new NSAIDs have few gastric or renal side effects. MAIN FINDINGS: Using misoprostol in conjunction with traditional NSAIDs reduces gastric and renal adverse effects. Misoprostol can be taken at the same time as NSAIDs or in a combination tablet. Two new NSAIDS, etodolac and nabumetone, do not inhibit cyclooxygenase 1 prostaglandins, which occur in the stomach and kidneys, but more selectively block cyclooxygenase 2 prostaglandins, which cause arthritic inflammation. These two NSAIDs have efficacy profiles comparable to older NSAIDs but have markedly fewer side effects. CONCLUSIONS: Safer treatment for arthritis can be achieved by combining misoprostol with traditional NSAIDs or by using one of two new agents, nabumetone or etodolac. PMID:9481468

  14. The Role of miRNAs in Common Inflammatory Arthropathies: Osteoarthritis and Gouty Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Papanagnou, Panagiota; Stivarou, Theodora; Tsironi, Maria

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNA species that are highly evolutionarily conserved, from higher invertebrates to man. Up to 1000 miRNAs have been identified in human cells thus far, where they are key regulators of the expression of numerous targets at the post-transcriptional level. They are implicated in various processes, including cell differentiation, metabolism, and inflammation. An expanding list of miRNAs is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of common, non-autoimmune inflammatory diseases. Interestingly, osteoarthritis (OA) is now being conceptualized as a metabolic disease, as there is a correlation among hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Experimental evidence suggests that metabolic deregulation is a commonality between these different pathological entities, and that miRNAs are key players in the modulation of metabolic routes. In light of these findings, this review discusses the role of miRNAs in OA and gouty arthritis, as well as the possible therapeutic targetability of miRNAs in these diseases. PMID:27845712

  15. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Olívia Meira; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Costa, André Nathan; Athanazio, Rodrigo Abensur; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD. PMID:24626274

  16. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory potential of the multidrug herbomineral formulation in male Wistar rats against rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Snehal S.; Shah, Praboth V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Immunological and inflammatory mechanisms, which may play a role in a number of disorders like rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ancient ayurvedic physicians had developed certain dietary and therapeutic measures to arrest or prevent these disorders. Objective: Rheuma off gold (RG) is a herbomineral formulation recommended by ayurvedic medical practitioners for treatment of RA. This study was carried out to lend scientific evidence to the efficacy claim for RG in the management of RA in folklore medicine. Materials and Methods: Arthritis was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant. Treatment with formulation 100 mg/kg and dexamethasone 2 mg/kg was given to rats intragastrically once a day from day 1 to day 21 and after which estimation of physical, biochemical, and hematological parameters were carried out. Results: Treatment of formulation to adjuvant induced arthritic animal showed statistically significant (P < 0.05) improvement in physical parameters like arthritic index, paw edema, paw thickness as well as reduction of inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein, serum rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The treatment also produced statistically significant (P < 0.05) increase in hemoglobin percent and improvement in splenomegaly and thymus index. In the histopathological examination, ameliorative effect of formulation was observed in hyperplasia of synovium, pannus formation, and destruction of the joint space. Conclusion: The results obtained in experiments indicated that the formulation significantly inhibited the adjuvant-induced arthritis which was comparable to dexamethasone and had preferable anti-inflammatory effect without significant side effect. Thus, the formulation may be a potential preventive or therapeutic candidate for the treatment of chronic inflammation and arthritis. PMID:23930040

  17. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha. A novel chemotactic cytokine for macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A E; Kunkel, S L; Harlow, L A; Mazarakis, D D; Haines, G K; Burdick, M D; Pope, R M; Strieter, R M

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that human macrophages (m phi s) play an important role in the elaboration of chemotactic cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (Koch, A. E., S. L. Kunkel, J. C. Burrows, H. L. Evanoff, G. K. Haines, R. M. Pope, and R. M. Strieter. 1991. J. Immunol. 147:2187; Koch, A. E., S. L. Kunkel, L. A. Harlow, B. Johnson, H. L. Evanoff, G. K. Haines, M. D. Burdick, R. M. Pope, and R. M. Strieter. 1992. J. Clin. Invest. 90:772; Koch, A. E., P. J. Polverini, S. L. Kunkel, L. A. Harlow, L. A. DiPietro, V. M. Elner, S. G. Elner, and R. M. Strieter. 1992. Science (Wash. DC). 258:1798). Recently, m phi inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1 alpha), a cytokine with chemotactic activity for m phi s and neutrophils (PMNs), has been described. We have examined the production of MIP-1 alpha using sera, synovial fluid (SF), and synovial tissue (ST) from 63 arthritic patients. MIP-1 alpha was higher in RA SF (mean, 29 +/- 8 ng/ml [SE]) compared with other forms of arthritis (2.8 +/- 1.7), or osteoarthritis (0.7 +/- 0.4; P < 0.05). RA SF MIP-1 alpha was greater than that found in either RA or normal peripheral blood (PB) (P < 0.05). Anti-MIP-1 alpha neutralized 36 +/- 3% (mean +/- SE) of the chemotactic activity for m phi s, but not PMNs, found in RA SFs. RA SF and PB mononuclear cells produced antigenic MIP-1 alpha. Mononuclear cell MIP-1 alpha production was augmented with phytohemagglutinin or LPS. Isolated RA ST fibroblast production of antigenic MIP-1 alpha was augmented upon incubation of cells with LPS, and to a lesser extent with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Isolated RA ST m phi s expressed constitutive MIP-1 alpha mRNA and antigenic MIP-1 alpha. Using ST immunohistochemistry, MIP-1 alpha+ cells from RA compared with normal were predominantly m phi s and lining cells (P < 0.05). These results suggest that MIP-1 alpha plays a role in the selective recruitment of m phi s in synovial inflammation associated with RA. Images PMID:8132778

  18. IK acts as an immunoregulator of inflammatory arthritis by suppressing TH17 cell differentiation and macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Lim; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Min, Jun-Ki; Moon, Su-Jin; Kim, Inki; Kang, Kyung-Won; Park, Sooho; Choi, SeulGi; Jung, Ha-Na; Lee, Dong-Hee; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic T helper cells (TH) and macrophages have been implicated in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which can lead to severe synovial inflammation and bone destruction. A range of therapies have been widely used for RA, including specific monoclonal antibodies and chemical inhibitors against inflammatory cytokines produced by these cells. However, these have not been sufficient to meet the medical need. Here, we show that in transgenic mice expressing truncated IK (tIK) cytokine, inflammatory arthritis symptoms were ameliorated as the result of suppression of the differentiation of TH1 and TH17 cells and of macrophage activation. During inflammatory responses, tIK cytokine systemically regulated macrophage functions and TH17 cell differentiation through inactivation of the MAPK and NF-κB pathways. Interestingly, the level of tIK cytokine was higher in synovial fluid of RA patients compared with that in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Our observations suggest that tIK cytokine can counterbalance the induction of inflammatory cells related to RA and thus could be a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. PMID:28071693

  19. Grape polyphenols and propolis mixture inhibits inflammatory mediator release from human leukocytes and reduces clinical scores in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mossalayi, M D; Rambert, J; Renouf, E; Micouleau, M; Mérillon, J M

    2014-02-15

    Polyphenols from red fruits and bee-derived propolis (PR) are bioactive natural products in various in vitro and in vivo models. The present study shows that hematotoxicity-free doses of grape polyphenols (GPE) and PR differentially decreased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from activated human peripheral blood leucocytes. While GPE inhibited the monocytes/macrophage response, propolis decreased both monokines and interferon γ (IFNγ) production. When used together, their distinct effects lead to the attenuation of all inflammatory mediators, as supported by a significant modulation of the transcriptomic profile of pro-inflammatory genes in human leukocytes. To enforce in vitro data, GPE+PR were tested for their ability to improve clinical scores and cachexia in chronic rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA). Extracts significantly reduced arthritis scores and cachexia, and this effect was more significant in animals receiving continuous low doses compared to those receiving five different high doses. Animals treated daily had significantly better clinical scores than corticoid-treated rats. Together, these findings indicate that the GPE+PR combination induces potent anti-inflammatory activity due to their complementary immune cell modulation.

  20. Cholecystokinin octapeptide exerts its therapeutic effects on collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaoxia; Cong, Bin; Shan, Baoen; Zhang, Jingge; Chen, Haiying; Wang, Tao; Ma, Chunling; Qin, Jin; Wen, Di; Yu, Feng

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an accepted murine experimental disease model with diverse histopathological features similar to human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CIA was induced in DBA/1J mice by immunization with chicken collagen type II (CII). CCK-8 at different doses was intraperitoneally administered daily for 1 week. Mice treated with CCK-8 at doses of 5 and 10 nmol but not 1 nmol displayed much delayed onset of CIA and significantly lower incidence and decreased severity of arthritis. CCK-8 treatment significantly reduced the production of cytokines (IL-17, IL-23, IL-6 and TNF-α) and chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in the joints of arthritic mice or in synovial cell culture supernatant, and increased the levels of IFN-γ and TGF-β. T cells from CCK-8 treated mice proliferated much less, produced low level of IL-17 and high levels of IFN-γ and TGF-β. Moreover, CCK-8 treated mice showed lower levels of CII-specific IgG, particularly that of IgG2a, in sera than those from control mice. These results indicate that CCK-8 is effective in suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses in CIA. CCK-8 may represent a new therapeutic modality for rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Acute postoperative inflammatory polyarthritis associated with a lone IgM cardiolipin antibody

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ignatius; Jawad, Ali

    2015-01-01

    While the most recognised complication after joint surgery is septic arthritis, other forms of joint pathology may occur. We present a case of postoperative polyarthritis with high inflammatory markers, which responded to a course of prednisolone. The occurrence of high IgM cardiolipin antibodies that normalised with treatment suggests that this condition is a form of transient autoimmunity. PMID:25733090

  2. Performance of the Existing Classification Criteria for Gout in Thai Patients Presenting With Acute Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jatuworapruk, Kanon; Lhakum, Panomkorn; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2016-02-01

    Currently, there are 5 existing classification criteria for gout: the Rome, New York, American Rheumatism Association (ARA), Mexico, and Netherlands criteria. This study was carried out to determine the performance of these classification criteria in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis.All consecutive patients presenting with acute arthritis and being consulted at the Rheumatology Unit, Chiang Mai University Hospital from January 2013 to May 2015 were invited to join the study. Gout was defined by the presence of monosodium urate crystals in the synovial fluid or tissue examined by experienced rheumatologists. The 5 existing gout classification criteria were performed and evaluated in all of the patients, who were divided in subgroups of early disease (≤2 years), established disease (>2 years), and those without tophus.There were 136 gout and 97 nongout patients. Sensitivity and specificity across all criteria ranged from 75.7% to 97.1% and 68.0% to 84.5%, respectively. Overall, the Mexico criteria had the highest sensitivity (97.1%), and the ARA survey criteria the highest specificity (84.5%), whereas the Mexico criteria performed well in early disease with sensitivity and specificity of 97.1% and 81.7%, respectively. All 5 criteria showed high sensitivity (from 76.4% to 99.1%) but low specificity (from 30.8% to 65.4%) in established disease. In patients without tophus, the sensitivity and specificity ranged from 64.1% to 95.7% and 68.8% to 85.4%, respectively. The ARA survey criteria across all groups showed consistently high specificity for gout.The 5 existing classification criteria for gout had limited sensitivity and specificity in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. The ARA survey criteria are the most suitable for diagnosing gout in Thai people when crystal identification is not available.

  3. Performance of the Existing Classification Criteria for Gout in Thai Patients Presenting With Acute Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jatuworapruk, Kanon; Lhakum, Panomkorn; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there are 5 existing classification criteria for gout: the Rome, New York, American Rheumatism Association (ARA), Mexico, and Netherlands criteria. This study was carried out to determine the performance of these classification criteria in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. All consecutive patients presenting with acute arthritis and being consulted at the Rheumatology Unit, Chiang Mai University Hospital from January 2013 to May 2015 were invited to join the study. Gout was defined by the presence of monosodium urate crystals in the synovial fluid or tissue examined by experienced rheumatologists. The 5 existing gout classification criteria were performed and evaluated in all of the patients, who were divided in subgroups of early disease (≤2 years), established disease (>2 years), and those without tophus. There were 136 gout and 97 nongout patients. Sensitivity and specificity across all criteria ranged from 75.7% to 97.1% and 68.0% to 84.5%, respectively. Overall, the Mexico criteria had the highest sensitivity (97.1%), and the ARA survey criteria the highest specificity (84.5%), whereas the Mexico criteria performed well in early disease with sensitivity and specificity of 97.1% and 81.7%, respectively. All 5 criteria showed high sensitivity (from 76.4% to 99.1%) but low specificity (from 30.8% to 65.4%) in established disease. In patients without tophus, the sensitivity and specificity ranged from 64.1% to 95.7% and 68.8% to 85.4%, respectively. The ARA survey criteria across all groups showed consistently high specificity for gout. The 5 existing classification criteria for gout had limited sensitivity and specificity in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. The ARA survey criteria are the most suitable for diagnosing gout in Thai people when crystal identification is not available. PMID:26844519

  4. Investigation of Antiarthritic Potential of Plumeria alba L. Leaves in Acute and Chronic Models of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vipin; Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Surender

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The present investigation was designed to evaluate antiarthritic potential of fractions of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves of P. alba. Materials and Methods. Plumeria alba L. leaves were extracted with hydroalcohol (30 : 70) to obtain hydroalcoholic extract of P. alba. This extract was further fractionated with solvents ethyl acetate and n-butanol to obtain EAPA and BPA, respectively. These fractions were tested against formaldehyde and Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis. Arthritis assessment, paw volume, body weight, motor incoordination, and nociceptive threshold were measured. On day 21, the animals were sacrificed and histopathology was done. Results. The 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of EAPA and BPA caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) reduction in paw swelling in both models. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and spleen weight decreased significantly (P < 0.01) in arthritic rats treated with extracts. There was significant (P < 0.05) improvement in thymus weight in EAPA treated rats whereas significant (P < 0.01) improvement was also seen in haemoglobin level (Hb) in diclofenac treated group. Motor incoordination and nociceptive threshold were also significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) improved. Conclusion. The present study suggests that Plumeria alba L. has protective activity against arthritis and supports the traditional use of P. alba for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25025056

  5. Therapeutic effect of the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide, but not pomalidomide, in experimental models of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Millan, Belen; Diaz de la Guardia, Rafael; Roca-Ho, Heleia; García-Herrero, Carmen M; Lavoie, Jessie R; Rosu-Myles, Michael; Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; O'Valle, Francisco; Criado, Gabriel; Delgado, Mario; Menendez, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Thalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) with proven therapeutic action in several autoimmune/inflammatory diseases; however, its inherent high toxicity has led to the development of more powerful and safer thalidomide analogs, including lenalidomide and pomalidomide. These are new generation IMiDs that exhibit direct antitumor activity as well as anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory properties, and are FDA-approved for the treatment of several hematological malignances. Here we investigated the potential therapeutic effects of lenalidomide and pomalidomide in several experimental murine models of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases: 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sulfate sodium-induced inflammatory bowel disease and type II collagen-induced arthritis. Lenalidomide displayed a strong therapeutic effect in all these models of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, while the effect of pomalidomide was less pronounced. In vitro experiments confirmed the immunosuppressive effect of both IMiDs on the proliferative response of stimulated human lymphocytes and on the balance of secreted cytokines toward an anti-inflammatory profile. We conclude that lenalidomide may offer a therapeutic opportunity against autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. PMID:28154372

  6. Therapeutic effect of the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide, but not pomalidomide, in experimental models of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Millan, Belen; Diaz de la Guardia, Rafael; Roca-Ho, Heleia; García-Herrero, Carmen M; Lavoie, Jessie R; Rosu-Myles, Michael; Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; O'Valle, Francisco; Criado, Gabriel; Delgado, Mario; Menendez, Pablo

    2017-02-03

    Thalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) with proven therapeutic action in several autoimmune/inflammatory diseases; however, its inherent high toxicity has led to the development of more powerful and safer thalidomide analogs, including lenalidomide and pomalidomide. These are new generation IMiDs that exhibit direct antitumor activity as well as anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory properties, and are FDA-approved for the treatment of several hematological malignances. Here we investigated the potential therapeutic effects of lenalidomide and pomalidomide in several experimental murine models of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases: 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sulfate sodium-induced inflammatory bowel disease and type II collagen-induced arthritis. Lenalidomide displayed a strong therapeutic effect in all these models of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, while the effect of pomalidomide was less pronounced. In vitro experiments confirmed the immunosuppressive effect of both IMiDs on the proliferative response of stimulated human lymphocytes and on the balance of secreted cytokines toward an anti-inflammatory profile. We conclude that lenalidomide may offer a therapeutic opportunity against autoimmune/inflammatory diseases.

  7. Hypothermia induced by adenosine 5'-monophosphate attenuates early stage injury in an acute gouty arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhimin; Guo, Weiting; Lu, Shulai; Lv, Wenshan; Li, Changgui; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Shihua; Yan, Shengli; Tao, Zhenyin; Wang, Yunlong

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether the hypothermia induced by Adenosine 5'-Monophosphate (5'-AMP) could attenuate early stage injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model. Ankle joint injection with monosodium urate monohydrate crystals (MSU crystals) in hypothermia rat model which was induced by 5'-AMP and then observe whether hypothermia induced by 5'-AMP could be effectively inhibit the inflammation on acute gouty arthritis in rats. AMP-induced hypothermia has protective effects on our acute gouty arthritis, which was demonstrated by the following criteria: (1) a significant reduction in the ankle swelling (p < 0.001); (2) a significant decrease in the occurrence of leukocyte infiltration and mild hemorrhage; (3) a significant reduction in the presence of serum Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, p < 0.001) and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, p < 0.001); and (4) a significant inhibition in the Nuclear Factor -κappaB (NF-κB) activity (p < 0.001). AMP-induced hypothermia could inhibit acute inflammation reaction and protect the synovial tissue against acute injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model.

  8. Anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode irradiation on collagen-induced arthritis in mice (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Yusuke; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an auto-immune disease afflicting multiple joints of the body, where as a result of the increase in inflammatory cytokines and tissue destructive factors such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, deterioration of the bones and cartilages of the joints occurs. The present investigation was carried out to study the anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode (LED) irradiation on hind paw inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice models. Materials and method: RA in the CIA mouse model was induced by immunization of DBA/1J mice with intradermal injections of an emulsion of bovine type II collagen and complete Freund's adjuvant. A total of 20 CIA mice were subdivided into the following groups: control group, CIA group and 2 groups of LED irradiated CIA mice (LED groups) (n=5 per group). The mouse knee joint area in the LED groups (the 570 nm and 940 nm groups) was irradiated with LED energy, three times a week for 500 s per session over 8 weeks at a dose of 5 J/cm2. The hind paw swelling was assessed by the increase in hind paw thickness. The serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines and arthritic factor MMP-3 were determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In the LED-570 and LED-940 groups at 4 weeks after arthritis induction, the swelling inhibition index was 18.1±4.9 and 29.3±4.0 respectively. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and MMP-3 serum levels were significantly lower in the LED-940 group. Conclusions: LED irradiation, particularly in the near-infrared was effective for inhibition of the inflammatory reactions caused by RA. PMID:25368445

  9. Sleep Disturbance and Older Adults' Inflammatory Responses to Acute Stress

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Kathi L.; Ng, H. Mei; Suhr, Julie A.; France, Christopher R.; Marshall, Gailen D.; Pigeon, Wilfred R.; Moynihan, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Poor sleep diminishes mental and physical health. The objective of this study was to examine associations between sleep disturbance and interleukin-6 (IL-6) responses to acute mental stress in older adults. Design Observational study of community-dwelling, healthy older adults. Setting Participants completed the study in a clinical research laboratory of a mid-sized university. Participants Generally healthy, community-dwelling men and women 50 years of age and older. Measurements IL-6 and negative affect at rest and following a series of challenging cognitive tests; sleep quality; depressive symptoms; perceived stress; loneliness. Results Participants categorized as poor sleepers based on Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores had significantly larger IL-6 responses to the cognitive stressors compared to good sleepers. The association between poor sleep and heightened IL-6 response to acute stress was not explained by other psychosocial factors previously linked to immune dysregulation, including depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and loneliness. Conclusions Findings add to the growing evidence for poor sleep as an independent risk factor for poor mental and physical health. Older adults may be particularly vulnerable to effects of sleep disturbance due to significant age-related changes in both sleep and inflammatory regulation. PMID:22327621

  10. “Employment and arthritis: making it work” a randomized controlled trial evaluating an online program to help people with inflammatory arthritis maintain employment (study protocol)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions are the leading cause of long-term work disability (WD), an outcome with a major impact on quality of life and a high cost to society. The importance of decreased at-work productivity has also recently been recognized. Despite the importance of these problems, few interventions have been developed to reduce the impact of arthritis on employment. We have developed a novel intervention called “Making It Work”, a program to help people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) deal with employment issues, prevent WD and improve at-work productivity. After favorable results in a proof-of-concept study, we converted the program to a web-based format for broader dissemination and improved accessibility. The objectives of this study are: 1) to evaluate in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) the effectiveness of the program at preventing work cessation and improving at-work productivity; 2) to perform a cost-utility analysis of the intervention. Methods/Design 526 participants with IA will be recruited from British Columbia, Alberta, and Ontario in Canada. The intervention consists of a) 5 online group sessions; b) 5 web-based e-learning modules; c) consultations with an occupational therapist for an ergonomic work assessment and a vocational rehabilitation counselor. Questionnaires will be administered online at baseline and every 6 months to collect information about demographics, disease measures, costs, work-related risk factors for WD, quality of life, and work outcomes. Primary outcomes include at-work productivity and time to work cessation of > 6 months for any reason. Secondary outcomes include temporary work cessation, number of days missed from work per year, reduction in hours worked per week, quality adjusted life year for the cost utility analysis, and changes from baseline in employment risk factors. Analysis of Variance will evaluate the intervention’s effect on at-work productivity, and multivariable

  11. Comparison of the suppressive effects of soluble CR1 and C5a receptor antagonist in acute arthritis induced in rats by blocking of CD59

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, M; Nishikawa, K; Morgan, B P; Matsuo, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effects of suppression of complement activation at C3 level and inhibition of C5a on acute synovitis in rats. Acute synovitis was induced in Wistar rats by intra-articular (i.a.) injection into one knee of 0.3 mg of MoAb 6D1 (anti-rat CD59 antibody). In the treatment groups, soluble CR1 (sCR1) or C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonist was administered intra-articularly or intravenously and effects on the course of the acute synovitis were monitored. Synovitis induced by 6D1 was characterized by joint swelling, thickening of synovial tissue, cellular infiltration and deposition of membrane attack complex (MAC) on the synovial surface. Neither inflammatory change nor MAC deposition was found in rats which received an i.a. injection of sCR1 to suppress complement activity in the joint. Intra-articular injection of sCR1 did not reduce plasma complement activity. Intravenous administration of sCR1 suppressed plasma complement activity but had no effect on the course of the arthritis and synovitis with MAC deposition was observed. Neither i.a. nor i.v. injection of C5aR antagonist had any suppressive effects on inflammatory change or MAC deposition in synovium. The data show that inflammatory change induced by 6D1 was mediated by local complement activation and was not accompanied by systemic complement activation. C5a generation was not responsible for the observed inflammation, suggesting that other complement activation products, possibly MAC, mediate the inflammatory change observed in this model of acute synovitis in rats. PMID:10632677

  12. The 1st National Clinical audit for Rheumatoid and Early Inflammatory Arthritis: findings and implications for nursing practice

    PubMed Central

    Firth, J; Snowden, N; Ledingham, J; Rivett, A; Galloway, J; Dennison, EM; MacPhie, E; Ide, Z; Rowe, I; Kandala, N; Jameson, K

    2016-01-01

    The first national audit for rheumatoid and early inflammatory arthritis has benchmarked care for the first three months of follow up activity from first presentation to a rheumatology service. Access to care, management of early RA and support for self care were measured against NICE quality standards and impact of early arthritis and experience of care were measured using patient reported outcome and experience measures. The results demonstrate delays in referral and accessing specialist care and the need for service improvement in treating to target, suppression of high levels of disease activity and support for self-care. Improvements in patient -reported outcomes within three months and high levels of overall satisfaction were reported but these results were affected by low response rates. Here we present a summary of the national data from the audit and discuss the implications for nursing practice. PMID:27281595

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine use in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is potentially prevalent among paediatric patients with chronic diseases but with variable rates among different age groups, diseases and countries. There are no recent reports on CAM use among paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Europe. We hypothesized that CAM use associates with a more severe disease in paediatric IBD and JIA. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire study among adolescent outpatients with IBD and JIA addressing the frequency and type of CAM use during the past year. The patients were recruited at the Children’s Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland. Results Of the 147 respondents, 97 had IBD (Crohn’s disease: n = 46; median age 15.5, disease duration 3.4 years) and 50 had JIA (median age 13.8, disease duration 6.9 years). During the past 12 months, 48% regularly used CAM while 81% reported occasional CAM use. Compared to patients with JIA, the use of CAM in IBD patients tended to be more frequent. The most commonly used CAM included probiotics, multivitamins, and mineral and trace element supplements. Self-imposed dietary restrictions were common, involving 27.6% of the non-CAM users but 64.8% of all CAM users. Disease activity was associated with CAM use in JIA but not in IBD. Conclusions CAM use is frequent among adolescents with IBD and JIA and associates with self-imposed dietary restrictions. Reassuringly, adherence to disease modifying drugs is good in young CAM users. In JIA, patients with active disease used more frequently CAM than patients with inactive disease. As CAM use is frequent, physicians should familiarise themselves with the basic concepts of CAM. The potential pharmacological interaction or the toxicity of certain CAM products warrants awareness and hence physicians should actively ask their patients about CAM use. PMID:24708564

  14. Human neutrophil FcγRIIA regulation by C5aR promotes inflammatory arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Naotake; Ernandez, Thomas; Li, Xun; Nishi, Hiroshi; Cullere, Xavier; Mekala, Divya; Hazen, Melissa; Köhl, Jörg; Lee, David M.; Mayadas, Tanya N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis culminates in joint destruction that in mouse models of disease, is supported by innate immune molecules including FcγRs and complement. However, the results may not predict outcomes in humans given the structural differences between murine and human activating FcγRs on neutrophils, a prominent component of joint exudates. In this study, we examined the role of the human neutrophil FcγRIIA in the development of arthritis and probed the underlying mechanism by which FcγRIIA initiated disease. Methods K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis was examined in mice that express FcγRIIA on neutrophils but lack their own activating FcγRs (γ-chain-deficient). The role of mast cells, complement (C3 and C5a) and CD18 integrins in FcγRIIA-initiated disease was examined using cell reconstitution approaches, inhibitors, and functional blocking antibodies respectively. Cross-talk between C5aR and FcγRIIA on neutrophils was evaluated in vitro. Results Neutrophil FcγRIIA expression was sufficient to restore susceptibility to K/BxN serum induced neutrophil recruitment, synovitis and bone destruction in γ-chain-deficient mice. Joint inflammation was robust and proceeded even in the absence of mast cells and vascular permeability, shown to contribute to disease in wild-type mice. Neutrophil recruitment was dependent on CD18 integrin LFA-1 and C5aR. C5aR in addition significantly enhanced FcγRIIA mediated phagocytosis and oxidative burst in vitro. Conclusion Human and murine activating FcγRs on neutrophils are not functionally equivalent, and in humans may play a primary role in arthritis. Cross-talk between neutrophil C5aR and FcγRIIA is essential for disease thus highlighting a new aspect of complement during the effector phase of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:21280001

  15. [SEIP-SERPE-SEOP Consensus document on the treatment of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Lozano, J; Calvo, C; Huguet Carol, R; Rodrigo, C; Núñez, E; Obando, I; Rojo, P; Merino, R; Pérez, C; Downey, F J; Colino, E; García, J J; Cilleruelo, M J; Torner, F; García, L

    2015-04-01

    This is a Consensus Document of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (Sociedad Española de Infectología Pediatrica), Spanish Society of Paediatric Rheumatology (Sociedad Española de Reumatología Pediátrica) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Orthopaedics (Sociedad Española de Ortopedia Pediátrica), on the treatment of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. A review is presented on the medical and surgical treatment of acute osteoarticular infection, defined as a process with less than 14 days of symptomatology, uncomplicated and community-acquired. The different possible options are evaluated based on the best available scientific knowledge, and a number of evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice are provided.

  16. Anti-inflammatory functions of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. and its compounds: A perspective on its potential role in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; ZHAO, FUTAO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to take a look at the anti-inflammatory functions of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (HCT) that have been illustrated in the literature and to explore new fields in which HCT could be used in the future. The use of HCT has been described in broad inflammatory domains, where it has exhibited a variety of activities, including antiviral, antibacterial, antiparasitic and immunostimulant activity, with high efficiency, mild features and definite therapeutic effects. The numerous anti-inflammatory functions of HCT have demonstrated that HCT has wide application prospects. New uses of HCT and the full extent of its utilization await further investigation. The basic pathological change of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is synovial proliferation which leads to joint destruction in the long-term. There are types of drugs that have been used clinically for patients with RA, however, due to their side-effects or high prices their broad usage is limited. A safe and low-cost drug is urgently required to be developed for the clinical usage of patients with RA. Thus, HCT has the potential to be a good candidate in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26170903

  17. Drug-disease interactions: reduced β-adrenergic and potassium channel antagonist activities of sotalol in the presence of acute and chronic inflammatory conditions in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kulmatycki, Kenneth M; Abouchehade, Kassem; Sattari, Saeed; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2001-01-01

    Inflammation may influence response to pharmacotherapy. We investigated the effect of inflammation on response to sotalol, a β-adrenergic receptor and potassium channel antagonist. Racemic sotalol (40 mg kg−1) was administered to healthy, acutely (interferonα 2a-induced) and chronically (Mycobacterium butyricum-induced adjuvant arthritis) inflamed male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=4 – 6/group). Another group of interferon-treated rats received 3 mg kg−1 of anti-TNF antibody infliximab. Electrocardiogram (ECG) recorded and plasma sotalol concentration monitored for 6 h. The study was repeated in acutely inflamed rats following administration of stereochemically pure individual sotalol enantiomers [40 mg kg−1 S (potassium channel blocker) or 20 mg kg−1 R (β-adrenergic/potassium channel blocker)]. Chronic arthritis was readily evident. Acute arthritis was associated with elevated segmented neutrophils and increased plasma nitrite and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) concentrations. Sotalol affected ECG in all rats. In both inflamed groups, however, response to sotalol in prolongation of QT interval (potassium channel sensitivity) was reduced. The effect of PR interval (β-adrenergic activity) was also reduced following administration of the racemate and R-enantiomer. No significant differences in pharmacokinetics were observed between control and inflamed rats. Infliximab reduced nitrite and TNF concentrations and reversed the effect of acute inflammation on both PR and QT intervals. The reduced electrocardiographic responses to sotalol is likely due to the influence of inflammation on the action of the drug on both β-adrenergic and potassium channel receptors secondary to over-expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and/or nitric oxide. Our observation may have therapeutic consequences in all conditions where inflammatory mediators are increased. PMID:11350865

  18. Dietary Intake of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Pain in spite of Inflammatory Control among Methotrexate Treated Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Lourdudoss, Cecilia; Di Giuseppe, Daniela; Wolk, Alicja; Westerlind, Helga; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Lampa, Jon

    2017-03-28

    Objective To investigate potential associations between dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and pain patterns in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients after three months of methotrexate (MTX) treatment. Methods We included 591 early RA patients with MTX monotherapy from a population based prospective case-control study, the Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA). Dietary data on PUFA (food frequency questionnaires) were linked with data on unacceptable pain (visual analogue scale (VAS) >40mm), non-inflammatory/refractory pain (VAS >40mm and C-reactive protein (CRP) <10mg/L) and inflammatory pain (VAS >40mm and CRP >10mg/L) after three months. Statistical analysis included logistic regression. Results After three months of MTX treatment, 125 patients (21.2%) had unacceptable pain, of which 92 patients had refractory pain and 33 patients had inflammatory pain. Omega-3 fatty acid (FA) intake was inversely associated with unacceptable pain and refractory pain (OR=0.57 [95% CI 0.35-0.95] and OR=0.47 [95% CI 0.26-0.84], respectively). Omega-6 to -3 FA ratio, but not omega-6 FA alone, was directly associated with unacceptable pain and refractory pain (OR=1.70 [95% CI 1.03-2.82] and OR=2.33 [95% CI 1.28-4.24], respectively). Furthermore, PUFA was not associated with neither inflammatory pain nor CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate at follow-up. Omega-3 FA supplementation was not associated with any pain patterns. Conclusion Omega-3 FA was inversely associated with, and omega-6 to -3 FA ratio was directly associated with unacceptable and refractory pain, but not with inflammatory pain or systemic inflammation. The inverse association between omega-3 FA and refractory pain may have a role in pain suppression in RA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of enthesitis-related arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Pamela F

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic, inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. The enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) JIA category describes a clinically heterogeneous group of children including some who have predominately enthesitis, enthesitis and arthritis, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, or inflammatory bowel disease-associated arthropathy. ERA accounts for 10%–20% of JIA. Common clinical manifestations of ERA include arthritis, enthesitis, and acute anterior uveitis. Axial disease is also common in children with established ERA. Treatment regimens for ERA, many of them based on adults with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, include the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and biologic agents either individually or in combination. PMID:23236258

  20. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect of Kerabala: a value-added ayurvedic formulation from virgin coconut oil inhibits pathogenesis in adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ratheesh, M; Sandya, S; Pramod, C; Asha, S; Svenia, Jose P; Premlal, S; GrishKumar, B

    2017-02-01

    Kerabala (CB) is a novel ayurvedic formulation used for treating various inflammatory diseases. This formulation was made from virgin coconut oil and it comprises extracts of Sida cordifolia, coconut milk and sesame oil. The current study was performed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory action of CB on carrageenan-induced acute and adjuvant-induced chronic experimental models. 5 mg/kg bwt was found to be potent dose from carrageenan model and evaluated its effect in adjuvant-induced chronic arthritic model. The antioxidant assays like SOD, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, lipid peroxidation product, nitrate level and GSH were measured in paw tissue. Hematological parameters like hemoglobin (HB) count, ESR, WBC count, plasma CRP levels were analyzed. By RT-PCR, the inflammatory markers like cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) expressions were evaluated. The extracellular matrix proteins like MMP-2 and MMP-9 were determined by zymography and its expression by western blotting. Histopathology and cytology of paw tissue and synovium were analyzed. The result indicated that there was a significant increment in the levels of antioxidant enzymes on CB administration. The hematological markers such as ESR, WBC and plasma CRP levels were reduced by CB treatment and it also increases the HB level. The upregulated gene level expressions of inflammatory markers like COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 were down regulated by administration of CB. MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression significantly reduced by CB administration. Massive influx of inflammatory cell infiltration, proliferative collagen in histological analysis of paw tissue of arthritic rat was decreased by CB administration. Synovial cytology of CB administrated group shows reduced number of reactive mesothelial cells and synovial inflammatory cells. This current study shows that ayurvedic drug CB has an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and

  1. Joint blood flow is more sensitive to inflammatory arthritis than oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and oxygen saturation

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Ajay; Ioussoufovitch, Seva; Morrison, Laura B.; St Lawrence, Keith; Lee, Ting-Yim; Bureau, Yves; Diop, Mamadou

    2016-01-01

    Joint hypoxia plays a central role in the progression and perpetuation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thus, optical techniques that can measure surrogate markers of hypoxia such as blood flow, oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and oxygen saturation are being developed to monitor RA. The purpose of the current study was to compare the sensitivity of these physiological parameters to arthritis. Experiments were conducted in a rabbit model of RA and the results revealed that joint blood flow was the most sensitive to arthritis and could detect a statistically significant difference (p<0.05, power = 0.8) between inflamed and healthy joints with a sample size of only four subjects. Considering that this a quantitative technique, the high sensitivity to arthritis suggests that joint perfusion has the potential to become a potent tool for monitoring disease progression and treatment response in RA. PMID:27867697

  2. β-Glucuronidase, a Regulator of Lyme Arthritis Severity, Modulates Lysosomal Trafficking and MMP-9 Secretion in Response to Inflammatory Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Bramwell, Kenneth K C; Mock, Kelton; Ma, Ying; Weis, John H; Teuscher, Cory; Weis, Janis J

    2015-08-15

    The lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (Gusb) is a key regulator of Lyme-associated and K/B×N-induced arthritis severity. The luminal enzymes present in lysosomes provide essential catabolic functions for the homeostatic degradation of a variety of macromolecules. In addition to this essential catabolic function, lysosomes play important roles in the inflammatory response following infection. Secretory lysosomes and related vesicles can participate in the inflammatory response through fusion with the plasma membrane and release of bioactive contents into the extracellular milieu. In this study, we show that GUSB hypomorphism potentiates lysosomal exocytosis following inflammatory stimulation. This leads to elevated secretion of lysosomal contents, including glycosaminoglycans, lysosomal hydrolases, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, a known modulator of Lyme arthritis severity. This mechanistic insight led us to test the efficacy of rapamycin, a drug known to suppress lysosomal exocytosis. Both Lyme and K/B×N-associated arthritis were suppressed by this treatment concurrent with reduced lysosomal release.

  3. Biology of recently discovered cytokines: Interleukin-17 – a unique inflammatory cytokine with roles in bone biology and arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gaffen, Sarah L

    2004-01-01

    IL-17 and its receptor are founding members of an emerging family of cytokines and receptors with many unique characteristics. IL-17 is produced primarily by T cells, particularly those of the memory compartment. In contrast, IL-17 receptor is ubiquitously expressed, making nearly all cells potential targets of IL-17. Although it has only limited homology to other cytokines, IL-17 exhibits proinflammatory properties similar to those of tumor necrosis factor-α, particularly with respect to induction of other inflammatory effectors. In addition, IL-17 synergizes potently with other cytokines, placing it in the center of the inflammatory network. Strikingly, IL-17 has been associated with several bone pathologies, most notably rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:15535837

  4. Majoon ushba, a polyherbal compound ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis via regulating inflammatory and bone remodeling markers in rats.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Doss, Hari Madhuri; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the anti-arthritic effect of majoon ushba (MU) and its underlying mechanism in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rats. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete freund's adjuvant (0.1ml) into the right hind paw of the Wistar albino rats. MU (1000mg/kg/b.wt) and methotrexate (3mg/kg/b.wt) were administered from day 11 to day 18th for 8days after adjuvant induction. We have found that MU treatment significantly increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) and inhibited the over production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) (ELISA) in the serum of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17), inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2)), MCP-1, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL) and transcription factors (NF-кB and AP-1) (Real-Time PCR) was found significantly downregulated in the synovial tissues of MU treated arthritic rats. In addition, the protein expression of NF-кB, IL-17, COX-2, and RANKL (western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis) was found reduced. On the other hand, osteoprotegerin (OPG), a bone remodeling marker was found to be elevated in synovial tissues of MU treated arthritic rats. Furthermore, MU treatment prevented body weight loss and reduced the joint paw edema, cell infiltration, cartilage and bone degradation as evidenced by the histopathological and radiological analysis. In conclusion, our current findings provide scientific evidence for the traditional claim of MU as an anti-arthritic drug.

  5. Pharmacological Basis for Use of Selaginella moellendorffii in Gouty Arthritis: Antihyperuricemic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ping; Chen, Ke-li; Zhang, Guo-li

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Selaginella moellendorffii Hieron. (SM) on gouty arthritis and getting an insight of the possible mechanisms. HPLC method was developed for chemical analysis. The paw oedema, the neutrophil accumulation, inflammatory mediators, lipid peroxidation, and histopathological changes of the joints were analyzed in gouty arthritis rat model, and the kidney injury and serum urate were detected in hyperuricemic mice. Pharmacokinetic result demonstrated that the main apigenin glycosides might be quantitatively transformed into apigenin in the mammalian body. Among these compounds, the apigenin exhibited the strongest effect on xanthine oxidase (XOD). SM aqueous extract has proved to be active in reducing hyperuricemia in dose-dependent manner, and the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in high dose group were decreased significantly as compared with hyperuricemic control group (P < 0.01). The high dose of SM extract could significantly prevent the paw swelling, reduce gouty joint inflammatory features, reduce the release of IL-1β and TNF-α, lower malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels, and increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) level (P < 0.01). For the first time, this study provides a rational basis for the traditional use of SM aqueous extract against gout in folk medicine. PMID:28250791

  6. Long-term safety and efficacy of biosimilar infliximab among patients with inflammatory arthritis switched from reference product

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Abuelmagd; Byrne, Niamh; Conway, Richard; Walsh, Thomas; Mannion, Geraldine; Hanly, Michael; O’Sullivan, Miriam; Curran, Ann Maria; Carey, John J

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the biosimilar infliximab in adult patients with inflammatory arthritis switched from reference product in our center. Patients and methods In April 2014, patients attending our rheumatology service for infliximab infusions were switched from reference product to the biosimilar infliximab following consent and hospital approval. Results Around 34 patients with inflammatory arthritis were switched from reference product to biosimilar infliximab in 2014: 50% female, mean age 55 years (standard deviation=12.9), mean disease duration 14.79 years (9.7), median duration on infliximab 57 months, and two-thirds on oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. There was no difference in efficacy or safety in the first 6 months of therapy. By the end of 2015, the mean follow-up on biosimilar infliximab was 15.8 (standard deviation=6.3) months. Our results showed no significant difference in Health Assessment Questionnaire score, patient global assessment of disease activity, number of disease flares, or the medication dose between the originator and the biosimilar infliximab. However, reported pain and C-reactive protein values were significantly higher during the longer follow-up period (p=0.043, 0.001 respectively). There was no significant difference in the number of adverse events or infusion reactions during follow-up periods. Only five (14.7%) patients discontinued the biosimilar infliximab. Conclusion Our patients experienced similar efficacy and safety for managing their arthritis with the biosimilar infliximab as the reference product infliximab, but at a much lower cost. PMID:28331376

  7. Endogenous Acute Phase Serum Amyloid A Lacks Pro-Inflammatory Activity, Contrasting the Two Recombinant Variants That Activate Human Neutrophils through Different Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Karin; Björkman, Lena; Ahlin, Sofie; Olsson, Maja; Sjöholm, Kajsa; Karlsson, Anna; Bylund, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Most notable among the acute phase proteins is serum amyloid A (SAA), levels of which can increase 1000-fold during infections, aseptic inflammation, and/or trauma. Chronically elevated SAA levels are associated with a wide variety of pathological conditions, including obesity and rheumatic diseases. Using a recombinant hybrid of the two human SAA isoforms (SAA1 and 2) that does not exist in vivo, numerous in vitro studies have given rise to the notion that acute phase SAA is a pro-inflammatory molecule with cytokine-like properties. It is however unclear whether endogenous acute phase SAA per se mediates pro-inflammatory effects. We tested this in samples from patients with inflammatory arthritis and in a transgenic mouse model that expresses human SAA1. Endogenous human SAA did not drive production of pro-inflammatory IL-8/KC in either of these settings. Human neutrophils derived from arthritis patients displayed no signs of activation, despite being exposed to severely elevated SAA levels in circulation, and SAA-rich sera also failed to activate cells in vitro. In contrast, two recombinant SAA variants (the hybrid SAA and SAA1) both activated human neutrophils, inducing L-selectin shedding, production of reactive oxygen species, and production of IL-8. The hybrid SAA was approximately 100-fold more potent than recombinant SAA1. Recombinant hybrid SAA and SAA1 activated neutrophils through different receptors, with recombinant SAA1 being a ligand for formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2). We conclude that even though recombinant SAAs can be valuable tools for studying neutrophil activation, they do not reflect the nature of the endogenous protein. PMID:23626589

  8. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Curcuma longa (turmeric) versus Zingiber officinale (ginger) rhizomes in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Gamal; Al-Kahtani, Mohammed Ali; El-Sayed, Wael Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    Turmeric (rich in curcuminoids) and ginger (rich in gingerols and shogaols) rhizomes have been widely used as dietary spices and to treat different diseases in Ayurveda/Chinese medicine since antiquity. Here, we compared the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant activity of these two plants in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Both plants (at dose 200 mg/kg body weight) significantly suppressed (but with different degrees) the incidence and severity of arthritis by increasing/decreasing the production of anti-inflammatory/pro-inflammatory cytokines, respectively, and activating the anti-oxidant defence system. The anti-arthritic activity of turmeric exceeded that of ginger and indomethacin (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug), especially when the treatment started from the day of arthritis induction. The percentage of disease recovery was 4.6-8.3% and 10.2% more in turmeric compared with ginger and indomethacin (P < 0.05), respectively. The present study proves the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant activity of turmeric over ginger and indomethacin, which may have beneficial effects against rheumatoid arthritis onset/progression as shown in AIA rat model.

  9. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  10. Novel hematologic inflammatory parameters to predict acute mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Toptas, Mehmet; Akkoc, İbrahim; Savas, Yildiray; Uzman, Sinan; Toptas, Yasar; Can, Mehmet Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    Acute mesenteric ischaemia (AMI) is an emergency condition that requires urgent diagnosis. Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) have been studied as inflammatory biomarkers in atherosclerosis, but data regarding AMI are lacking. The study population included patients with AMI (n = 46) versus age and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 46). Computed multidetector tomographic angiography was performed to diagnose AMI. NLR and PLR were calculated using complete blood count. C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were also analyzed. Neutrophil levels and lymphocytes were significantly higher in patients with AMI than in the control individuals (P < 0.001 and P = 0.43, respectively). NLR levels were significantly higher in patients with AMI compared with that in the control individuals (P < 0.001). Platelet levels did not reach statistical significance between the groups (P = 0.709). However, patients with AMI had significantly higher PLR levels than the control group (P = 0.039). CRP levels on admission were higher in patients with AMI in comparison with control individuals. There was also a positive correlation between NLR and CRP (r = 0.548, P < 0.001), and between PLR and CRP (r = 0.528, P < 0.001). NLR level greater than 4.5, measured on admission, yielded an area under the curve value of 0.790 (95% confidence interval 0.681-0.799, sensitivity 77%, specificity 72%), and PLR level of greater than 157 yielded an area under the curve value of 0.604 (95% confidence interval 0.486-0.722, sensitivity 59%, specificity 65%). Patients with AMI had increased NLR, PLR, and CRP levels compared with controls. Increased NLR and PLR was an independent predictor of AMI.

  11. Mast cells contribute to autoimmune inflammatory arthritis via their tryptase/heparin complexes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kichul; Nigrovic, Peter A; Crish, James; Boilard, Eric; McNeil, H Patrick; Larabee, Katherine S; Adachi, Roberto; Gurish, Michael F; Gobezie, Reuben; Stevens, Richard L; Lee, David M

    2009-01-01

    Although mast cells (MCs) often are abundant in the synovial tissues of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, the contribution of MCs to joint inflammation and cartilage loss remains poorly understood. MC-restricted tryptase/heparin complexes have proinflammatory activity, and significant amounts of human tryptase beta (hTryptase-beta) are present in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid. Mouse MC protease-6 (mMCP-6) is the ortholog of hTryptase-beta, and this serine protease is abundant in the synovium of arthritic mice. We now report that C57BL/6 (B6) mice lacking their tryptase/heparin complexes have attenuated arthritic responses, with mMCP-6 as the dominant tryptase responsible for augmenting neutrophil infiltration in the K/BxN mouse serum-transfer arthritis model. While inflammation in this experimental arthritis model was not dependent on protease-activated receptor-2, it was dependent on the chemokine receptor CXCR2. In support of the latter data, exposure of synovial fibroblasts to hTryptase-beta/heparin or mMCP-6/heparin complexes resulted in expression of the neutrophil chemotactic factors CXCL1/KC, CXCL5/LIX, and CXCL8/IL-8. Our proteomics, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry data also revealed substantial loss of cartilage-derived aggrecan proteoglycans in the arthritic joints of wild-type B6 mice but not mMCP-6-null B6 mice. These observations demonstrate the functional contribution of MC-restricted tryptase/heparin complexes in the K/BxN mouse arthritis model and connect our mouse findings with rheumatoid arthritis pathophysiology.

  12. Gastrodia elata attenuates inflammatory response by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Wang, Li-Min; Xu, Jian-Zhong; Tian, Ke; Gu, Chen-Xi; Li, Zhi-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Gastrodia elata (GE), which belongs to the Orchidaceae family, was found to possess anti-inflammatory activity. However, the effect of GE on inflammatory response in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes (RA-FLS) remains largely unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GE on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced inflammatory response in RA-FLS and the underlying molecular mechanism was also explored. Our results demonstrated that GE significantly attenuated TNF-α-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production in RA-FLS. GE also inhibited TNF-α-induced MMP-3 and MMP-13 expression in RA-FLS. Furthermore, pretreatment with GE significantly attenuated TNF-α-induced the expression of p-p65 and IκBα degradation in RA-FLS. In conclusion, this study demonstrated for the first time that GE attenuated inflammatory response by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway signaling in RA-FLS. Thus, GE might have a therapeutic potential towards the treatment of RA.

  13. Spontaneous ultra-weak photon emission in correlation to inflammatory metabolism and oxidative stress in a mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    He, Min; van Wijk, Eduard; van Wietmarschen, Herman; Wang, Mei; Sun, Mengmeng; Koval, Slavik; van Wijk, Roeland; Hankemeier, Thomas; van der Greef, Jan

    2017-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis has driven the development of new approaches and technologies for investigating the pathophysiology of this devastating, chronic disease. From the perspective of systems biology, combining comprehensive personal data such as metabolomics profiling with ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) data may provide key information regarding the complex pathophysiology underlying rheumatoid arthritis. In this article, we integrated UPE with metabolomics-based technologies in order to investigate collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, at the systems level, and we investigated the biological underpinnings of the complex dataset. Using correlation networks, we found that elevated inflammatory and ROS-mediated plasma metabolites are strongly correlated with a systematic reduction in amine metabolites, which is linked to muscle wasting in rheumatoid arthritis. We also found that increased UPE intensity is strongly linked to metabolic processes (with correlation co-efficiency |r| value >0.7), which may be associated with lipid oxidation that related to inflammatory and/or ROS-mediated processes. Together, these results indicate that UPE is correlated with metabolomics and may serve as a valuable tool for diagnosing chronic disease by integrating inflammatory signals at the systems level. Our correlation network analysis provides important and valuable information regarding the disease process from a system-wide perspective.

  14. Macrophages from the synovium of active rheumatoid arthritis exhibit an activin A-dependent pro-inflammatory profile.

    PubMed

    Soler Palacios, Blanca; Estrada-Capetillo, Lizbeth; Izquierdo, Elena; Criado, Gabriel; Nieto, Concha; Municio, Cristina; González-Alvaro, Isidoro; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Pablos, Jose Luis; Corbí, Angel L; Puig-Kröger, Amaya

    2015-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease whose pathogenesis and severity correlates with the presence of macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines within the inflamed synovium. Macrophage-derived cytokines fuel the pathological processes in RA and are targets of clinically successful therapies. However, although macrophage polarization determines cytokine production, the polarization state of macrophages in RA joints remains poorly defined. To dissect the molecular basis for the tissue-damaging effects of macrophages in RA joints, we undertook the phenotypic and transcriptomic characterization of ex vivo isolated CD14(+) RA synovial fluid (RA-SF) macrophages. Flow cytometry and gene profiling indicated that RA-SF macrophages express pro-inflammatory polarization markers (MMP12, EGLN3, CCR2), lack expression of markers associated with homeostatic and anti-inflammatory polarization (IGF1, HTR2B) and exhibit a transcriptomic profile that resembles the activin A-dependent gene signature of pro-inflammatory in vitro-generated macrophages. In fact, high levels of Smad-activating activin A were found in RA-SF and, accordingly, the Smad signalling pathway was activated in ex vivo-isolated RA-SF macrophages. In vitro experiments on monocytes and macrophages indicated that RA-SF promoted the acquisition of pro-inflammatory markers (INHBA, MMP12, EGLN3, CCR2) but led to a significant reduction in the expression of genes associated with homeostasis and inflammation resolution (FOLR2, SERPINB2, IGF1, CD36), thus confirming the pro-inflammatory polarization ability of RA-SF. Importantly, the macrophage-polarizing ability of RA-SF was inhibited by an anti-activin A-neutralizing antibody, thus demonstrating that activin A mediates the pro-inflammatory macrophage-polarizing ability of RA-SF. Moreover, and in line with these findings, multicolour immunofluorescence evidenced that macrophages within RA synovial membranes (RA-SM) also express pro-inflammatory

  15. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing.

  16. Trikatu, a herbal compound that suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Murunikkara, Vachana; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2014-01-01

    Gout is an inflammatory joint disorder characterized by hyperuricaemia and precipitation of monosodium urate crystals in the joints. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of trikatu, a herbal compound in monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Paw volume and levels/activities of lysosomal enzymes, lipid peroxidation, anti-oxidant status and histopathological examination of ankle joints were determined in control and monosodium urate crystal-induced rats. In addition, analgesic (acetic acid-induced writhing response), anti-pyretic (yeast-induced pyrexia) and gastric ulceration effects were tested. The levels of lysosomal enzymes, lipid peroxidation and paw volume were significantly increased, and anti-oxidant status was found to be reduced in monosodium urate crystal-induced rats, whereas the biochemical changes were reverted to near normal levels upon trikatu (1000 mg/kg b.wt) administration. The trikatu has also been found to exhibit significant analgesic and anti-pyretic effects with the absence of gastric damage. In conclusion, the present results clearly indicated that trikatu exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect against monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in rats in association with analgesic and anti-pyretic effects in the absence of gastrointestinal damage.

  17. Ginsenoside Rc from Korean Red Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) Attenuates Inflammatory Symptoms of Gastritis, Hepatitis and Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Rhee, Man Hee; Lee, Jongsung; Kim, Seung Hyung; Yang, Yanyan; Kim, Han Gyung; Kim, Yong; Kim, Chaekyun; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) is an herbal medicine prescribed worldwide that is prepared from Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae). Out of ginseng's various components, ginsenosides are regarded as the major ingredients, exhibiting anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. Although recent studies have focused on understanding the anti-inflammatory activities of KRG, compounds that are major anti-inflammatory components, precisely how these can suppress various inflammatory processes has not been fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to identify inhibitory saponins, to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of the saponins, and to understand the inhibitory mechanisms. To do this, we employed in vitro lipopolysaccharide-treated macrophages and in vivo inflammatory mouse conditions, such as collagen (type II)-induced arthritis (CIA), EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-triggered hepatitis. Molecular mechanisms were also verified by real-time PCR, immunoblotting analysis, and reporter gene assays. Out of all the ginsenosides, ginsenoside Rc (G-Rc) showed the highest inhibitory activity against the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[Formula: see text], interleukin (IL)-1[Formula: see text], and interferons (IFNs). Similarly, this compound attenuated inflammatory symptoms in CIA, EtOH/HCl-mediated gastritis, and LPS/D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-triggered hepatitis without altering toxicological parameters, and without inducing gastric irritation. These anti-inflammatory effects were accompanied by the suppression of TNF-[Formula: see text] and IL-6 production and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in mice with CIA. G-Rc also attenuated the increased levels of luciferase activity by IRF-3 and AP-1 but not NF-[Formula: see text]B. In support of this phenomenon, G-Rc reduced TBK1, IRF-3, and ATF2 phosphorylation in the joint and liver tissues of mice with hepatitis. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that

  18. [Clinical and microbiological study of acute pelvic inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Ovalle, A; Martínez, M A; Casals, A; Yuhaniak, R; Giglio, M S

    1993-01-01

    Upper genital tract infection was investigated in 46 women admitted to hospital with clinic diagnosis of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and 62 control women accepted to hospital for laparoscopy Fallopian tubes sterilization. Diagnosis was ratified by laparoscopy in mild and moderate salpingitis; culdocentesis and ultrasonography were performed in severe salpingitis and endometrial sample was made in endometritis. Microbiological specimens were taken from the cervix and abdomen. Antecedents and complete clinical studies were obtained. Patients were treated with antibiotic association sodic G penicillin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. Risk factors to development PID were: single female (p < 0.05), multiple sexual partner (p < 0.01), previous PID (p < 0.05), infertility (p < 0.05), mean year of IUD use in severe salpingitis (p = 0.05) and mean years of age from women with sexually transmitted bacterias (STB) vs endogenous bacterias (EB) (p < 0.05). In the control group no abdomen bacterias were isolated. In patients with PID, C. trachomatis was detected by serology in 28.3%. N. gonorrhoeae was isolated from the cervix in 23.9% and from the abdomen 17.4%. Besides it was isolated from the abdomen: M. hominis 17.3% and E. coli 15.2%. STB were isolated in 54.3% and EB in 47.8% of the patients. Bacterial association was present on the 37%. Cervix isolation of G. vaginalis and Mycoplasma were not correlated with development of PID. Cervix microbiological samples were useful to know abdomen microbic etiology. They coincide with those in the 90.9%. EB were more frequently isolated from severe salpingitis (p = 0.05) and STB from mild and moderate salpingitis (p = 0.05). Antibiotic association cured all the mild and moderate salpingitis with independence of bacterial etiology. Failure occurred in 2 diffuse peritonitis and 13/14 tubo-ovarian abscesses. Surgery used in severe salpingitis and diffuse peritonitis, principally consisted in anexectomy, peritoneal toilet and

  19. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint as a complication of acute otitis media in a child: A rare case and the importance of real-time PCR for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bast, F; Collier, S; Chadha, P; Collier, J

    2015-11-01

    We document the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with pain in his left ear and trismus after a diagnosis of acute otitis media one week previously. His blood inflammatory markers were raised and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed significant left temporomandibular joint effusion and partial attenuation of the left mastoid. A clinical diagnosis of septic arthritis of the TMJ was made and the patient was commenced on broad-spectrum antibiotics. Analysis using real time PCR enabled identification of the offending organism, confirmation of the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment to be specifically tailored for treatment.

  20. Effect of acupuncture on rats with acute gouty arthritis inflammation: a metabonomic method for profiling of both urine and plasma metabolic perturbation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Si-Lan; Liu, Yu-Jie; Yin, Hai-Lin; Zhang, Liu; Xiao, Jin; Zhu, Hong-Yuan; Xue, Jin-Tao; Ye, Li-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is a common inflammation model with multiple pathogenic mechanisms seen in clinical practice, for which acupuncture may potentially be an alternative therapy. To investigate the effect of acupuncture on acute gouty arthritis and search for its mechanism, a metabonomic method was developed in this investigation. Acute gouty arthritis model rats were induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. The urine and plasma samples were collected at several time points and the endogenous metabolites were analyzed by an ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). Data were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) analysis to compare metabolic profiles of MSU crystal-induced acute gouty arthritis rats with MSU crystal-induced acute gouty arthritis, treated with acupuncture rats. The results showed that acupuncture could restore the metabolite network that disturbed by MSU administration. Our study indicates that UPLC-MS-based metabonomics can be used as a potential tool for the investigation of biological effect of acupuncture on acute gouty arthritis.

  1. Extracts of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. attenuate the inflammatory response in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    XU, WEI; HUANG, MINGQING; ZHANG, YUQIN; LI, HUANG; ZHENG, HAIYIN; YU, LISHUANG; CHU, KEDAN; LIN, YU; CHEN, LIDIAN

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a serious public health problem, which is commonly treated with traditional Chinese or herbal medicine. The present study evaluated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. extraction (BCBE) on a type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Wistar rats with CIA received either 125 or 500 mg/kg BCBE, after which, paw swelling was markedly suppressed compared with in the model group. In addition, BCBE significantly ameliorated pathological joint alterations, including synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone destruction. The protein and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB in synovial tissue were determined by immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of these factors were significantly downregulated in the BCBE-treated group compared with in the model group. These results indicated that BCBE may exert an inhibitory effect on the CIA rat model, and its therapeutic potential is associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27035125

  2. Synovial fluid antigen-presenting cells unmask peripheral blood T cell responses to bacterial antigens in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Life, P F; Viner, N J; Bacon, P A; Gaston, J S

    1990-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that synovial fluid (SF) mononuclear cells (MC) from patients with both reactive arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides proliferate in vitro in response to bacteria clinically associated with the triggering of reactive arthritis. In all cases, such SFMC responses are greater than the corresponding peripheral blood (PB) MC responses, often markedly so, and the mechanism for this is unclear. We have investigated this phenomenon by comparing the relative abilities of irradiated non-T cells derived from PB and SF to support autologous T cell responses to ReA-associated bacteria. Seven patients whose SFMC had been shown previously to respond to bacteria were studied. We demonstrate antigen-specific responses of PB T cells to bacteria in the presence of SF non-T cells which are in marked contrast to the minimal responses of either unfractionated PBMC or PB T cells reconstituted with PB non-T cells. We also show that PB, but not SF T cells respond strongly to autologous SF non-T cells in the absence of antigen or mitogen. These findings demonstrate that SF antigen-presenting cells (APC) are potent activators of PB T cells. We conclude that the contrasting responses of SFMC and PBMC to bacterial antigens may be accounted for at least in part by an enhanced ability of SF APC to support T cell proliferative responses. PMID:2311298

  3. Anti-inflammatory and joint protective effects of extra-virgin olive-oil polyphenol extract in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rosillo, María Ángeles; Alcaraz, María José; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Fernández-Bolaños, José G; Alarcón-de-la-Lastra, Catalina; Ferrándiz, María Luisa

    2014-12-01

    The consumption of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) in Mediterranean countries has shown beneficial effects. A wide range of evidence indicates that phenolic compounds present in EVOO are endowed with anti-inflammatory properties. In this work, we evaluated the effects of EVOO-polyphenol extract (PE) in a model of rheumatoid arthritis, the collagen-induced arthritis model in mice. On day 0, DBA-1/J mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen. On day 21, mice received a booster injection. PE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was orally administered once a day from days 29 to 41 to arthritic mice. We have demonstrated that PE decreases joint edema, cell migration, cartilage degradation and bone erosion. PE significantly reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2 in the joint as well as the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1. Our data indicate that PE inhibits c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3. In addition, PE decreases nuclear factor κB translocation leading to the down-regulation of the arthritic process. These results support the interest of natural diet components in the development of therapeutic products for arthritic conditions.

  4. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies suppress let-7a expression in monocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and facilitate the inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ning-Sheng; Yu, Hui-Chun; Yu, Chia-Li; Koo, Malcolm; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Lu, Ming-Chi

    2015-12-01

    We hypothesized that anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) could affect the expression of miRNAs in monocytes and contribute to the inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The expression profiles of 270 human miRNAs, co-cultured with ACPAs or human immunoglobulin G (IgG), were analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Ten miRNAs exhibited differential expression in U937 cells after co-cultured with ACPAs compared with human IgG. The expression levels of these miRNAs were investigated in monocytes from 21 ACPA-positive RA patients and 13 controls. Among these miRNAs, the expression levels of let-7a was decreased in monocytes from ACPA-positive RA patients. The expression levels of let-7a showed a negative correlation with positivity of rheumatoid factor in patients sampled. We found that transfection of U937 cells with let-7a mimic suppressed K-Ras protein expression. In the ACPA-mediated signaling pathway, transfection of U937 cells with let-7a mimic suppressed the ACPA-enhanced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and the expression and secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β. In conclusion, ACPA-mediated decreased let-7a expression in monocytes from ACPA-positive RA patients. Decreased let-7a expression was associated with the positivity of RF in ACPA-positive RA patients. The decreased expression of let-7a could facilitate the inflammatory pathway via enhanced ACPA-mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK and increased expression of IL-1β through an increase in the expression of Ras proteins.

  5. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  6. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-01-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal-induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal-induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis. PMID:27432278

  7. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-09-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal‑induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine‑rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor‑κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal‑induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti‑oxidative and anti‑inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis.

  8. Enhanced natural killer activity and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice selected for high acute inflammatory response (AIRmax).

    PubMed

    Castoldi, Lindsey; Golim, Marjorie Assis; Filho, Orlando Garcia Ribeiro; Romagnoli, Graziela Gorete; Ibañez, Olga Célia Martinez; Kaneno, Ramon

    2007-03-01

    Strains of mice with maximal and minimal acute inflammatory responsiveness (AIRmax and AIRmin, respectively) were developed through selective breeding based on their high- or low-acute inflammatory responsiveness. Previous reports have shown that AIRmax mice are more resistant to the development of a variety of tumours than AIRmin mice, including spontaneous metastasis of murine melanoma. Natural killer activity is involved in immunosurveillance against tumour development, so we analysed the number and activity of natural killer cells (CD49b(+)), T-lymphocyte subsets and in vitro cytokine production by spleen cells of normal AIRmax and AIRmin mice. Analysis of lymphocyte subsets by flow cytometry showed that AIRmax mice had a higher relative number of CD49b(+) cells than AIRmin mice, as well as cytolytic activity against Yac.1 target cells. The number of CD3(+) CD8(+) cells was also higher in AIRmax mice. These findings were associated with the ability of spleen cells from AIRmax mice in vitro to produce higher levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-12p40 and interferon-gamma but not the anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. Taken together, our data suggest that the selective breeding to achieve the AIRmax and AIRmin strains was able to polarize the genes associated with cytotoxic activity, which can be responsible for the antitumour resistance observed in AIRmax mice.

  9. Telemedicine delivery of patient education in remote Ontario communities: feasibility of an Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care (ACPAC)-led inflammatory arthritis education program

    PubMed Central

    Warmington, Kelly; Flewelling, Carol; Kennedy, Carol A; Shupak, Rachel; Papachristos, Angelo; Jones, Caroline; Linton, Denise; Beaton, Dorcas E; Lineker, Sydney

    2017-01-01

    Objective Telemedicine-based approaches to health care service delivery improve access to care. It was recognized that adults with inflammatory arthritis (IA) living in remote areas had limited access to patient education and could benefit from the 1-day Prescription for Education (RxEd) program. The program was delivered by extended role practitioners with advanced training in arthritis care. Normally offered at one urban center, RxEd was adapted for videoconference delivery through two educator development workshops that addressed telemedicine and adult education best practices. This study explores the feasibility of and participant satisfaction with telemedicine delivery of the RxEd program in remote communities. Materials and methods Participants included adults with IA attending the RxEd program at one of six rural sites. They completed post-course program evaluations and follow-up interviews. Educators provided post-course feedback to identify program improvements that were later implemented. Results In total, 123 people (36 in-person and 87 remote, across 6 sites) participated, attending one of three RxEd sessions. Remote participants were satisfied with the quality of the video-conference (% agree/strongly agree): could hear the presenter (92.9%) and discussion between sites (82.4%); could see who was speaking at other remote sites (85.7%); could see the slides (95.3%); and interaction between sites adequately facilitated (94.0%). Educator and participant feedback were consistent. Suggested improvements included: use of two screens (speaker and slides); frontal camera angles; equal interaction with remote sites; and slide modifications to improve the readability on screen. Interview data included similar constructive feedback but highlighted the educational and social benefits of the program, which participants noted would have been inaccessible if not offered via telemedicine. Conclusion Study findings confirm the feasibility of delivering the RxEd program

  10. Inflammatory cytokines compromise programmed cell death-1 (PD-1)-mediated T cell suppression in inflammatory arthritis through up-regulation of soluble PD-1.

    PubMed

    Bommarito, D; Hall, C; Taams, L S; Corrigall, V M

    2017-02-28

    The programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor plays a major role in regulating T cell activation. Our aim was to determine how inflammation influences PD-1-mediated T cell suppression. Flow cytometry analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) synovial fluid (SF) mononuclear cells showed an increase in the percentage of PD-1(+) cells within the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell compartment compared to paired peripheral blood (PB). Upon in-vitro T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation of healthy control (HC) CD4(+) T cells in the presence of plate-bound PD-L1fc chimera, significantly decreased proliferation and interferon (IFN)-γ secretion was observed. In contrast, CD4(+) T cells from RA and PsA PB and SF appeared resistant to such PD-1-mediated inhibition. Addition of the proinflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β, which were increased in RA and PsA SF compared to osteoarthritis (OA) SF, consistently abrogated PD-1-mediated suppression in HC CD4(+) T cell cultures. This effect was reversed by inhibitors of these cytokines. Soluble PD-1 (sPD-1) levels were increased in cell culture supernatants from TNFα and IL-6-stimulated cultures compared to untreated controls, and also in RA and PsA, but not in OA, serum and SF. Functionally, addition of sPD-1fc counteracted PD-1-mediated suppression of HC CD4(+) T cells, and increased T cell proliferation in HC CD4(+) T cell/monocyte co-cultures. These in-vitro findings indicate that CD4(+) T cells from patients with RA and PsA show increased resistance to PD-1-mediated suppression, which may be explained in part by the presence of soluble PD-1 in the inflammatory environment.

  11. Dual effect of nitric oxide in articular inflammatory pain in zymosan-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    da S Rocha, José C; Peixoto, Magno E B; Jancar, Sônia; de Q Cunha, Fernando; de A Ribeiro, Ronaldo; da Rocha, Francisco A C

    2002-06-01

    The contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to articular pain in arthritis induced by zymosan (1 mg, intra articular) in rats was assessed by measuring articular incapacitation (AI). Systemic treatment with the non-selective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME (10 - 100 mg kg(-1) i.p.) or with the selective iNOS inhibitors aminoguanidine (AG; 10 - 100 mg kg(-1) i.p.) or 1400W (0.5 - 1 mg kg(-1) s.c.) inhibited the AI induced by injection of zymosan 30 min later. Local (intra articular) treatment with the NOS inhibitors (L-NAME or AG, 0.1 - 1 micromol; 1400W, 0.01 (micromol) 30 min before zymosan also inhibited the AI. Systemic or local treatment with the NOS inhibitors (L-NAME; AG, 100 mg kg(-1) i.p. or 0.1 micromol joint(-1); 1400W, 1 mg kg(-1) s.c. or 0.01 micromol joint(-1)), 2 h after zymosan did not affect the subsequent AI. Local treatment with the NO donors SNP or SIN-1, 2 h after zymosan did inhibit AI. L-NAME and AG, given i.p. inhibited nitrite but not prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) levels in the joints. L-NAME (100 mg kg(-1)) but not AG (100 mg kg(-1)) increased mean arterial blood pressure. Neither L-NAME, AG nor the NO donor SIN-1 altered articular oedema induced by zymosan. In conclusion, inhibitors of iNOS decrease pain in zymosan arthritis only when given before the zymosan. This was not due to inhibition of articular PGE(2) release or oedema. NO donors also promoted antinociception in zymosan arthritis without affecting oedema.

  12. Recommendations of the ESSR Arthritis Subcommittee on Ultrasonography in Inflammatory Joint Disease.

    PubMed

    Plagou, Athena; Teh, James; Grainger, Andrew J; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Rennie, Winston; Åström, Gunnar; Feydy, Antoine; Giraudo, Chiara; Guerini, Henri; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Isaac, Amanda; Jans, Lennart; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Kainberger, Franz; Maas, Mario; Martinoli, Carlo; Mascarenhas, Vasco V; Miese, Falk; O'Connor, Philip; Oei, Edwin H; Østergaard, Mikkel; Peetrons, Philippe; Platzgummer, Hannes; Reijnierse, Monique; Robinson, Philip; Rupreht, Mitja; Simoni, Paolo; Wick, Marius C; Zejden, Anna; Klauser, Andrea S

    2016-11-01

    This article presents the recommendations of the European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology Arthritis Subcommittee on the use of ultrasonography (US) in rheumatic disease, focused on the examination of joints in the adult population. The recommended examination technique and protocols used in a radiologic work-up are discussed. The main US features that can lead to a final diagnosis in the most common rheumatic diseases are addressed. The differential diagnosis that should be considered at image interpretation is presented. The role of US in interventional procedures and clinically important recent developments is also discussed.

  13. Synergistic effects of anethole and ibuprofen in acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski-Rebecca, Edirlene S; Rocha, Bruno A; Wiirzler, Luiz A M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Velazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2015-12-05

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of anethole and ibuprofen in comparison with monotherapy by either drug alone, using two in vivo inflammatory models, namely the pleurisy and paw edema in rats. We also measured the levels of the TNF protein in plasma, and the ability of anethole to inhibit, in vitro, the activity of the cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes. The test drugs (anethole; ibuprofen; anethole + ibuprofen), at different doses, were administered once (p.o.) 60 min before the induction of the inflammatory response. The association of anethole + ibuprofen inhibited the development of the inflammatory response in both models used. This effect can be partially explained by the inhibitory action on the production of TNF and of COX isoforms. The isobologram analysis evidenced a synergistic effect between ibuprofen and anethole, because the combination of drugs showed a higher inhibitory potential than either drug alone.

  14. Peripheral NLCR4 inflammasome participates in the genesis of acute inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Alexandre H; Talbot, Jhimmy; Silva, Rangel L; Lima, Jonilson B; França, Rafael O; Verri, Waldiceu A; Mascarenhas, Danielle P; Ryffel, Bernhard; Cunha, Fernando Q; Zamboni, Dario S; Cunha, Thiago M

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory hyperalgesia is a complex process that depends on the sensitization of primary nociceptive neurons triggered by proinflammatory mediators, such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β). Recently, the peripheral activation of caspase-1 (previously known as IL-1β-converting enzyme) was implicated in the induction of acute inflammatory pain by promoting the processing of IL-1β from its precursor form, pro-IL-1β. Caspase-1 activation in several systems requires the assembly of an intracellular molecular platform called an inflammasome. Inflammasomes consist of 1 nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR), the adapter molecule apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a C-terminal caspase recruitment domain (ASC), and caspase-1. NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes are well described. However, the identity of the inflammasome that is involved in the peripheral activation of caspase-1 that accounts for acute inflammatory hyperalgesia has not been described. The present findings demonstrated that mice deficient in NLRC4 or ASC, but not in NLRP3, present reduced mechanical and thermal acute inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan. The reduced hyperalgesia was accompanied by significant impairments in the levels of mature forms of IL-1β (p17) and caspase-1 (p20) compared to wild-type mice at the inflammatory site. Therefore, these results identified the inflammasome components NLRC4 and ASC as the molecular platform involved in the peripheral activation of caspase-1 and IL-1β maturation, which are responsible for the induction of acute inflammatory pain. In conclusion, our study provides new therapeutic targets for the control of acute inflammatory pain.

  15. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 Receptor Antagonist, Potentiates the Inflammatory Response in a Rat Model of Peptidoglycan Polysaccharide-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rico, Mario C.; Dela Cadena, Raul A.; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2011-01-01

    The P2Y12 receptor plays a crucial role in the regulation of platelet activation by several agonists, which is irreversibly antagonized by the active metabolite of clopidogrel, a widely used anti-thrombotic drug. In this study, we investigated whether reduction of platelet reactivity leads to reduced inflammatory responses using a rat model of erosive arthritis. We evaluated the effect of clopidogrel on inflammation in Lewis rats in a peptidoglycan polysaccharide (PG-PS)-induced arthritis model with four groups of rats: 1) untreated, 2) clopidogrel-treated, 3) PG-PS-induced, and 4) PG-PS-induced and clopidogrel-treated. There were significant differences between the PG-PS+clopidogrel group when compared to the PG-PS group including: increased joint diameter and clinical manifestations of inflammation, elevated plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta, interferon (IFN) gamma, and IL-6), an elevated neutrophil blood count and an increased circulating platelet count. Plasma levels of IL-10 were significantly lower in the PG-PS+clopidogrel group compared to the PG-PS group. Plasma levels of platelet factor 4 (PF4) were elevated in both the PG-PS and the PG-PS+clopidogrel groups, however PF4 levels showed no difference upon clopidogrel treatment, suggesting that the pro- inflammatory effect of clopidogrel may be due to its action on cells other than platelets. Histology indicated an increase in leukocyte infiltration at the inflammatory area of the joint, increased pannus formation, blood vessel proliferation, subsynovial fibrosis and cartilage erosion upon treatment with clopidogrel in PG-PS-induced arthritis animals. In summary, animals treated with clopidogrel showed a pro-inflammatory effect in the PG-PS-induced arthritis animal model, which might not be mediated by platelets. Elucidation of the mechanism of clopidogrel-induced cell responses is important to understand the role of the P2Y12 receptor in inflammation. PMID:22028806

  16. TNFR1 and TNFR2 differentially mediate TNF-α-induced inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongfeng; Xiao, Weiguo

    2017-04-01

    TNF-α has long been implicated in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, how the receptors of TNF-α, namely TNFR1 and TNFR2, mediate TNF-α-induced inflammatory responses in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in RA has not been elucidated. In the present study, primary FLS cells were isolated from RA patients and treated with TNF-α in vitro. The exogenous TNF-α induced the expression and release of endogenous TNF-α in FLS. In addition, TNF-α led to gradual downregulation of TNFR1 following 1 h treatment. By contrast, the expression of TNFR2 was markedly upregulated after 12 h treatment with TNF-α. Moreover, following TNF-α treatment, the expression of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, and IL-8 was gradually increased with time, but their mRNA levels dropped significantly at 48 h. We further investigated the differential functions of TNFR1 and TNFR2 in FLS by conducting siRNA-mediated knockdown. The TNF-α autocrine was inhibited to a greater extent in TNFR1-silenced FLS compared with TNFR2-silenced FLS. Silencing of TNFR1, not TNFR2, activated intrinsic apoptosis and inhibited TNF-α-induced cytokine production in FLS. These results suggest that TNFR1 is the major pro-inflammatory mediator of TNF-α in FLS, whereas TNFR2, which is upregulated in response to prolonged TNF-α stimulation, may act as an immunosuppressor in FLS for the prevention of overwhelming inflammatory reactions.

  17. [Target Molecule for a Demyelinating Type of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into demyelinating type, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and axonal form, acute axonal motor neuropathy (AMAN). It has been clearly established that the target molecule for the former is a ganglioside. In contrast, despite years of effort, the target molecule for the latter has not been identified. Recently, molecules around the nodes of Ranvier have entered the spotlight, and "moesin" was reported to be a target molecule for cytomegalovirus associated-AIDP.

  18. Safety of celecoxib and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results of the phase 4 registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess long-term safety and developmental data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients treated in routine clinical practice with celecoxib or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs). Methods Children aged ≥2 to <18 years with rheumatoid-factor–positive or –negative polyarthritis, persistent or extended oligoarthritis, or systemic arthritis were enrolled into this prospective, observational, multicenter standard-of-care registry. Eligible patients were newly or recently prescribed (≤6 months) an nsNSAID or celecoxib. Enrolled patients were followed to the end of the study, whether they remained on the original NSAID, switched, or discontinued therapy altogether. All adverse events (AEs) regardless of severity were captured in the database. Results A total of 274 patients (nsNSAID, n = 219; celecoxib, n = 55) were observed for 410 patient-years of observation. Naproxen, meloxicam, and nabumetone were the most frequently used nsNSAIDs. At baseline, the celecoxib group was older, had a numerically longer median time since diagnosis, and a numerically higher proportion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal-related NSAID intolerance. AEs reported were those frequently observed with NSAID treatment and were similar across groups (nsNSAIDs: 52.0%; celecoxib: 52.9%). Twelve unique patients experienced a total of 18 serious AEs; the most frequent were infections, and none was attributed to NSAID use. Conclusions The safety profile of celecoxib and nsNSAIDs appears similar overall. The results from this registry, ongoing pharmacovigilance, and the phase 3 trial that led to the approval of celecoxib for children with JIA provide evidence that the benefit-risk for celecoxib treatment in JIA remains positive. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00688545. PMID:25057265

  19. Acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Quek, Amy May Lin; Soon, Derek; Chan, Yee Cheun; Thamboo, Thomas Paulraj; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-06-15

    Inflammatory neuropathies have been reported to occur in association with nephrotic syndrome. Their underlying immuno-pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. A 50-year-old woman concurrently presented with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and nephrotic syndrome secondary to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Both neuropathy and proteinuria improved after plasma exchange and steroids. Literature review of cases of concurrent inflammatory neuropathies and nephrotic syndrome revealed similar neuro-renal presentations. This neuro-renal condition may be mediated by autoantibodies targeting myelin and podocytes.

  20. Collagen-induced arthritis and related animal models: how much of their pathogenesis is auto-immune, how much is auto-inflammatory?

    PubMed

    Billiau, Alfons; Matthys, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we discuss our studies on the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and related mouse models for rheumatoid arthritis. Of note, these models invariably rely on the use of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Our analysis has focused on explaining the dichotomous - either protective or disease-promoting - role of endogenous IFN-γ. Induction of a myelopoietic burst by CFA was identified as an important and underestimated factor in mediating the role of IFN-γ and other cytokines (IL-6, IL-17, GCP-2, RANK-L). Myelopoiesis provides an excess in precursors for joint-infiltrating neutrophils and osteoclasts. We postulate that classical CIA is primarily an auto-inflammatory disease, in part because of a strong innate immune response to the adjuvant. Superimposed on this, collagen-specific auto-immunity reinforces inflammatory reactivity in joints.

  1. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome presenting as secondary syphilis with polymorphous erythema and knee arthritis.

    PubMed

    Brochard, J; Khatchatourian, L; Woaye-Hune, P; Biron, C; Lefebvre, M; Denis-Musquer, M; Grange, P; Dupin, N; Raffi, F

    2017-03-08

    Syphilis and HIV are strongly linked to one another and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation can complicate matters. A 24-years-old homosexual man was hospitalized for fever, cough and headache. HIV infection had been diagnosed 5 years earlier but he discontinued ART for the last 2 years. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  3. An animal model of chronic inflammatory pain: pharmacological and temporal differentiation from acute models.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Alex W; Medhurst, Stephen J; Dixon, Claire I; Bontoft, Nick C; Winyard, Lisa A; Brackenborough, Kim T; De Alba, Jorge; Clarke, Christopher J; Gunthorpe, Martin J; Hicks, Gareth A; Bountra, Chas; McQueen, Daniel S; Chessell, Iain P

    2006-08-01

    Clinically, inflammatory pain is far more persistent than that typically modelled pre-clinically, with the majority of animal models focussing on short-term effects of the inflammatory pain response. The large attrition rate of compounds in the clinic which show pre-clinical efficacy suggests the need for novel models of, or approaches to, chronic inflammatory pain if novel mechanisms are to make it to the market. A model in which a more chronic inflammatory hypersensitivity phenotype is profiled may allow for a more clinically predictive tool. The aims of these studies were to characterise and validate a chronic model of inflammatory pain. We have shown that injection of a large volume of adjuvant to the intra-articular space of the rat knee results in a prolonged inflammatory pain response, compared to the response in an acute adjuvant model. Additionally, this model also results in a hypersensitive state in the presence and absence of inflammation. A range of clinically effective analgesics demonstrate activity in this chronic model, including morphine (3mg/kg, t.i.d.), dexamethasone (1mg/kg, b.i.d.), ibuprofen (30mg/kg, t.i.d.), etoricoxib (5mg/kg, b.i.d.) and rofecoxib (0.3-10mg/kg, b.i.d.). A further aim was to exemplify the utility of this chronic model over the more acute intra-plantar adjuvant model using two novel therapeutic approaches; NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonism and iNOS inhibition. Our data shows that different effects were observed with these therapies when comparing the acute model with the model of chronic inflammatory joint pain. These data suggest that the chronic model may be more relevant to identifying mechanisms for the treatment of chronic inflammatory pain states in the clinic.

  4. Pathophysiological mechanisms of acute pancreatitis define inflammatory markers of clinical prognosis.

    PubMed

    Minkov, Georgi A; Halacheva, Krasimira S; Yovtchev, Yovcho P; Gulubova, Maya V

    2015-07-01

    Development of acute pancreatitis illustrates the need to understand the basic mechanisms of disease progression to drive the exploration of therapeutic options. Cytokines play a major role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis as underlying systemic inflammatory response, tissue damage, and organ dysfunction. However, little is known about circulating concentrations of these inflammatory markers and their real impact on clinical practice. Experimental studies have suggested that the prognosis for acute pancreatitis depends on the degree of pancreatic necrosis and the intensity of multisystem organ failure generated by the systemic inflammatory response. This suggests an intricate balance between localized tissue damage with proinflammatory cytokine production and a systemic anti-inflammatory response that restricts the inappropriate movement of proinflammatory agents into the circulation. Implication of such mediators suggests that interruption or blunting of an inappropriate immune response has the potential to improve outcome. A detailed understanding of pathophysiological processes and immunological aspects in patients with acute pancreatitis is the basis for the development of therapeutic strategies that will provide significant reductions in morbidity and mortality.

  5. Role of inflammatory mediators in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Moochhala, Shabbir

    2004-02-01

    Inflammatory response leading to organ dysfunction and failure continues to be the major problem after injury in many clinical conditions such as sepsis, severe burns, acute pancreatitis, haemorrhagic shock, and trauma. In general terms, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an entirely normal response to injury. Systemic leukocyte activation, however, is a direct consequence of a SIRS and if excessive, can lead to distant organ damage and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). When SIRS leads to MODS and organ failure, the mortality becomes high and can be more than 50%. Acute lung injury that clinically manifests as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major component of MODS of various aetiologies. Inflammatory mediators play a key role in the pathogenesis of ARDS, which is the primary cause of death in these conditions. This review summarizes recent studies that demonstrate the critical role played by inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, platelet activating factor (PAF), IL-10, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), C5a, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, substance P, chemokines, VEGF, IGF-I, KGF, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in the pathogenesis of ARDS. It is reasonable to speculate that elucidation of the key mediators in ARDS coupled with the discovery of specific inhibitors would make it possible to develop clinically effective anti-inflammatory therapy.

  6. Animal Models of Bone Loss in Inflammatory Arthritis: from Cytokines in the Bench to Novel Treatments for Bone Loss in the Bedside-a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Alves, C Henrique; Farrell, Eric; Vis, Marijn; Colin, Edgar M; Lubberts, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Throughout life, bone is continuously remodelled. Bone is formed by osteoblasts, from mesenchymal origin, while osteoclasts induce bone resorption. This process is tightly regulated. During inflammation, several growth factors and cytokines are increased inducing osteoclast differentiation and activation, and chronic inflammation is a condition that initiates systemic bone loss. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory auto-immune disease that is characterised by active synovitis and is associated with early peri-articular bone loss. Peri-articular bone loss precedes focal bone erosions, which may progress to bone destruction and disability. The incidence of generalised osteoporosis is associated with the severity of arthritis in RA and increased osteoporotic vertebral and hip fracture risk. In this review, we will give an overview of different animal models of inflammatory arthritis related to RA with focus on bone erosion and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, a humanised endochondral ossification model will be discussed, which can be used in a translational approach to answer osteoimmunological questions.

  7. Inflammatory triggers of acute rejection of organ allografts

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Daniel N.; Kreisel, Daniel; Fullerton, James N.; Gilroy, Derek W.; Goldstein, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Solid organ transplantation is a vital therapy for end stage diseases. Decades of research has established that the components of the adaptive immune system are critical for transplant rejection, but the role of the innate immune system in organ transplantation is just emerging. Accumulating evidence indicates that the innate immune system is activated at the time of organ implantation by the release of endogenous inflammatory triggers. This review discusses the nature of these triggers in organ transplantation and also potential mediators that may enhance inflammation resolution after organ implantation. PMID:24517430

  8. Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Repression of Pro-Inflammatory Genes in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    reads over 100-bp windows. Read distribution in inputs (In) was used to establish background. Peaks were called (marked in red) using CLC Genomics...acetylation were also limited to initiation-controlled genes, and were not seen at elongations-controlled Tnf (Fig. 3). Modifications are read by so- called ...is driven by immune cells such as macrophages that migrate into the affected joints and produce small proteins called inflammatory cytokines. This

  9. Aging predisposes to acute inflammatory induced pathology after tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Sckisel, Gail D; Chen, Mingyi; Mirsoian, Annie; Zamora, Anthony E; Maverakis, Emanual; Wilkins, Danice E C; Alderson, Kory L; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Weiss, Jonathan M; Monjazeb, Arta M; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L; Blazar, Bruce R; Wiltrout, Robert H; Redelman, Doug; Taub, Dennis D; Murphy, William J

    2013-10-21

    Cancer commonly occurs in the elderly and immunotherapy (IT) is being increasingly applied to this population. However, the majority of preclinical mouse tumor models assessing potential efficacy and toxicities of therapeutics use young mice. We assessed the impact of age on responses to systemic immune stimulation. In contrast to young mice, systemic cancer IT regimens or LPS given to aged mice resulted in rapid and lethal toxicities affecting multiple organs correlating with heightened proinflammatory cytokines systemically and within the parenchymal tissues. This inflammatory response and increased morbidity with age was independent of T cells or NK cells. However, prior in vivo depletion of macrophages in aged mice resulted in lesser cytokine levels, increased survival, and decreased liver histopathology. Furthermore, macrophages from aged mice and normal human elderly volunteers displayed heightened TNF and IL-6 production upon in vitro stimulation. Treatment of both TNF knockout mice and in vivo TNF blockade in aged mice resulted in significant increases in survival and lessened pathology. Importantly, TNF blockade in tumor-bearing, aged mice receiving IT displayed significant anti-tumor effects. These data demonstrate the critical role of macrophages in the age-associated hyper-inflammatory cytokine responses to systemic immunostimulation and underscore the importance of performing preclinical assessments in aged mice.

  10. Aging predisposes to acute inflammatory induced pathology after tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Chen, Mingyi; Mirsoian, Annie; Zamora, Anthony E.; Maverakis, Emanual; Wilkins, Danice E.C.; Alderson, Kory L.; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Redelman, Doug; Taub, Dennis D.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer commonly occurs in the elderly and immunotherapy (IT) is being increasingly applied to this population. However, the majority of preclinical mouse tumor models assessing potential efficacy and toxicities of therapeutics use young mice. We assessed the impact of age on responses to systemic immune stimulation. In contrast to young mice, systemic cancer IT regimens or LPS given to aged mice resulted in rapid and lethal toxicities affecting multiple organs correlating with heightened proinflammatory cytokines systemically and within the parenchymal tissues. This inflammatory response and increased morbidity with age was independent of T cells or NK cells. However, prior in vivo depletion of macrophages in aged mice resulted in lesser cytokine levels, increased survival, and decreased liver histopathology. Furthermore, macrophages from aged mice and normal human elderly volunteers displayed heightened TNF and IL-6 production upon in vitro stimulation. Treatment of both TNF knockout mice and in vivo TNF blockade in aged mice resulted in significant increases in survival and lessened pathology. Importantly, TNF blockade in tumor-bearing, aged mice receiving IT displayed significant anti-tumor effects. These data demonstrate the critical role of macrophages in the age-associated hyper-inflammatory cytokine responses to systemic immunostimulation and underscore the importance of performing preclinical assessments in aged mice. PMID:24081947

  11. Acute gouty arthritis complicated with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction is independently associated with short- and long-term adverse non-fatal cardiac events.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Liang; Lee, Hsin-Fu; Chou, Shing-Hsien; Lin, Yen-Chen; Lin, Chia-Pin; Wang, Chun-Li; Chang, Chi-Jen; Hsu, Lung-An

    2014-01-01

    Large epidemiologic studies have associated gouty arthritis with the risk of coronary heart disease. However, there has been a lack of information regarding the outcomes for patients who have gout attacks during hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction. We reviewed the data of 444 consecutive patients who were admitted to our hospital between 2005 and 2008 due to acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The clinical outcomes were compared between patients with gout attack and those without. Of the 444, 48 patients with acute STEMI developed acute gouty arthritis during hospitalization. The multivariate analysis identified prior history of gout and estimated glomerular filtration rate as independent risk factors of gout attack for patients with acute STEMI (odds ratio (OR) 21.02, 95 % CI 2.96-149.26, p = 0.002; OR 0.92, 95 % CI 0.86-0.99, p = 0.035, respectively). The in-hospital mortality and duration of hospital stay did not differ significantly between the gouty group and the non-gouty group (controls). During a mean follow-up of 49 ± 28 months, all-cause mortality and stroke were similar for both groups. Multivariate Cox regression showed that gout attack was independently associated with short- and long-term adverse non-fatal cardiac events (hazard ratio (HR) 1.88, 95 % CI 1.09-3.24, p = 0.024; HR 1.82, 95 % CI 1.09-3.03, p = 0.022, respectively). Gout attack among patients hospitalized due to acute STEMI was independently associated with short-term and long-term rates of adverse non-fatal cardiac events.

  12. Serum inflammatory biomarkers fail to identify early axial spondyloarthritis: results from the SpondyloArthritis Caught Early (SPACE) cohort

    PubMed Central

    Turina, Maureen C; Yeremenko, Nataliya; van Gaalen, Floris; van Oosterhout, Maikel; Berg, Inger J; Ramonda, Ramona; Lebre, Cristina (M C); Landewé, Robert; Baeten, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Decreasing the diagnostic delay in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) remains a major challenge. Here, we assessed the value of serum inflammatory biomarkers to distinguish early axSpA from other pathologies in a large cohort of patients referred with early back pain. Methods Serum c reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and calprotectin were determined in the SPondyloArthritis Caught Early (SPACE) cohort (n=310), an early back pain inception cohort. Additionally, explorative serum biomarkers derived from the literature (interleukin-27 (IL-27), human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) and lipcolin-2 (LCN-2)) were determined by ELISA in full-blown patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (n=21) and healthy controls (n=20). Results Serum CRP and ESR levels were not elevated in early axSpA versus ‘control’ back pain patients. Serum calprotectin was elevated in early axSpA versus controls (p=0.01) but failed to identify early axSpA at the individual level (positive predictive value of 38.7%). As to explorative biomarkers, serum levels of IL-27 were not detectable, and hBD-2 and LCN-2 serum levels were not elevated in full-blown AS versus healthy controls (p=0.572, p=0.562, respectively). Therefore, these markers were not further determined in the SPACE cohort. Conclusions None of the candidate serum inflammatory markers were useful as diagnostic markers in the early phase of axSpA. PMID:28123777

  13. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  14. Pro-inflammatory effects of hydrogen sulphide on substance P in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Sidhapuriwala, Jenab N; Ng, Siaw Wei; Tamizhselvi, Ramasamy; Moochhala, Shabbir M

    2008-04-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S), a novel gasotransmitter, has been recognized to play an important role in inflammation. Cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE) is a major H(2)S synthesizing enzyme in the cardiovascular system and DL-propargylglycine (PAG) is an irreversible inhibitor of CSE. Substance P (SP), a product of preprotachykinin-A (PPT-A) gene, is a well-known pro-inflammatory mediator which acts principally through the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). We have shown an association between H(2)S and SP in pulmonary inflammation as well as a pro-inflammatory role of H(2)S and SP in acute pancreatitis. The present study was aimed to investigate the interplay between pro-inflammatory effects of H(2)S and SP in a murine model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced in mice by 10 hourly intraperitoneal injections of caerulein (50 (g/kg). PAG (100 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered either 1 hr before (prophylactic) or 1 hr after (therapeutic) the first caerulein injection. PAG, given prophylactically as well as therapeutically, significantly reduced plasma H(2)S levels and pancreatic H(2)S synthesizing activities as well as SP concentrations in plasma, pancreas and lung compared with caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, prophylactic as well as therapeutic administration of PAG significantly reduced PPT-A mRNA expression and NK-1R mRNA expression in both pancreas and lung when compared with caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. These results suggest that the pro-inflammatory effects of H(2)S may be mediated by SP-NK-1R pathway in acute pancreatitis.

  15. Gonococcal and nongonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo

    2009-02-01

    Acute bacterial arthritis usually is caused by gonococcal or nongonococcal infection of the joints. Nongonococcal and gonococcal arthritis are the most potentially dangerous and destructive forms of acute arthritis. These bacterial infections of the joints are usually curable with treatment, but morbidity and mortality are still significant in patients who have underlying rheumatoid arthritis, patients who have prosthetic joints, elderly patients, and patients who have severe and multiple comorbidities. This article reviews the risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of nongonococcal and gonococcal arthritis.

  16. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: Updates on an inflammatory CNS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Daniela; Alper, Gulay; Van Haren, Keith; Kornberg, Andrew J; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Tenembaum, Silvia; Belman, Anita L

    2016-08-30

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated demyelinating CNS disorder with predilection to early childhood. ADEM is generally considered a monophasic disease. However, recurrent ADEM has been described and defined as multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis. ADEM often occurs postinfectiously, although a causal relationship has never been established. ADEM and multiple sclerosis are currently viewed as distinct entities, generally distinguishable even at disease onset. However, pathologic studies have demonstrated transitional cases of yet unclear significance. ADEM is clinically defined by acute polyfocal neurologic deficits including encephalopathy. MRI typically demonstrates reversible, ill-defined white matter lesions of the brain and often also the spinal cord, along with frequent involvement of thalami and basal ganglia. CSF analysis may reveal a mild pleocytosis and elevated protein, but is generally negative for intrathecal oligoclonal immunoglobulin G synthesis. In the absence of a specific diagnostic test, ADEM is considered a diagnosis of exclusion, and ADEM mimics, especially those requiring a different treatment approach, have to be carefully ruled out. The role of biomarkers, including autoantibodies like anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of ADEM is currently under debate. Based on the presumed autoimmune etiology of ADEM, the current treatment approach consists of early immunotherapy. Outcome of ADEM in pediatric patients is generally favorable, but cognitive deficits have been reported even in the absence of other neurologic sequelae. This review summarizes the current knowledge on epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, neuroimaging features, CSF findings, differential diagnosis, therapy, and outcome, with a focus on recent advances and controversies.

  17. Comparative Expression Analyses of Pro- versus Anti-Inflammatory Mediators within Synovium of Patients with Joint Trauma, Osteoarthritis, and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shaqura, Mohammed; John, Thilo; Likar, Rudolf; Ebied, Reham Said; Schäfer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Synovial injury and healing are complex processes including catabolic effects by proinflammatory cytokines and anabolic processes by anti-inflammatory mediators. Here we examined the expression of pro- versus anti-inflammatory mediators in synovium of patients with diagnostic arthroscopy (control), joint trauma (JT), osteoarthritis (OA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Synovial samples from these patients were subjected to RT-PCR and double immunofluorescence confocal microscopy of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators as well as immune cell markers. Interestingly, pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators were expressed predominantly in granulocytes in patients with JT and in macrophages, lymphocytes, and plasma cells in patients with OA and RA. Interestingly, parallel to the severity of inflammation, proinflammatory mediators IL-1β, TNF-α, and 5-LOX specific mRNA as well as immunoreactive (IR) cells were significantly more abundant in patients with RA and JT than in those with OA. However, anti-inflammatory mediators 15-LOX, FPR2, and IL-10 specific mRNA as well as IR cells were significantly more abundant in patients with OA than in those with JT and RA. These findings show that upregulation of proinflammatory mediators contributes to the predominantly catabolic inflammatory process in JT and RA synovium, whereas upregulation of anabolic anti-inflammatory mediators counteracts inflammation resulting in the inferior inflammatory process in OA synovium. PMID:28316377

  18. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone damage and repair in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Swales, Catherine; Sabokbar, Afsie

    2014-08-01

    Bone remodelling relies on tightly controlled cycles of bone resorption and formation, mediated by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively. The past two decades have seen a huge increase in our understanding of immune modulation and disruption of bone homeostasis in rheumatic diseases; identification of the molecular pathways responsible for accelerated bone loss in such conditions has given rise to potential novel therapeutic targets. Most recently, the role of microRNAs in inflammatory and noninflammatory bone loss raises the intriguing possibility that modification of cellular protein translation could also be a treatment strategy for bone damage.

  19. Cytokines in chronic inflammatory arthritis. II. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in rheumatoid synovial effusions.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, W D; Firestein, G S; Taetle, R; Kaushansky, K; Zvaifler, N J

    1989-01-01

    A liquid culture technique was used to study 23 synovial fluids (SF) (21 from inflammatory joint diseases and 2 noninflammatory SF) and supernatants of two cultured rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial tissues for colony-stimulating factor (CSF). The proliferative responses of human peripheral blood macrophage-depleted non-T cells treated with synovial fluids, supernatants of synovial tissue explants, and recombinant granulocyte-macrophage (rGM)-CSF were compared. Aggregates of cells that formed in long-term cultures (15 d) were similar for each applied agent and consisted of macrophages, eosinophils, and large blasts. Tritiated thymidine incorporation was proportional to the concentration of rGM-CSF and was accompanied by an increase in number and size of cellular aggregates formed in the cultures. CSF activity was observed in inflammatory SF, with tritiated thymidine uptake of 3,501 +/- 1,140 cpm in the presence of RA samples (n = 15) compared to 1,985 +/- 628 for non-RA inflammatory SF (n = 7) (P less than 0.05) and 583 +/- 525 for medium (n = 6) (P less than 0.01). The proliferative response to RA SF was often more apparent when the samples were diluted, because at higher concentrations the RA SF was inhibitory. Two RA SF were fractionated by Sephadex G100 column chromatography; low levels of CSF activity were detected in fractions corresponding to Mr of 70-100 kD, but the major CSF activity was found in the 20-24-kD fractions. A polyclonal rabbit anti-GM-CSF antibody eliminated the stimulating activity from both rGM-CSF and RA SF. Finally, a specific RIA identified significant levels of GM-CSF (40-140 U/ml) in the culture supernatants of 3 additional RA synovial tissues. These data document the local production of GM-CSF in rheumatoid synovitis and are the first description of this cytokine at a site of disease activity. Images PMID:2646320

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Properties of NAP in Acute Toxoplasma Gondii-Induced Ileitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Heimesaat, Markus M; Fischer, André; Kühl, Anja A; Göbel, Ulf B; Gozes, Illana; Bereswill, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    The octapeptide NAP has been shown to exert neuroprotective properties. Here, we investigated potential anti-inflammatory effects of NAP in an acute ileitis model. To address this, C57BL/6j mice were perorally infected with Toxoplasma gondii (day 0). Within 1 week postinfection (p.i.), placebo (PLC)-treated mice developed acute ileitis due to Th1-type immune responses. Mice that were subjected to intraperitoneal NAP treatment from day 1 until day 6 p.i., however, developed less distinct macroscopic and microscopic disease as indicated by less body weight loss, less distinct histopathological ileal changes, and lower ileal apoptotic, but higher proliferating cell numbers, less abundance of neutrophils, macrophages, monocytes, and T lymphocytes, but higher numbers of regulatory T cells in the ileal mucosa and lamina propria, and lower concentrations of pro-inflammatory mediators in the ilea as compared to PLC controls at day 7 p.i. Remarkably, NAP-mediated anti-inflammatory effects could also be observed in extra-intestinal compartments including liver and spleen. Strikingly, lower MCP-1, TNF, and IL-12p70 serum concentrations in NAP as compared to PLC-treated mice at day 7 p.i. indicate a pronounced systemic anti-inflammatory effect of NAP in acute ileitis. These findings provide first evidence for NAP as a potential novel treatment option in intestinal inflammation.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effects of melatonin in a rat model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Cristina; Marchena, Ana M; Holguín-Arévalo, María S; Martín-Partido, Gervasio; Rodríguez, Ana B; Paredes, Sergio D; Pariente, José A

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the protective effect of melatonin in a rat model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. For the induction of experimental acute pancreatitis, four subcutaneous injections of caerulein (20 mgkg–1 body weight) were given to Wistar rats at 2-h intervals. Melatonin was injected intraperitoneally (25 mg kg–1 body weight) 30 min before each caerulein injection. After 12 h, rats were sacrificed by decapitation. Blood and pancreas samples were collected and processed for serological and histopathological studies,respectively. Lipase, a-amylase, corticosterone, total antioxidant power and cytokines interleukin (IL)-1b, IL-4 and tumour necrosis factor(TNF)-a were determined using commercial kits. ANOVA and Tukey tests (P<0.05) were performed for the statistical analysis of the results.Results showed that the administration of melatonin reduced histological damage induced by caerulein treatment as well as the hyperamylasemia and hyperlipidemia. Corticosterone and antioxidant total power were also reverted to basal activities. Furthermore, melatonin pre-treatment reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1b and TNF-a and increased the serum levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4. In conclusion,the findings suggest that the protective effect of melatonin in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis is mediated by the anti-inflammatory ability of this indolamine. Thus, melatonin may have a protective effect against acute pancreatitis.

  2. Acute septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae: a rare causative origin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Myong-Joo; Kim, Yeon-Dong; Ham, Hyang-Do

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is a rare entity with symptoms that include erythema, swelling, and tenderness over the AC joint, fever, and limitation of shoulder motion with pain. In previous reports, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species have been mentioned as common causative organisms. Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal inhabitant of the oral cavity, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital tract. However, it sometimes causes opportunistic infections leading to septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. AC joint infection associated with H.parainfluenzae is very rare, and only one case has been reported in the literature. Moreover, septic arthritis in immunocompetent patients is also very rare. Here, we report the case of a healthy patient with H. parainfluenzae-related septic arthritis of the AC joint.

  3. The Impact of Acute Matriptase Inhibition in Hepatic Inflammatory Models

    PubMed Central

    Szombath, Gergely; Rokonál, Patrik; Mátis, Gábor; Neogrády, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Dysfunction of matriptase-2 can be involved in iron regulatory disorder via downregulation of hepcidin expression. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 3-amidinophenylalanine-derived matriptase inhibitors on porcine hepatic inflammatory cell models. Methods. Hepatocyte-Kupffer cell cocultures (ratio of 2 : 1 and 6 : 1) were treated with four structurally related matriptase inhibitors at 50 μM. Cell cytotoxicity and relative expressions of IL-6 and IL-8 and the levels of hepcidin were determined by MTS and porcine-specific ELISA. The extracellular H2O2 contents were analyzed by Amplex Red method. Results. Matriptase inhibitors at 50 µM for 24 h did not increase cell death rate. The elevated ROS production observed after short-term application of inhibitor MI-441 could be correlated with lowered hepcidin expression. MI-460 could significantly enhance hepcidin levels in the supernatants of cocultures (by 62.21 ± 26.8% in hepatocyte-Kupffer cell, 2 : 1, and by 42.6 ± 14.3% in hepatocyte-Kupffer cell, 6 : 1, cocultures, resp.). No significant changes were found in IL-6 and IL-8 levels in cocultures exposed to matriptase inhibitors. Conclusions. Based on in vitro findings, administration of MI-460 via modulation of hepcidin expression without cytotoxic and oxidative stress inducing properties might be a reliable alternative to treat iron overload in human and veterinary clinical practice. PMID:27642598

  4. Management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Abdul A; Elkhalili, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a comorbid condition that affects, based on recent estimates, between 47% and 54% of patients with gouty arthritis. However, data from randomized controlled trials in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD are limited, and current gouty arthritis treatment guidelines do not address the challenges associated with managing this patient population. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are recommended first-line treatments for acute gouty arthritis attacks. However, in patients with CKD, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended because their use can exacerbate or cause acute kidney injury. Also, colchicine toxicity is increased in patients with CKD, and dosage reduction is required based on level of kidney function. Allopurinol, febuxostat, and pegloticase are all effective treatments for controlling elevated uric acid levels after the treatment of an acute attack. However, in patients with CKD, required allopurinol dosage reductions may limit efficacy; pegloticase requires further investigation in this population, and febuxostat has not been studied in patients with creatinine clearance<30 mL/min. This article reviews the risks and benefits associated with currently available pharmacologic agents for the management of acute and chronic gouty arthritis including urate-lowering therapy in patients with CKD. Challenges specific to primary care providers are addressed, including guidance to help them decide when to collaborate with, or refer patients to, rheumatology and nephrology specialists based on the severity of gout and CKD.

  5. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for acute fulminant inflammatory cardiomyopathy: Series of six patients and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Goland, Sorel; Czer, Lawrence SC; Siegel, Robert J; Tabak, Steven; Jordan, Stanley; Luthringer, Daniel; Mirocha, James; Coleman, Bernice; Kass, Robert M; Trento, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although an autoimmune mechanism has been postulated for myocarditis and acute-onset inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), immunomodulatory treatment strategies are still under investigation. METHODS AND RESULTS: The clinical data of six patients with acute inflammatory DCM referred for evaluation for possible heart transplantation were reviewed. All patients were admitted with acute congestive heart failure and severely impaired left ventricular (LV) function and were treated with high-dose (2 g/kg) intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The diagnosis of acute inflammatory DCM was based on recent onset of congestive heart failure (New York Heart Association functional class III or IV) with severely depressed LV ejection fraction ([LVEF] 30% or lower) occurring shortly after viral-like illness. All patients had inflammation on endomyocardial biopsy or elevated cardiac enzymes, as well as a normal coronary angiogram. All patients were in New York Heart Association class I or II at the time of hospital discharge. The mean LVEF improved from 21.7±7.5% at baseline to 50.3±8.6% at discharge (P=0.005). Four patients had complete recovery (LVEF 50% or higher) and two patients had partial LV recovery. Patients were followed for a median 13.2 months (range two to 24 months) and had a mean LVEF of 53±6% (P not significant versus LVEF at discharge). CONCLUSIONS: Therapy with intravenous high-dose IVIG may be a potentially useful treatment in selected patients if given early in the course of acute fulminant inflammatory DCM. A randomized, prospective trial is warranted to prove the real benefit of IVIG in this patient population. PMID:18612500

  6. Exploring the Inflammatory Metabolomic Profile to Predict Response to TNF-α Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cuppen, Bart V J; Fu, Junzeng; van Wietmarschen, Herman A; Harms, Amy C; Koval, Slavik; Marijnissen, Anne C A; Peeters, Judith J W; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Tekstra, Janneke; van Laar, Jacob M; Hankemeier, Thomas; Lafeber, Floris P J G; van der Greef, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In clinical practice, approximately one-third of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) respond insufficiently to TNF-α inhibitors (TNFis). The aim of the study was to explore the use of a metabolomics to identify predictors for the outcome of TNFi therapy, and study the metabolomic fingerprint in active RA irrespective of patients' response. In the metabolomic profiling, lipids, oxylipins, and amines were measured in serum samples of RA patients from the observational BiOCURA cohort, before start of biological treatment. Multivariable logistic regression models were established to identify predictors for good- and non-response in patients receiving TNFi (n = 124). The added value of metabolites over prediction using clinical parameters only was determined by comparing the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC), sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative predictive value and by the net reclassification index (NRI). The models were further validated by 10-fold cross validation and tested on the complete TNFi treatment cohort including moderate responders. Additionally, metabolites were identified that cross-sectionally associated with the RA disease activity score based on a 28-joint count (DAS28), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) or C-reactive protein (CRP). Out of 139 metabolites, the best-performing predictors were sn1-LPC(18:3-ω3/ω6), sn1-LPC(15:0), ethanolamine, and lysine. The model that combined the selected metabolites with clinical parameters showed a significant larger AUC-ROC than that of the model containing only clinical parameters (p = 0.01). The combined model was able to discriminate good- and non-responders with good accuracy and to reclassify non-responders with an improvement of 30% (total NRI = 0.23) and showed a prediction error of 0.27. For the complete TNFi cohort, the NRI was 0.22. In addition, 88 metabolites were associated with DAS28, ESR or CRP (p<0.05). Our study established an accurate prediction model

  7. Exploring the Inflammatory Metabolomic Profile to Predict Response to TNF-α Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    van Wietmarschen, Herman A.; Harms, Amy C.; Koval, Slavik; Marijnissen, Anne C. A.; Peeters, Judith J. W.; Bijlsma, Johannes W. J.; Tekstra, Janneke; van Laar, Jacob M.; Hankemeier, Thomas; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.; van der Greef, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In clinical practice, approximately one-third of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) respond insufficiently to TNF-α inhibitors (TNFis). The aim of the study was to explore the use of a metabolomics to identify predictors for the outcome of TNFi therapy, and study the metabolomic fingerprint in active RA irrespective of patients’ response. In the metabolomic profiling, lipids, oxylipins, and amines were measured in serum samples of RA patients from the observational BiOCURA cohort, before start of biological treatment. Multivariable logistic regression models were established to identify predictors for good- and non-response in patients receiving TNFi (n = 124). The added value of metabolites over prediction using clinical parameters only was determined by comparing the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC), sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative predictive value and by the net reclassification index (NRI). The models were further validated by 10-fold cross validation and tested on the complete TNFi treatment cohort including moderate responders. Additionally, metabolites were identified that cross-sectionally associated with the RA disease activity score based on a 28-joint count (DAS28), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) or C-reactive protein (CRP). Out of 139 metabolites, the best-performing predictors were sn1-LPC(18:3-ω3/ω6), sn1-LPC(15:0), ethanolamine, and lysine. The model that combined the selected metabolites with clinical parameters showed a significant larger AUC-ROC than that of the model containing only clinical parameters (p = 0.01). The combined model was able to discriminate good- and non-responders with good accuracy and to reclassify non-responders with an improvement of 30% (total NRI = 0.23) and showed a prediction error of 0.27. For the complete TNFi cohort, the NRI was 0.22. In addition, 88 metabolites were associated with DAS28, ESR or CRP (p<0.05). Our study established an accurate prediction

  8. Trikatu, an herbal compound ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis by the suppression of inflammatory immune responses in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis and on cultured fibroblast like synoviocytes via the inhibition of the NFκB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Doss, Hari Madhuri; Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-10-25

    The present study was designed to investigate the potential therapeutic effect of trikatu, an herbal compound and its underlying molecular mechanism in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Our results indicate that trikatu (1000 mg/kg/b.wt. oral) administration suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1) and downregulated the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, MCP-1, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)) and transcription factors (nuclear factor kappa B 65 (NFкB-p65) and activator protein-1 (AP-1)) in cultured AIA-fibroblast like synoviocytes and synovial tissue of AIA rats. Consistently, the protein expression of NFкB-p65, IL-17, TNF-α, COX-2, and RANKL was also dramatically reduced in cultured AIA-fibroblast like synoviocytes and synovial tissue of AIA rats by trikatu treatment. In addition, trikatu suppressed the expression and phosphorylation of NFкB-p65 similar to the Bay 11-7082 (NFкB inhibitor) in cultured AIA-fibroblast like synoviocytes. Furthermore, trikatu alleviated the histopathology of joint of arthritic rats. Overall, these data highlights that trikatu could be a promising alternative modality for the possible treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.

  9. Efficacy and safety of monoclonal antibodies targeting interleukin-17 pathway for inflammatory arthritis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Min; Duan, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    T-helper 17 (Th17) pathway plays an important and distinct role in autoimmunity and inflammation. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that interleukin-17 (IL-17) is also synthesized in inflammatory arthritis tissues and exerts potent proinflammatory and joint-destructive activities. Clinical studies have been performed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of antibodies blocking the IL-17 signaling pathway in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we performed a meta-analysis to systematically evaluate the clinical effects of IL-17 antibodies in RA patients. By searching PubMed, five randomized, placebo-controlled randomized controlled clinical trials that tested three antibodies against IL-17A (LY2439821 and secukinumab/AIN457) and the IL-17A receptor (brodalumab) were identified. The primary outcomes that were analyzed include American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Improvement Criteria and Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28). Meanwhile, the safety and adverse effects were also systematically analyzed. The results of the meta-analysis demonstrated that IL-17 antibody is effective in ameliorating the RA symptoms. Specifically, IL-17-blocking antibody significantly reduced ACR20 and ACR50. It also dramatically reduced DAS28, an index that measures tenderness and swelling severity of joints. The side effects of and intolerance to the antibody treatment were higher than those in the placebo control. The analysis result provides evidence-based information for clinical use of these agents in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27672309

  10. An evaluation of seasonal variations in footwear worn by adults with inflammatory arthritis: a cross-sectional observational study using a web-based survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Foot problems are common in adults with inflammatory arthritis and therapeutic footwear can be effective in managing arthritic foot problems. Accessing appropriate footwear has been identified as a major barrier, resulting in poor adherence to treatment plans involving footwear. Indeed, previous New Zealand based studies found that many people with rheumatoid arthritis and gout wore inappropriate footwear. However, these studies were conducted in a single teaching hospital during the New Zealand summer therefore the findings may not be representative of footwear styles worn elsewhere in New Zealand, or reflect the potential influence of seasonal climate changes. The aim of the study was to evaluate seasonal variations in footwear habits of people with inflammatory arthritic conditions in New Zealand. Methods A cross-sectional study design using a web-based survey. The survey questions were designed to elicit demographic and clinical information, features of importance when choosing footwear and seasonal footwear habits, including questions related to the provision of therapeutic footwear/orthoses and footwear experiences. Results One-hundred and ninety-seven participants responded who were predominantly women of European descent, aged between 46–65 years old, from the North Island of New Zealand. The majority of participants identified with having either rheumatoid arthritis (35%) and/or osteoarthritis (57%) and 68% reported established disease (>5 years duration). 18% of participants had been issued with therapeutic footwear. Walking and athletic shoes were the most frequently reported footwear type worn regardless of the time of year. In the summer, 42% reported wearing sandals most often. Comfort, fit and support were reported most frequently as the footwear features of greatest importance. Many participants reported difficulties with footwear (63%), getting hot feet in the summer (63%) and the need for a sandal which could accommodate a supportive

  11. [SEIP-SERPE-SEOP Consensus Document on aetiopathogenesis and diagnosis of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Lozano, J; Calvo, C; Huguet Carol, R; Rodrigo, C; Núñez, E; Pérez, C; Merino, R; Rojo, P; Obando, I; Downey, F J; Colino, E; García, J J; Cilleruelo, M J; Torner, F; García, L

    2015-09-01

    This is a Consensus Document of the Sociedad Española de Infectología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Reumatología Pediátrica and Sociedad Española de Ortopedia Pediátrica on the aetiology and diagnosis of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. A review is presented of the aetiopathogenesis and pathophysiology of acute osteoarticular infection defined as a process with less than 14 days of symptomatology, uncomplicated, and community-acquired. The diagnostic approach to these conditions is summarised based on the best available scientific knowledge. Based on this evidence, a number of recommendations for clinical practice are provided.

  12. Comparison of clinical burden between patients with erosive hand osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthritis in symptomatic community-dwelling adults: the Keele clinical assessment studies

    PubMed Central

    Kloppenburg, Margreet; Marshall, Michelle; Nicholls, Elaine; Rosendaal, Frits R.; van der Windt, Danielle A.; Peat, George

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate in the general population the clinical impact of erosive OA in interphalangeal joints (IPJs) compared with symptomatic radiographic hand OA and inflammatory arthritis. Methods. Standardized assessments with hand radiographs were performed in participants of two population-based cohorts in North Staffordshire with hand symptoms lasting ≥1 day in the past month. Erosive OA was defined as the presence of an eroded or remodelled phase in ≥1 IPJ using the Verbruggen–Veys method. Radiographic hand OA was defined as the presence of ≥1 IPJ/first carpometacarpal joint with a Kellgren–Lawrence score of ≥2. Diagnoses of inflammatory arthritis were based on medical records. Hand pain and disability were assessed with the Australian/Canadian Hand Osteoarthritis Index (AUSCAN). Linear regression analyses were used to compare clinical determinants between groups and calculate mean differences with 95% CIs, adjusted for age and sex. Results. Of 1076 participants with hand symptoms [60% women, mean age 64.8 years (s.d. 8.3 years)]; 80 persons (7.4%) had erosive OA. The population prevalence of erosive OA in ≥1 IPJ was 2.4% (95% CI 1.8, 3.0). Persons with erosive OA reported more pain and disability than persons with symptomatic radiographic hand OA [adjusted mean difference 1.3 (95% CI 0.3, 2.3) and 2.3 (95% CI 0.4, 4.2), respectively]. Individuals with inflammatory arthritis (n = 44) reported more pain and disability than those with erosive OA [adjusted mean difference 1.7 (95% CI 0.05, 3.4) and 6.3 (95% CI 2.8, 9.9), respectively]. Conclusion. While erosive OA has a greater impact than symptomatic radiographic hand OA in the general population, it is not as severe in terms of hand pain and disability as inflammatory RA. PMID:24046470

  13. Cytomegalovirus Reactivation Induced Acute Hepatitis and Gastric Erosions in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis under Treatment with an Anti-IL-6 Receptor Antibody, Tocilizumab.

    PubMed

    Komura, Takuya; Ohta, Hajime; Nakai, Ryotaro; Seishima, Jun; Yamato, Masatoshi; Miyazawa, Masaki; Kaji, Kiichiro; Marukawa, Yohei; Kagaya, Takashi; Kitagawa, Kiyoki; Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Kaneko, Shuichi; Unoura, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Tocilizumab, an anti-human interleukin 6 receptor (IL-6R) monoclonal antibody, is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is expected to exhibit clinical efficacy when used to treat other autoimmune diseases. However, a risk of opportunistic infection is occasionally recognized. A 54-year-old woman had received an oral corticosteroid and methotrexate to treat RA. Despite receiving these treatments, she received additional treatment with tocilizumab due to poor control of the disease activity. She presented at our hospital with a high fever and epigastralgia 19 days after receiving this treatment. A laboratory evaluation revealed liver injury and cytomegalovirus (CMV) viremia. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) revealed hepatosplenomegaly, but no ascites. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastric erosions induced by CMV, which were confirmed immunohistochemically. Hence, we diagnosed the patient with CMV reactivation-induced acute hepatitis and gastric erosions under tocilizumab treatment. She received an anti-cytomegalovirus drug, ganciclovir, for 14 days due to her viremia and impaired general condition, which was suggestive of a severe infection. Her general condition subsequently improved, the liver function test results normalized, and the gastric erosions disappeared. In conclusion, although tocilizumab is very useful for treating certain autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, and will be prescribed more widely in the future, associated CMV infections must be closely monitored, as these can be lethal.

  14. Gouty arthritis: understanding the disease state and management options in primary care.

    PubMed

    Sunkureddi, Prashanth

    2011-09-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of monosodium urate crystal deposits into the joint space. The disease is associated with debilitating clinical symptoms and functional impairments as well as adverse economic and quality-of-life burdens. Because gouty arthritis is typically diagnosed and managed in the primary care setting, clinicians require a thorough knowledge of the presenting clinical features, risk factors, differential diagnoses, and treatment options for appropriate management. Although generally effective, the use of currently available therapies to control gouty arthritis is challenging because many medications used to treat comorbidities can exacerbate gouty arthritis and because current agents are associated with a number of adverse events, contraindications, or both. Based on an understanding of the underlying inflammatory pathogenesis of gouty arthritis, several new agents are being developed that may provide improved efficacy.

  15. Vaccination and inflammatory arthritis: overview of current vaccines and recommended uses in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Müller-Ladner, Claudia; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2013-06-01

    Patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases are prone to infectious complications during the course of their disease. The underlying disease with an impaired immune system and additional different immunosuppressive medication render patients more susceptible to infections, some of which are potentially preventable with vaccination. Since it is not clear how strongly the underlying and medication-induced immunosuppression interferes with vaccination, a lot of questions remain about its indications, efficacy and safety . Due to these unresolved questions, in 2011, EULAR published general guidelines about vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. These guidelines provide a basis for patient care and are also the basis of the following review article. With more available and earlier used immunosuppressive medications, a lot of questions still remain about optimal use of vaccines, the role of different medication combinations on efficacy and safety of vaccinations especially of the actual prevention of disease, the role of age, gender, disease activity and duration, and optimal revaccination schedules in this patient group. Actual studies elute the role of different medication combinations on efficacy and safety mainly addressing influenza and pneumococcal vaccination. In addition, interesting new data on basic immunological processes during TNF-α-blockade open up questions for further research.

  16. Management of early inflammatory arthritis. Genetic factors predicting persistent disease: the role of defective enzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Waring, R H; Emery, P

    1992-06-01

    In this chapter, we investigate the use of non-toxic 'probe drugs' to give information about basic biochemical pathways. We have examined the hypothesis that a major factor in RA is defective metabolism of sulphur-containing compounds. At least two pathways have been shown to be abnormal in RA. Generally, patients have reduced capacity to metabolize and detoxify thiol compounds by methylation, and have increased levels of plasma cysteine. They also have a lower capacity for S-oxidation of cysteine and its derivatives, with reduced amounts of plasma sulphate. The raised cysteine resulting from less effective metabolism may lead to reduced clearance of immune complexes and a raised inflammatory response in RA patients. Lower plasma sulphate, however, leads to defective tissue synthesis, and makes adequate repair of damaged joints less feasible. The co-existence of defects in these two interacting endogenous pathways serves to perpetuate the disease process, leading to chronic inflammation and tissue destruction. These enzyme defects have been shown to be predictive of persistent disease.

  17. Acute Hemorrhagic Myositis in Inflammatory Myopathy and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Van Gelder, Howard; Wu, Kim M.; Gharibian, Nayiri; Patel, Dharmi B.; Clements, Philip J.; Heinze, Emil R.; Morris, Robert I.; Wong, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    We describe two patients with dermatomyositis that presented with interstitial lung disease, positive V and Shawl sign who developed acute spontaneous abdominal/retroperitoneal bleed. Both patients expired despite aggressive treatment and resuscitation. Hemorrhagic myositis in these two patients with inflammatory myopathy is a very rare complication. The association of anti-Ro52 with this potentially very serious complication remains unclear. This potential relationship should be further evaluated in future studies. PMID:25379317

  18. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Novel Semicarbazide-Sensitive Amine-Oxidase Inhibitor SzV-1287 in Chronic Arthritis Models of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Ádám; Menghis, Awt; Botz, Bálint; Borbély, Éva; Kemény, Ágnes; Tékus, Valéria; Csepregi, Janka Zsófia; Mócsai, Attila; Juhász, Tamás; Zákány, Róza; Bogdán, Dóra; Mátyus, Péter; Keeble, Julie; Pintér, Erika; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2017-01-01

    Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) catalyses oxidative deamination of primary amines. Since there is no data about its function in pain and arthritis mechanisms, we investigated the effects of our novel SSAO inhibitor SzV-1287 in chronic mouse models of joint inflammation. Effects of SzV-1287 (20 mg/kg i.p./day) were investigated in the K/BxN serum-transfer and complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-evoked active immunization models compared to the reference SSAO inhibitor LJP-1207. Mechanonociception was assessed by aesthesiometry, oedema by plethysmometry, clinical severity by scoring, joint function by grid test, myeloperoxidase activity by luminescence, vascular leakage by fluorescence in vivo imaging, histopathological changes by semiquantitative evaluation, and cytokines by Luminex assay. SzV-1287 significantly inhibited hyperalgesia and oedema in both models. Plasma leakage and keratinocyte chemoattractant production in the tibiotarsal joint, but not myeloperoxidase activity was significantly reduced by SzV-1287 in K/BxN-arthritis. SzV-1287 did not influence vascular and cellular mechanisms in CFA-arthritis, but significantly decreased histopathological alterations. There was no difference in the anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory actions of SzV-1287 and LJP-1207, but only SzV-1287 decreased CFA-induced tissue damage. Unlike SzV-1287, LJP-1207 induced cartilage destruction, which was confirmed in vitro. SzV-1287 exerts potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions in chronic arthritis models of distinct mechanisms, without inducing cartilage damage. PMID:28067251

  19. Detection of DNA from a range of bacterial species in the knee joints of dogs with inflammatory knee arthritis and associated degenerative anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Muir, Peter; Oldenhoff, William E; Hudson, Alan P; Manley, Paul A; Schaefer, Susan L; Markel, Mark D; Hao, Zhengling

    2007-01-01

    Mixtures of bacterial nucleic acids can often be detected in synovial joints affected with arthritis. We investigated the potential role of such mixtures of bacterial nucleic acids in the pathogenesis of arthritis in a naturally occurring canine model. Dogs with a common inflammatory knee arthritis in which associated pathological degenerative anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture often develops were studied. Synovial biopsies were obtained from 43 dogs with the naturally occurring ACL rupture arthropathy, 12 dogs with normal knees and intact ACL, and 16 dogs with normal knees and experimentally induced ACL rupture. Using PCR, specimens were tested for Borrelia burgdorferi OspA and p66 gene sequences. Broad-ranging 16S rRNA primers were also used; 'panbacterial' PCR products were cloned and multiple clones were sequenced for bacterial identification. Synovium was also studied histologically. The presence of bacterial DNA within the synovium was significantly associated with the naturally occurring ACL rupture arthropathy (p<0.05); knee joints from 37% of these dogs were PCR-positive. Mixtures of bacterial DNA were common and often included environmental bacteria; predominant organisms included Borrelia burgdorferi and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. DNA from environmental bacteria was only found in dogs with the naturally occurring ACL rupture arthopathy; joints from 33% of affected dogs contained such bacterial DNA. Synovial inflammation developed in dogs with both naturally occurring and experimentally induced ACL rupture, when compared with intact ACL controls (p<0.01). These results indicate that mixtures of DNA derived from environmental bacteria are commonly found in the knee joint of a naturally occurring canine arthropathy, often in association with a recognized joint pathogen. Our results also suggest that knee instability alone is not responsible for this finding and have led us to hypothesize that mixtures of bacterial DNA are an important causative

  20. The skin tissue is adversely affected by TNF-alpha blockers in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: a 5-year prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Natalia P.; dos Reis Neto, Edgard Torres; Soares, Maria Roberta M. P.; Freitas, Daniele S.; Porro, Adriana; Ciconelli, Rozana M.; Pinheiro, Marcelo M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the incidence of and the main risk factors associated with cutaneous adverse events in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis following anti-TNF-α therapy. METHODS: A total of 257 patients with active arthritis who were taking TNF-α blockers, including 158 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 87 with ankylosing spondylitis and 12 with psoriatic arthritis, were enrolled in a 5-year prospective analysis. Patients with overlapping or other rheumatic diseases were excluded. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, demographic and clinical data were evaluated, including the Disease Activity Score-28, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Psoriasis Area Severity Index. Skin conditions were evaluated by two dermatology experts, and in doubtful cases, skin lesion biopsies were performed. Associations between adverse cutaneous events and clinical, demographic and epidemiological variables were determined using the chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors. The significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 months of follow-up, 71 adverse events (73.85/1000 patient-years) were observed, of which allergic and immune-mediated phenomena were the most frequent events, followed by infectious conditions involving bacterial (47.1%), parasitic (23.5%), fungal (20.6%) and viral (8.8%) agents. CONCLUSION: The skin is significantly affected by adverse reactions resulting from the use of TNF-α blockers, and the main risk factors for cutaneous events were advanced age, female sex, a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity and the use of infliximab. PMID:24141833

  1. Anti-inflammatory activity of Justicia prostrata gamble in acute and sub-acute models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sanmugapriya, E; Shanmugasundaram, P; Venkataraman, S

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the aqueous (AQJP) and alcoholic (ALJP) extracts of the whole plant of Justicia prostrata Gamble (Acanthaceae) were screened for their acute and subacute anti-inflammatory activities using carrageenan-induced acute inflammation and cotton-pellet-induced granuloma (subacute inflammation), respectively, in rats. In the carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema model, both extracts were found to exhibit maximum reduction in paw volume at the first hour in a dose-dependent manner. At the dose of 500 mg/kg p.o., both extracts AQJP and ALJP showed maximum inhibition (51.39% and 62.5%, respectively) in rat paw oedema volume at the first hour of carrageenan-induced acute inflammation. In the cotton pellet granuloma assay, AQJP and ALJP at the dose of 500 mg/kg p.o. suppressed the transudative, exudative and proliferative phases of chronic inflammation. These extracts were able to (i) reduce the lipid peroxide content of exudates and liver and (ii) normalize the increased activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases in serum and liver of cotton pellet granulomatous rats. Preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of lignans, triterpenes and phenolic compounds in ALJP, whereas phenolic compounds and glycosides in AQJP. The anti-inflammatory properties of these extracts may possibly be due to the presence of phenolic compounds. The anti-inflammatory effects produced by the extracts at the dose of 500 mg/kg, p.o. was comparable with the reference drug diclofenac sodium (5 mg/kg p.o.).

  2. Inflammatory and Antioxidant Pattern Unbalance in “Clopidogrel-Resistant” Patients during Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Anna Maria; Cecchettini, Antonella; Parodi, Guido; Marcucci, Rossella; Parolini, Marina; Romagnuolo, Ilaria; Citti, Lorenzo; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. In acute coronary syndrome (ACS), inflammation and redox response are associated with increased residual platelet reactivity (RPR) on clopidogrel therapy. We investigated whether clopidogrel interaction affects platelet function and modulates factors related to inflammation and oxidation in ACS patients differently responding to clopidogrel. Material and Methods. Platelet aggregation was measured in 29 ACS patients on dual (aspirin/clopidogrel) antiplatelet therapy. Nonresponders (NR) were defined as RPR ≥70% by ADP. Several inflammatory and redox parameters were assayed and platelet proteome was determined. Results. Eight (28%) out of 29 ACS patients resulted NR to clopidogrel. At 24 hours, the levels of Th2-type cytokines IL-4, IFNγ, and MCP-1 were higher in NR, while blood GSH (r-GSHbl) levels were lower in NR than responders (R). Proteomic analysis evidenced an upregulated level of platelet adhesion molecule, CD226, and a downregulation of the antioxidant peroxiredoxin-4. In R patients the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 decreased, while the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-1Ra increased. Conclusions. In patients with high RPR on clopidogrel therapy, an unbalance of inflammatory factors, platelet adhesion molecules, and circulatory and platelet antioxidant molecules was observed during the acute phase. Proinflammatory milieu persists in nonresponders for a long time after the acute event while antioxidant blood factors tend to conform to normal responsiveness. PMID:25873769

  3. Volume Exercise in Older Athletes Influences Inflammatory and Redox Responses to Acute Exercise.

    PubMed

    Estrela, Andre L; Zaparte, Aline; da Silva, Jefferson D; Moreira, José C; Turner, James E; Bauer, Moisés E

    2017-02-09

    To examine whether the volume of previous exercise training in older athletes influences inflammatory, redox and hormonal profiles, forty trained marathon runners were divided into higher-volume (HVG, ~480 min/week) and lower-volume groups (LVG, ~240 min/week). Plasma inflammatory proteins, redox biomarkers and salivary testosterone and cortisol, were assessed at rest and following two maximal acute exercise bouts. At rest, the LVG exhibited higher CRP, higher protein carbonyls and lower SOD activity compared to the HVG (p's<0.05). In response to exercise, TNF- declined similarly in both groups whereas CRP increased differentially (+60% LVG; +24% HVG; p's<0.05). Protein carbonyls decreased and thiols increased similarly in both groups, but SOD declined differentially between groups (-14% LVG; -20% HVG; p's<0.05). Salivary testosterone decreased similarly in both groups, whereas cortisol did not change. Higher-volume of training is associated with favorable inflammatory and redox profiles at rest, perhaps mediated by small inflammatory responses to acute exercise.

  4. Enhanced therapeutic anti-inflammatory effect of betamethasone upon topical administration with low frequency, low intensity (20 kHz, 100 mW/cm2) ultrasound exposure on carrageenan-induced arthritis in mice model

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Gadi; Natsheh, Hiba; Sunny, Youhan; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Touitou, Elka; Lerman, Melissa A.; Lazarovici, Philip; Lewin, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether low frequency, low intensity (LFLI, 20 kHz, <100 mW/cm2, spatial-peak, temporal-peak) ultrasound (US), delivered by a light-weight (<100g), tether-free, fully wearable, battery powered applicator is capable of reducing inflammation in a mouse model of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). The therapeutic, acute, anti-inflammatory effect was estimated by the relative swelling induced in mice hind limb paws. In an independent, indirect approach, the inflammation was bio-imaged by measuring glycolytic activity with near infrared labeled 2-deoxy-glucose (2DG). The outcome of the experiments indicated that the combination of US exposure with topical application of 0.1% w/w betamethasone gel, exhibited statistically significant (p<0.05) enhanced anti-inflammatory properties in comparison with the drug or US treatment alone. The present study underscores the potential benefits of LFLI US assisted drug delivery. However, the proof of concept presented indicates the need for additional experiments to systematically evaluate and optimize the potential of, and the conditions for, safe, LFLI ultrasound promoted non-invasive drug delivery. PMID:26003010

  5. Meta-analysis of short term low dose prednisolone versus placebo and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether short term, oral low dose prednisolone (⩽15 mg daily) is superior to placebo and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Design: Meta-analysis of randomised trials of oral corticosteroids compared with placebo or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Setting: Trials conducted anywhere in the world. Subjects: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Main outcome measures: Joint tenderness, pain, and grip strength. Outcomes measured on different scales were combined by using the standardised effect size (difference in effect divided by SD of the measurements). Results: Ten studies were included in the meta-analysis. Prednisolone had a marked effect over placebo on joint tenderness (standardised effect size 1.31; 95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.83), pain (1.75; 0.87 to 2.64), and grip strength (0.41; 0.13 to 0.69). Measured in the original units the differences were 12 (6 to 18) tender joints and 22 mm Hg (5 mm Hg to 40 mm Hg) for grip strength. Prednisolone also had a greater effect than non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on joint tenderness (0.63; 0.11 to 1.16) and pain (1.25; 0.26 to 2.24), whereas the difference in grip strength was not significant (0.31; −0.02 to 0.64). Measured in the original units the differences were 9 (5 to 12) tender joints and 12 mm Hg (−6 mm Hg to 31 mm Hg). The risk of adverse effects during moderate and long term use seemed acceptable. Conclusion: Prednisolone in low doses (⩽15 mg daily) may be used intermittently in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, particularly if the disease cannot be controlled by other means. Key messages Prednisolone in low doses—that is, no more than 15 mg daily—is highly effective in patients with rheumatoid arthritis The risk of adverse effects is acceptable in short, moderate, or long term use Oral low dose prednisolone may be used intermittently in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, particularly if

  6. Ozone oxidative postconditioning ameliorates joint damage and decreases pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and oxidative stress in PG/PS-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Jaqueline Dranguet; Fraga, Angela; Díaz, María Teresa; Mallok, A; Viebahn-Hänsler, Renate; Fahmy, Ziad; Barberá, Ariana; Delgado, Liván; Menéndez, Silvia; Fernández, Olga Sonia León

    2013-08-15

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is the most prevalent chronic condition present in ~1% of the adult population. Many pro-inflammatory mediators are increased in RA, including Reactive Oxygen Species such as nitric oxide NO, pro-inflammatory cytokines as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and other molecules. Ozone oxidative postconditioning has regulatory effects on some pathological targets associated with RA. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of ozone therapy in PG/PS-induced arthritis in rats in point of joints inflammation and morphology. Moreover, cytokines, nitric oxide and oxidative stress levels in spleen homogenates were evaluated. Ozone treatment ameliorated joint damage, reduced TNF-α concentrations as well as TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels. Besides, cellular redox balance, nitric oxide and fructolysine levels were reestablished after ozone oxidative postconditioning. It was concluded that pleiotropic ozone's effects clarify its therapeutic efficacy in RA. Decreasing inflammation and joint injury, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β transcripts and re-establishment of cellular redox balance after ozone treatment were demonstrated.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of methyl ursolate obtained from a chemically derived crude extract of apple peels: potential use in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pádua, Tatiana A; de Abreu, Bianca S S C; Costa, Thadeu E M M; Nakamura, Marcos J; Valente, Lígia M M; Henriques, Maria das Graças; Siani, Antonio C; Rosas, Elaine C

    2014-11-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpene acid found in apple peels (Malus domestica, Borkh, Rosaceae), has a large spectrum of pharmacological effects. However, the vegetal matrix usually produces highly viscous and poorly soluble extracts that hamper the isolation of this compound. To overcome this problem, the crude EtOH-AcOEt extract of commercial apple peels was exhaustively treated with diazomethane, after which methyl ursolate (MU) was purified by column chromatography and characterized spectrometrically. The anti-inflammatory effects of UA and MU (50 mg/kg) were analyzed by zymosan-induced paw edema, pleurisy and in an experimental arthritis model. After 4 h of treatment with UA and MU, paw edema was reduced by 46 and 44 %, respectively. Both UA and MU inhibited protein extravasation into the thoracic cavity; tibio-femoral edema by 40 and 48 %, respectively; and leukocyte influx into the synovial cavity after 6 h by 52 and 73 %, respectively. Additionally, both UA and MU decreased the levels of mediators related to synovial inflammation, such as KC/CXCL-1 levels by 95 and 90 %, TNF-α levels by 76 and 71 %, and IL-1β levels by 57 and 53 %, respectively. Both the compounds were equally effective when assayed in different inflammatory models, including experimental arthritis. Hence, MU may be considered to be a useful anti-inflammatory derivative to overcome the inherent poor solubility of UA for formulating pharmaceutical products.

  8. The effects of Chamaecyparis obtusa essential oil on pain-related behavior and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in carrageenan-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Suh, Hye Rim; Chung, Hyun Joo; Park, Eui Ho; Moon, Sun Wook; Park, Su Jin; Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Yang In; Han, Hee Chul

    2015-01-01

    Chamaecyparis obtusa essential oil (COE) has been widely used to treat allergic diseases and was suggested to exert anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial effects. This study evaluated the effects of COE on pain-related behavior and pro-inflammatory cytokines in rats with carrageenan (CGN)-induced arthritis. Reduced dynamic weight load on inflamed joint in voluntarily walking rats was used as the behavior test for arthritic pain; 10% COE-treated group was significantly attenuated pain (6-8 h post-CGN injection) compared to VEH (mineral oil)-treated group. In addition, the protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6 (6-8 h), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 (8 h) within the synovial membrane, as well as IL-1β, COX-2 (6-8 h), and IL-6 (5-7 h) within the meniscus, of 10% COE-treated group were significantly reduced. The current results implicate that COE has anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects on arthritis in rats.

  9. Acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in hantavirus and hepatitis B virus coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jong Youb; Lim, Young-Ho; Choi, Eun-Hi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired autoimmune disorder with progressive weakness. Acute-onset CIDP resembles Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a rapidly progressive disorder, and follows a chronic course. To our knowledge, no case of acute-onset CIDP in hantavirus and hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection has been reported previously. Clinical findings: We report a case of acute-onset CIDP that was initially diagnosed as GBS. Diagnoses: A 44-year-old male logger complained of acute quadriplegia and dyspnea. Mechanical ventilation was initiated. He was an HBV carrier with mild elevation of hepatic enzyme, and positive for hantavirus antibody. He was diagnosed with GBS and immunoglobulin therapy was administered. Interventions: After 8 months, quadriplegia and hypesthesia recurred. Immunoglobulin therapy at this time had no effect, but steroid therapy had some effect. Outcomes: A diagnosis of CIDP was made. After 2 months, severe extremity pain and dyspnea developed again, and steroid pulse therapy was initiated. Conclusion: Besides GBS, acute-onset CIDP can occur with hantavirus and HBV coinfection. Patients with this coinfection in whom GBS has been initially diagnosed should be followed up for a long time, because of the possibility of relapse or deterioration, and acute-onset CIDP should always be considered. PMID:27930572

  10. Acute exacerbation of preexisting interstitial lung disease after administration of etanercept for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kiyofumi; Sato, Takeo; Takagi-Kobayashi, Shoko; Hasegawa, Shunsuke; Shigihara, Nayumi; Akiyama, Osamu

    2007-05-01

    A 70-year-old woman with a 6-year history of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and asymptomatic interstitial lung disease (ILD) began taking etanercept for ongoing arthritis despite treatment with methotrexate (MTX) and bucillamine. MTX was discontinued before introduction of etanercept. She developed lung injury 8 weeks after starting etanercept. Etanercept was discontinued and oral prednisolone 40 mg/day was begun, and her clinical findings gradually improved. Lung injury, although rare, is a recently noticed, potentially fatal adverse effect of all 3 licensed biological anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents. We recommend caution in the use of anti-TNF agents in elderly RA patients with preexisting ILD.

  11. The anti-inflammatory fungal compound (S)-curvularin reduces proinflammatory gene expression in an in vivo model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Nadine; Art, Julia; Forsch, Ingrid; Werner, Anke; Erkel, Gerhard; Jung, Mathias; Horke, Sven; Kleinert, Hartmut; Pautz, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    In previous studies, we identified the fungal macrocyclic lactone (S)-curvularin (SC) as an anti-inflammatory agent using a screening system detecting inhibitors of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether SC is able to decrease proinflammatory gene expression in an in vivo model of a chronic inflammatory disease. Therefore, the effects of SC and dexamethasone were compared in the model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. Total genomic microarray analyses were performed to identify SC target genes. In addition, in human C28/I2 chondrocytes and MonoMac6 monocytes, the effect of SC on proinflammatory gene expression was tested at the mRNA and protein level. In the CIA model, SC markedly reduced the expression of a number of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines involved in the pathogenesis of CIA as well as human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In almost all cases, the effects of SC were comparable with those of dexamethasone. In microarray analyses, we identified additional new therapeutic targets of SC. Some of them, such as S100A8, myeloperoxidase, or cathelicidin, an antimicrobial peptide, are known to be implicated in pathophysiological processes in RA. Similar anti-inflammatory effects of SC were also observed in human C28/I2 chondrocyte cells, which are resistant to glucocorticoid treatment. These data indicate that SC and glucocorticoid effects are mediated via independent signal transduction pathways. In summary, we demonstrate that SC is a new effective anti-inflammatory compound that may serve as a lead compound for the development of new drugs for the therapy of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  12. Aged neutrophils contribute to the first line of defense in the acute inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Bernd; Vadlau, Yannick; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Nekolla, Katharina; Sharaf, Kariem; Gaertner, Florian; Massberg, Steffen; Krombach, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Under steady-state conditions, aged neutrophils are removed from the circulation in bone marrow, liver, and spleen, thereby maintaining myeloid cell homeostasis. The fate of these aged immune cells under inflammatory conditions, however, remains largely obscure. Here, we demonstrate that in the acute inflammatory response during endotoxemia, aged neutrophils cease returning to the bone marrow and instead rapidly migrate to the site of inflammation. Having arrived in inflamed tissue, aged neutrophils were found to exhibit a higher phagocytic activity as compared with the subsequently recruited nonaged neutrophils. This distinct behavior of aged neutrophils under inflammatory conditions is dependent on specific age-related changes in their molecular repertoire that enable these “experienced” immune cells to instantly translate inflammatory signals into immune responses. In particular, aged neutrophils engage Toll-like receptor-4- and p38 MAPK-dependent pathways to induce conformational changes in β2 integrins that allow these phagocytes to effectively accomplish their mission in the front line of the inflammatory response. Hence, ageing in the circulation might represent a critical process for neutrophils that enables these immune cells to properly unfold their functional properties for host defense. PMID:27609642

  13. Inflammatory Cytokine Gene Expression in Mesenteric Adipose Tissue during Acute Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mustain, W. Conan; Starr, Marlene E.; Valentino, Joseph D.; Cohen, Donald A.; Okamura, Daiki; Wang, Chi; Evers, B. Mark; Saito, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Background Production of inflammatory cytokines by mesenteric adipose tissue (MAT) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Animal models of colitis have demonstrated inflammatory changes within MAT, but it is unclear if these changes occur in isolation or as part of a systemic adipose tissue response. It is also unknown what cell types are responsible for cytokine production within MAT. The present study was designed to determine whether cytokine production by MAT during experimental colitis is depot-specific, and also to identify the source of cytokine production within MAT. Methods Experimental colitis was induced in 6-month-old C57BL/6 mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (2% in drinking water) for up to 5 days. The induction of cytokine mRNA within various adipose tissues, including mesenteric, epididymal, and subcutaneous, was analyzed by qRT-PCR. These adipose tissues were also examined for histological evidence of inflammation. The level of cytokine mRNA during acute colitis was compared between mature mesenteric adipocytes, mesenteric stromal vascular fraction (SVF), and mesenteric lymph nodes. Results During acute colitis, MAT exhibited an increased presence of infiltrating mononuclear cells and fibrotic structures, as well as decreased adipocyte size. The mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were significantly increased in MAT but not other adipose tissue depots. Within the MAT, induction of these cytokines was observed mainly in the SVF. Conclusions Acute experimental colitis causes a strong site-specific inflammatory response within MAT, which is mediated by cells of the SVF, rather than mature adipocytes or mesenteric lymph nodes. PMID:24386254

  14. Chuanhu Anti-Gout Mixture versus Colchicine for Acute Gouty Arthritis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YanGang; Wang, Luan; Li, EnZe; Li, Yang; Wang, ZhongChao; Sun, XiaoFang; Yu, XiaoLong; Ma, Lin; Wang, YunLong; Wang, YouXin

    2014-01-01

    Background The Chuanhu anti-gout mixture has been used for many years in the treatment of gout in Chinese Traditional Medicine, and current methods for treatments for acute gouty arthritis have been either less effective or have had serious side effects. Methods In this 12-week, double-blind, double-dummy, non-inferiority study, outpatient individuals with newly diagnosed acute gouty arthritis were randomly assigned to receive Chuanhu anti-gout mixture or colchicine. Both the study investigators and the participants were masked to the treatment assignments. The primary outcome was the recurrence rate of acute gouty arthritis, and the secondary outcomes were changes in white blood cells (WHC) and C-reactive protein (CRP). This trial is registered at ISRCTN.org as trial ISRCTN65219941. Results A total of 176 patients were randomly assigned to receive either the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture or Colchicine. The overall recurrence rates in the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture group (CH group) and the Colchicine group (Col group) were 12.50% vs 14.77% (difference -2.22%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): -10.78%~6.23%), meeting the predefined non-inferiority criterion of 15%, as did the data for WHC and CRP. The incidence of adverse events (mainly diarrhea) was less in the Col group than in the CH group (2.27% vs 28.41%, 95% CI 0.01~0.26). In addition, changes in blood uric acid, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and creatinine in the CH group were significantly larger compared to those in the Col group (P<0.05). Conclusions The Chuanhu anti-gout mixture was non-inferior to colchicine for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. The study suggested that the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture can be considered an alternative choice for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis because of its lower incidence of adverse events and its protection of kidney and renal function. PMID:25013367

  15. Acute pediatric septic arthritis: a systematic review of literature and current controversies.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Yashwant Singh; Jaiswal, Atin; Singh, Satyaprakash; Arya, Rajender Kumar; Lal, Hitesh

    2014-03-31

    We present a review of the current literature and the author's opinion regarding Septic arthritis in the pediatric age group. The etiopathogenesis, clinical features, the laboratory parameters for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment, radiological features, are discussed along-with the debatable issues pertaining to the choice of antibiotics, their duration, and the need and mode of surgical drainage and mobilization of the joint.

  16. CCR2+Ly6Chi Inflammatory Monocyte Recruitment Exacerbates Acute Disability Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Matthew D.; Taylor, Roslyn A.; Mullen, Michael T.; Ai, Youxi; Aguila, Hector L.; Mack, Matthias; Kasner, Scott E.; McCullough, Louise D.

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating type of stroke that lacks a specific treatment. An intense immune response develops after ICH, which contributes to neuronal injury, disability, and death. However, the specific mediators of inflammation-induced injury remain unclear. The objective of the present study was to determine whether blood-derived CCR2+Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes contribute to disability. ICH was induced in mice and the resulting inflammatory response was quantified using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and neurobehavioral testing. Importantly, blood-derived monocytes were distinguished from resident microglia by differential CD45 staining and by using bone marrow chimeras with fluorescent leukocytes. After ICH, blood-derived CCR2+Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes trafficked into the brain, outnumbered other leukocytes, and produced tumor necrosis factor. Ccr2−/− mice, which have few circulating inflammatory monocytes, exhibited better motor function following ICH than control mice. Chimeric mice with wild-type CNS cells and Ccr2−/− hematopoietic cells also exhibited early improvement in motor function, as did wild-type mice after inflammatory monocyte depletion. These findings suggest that blood-derived inflammatory monocytes contribute to acute neurological disability. To determine the translational relevance of our experimental findings, we examined CCL2, the principle ligand for the CCR2 receptor, in ICH patients. Serum samples from 85 patients were collected prospectively at two hospitals. In patients, higher CCL2 levels at 24 h were independently associated with poor functional outcome at day 7 after adjusting for potential confounding variables. Together, these findings suggest that inflammatory monocytes worsen early disability after murine ICH and may represent a therapeutic target for patients. PMID:24623768

  17. Effect of IMOD™ on the inflammatory process after acute ischemic stroke: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Considering the role of inflammation in acute cerebrovascular accidents, anti-inflammatory treatment has been considered as an option in cerebrovascular diseases. Regarding the properties of Setarud (IMOD™) in immune regulation, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of this medication in treating patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods In this randomized clinical trial, 99 patients with their first ever acute ischemic stroke were divided into two groups of IMOD™ (n = 49) and control (n = 50). The control group underwent routine treatment and the intervention group underwent routine treatment plus daily intermittent infusion of IMOD™ (250mg on the first day and then 375mg into DW5% serum during a 30-minute period for 7 days). The serum levels of inflammatory markers were evaluated on the first day (baseline) and on 4th and 7th days. Data were analyzed and the results were compared. Results and major conclusion 58 males (58.6%) and 41 females (41.4%) with a mean age of 67.00 ± 8.82 years, who had their first ever stroke attack, were enrolled in this trial. Treatment with IMOD™ showed a decreasing trend in IL-6 levels compared to the control group (p = 0.04). In addition, the treatment resulted in the control of increasing serum levels of hsCRP after 7 days compared to the control group (p = 0.02). There was an insignificant decrease in TNF-α and IL-1 levels in the IMOD™ group. Considering the prominent role of inflammation after an ischemic cerebral damage, it appears that treatment with IMOD™ improves the inflammatory profile. Therefore, IMOD™ (Setarud) might be considered as a therapeutic option in the acute ischemic stroke. However, future studies are necessary on its long-term results and clinical efficacy. PMID:23514014

  18. Simultaneous acute shoulder arthritis and multiple mononeuropathy in a newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patient - First case report.

    PubMed

    Kotlęga, Dariusz; Gołąb-Janowska, Monika; Zaborowski, Grzegorz; Ciećwież, Sylwester; Nowacki, Przemysław

    Diabetes is a common disorder that leads to the musculoskeletal symptoms such as the shoulder arthritis. The involvement of peripheral nervous system is one of the troublesome for the patients as it provokes chronic sensory symptoms, lower motor neuron involvement and autonomic symptoms. In the course of the disease there has been several types of neuropathies described. A 41-year-old male patient was admitted to the internal medicine department because of the general weakness, malaise, polydypsia and polyuria since several days. The initial blood glucose level was 780mg/dl. During the first day the continuous insulin infusion was administered. On the next day when he woke up, the severe pain in the right shoulder with limited movement, right upper extremity weakness and burning pain in the radial aspect of this extremity appeared. On examination right shoulder joint movement limitation was found with the muscle weakness and sensory symptoms in the upper limbs. The clinical picture indicated on the right shoulder arthritis and the peripheral nervous system symptoms such as the right musculocutaneous, supraspinatus, right radial nerve and left radial nerve damage. We present a first case report of simultaneous, acute involvement of the shoulder joint and multiple neuropathy in a patient with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, presumably in the state of ketoacidosis.

  19. The effect of obesity on inflammatory cytokine and leptin production following acute mental stress.

    PubMed

    Caslin, H L; Franco, R L; Crabb, E B; Huang, C J; Bowen, M K; Acevedo, E O

    2016-02-01

    Obesity may contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk by eliciting chronic systemic inflammation and impairing the immune response to additional stressors. There has been little assessment of the effect of obesity on psychological stress, an independent risk factor for CVD. Therefore, it was of interest to examine interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and leptin following an acute mental stress task in nonobese and obese males. Twenty college-aged males (21.3 ± 0.56 years) volunteered to participate in a 20-min Stroop color-word and mirror-tracing task. Subjects were recruited for obese (body mass index: BMI > 30) and nonobese (BMI < 25) groups, and blood samples were collected for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis. The acute mental stress task elicited an increase in heart rate, catecholamines, and IL-1β in all subjects. Additionally, acute mental stress increased cortisol concentrations in the nonobese group. There was a significant reduction in leptin in obese subjects 30 min posttask compared with a decrease in nonobese subjects 120 min posttask. Interestingly, the relationship between the percent change in leptin and IL-1Ra at 120 min posttask in response to an acute mental stress task was only observed in nonobese individuals. This is the first study to suggest that adiposity in males may impact leptin and inflammatory signaling mechanisms following acute mental stress.

  20. Impairment of T cell development and acute inflammatory response in HIV-1 Tat transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Fiume, Giuseppe; Scialdone, Annarita; Albano, Francesco; Rossi, Annalisa; Maria Tuccillo, Franca; Rea, Domenica; Palmieri, Camillo; Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Cicala, Carla; Bellevicine, Claudio; Falcone, Cristina; Vecchio, Eleonora; Pisano, Antonio; Ceglia, Simona; Mimmi, Selena; Iaccino, Enrico; Laurentiis, Annamaria de; Pontoriero, Marilena; Agosti, Valter; Troncone, Giancarlo; Mignogna, Chiara; Palma, Giuseppe; Arra, Claudio; Mallardo, Massimo; Maria Buonaguro, Franco; Scala, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation and chronic inflammation are hallmark features of HIV infection causing T-cell depletion and cellular immune dysfunction in AIDS. Here, we addressed the issue whether HIV-1 Tat could affect T cell development and acute inflammatory response by generating a transgenic mouse expressing Tat in lymphoid tissue. Tat-Tg mice showed thymus atrophy and the maturation block from DN4 to DP thymic subpopulations, resulting in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depletion in peripheral blood. In Tat-positive thymus, we observed the increased p65/NF-κB activity and deregulated expression of cytokines/chemokines and microRNA-181a-1, which are involved in T-lymphopoiesis. Upon LPS intraperitoneal injection, Tat-Tg mice developed an abnormal acute inflammatory response, which was characterized by enhanced lethality and production of inflammatory cytokines. Based on these findings, Tat-Tg mouse could represent an animal model for testing adjunctive therapies of HIV-1-associated inflammation and immune deregulation. PMID:26343909

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Adrenomedullin on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Carrageenan in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Talero; Rosanna, Di Paola; Emanuela, Mazzon; Esposito, Emanuela; Virginia, Motilva; Salvatore, Cuzzocrea

    2012-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52 amino acid peptide that has shown predominant anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we evaluated the possible therapeutic effect of this peptide in an experimental model of acute inflammation, the carrageenan- (CAR-) induced pleurisy. Pleurisy was induced by injection of CAR into the pleural cavity of mice. AM (200 ng/kg) was administered by intraperitoneal route 1 h after CAR, and the animals were sacrificed 4 h after that. AM treatment attenuated the recruitment of leucocytes in the lung tissue and the generation and/or the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines as well as the expression of the intercellular cell adhesion molecules. Moreover, AM inhibited the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), thereby abating the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and prevented the oxidative and nitroxidative lung tissue injury, as shown by the reduction of nitrotyrosine, malondialdehyde (MDA), and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) levels. Finally, we demonstrated that these anti-inflammatory effects of AM were associated with the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. All these parameters were markedly increased by intrapleural CAR in the absence of any treatment. We report that treatment with AM significantly reduces the development of acute lung injury by downregulating a broad spectrum of inflammatory factors. PMID:22685374

  2. Acute-Phase Inflammatory Response to Single-Bout HIIT and Endurance Training: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaspar, Felix; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Perkins, Steven; Al-Aubaidy, Hayder A.; deJong, Bev; Butkowski, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study compared acute and late effect of single-bout endurance training (ET) and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on the plasma levels of four inflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein and insulin-like growth factor 1. Design. Cohort study with repeated-measures design. Methods. Seven healthy untrained volunteers completed a single bout of ET and HIIT on a cycle ergometer. ET and HIIT sessions were held in random order and at least 7 days apart. Blood was drawn before the interventions and 30 min and 2 days after the training sessions. Plasma samples were analyzed with ELISA for the interleukins (IL), IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), insulin growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and C-reactive protein (CRP). Statistical analysis was with Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results. ET led to both a significant acute and long-term inflammatory response with a significant decrease at 30 minutes after exercise in the IL-6/IL-10 ratio (−20%; p = 0.047) and a decrease of MCP-1 (−17.9%; p = 0.03). Conclusion. This study demonstrates that ET affects the inflammatory response more adversely at 30 minutes after exercise compared to HIIT. However, this is compensated by a significant decrease in MCP-1 at two days associated with a reduced risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:27212809

  3. Effect of Previous High Glutamine Infusion on Inflammatory Mediators and Mortality in an Acute Pancreatitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Garib, Ricardo; Garla, Priscila; Moretti, Ana I. S.; Machado, Marcel C. C.; Waitzberg, Dan L.

    2016-01-01

    Parenteral glutamine supplementation in acute inflammatory conditions is controversial. We evaluated the inflammatory and survival responses after parenteral glutamine infusion in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) model. Lewis rats received 1 g/kg parenteral glutamine (n = 42), saline (n = 44), or no treatment (n = 45) for 48 h before AP induction. Blood, lung, and liver samples were collected 2, 12, and 24 h after AP to measure serum cytokines levels and tissue heat shock protein (HSP) expression. From each group, 20 animals were not sacrificed after AP for a 7-day mortality study. Serum cytokine levels did not differ among groups at any time point, but the intragroup analysis over time showed higher interferon-γ only in the nontreatment and saline groups at 2 h (versus 12 and 24 h; both p ≤ 0.05). The glutamine group exhibited greater lung and liver HSP90 expression than did the nontreatment group at 2 and 12 h, respectively; greater liver HSP90 and HSP70 expression than did the saline group at 12 h; and smaller lung HSP70 and liver HSP90 expression than did the nontreatment group at 24 h (all p ≤ 0.019). The 7-day mortality rate did not differ among groups. In experimental AP, pretreatment with parenteral glutamine was safe and improved early inflammatory mediator profiles without affecting mortality. PMID:28070142

  4. Suppression of arthritis-induced bone erosion by a CRAC channel antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C; Soboloff, Jonathan; Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina L; Larrouture, Quitterie C; Witt, Michelle R; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Elliott, Meenal; Hirsch, Raphael; Barnett, John B

    2016-01-01

    Objective We have shown in vitro and in vivo that osteoclast maturation requires calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channels. In inflammatory arthritis, osteoclasts mediate severe and debilitating bone erosion. In the current study, we assess the value of CRAC channels as a therapeutic target to suppress bone erosion in acute inflammatory arthritis. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in mice. The CRAC channel inhibitor 3,4-dichloropropionaniline (DCPA) and a placebo was administered 1 day prior to collagen II booster to induce arthritis. Effects on swelling, inflammatory cell invasion in joints, serum cytokines and bone erosion were measured. Results Assays, by blinded observers, of arthritis severity showed that DCPA, 21 mg/kg/day, suppressed arthritis development over 3 weeks. Bone and cartilage damage in sections of animal feet was reduced approximately 50%; overall swelling of joints was reduced by a similar amount. Effects on bone density by µCT showed clear separation in DCPA-treated CIA animals from CIA without treatment, while differences between controls without CIA and CIA treated with DCPA differed by small amounts and in most cases were not statistically different. Response was not related to anticollagen titres. There were no adverse effects in the treated group on animal weight or activity, consistent with low toxicity. The effect was maximal 12–17 days after collagen booster, during the rapid appearance of arthritis in untreated CIA. At 20 days after treatment (day 40), differences in arthritis score were reduced and tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1, or IL-6 in the serum of the animals were similar in treated and untreated animals. Conclusions DCPA, a novel inhibitor of CRAC channels, suppresses bone erosion associated with acute arthritis in mice and might represent a new treatment modality for acute arthrits. PMID:26819750

  5. Intracellular delivery of desulfated heparin with bile acid conjugation alleviates T cell-mediated inflammatory arthritis via inhibition of RhoA-dependent transcellular diapedesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin Hee; Hwang, Seung Rim; Sung, Shijin; Jang, Ji Ae; Alam, Md Mahmudul; Sa, Keum Hee; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Kim, In San; Byun, Young Ro; Kang, Young Mo

    2014-06-10

    Heparin has a potential regulatory role in inflammatory diseases. However, the anticoagulant activity and poor oral bioavailability of heparin limit its use as an anti-inflammatory agent. Conjugation of bis-deoxycholic acid to 6-O-desulfated low molecular weight heparin (6DSHbD) was efficiently internalized by activated endothelial cells via a 2-step model, in which heparin attaches to adhesion molecules that facilitate accessibility of the bile acid conjugate to membrane transporters. The critical role of P-selectin during endothelial cell uptake of 6DSHbD by arthritic tissue was confirmed in p-selectin(-/-) arthritic mice. Intracellular 6DSHbD inhibited transcellular diapedesis of T cells through activated endothelial cells and impaired both the formation of ICAM-1-rich docking structures at the T cell contact surface and subsequent cytoskeletal rearrangement. Furthermore, 6DSHbD blocked activation of RhoA-GTPase and phosphorylation of ezrin/radixin/moesin induced by ICAM-1 cross-linking on activated endothelial cells, thereby impairing lymphocyte transcellular transmigration. After oral administration 6DSHbD was preferentially delivered to inflamed joint tissue, particularly in and around post-capillary venular endothelium and inhibited effector T cell homing to arthritic joints. Aggravation of collagen-induced arthritis conferred by the transfer of effector T cells was suppressed by oral 6DSHbD. Thus, intracellular heparin exerts anti-inflammatory effects through the inhibition of RhoA-dependent transendothelial recruitment of T cells and may have applications in the treatment of chronic inflammatory arthritis.

  6. Incidence of active mycobacterial infections in Brazilian patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and negative evaluation for latent tuberculosis infection at baseline - A longitudinal analysis after using TNFα blockers

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Carina Mori Frade; Terreri, Maria Teresa; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Barbosa, Cássia; Machado, Natália Pereira; Melo, Maria Roberta; Pinheiro, Marcelo Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Several studies point to the increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIAs) after using tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α blockers. To study the incidence of active mycobacterial infections (aMI) in patients starting TNF α blockers, 262 patients were included in this study: 109 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 93 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 44 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and 16 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All patients had indication for anti-TNF α therapy. Epidemiologic and clinical data were evaluated and a simple X-ray and tuberculin skin test (TST) were performed. The control group included 215 healthy individuals. The follow-up was 48 months to identify cases of aMI. TST positivity was higher in patients with AS (37.6%) than in RA (12.8%), PsA (18.8%) and JIA (6.8%) (p < 0.001). In the control group, TST positivity was 32.7%. Nine (3.43%) patients were diagnosed with aMI. The overall incidence rate of aMI was 86.93/100,000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 23.6-217.9] for patients and 35.79/100,000 person-years (95% CI 12.4-69.6) for control group (p < 0.001). All patients who developed aMI had no evidence of LTBI at the baseline evaluation. Patients with CIA starting TNF α blockers and no evidence of LTBI at baseline, particularly with nonreactive TST, may have higher risk of aMI. PMID:26560983

  7. Improved early diagnosis of acute inflammatory skeletal-articular diseases in children: A two-radiopharmaceutical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Handmaker, H.; Giammona, S.T.

    1984-05-01

    The febrile child with a painful bone or joint still presents a difficult pediatric diagnostic problem. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, and cellulitis are the most common causes of this symptom. Thirty-seven patients with these disorders were studied. Because findings from technetium-99m phosphate bone scans and roentgenograms are often normal in patients in the early stages of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, children suspected of having this disorder were tested using gallium-67 citrate scans in addition to the other diagnostic procedures. The increased diagnostic accuracy of this approach over that of bone scan and roentgenogram studies alone was observed in the children with fever and bone or joint pain.

  8. Acute Exercise-Induced Mitochondrial Stress Triggers an Inflammatory Response in the Myocardium via NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation with Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiying; Miao, Weiguo; Ma, Jingfen; Xv, Zhen; Bo, Hai; Li, Jianyu; Zhang, Yong; Ji, Li Li

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has indicated that acute strenuous exercise can induce a range of adverse reactions including oxidative stress and tissue inflammation. However, little is currently known regarding the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of the inflammatory response in the myocardium during acute heavy exercise. This study evaluated the mitochondrial function, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and mitochondrial autophagy-related proteins to investigate the regulation and mechanism of mitochondrial stress regarding the inflammatory response of the rat myocardium during acute heavy exercise. The results indicated that the mitochondrial function of the myocardium was adaptively regulated to meet the challenge of stress during acute exercise. The exercise-induced mitochondrial stress also enhanced ROS generation and triggered an inflammatory reaction via the NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, the mitochondrial autophagy-related proteins including Beclin1, LC3, and Bnip3 were all significantly upregulated during acute exercise, which suggests that mitophagy was stimulated in response to the oxidative stress and inflammatory response in the myocardium. Taken together, our data suggest that, during acute exercise, mitochondrial stress triggers the rat myocardial inflammatory response via NLRP3 inflammasome activation and activates mitophagy to minimize myocardial injury.

  9. Anti-inflammatory drugs and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from monocytes: role of transcription factor NF-kappa B and implication for rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Lavagno, Luisa; Gunella, Gabriele; Bardelli, Claudio; Spina, Simona; Fresu, Luigia Grazia; Viano, Ilario; Brunelleschi, Sandra

    2004-10-06

    Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) represents a relevant target in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Besides inhibiting cyclooxygenase, anti-inflammatory drugs can affect the activation of transcription factors. We investigated the ability of dexamethasone, indomethacin, and rofecoxib to modulate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and TNF-alpha release from human monocytes challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Both stimuli induced NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and TNF-alpha secretion. Dexamethasone potently inhibited TNF-alpha release, indomethacin inhibited only PMA-evoked release, while rofecoxib had no effect. In the electrophoretic mobility shift assay, dexamethasone and rofecoxib dose-dependently inhibited the DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB in stimulated monocytes, whereas indomethacin failed to inhibit the LPS-evoked one. These results were further confirmed by evaluating the drugs' ability to reduce nuclear NF-kappaB subunits, as well as the amount of phosphorylated IkappaBalpha in cytosolic fractions. In conclusion, these results indicate that anti-inflammatory drugs differ largely in their ability to inhibit NF-kappaB activity and/or TNF-alpha release from human monocytes. These effects can be relevant to rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

  10. Differential effects of isoflurane and CO2 inhalation on plasma levels of inflammatory markers associated with collagen-induced arthritis in DBA mice.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Christopher C; Lucas, Edralin A; Clarke, Stephen L; Smith, Brenda J; Kuvibidila, Solo

    2009-07-01

    Inhalation of CO2 or isoflurane is a commonly used method of euthanasia with mice, but information related to their effects on serum inflammatory markers in chronic models of inflammation is limited. In the current study, nineteen-week old DBA female mice with (n = 53) or without (n = 51) collagen-induced arthritis were randomly assigned to euthanization with CO2 (n = 55) or isoflurane (n = 49. Plasma was collected for the measurement of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by ELISA. When mice without and with collagen-induced arthritis were pooled, compared to CO2, administration of isoflurane was associated with lower production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha (pg/ml, mean +/- SEM) (26.1 +/- 2.82 versus 48.1 +/- 7.99) and IL-6 (25.18 +/- 2.73 versus 48.1 +/- 6.82) (ANOVA, p < 0.05). In contrast to TNF-alpha and IL-6, administration of CO2 decreased the plasma sICAM-1 level (1170+/- 50 versus 758 +/- 24 for CO2) (p < 0.00001). When data were analyzed as a function of collagen-induced arthritis, the differences between CO2 and isoflurane persisted. Low plasma sICAM-1 levels found in CO2 euthanasia group may be due to degradation. Since mice are the most common animal model for studying inflammation, researchers should be aware of these iatrogenic experimental variables before interpreting their data.

  11. Serum-sickness-like disease is a common cause of acute arthritis in children.

    PubMed

    Kunnamo, I; Kallio, P; Pelkonen, P; Viander, M

    1986-11-01

    Among 283 children in a prospective study of arthritis we found 15 patients with a self-limited serum-sickness-like disease consisting of urticaria or joint erythema and mostly polyarticular arthritis. The mean duration of joint symptoms was 5.9 days. A preceding infection was reported in 12 patients and 12 had received drugs, the therapy starting on average 12.8 days before the onset of joint symptoms. In 9 cases the drug was penicillin. Four patients had recurrent attacks. Circulating immune complexes were detected in the serum of 12 patients, but specific IgE antibodies to penicillin only in 3 patients. The estimated annual incidence of the condition was 4.7/100,000 children under age 16.

  12. Inflammatory Gout: Observations over a Half-Century

    PubMed Central

    Malawista, Stephen E.; Chevance de Boisfleury, Anne; Naccache, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    This is a discussion of acute gouty arthritis, seen for over 50 years of engagement. It addresses the evolution of our current understanding of the interaction between urate crystals and key cellular components of the gouty inflammatory paroxysm, with new material on pathogenesis. PMID:22131362

  13. Trait Hostility and Acute Inflammatory Responses to Stress in the Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Dominique; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Boisclair Demarble, Julie; D’Antono, Bianca

    2016-01-01

    Hostility has been associated with higher basal levels of inflammation. The present study evaluated the association of hostility with acute stress-induced changes in inflammatory activity. One hundred and ninety-nine healthy men and women, aged 19–64 years, were exposed to a stress protocol involving four interpersonal stressors. Participants completed the Cook-Medley Hostility questionnaire and provided two blood samples for the measurement of inflammatory biomarkers (CRP, Il-6, MPO, TNF-α, MCP-1, Il-8, Il-10, and Il-18), prior to and following exposure to a standardized stress protocol. In univariate analyses, hostility was associated with significantly higher TNF-α, but lower Il-8 and Il-18 values post-stress, though only Il-8 remained significant after controlling for baseline differences. In multivariate analyses, a significant Age by Hostility interaction emerged for Il-6, while sex moderated the relation between hostility and Il-10 reactivity. Following stress, hostility was associated with greater pro-inflammatory Il-6 activity among younger individuals and to decreased anti-inflammatory Il-10 activity in women. Future research is needed to replicate these findings and to evaluate their implication for disease. PMID:27270459

  14. The Acute Inflammatory Response to Absorbed Collagen Sponge Is Not Enhanced by BMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hairong; Wismeijer, Daniel; Hunziker, Ernst B.; Wu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Absorbed collagen sponge (ACS)/bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) are widely used in clinical practise for bone regeneration. However, the application of this product was found to be associated with a significant pro-inflammatory response, particularly in the early phase after implantation. This study aimed to clarify if the pro-inflammatory activities, associated with BMP-2 added to ACS, were related to the physical state of the carrier itself, i.e., a wet or a highly dehydrated state of the ACS, to the local degree of vascularisation and/or to local biomechanical factors. ACS (0.8 cm diameter)/BMP-2 were implanted subcutaneously in the back of 12 eight-week-old Sprague Dawley rats. Two days after surgery, the implanted materials were retrieved and analysed histologically and histomorphometrically. The acute inflammatory response following implantation of ACS was dependent of neither the presence or absence of BMP-2 nor the degree of vascularization in the surrounding tissue nor the hydration state (wet versus dry) of the ACS material at the time of implantation. Differential micro biomechanical factors operating at the implantation site appeared to have an influence on the thickness of inflammation. We conclude that the degree of the early inflammatory response of the ACS/BMP-2 may be associated with the physical and chemical properties of the carrier material itself. PMID:28245606

  15. TLR3 is an endogenous sensor of tissue necrosis during acute inflammatory events.

    PubMed

    Cavassani, Karen A; Ishii, Makoto; Wen, Haitao; Schaller, Matthew A; Lincoln, Pamela M; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Hogaboam, Cory M; Kunkel, Steven L

    2008-10-27

    Ligands from dying cells are a source of Toll-like receptor (TLR) activating agents. Although TLR3 is known to respond to RNA from necrotic cells, the relative importance of this response in vivo during acute inflammatory processes has not been fully explored. We observed the involvement of TLR3 activation during experimental polymicrobial septic peritonitis and ischemic gut injury in the absence of an exogenous viral stimulus. In TLR3-deficient mice, increased chemokine/cytokine levels and neutrophil recruitment characterized the initial inflammatory responses in both injury models. However, the levels of inflammatory chemokines and tumor necrosis factor alpha quickly returned to baseline in tlr3(-/-) mice, and these mice were protected from the lethal effects of sustained inflammation. Macrophages from tlr3(-/-) mice responded normally to other TLR ligands but did not respond to RNA from necrotic neutrophils. Importantly, an immunoneutralizing antibody directed against TLR3 attenuated the generation of inflammatory chemokines evoked by byproducts from necrotic neutrophils cultured with wild-type macrophages. In vivo, anti-TLR3 antibody attenuated the tissue injury associated with gut ischemia and significantly decreased sepsis-induced mortality. Collectively, these data show that TLR3 is a regulator of the amplification of immune response and serves an endogenous sensor of necrosis, independent of viral activation.

  16. Acute aerocystitis in Piaractus mesopotamicus: participation of eicosanoids and pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Claudiano, Gustavo da Silva; Petrillo, Thalita R; Manrique, Wilson G; Castro, Marcello P; Loureiro, Bruna A; Marcusso, Paulo F; Belo, Marco A A; Moraes, Julieta R E; de Moraes, Flávio Ruas

    2013-05-01

    A total of 360 pacus (Piaractus mesopotamicus) were used to study vascular permeability (VP) and inflammatory cell component (CC) in induced aerocystitis in P. mesopotamicus through inoculation of inactivated Aeromonas hydrophila, and the effect of steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. It was observed that after inoculation of A. hydrophila, the maximum VP occurred 180 min post-stimulus (MPS). Pretreatment with anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited VP, and the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone was seen earlier than the effects caused by meloxicam and indomethacin. Inoculation of the bacterium caused a gradual increase in the accumulation of cells, which reached a maximum 24 h post-stimulus (HPS). Pretreatment with dexamethasone, indomethacin and meloxicam reduced the accumulation of lymphocytes, thrombocytes, granulocytes and macrophages. There was no significant difference between the different doses of the drugs tested. The results suggest that eicosanoids and pro-inflammatory cytokines participate in chemical mediation in acute inflammation in pacus.

  17. Trait Hostility and Acute Inflammatory Responses to Stress in the Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Girard, Dominique; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Boisclair Demarble, Julie; D'Antono, Bianca

    2016-01-01

    Hostility has been associated with higher basal levels of inflammation. The present study evaluated the association of hostility with acute stress-induced changes in inflammatory activity. One hundred and ninety-nine healthy men and women, aged 19-64 years, were exposed to a stress protocol involving four interpersonal stressors. Participants completed the Cook-Medley Hostility questionnaire and provided two blood samples for the measurement of inflammatory biomarkers (CRP, Il-6, MPO, TNF-α, MCP-1, Il-8, Il-10, and Il-18), prior to and following exposure to a standardized stress protocol. In univariate analyses, hostility was associated with significantly higher TNF-α, but lower Il-8 and Il-18 values post-stress, though only Il-8 remained significant after controlling for baseline differences. In multivariate analyses, a significant Age by Hostility interaction emerged for Il-6, while sex moderated the relation between hostility and Il-10 reactivity. Following stress, hostility was associated with greater pro-inflammatory Il-6 activity among younger individuals and to decreased anti-inflammatory Il-10 activity in women. Future research is needed to replicate these findings and to evaluate their implication for disease.

  18. IDO2 is a critical mediator of autoantibody production and inflammatory pathogenesis in a mouse model of autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Lauren M F; Pigott, Elizabeth; DuHadaway, James B; Grabler, Samantha; Metz, Richard; Prendergast, George C; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2014-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune disorders are associated with altered activity of the immunomodulatory enzyme IDO. However, the precise contributions of IDO function to autoimmunity remain unclear. In this article, we examine the effect of two different IDO enzymes, IDO1 and IDO2, on the development of autoimmune arthritis in the KRN preclinical model of rheumatoid arthritis. We find that IDO2, not IDO1, is critical for arthritis development, providing direct evidence of separate in vivo functions for IDO1 and IDO2. Mice null for Ido2 display decreased joint inflammation relative to wild-type mice owing to a reduction in pathogenic autoantibodies and Ab-secreting cells. Notably, IDO2 appears to specifically mediate autoreactive responses, but not normal B cell responses, as total serum Ig levels are not altered and IDO2 knockout mice are able to mount productive Ab responses to model Ags in vitro and in vivo. Reciprocal adoptive transfer studies confirm that autoantibody production and arthritis are modulated by IDO2 expression in a cell type extrinsic to the T cell. Taken together, our results, provide important insights into IDO2 function by defining its pathogenic contributions to autoantibody-mediated autoimmunity.

  19. Spinal analgesic action of endomorphins in acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Przewłocka, B; Mika, J; Labuz, D; Toth, G; Przewłocki, R

    1999-02-19

    We studied spinal analgesic and antiallodynic effects of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 administered i.t. in comparison with Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or morphine, during acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in rats chronically implanted with intrathecal cannulas. Endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 (2.5, 5, 10 microg i.t.) increased the tail-flick latency and, to the lesser extent, the paw pressure latency. The range of potencies in both those models of acute pain was as follows: DAMGO > morphine = endomorphin-1 > endomorphin-2. In a model of inflammatory pain, the number of formalin-induced flinching episodes was decreased by endomorphin-1. The effect of endomorphin-2 was much less pronounced. Both DAMGO and morphine significantly inhibited the pain-related behavior evoked by formalin. In a neuropathic pain model (sciatic nerve crushing in rats), endomorphin-1 and -2 (5 microg i.t.) had a statistically significant effect on the tail-flick latency and on the cold-water tail flick latency. Morphine, 5 microg, was found to be ineffective. Endomorphin-1 and -2 (2.5 and 5 microg i.t.) dose-dependently antagonized allodynia. Those effects of endomorphins were antagonized in acute (30 microg), inflammatory (30 microg) and neuropathic pain models (60 microg) by cyprodime, a selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist. In conclusion, our results show a strong analgesic action of endomorphins at the spinal cord level. The most interesting finding is a strong, stronger than in the case of morphine, antiallodynic effect of endomorphins in rats subjected to sciatic nerve crushing, which suggests a possible use of these compounds in a very difficult therapy of neuropathic pain.

  20. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  1. HLA B27 associated chronic arthritis in children: review of 65 cases.

    PubMed

    Prieur, A M

    1987-01-01

    The study of sixty-five children with antigen HLA B27 associated chronic rheumatism was performed. There was a male preponderance, and mean age at onset was ten. A family history was available in half patients. After a 5-year follow up study, 32% of the patients were diagnosed as having ankylosing spondylitis or Reiter's syndrome or psoriatic arthritis or arthritis associated to inflammatory bowel disease. The other patients should be considered as having an HLA B27 associated juvenile chronic arthritis with special features such as enthesopathy, acute joint pain or sausage-like digits. Three patients had a very severe outcome with considerable joint lesion seen on X Ray.

  2. The microbiome and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eppinga, Hester; Konstantinov, Sergey R; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Thio, H Bing

    2014-03-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, seen in combination with the chronic inflammatory skin disease psoriasis and belonging to the family of spondylarthritides (SpA). A link is recognized between psoriatic arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Environmental factors seem to induce inflammatory disease in individuals with underlying genetic susceptibility. The microbiome is a subject of increasing interest in the etiology of these inflammatory immune-mediated diseases. The intestinal microbiome is able to affect extra-intestinal distant sites, including the joints, through immunomodulation. At this point, evidence regarding a relationship between the microbiome and psoriatic arthritis is scarce. However, we hypothesize that common immune-mediated inflammatory pathways seen in the "skin-joint-gut axis" in psoriatic arthritis are induced or at least mediated by the microbiome. Th17 has a crucial function in this mechanism. Further establishment of this connection may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for psoriatic arthritis.

  3. [Gonococcus-associated arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bodmer, K

    1989-04-01

    The various forms of arthritis associated with a gonococcus infection are pathogenetically and clinically differentiated. Whereas an infectious systemic process with different clinical symptoms is said to be underlying the arthritis-dermatitis syndrome as well as the septic GO-arthritis, the third form is para-infectious reactive arthritis. It is often difficult to diagnose an infectious GO-arthritis, as direct evidence of the virus found in joint and blood is rarely positive, so that the diagnosis can be affirmed or negated on the basis of clinical facts of the reaction of arthritis after an appropriate antibiotic therapy. Differential diagnostic considerations may help to find the correct diagnosis in view of an acute urethritis arthritis.

  4. Anti-inflammatory effect of glycosaminoglycan derived from Gryllus bimaculatus (a type of cricket, insect) on adjuvant-treated chronic arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Mi Young; Han, Jea Woong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Lee, Byung Mu

    2014-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) derived from cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus, Gb) were investigated in a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated chronic arthritic rat model. This GAG produced a significant anti-edema effect as evidenced by inhibition of C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor, and interfered with atherogenesis by reducing proinflammatory cytokine levels of (1) vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), (2) interleukin-6, (3) prostaglandin E2-stimulated lipopolysaccharide in RAW 264.7 cells, and (4) tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production in normal splenocytes, in a dose-dependent manner. This GAG was also found to induce nitric oxide (NO) production in HUVEC cells and elevated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity levels. Histological findings demonstrated the fifth lumbar vertebrae (LV) dorsal root ganglion, which was linked to the paw treated with Gb GAG, was repaired against CFA-induced cartilage destruction. Further, combined indomethacin (5 mg/kg)-Gb GAG (10 mg/kg) inhibited more effectively CFA-induced paw edema at 3 h and 2 or 3 d after treatment to levels comparable to only the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. Ultraviolet (UV)-irritated skin inflammation also downregulated nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activity in transfected HaCaT cells. Data suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of GAG obtained from cricket (Gb) may be useful for treatment of inflammatory diseases including chronic arthritis.

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Bioactive Compound Ferulic Acid Contained in Oldenlandia diffusa on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao; Liang, Qing-Hua; Xiong, Xin-Gui; Chen, Jiang; Wu, Dan; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to identify the active compounds in Oldenlandia diffusa (OD) decoction and the compounds absorbed into plasma, and to determine whether the absorbed compounds derived from OD exerted any anti-inflammatory effects in rats with collagen induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The UPLC-PDA (Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography Photo-Diode Array) method was applied to identify the active compounds both in the decoction and rat plasma. The absorbable compound was administered to the CIA rats, and the effects were dynamically observed. X-ray films of the joints and HE stain of synovial tissues were analyzed. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in the rats from each group were measured by means of ELISA. The absorbed compound in the plasma of CIA rats was identified as ferulic acid (FA), following OD decoction administration. Two weeks after the administration of FA solution or OD decoction, the general conditions improved compared to the model group. The anti-inflammatory effect of FA was inferior to that of the OD decoction (P < 0.05), based on a comparison of IL-1β TNF-α levels. FA from the OD decoction was absorbed into the body of CIA rats, where it elicited anti-inflammatory responses in rats with CIA. Conclusions. These results suggest that FA is the bioactive compound in OD decoction, and FA exerts its effects through anti-inflammatory pathways. PMID:24883069

  6. Rapid dendritic cell recruitment is a hallmark of the acute inflammatory response at mucosal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis of challenge sites such as skin and the peritoneal cavity has identified neutrophils as virtually the sole cellular participants in acute bacterial inflammation, peak influx occurring 24-48 h in advance of mononuclear cell populations associated with adaptive immunity. This study challenges the general applicability of this paradigm. We demonstrate here that the earliest detectable cellular response after inhalation of Moraxella catarrhalis organisms is the recruitment of putative class II major histocompatibility complex-bearing dendritic cell (DC) precursors into the airway epithelium, the initial wave arriving in advance of the neutrophil influx. Unlike the neutrophils which rapidly transit into the airway lumen, the DC precursors remain within the epithelium during the acute inflammatory response where they differentiate, and develop the dendriform morphology typical of resident DC found in the normal epithelium. During the ensuing 48-h period, these cells then migrate to the regional lymph nodes. No comparable DC response was observed after epidermal or intraperitoneal challenge, and it may be that mucosal surfaces are unique in their requirement for rapid DC responses during acute inflammation. We hypothesize that the role of the DC influx during acute inflammation may be surveillance for opportunistic viruses, and that this covert protective mechanism is operative at a restricted number of mucosal tissue sites. PMID:8145044

  7. Curcumin in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Shehzad, Adeeb; Rehman, Gauhar; Lee, Young Sup

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric is also used as a remedy for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases. Acute and chronic inflammation is a major factor in the progression of obesity, type II diabetes, arthritis, pancreatitis, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases, as well as certain types of cancer. Turmeric has a long history of use in Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Recent studies on the efficacy and therapeutic applicability of turmeric have suggested that the active ingredient of tumeric is curcumin. Further, compelling evidence has shown that curcumin has the ability to inhibit inflammatory cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis through multiple molecular targets and mechanisms of action. Curcumin is safe, non-toxic, and mediates its anti-inflammatory effects through the down-regulation of inflammatory transcription factors, cytokines, redox status, protein kinases, and enzymes that all promote inflammation. In addition, curcumin induces apoptosis through mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, as well as activation of caspase cascades. In the current study, the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin were evaluated relative to various chronic inflammatory diseases. Based on the available pharmacological data obtained from in vitro and in vivo research, as well as clinical trials, an opportunity exists to translate curcumin into clinics for the prevention of inflammatory diseases in the near future.

  8. Kinematic Analysis of Gait Following Intra-articular Corticosteroid Injection into the Knee Joint with an Acute Exacerbation of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Saurabh; Szturm, Tony; El-Gabalawy, Hani S.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The objective of this study was to examine the effects of intra-articular corticosteroid injection (ICI) on ipsilateral knee flexion/extension, ankle dorsiflexion/plantarflexion (DF/PF), and hip abduction/adduction (abd/add) during stance phase in people with an acute exacerbation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the knee joint. The study also assessed the effects of ICI on spatiotemporal parameters of gait and functional status in this group. Methods: Nine people with an exacerbation of RA of the knee were recruited. Kinematic and spatiotemporal gait parameters were obtained for each participant. Knee-related functional status was assessed using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Spatiotemporal gait parameters and joint angles (knee flexion, ankle DF/PF, hip abd/add) of the affected side were compared pre- and post-ICI. Results: Data for eight people were available for analysis. Median values for knee flexion and ankle PF increased significantly following ICI. Gait parameters of cadence, velocity, bilateral stride length, bilateral step length, step width, double-support percentage, and step time on the affected side also showed improvement. Pain and knee-related functional status as measured by the KOOS showed improvement. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a beneficial short-term effect of ICI on knee-joint movements, gait parameters, and knee-related functional status in people with acute exacerbation of RA of the knee. PMID:22942516

  9. Relationship between production of acute-phase proteins and strength of inflammatory stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Takashi; Tomizawa, Misaki; Seita, Tetsurou; Tagata, Kazutoshi; Yamamoto, Shizuo

    2011-07-01

    The relationship between intensity of inflammatory stimulation and production of α(2)-macroglobulin (α2M) and α(1)-acid glycoprotein (AAG) in rats was investigated. Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with turpentine oil at doses of 0.05, 0.2 or 0.4 mL/rat. Serum levels of α2M, interleukin (IL)-6 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and AAG was measured by single radial immunodiffusion. Peak serum levels of α2M and AAG in rats injected at 0.05 mL/rat were significantly lower than those at 0.2 or 0.4 mL/rat. However, no significant differences were observed for peak serum levels of these acute-phase proteins between 0.2 and 0.4 mL/rat. Furthermore, peak serum levels of IL-6 and CINC-1 in rats injected at 0.05 mL/rat were significantly lower than those at 0.2 or 0.4 mL/rat. Thus, the production of these acute-phase proteins has upper limits, even under increased strength of inflammatory stimulation in rats injected with turpentine oil.

  10. AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors contribute to inflammation, degeneration and pain related behaviour in inflammatory stages of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Cleo S; Williams, Anwen S; Gilbert, Sophie J; Harvey, Ann K; Evans, Bronwen A; Mason, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Synovial fluid glutamate concentrations increase in arthritis. Activation of kainate (KA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors (GluRs) increase interleukin-6 (IL-6) release and cause arthritic pain, respectively. We hypothesised that AMPA and KA GluRs are expressed in human arthritis, and that intra-articular NBQX (AMPA/KA GluR antagonist) prevents pain and pathology in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Methods GluR immunohistochemistry was related to synovial inflammation and degradation in osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A single intra-articular NBQX injection was given at induction, and knee swelling and gait of AIA and AIA+NBQX rats compared over 21 days, before imaging, RT-qPCR, histology and immunohistochemistry of joints. Effects of NBQX on human primary osteoblast (HOB) activity were determined. Results AMPAR2 and KA1 immunolocalised to remodelling bone, cartilage and synovial cells in human OA and RA, and rat AIA. All arthritic tissues showed degradation and synovial inflammation. NBQX reduced GluR abundance, knee swelling (p<0.001, days 1–21), gait abnormalities (days 1–2), end-stage joint destruction (p<0.001), synovial inflammation (p<0.001), and messenger RNA expression of meniscal IL-6 (p<0.05) and whole joint cathepsin K (p<0.01). X-ray and MRI revealed fewer cartilage and bone erosions, and less inflammation after NBQX treatment. NBQX reduced HOB number and prevented mineralisation. Conclusions AMPA/KA GluRs are expressed in human OA and RA, and in AIA, where a single intra-articular injection of NBQX reduced swelling by 33%, and inflammation and degeneration scores by 34% and 27%, respectively, exceeding the efficacy of approved drugs in the same model. AMPA/KA GluR antagonists represent a potential treatment for arthritis. PMID:24130267

  11. Alternative for Anti-TNF Antibodies for Arthritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders. PMID:21811249

  12. Alternative for anti-TNF antibodies for arthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders.

  13. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  14. Elevated Circulating Levels of Inflammatory Markers in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al Shahi, Hamad; Shimada, Kazunori; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Yoshihara, Takuma; Sai, Eiryu; Shiozawa, Tomoyuki; Naito, Ryo; Aikawa, Tatsuro; Ouchi, Shohei; Kadoguchi, Tomoyasu; Miyazaki, Tetsuro; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We evaluated inflammatory cytokines and chemokine in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with either acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods. We enrolled 20 ACS patients and 50 stable CAD patients without previous history of ACS who underwent cardiac catheterization. Patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of ≤30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and C-reactive protein of ≥1.0 mg/dL were excluded. Blood samples were collected from the patients just before catheterization, and PBMCs were isolated from the whole blood. The levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine were measured by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoassays. Results. The expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-10, IL-23A, IL-27, and IL-37 was significantly higher in the ACS group than in the CAD group (P < 0.05). In contrast, the expression of IL-33 was significantly lower in the ACS group than in the CAD group (P < 0.05). The ACS patients had higher plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 in the ACS group than in the CAD group. Conclusion. Circulating levels of pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-23A, IL-27, IL-33, and IL-37, may be associated with the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in ACS patients. PMID:26504600

  15. Therapeutic effects of sesame oil on monosodium urate crystal-induced acute inflammatory response in rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chen, Si-Jin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2013-01-01

    Sesame oil has been used in traditional Taiwanese medicine to relieve the inflammatory pain in people with joint inflammation, toothache, scrapes, and cuts. However, scientific evidence related to the effectiveness or action mechanism of sesame oil on relief of pain and inflammation has not been examined experimentally. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effect of sesame oil on monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystal-induced acute inflammatory response in rats. Air pouch, a pseudosynovial cavity, was established by injecting 24 mL of filtered sterile air subcutaneously in the backs of the rats. At day 0, inflammation in air pouch was induced by injecting MSU crystal (5 mg/rat, suspended in sterilized phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.4), while sesame oil (0, 1, 2, or 4 mL/kg, orally) was given 6 h after MSU crystal injection. Parameters in lavage and skin tissue from the air pouches were assessed 6 h after sesame oil was given. Sesame oil decreased MSU crystal-induced total cell counts, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 levels in lavage and pouch tissue. Sesame oil significantly decreased leukocyte and neutrophil counts in lavage compared with MSU crystal alone group. Sesame oil decreased activated mast cell counts in skin tissue in MSU crystal-treated rats. Sesame oil significantly decreased nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity and IL-4 level in isolated mast cells from rats treated with MSU crystal. Furthermore, sesame oil decreased lavage complement proteins C3a and C5a levels in MSU crystal-treated rats. In conclusion, sesame oil shows a potent therapeutic effect against MSU crystal-induced acute inflammatory response in rats.

  16. Vitamin D3 pretreatment regulates renal inflammatory responses during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Tan, Zhu-Xia; Xie, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Hua; Zhao, Hui; Yu, De-Xin; Xu, De-Xiang

    2015-12-22

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is highly expressed in human and mouse kidneys. Nevertheless, its functions remain obscure. This study investigated the effects of vitamin D3 (VitD3) pretreatment on renal inflammation during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS. In VitD3 + LPS group, mice were pretreated with VitD3 (25 μg/kg) at 48, 24 and 1 h before LPS injection. As expected, an obvious reduction of renal function and pathological damage was observed in LPS-treated mice. VitD3 pretreatment significantly alleviated LPS-induced reduction of renal function and pathological damage. Moreover, VitD3 pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced renal inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. In addition, pretreatment with 1,25(OH)2D3, the active form of VitD3, alleviated LPS-induced up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human HK-2 cells, a renal tubular epithelial cell line, in a VDR-dependent manner. Further analysis showed that VitD3, which activated renal VDR, specifically repressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 subunit in the renal tubules. LPS, which activated renal NF-κB, reciprocally suppressed renal VDR and its target gene. Moreover, VitD3 reinforced the physical interaction between renal VDR and NF-κB p65 subunit. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for VitD3-mediated anti-inflammatory activity during LPS-induced acute kidney injury.

  17. Limited inflammatory response in rats after acute exposure to a silicon carbide nanoaerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laloy, J.; Lozano, O.; Alpan, L.; Masereel, B.; Toussaint, O.; Dogné, J. M.; Lucas, S.

    2015-08-01

    Inhalation represents the major route of human exposure to manufactured nanomaterials (NMs). Assessments are needed about the potential risks of NMs from inhalation on different tissues and organs, especially the respiratory tract. The aim of this limited study is to determine the potential acute pulmonary toxicity in rats exposed to a dry nanoaerosol of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles (NPs) in a whole-body exposure (WBE) model. The SiC nanoaerosol is composed of a bimodal size distribution of 92.8 and 480 nm. The exposure concentration was 4.91 mg/L, close to the highest recommended concentration of 5 mg/L by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Rats were exposed for 6 h to a stable and reproducible SiC nanoaerosol under real-time measurement conditions. A control group was exposed to the filtered air used to create the nanoaerosol. Animals were sacrificed immediately, 24 or 72 h after exposure. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from rat lungs was recovered. Macrophages filled with SiC NPs were observed in the rat lungs. The greatest load of SiC and macrophages filled with SiC were observed on the rat lungs sacrificed 24 h after acute exposure. A limited acute inflammatory response was found up to 24 h after exposure characterized by a lactate dehydrogenase and total protein increase or presence of inflammatory cells in pulmonary lavage. For this study a WBE model has been developed, it allows the simultaneous exposure of six rats to a nanoaerosol and six rats to clean-filtered air. The nanoaerosol was generated using a rotating brush system (RBG-1000) and analyzed with an electrical low pressure impactor in real time.

  18. Functional Role of Monocytes and Macrophages for the Inflammatory Response in Acute Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Henning W.; Trautwein, Christian; Tacke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Different etiologies such as drug toxicity, acute viral hepatitis B, or acetaminophen poisoning can cause acute liver injury or even acute liver failure (ALF). Excessive cell death of hepatocytes in the liver is known to result in a strong hepatic inflammation. Experimental murine models of liver injury highlighted the importance of hepatic macrophages, so-called Kupffer cells, for initiating and driving this inflammatory response by releasing proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1beta, or monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, CCL2) as well as activating other non-parenchymal liver cells, e.g., endothelial or hepatic stellate cells. Many of these proinflammatory mediators can trigger hepatocytic cell death pathways, e.g., via caspase activation, but also activate protective signaling pathways, e.g., via nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). Recent studies in mice demonstrated that these macrophage actions largely depend on the recruitment of monocytes into the liver, namely of the inflammatory Ly6c+ (Gr1+) monocyte subset as precursors of tissue macrophages. The chemokine receptor CCR2 and its ligand MCP-1/CCL2 promote monocyte subset infiltration upon liver injury. In contrast, the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 and its ligand fractalkine (CX3CL1) are important negative regulators of monocyte infiltration by controlling their survival and differentiation into functionally diverse macrophage subsets upon injury. The recently identified cellular and molecular pathways for monocyte subset recruitment, macrophage differentiation, and interactions with other hepatic cell types in the injured liver may therefore represent interesting novel targets for future therapeutic approaches in ALF. PMID:23091461

  19. Diagnostic value of blood inflammatory markers for detection of acute appendicitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Ulrich; Biereder, Birgit; Elouahidi, Tino; Bauer, Katrin; Keller, Thomas; Tröbs, Ralf-Bodo

    2006-01-01

    Background Acute appendicitis (AA) is a common surgical problem that is associated with an acute-phase reaction. Previous studies have shown that cytokines and acute-phase proteins are activated and may serve as indicators for the severity of appendicitis. The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic value of different serum inflammatory markers in detection of phlegmonous or perforated appendicitis in children. Methods Data were collected prospectively on 211 consecutive children. Laparotomy was performed for suspected AA for 189 patients. Patients were subdivided into groups: nonsurgical abdominal pain, early appendicitis, phlegmonous or gangrenous appendicitis, perforated appendicitis. White blood cell count (WBC), serum C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), acid α1-glycoprotein (α1GP), endotoxin, and erythrocyte sedimentation reaction (ESR) were estimated ad the time of admission. The diagnostic performance was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results WBC count, CRP and IL-6 correlated significantly with the severity of appendiceal inflammation. Identification of children with severe appendicitis was supported by IL-6 or CRP but not WBC. Between IL-6 and CRP, there were no significant differences in diagnostic use. Conclusion Laboratory results should be considered to be integrated within the clinical assessment. If used critically, CRP and IL-6 equally provide surgeons with complementary information in discerning the necessity for urgent operation. PMID:17132173

  20. Neurohormonal and Inflammatory Hyper-Responsiveness to Acute Mental Stress in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Ali A.; Deuster, Patricia A.; Francis, Jennifer L.; Bonsall, Robert W.; Tracy, Russell P.; Kop, Willem J.

    2010-01-01

    Depression is associated with dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, overactivity of the sympathoadrenal system, and increased levels of inflammation markers. It is not known whether these biological processes are disproportionately elevated in response to acute negative emotional arousal by mental stress (MS). The present study investigates responses of neurohormones and inflammatory markers to MS in 14 clinically depressed (age: 42±10 years; 50% female) and 14 non-depressed control participants (age: 39±6 years; 50% female). Heightened acute MS reactivity was documented in depressed participants (adrenocorticotropic hormone, ρ=0.001; Norepinephrine, ρ=0.042; Epinephrine, ρ=0.039), and a delayed increase in cortisol was observed (ρ=0.002). Inflammation markers increased more strongly in depressed vs. non-depressed participants (IL-6, ρ=0.027; tumor necrosis factor-alpha, ρ=0.050; and recovery C-reactive protein, ρ=0.003). It is concluded that depressed individuals display hyper-reactivity of neuroimmunological markers in response to acute negative emotions. This hyper-reactivity may serve a pathologic role in the elevated morbidity and mortality risk associated with depression. PMID:20117167

  1. Association of calprotectin with leukocyte chemotactic and inflammatory mediators following acute aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Arun; Slusher, Aaron L; Zourdos, Michael C; Whitehurst, Michael; Fico, Brandon G; Huang, Chun-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether acute aerobic exercise-mediated calprotectin in plasma would be associated with monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in healthy individuals. Eleven healthy participants, aged 18 to 30 years, were recruited to perform a 30-min bout of aerobic exercise at 75% maximal oxygen uptake. Acute aerobic exercise elicited a significant elevation across time in plasma calprotectin, MCP-1, MPO, and IL-6. Body mass index (BMI) was positively correlated with calprotectin area-under-the-curve with "respect to increase" (AUCi) and IL-6 AUCi. Furthermore, calprotectin AUCi was positively correlated with IL-6 AUCi and MPO AUCi, even after controlling for BMI. Although MPO AUCi was positively correlated with IL-6 AUCi, this relationship no longer existed after controlling for BMI. These results suggest that acute aerobic exercise could mediate innate immune response associated with calprotectin and its related leukocyte chemotactic and inflammatory mediators, especially in individuals with elevated BMI.

  2. Relationship of Acute Lung Inflammatory Injury to Fas/FasL System

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Thomas A.; Guo, Ren-Feng; Neff, Simona B.; Sarma, J. Vidya; Speyer, Cecilia L.; Gao, Hongwei; Bernacki, Kurt D.; Huber-Lang, Markus; McGuire, Stephanie; Hoesel, L. Marco; Riedemann, Niels C.; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Zetoune, Firas S.; Ward, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that apoptosis plays a significant role in tissue damage during acute lung injury. To evaluate the role of the apoptosis mediators Fas and FasL in acute lung injury, Fas (lpr)- or FasL (gld)-deficient and wild-type mice were challenged with intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes. Lung injury parameters (125I-albumin leak, accumulation of myeloperoxidase, and wet lung weights) were measured and found to be consistently reduced in both lpr and gld mice. In wild-type mice, lung injury was associated with a marked increase in Fas protein in lung. Inflamed lungs of wild-type mice showed striking evidence of activated caspase-3, which was much diminished in inflamed lungs from lpr mice. Intratracheal administration of a monoclonal Fas-activating antibody (Jo2) in wild-type mice induced MIP-2 and KC production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and a murine alveolar macrophage cell line (MH-S) showed significantly increased MIP-2 production after incubation with this antibody. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid content of MIP-2 and KC was substantially reduced in lpr mice after lung injury when compared to levels in wild-type mice. These data suggest that the Fas/FasL system regulates the acute lung inflammatory response by positively affecting CXC-chemokine production, ultimately leading to enhanced neutrophil influx and tissue damage. PMID:15743781

  3. Topical Anti‐Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Multiple Applications of S(+)‐Flurbiprofen Plaster (SFPP) in a Rat Adjuvant‐Induced Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Preclinical Research The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of multiple applications of S(+)‐flurbiprofen plaster (SFPP), a novel Nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drug (NSAID) patch, for the alleviation of inflammatory pain and edema in rat adjuvant‐induced arthritis (AIA) model as compared to other NSAID patches. The AIA model was induced by the injection of Mycobacterium butyricum and rats were treated with a patch (1.0 cm × 0.88 cm) containing each NSAID (SFP, ketoprofen, loxoprofen, diclofenac, felbinac, flurbiprofen, or indomethacin) applied to the paw for 6 h per day for 5 days. The pain threshold was evaluated using a flexion test of the ankle joint, and the inflamed paw edema was evaluated using a plethysmometer. cyclooxygenase (COX)−1 and COX‐2 inhibition was evaluated using human recombinant proteins. Multiple applications of SFPP exerted a significant analgesic effect from the first day of application as compared to the other NSAID patches. In terms of paw edema, SFPP decreased edema from the second day after application, Multiple applications of SFPP were superior to those of other NSAID patches, in terms of the analgesic effect with multiple applications. These results suggest that SFPP may be a beneficial patch for providing analgesic and anti‐inflammatory effects clinically. Drug Dev Res 77 : 206–211, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Drug Development Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27241582

  4. Orally Administered Enoxaparin Ameliorates Acute Colitis by Reducing Macrophage-Associated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lean, Qi Ying; Eri, Rajaraman D.; Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Stewart, Niall; Peterson, Gregory M.; Gueven, Nuri; Patel, Rahul P.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, cause significant morbidity and decreased quality of life. The currently available treatments are not effective in all patients, can be expensive and have potential to cause severe side effects. This prompts the need for new treatment modalities. Enoxaparin, a widely used antithrombotic agent, is reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties and therefore we evaluated its therapeutic potential in a mouse model of colitis. Acute colitis was induced in male C57BL/6 mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Mice were treated once daily with enoxaparin via oral or intraperitoneal administration and monitored for colitis activities. On termination (day 8), colons were collected for macroscopic evaluation and cytokine measurement, and processed for histology and immunohistochemistry. Oral but not intraperitoneal administration of enoxaparin significantly ameliorated DSS-induced colitis. Oral enoxaparin-treated mice retained their body weight and displayed less diarrhea and fecal blood loss compared to the untreated colitis group. Colon weight in enoxaparin-treated mice was significantly lower, indicating reduced inflammation and edema. Histological examination of untreated colitis mice showed a massive loss of crypt architecture and goblet cells, infiltration of immune cells and the presence of edema, while all aspects of this pathology were alleviated by oral enoxaparin. Reduced number of macrophages in the colon of oral enoxaparin-treated mice was accompanied by decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Oral enoxaparin significantly reduces the inflammatory pathology associated with DSS-induced colitis in mice and could therefore represent a novel therapeutic option for the management of ulcerative colitis. PMID:26218284

  5. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  6. Inflammatory arthritis. The role of physical and rehabilitation medicine physicians. The European perspective based on the best evidence. A paper by the UEMS-PRM Section Professional Practice Committee.

    PubMed

    Küçükdeveci, A A; Oral, A; Ilıeva, E M; Varela, E; Valero, R; Berteanu, M; Chrıstodoulou, N

    2013-08-01

    One of the objectives of the Professional Practice Committee (PPC) of the Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM) Section of the Union of European Medical Specialists (UEMS) is the development of the field of competence of PRM physicians in Europe. To achieve this objective, UEMS PRM Section PPC has adopted a systematic action plan of preparing a series of papers describing the role of PRM physicians in a number of disabling health conditions, based on the evidence of effectiveness of the physical and rehabilitation medicine interventions. Inflammatory arthritis is a major cause of disability with an important economic burden in society. The goals in the management of inflammatory arthritis are to control pain and disease activity, prevent joint damage, protect and enhance function and improve quality of life. This paper aims to define the role of PRM physicians in people with inflammatory arthritis. PRM interventions imply non-pharmacological treatments which include patient education for joint protection, energy conservation and self-management techniques, exercise therapy, physical modalities, orthoses/assistive devices and balneotherapy. Therapeutic patient education and exercises are the cornerstones of therapy with strong evidence of their effectiveness to improve function. Physical modalities are primarily used to decrease pain and stiffness whereas orthoses/assistive devices are usually prescribed to enhance activities and participation. PRM physicians have distinct roles in the management of people with inflammatory arthritis such that they effectively organise and supervise the PRM program in the context of interdisciplinary team work. Their role starts with a comprehensive assessment of patient's functioning based on the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) as the framework. In the light of this assessment, appropriate PRM interventions individualised for the patient are administered. Future research and actions

  7. Evidence of different mediators of central inflammation in dysfunctional and inflammatory pain — Interleukin-8 in fibromyalgia and interleukin-1 β in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Eva; Altawil, Reem; Kadetoff, Diana; Finn, Anja; Westman, Marie; Le Maître, Erwan; Andersson, Magnus; Jensen-Urstad, Mats; Lampa, Jon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to relate central inflammation to autonomic activity (heart rate variability (HRV)) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and fibromyalgia (FM). RA patients had reduced parasympathetic activity and FM patients had increased sympathetic activity compared to healthy controls. Comparisons between RA and FM showed higher cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) interleukin (IL)-1β inversely correlated to parasympathetic activity in RA. The FM patients had higher concentrations of CSF IL-8, IL-1Ra, IL-4 and IL-10, but none of these cytokines correlated with HRV. In conclusion, we found different profiles of central cytokines, i.e., elevated IL-1β in inflammatory pain (RA) and elevated IL-8 in dysfunctional pain (FM). PMID:25773155

  8. Bim-BH3 mimetic therapy is effective at suppressing inflammatory arthritis through the activation of myeloid cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Scatizzi, John C.; Hutcheson, Jack; Pope, Richard M.; Firestein, Gary S.; Koch, Alisa E.; Mavers, Melissa; Smason, Avraham; Agrawal, Hemant; Haines, G. Kenneth; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Perlman, Harris

    2010-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a destructive autoimmune disease characterized by an increased inflammation in the joint. Therapies which activate the apoptotic cascade may have potential as a future therapy for RA, however few therapeutics fit this category. Recently, therapies that mimic the action of Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3) domain-only proteins such as Bim have shown success in preclinical studies of cancer but their potential in autoimmune disease is unknown. Methods Synovial tissue from RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients were analyzed for expression of Bim and CD68 using immunohistochemistry. Macrophages from mice lacking (Bim−/−) were examined for response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using flow cytometry, real time PCR, ELISA, and immunoblot analysis. Bim−/− mice were stimulated with thioglycollate or LPS and examined for macrophage activation and cytokine production. Experimental arthritis was induced using the K/BxN serum-transfer model. A mimetic peptide corresponding to the BH3 domain of Bim (TAT-BH3) was administered as a prophylactic and as a therapeutic. Edema of the ankles and histopathogical analysis of ankle sections were used to determine severity of arthritis, cellular composition, and apoptosis. Results The expression of Bim was reduced in RA synovial tissue as compared to controls, particularly in macrophages. Bim−/− macrophages displayed elevated expression of markers of inflammation and secreted more IL-1β following stimulation with LPS or thioglycollate. TAT-BH3 ameliorated arthritis development, reduced the number of myeloid cells in the joint, and enhanced apoptosis without inducing cytotoxicity. Conclusion These data demonstrate that BH3 mimetic therapy may have significant potential for RA treatment. PMID:20112357

  9. EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders: 2015/2016 update.

    PubMed

    Agca, R; Heslinga, S C; Rollefstad, S; Heslinga, M; McInnes, I B; Peters, M J L; Kvien, T K; Dougados, M; Radner, H; Atzeni, F; Primdahl, J; Södergren, A; Wallberg Jonsson, S; van Rompay, J; Zabalan, C; Pedersen, T R; Jacobsson, L; de Vlam, K; Gonzalez-Gay, M A; Semb, A G; Kitas, G D; Smulders, Y M; Szekanecz, Z; Sattar, N; Symmons, D P M; Nurmohamed, M T

    2017-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint disorders (IJD) have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared with the general population. In 2009, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) taskforce recommended screening, identification of CVD risk factors and CVD risk management largely based on expert opinion. In view of substantial new evidence, an update was conducted with the aim of producing CVD risk management recommendations for patients with IJD that now incorporates an increasing evidence base. A multidisciplinary steering committee (representing 13 European countries) comprised 26 members including patient representatives, rheumatologists, cardiologists, internists, epidemiologists, a health professional and fellows. Systematic literature searches were performed and evidence was categorised according to standard guidelines. The evidence was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist is responsible for CVD risk management in patients with IJD. Third, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids should be in accordance with treatment-specific recommendations from EULAR and Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society. Ten recommendations were defined, of which one is new and six were changed compared with the 2009 recommendations. Each designated an appropriate evidence support level. The present update extends on the evidence that CVD risk in the whole spectrum of IJD is increased. This underscores the need for CVD risk management in these patients. These recommendations are defined to provide assistance in CVD risk management in IJD, based on expert opinion and scientific evidence.

  10. Intracellular Hmgb1 Inhibits Inflammatory Nucleosome Release and Limits Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Rui; Zhang, Qiuhong; Hou, Wen; Yan, Zhenwen; Chen, Ruochan; Bonaroti, Jillian; Bansal, Preeti; Billiar, Timothy R.; Tsung, Allan; Wang, Qingde; Bartlett, David L.; Whitcomb, David C; Chang, Eugene B.; Zhu, Xiaorong; Wang, Haichao; Lu, Ben; Tracey, Kevin J.; Cao, Lizhi; Fan, Xue-Gong; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Tang, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an abundant protein that regulates chromosome architecture and also functions as a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule. Little is known about its intracellular roles in response to tissue injury or during subsequent local and systemic inflammatory responses. We investigated the function of Hmgb1 in mice following induction of acute pancreatitis. METHODS: We utilized a Cre/LoxP system to create mice with pancreas-specific disruption in Hmbg1 (Pdx1-Cre; HMGB1flox/flox mice). Acute pancreatitis was induced in these mice (HMGB1flox/flox mice served as controls) following injection of L-arginine or cerulein. Pancreatic tissues and acinar cells were collected and analyzed by histologic, immunoblot, and immunohistochemical analyses. RESULTS: Following injection of L-arginine or cerulein, Pdx1-Cre; HMGB1flox/flox mice developed acute pancreatitis more rapidly than controls, with increased mortality. Pancreatic tissues of these mice also had higher levels of serum amylase, acinar cell death, leukocyte infiltration, and interstitial edema than controls. Pancreatic tissues and acinar cells collected from the Pdx1-Cre; HMGB1flox/flox mice following L-arginine- or cerulein injection demonstrated nuclear catastrophe with greater nucleosome release when compared with controls, along with increased phosphorylation/activation of RELA Nfκb, degradation of Iκb, and phosphorylation of Mapk. Inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (N-acetyl-L-cysteine) blocked L-arginine–induced DNA damage, necrosis, apoptosis, release of nucleosomes, and activation of Nfκb in pancreatic tissues and acinar cells from Pdx1-Cre; HMGB1flox/flox and control mice. Exogenous genomic DNA and recombinant histone H3 proteins significantly induced release of HMGB1 from mouse macrophages; administration of antibodies against H3 to mice reduced serum levels of HMGB1 and increased survival following L-arginine injection. CONCLUSIONS: In 2 mouse

  11. Effect of acute intradialytic strength physical exercise on oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Esgalhado, Marta; Stockler-Pinto, Milena Barcza; de França Cardozo, Ludmila Ferreira Medeiros; Costa, Cinthia; Barboza, Jorge Eduardo; Mafra, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress and inflammation are common findings in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, and they are directly related to the increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, which is the major cause of death in these patients, particularly for those undergoing hemodialysis (HD). Strength physical exercise is a new therapeutic approach to reduce these complications in CKD patients. Following this, the purpose of this study was to assess the effect of acute intradialytic strength physical exercise on oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in HD patients. Methods Sixteen HD patients were studied (11 women; 44.4±14.6 years; body mass index 23.3±4.9 kg/m2; 61.6±43.1 months of dialysis) and served as their own controls. Acute (single session) intradialytic physical exercise were performed at 60% of the one-repetition maximum test for three sets of 10 repetitions for four exercise categories in both lower limbs during 30 minutes. Blood samples were collected on two different days at exactly the same time (30 minutes and 60 minutes after initiating the dialysis—with and without exercise). Antioxidant enzymes activity [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase], lipid peroxidation marker levels (malondialdehyde), and inflammatory marker levels (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein) were determined. Results SOD plasma levels were significantly reduced after acute physical exercise from 244.8±40.7 U/mL to 222.4±28.9 U/mL (P=0.03) and, by contrast, increased on the day without exercise (218.2±26.5 U/mL to 239.4±38.6 U/mL, P=0.02). There was no alteration in plasma catalase, glutathione peroxidase, malondialdehyde, or high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in on either day (with or without exercise). Additionally, there was no association between these markers and clinical, anthropometric, or biochemical parameters. Conclusion These data suggest that acute intradialytic strength physical exercise was unable to

  12. Immuno-inflammatory activation in acute cardio-embolic strokes in comparison with other subtypes of ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Licata, Giuseppe; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Corrao, Salvatore; Di Sciacca, Riccardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2009-05-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between inflammatory biomarker blood levels, cardioembolic stroke subtype and neurological deficit. So the aim of our study is to evaluate plasma levels of immuno-inflammatory variables in patients with cardio-embolic acute ischaemic stroke compared to other diagnostic subtypes and to evaluate the relationship between immuno-inflammatory variables, acute neurological deficit and brain infarct volume. One hundred twenty patients with acute ischaemic stroke and 123 controls without a diagnosis of acute ischaemic stroke were evaluated. The type of acute ischaemic stroke was classified according to the TOAST classification. We evaluated plasma levels of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10, E-selectin, P-selectin, sICAM-1,sVCAM-1, vWF, TPA and PAI-1. Patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cardio-embolic (CEI) showed, compared to other subtypes, significantly higher median plasma levels of TNF-alpha , IL-6 and IL-1beta. Furthermore stroke patients classified as lacunar showed, compared to other subtypes, significantly lower median plasma levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1beta. Multiple linear regression showed a significant association between the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) score at admission and diagnostic subtype, infarct volume of cardio-embolic strokes and some inflammatory variables. Our findings confirm that cardio-embolic strokes have a worse clinical presentation and produce larger and more disabling strokes than other ischaemic stroke subtypes reporting a possible explanation of higher immuno-inflammatory activation of the acute phase.

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; McInnes, Iain B

    2016-10-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, which can cause cartilage and bone damage as well as disability. Early diagnosis is key to optimal therapeutic success, particularly in patients with well-characterised risk factors for poor outcomes such as high disease activity, presence of autoantibodies, and early joint damage. Treatment algorithms involve measuring disease activity with composite indices, applying a treatment-to-target strategy, and use of conventional, biological, and newz non-biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. After the treatment target of stringent remission (or at least low disease activity) is maintained, dose reduction should be attempted. Although the prospects for most patients are now favourable, many still do not respond to current therapies. Accordingly, new therapies are urgently required. In this Seminar, we describe current insights into genetics and aetiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, assessment, therapeutic agents, and treatment strategies together with unmet needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Acute ethanol intake attenuates inflammatory cytokines after brain injury in rats: a possible role for corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Gottesfeld, Zehava; Moore, Anthony N; Dash, Pramod K

    2002-03-01

    It has been reported that acute ethanol intoxication exerts dose-dependent effects, both beneficial and detrimental, on the outcome of traumatic brain injury (TBI), although the mechanism(s) has not been determined. Given that pro-inflammatory cytokines are either neuroprotective or neurotoxic, depending on their tissue levels, ethanol-induced alterations in brain cytokine production may be involved in determining the recovery after TBI. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of acute ethanol pretreatments (producing blood alcohol concentrations of 100+/-16 mg/dL, and 220+/-10 mg/dL, considered low and intoxicating doses, respectively) on interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels in discrete brain regions. In addition, serum corticosterone levels were also examined because the hormone is a modulator of cytokine production, its secretion is stimulated by ethanol, and it has been associated with the severity of post-injury neurologic dysfunction. The data presented in this report demonstrate that moderate cortical impact brain injury elicits a marked increase in IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in the injured cortex as well as in the hippocampus ipsilateral to the injury. Ethanol pretreatment lowered cytokine levels in the cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus in a dose-dependent manner after TBI compared to the untreated injured rats. Serum corticosterone levels were markedly increased in the injured rats, and were further augmented in the ethanol-pretreated injured animals in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that ethanol-induced decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine production may be linked to increased circulating corticosterone, both of which may contribute to the outcome of brain injury.

  15. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions of robenacoxib in acute joint inflammation in dog.

    PubMed

    Schmid, V B; Spreng, D E; Seewald, W; Jung, M; Lees, P; King, J N

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish dose-response and blood concentration-response relationships for robenacoxib, a novel nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with selectivity for inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 isoenzyme, in a canine model of synovitis. Acute synovitis of the stifle joint was induced by intra-articular injection of sodium urate crystals. Robenacoxib (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg), placebo and meloxicam (0.2 mg/kg) were administered subcutaneously (s.c.) 3 h after the urate crystals. Pharmacodynamic endpoints included data from forceplate analyses, clinical orthopaedic examinations and time course of inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 in ex vivo whole blood assays. Blood was collected for pharmacokinetics. Robenacoxib produced dose-related improvement in weight-bearing, pain and swelling as assessed objectively by forceplate analysis (estimated ED(50) was 1.23 mg/kg for z peak force) and subjectively by clinical orthopaedic assessments. The analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of robenacoxib were significantly superior to placebo (0.25-4 mg/kg robenacoxib) and were non-inferior to meloxicam (0.5-4 mg/kg robenacoxib). All dosages of robenacoxib produced significant dose-related inhibition of COX-2 (estimated ED(50) was 0.52 mg/kg) but no inhibition of COX-1. At a dosage of 1-2 mg/kg administered s.c., robenacoxib should be at least as effective as 0.2 mg/kg of meloxicam in suppressing acute joint pain and inflammation in dogs.

  16. Anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin in lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory in acute lung injury by suppressing COX-2 and NF-kB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Yu-Tao; Xiao, Lu; Zhu, Lingpeng; Wang, Qiujuan; Yan, Tianhua

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory in acute lung injury. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice and the possible mechanisms involved in this protection were investigated. Pretreatment with apigenin prior to the administration of intratracheal LPS significantly induced a decrease in lung wet weight/dry weight ratio in total leukocyte number and neutrophil percent in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and in IL-6 and IL-1β, the tumor neurosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the BALF. These results showed that anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin against the LPS-induced ALI may be due to its ability of primary inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) gene expression of lung. The results presented here suggest that the protective mechanism of apigenin may be attributed partly to decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines through the inhibition of COX-2 and NF-kB activation. The results support that use of apigenin is beneficial in the treatment of ALI.

  17. The function of tumour necrosis factor and receptors in models of multi-organ inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kollias, G.; Douni, E.; Kassiotis, G.; Kontoyiannis, D.

    1999-01-01

    There is now good evidence to demonstrate that aberrations in tumour necrosis factor (TNF) production in vivo may be either pathogenic or protective and several plausible mechanisms may explain these contrasting activities. According to the classic pro-inflammatory scenario, failure to regulate the production of TNF at a site of immunological injury may lead to chronic activation of innate immune cells and to chronic inflammatory responses, which may consequently lead to organ specific inflammatory pathology and tissue damage. However, more cryptic functions of this molecule may be considered to play a significant part in the development of TNF mediated pathologies. Direct interference of TNF with the differentiation, proliferation or death of specific pathogenic cell targets may be an alternative mechanism for disease initiation or progression. In addition to these activities, there is now considerable evidence to suggest that TNF may also directly promote or down regulate the adaptive immune response. A more complete understanding of the temporal and spatial context of TNF/TNF receptor (TNF-R) function and of the molecular and cellular pathways leading to the development of TNF/TNF-R mediated pathologies is necessary to fully comprehend relevant mechanisms of disease induction and progression in humans. In this paper, the potential pathogenic mechanisms exerted by TNF and receptors in models of multi-organ inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease are discussed. Elucidating the nature and level of contribution of these mechanisms in chronic inflammation and autoimmunity may lead to better regulatory and therapeutic applications.

 PMID:10577971

  18. Effects of altering dietary essential fatty acids on requirements for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a double blind placebo controlled study.

    PubMed

    Belch, J J; Ansell, D; Madhok, R; O'Dowd, A; Sturrock, R D

    1988-02-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) benefit from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is mediated through inhibition of the cyclo-oxygenase enzyme, thereby decreasing production of the 2 series prostaglandins (PGs). The lipoxygenase enzyme is intact, however, allowing leucotriene (LT) production, e.g., LTB4 (an inflammatory mediator). Treatment with evening primrose oil (EPO) which contains gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) leads to production of the 1 series PGs, e.g., PGE1, which has less inflammatory effects. Also LT production is inhibited. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, fish oil) treatment provides a substrate for PGs and LTs, which are also less inflammatory. In this study 16 patients with RA were given 540 mg GLA/day (EPO), 15 patients 240 mg EPA and 450 mg GLA/day (EPO/fish oil), and 18 patients an inert oil (placebo). The aim of this study was to determine if EPO or EPO/fish oil could replace NSAID treatment in RA. The initial 12 month treatment period was followed by three months of placebo for all groups. Results at 12 months showed a significant subjective improvement for EPO and EPO/fish oil compared with placebo. In addition, by 12 months the patients receiving EPO and EPO/fish oil had significantly reduced their NSAIDs. After 3 months of placebo those receiving active treatment had relapsed. Despite the decrease in NSAIDs, measures of disease activity did not worsen. It is suggested that EPO and EPO/fish oil produce a subjective improvement and allow some patients to reduce or stop treatment with NSAIDs. There is, however, no evidence that they act as disease modifying agents.

  19. Effects of altering dietary essential fatty acids on requirements for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a double blind placebo controlled study.

    PubMed Central

    Belch, J J; Ansell, D; Madhok, R; O'Dowd, A; Sturrock, R D

    1988-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) benefit from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is mediated through inhibition of the cyclo-oxygenase enzyme, thereby decreasing production of the 2 series prostaglandins (PGs). The lipoxygenase enzyme is intact, however, allowing leucotriene (LT) production, e.g., LTB4 (an inflammatory mediator). Treatment with evening primrose oil (EPO) which contains gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) leads to production of the 1 series PGs, e.g., PGE1, which has less inflammatory effects. Also LT production is inhibited. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, fish oil) treatment provides a substrate for PGs and LTs, which are also less inflammatory. In this study 16 patients with RA were given 540 mg GLA/day (EPO), 15 patients 240 mg EPA and 450 mg GLA/day (EPO/fish oil), and 18 patients an inert oil (placebo). The aim of this study was to determine if EPO or EPO/fish oil could replace NSAID treatment in RA. The initial 12 month treatment period was followed by three months of placebo for all groups. Results at 12 months showed a significant subjective improvement for EPO and EPO/fish oil compared with placebo. In addition, by 12 months the patients receiving EPO and EPO/fish oil had significantly reduced their NSAIDs. After 3 months of placebo those receiving active treatment had relapsed. Despite the decrease in NSAIDs, measures of disease activity did not worsen. It is suggested that EPO and EPO/fish oil produce a subjective improvement and allow some patients to reduce or stop treatment with NSAIDs. There is, however, no evidence that they act as disease modifying agents. PMID:2833184

  20. The effects of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors, methotrexate, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids on cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roubille, Camille; Richer, Vincent; Starnino, Tara; McCourt, Collette; McFarlane, Alexandra; Fleming, Patrick; Siu, Stephanie; Kraft, John; Lynde, Charles; Pope, Janet; Gulliver, Wayne; Keeling, Stephanie; Dutz, Jan; Bessette, Louis; Bissonnette, Robert; Haraoui, Boulos

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this systematic literature review was to determine the association between cardiovascular events (CVEs) and antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA)/psoriasis (Pso). Systematic searches were performed of MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases (1960 to December 2012) and proceedings from major relevant congresses (2010–2012) for controlled studies and randomised trials reporting confirmed CVEs in patients with RA or PsA/Pso treated with antirheumatic drugs. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed on extracted data. Out of 2630 references screened, 34 studies were included: 28 in RA and 6 in PsA/Pso. In RA, a reduced risk of all CVEs was reported with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (relative risk (RR), 0.70; 95% CI 0.54 to 0.90; p=0.005) and methotrexate (RR, 0.72; 95% CI 0.57 to 0.91; p=0.007). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increased the risk of all CVEs (RR, 1.18; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.38; p=0.04), which may have been specifically related to the effects of rofecoxib. Corticosteroids increased the risk of all CVEs (RR, 1.47; 95% CI 1.34 to 1.60; p<0.001). In PsA/Pso, systemic therapy decreased the risk of all CVEs (RR, 0.75; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.91; p=0.003). In RA, tumour necrosis factor inhibitors and methotrexate are associated with a decreased risk of all CVEs while corticosteroids and NSAIDs are associated with an increased risk. Targeting inflammation with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors or methotrexate may have positive cardiovascular effects in RA. In PsA/Pso, limited evidence suggests that systemic therapies are associated with a decrease in all CVE risk. PMID:25561362

  1. Comparison of Prednisolone, Etoricoxib, and Indomethacin in Treatment of Acute Gouty Arthritis: An Open-Label, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lingling; Liu, Shiqun; Guan, Meiping; Xue, Yaoming

    2016-01-01

    Background At present there are several kinds of medicine for treating acute gout arthritis (AGA). This study compared the efficacy and safety of prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin in the treatment of AGA. Material/Methods This was an open-label, randomized, active-comparator study in patients with AGA. Patients were randomized to 4 days of prednisolone 35 mg qd, etoricoxib 120 mg qd, or indomethacin 50 mg tid. The primary efficacy endpoint was the reduction of self-assessed pain in the index joint from baseline. Secondary endpoints included changes in physician’s assessment of tenderness, erythema, swelling, and joint activity; patient assessment of response to therapy; and safety. Results We analyzed 113 patients. Baseline demographics were comparable among treatment groups. Oral prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin were similarly effective in improving pain, tenderness, and joint activity over 4 days. For inflammation, oral prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin were similarly effective in reducing erythema, but prednisolone might be more effective in reducing swelling than indomethacin. The patient response to therapy was similar in the 3 groups. There were more total adverse events with indomethacin compared with the other 2 drugs. Conclusions Efficacy was comparable among prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin for the treatment of AGA. Prednisolone might be more effective in reducing inflammation and it had a better safety profile. PMID:26965791

  2. Endothelial Fas-Ligand in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and in Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kokkonen, Tuomo S.; Karttunen, Tuomo J.

    2015-01-01

    Fas-mediated induction of apoptosis is a major factor in the selection of lymphocytes and downregulation of immunological processes. In the present study, we have assessed endothelial Fas-ligand (FasL) expression in normal human ileum, appendix, and colon, and compared the expression levels with that in inflammatory bowel disease and in acute appendicitis. In a normal appendix, endothelial FasL levels were constant in almost half of the mucosal vessels; but, in the normal ileum and colon, endothelial FasL was practically restricted to areas in close proximity to lymphatic follicles, and was expressed mainly in the submucosal aspect of the follicles in the vessels with high endothelium. In samples from subjects with either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, the extent of endothelial FasL expression was elevated in the submucosa and associated with an elevated number of lymphoid follicles. In inflammatory bowel disease, ulcers and areas with a high density of mononuclear cells expressing FasL also showed an elevated density of blood vessels with endothelial FasL expression. Although the function of endothelial FasL remains unclear, such a specific expression pattern suggests that endothelial FasL expression has a role in the regulation of lymphocyte access to the peripheral lymphoid tissues, including the intestinal mucosa. PMID:26374830

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of Ajmodadi Churna extract against acute inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ram, H. N. Aswatha; Sriwastava, Neeraj K.; Makhija, Inder K.; Shreedhara, C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ayurvedic polyherbal formulations are widely prescribed for a wide range of inflammatory conditions, yet, despite widespread use, there has been no systematic documentation of their safety and efficacy. Objective: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous extracts of Ajmodadi churna (AJM) in rats. Materials and Methods: Carrageenan-induced hind paw edema and air pouch inflammation models were used for the study. Results: The extracts showed significant antiinflammatory activity, reducing paw edema volume by 0.417 ± 0.097 and 0.379 ± 0.049, respectively. In the carrageenan-induced air pouch model, AJM reduced total leukocyte count by 73.09 ± 7.13 and 62.17 ± 10.53, granulocyte count by 69.48 ± 5.44 and 63.33 ± 4.13, and myeloperoxidase activity by 14.84 ± 0.91 and 18.44 ± 3.18, respectively, compared to controls. Discussion and Conclusion: AJM significantly reduced paw edema, during the second phase of edema development. In the carrageenan-induced air pouch model, AJM inhibited cellular infiltration into the air pouch fluid. We conclude that AJM is an effective candidate for prevention or treatment of acute inflammation PMID:22529678

  4. Acute inflammatory bowel disease complicating chronic alcoholism and mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-05-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

  5. Acute Inflammatory Bowel Disease Complicating Chronic Alcoholism and Mimicking Carcinoid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome. PMID:22949895

  6. Indium 111-labeled granulocyte scan in the diagnosis and management of acute inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.L.; Subramanian, K.; Gasparaitis, A.; Abcarian, H.; Pavel, D.G. )

    1990-06-01

    The indium 111 granulocyte scan was used to evaluate 39 individuals known to have or suspected of having inflammatory bowel disease. Twenty-three of these individuals had positive scans and 16 had negative scans. Eighty-seven confirmatory studies, which consisted of barium radiography, endoscopy, operative findings, and histopathology, were performed in 37 of these individuals. The remaining two negative scans corroborated only by clinical course, CBC, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. In addition, 10 follow-up scans were performed in six of the 39 patients to monitor therapy or investigate a change in symptoms. As an anatomic indicator of acute granulocytic infiltration of the intestinal lamina propria and crypts, the authors found that this scan had a 97 percent rate of sensitivity and 100 percent specificity. Specific indications for the use of the indium 111-labeled granulocyte scan are described. For the authors, in general, this test has become a vital adjunct to endoscopy and radiography in the diagnosis and management of patients with symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease.

  7. S100A8 promotes migration and infiltration of inflammatory cells in acute anterior uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuqin; Zhang, Zuhui; Zhang, Laihe; Li, Xinxin; Lu, Rui; Xu, Peipei; Zhang, Xuhong; Dai, Mali; Dai, Xiaodan; Qu, Jia; Lu, Fan; Chi, Zailong

    2016-01-01

    Uveitis, the pathologic condition of inflammation of the uvea, frequently leads to severe vision loss and blindness. S100A8 is a calcium-binding protein which mainly expresses in granulocytes and monocytes and plays a prominent role in the regulation of inflammatory processes and immune response. Here, we determined the role of S100A8-positive cells in acute anterior uveitis (AAU) and keratitis. In rat models of endotoxin (lipopolisaccharide, LPS) -induced uveitis (EIU) and keratitis, S100A8-positive granulocytes and monocytes increased significantly in the iris-ciliary body and cornea as well as in the blood. Interestingly, Glucocorticoids slightly increased S100A8 levels in leukocytes, but reduced its presence significantly in the iris-ciliary body after LPS injection. Moreover, inhibition of NF-kB activation remarkably suppressed both progression of AAU and total S100A8 levels in leukocytes and the iris-ciliary body after LPS administration. Additionally, S100A8 protein level was also found to be elevated in the serum of AAU patients parallel with the progression of AAU through the designated clinical stages. Thus, S100A8 plays a pivotal role in the processes of AAU through involvement in migration and infiltration of S100A8-positive cells. Our findings suggest that serum levels of S100A8 protein can be used to monitor inflammatory activity in AAU. PMID:27786310

  8. Hydroxysafflor yellow A attenuates the expression of inflammatory cytokines in acute soft tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Fang; Xue, Changjiang; Wang, Yu; Peng, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yadan; Jin, Ming; Zang, Baoxia

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effect of hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) on the inflammatory response to strike-induced acute soft tissue injury in rats. Soft tissue injury was induced in rat leg muscles using a strike hammer, followed by intraperitoneal administration of HSYA at 16, 32, or 64 mg/kg. After 24 h, the rats were anaesthetized, blood and muscle samples were taken. Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-αwere measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Total RNA and protein were isolated from muscle tissue to determine the mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, and the protein level of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression was determined by muscle histopathology and immunohistochemistry. HSYA attenuated pathologic changes instrike-induced soft tissue inflammation. Treatment with HSYA also alleviated strike-induced increases in TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1mRNA levels and inhibited the increased activation of NF-κB and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in muscle tissue. These findings suggest that HSYA effectively inhibits strike-induced inflammatory signal transduction in rats. PMID:28074914

  9. The in vivo quantitation and kinetics of monocyte migration into acute inflammatory tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Issekutz, T. B.; Issekutz, A. C.; Movat, H. Z.

    1981-01-01

    Mononuclear leukocytes isolated from the blood of rabbits, were labeled with 51Cr and returned to the animal intravenously. 51Cr-labeled monocytes disappeared from the blood with a half-life of 39.0 +/- 2.51 hours. Numerous acute inflammatory lesions were produced by the intradermal injection of Escherichia coli into the skin of the back of a rabbit. The animal was sacrificed after 1 hour, and the radioactivity in each lesion was determined. Monocyte accumulation was substantial by the time a lesion was 1 hour old. The maximum rate of accumulation occurred at 3--4 hours, and monocytes continued to enter the lesions at 25% of the maximal rate for at least 24 hours. Monocytes initially migrate into bacterial inflammatory sites simultaneously with neutrophils and histologically become the predominant cell type after 12 hours because they continue to migrate into these lesions long after neutrophils have stopped. The kinetics of monocyte migration is related to other aspects of inflammation. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7013494

  10. PKC δ mediates pro-inflammatory responses in a mouse model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ramnath, Raina Devi; Sun, Jia; Bhatia, Madhav

    2010-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder of the pancreas. Protein kinase C (PKC) δ plays an important role in mediating chemokine production in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. This study aims to investigate the role of PKC δ in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and to explore the mechanisms through which PKC δ mediates pro-inflammatory signaling. Acute pancreatitis was induced in mice by ten hourly intraperitoneal injections of caerulein. PKC δ translocation inhibitor peptide (δV1-1) at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg or Tat (carrier peptide) at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg was administered to mice either 1 h before or 1 h after the first caerulein injection. One hour after the last caerulein injection, the mice were killed and pancreas, lungs, and blood were collected. Prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with δV1-1 attenuated caerulein-induced plasma amylase levels and pancreatic edema. Treatment with δV1-1 decreased myeloperoxidase activity and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels in both pancreas and plasma. PKC δ mediated acute pancreatitis by activating pancreatic nuclear factor κB, activator protein-1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Moreover, blockade of PKC δ attenuated lung myeloperoxidase activity and edema. Histological examination of pancreatic and lung sections confirmed protection against acute pancreatitis. Treatment with Tat had no protective effect on acute pancreatitis. Blockade of PKC δ represents a promising prophylactic and/or therapeutic tool for the treatment of acute pancreatitis.

  11. Comparing the effects of rapid and gradual cooling on body temperature and inflammatory response following acute hyperthermia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperthermia negatively impacts human and animal health, and extreme cases can result in mortality if recovery is not appropriately managed. The study objective was to determine the effects of rapid versus gradual cooling on body temperature and the inflammatory response following exposure to acute ...

  12. Effect of surgical castration with or without oral meloxicam on the acute inflammatory response in yearling beef bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pain management and welfare are increasingly prevalent concerns within animal agriculture. Analgesics may alleviate pain and inflammation associated with castration of beef cattle. This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of surgical castration on the acute inflammatory response and immunom...

  13. Effect of surgical castration with or without oral meloxicam on the acute inflammatory response in yearling beef bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pain management and welfare are increasingly prevalent concerns within animal agriculture and oral analgesics may alleviate the pain associated with castration. This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of surgical castration on the acute inflammatory response and immunomodulation and whethe...

  14. Effect of surgical castration with or without meloxicam on the acute inflammatory response in yearling beef bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pain management and welfare are increasingly prevalent concerns within animal agriculture and oral analgesics may alleviate the pain associated with castration. This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of surgical castration on the acute inflammatory response and immunomodulation and whethe...

  15. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome Kaposi sarcoma in the liver manifesting as acute obstructive hepatitis: another potential role for montelukast?

    PubMed

    Read, P J; Lucas, S; Morris, S; Kulasegaram, R

    2013-02-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been described in Kaposi sarcoma, but does not usually manifest as acute hepatitis. We describe a case of rapid obstructive jaundice after initiation of antiretroviral therapy, in which the liver biopsy confirmed hepatic Kaposi sarcoma, and the clinical course was altered by the addition of montelukast.

  16. Acute anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled budesonide in asthma: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gibson, P G; Saltos, N; Fakes, K

    2001-01-01

    Corticosteroids can have acute effects on airway function and methacholine airway responsiveness in asthma as early as 6 h after dosing, suggesting there may be an acute anti-inflammatory effect of inhaled corticosteroid in asthma. This study aimed to determine the effects of a single dose of inhaled budesonide on sputum eosinophils and mast cells in adults with asthma, and to examine whether the mechanism of clearance of eosinophils was by apoptosis. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was conducted. At the screening visit, adults with stable asthma (n = 41) ceased inhaled corticosteroid therapy for 4 d and those with significant sputum eosinophilia (> or = 7%) were randomized (n = 26) to a single dose of budesonide 2,400 microg or placebo via Turbuhaler, on two separate study days. Symptoms and lung function were followed for 6 h, then sputum was induced and airway responsiveness to hypertonic saline determined. Sputum eosinophils (mean, SE) were significantly lower 6 h after budesonide (25%, 4.5), compared with placebo (37%, 6.2, p < 0.05). There was a 2.2-fold (95% CI 1.45 to 3.33) improvement in airway responsiveness with budesonide. No significant difference was seen on mast cells, apoptotic eosinophils, symptoms, or lung function. In conclusion, a single dose of inhaled corticosteroids has beneficial effects on airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness as early as 6 h after dosing. This may be clinically useful as therapy during mild exacerbations of asthma.

  17. Acute estrogen surge enhances inflammatory nociception without altering spinal Fos expression.

    PubMed

    Ralya, Andrew; McCarson, Kenneth E

    2014-07-11

    Chronic pain is a major neurological disorder that can manifest differently between genders or sexes. The complex actions of sex hormones may underlie these differences; previous studies have suggested that elevated estrogen levels can enhance pain perception. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that acute, activational effects of estradiol (E2) increase persistent inflammatory nociception, and anatomically where this modulation occurs. Spinal expression of Fos is widely used as a marker of nociceptive activation. This study used formalin-evoked nociception in ovariectomized (OVX) adult female rats and measured late-phase hindlimb flinching and Fos expression in the spinal cord, and their modification by acute estrogen supplementation similar to a proestrus surge. Six days after ovariectomy, female rats were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with 10μg/kg E2 or vehicle. Twenty-four hours later, 50μL of 1.25% or 100μL of 5% formalin was injected into the right hindpaw; hindlimb flinches were counted, and spinal cords removed 2h after formalin injection. The numbers of Fos-expressing neurons in sections of the lumbar spinal cord were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Formalin-induced inflammation produced a dose-dependent increase in late-phase hindlimb flinching, and E2 pretreatment increased flinching following 5%, but not 1.25% formalin injection. Despite the modification of behavior by E2, the number of spinal Fos-positive neurons was not altered by E2 pretreatment. These findings demonstrate that an acute proestrus-like surge in serum estrogen can produce a stimulus-intensity-dependent increase in inflammation-evoked nociceptive behavior. However, the lack of effect on spinal Fos expression suggests that this enhancement of nociceptive signaling by estrogen is independent of changes in peripheral activation of, expression of the immediate early gene Fos by, or signal throughput of spinal nociceptive neurons.

  18. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  19. Oral anti-inflammatory activity of cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive constituent of cannabis, in acute carrageenan-induced inflammation in the rat paw.

    PubMed

    Costa, Barbara; Colleoni, Mariapia; Conti, Silvia; Parolaro, Daniela; Franke, Chiara; Trovato, Anna Elisa; Giagnoni, Gabriella

    2004-03-01

    Cannabidiol, the major non-psychoactive component of marijuana, has various pharmacological actions of clinical interest. It is reportedly effective as an anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic in murine collagen-induced arthritis. The present study examined the anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesic effects of cannabidiol, administered orally (5-40 mg/kg) once a day for 3 days after the onset of acute inflammation induced by intraplantar injection of 0.1 ml carrageenan (1% w/v in saline) in the rat. At the end of the treatment prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was assayed in the plasma, and cyclooxygenase (COX) activity, production of nitric oxide (NO; nitrite/nitrate content), and of other oxygen-derived free radicals (malondialdehyde) in inflamed paw tissues. All these markers were significantly increased following carrageenan. Thermal hyperalgesia, induced by carrageenan and assessed by the plantar test, lasted 7 h. Cannabidiol had a time- and dose-dependent anti-hyperalgesic effect after a single injection. Edema following carrageenan peaked at 3 h and lasted 72 h; a single dose of cannabidiol reduced edema in a dose-dependent fashion and subsequent daily doses caused further time- and dose-related reductions. There were decreases in PGE2 plasma levels, tissue COX activity, production of oxygen-derived free radicals, and NO after three doses of cannabidiol. The effect on NO seemed to depend on a lower expression of the endothelial isoform of NO synthase. In conclusion, oral cannabidiol has a beneficial action on two symptoms of established inflammation: edema and hyperalgesia.

  20. TRAIL administration down-modulated the acute systemic inflammatory response induced in a mouse model by muramyldipeptide or lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Secchiero, Paola; Crovella, Sergio; Zauli, Giorgio

    2012-10-01

    The potent inducer of apoptosis TRAIL/Apo2 ligand is now under considerations in clinical trials for the treatment of different types of cancer. Since the natural history of cancer is often characterized by microbial infections, we have investigated the effect of recombinant human TRAIL in a mouse model of systemic acute inflammation of microbial origin represented by BALB/c mice treated with either bacterial muramyldipeptide (MDP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). When administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), these inflammatory bacterial compounds triggered a severe systemic inflammatory response within 2h, represented by body temperature elevation, increase of circulating serum amyloid-A (SAA) and of the number of leukocytes in the peritoneal cavity. Moreover, both MDP and LPS induced a significant elevation of the circulating levels of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Noteworthy, pre-treatment with recombinant human TRAIL 48 and 72 h before administration of either MDP or LPS, significantly counteracted all acute inflammatory responses, including the elevation of key pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as IL-1α, IL-6, G-CSF, MCP-1. These data demonstrate for the first time that TRAIL has a potent anti-inflammatory activity, which might be beneficial for the anti-tumoral activity of TRAIL.

  1. Pharmacologic modulation of RORγt translates to efficacy in preclinical and translational models of psoriasis and inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaohua; Soroosh, Pejman; De Leon-Tabaldo, Aimee; Luna-Roman, Rosa; Sablad, Marciano; Rozenkrants, Natasha; Yu, Jingxue; Castro, Glenda; Banie, Homayon; Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping; Santamaria-Babi, Luis; Schlueter, Thomas; Albers, Michael; Leonard, Kristi; Budelsky, Alison L.; Fourie, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    The IL-23/IL-17 pathway is implicated in autoimmune diseases, particularly psoriasis, where biologics targeting IL-23 and IL-17 have shown significant clinical efficacy. Retinoid-related orphan nuclear receptor gamma t (RORγt) is required for Th17 differentiation and IL-17 production in adaptive and innate immune cells. We identified JNJ-54271074, a potent and highly-selective RORγt inverse agonist, which dose-dependently inhibited RORγt-driven transcription, decreased co-activator binding and promoted interaction with co-repressor protein. This compound selectively blocked Th17 differentiation, significantly reduced IL-17A production from memory T cells, and decreased IL-17A- and IL-22-producing human and murine γδ and NKT cells. In a murine collagen-induced arthritis model, JNJ-54271074 dose-dependently suppressed joint inflammation. Furthermore, JNJ-54271074 suppressed IL-17A production in human PBMC from rheumatoid arthritis patients. RORγt-deficient mice showed decreased IL-23-induced psoriasis-like skin inflammation and cytokine gene expression, consistent with dose-dependent inhibition in wild-type mice through oral dosing of JNJ-54271074. In a translational model of human psoriatic epidermal cells and skin-homing T cells, JNJ-54271074 selectively inhibited streptococcus extract-induced IL-17A and IL-17F. JNJ-54271074 is thus a potent, selective RORγt modulator with therapeutic potential in IL-23/IL-17 mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:27905482

  2. Inflammatory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Whitesell, Jackie

    2010-09-01

    Inflammatory neuropathies are acquired disorders of peripheral nerves and occasionally of the central nervous system that can affect individuals at any age. The course can be monophasic, relapsing, or progressive. Inflammatory neuropathies are classified as acute or chronic. The acute form reaches a nadir by 4 weeks and the chronic form over 8 weeks or greater. The most common example of an acute inflammatory neuropathy is acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), which is part of the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The most common chronic inflammatory neuropathy is chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP). Other chronic inflammatory neuropathies are multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and the Lewis-Sumner syndrome. The Fisher syndrome and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis occur acutely and have clinical overlap with AIDP.

  3. The Human and Economic Burden of Difficult-to-Treat Gouty Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bardin, Thomas; Voshaar, Martijn A H Oude; van de Laar, Martinus A F J

    2015-10-01

    Gouty arthritis, one of the most painful and common forms of adult arthritis, is caused by monosodium urate crystal deposits in joints, most often in the lower extremities. Crystals trigger an inflammatory response leading to acute flares characterized by a rapid onset of pain, warmth, swelling, and redness in involved joints. Over time, continued monosodium urate crystal deposits and inflammation can lead to chronic tophaceous gout that result in bone erosion, progressing to joint destruction and significant disability. The goal of therapy in an acute gout flare is prompt and safe termination of pain and inflammation. Acute gouty arthritis is usually treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine, or corticosteroids. However, for a growing number of patients, current standard treatments are ineffective or are contraindicated, largely due to the presence of comorbidities. Gouty arthritis can have a major negative impact of health-related quality of life, especially in patients with difficult-to-treat disease, as revealed by recent studies comparing health-related quality of life with that of the general population. Additionally, gouty arthritis also constitutes an important economic burden through absence from work and medical costs. This burden is even greater in patients with difficult-to-treat disease.

  4. Disease-Regulated Gene Therapy with Anti-Inflammatory Interleukin-10 Under the Control of the CXCL10 Promoter for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Broeren, Mathijs G A; de Vries, Marieke; Bennink, Miranda B; Arntz, Onno J; Blom, Arjen B; Koenders, Marije I; van Lent, Peter L E M; van der Kraan, Peter M; van den Berg, Wim B; van de Loo, Fons A J

    2016-03-01

    Disease-inducible promoters for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have the potential to provide regulated expression of therapeutic proteins in arthritic joints. In this study, we set out to identify promoters of human genes that are upregulated during RA and are suitable to drive the expression of relevant amounts of anti-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-10. Microarray analysis of RA synovial biopsies compared with healthy controls yielded a list of 22 genes upregulated during RA. Of these genes, CXCL10 showed the highest induction in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated synovial cells. The CXCL10 promoter was obtained from human cDNA and cloned into a lentiviral vector carrying firefly luciferase to determine the promoter inducibility in primary synovial cells and in THP-1 cells. The promoter activation was strongest 8-12 hr after stimulation with the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and was reinducible after 96 hr. In addition, the CXCL10 promoter showed a significant response to RA patient serum, compared with sera from healthy individuals. The luciferase gene was replaced with IL-10 to determine the therapeutic properties of the CXCL10p-IL10 lentiviral vector. Primary synovial cells transduced with CXCL10p-IL10 showed a great increase in IL-10 production after stimulation, which reduced the release of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. We conclude that the selected proximal promoter of the CXCL10 gene responds to inflammatory mediators present in the serum of patients with RA and that transduction with the lentiviral CXCL10p-IL10 vector reduces inflammatory cytokine production by primary synovial cells from patients with RA. CXCL10 promoter-regulated IL-10 overexpression can thus provide disease-inducible local gene therapy suitable for RA.

  5. In vitro xanthine oxidase and albumin denaturation inhibition assay of Barringtonia racemosa L. and total phenolic content analysis for potential anti-inflammatory use in gouty arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Nurul Izzati; Sidik, Norrizah Jaafar; Awal, Asmah; Adam, Nurul Athirah Mohamad; Rezali, Nur Inani

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro anti-inflammatory activities and total phenolic content (TPC) of methanolic extracts of infloresence axes, endosperms, leaves, and pericarps of Barringtonia racemosa L. Methods: The anti-inflammatory study was conducted by assessing the potential through xanthine oxidase (XO) and albumin denaturation inhibition assays. Meanwhile, the TPC in the extracts were assessed by Folin-Ciocalteu assay. Results: In the XO inhibition assay, the infloresence axes extract was found to exert the highest inhibition capacity at 0.1% (w/v) with 59.54 ± 0.001% inhibition followed by leaves (58.82 ± 0.001%), pericarps (57.99 ± 0.003%), and endosperms (57.20 ± 0.003%) extracts. Similarly in the albumin denaturation inhibition assay, the infloresence axes extract had shown the greatest inhibition capacity with 70.58 ± 0.004% inhibition followed by endosperms (66.80 ± 0.024%), leaves (65.29 ± 0.006%), and pericarps extracts (43.33 ± 0.002%). Meanwhile, for TPC analysis, leaves extract was found to have the highest phenolic content (53.94 ± 0.000 mg gallic acid equivalent [GAE]/g DW) followed by infloresence axes (31.54 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW), endosperms (22.63 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW), and the least was found in pericarps (15.54 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW). Conclusion: The results indeed verified the in vitro anti-inflammatory activities of B. racemosa and supported its potential to be used in alleviating gouty arthritis and XO-related diseases. PMID:27757263

  6. [The role of biomarkers in diagnostics and forecasting of effectiveness of modern therapy of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, E N; Novikov, A A; Nasonov, E L

    2013-08-01

    The rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most severe and widespread systemic inflammatory autoimmune diseases. The modern laboratory diagnostic of rheumatoid arthritis includes detection of large spectrum of biomarkers (autoantibodies, indicators of acute phase of inflammation, cytokines, markers of activation of endothelium, subpopulations of lymphocytes, products of metabolism of bone and cartilaginous tissue, genetic markers) in blood, synovial fluid, and synovial tissue. Alongside with common techniques of immunodiagnostics, the multiplex analysis of biomarkers based on genetic, transcript and proteomic technologies is applied. The results of identification of biomarkers are an important instrument of early diagnostics, activity evaluation, severity of disease course and disease prognosis and effectiveness of applied therapy. Among biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis the most clinical value have antibodies (rheumatoid factor class IgM, antibodies to citrullinized proteins) and acute phase indicators (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein) which are diagnostic criteria of rheumatoid arthritis and can be used in evaluation of prognosis of this disease. On basis of multi-parametric analysis of 12 key proteins of blood serum the new index of activity of rheumatoid arthritis (Vectra DA) is developed Nowadays, the potential biomarkers are detected providing to implement immunologic monitoring and prognosis of effectiveness of therapy of rheumatoid arthritis with genetic engineering biologic preparations. The laboratory tests are developed to evaluate immunogenicity of genetic engineering biologic preparations and diagnostic of latent tuberculosis infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis against the background of therapy with using this group of pharmaceuticals.

  7. Assessments of Immunomodulatory and Inflammatory effects against Induction of Entamoeba histolytica (HM1 IMS strain) crude extract Antigen in Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis Female Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Bagde, Swati; Singh, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Today it is well known about mechanisms of cell communication, how the cells that mediate immune response and tissue injury accumulate in tissues but the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is still unknown. This study was to evaluate immunomodulatory effects of crude Entamoeba histolytica (HM1 IMS strain) antigen in complete freund's adjuvant female wistar rats by studying the alterations in humoral and cell mediated immune responses and also the inflammatory effects by evaluating the changes in body weight, paw thickness, biochemical, serological, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and histopathology activities. Animals were randomly divided into six groups (n=6). CFA was induced in arthritic, drug and AA+CFA group whereas, 0.5ml amoebic antigen was induced subplantal in AA group while 0.5ml dose of amoebic antigen was given orally to AA+CFA group for 7-28th days. Indomethacin was used as a standard drug. Effects of amoebic antigen were associated with increased paw thickness and decreased body weight when compared to healthy control showed a significant difference. Oral administration of amoebic antigen has showed increased severe symptoms of arthritis in AA+CFA on comparison to healthy control rats. Significant increase in serum level of IL-6 and α TNF were found in AA group followed by AA+CFA group whereas, decrease in concentration of IL-10 was appear in AA+CFA group on comparison to arthritic and healthy control group (P<0.05). Histopathology of AA group showed severe signs of necrotic and degenerative changes on comparison to healthy control group. Thus the results demonstrated that E. histolytica alone or in combination with CFA increased bone damage, with alterations in antioxidant level in liver and kidney tissue homogenates as well as showed immunomodulatory arthritogenic properties which may contribute and raise joint inflammation.

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Joint Protection in Collagen-Induced Arthritis after Treatment with IQ-1S, a Selective c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Hammaker, Deepa; Kochetkova, Irina; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Lyakhov, Sergey A; Firestein, Gary S; Quinn, Mark T

    2015-06-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) participate in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including inflammatory diseases. We recently synthesized the sodium salt of IQ-1S (11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one oxime) and demonstrated that it is a high-affinity JNK inhibitor and inhibits murine delayed-type hypersensitivity. Here we show that IQ-1S is highly specific for JNK and that its neutral form is the most abundant species at physiologic pH. Molecular docking of the IQ-1S syn isomer into the JNK1 binding site gave the best pose, which corresponded to the position of cocrystallized JNK inhibitor SP600125 (1,9-pyrazoloanthrone). Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of IQ-1S showed that it inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 3 gene expression induced by interleukin-1β in human fibroblast-like synoviocytes and significantly attenuated development of murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Treatment with IQ-1S either before or after induction of CIA resulted in decreased clinical scores, and joint sections from IQ-1S-treated CIA mice exhibited only mild signs of inflammation and minimal cartilage loss compared with those from control mice. Collagen II-specific antibody responses were also reduced by IQ-1S treatment. By contrast, the inactive ketone derivative 11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one had no effect on CIA clinical scores or collagen II-specific antibody titers. IQ-1S treatment also suppressed proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in joints and lymph node cells. Finally, treatment with IQ-1S increased the number of Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in lymph nodes. Thus, IQ-1S can reduce inflammation and cartilage loss associated with CIA and can serve as a small-molecule modulator for mechanistic studies of JNK function in rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Therapeutic Effect of Ergotope Peptides on Collagen-Induced Arthritis by Downregulation of Inflammatory and Th1/Th17 Responses and Induction of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaoyin; Deng, Shaohua; Li, Shan; Xi, Yebin; Li, Chengzhen; Wang, Li; He, Dongyi; Wang, Zhaojun; Chen, Guangjie

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that results in a chronic and inflammatory disorder. Dynamic balance of helper T cells (Th) 1 and 17 and regulatory T cells (Treg) is broken in RA. Since there is no cure for RA at present, it is necessary to find a truly effective and convenient treatment. Several studies have intended to induce ergotopic regulation to treat autoimmune diseases. This study was undertaken to find potential ergotope peptides and investigate their effects in treating the animal model of RA and their underlying regulatory mechanisms. First, we selected functional ergotope peptides from 25 overlapping peptides derived from the interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) α chain, and then used these peptides to treat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We showed ergotope peptides as immunomodulatory factors with great benefits at the clinical and pathologic levels. This effect was associated with inhibition of type II collagen (CII)-specific proliferation and autoantibody production as well as induction of antiergotypic immune response, downregulation of both Th1 and Th17 cells and their related components, and emergence of Treg cells that had suppressive action on autoreactive T cells. We also proved that cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and IL-10 are two important mediators that are critical to Treg suppressive function. Inhibition of Th1 and Th17 in established CIA could be attributed to ergotope-induced Treg cells. Our findings reveal that ergotope peptides induce regulatory immune responses and restore immune tolerance, suggesting that treatment with ergotope peptides may be a novel approach to therapy for RA patients and has good application prospects, with cheap, effective, convenient, wide-spectrum features. PMID:27579476

  10. Dark chocolate attenuates intracellular pro-inflammatory reactivity to acute psychosocial stress in men: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Ulrike; Arpagaus, Angela; Meister, Rebecca E; von Känel, Roland; Huber, Susanne; Ehlert, Ulrike; Wirtz, Petra H

    2016-10-01

    Flavanol-rich dark chocolate consumption relates to lower risk of cardiovascular mortality, but underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated the effect of acute dark chocolate consumption on inflammatory measures before and after stress. Healthy men, aged 20-50years, were randomly assigned to a single intake of either 50g of flavanol-rich dark chocolate (n=31) or 50g of optically identical flavanol-free placebo-chocolate (n=34). Two hours after chocolate intake, both groups underwent the 15-min Trier Social Stress Test. We measured DNA-binding-activity of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB (NF-κB-BA) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, as well as plasma and whole blood mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, prior to chocolate intake as well as before and several times after stress. We also repeatedly measured the flavanol epicatechin and the stress hormones epinephrine and cortisol in plasma and saliva, respectively. Compared to the placebo-chocolate-group, the dark-chocolate-group revealed a marginal increase in IL-10 mRNA prior to stress (p=0.065), and a significantly blunted stress reactivity of NF-κB-BA, IL-1β mRNA, and IL-6 mRNA (p's⩽0.036) with higher epicatechin levels relating to lower pro-inflammatory stress reactivity (p's⩽0.033). Stress hormone changes to stress were controlled. None of the other measures showed a significant chocolate effect (p's⩾0.19). Our findings indicate that acute flavanol-rich dark chocolate exerts anti-inflammatory effects both by increasing mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and by attenuating the intracellular pro-inflammatory stress response. This mechanism may add to beneficial effects of dark chocolate on cardiovascular health.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of formoterol and ipratropium bromide against acute cadmium-induced pulmonary inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Fievez, Laurence; Cheu, Esteban; Bureau, Fabrice; Rong, Weifang; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yong; Advenier, Charles; Gustin, Pascal

    2010-02-25

    In this study, the anti-inflammatory properties of formoterol and ipratropium bromide, alone or in combination, were investigated in a rat model of acute pulmonary inflammation induced by cadmium inhalation. Airway resistance and inflammatory responses, including matrix metalloproteinease-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinease-9 (MMP-9) activities, were evaluated. Compared to values obtained in rats exposed to cadmium, pretreatment by bronchodilators administered alone significantly prevented the cadmium-induced increase of airway resistance. Formoterol elicited a significant decrease in total cell number, neutrophil and macrophage counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas ipratropium bromide reduced neutrophil numbers. The two compounds administered alone significantly attenuated the lung lesions associated with parenchyma inflammatory cell influx and congestion observed in the cadmium group. The increased MMP-9 activity was significantly attenuated. Although only formoterol induced a decrease protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, both compounds inhibited the pulmonary edema by reducing wet-to-dry weight ratio which returned to values similar to those recorded in the sham group. All the effects of formoterol on the cadmium-induced inflammatory responses were reversed by propranolol. Similar anti-inflammatory effects were obtained in rats pretreated with ilomastat which showed a significant reduction on inflammatory cell infiltration and MMP-9 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Neither synergistic nor additive effects were obtained when the two bronchodilators were administered in combination. In conclusion, formoterol and ipratropium bromide partially protect the lungs against the inflammation by reducing neutrophilic infiltration. This protective effect is associated with reduced MMP-9 activity known to play an important pro-inflammatory role in acute inflammatory process.

  12. Ackerman syndrome: a rare cause of arthritis with dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Kosar; Thomas, Liza; Shaikh, Niaz Ahmed; Ahmed Abdul Hamid, Badr

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a middle-aged woman who presented with acute onset of non-erosive oligoarthritis and cutaneous lesions. Her laboratory work up revealed mild anaemia with positive antinuclear antibody. Her skin biopsy confirmed the presence of interstitial granulomatous dermatitis. She was treated with a successful trial of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis (IGDA), or Ackerman syndrome, is an under-recognised cause of arthritis with dermatitis. This is primarily due to the varied clinical presentation of the skin lesions and the non-specific laboratory findings. Our aim is to highlight the pivotal role of skin biopsy as part of the diagnostic assessment of patients who present with arthritis and concomitant skin lesions. PMID:25666244

  13. Systemic TNF blockade does not modulate synovial expression of the pro-inflammatory mediator HMGB1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients – a prospective clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, Erik; Grundtman, Cecilia; af Klint, Erik; Lindberg, Johan; Ernestam, Sofia; Ulfgren, Ann-Kristin; Harris, Helena Erlandsson; Andersson, Ulf

    2008-01-01

    Introduction High-mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) has recently been identified as an endogenous mediator of arthritis. TNF and IL-1β, pivotal cytokines in arthritis pathogenesis, both have the ability to induce the release of HMGB1 from myeloid and dendritic cells. It was, therefore, decided to investigate whether treatment based on TNF blockade in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects the expression of synovial HMGB1. Methods Repeated arthroscopy-guided sampling of synovial tissue was performed in nine patients with RA before and nine weeks after initiation of anti-TNF mAb (infliximab) therapy. Synovial biopsy specimens were analysed for HMGB1 protein by immunohistochemical staining and for HMGB1 mRNA expression by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Statistical evaluations were based on Wilcoxon's signed rank tests or Spearman rank sum tests. Results Aberrant, extranuclear HMGB1 and constitutive nuclear HMGB1 expression, with histological signs of inflammation, were evident in all biopsies obtained before infliximab therapy. Signs of inflammation were still evident in the second biopsies obtained nine weeks after initiation of infliximab therapy. The cytoplasmic and extracellular expression of HMGB1 decreased in five patients, remained unchanged in one patient and increased in three patients, making the overall change in HMGB1 protein expression not significant. No correlation between the clinical response, as measured by disease activity score calculated for 28 joints (DAS28) or the American College of Rheumatology response criteria (ACR 20, 50, and 70), and the direction of change of HMGB1 expression in individual patients could be discerned. In addition, infliximab therapy did not alter HMGB1 mRNA synthesis. Conclusion Pro-inflammatory HMGB1 expression during rheumatoid synovitis was not consistently influenced by TNF-blocking therapy with infliximab. This suggests that TNF is not the main inducer of extranuclear HMGB1 during synovitis

  14. The effectiveness of Echinacea extract or composite glucosamine, chondroitin and methyl sulfonyl methane supplements on acute and chronic rheumatoid arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Nadia Ms; Hamuda, Hayam M; Melek, Samuel T; Darwish, Sahar K

    2013-03-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of the oral administration for 15 days of either Echinacea (E) or genuphil (a composite of chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine and methyl sulfonyl methane [GCM]) nutraceutical supplements on female rat model of acute or chronic arthritis induced by bacterial outer membrane protein (OMP) from faecal flora of healthy and rheumatic humans. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP2), C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) values increased (p < 0.05) in both arthritic groups as compared to normal values. The rheumatic markers anti-CCP2, CRP and RF values decreased significantly in E- and GCM-treated groups compared to arthritic none-treated acute or chronic groups. The results of RF values of GCM-treated groups in acute and chronic models decreased exhibiting no statistical difference compared with the normal value. Histological examinations of the hind paw sections revealed moderate inflammation, oedema and mild proliferation of synovial cells in acute arthritic rats and more damage to cartilage and bone with severe inflammation in chronic ones. Echinacea acute treated group showed edema with proliferated synovial membrane and partial damage in cartilage and bone. While in the E-chronic treated group, rough edge with destructed cartilage and bone existed. However, the acute GCM group revealed mild cartilage damage. But the chronic GCM group showed mild synovial cells proliferation and revealed no inflammation with mild cartilage damage edge. Results demonstrated the OMP arthropathic property and through promising light on arthritis treatment using E- or GCM, with the advantage of GMC results over that of E-. The composite GCM is needed for further studies over the dose and duration to assess its preventive effects against the bacterial OMP arthrogenicity.

  15. Gonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cucurull, E; Espinoza, L R

    1998-05-01

    Disseminated gonococcal infection is the most common systemic complication of acute gonorrhea and occurs in 0.5% to 3.0% of patients with untreated mucosal infection. It is also the most common cause of septic arthritis in patients less than 30 years of age. Fortunately, the incidence of gonorrhea is decreasing dramatically in the United States and Western Europe, although it is still high in developing countries. Increasing resistance to antibiotics requires continuous surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibilities to determine the efficacy of current therapeutic measures.

  16. Acute hemolytic vascular inflammatory processes are prevented by nitric oxide replacement or a single dose of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camila Bononi; Souza, Lucas Eduardo Botelho; Leonardo, Flavia Costa; Costa, Fabio Trindade Maranhão; Werneck, Claudio C; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2015-08-06

    Hemolysis and consequent release of cell-free hemoglobin (CFHb) impair vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and cause oxidative and inflammatory processes. Hydroxyurea (HU), a common therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD), induces fetal Hb production and can act as an NO donor. We evaluated the acute inflammatory effects of intravenous water-induced hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice and determined the abilities of an NO donor, diethylamine NONOate (DEANO), and a single dose of HU to modulate this inflammation. Intravenous water induced acute hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice, attaining plasma Hb levels comparable to those observed in chimeric SCD mice. This hemolysis resulted in significant and rapid systemic inflammation and vascular leukocyte recruitment within 15 minutes, accompanied by NO metabolite generation. Administration of another potent NO scavenger (2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) to C57BL/6 mice induced similar alterations in leukocyte recruitment, whereas hemin-induced inflammation occurred over a longer time frame. Importantly, the acute inflammatory effects of water-induced hemolysis were abolished by the simultaneous administration of DEANO or HU, without altering CFHb, in an NO pathway-mediated manner. In vitro, HU partially reversed the Hb-mediated induction of endothelial proinflammatory cytokine secretion and adhesion molecule expression. In summary, pathophysiological levels of hemolysis trigger an immediate inflammatory response, possibly mediated by vascular NO consumption. HU presents beneficial anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting rapid-onset hemolytic inflammation via an NO-dependent mechanism, independently of fetal Hb elevation. Data provide novel insights into mechanisms of hemolytic inflammation and further support perspectives for the use of HU as an acute treatment for SCD and other hemolytic disorders.

  17. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on inflammatory cytokines in acute myocardial ischemia injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    LIU, FANG; LIU, GUANG-JIE; LIU, NA; ZHANG, GANG; ZHANG, JIAN-XIN; LI, LAN-FANG

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is believed to be involved in numerous physiological and pathophysiological processes, and now it is recognized as the third endogenous signaling gasotransmitter, following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide; however, the effects of H2S on inflammatory factors in acute myocardial ischemia injury in rats have not been clarified. In the present study, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) was used as the H2S donor. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: Sham, ischemia, ischemia + low-dose (0.78 mg/kg) NaHS, ischemia + medium-dose (1.56 mg/kg) NaHS, ischemia + high-dose (3.12 mg/kg) NaHS and ischemia + propargylglycine (PPG) (30 mg/kg). The rats in each group were sacrificed 6 h after the surgery for sample collection. Compared with the ischemia group, the cardiac damage in the rats in the ischemia + NaHS groups was significantly reduced, particularly in the high-dose group; in the ischemia + PPG group, the myocardial injury was aggravated compared with that in the ischemia group. Compared with the ischemia group, the levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the serum of rats in the ischemia + medium- and high-dose NaHS groups were significantly reduced, and the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA and nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) protein in the myocardial tissues of rats was significantly reduced. In the ischemia + PPG group, the TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels in the serum were significantly increased, the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA was increased, although without a significant difference, and the expression of NF-κB was increased. The findings of the present study provide novel evidence for the dual effects of H2S on acute myocardial ischemia injury via the modulation of inflammatory factors. PMID:25667680

  18. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of acute gouty arthritis on top of chronic gouty involvement in different joints.

    PubMed

    Emad, Yasser; Ragab, Yasser; El-Naggar, Ahmed; El-Shaarawy, Nashwa; Abd-Allah, Mayada A; Gamal, Rania M; Fathy, Ahmed; Hawass, Mona; Rasker, Johannes J

    2015-11-01

    The aims of the current study are to describe gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of an acute flare of established gouty arthritis in different joints and to examine a possible association between serum uric acid and MRI signs indicative of ongoing inflammation and/or structural joint damage as well as association with disease characteristics and laboratory findings. Twenty-seven male patients with established chronic gout agreed to participate, mean age 47.6 years, and mean disease duration in months 43.2 (±31.8). For all patients, detailed demographic, disease characteristics, and laboratory findings were obtained and correlated with MRI findings. In 27 patients with established gout, a total of 50 MRI studies were performed of the following joints: feet joints (n = 23), ankles (n = 18), knees (n = 5), and hand and wrist joints (n = 4). MRI revealed capsular thickening in 19 patients, bone marrow edema (BME) in 15, soft tissue edema (STE) in 20, joint effusion in 21, bone erosions in 17, cartilaginous erosions in 4, and tenosynovitis in 9 cases. In 17 cases, tophaceous lesions were found. Post contrast MRI showed synovial thickening in seven cases. Positive correlations were observed between serum uric acid levels and the following MRI findings: capsular thickening (r = 0.552, p = 0.003), BME (r = 0.668, p ≤ 0.0001), STE (r = 0.559, p = 0.002), and tenosynovitis (r = 0.513, p = 0.006). Using MRI in chronic gout, important features can be detected like BME, minute cartilaginous erosions, and hypertrophic synovial inflammation in post contrast MR images. Serum uric acid (SUA) was positively correlated with capsular thickening, BME, STE, and tenosynovitis.

  19. Modulation of inflammatory response via α2-adrenoceptor blockade in acute murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, A; Lu, N; Guo, Y; Chen, J; Liu, Z

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by heavy production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β. Interactions of the autonomic nervous system with local immune cells play an important role in the development of IBD, and the balance of autonomic nerve function is broken in IBD patients with sympathetic overactivity. However, the function of catecholamines in the progress of colitis is unclear. In this study, we examined the role of catecholamines via α2-adrenoreceptor in acute murine colitis. The expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine b-hydroxylase (DBH), two rate-limiting enzymes in catecholamine synthesis, was detected by immunohistochemistry in murine colitis. Murine colitis was induced by dextran sodium sulphate or trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS), and the mice were administered RX821002 or UK14304, α2-adrenoceptor antagonists or agonists. Colitis was evaluated by clinical symptoms, myeloperoxidase assay, TNF-α and IL-1β production and histology. Lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) from mice with TNBS colitis were cultured in the absence or presence of RX821002 or UK14304, and stimulated further by lipopolysaccharide. TH and DBH are induced in LPMCs of inflamed colon, the evidence of catecholamine synthesis during the process of colitis. RX821002 down-regulates the production of proinflammatory cytokines from LPMCs, while UK14304 leads to exacerbation of colitis. Together, our data show a critical role of catecholamines via α2-adrenoreceptors in the progress of acute colitis, and suggest that use of the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist represents a novel therapeutic approach for the management of colitis. PMID:19250273

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory reaction in acute lung injury via regulating inflammation and redox status.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xianfeng; Liu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yingxun; Ma, Chunhua

    2015-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) represents a clinical syndrome that results from complex responses of the lung to a multitude of direct and indirect insults. This study aims to evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol (EUL) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory reaction in ALI. ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS (0.5 mg/kg), and EUL (5, and 10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 1h prior to LPS administration. After 6h, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were collected. The findings suggest that the protective mechanism of EUL may be attributed partly to decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines through the regulating inflammation and redox status. The results support that use of EUL is beneficial in the treatment of ALI.

  1. Alteration in inflammatory/apoptotic pathway and histone modifications by nordihydroguaiaretic acid prevents acute pancreatitis in swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ujwal Mukund; Gupta, Chanchal; Wagh, Preshit Ravindra; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2011-11-01

    Reactive oxygen radicals, pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines have been implicated in caerulein induced acute pancreatitis. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a plant lignin, has marked anti-inflammatory properties. The present study aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of NDGA against caerulein induced pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal administration of eight doses of caerulein in male swiss albino mice. NDGA was administered after 9 h of acute pancreatitis induction. Pancreatic damage and the protective effect of NDGA were assessed by oxidative stress parameters and histopathology of pancreas. The mRNA expression of heat shock proteins (DNAJ C15 and HSPD1) was examined by real-time RT-PCR analysis. Expression of HSP 27, NF-κB, TNF-α, p-p38, Bcl-2, p-PP2A, procaspase-3, caspase-3 and histone modifications were examined by western blotting. NDGA attenuated the oxidative stress, led to increased plasma α-amylase and decreased IGF-1 in AP mice. It modulated the mRNA and protein levels of heat shock proteins and reduced the expression of NF-κB, TNF-α and p-p38. It increased the number of TUNEL positive apoptotic cells in the pancreas of AP mice. In addition, NDGA prevented the changes in modifications of histone H3 in acute pancreatitis. To best of our knowledge, this is the first report which suggests that NDGA prevents the progression of acute pancreatitis by involving alteration of histone H3 modifications and modulating the expression of genes involved in inflammatory/apoptotic cascade, which may be responsible for decreased necrosis and increased apoptosis in this model of acute pancreatitis.

  2. Prolonged pretreatment of mice with cholera toxin, but not isoproterenol, alleviates acute lethal systemic inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyang; Guo, Xiangrui; Cao, Junxia; Zhang, Xueying; Zhang, Jiyan; Sun, Dejun; Wang, Qingyang

    2014-11-01

    Isoproterenol, a synthetic non-selective β-adrenergic agonist, is often used during the immediate postoperative period after open heart surgery for its chronotropic and vasodilatory effects. It has been demonstrated that isoproterenol pretreatment followed by immediate LPS administration leads to reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) response in vivo. However, sepsis never happens immediately after the surgery, but rather severe immune dysfunction occurs at least 24h later. It remains elusive what effects isoproterenol might exert to innate immunity during the period. In this scenario, we investigated the effects of 24-h isoproterenol pretreatment on septic shock induced by experimental endotoxemia and bacterial peritonitis, with cholera toxin as another cAMP elevator. Unexpectedly, we found that isoproterenol and cholera toxin exhibited distinct effects in acute lethal systemic inflammatory response. Isoproterenol worsened liver injury without enhancing NK/NKT activity. Meanwhile, cholera toxin but not isoproterenol showed dramatically reduced TNF-α response in LPS induced septic shock. Our data provide a caution for the clinical use of isoproterenol and suggest that isoproterenol has cAMP-independent functions.

  3. Effects of Acute Lithium Treatment on Brain Levels of Inflammatory Mediators in Poststroke Rats.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Matthew; Nassar, Ahmad; Kaplanski, Jacob; Zlotnik, Alexander; Sharon-Granit, Yael; Azab, Abed N

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Few therapeutic options with proven efficacy are available for the treatment of this disabling disease. Lithium is the gold standard treatment for bipolar disorder. Moreover, lithium has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effects and therapeutic efficacy as a treatment of other neurological disorders. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of lithium on brain inflammatory mediators levels, fever, and mortality in postischemic stroke rats. Ischemic stroke was induced by occlusion of the mid cerebral artery (MCAO). Pretreatment with a single dose of lithium at 2 hours before MCAO induction significantly reduced the elevation in interleukin- (IL-) 6 and prostaglandin E2 levels in brain of post-MCAO rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. On the other hand, lithium did not affect the elevation in IL-1α, IL-10, IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in brain of post-MCAO rats. Moreover, pretreatment with lithium did not alter post-MCAO fever and mortality. These results suggest that acute pretreatment with a single dose of lithium did not markedly affect post-MCAO morbidity and mortality in rats.

  4. Association of disease activity with acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a retrospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Yuko; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kondo, Harumi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to identify risk factors for acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease (ILD) during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This is a retrospective, case-control study. We reviewed 395 consecutive RA patients who received tocilizumab. First, we divided the patients according to the presence (RA-ILD) or absence of ILD (non-ILD) assessed by chest X-ray or high-resolution computed tomography, and compared them for characteristics relevant to RA-ILD. Subsequently, focusing on the patients with RA-ILD, we assessed their baseline characteristics and clinical courses comparing patients with acute exacerbation to those without. Comparing 78 with ILD and 317 without ILD, the following were identified as factors related to RA-ILD on multivariate analysis: age 60 years or older (OR 4.5, 95 % CI 2.2-9.4, P < 0.0001), smoking habit (OR 2.9, 95 % CI 1.5-5.5, P = 0.002), and high rheumatoid factor levels (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.4-5.5, P = 0.002). Of 78 RA-ILD patients, six developed acute exacerbation during tocilizumab treatment. The median duration between the initiation of tocilizumab treatment and the acute exacerbation occurrence was 48 weeks. While baseline characteristics did not differ between acute exacerbation and non-acute exacerbation groups, patients experiencing acute exacerbation had significantly higher Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) at 24 weeks (20.8 vs. 6.2, P = 0.019). Univariate analysis showed that CDAI > 10 at 24 weeks was a risk factor for acute exacerbation (OR 4.7, 95 % CI 2.1-10.4, P = 0.02). Uncontrolled arthritis activity during tocilizumab treatment may be associated with acute exacerbation of RA-ILD, suggesting post-treatment monitoring of disease activity is important not only with respect to RA itself but also for RA-ILD.

  5. Septic arthritis after ureteroneocystostomy.

    PubMed

    Allen, W R

    1979-04-01

    Acute infectious arthritis is an uncommon disease that is most commonly caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or gram-positive cocci. Gram-negative bacteria are an infrequent and highly virulent cause of septic arthritis and most commonly enter the circulation through the urinary tract, as in this case after ureteroneocystostomy. The resulting arthritis carries a mortality of 25% and a morbidity of 80%. Early recognition and treatment with appropriate antibiotics and mechanical drainage is imperative. Needle drainage of the affected joint has been shown superior to open surgical drainage.

  6. Eriodictyol, a plant flavonoid, attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury through its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, GUANG-FA; GUO, HONG-JUAN; HUANG, YAN; WU, CHUN-TING; ZHANG, XIANG-FENG

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by excessive inflammatory responses and oxidative injury in the lung tissue. It has been suggested that anti-inflammatory or antioxidative agents could have therapeutic effects in ALI, and eriodictyol has been reported to exhibit antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of eriodictyol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in a mouse model. The mice were divided into four groups: Phosphate-buffered saline-treated healthy control, LPS-induced ALI, vehicle-treated ALI (LPS + vehicle) and eriodictyol-treated ALI (LPS + eriodictyol). Eriodictyol (30 mg/kg) was administered orally once, 2 days before the induction of ALI. The data showed that eriodictyol pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced ALI through its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity. Furthermore, the eriodictyol pretreatment activated the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in the ALI mouse model, which attenuated the oxidative injury and inhibited the inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. In combination, the results of the present study demonstrated that eriodictyol could alleviate the LPS-induced lung injury in mice by regulating the Nrf2 pathway and inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, suggesting that eriodictyol could be used as a potential drug for the treatment of LPS-induced lung injury. PMID:26668626

  7. Age, Predisposing Diseases, and Ultrasonographic Findings in Determining Clinical Outcome of Acute Acalculous Inflammatory Gallbladder Diseases in Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated clinical factors such as age, gender, predisposing diseases and ultrasonographic findings that determine clinical outcome of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder diseases in children. The patients were divided into the four age groups. From March 2004 through February 2014, clinical data from 131 children diagnosed as acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease by ultrasonography were retrospectively reviewed. Systemic infectious diseases were the most common etiology of acute inflammatory gallbladder disease in children and were identified in 50 patients (38.2%). Kawasaki disease was the most common predisposing disease (28 patients, 21.4%). The incidence was highest in infancy and lowest in adolescence. The age groups were associated with different predisposing diseases; noninfectious systemic disease was the most common etiology in infancy and early childhood, whereas systemic infectious disease was the most common in middle childhood and adolescence (P = 0.001). Gallbladder wall thickening was more commonly found in malignancy (100%) and systemic infection (94.0%) (P = 0.002), whereas gallbladder distension was more frequent in noninfectious systemic diseases (60%) (P = 0.000). Ascites seen on ultrasonography was associated with a worse clinical course compared with no ascites (77.9% vs. 37.7%, P = 0.030), and the duration of hospitalization was longer in patients with ascites (11.6 ± 10.7 vs. 8.0 ± 6.6 days, P = 0.020). In conclusion, consideration of age and predisposing disease in addition to ultrasonographic gallbladder findings in children suspected of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease might result in better outcomes. PMID:27550491

  8. Use of aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2015-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to induce or exacerbate psoriasis. We aimed to evaluate the association between several widely used analgesics, including aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a large cohort of US women, the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2005). Information on regular use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen was collected for 95,540 participants during the follow-up. During 1,321,280 person-years of follow-up, we documented 646 incident psoriasis cases and 165 concomitant PsA cases. Compared to women who reported no use, regular acetaminophen and NSAIDs users with more than 10 years of use had multivariate hazard ratios of 3.60 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.02-6.41] and 2.10 (95% CI: 1.11-3.96) for PsA, respectively. There was no clear association between aspirin and risk of psoriasis or PsA. In conclusion, long-term acetaminophen and NSAIDs use may be associated with an increased risk of PsA. Special attention on psoriasis and PsA screening may be needed for those who are prescribed for acetaminophen and NSAIDs for long-term periods.

  9. A proposed 30-45 minute 4 page standard protocol to evaluate rheumatoid arthritis (SPERA) that includes measures of inflammatory activity, joint damage, and longterm outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pincus, T; Brooks, R H; Callahan, L F

    1999-02-01

    A proposed 4 page, 30-45 minute standard protocol to assess rheumatoid arthritis (SPERA) is described that includes all relevant measures of inflammatory activity such as joint swelling, measures of joint damage such as joint deformity, and outcomes such as joint replacement surgery, to monitor patients in longterm observational studies. Forms are included: (1) a patient self-report modified health assessment questionnaire (MHAQ) to assess function, pain, fatigue, psychological distress, symptoms, and drugs used; (2) assessor-completed forms: "RA clinical features" --criteria for RA, functional class, family history, extraarticular disease, comorbidities, joint surgery, radiographic score, and laboratory findings. (3) A 32 joint count with 5 variables: (a) a "shorthand" normal/abnormal so that normal joints require no further detailed assessment; (b) tenderness or pain on motion; (c) swelling; (d) limited motion or deformity; (e) previous surgeries; physical measures of function, i.e., grip strength, walk time, and button test. (4) Medication review of previous disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD), work history, and years of education. The forms allow cost effective acquisition of all relevant measures of activity, damage, and outcomes in routine clinical care, and allow recognition that measures of activity may show similar or improved values over 5-10 years, while measures of damage and outcomes indicate severe progression in the same patients. The SPERA is feasible to acquire most known relevant measures of activity, damage, and outcomes in RA in 30-45 min in usual clinical settings, to provide a complete database for analyses of longterm outcomes.

  10. Expansions of Cytotoxic CD4+CD28− T Cells Drive Excess Cardiovascular Mortality in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Other Chronic Inflammatory Conditions and Are Triggered by CMV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Broadley, Iain; Pera, Alejandra; Morrow, George; Davies, Kevin A.; Kern, Florian

    2017-01-01

    A large proportion of cardiovascular (CV) pathology results from immune-mediated damage, including systemic inflammation and cellular proliferation, which cause a narrowing of the blood vessels. Expansions of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells characterized by loss of CD28 (“CD4+CD28− T cells” or “CD4+CD28null cells”) are closely associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), in particular coronary artery damage. Direct involvement of these cells in damaging the vasculature has been demonstrated repeatedly. Moreover, CD4+CD28− T cells are significantly increased in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune conditions. It is striking that expansions of this subset beyond 1–2% occur exclusively in CMV-infected people. CMV infection itself is known to increase the severity of autoimmune diseases, in particular RA and has also been linked to increased vascular pathology. A review of the recent literature on immunological changes in CVD, RA, and CMV infection provides strong evidence that expansions of cytotoxic CD4+CD28− T cells in RA and other chronic inflammatory conditions are limited to CMV-infected patients and driven by CMV infection. They are likely to be responsible for the excess CV mortality observed in these situations. The CD4+CD28− phenotype convincingly links CMV infection to CV mortality based on a direct cellular-pathological mechanism rather than epidemiological association. PMID:28303136

  11. [Comparison of hospital prevalence of rheumatic heart diseases and acute rheumatic arthritis in France and Africa].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Gérard, R

    1993-03-01

    This study reports the results of a multicentre enquiry performed in France in 1990 which included 41,242 adults hospitalised in Cardiology Units, 33,907 children hospitalised in Pediatric departments and 8,868 soldiers. A comparative enquiry was also carried out in North Africa (Tunis) and West Africa (Abidjan, Ouagadougou). The results of the French arm of the enquiry showed that rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has become very rare in adults (3.1% of all cardiac disease) and that it tends to occur in older subjects (average 54.4 years of age). There is practically no RHD in young adults. This decreased prevalence of RHD is confirmed in children in whom this diagnosis represents only 0.04% of cases of all cardiac disease--of which 87.5% are of extra-European origin. In contrast, there is a high frequency of RHD in Tunisia (29.3%) and West Africa (13.2% in Abidjan and 13% in Ouagadougou). The disease remains active as is shown by the age of affected adults in Africa (average 21 and 27 years of age). The results also show a reduction to a very low prevalence of acute rheumatic fever in French pediatric departments (0.005%). The authors discuss the reasons for the persistence of endemic infection in Africa: virulence of the streptococcus, predisposing factors (HLA group?), geographic factors and, above all, socioeconomic factors and difficulties in obtaining treatment and prophylaxis. A movement of international cooperation is suggested in order to combat RHD in Africa, especially with regards to its prevention in childhood.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  13. The effect of montelukast in a model of gouty arthritis induced by sodium monourate crystals.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Loida; Arjona, Marjorie; Blanco, Gustavo; Alvarez, Stuart; Arcila, Eduardo; Ortega, Arnaldo; Nuñez, Dubelis; Verzura, Julie; Tovar, Robert; Bethencourt, Sarah; Riera, Ricardo; Mora-Orta, Sioly; Corado, José

    2011-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are the first line of therapy in acute gouty arthritis. NSAIDs inhibit the cyclooxygenase pathway, but not the lipooxygenase activity and can have many adverse effects and thus have a limited effect on the control of inflammation in this disease. In this work we studied the effect of montelukast on the cellular inflammatory infiltrate in a model of murine arthritis induced by sodium monourate crystals (SMU), using a subcutaneous air cavity (air pouch) in BALB/c mice. Seven groups of BALB/c mice (n = 4) were distributed into five experimental groups and two inflammatory control groups, a positive and a negative one. Previous to SMU exposure, the experimental groups received montelukast (1 and 0.01 mg/Kg/w) and/or indomethacine (2.5 mg/Kg/w), followed by administration of SMU in the air pouch. The total and differential counts of inflammatory cells were analyzed after 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours. Montelukast, significantly reduced the total number of cells (p < 0.05), with a predominant impact on polymorphonuclear over mononuclear cells, especially after 12 hours of the medication. The montelukast/indometacine combination showed an additive effect. Our data show that montelukast has an anti-inflammatory effect in the model of gouty arthritis. Consequently, anti-leukotrienes could represent a new and effective therapy, either isolated or combined with conventional therapy of gouty arthritis.

  14. TRPA1 contributes to the acute inflammatory response and mediates carrageenan-induced paw edema in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Moilanen, Lauri J; Laavola, Mirka; Kukkonen, Meiju; Korhonen, Riku; Leppänen, Tiina; Högestätt, Edward D; Zygmunt, Peter M; Nieminen, Riina M; Moilanen, Eeva

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is an ion channel involved in thermosensation and nociception. TRPA1 is activated by exogenous irritants and also by oxidants formed in inflammatory reactions. However, our understanding of its role in inflammation is limited. Here, we tested the hypothesis that TRPA1 is involved in acute inflammatory edema. The TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) induced inflammatory edema when injected intraplantarly to mice, mimicking the classical response to carrageenan. Interestingly, the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 and the cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitor ibuprofen inhibited not only AITC but also carrageenan-induced edema. TRPA1-deficient mice displayed attenuated responses to carrageenan and AITC. Furthermore, AITC enhanced COX-2 expression in HEK293 cells transfected with human TRPA1, a response that was reversed by HC-030031. This study demonstrates a hitherto unknown role of TRPA1 in carrageenan-induced inflammatory edema. The results also strongly suggest that TRPA1 contributes, in a COX-dependent manner, to the development of acute inflammation.

  15. Efficacy and safety profile of combination of tramadol-diclofenac versus tramadol-paracetamol in patients with acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain, and acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a Phase III, 5-day open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Chandanwale, Ajay S; Sundar, Subramanian; Latchoumibady, Kaliaperumal; Biswas, Swati; Gabhane, Mukesh; Naik, Manoj; Patel, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tramadol and diclofenac versus a standard approved FDC of tramadol and paracetamol, in patients with acute moderate to severe pain. Methods A total of 204 patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions (n=52), acute flare of osteoarthritis (n=52), acute flare of rheumatoid arthritis (n=50), or postoperative pain (n=50) were enrolled in the study at baseline. Each disease category was then randomized to receive either of two treatments for 5 days: group A received an FDC of immediate-release tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg) and sustained-release diclofenac sodium (75 mg) (one tablet, twice daily), and group B received an FDC of tramadol hydrochloride (37.5 mg) and paracetamol (325 mg) (two tablets every 4–6 hours, up to a maximum of eight tablets daily). The primary efficacy end points were reductions in pain intensity from baseline at day 3 and day 5 as assessed by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score. Results Group A showed a significant reduction in the VAS score for overall pain from baseline on day 3 (P=0.001) and day 5 (P<0.0001) as compared with group B. The combination of tramadol-diclofenac resulted in few mild to moderate adverse events (nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and gastritis), which required minimal management, without any treatment discontinuation. The number of adverse events in group A was nine (8.82%) compared with 22 (21.78%) in group B, after 5 days of treatment. Conclusion An FDC of tramadol-diclofenac showed a significantly greater reduction in pain intensity and was well tolerated compared with tramadol-paracetamol, resulting in better analgesia in patients suffering from moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain following orthopedic surgery, or acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25152629

  16. Femur chondrosarcoma misdiagnosed as acute knee arthritis and osteomyelitis--further developing a hitherto unreported complication of tumor embolic ischemic ileal perforation after arthroscopic lavage.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louis Tsun Cheung

    2014-12-01

    The differentiation between osteomyelitis and bone tumor may be difficult due to their overlapping clinical and radiological features. A 25-year-old lady presented with left knee pain and joint effusion associated with redness and hotness. A sub-optimally taken plain radiograph showed mixed osteolytic and osteoblastic lesion in the left lower femur with surrounding soft tissue swelling. Since the clinical diagnosis was acute osteomyelitis and arthritis, arthroscopic lavage was performed as a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. The removed loose bodies and fibrinous tissue showed pathological features suspicious of chondrosarcoma. Subsequent MRI revealed an infiltrative tumor eroding through the cortex and joint cartilage. En bloc excision of the left lower femur, upper tibia including the knee joint and patella was performed, and the final diagnosis was grade 2 chondrosarcoma. The patient developed bilateral pulmonary metastasis 33 months after operation. Five months later, she suffered from a hitherto undescribed complication of ischemic perforation of the terminal ileum secondary to tumor embolic arterial obstruction with no macroscopic intestinal or peritoneal tumor deposit. The patient developed multiple brain metastases and died 43 months after initial presentation. Our case illustrates that malignant bone tumor as a differential diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis and arthritis merits recognition and exclusion before arthroscopic lavage, which may enhance tumor dissemination and in our patient results in embolic ischemic ileal perforation.

  17. Polymorphisms in key pulmonary inflammatory pathways and the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Samuel M.; Grissom, Colin K.; Rondina, Matthew T.; Hoidal, John R.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Wolff, Roger K.; Morris, Alan H.; Paine, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Aim Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is an important clinical and public health problem. Why some at-risk individuals develop ARDS and others do not is unclear but may be related to differences in inflammatory and cell signaling systems. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) and Granulocyte-Monocyte Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) pathways have recently been implicated in pulmonary pathophysiology; whether genetic variation within these pathways contributes to ARDS risk or outcome is unknown. Materials and Methods We studied 842 patients from three centers in Utah and 14 non-Utah ARDS Network centers. We studied patients at risk for ARDS and patients with ARDS to determine whether Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the RAGE and GM-CSF pathways were associated with development of ARDS. We studied 29 SNPs in 5 genes within the two pathways and controlled for age, sepsis as ARDS risk factor, and severity of illness, while targeting a false discovery rate of ≤5%. In a secondary analysis we evaluated associations with mortality. Results Of 842 patients, 690 had ARDS, and 152 were at-risk. Sepsis was the risk factor for ARDS in 250 (30%) patients. When controlling for age, APACHE III score, sepsis as risk factor, and multiple comparisons, no SNPs were significantly associated with ARDS. In a secondary analysis, only rs743564 in CSF2 approached significance with regard to mortality (OR 2.17, unadjusted p = 0.005, adjusted p = 0.15). Conclusions Candidate SNPs within 5 genes in the RAGE and GM-CSF pathways were not significantly associated with development of ARDS in this multi-centric cohort. PMID:25513711

  18. Activation of circulated immune cells and inflammatory immune adherence are involved in the whole process of acute venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Le-Min; Duan, Qiang-Lin; Yang, Fan; Yi, Xiang-Hua; Zeng, Yu; Tian, Hong-Yan; Lv, Wei; Jin, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate localization and distribution of integrin subunit β1, β2 and β3 and morphological changes of ligand-recepter binding in thrombi of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) patients and explore activation of circulated immune cells, inflammatory immune adherence and coagulation response in acute venous thrombosis. Methods: Thrombi were collected from patients with acute PE. Immunohistochemistry was done to detect the expression and distribution of integrin β1, β2 and β3 in cells within thrombi, and ligands of integrin subunit β1, β2 and β3 were also determined by immunohistochemistry within the thrombi. Results: 1) Acute venous thrombi were red thrombi composed of skeletons and filamentous mesh containing large amounts of red blood cells and white blood cells; 2) Integrin subunit β1, β2 and β3 were expressed on lymphocytes, neutrophils and platelets; 3) No expression of integrin β1 ligands: Laminin, Fibronectin, Collagen I or Collagen-II on lymphocytes; integrin β2 ligands including ICAM, factor X and iC3b are distributed on neutrophils, and ligand fibrinogen bound to neutrophils; integrin β3 was expressed on platelets which form the skeleton of thrombi and bound to fibrinogen to construct mesh structure; 4) Factor Xa was expressed on the filamentous mesh; 5) Filamentous mesh was fully filled with red blood cell dominant blood cells. Conclusion: Acute venous thrombosis is an activation process of circulated lymphocytes, neutrophils and platelets mainly, and a whole process including integrin subunit β2 and β3 binding with their ligands. Activation of immune cells, inflammatory immune adherence and coagulation response are involved in the acute venous thrombosis. PMID:24753749

  19. Progranulin protects against endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury by downregulating renal cell death and inflammatory responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoying; Gou, Linfeng; Zhou, Meng; Yang, Fusheng; Zhao, Yihan; Feng, Tingting; Shi, Peikun; Ghavamian, Armin; Zhao, Weiming; Yu, Yuan; Lu, Yi; Yi, Fan; Liu, Guangyi; Tang, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Progranulin (PGRN), a pluripotent secreted growth factor, is involved in various physiologic and disease processes. However, the role of PGRN in endotoxin-induced septic acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unknown. The objective of this study is to investigate the protective effects of PGRN on an endotoxin-induced AKI mouse model by using PGRN-deficient mice and recombinant PGRN (rPGRN) pretreatment. PGRN levels were increased in kidneys of wild-type (WT) mice at 6 and 24h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Renal function detection, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining, ELISA and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine triphosphate nick-end labeling were used to reveal tissue injury, inflammatory cell infiltration, production of inflammatory mediators and cell death in mouse kidneys after LPS injection. PGRN deficiency resulted in severe kidney injury and increased apoptotic death, inflammatory cell infiltration, production of pro-inflammatory mediators and the expression and nucleus-to-cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 in the kidney. In addition, rPGRN administration before LPS treatment ameliorated the endotoxin-induced AKI in WT mice. PGRN may be a novel biologic agent with therapeutic potential for endotoxin-induced septic AKI possibly by inhibiting LPS-induced renal cell death and inflammatory responses in mice.

  20. Correlative mRNA and protein expression of middle and inner ear inflammatory cytokines during mouse acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Trune, Dennis R; Kempton, Beth; Hausman, Frances A; Larrain, Barbara E; MacArthur, Carol J

    2015-08-01

    Although the inner ear has long been reported to be susceptible to middle ear disease, little is known of the inflammatory mechanisms that might cause permanent sensorineural hearing loss. Recent studies have shown inner ear tissues are capable of expressing inflammatory cytokines during otitis media. However, little quantitative information is available concerning cytokine gene expression in the inner ear and the protein products that result. Therefore, this study was conducted of mouse middle and inner ear during acute otitis media to measure the relationship between inflammatory cytokine genes and their protein products with quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Balb/c mice were inoculated transtympanically with heat-killed Haemophilus influenzae and middle and inner ear tissues collected for either quantitative RT-PCR microarrays or ELISA multiplex arrays. mRNA for several cytokine genes was significantly increased in both the middle and inner ear at 6 h. In the inner ear, these included MIP-2 (448 fold), IL-6 (126 fold), IL-1β (7.8 fold), IL-10 (10.7 fold), TNFα (1.8 fold), and IL-1α (1.5 fold). The 24 h samples showed a similar pattern of gene expression, although generally at lower levels. In parallel, the ELISA showed the related cytokines were present in the inner ear at concentrations higher by 2-122 fold higher at 18 h, declining slightly from there at 24 h. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies to a number of these cytokines demonstrated they occurred in greater amounts in the inner ear tissues. These findings demonstrate considerable inflammatory gene expression and gene products in the inner ear following acute otitis media. These higher cytokine levels suggest one potential mechanism for the permanent hearing loss seen in some cases of acute and chronic otitis media.

  1. Acute Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Responses to Resistance Exercise in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Volaklis, Konstantinos A.; Smilios, Ilias; Spassis, Apostolos T.; Zois, Christos E.; Douda, Helen T.; Halle, Martin; Tokmakidis, Savvas P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the inflammatory effects of resistance exercise in healthy and even less in diseased individuals such as cardiac patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute pro- and anti-inflammatory responses during resistance exercise (RE) in patients with coronary artery disease. Eight low risk patients completed two acute RE protocols at low (50% of 1 RM; 2x18 rps) and moderate intensity (75% of 1 RM; 3x8 rps) in random order. Both protocols included six exercises and had the same total load volume. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately after and 60 minutes after each protocol for the determination of lactate, TNFα, INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, and hsCRP concentrations. IL-6 and IL-10 levels increased (p < 0.05) immediately after both RE protocols with no differences between protocols. INF-γ was significantly lower (p < 0.05) 60 min after the low intensity protocol, whereas TGF-β1 increased (p < 0.05) immediately after the low intensity protocol. There were no differences in TNF-& and hs-CRP after both RE protocols or between protocols. The above data indicate that acute resistance exercise performed at low to moderate intensity in low risk, trained CAD patients is safe and does not exacerbate the inflammation associated with their disease. Key points Acute resistance exercise is safe without exacerbating inflammation in patients with CAD. Both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) elicit desirable pro-and anti-inflammatory responses. With both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) acceptable clinical hemodynamic alterations were observed. PMID:25729295

  2. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    PubMed Central

    Essenmacher, Alex C.; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  3. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  4. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  5. Traumeel – an emerging option to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the management of acute musculoskeletal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are on the rise. First-line management of such injuries usually employs the RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) approach to limit excessive inflammation. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are also commonly used to limit inflammation and to control pain. Traumeel®, a preparation with bioregulatory effects is also used to treat the symptoms associated with acute musculoskeletal injuries, including pain and swelling. Traumeel is a fixed combination of biological and mineral extracts, which aims to apply stimuli to multiple targets to restore normal functioning of regulatory mechanisms. This paper presents the accumulating evidence of Traumeel’s action on the inflammatory process, and of its efficacy and tolerability in randomized trials, as well as observational and surveillance studies for the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. Traumeel has shown comparable effectiveness to NSAIDs in terms of reducing symptoms of inflammation, accelerating recovery, and improving mobility, with a favorable safety profile. While continued research and development is ongoing to broaden the clinical evidence of Traumeel in acute musculoskeletal injury and to further establish its benefits, current information suggests that Traumeel may be considered as an anti-inflammatory agent that is at least as effective and appears to be better tolerated than NSAIDs. PMID:21556350

  6. [Tocilizumab in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Rueda Gotor, Javier; Blanco Alonso, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the receptor for IL-6, approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Japan, Europe and the US. Wide clinical development has shown the efficacy of TCZ in most of the possible situations of RA: RA without prior failure to MTX (AMBITION), RA unresponsive to MTX (SATORI, OPTION, LITHE) or any DMARD (TOWARD, ROSE) as well as RA refractory to anti-TNFa agents (RADIATE). In addition to its early onset, efficacy was constant and even increased as time passed (GROWTH95, GROWTH96). TCZ has shown great efficacy in correcting laboratory alterations in RA, both in acute phase reactants as well as anemia of inflammatory disease. Although in RA TCZ us initially indicated in combination with MTX, it has also shown its efficacy as monotherapy (AMBITION). TCZ is equally effective in the prevention of structural damage (SAMURAI, LITHE). In addition, it has shown to be a safe and well-tolerated drug, similar to other biologic therapies. All of these aspects make TCZ an adequate therapeutic alternative to be considered in any RA scenario.

  7. Being as Normal as Possible: How Young People Ages 16–25 Years Evaluate the Risks and Benefits of Treatment for Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, Janet E.; Thompson, Ben; Foster, Helen E.; Kay, Lesley; Myers, Andrea; Rapley, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore how young people (ages 16–25 years) with inflammatory arthritis evaluate the risks and benefits of treatment, particularly treatment with biologic therapies. Methods This qualitative study involved in‐depth interviews (n = 44) with young people, trusted others (e.g., parents), and health professionals; audio‐recordings (n = 4) of biologic therapy–related consultations; and focus groups (n = 4). Analysis used techniques from grounded theory (open and focused coding, constant comparison, memoing, and mapping). Results Young people aspired to live what they perceived as a “normal” life. They saw treatment as presenting both an opportunity for and a threat to achieving this. Treatment changes were therefore subject to complex and ongoing evaluation, covering administration, associated restrictions, anticipated effects, and side effects. Information sources included expert opinion (of professionals and other patients) and personal experience. Previous treatments provided important reference points. Faced with uncertain outcomes, young people made provisional decisions. Both trusted others and health professionals expressed concern that young people were too focused on short‐term outcomes. Conclusion Young people value treatment that helps them to live a “normal” life. There is more to this than controlling disease. The emotional, social, and vocational consequences of treatment can be profound and lasting: opportunities to discuss the effects of treatment should be provided early and regularly. While making every effort to ensure understanding of the long‐term clinical consequences of taking or not taking medication, the wider impact of treatment should not be dismissed. Only through understanding young people's values, preferences, and concerns can a sustainable balance between disease control and treatment burden be achieved. PMID:27040737

  8. Pain mechanisms and ultrasonic inflammatory activity as prognostic factors in patients with psoriatic arthritis: protocol for a prospective, exploratory cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Lene; Mease, Philip; de Wit, Maarten; Skov, Lone; Glintborg, Bente; Christensen, Anton Wulf; Ballegaard, Christine; Bliddal, Henning; Bukhave, Kristine; Bartels, Else Marie; Amris, Kirstine; Ellegaard, Karen; Kristensen, Lars Erik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Persistent pain is a major concern for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Pain may be due to inflammatory activity or augmented central pain processing. Unawareness of the origin and mechanisms of pain can lead to misinterpretation of disease activity (by composite scores) and erroneous treatments. Ultrasonography (US) is a highly sensitive method to detect tissue inflammation. Evaluating pain mechanisms in relation to US measures may prove valuable in predicting response to treatment in PsA. Aims To study the association and prognostic value of pain mechanisms, ultrasonic activity and clinical outcomes in patients with PsA who intensify antirheumatic treatment. Methods and analyses 100 participants >18 years of age with PsA who initiate or switch antirheumatic treatment (biologicals and/or conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)) will be prospectively recruited from outpatient clinics in Copenhagen. All data (demographics, clinical, imaging, blood samples and patient-reported outcomes) will be collected at baseline and after 4 months. Pain is assessed by the PainDETECT Questionnaire, Visual Analogue Scale for pain, Swollen to Tender Joint Count Ratio, Widespread Pain Index and tender point examination. The association between pain variables and clinical/US characteristics will be described by correlation analyses. The predictive value of pain measures and baseline US scores on treatment response will be analysed with regression models. Outcomes are composite and clinical, as well as patient reported. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the ethics committee of the Capital Region of Denmark (H-15009080) and has been designed in cooperation with patient research partners. The study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov (number NCT02572700). Results will be disseminated through publication in international peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number NCT02572700, Pre-results. PMID:27084281

  9. Influence of Insulin Resistance and TNF-α on the Inflammatory Process, Oxidative Stress, and Disease Activity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Delongui, Francieli; Alfieri, Daniela Frizon; Lozovoy, Marcell Alysson Batisti; Amin, Ricardo Braga; Dichi, Isaias; Simão, Andréa Name Colado

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the involvement of TNF-α and insulin resistance (IR) in the inflammatory process, oxidative stress, and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This cross-sectional study included 270 subjects (control group, n = 97) and RA patients (n = 173). RA patients were divided into four groups: the first group without IR and not using antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF−) (G1, IR− TNF−); the second group without IR and using anti-TNF-α (G2, IR− TNF+); the third group with IR and not using anti-TNF-α (G3, IR+ TNF−); and the fourth group with IR and using anti-TNF-α (G4, IR+ TNF+). G3 and G4 had higher (p < 0.05) advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) and oxidative stress index (OSI) compared to G1. G4 group presented higher (p < 0.05) AOPPs and OSI than G2. TRAP was significantly lower in G3 compared to G1. Plasma TNF-α levels were significantly higher in G4 and G2 compared to G1 (p < 0.0001) and G3 (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.01, resp.). The presence of insulin resistance was robustly associated with both oxidative stress and TNF-α levels. More studies are warranted to verify if IR can be involved in therapeutic failure with TNF-α inhibitors. This trial is registered with Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry Register number RBR-2jvj92. PMID:27340510

  10. Striatal opioid receptor availability is related to acute and chronic pain perception in arthritis: does opioid adaptation increase resilience to chronic pain?

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher A; Matthews, Julian; Fairclough, Michael; McMahon, Adam; Barnett, Elizabeth; Al-Kaysi, Ali; El-Deredy, Wael; Jones, Anthony K P

    2015-11-01

    The experience of pain in humans is modulated by endogenous opioids, but it is largely unknown how the opioid system adapts to chronic pain states. Animal models of chronic pain point to upregulation of opioid receptors (OpR) in the brain, with unknown functional significance. We sought evidence for a similar relationship between chronic pain and OpR availability in humans. Using positron emission tomography and the radiotracer (11)C-diprenorphine, patients with arthritis pain (n = 17) and healthy controls (n = 9) underwent whole-brain positron emission tomography scanning to calculate parametric maps of OpR availability. Consistent with the upregulation hypothesis, within the arthritis group, greater OpR availability was found in the striatum (including the caudate) of patients reporting higher levels of recent chronic pain, as well as regions of interest in the descending opioidergic pathway including the anterior cingulate cortex, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray. The functional significance of striatal changes were clarified with respect to acute pain thresholds: data across patients and controls revealed that striatal OpR availability was related to reduced pain perception. These findings are consistent with the view that chronic pain may upregulate OpR availability to dampen pain. Finally, patients with arthritis pain, compared with healthy controls, had overall less OpR availability within the striatum specifically, consistent with the greater endogenous opioid binding that would be expected in chronic pain states. Our observational evidence points to the need for further studies to establish the causal relationship between chronic pain states and OpR adaptation.

  11. Glucocorticoids limit acute lung inflammation in concert with inflammatory stimuli by induction of SphK1

    PubMed Central

    Vettorazzi, Sabine; Bode, Constantin; Dejager, Lien; Frappart, Lucien; Shelest, Ekaterina; Klaßen, Carina; Tasdogan, Alpaslan; Reichardt, Holger M.; Libert, Claude; Schneider, Marion; Weih, Falk; Henriette Uhlenhaut, N.; David, Jean-Pierre; Gräler, Markus; Kleiman, Anna; Tuckermann, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe inflammatory disease for which no specific treatment exists. As glucocorticoids have potent immunosuppressive effects, their application in ALI is currently being tested in clinical trials. However, the benefits of this type of regimen remain unclear. Here we identify a mechanism of glucocorticoid action that challenges the long-standing dogma of cytokine repression by the glucocorticoid receptor. Contrarily, synergistic gene induction of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) by glucocorticoids and pro-inflammatory stimuli via the glucocorticoid receptor in macrophages increases circulating sphingosine 1-phosphate levels, which proves essential for the inhibition of inflammation. Chemical or genetic inhibition of SphK1 abrogates the therapeutic effects of glucocorticoids. Inflammatory p38 MAPK- and mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1)-dependent pathways cooperate with glucocorticoids to upregulate SphK1 expression. Our findings support a critical role for SphK1 induction in the suppression of lung inflammation by glucocorticoids, and therefore provide rationales for effective anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:26183376

  12. The role of Vitamin D in immuno-inflammatory responses in Ankylosing Spondylitis patients with and without Acute Anterior Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Mitulescu, TC; Stavaru, C; Voinea, LM; Banica, LM; Matache, C; Predeteanu, D

    2016-01-01

    Hypothesis:Abnormal Vitamin D (Vit D) level could have consequences on the immuno-inflammatory processes in Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). Aim:The purpose of this study was to analyze the role of Vitamin D in the interplay between immune and inflammation effectors in AS associated-Acute Anterior Uveitis (AAU). Methods and Results:25-hydroxyvitamin D (Vit D), LL-37 peptide, IL-8 and Serum Amyloid A (SAA) were identified and quantified in the serum/ plasma of thirty-four AS patients [eleven AS patients presenting AAU (AAU AS patients) and twenty-three AS patients without AAU (wAAU AS patients)] and eighteen healthy individuals (Control) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Acute-phase SAA level was significantly higher in AS patients compared to Controls. Contrary with wAAU AS patients, significantly elevated levels of IL-8, and diminished levels of Vit D characterized AAU AS patients. Regarding LL-37, its level decreased concomitantly with the level of Vit D. When AS patients were subgrouped based on AAU presence or on Vit D level, important associations between immuno-inflammatory assessed markers and AS features were noticed. Generally, Vit D levels were associated indirectly with leukocytes/ neutrophils number or with ESR, CRP, and Fibrinogen levels. The levels of SAA and IL-8 associated directly with AAU or with AAU relapses, especially in AS patients with Vit D insufficiency, while SAA associated directly with infection/ inflammatory markers and with disease activity indexes or with the degree of functional limitation. Discussion:Altered levels of Vit D affect the balance between LL-37, IL-8 and SAA, suggesting an association with AAU, an extra-articular manifestation of AS. Abbreviations:Vit D = Vitamin D, AS = Ankylosing Spondylitis, AAU = Acute Anterior Uveitis, AAU AS = AS patients with AAU, wAAU AS = AS patients without AAU, SSZ = Sulphasalazine, Leu = Leukocytes, Neu = Neutrophils. PMID:27713770

  13. Acute restraint stress induces specific changes in nitric oxide production and inflammatory markers in the rat hippocampus and striatum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Spiers, Jereme G; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mild stress has been shown to cause hippocampal neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) overexpression and the resultant nitric oxide (NO) production has been implicated in the etiology of depression. However, the extent of nitrosative changes including NOS enzymatic activity and the overall output of NO production in regions of the brain like the hippocampus and striatum following acute stress has not been characterized. In this study, outbred male Wistar rats aged 6-7 weeks were randomly allocated into 0 (control), 60, 120, or 240 min stress groups and neural regions were cryodissected for measurement of constitutive and inducible NOS enzymatic activity, nitrosative status, and relative gene expression of neuronal and inducible NOS. Hippocampal constitutive NOS activity increased initially but was superseded by the inducible isoform as stress duration was prolonged. Interestingly, hippocampal neuronal NOS and interleukin-1β mRNA expression was downregulated, while the inducible NOS isoform was upregulated in conjunction with other inflammatory markers. This pro-inflammatory phenotype within the hippocampus was further confirmed with an increase in the glucocorticoid-antagonizing macrophage migration inhibitory factor, Mif, and the glial surveillance marker, Ciita. This indicates that despite high levels of glucocorticoids, acute stress sensitizes a neuroinflammatory response within the hippocampus involving both pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible NOS while concurrently modulating the immunophenotype of glia. Furthermore, there was a delayed increase in striatal inducible NOS expression while no change was found in other pro-inflammatory mediators. This suggests that short term stress induces a generalized increase in inducible NOS signaling that coincides with regionally specific increased markers of adaptive immunity and inflammation within the brain.

  14. Synovial fluid lactic acid levels in septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Riley, T V

    1981-01-01

    Synovial fluid lactic acid estimations were carried out on 50 samples by gas liquid chromatography. Specimens from 4 patients with bacteria arthritis, other than gonococcal, had a mean lactic acid concentration of 215 mg/dl. One patient with gonococcal arthritis had a synovial fluid lactic acid of 30 mg/dl. Forty-one patients with inflammatory arthritis and 4 patients with degenerative arthritis had mean synovial fluid lactic acid levels of 27 and 23 mg/dl respectively. The estimation of synovial fluid lactic acid is reliable in differentiating septic arthritis from inflammatory and degenerative arthritis except when the infecting organism is NEisseria gonorrhoeae.

  15. Acute effects of anti-inflammatory drugs on neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser-induced uveitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Millichamp, N J; Dziezyc, J; Rohde, B H; Chiou, G C; Smith, W B

    1991-08-01

    Dogs were treated with flunixin meglumine, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor; L-651,896, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor; and matrine, a herbal anti-inflammatory drug. Acute inflammation was induced in the eyes by disruption of the anterior lens capsule, using a neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser. Intraocular pressure, pupil diameter, and eicosanoid production in the aqueous humor were measured. Statistically significant effects were seen in the eyes of flunixin meglumine-treated dogs where mydriasis was maintained and aqueous prostaglandin E2 concentration was reduced.

  16. Characterization of Inflammatory Response in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure and Relationship with Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Cristina; Solà, Elsa; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Fernàndez, Guerau; Huelin, Patricia; Graupera, Isabel; Moreira, Rebeca; de Prada, Gloria; Ariza, Xavier; Pose, Elisa; Fabrellas, Núria; Kalko, Susana G.; Jiménez, Wladimiro; Ginès, Pere

    2016-01-01

    ACLF is characterized by a systemic inflammatory response, but the cytokines involved in this process have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to characterize the systemic inflammatory response in patients with cirrhosis and ACLF and its relationship with prognosis. Fifty-five patients with cirrhosis, 26 with ACLF, were studied prospectively. Systemic inflammatory response was analyzed by measuring a large array of plasma cytokines by using a multiplex kit. A principal component analysis show noticeable differences between ACLF and decompensated cirrhosis without ACLF. Patients with ACLF had significant abnormal levels of 12 cytokines compared to those without ACLF, including: VCAM-1, VEGF-A, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, Eotaxin, IP-10, RANTES, GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-2, ICAM-1, and MCP-1. Cytokines showing the most marked relationship with ACLF were VCAM-1 and VEGF-A (AUCROC 0.77; p = 0.001). There was a significant relationship between some of inflammatory mediators and 3-month mortality, particularly VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and GM-CSF (AUCROC>0.7; p < 0.05). Functional Enrichment Analysis showed that inflammatory markers differentially expressed in ACLF patients were enriched in leukocyte migration, particularly monocytes and macrophages, and chemotaxis pathways. In conclusion, ACLF is characterized by a marked inflammatory reaction with activation of mediators of adhesion and migration of leukocytes. The intensity of the inflammatory reaction correlates with prognosis. PMID:27578545

  17. Acute cold stress improved the transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines of Chinese soft-shelled turtle against Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuobing; Chen, Bojian; Yuan, Lin; Niu, Cuijuan

    2015-03-01

    Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, is widely cultured in East and Southeast Asian countries. It frequently encounters the stress of abrupt temperature changes, which leads to mass death in most cases. However, the mechanism underlying the stress-elicited death remains unknown. We have suspected that the stress impaired the immune function of Chinese soft-shelled turtle, which could result in the mass death, as we noticed that there was a clinical syndrome of infection in dead turtles. To test our hypothesis, we first performed bioinformatic annotation of several pro-inflammatory molecules (IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, IL-12β) of Chinese soft-shelled turtle. Then, we treated the turtles in six groups, injected with Aeromonas hydrophila before acute cold stress (25 °C) and controls, after acute cold stress (15 °C) and controls as well as after the temperature was restored to 25 °C and controls, respectively. Subsequently, real-time PCR for several pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, IL-12β, IL-8 and IFNγ) was performed to assess the turtle immune function in spleen and intestine, 24 hours after the injection. We found that the mRNA expression levels of the immune molecules were all enhanced after acute cold stress. This change disappeared when the temperature was restored back to 25 °C. Our results suggest that abrupt temperature drop did not suppress the immune function of Chinese soft-shelled turtle in response to germ challenge after abrupt temperature drop. In contrast, it may even increase the expression of various cytokines at least, within a short time after acute cold stress.

  18. Early Activation of Th2/Th22 Inflammatory and Pruritogenic Pathways in Acute Canine Atopic Dermatitis Skin Lesions.

    PubMed

    Olivry, Thierry; Mayhew, David; Paps, Judy S; Linder, Keith E; Peredo, Carlos; Rajpal, Deepak; Hofland, Hans; Cote-Sierra, Javier

    2016-10-01

    Determining inflammation and itch pathway activation in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) is fraught with the inability to precisely assess the age of skin lesions, thus affecting the analysis of time-dependent mediators. To characterize inflammatory events occurring during early experimental acute AD lesions, biopsy samples were collected 6, 24, and 48 hours after epicutaneous application of Dermatophagoides farinae house dust mites to sensitized atopic dogs. The skin transcriptome was assessed using a dog-specific microarray and quantitative PCR. Acute canine AD skin lesions had a significant up-regulation of genes encoding T helper (Th) 2 (e.g., IL4, IL5, IL13, IL31, and IL33), Th9 (IL9), and Th22 (IL22) cytokines as well as Th2-promoting chemokines such as CCL5 and CCL17. Proinflammatory (e.g., IL6, LTB, and IL18) cytokines were also up-regulated. Other known pruritogenic pathways were also activated: there was significant up-regulation of genes encoding proteases cathepsin S (CTSS), mast cell chymase (CMA1), tryptase (TPS1) and mastin, neuromedin-B (NMB), nerve growth factor (NGF), and leukotriene-synthesis enzymes (ALOX5, ALOX5AP, and LTA4H). Experimental acute canine house dust mite-induced AD lesions exhibit an activation of innate and adaptive immune responses and pruritogenic pathways similar to those seen in humans with acute AD, thereby validating this model to test innovative therapeutics modalities for this disease.

  19. The role and importance of glycosylation of acute phase proteins with focus on alpha-1 antitrypsin in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cormac; Saldova, Radka; Wormald, Mark R; Rudd, Pauline M; McElvaney, Noel G; Reeves, Emer P

    2014-07-03

    Acute phase proteins (APPs) are a group of circulating plasma proteins which undergo changes quantitatively or qualitatively at the time of inflammation. Many of these APPs are glycosylated, and it has been shown that alterations in glycosylation may occur in inflammatory and malignant conditions. Changes in glycosylation have been studied as potential biomarkers in cancer and also in chronic inflammatory conditions and have been shown to correlate with disease severity in certain conditions. Serine protease inhibitors (serpins), many of which are also APPs, are proteins involved in the control of proteases in numerous pathways. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin (AAT) is the most abundant serpin within the circulation and is an APP which has been shown to increase in response to inflammation. The primary role of AAT is maintaining the protease/antiprotease balance in the lung, but it also possesses important anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. Several glycoforms of AAT exist, and they possess differing properties in regard to plasma half-life and stability. Glycosylation may also be important in determining the immune modulatory properties of AAT. The review will focus on the role and importance of glycosylation in acute phase proteins with particular attention to AAT and its use as a biomarker of disease. The review describes the processes involved in glycosylation, how glycosylation changes in differing disease states, and the alterations that occur to glycans of APPs with disease and inflammation. Finally, the review explores the importance of changes in glycosylation of AAT at times of inflammation and in malignant conditions and how this may impact upon the functions of AAT.

  20. Inflammatory markers following acute fuel oil exposure or bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Lee, Kelly A; Tell, Lisa A; Mohr, F Charles

    2012-12-01

    Adult mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) were orally dosed with bunker C fuel oil for 5 days, and five different inflammatory markers (haptoglobin, mannan-binding lectin, ceruloplasmin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, and plasma iron) were measured in blood plasma prior to and 8, 24, 48, and 72 hr following exposure. In order to contrast the response to fuel oil with that of a systemic inflammatory response, an additional five ducks were injected intramuscularly with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Oil-treated birds had an inflammatory marker profile that was significantly different from control and LPS-treated birds, showing decreases in mannan-binding lectin-dependent hemolysis and unsaturated iron-binding capacity, but no changes in any of the other inflammatory markers. Birds treated with oil also exhibited increased liver weights, decreased body and splenic weights, and decreased packed cell volume.

  1. Pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase/visfatin enzymatic activity identifies a new inflammatory pathway linked to NAD.

    PubMed

    Busso, Nathalie; Karababa, Mahir; Nobile, Massimo; Rolaz, Aline; Van Gool, Frédéric; Galli, Mara; Leo, Oberdan; So, Alexander; De Smedt, Thibaut

    2008-05-21

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also known as visfatin, is the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway of NAD biosynthesis from nicotinamide. Since its expression is upregulated during inflammation, NAMPT represents a novel clinical biomarker in acute lung injury, rheumatoid arthritis, and Crohn's disease. However, its role in disease progression remains unknown. We report here that NAMPT is a key player in inflammatory arthritis. Increased expression of NAMPT was confirmed in mice with collagen-induced arthritis, both in serum and in the arthritic paw. Importantly, a specific competitive inhibitor of NAMPT effectively reduced arthritis severity with comparable activity to etanercept, and decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in affected joints. Moreover, NAMPT inhibition reduced intracellular NAD concentration in inflammatory cells and circulating TNFalpha levels during endotoxemia in mice. In vitro pharmacological inhibition of NAMPT reduced the intracellular concentration of NAD and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by inflammatory cells. Thus, NAMPT links NAD metabolism to inflammatory cytokine secretion by leukocytes, and its inhibition might therefore have therapeutic efficacy in immune-mediated inflammatory disorders.

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of a new tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor (CNI-1493) in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats

    PubMed Central

    ÅKerlund, K; Erlandsson Harris, H; Tracey, K J; Wang, H; Fehniger, T; Klareskog, L; Andersson, J; Andersson, U

    1999-01-01

    A recently developed compound, a multivalent guanylhydrazone (CNI-1493) that inhibits TNF-α production by suppressing TNF-α translational efficiency, was administered in an experimental model of collagen type II-induced arthritis in DA rats. CNI-1493 was injected daily intraperitoneally either before the onset of arthritis or after the establishment of clinical disease. Prophylactic treatment with CNI-1493 significantly prevented or delayed the onset and suppressed the severity of arthritis in a dose-dependent manner. Therapeutic intervention with CNI-1493 in established joint disease also resulted in a significant reduction of clinical signs of arthritis in treated animals. No severe side-effects were noted when animals were treated with daily CNI-1493 doses up to 5 mg/kg. An immunohistochemical study was performed which demonstrated that CNI-1493 led to a reduced expression of TNF-α at the site of disease activity. Thus, CNI-1493 with documented inhibitory effects on TNF-α synthesis, has proven successful in ameliorating the course of arthritis in CIA. We believe that the use of a compound such as CNI-1493 with a defined mode of action provides a useful tool for dissecting and understanding important pathogenic mechanisms operating in the development of chronic arthritis. PMID:9933418

  3. Discovery of a New Inhibitor of Myeloid Differentiation 2 from Cinnamamide Derivatives with Anti-Inflammatory Activity in Sepsis and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gaozhi; Zhang, Yali; Liu, Xing; Fang, Qilu; Wang, Zhe; Fu, Lili; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Yunjie; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2016-03-24

    Acute inflammatory diseases, including acute lung injury and sepsis, remain the most common life-threatening illness in intensive care units worldwide. Cinnamamide has been incorporated in several synthetic compounds with therapeutic potentials including anti-inflammatory properties. However, the possible mechanism and direct molecular target of cinnamamides for their anti-inflammatory effects were rarely investigated. In this study, we synthesized a series of cinnamamides and evaluated their anti-inflammatory activities. The most active compound, 2i, was found to block LPS-induced MD2/TLR4 pro-inflammatory signaling activation in vitro and to attenuate LPS-caused sepsis and acute lung injury in vivo. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that 2i exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by directly targeting and binding MD2 in Arg90 and Tyr102 residues and inhibiting MD2/TLR4 complex formation. Taken together, this work presents a novel MD2 inhibitor, 2i, which has the potential to be developed as a candidate for the treatment of sepsis, and provides a new lead structure for the development of anti-inflammatory agents targeting MD2.

  4. Role of Cystathionine Gamma-Lyase in Immediate Renal Impairment and Inflammatory Response in Acute Ischemic Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Markó, Lajos; Szijártó, István A.; Filipovic, Milos R.; Kaßmann, Mario; Balogh, András; Park, Joon-Keun; Przybyl, Lukasz; N’diaye, Gabriele; Krämer, Stephanie; Anders, Juliane; Ishii, Isao; Müller, Dominik N.; Gollasch, Maik

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to act protectively during renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). However, the role of the endogenous H2S in acute kidney injury (AKI) is largely unclear. Here, we analyzed the role of cystathionine gamma-lyase (CTH) in acute renal IRI using CTH-deficient (Cth−/−) mice whose renal H2S levels were approximately 50% of control (wild-type) mice. Although levels of serum creatinine and renal expression of AKI marker proteins were equivalent between Cth−/− and control mice, histological analysis revealed that IRI caused less renal tubular damage in Cth−/− mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that renal population of infiltrated granulocytes/macrophages was equivalent in these mice. However, renal expression levels of certain inflammatory cytokines/adhesion molecules believed to play a role in IRI were found to be lower after IRI only in Cth−/− mice. Our results indicate that the systemic CTH loss does not deteriorate but rather ameliorates the immediate AKI outcome probably due to reduced inflammatory responses in the kidney. The renal expression of CTH and other H2S-producing enzymes was markedly suppressed after IRI, which could be an integrated adaptive response for renal cell protection. PMID:27273292

  5. Combining robust state estimation with nonlinear model predictive control to regulate the acute inflammatory response to pathogen.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, Gregory; Djouadi, Seddik M; Day, Judy D

    2015-10-01

    The inflammatory response aims to restore homeostasis by means of removing a biological stress, such as an invading bacterial pathogen. In cases of acute systemic inflammation, the possibility of collateral tissue damage arises, which leads to a necessary down-regulation of the response. A reduced ordinary differential equations (ODE) model of acute inflammation was presented and investigated in [10]. That system contains multiple positive and negative feedback loops and is a highly coupled and nonlinear ODE. The implementation of nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) as a methodology for determining proper therapeutic intervention for in silico patients displaying complex inflammatory states was initially explored in [5]. Since direct measurements of the bacterial population and the magnitude of tissue damage/dysfunction are not readily available or biologically feasible, the need for robust state estimation was evident. In this present work, we present results on the nonlinear reachability of the underlying model, and then focus our attention on improving the predictability of the underlying model by coupling the NMPC with a particle filter. The results, though comparable to the initial exploratory study, show that robust state estimation of this highly nonlinear model can provide an alternative to prior updating strategies used when only partial access to the unmeasurable states of the system are available.

  6. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of salbutamol on acute and chronic models of inflammation in rats: involvement of an antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uzkeser, Hulya; Cadirci, Elif; Halici, Zekai; Odabasoglu, Fehmi; Polat, Beyzagul; Yuksel, Tugba Nurcan; Ozaltin, Seda; Atalay, Fadime

    2012-01-01

    The possible role of β-2 adrenergic receptors in modulation of inflammatory and nociceptive conditions suggests that the β-2 adrenergic receptor agonist, salbutamol, may have beneficial anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. Therefore, in this study, we induced inflammatory and nociceptive responses with carrageenan-induced paw edema or cotton-pellet-induced granuloma models, both of which result in oxidative stress. We hypothesized that salbutamol would prevent inflammatory and nociceptive responses by stimulating β-2 adrenergic receptors and the prevention of generation of ROS during the acute inflammation process in rats. Both doses of salbutamol used in the study (1 and 2 mg/kg) effectively blocked the acute inflammation and inflammatory nociception induced by carrageenan. In the cotton-pellet-induced granuloma test, both doses of salbutamol also significantly decreased the weight of granuloma tissue on the cotton pellets when compared to the control. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of salbutamol were found to be comparable with those of indomethacin. Salbutamol decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO) level and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and level of glutathione (GSH) during the acute phase of inflammation. In conclusion, salbutamol can decrease acute and chronic inflammation, possibly through the stimulation of β-2 adrenergic receptors. This anti-inflammatory effect may be of significance in asthma treatment, where inflammation also takes part in the etiopathology. This study reveals that salbutamol has significant antioxidative effects, which at least partially explain its anti-inflammatory capabilities. These findings presented here may also shed light on the roles of β-2 adrenergic receptors in inflammatory and hyperalgesic conditions.

  7. Peripheral Inflammatory Markers and Antioxidant Response during the Post-Acute and Chronic Phase after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Licastro, Federico; Hrelia, Silvana; Porcellini, Elisa; Malaguti, Marco; Di Stefano, Cristina; Angeloni, Cristina; Carbone, Ilaria; Simoncini, Laura; Piperno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a mechanical insult to the brain caused by external forces and associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The patients may show different profiles of neurological recovery and a combination of oxidative damage and inflammatory processes can affect their courses. It is known that an overexpression of cytokines can be seen in peripheral blood in the early hours/days after the injury, but little is known about the weeks and months encompassing the post-acute and chronic phases. In addition, no information is available about the antioxidant responses mediated by the major enzymes that regulate reactive oxygen species levels: superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and GSH-related enzymes. This study investigates the 6-month trends of inflammatory markers and antioxidant responses in 22 severe TBI patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness, consecutively recruited in a dedicated neurorehabilitation facility. Patients with a high degree of neurological impairment often show an uncertain outcome. In addition, the profiles of plasma activities were related to the neurological recovery after 12 months. Venous peripheral blood samples were taken blindly as soon as clinical signs and laboratory markers confirmed the absence of infections, 3 and 6 months later. The clinical and neuropsychological assessment continued up to 12 months. Nineteen patients completed the follow-up. In the chronic phase, persistent high plasma levels of cytokines can interfere with cognitive functioning and higher post-acute levels of cytokines [interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL1b, IL6] are associated with poorer cognitive recoveries 12 months later. Moreover, higher IFN-γ, higher TNF-α, and lower glutathione peroxidase activity are associated with greater disability. The results add evidence of persistent inflammatory response, provide information about long-term imbalance of antioxidant activity, and suggest that

  8. Peripheral Inflammatory Markers and Antioxidant Response during the Post-Acute and Chronic Phase after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Licastro, Federico; Hrelia, Silvana; Porcellini, Elisa; Malaguti, Marco; Di Stefano, Cristina; Angeloni, Cristina; Carbone, Ilaria; Simoncini, Laura; Piperno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a mechanical insult to the brain caused by external forces and associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The patients may show different profiles of neurological recovery and a combination of oxidative damage and inflammatory processes can affect their courses. It is known that an overexpression of cytokines can be seen in peripheral blood in the early hours/days after the injury, but little is known about the weeks and months encompassing the post-acute and chronic phases. In addition, no information is available about the antioxidant responses mediated by the major enzymes that regulate reactive oxygen species levels: superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and GSH-related enzymes. This study investigates the 6-month trends of inflammatory markers and antioxidant responses in 22 severe TBI patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness, consecutively recruited in a dedicated neurorehabilitation facility. Patients with a high degree of neurological impairment often show an uncertain outcome. In addition, the profiles of plasma activities were related to the neurological recovery after 12 months. Venous peripheral blood samples were taken blindly as soon as clinical signs and laboratory markers confirmed the absence of infections, 3 and 6 months later. The clinical and neuropsychological assessment continued up to 12 months. Nineteen patients completed the follow-up. In the chronic phase, persistent high plasma levels of cytokines can interfere with cognitive functioning and higher post-acute levels of cytokines [interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL1b, IL6] are associated with poorer cognitive recoveries 12 months later. Moreover, higher IFN-γ, higher TNF-α, and lower glutathione peroxidase activity are associated with greater disability. The results add evidence of persistent inflammatory response, provide information about long-term imbalance of antioxidant activity, and suggest that

  9. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) inhibition: a possible mechanism for the anti-inflammatory potency of liposomally conjugated methotrexate formulations in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A S; Jones, S G; Goodfellow, R M; Amos, N; Williams, B D

    1999-01-01

    Liposomes with conventional and long-circulation times were employed as carriers for the methotrexate derivative MTX-γ-DMPE (MTX-EPC and MTX-PEG respectively), their mechanism of action was investigated in vitro and in vivo and their therapeutic efficacy assessed using the rat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. At non-toxic dose, both MTX-EPC and MTX-PEG inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced release of IL-1β from activated rat peritoneal macrophages (rPMΦ) in a dose and time dependent manner. Free methotrexate (MTX) was not active in this respect. After a single intravenous injection (i.v.), and at equivalent doses, both free MTX (500 μg) and MTX-EPC inhibited the LPS induced rise in plasma IL-1β levels observed in MTX-PEG and saline treated rats. When used to treat established CIA, MTX-EPC resulted in significantly lower clinical score (CS) (1.0±0.42 (P<0.001)) and hind paw diameter (HPD) (6.5±0.34 mm (P<0.001)) measurements than controls (3.0±0.26; 7.33±0.41 mm), after only two i.v. doses, and remained significantly lower for the entire experimental period. By day 24 both CS (2±0.61 (P<0.001)) and HPD (6.97±0.25 mm (P<0.002)) measurements had also become significantly lower in MTX-PEG treated rats than in saline treated controls (3.62±0.17, 7.92±0.38 mm) and remained lower until day 30. Joint inflammation in MTX treated rats was completely ameliorated by day 20 but the health and well being of the animals was compromised and the experiment terminated at this time-point. Our results clearly demonstrate that both MTX-EPC and MTX-PEG liposomes have potential for development into therapeutic modalities for the treatment of inflammatory joint disease in man. PMID:10498857

  10. [Arthritis and infections].

    PubMed

    Cimaz, R; Meregalli, E; Biggioggero, M; Casadei, A; Careddu, P

    2005-08-01

    Arthritis caused by infectious agents can be secondary to direct invasion of the joint space or to immune mechanisms (subsequent to or concomitant to an infection). Septic arthritis refers to a situation when bacteria can be cultured in synovial fluid. Arthritis can complicate for example meningococcemia or infection by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Haemophilus influenzae. Reactive (postinfectious) arthritides are an important diagnostic category within a pediatric rheumatology practice. Yersinia and, less frequently, Salmonella, play an important role in postdiarrheal disorders. The arthritis that can ensue is usually oligoarticular and occurs 1-2 weeks after the enteric infection. Reiter's syndrome, rare in the pediatric age, is characterized by the triad urethritis-conjunctivitis-arthritis. Postviral arthritides can occur after a variety of viral infections, including Parvovirus B19, rubella, and others (e.g. hepatitis B, Epstein-Barr virus, chickenpox, mumps). Especially in patients with acute arthritis, the presence of preceding infections should always be investigated. Although the majority of postinfectious arthritides are self-limiting in nature and do not require specific treatment, conditions such as Lyme borreliosis and rheumatic fever can be associated with significant morbidity, and sometimes can be even lethal.

  11. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... psoriasis are also at risk for psoriatic arthritis. Identification of genes that increase the risk of psoriatic arthritis will help scientists unlock the secrets of this troubling disease, and identify targets for more specific and effective therapy. Biologic therapies. ...

  12. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is inflammation of a joint due to a gonorrhea infection. Causes Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis ...

  13. Gout - a guide for the general and acute physicians.

    PubMed

    Abhishek, Abhishek; Roddy, Edward; Doherty, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Gout is the most prevalent inflammatory arthritis and affects 2.5% of the general population in the UK. It is also the only arthritis that has the potential to be cured with safe, inexpensive and well tolerated urate-lowering treatments, which reduce serum uric acid by either inhibiting xanthine oxidase - eg allopurinol, febuxostat - or by increasing the renal excretion of uric acid. Of these, xanthine oxidase inhibitors are used first line and are effective in 'curing' gout in the vast majority of patients. Gout can be diagnosed on clinical grounds in those with typical podagra. However, in those with involvement of other joints, joint aspiration is recommended to demonstrate monosodium urate crystals and exclude other causes of acute arthritis, such as septic arthritis. However, a clinical diagnosis of gout can be made if joint aspiration is not feasible. This review summarises the current understanding of the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, investigations and treatment of gout.

  14. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 down-regulates inflammatory responses and protects against endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiao; Shetty, Sreerama; Zhang, Ping; Gao, Rong; Hu, Yuxin; Wang, Shuxia; Li, Zhenyu; Fu, Jian

    2014-06-01

    The presence of endotoxin in blood can lead to acute kidney injury (AKI) and septic shock. Resolvins, the endogenous lipid mediators derived from docosahexaenoic acid, have been reported to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory action. Using a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI, we investigated the effects of aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) on inflammatory kidney injury. Administration of AT-RvD1 1 h after LPS challenge protected the mice from kidney injury as indicated by the measurements of blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and morphological alterations associated with tubular damage. The protective effects were evidenced by decreased neutrophil infiltration in the kidney indicating reduction in inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment restored kidney cell junction protein claudin-4 expression, which was otherwise reduced after LPS challenge. AT-RvD1 treatment inhibited endotoxin-induced NF-κB activation and suppressed LPS-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in the kidney. Moreover, AT-RvD1 treatment markedly decreased LPS-induced IL-6 level in the kidney and blocked IL-6-mediated signaling including STAT3 and ERK phosphorylation. Our findings demonstrate that AT-RvD1 is a potent anti-inflammatory mediator in LPS-induced kidney injury, and AT-RvD1 has therapeutic potential against AKI during endotoxemia.

  15. An ensemble of models of the acute inflammatory response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in rats: results from parameter space reduction.

    PubMed

    Daun, Silvia; Rubin, Jonathan; Vodovotz, Yoram; Roy, Anirban; Parker, Robert; Clermont, Gilles

    2008-08-21

    In previous work, we developed an 8-state nonlinear dynamic model of the acute inflammatory response, including activated phagocytic cells, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and tissue damage, and calibrated it to data on cytokines from endotoxemic rats. In the interest of parsimony, the present work employed parametric sensitivity and local identifiability analysis to establish a core set of parameters predominantly responsible for variability in model solutions. Parameter optimization, facilitated by varying only those parameters belonging to this core set, was used to identify an ensemble of parameter vectors, each representing an acceptable local optimum in terms of fit to experimental data. Individual models within this ensemble, characterized by their different parameter values, showed similar cytokine but diverse tissue damage behavior. A cluster analysis of the ensemble of models showed the existence of a continuum of acceptable models, characterized by compensatory mechanisms and parameter changes. We calculated the direct correlations between the core set of model parameters and identified three mechanisms responsible for the conversion of the diverse damage time courses to similar cytokine behavior in these models. Given that tissue damage level could be an indicator of the likelihood of mortality, our findings suggest that similar cytokine dynamics could be associated with very different mortality outcomes, depending on the balance of certain inflammatory elements.

  16. Unfractionated bone marrow cells attenuate paraquat-induced glomerular injury and acute renal failure by modulating the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sing-Yi; Yeh, Ti-Yen; Lin, Shih-Yi; Peng, Fu-Chuo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of unfractionated bone marrow cells (BMCs) in attenuating acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by paraquat (PQ) in a mouse model. PQ (55 mg/kg BW) was intraperitoneally injected into C57BL/6 female mice to induce AKI, including renal function failure, glomerular damage and renal tubule injury. Glomerular podocytes were the first target damaged by PQ, which led to glomerular injury. Upon immunofluorescence staining, podocytes depletion was validated and accompanied by increased urinary podocin levels, measured on days 1 and 6. A total of 5.4 × 106 BMCs obtained from the same strain of male mice were injected into AKI mice through the tail vein at 3, 24, and 48 hours after PQ administration. As a result, renal function increased, tubular and glomerular injury were ameliorated, podocytes loss improved, and recipient mortality decreased. In addition, BMCs co-treatment decreased the extent of neutrophil infiltration and modulated the inflammatory response by shifting from pro-inflammatory Th1 to an anti-inflammatory Th2 profile, where IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ levels declined and IL-10 and IL-4 levels increased. The present study provides a platform to investigate PQ-induced AKI and repeated BMCs injection represents an efficient therapeutic strategy. PMID:26988026

  17. Systems analysis uncovers inflammatory Th/Tc17-driven modules during acute GVHD in monkey and human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Benjamin; Tkachev, Victor; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Betz, Kayla; Brown, Melanie; Hunt, Daniel J.; Schell, John B.; Zeleski, Katie; Yu, Alison; Giver, Cynthia R.; Waller, Edmund K.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    One of the central challenges of transplantation is the development of alloreactivity despite the use of multiagent immunoprophylaxis. Effective control of this immune suppression–resistant T-cell activation represents one of the key unmet needs in the fields of both solid-organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT). To address this unmet need, we have used a highly translational nonhuman primate (NHP) model to interrogate the transcriptional signature of T cells during breakthrough acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) that occurs in the setting of clinically relevant immune suppression and compared this to the hyperacute GVHD, which develops in unprophylaxed or suboptimally prophylaxed transplant recipients. Our results demonstrate the complex character of the alloreactivity that develops during ongoing immunoprophylaxis and identify 3 key transcriptional hallmarks of breakthrough acute GVHD that are not observed in hyperacute GVHD: (1) T-cell persistence rather than proliferation, (2) evidence for highly inflammatory transcriptional programming, and (3) skewing toward a T helper (Th)/T cytotoxic (Tc)17 transcriptional program. Importantly, the gene coexpression profiles from human HCT recipients who developed GVHD while on immunosuppressive prophylactic agents recapitulated the patterns observed in NHP, and demonstrated an evolution toward a more inflammatory signature as time posttransplant progressed. These results strongly implicate the evolution of both inflammatory and interleukin 17–based immune pathogenesis in GVHD, and provide the first map of this evolving process in primates in the setting of clinically relevant immunomodulation. This map represents a novel transcriptomic resource for further systems-based efforts to study the breakthrough alloresponse that occurs posttransplant despite immunoprophylaxis and to develop evidence-based strategies for effective treatment of this disease. PMID:27758873

  18. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain