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Sample records for acute inflammatory lung

  1. Relationship of Acute Lung Inflammatory Injury to Fas/FasL System

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Thomas A.; Guo, Ren-Feng; Neff, Simona B.; Sarma, J. Vidya; Speyer, Cecilia L.; Gao, Hongwei; Bernacki, Kurt D.; Huber-Lang, Markus; McGuire, Stephanie; Hoesel, L. Marco; Riedemann, Niels C.; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Zetoune, Firas S.; Ward, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that apoptosis plays a significant role in tissue damage during acute lung injury. To evaluate the role of the apoptosis mediators Fas and FasL in acute lung injury, Fas (lpr)- or FasL (gld)-deficient and wild-type mice were challenged with intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes. Lung injury parameters (125I-albumin leak, accumulation of myeloperoxidase, and wet lung weights) were measured and found to be consistently reduced in both lpr and gld mice. In wild-type mice, lung injury was associated with a marked increase in Fas protein in lung. Inflamed lungs of wild-type mice showed striking evidence of activated caspase-3, which was much diminished in inflamed lungs from lpr mice. Intratracheal administration of a monoclonal Fas-activating antibody (Jo2) in wild-type mice induced MIP-2 and KC production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and a murine alveolar macrophage cell line (MH-S) showed significantly increased MIP-2 production after incubation with this antibody. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid content of MIP-2 and KC was substantially reduced in lpr mice after lung injury when compared to levels in wild-type mice. These data suggest that the Fas/FasL system regulates the acute lung inflammatory response by positively affecting CXC-chemokine production, ultimately leading to enhanced neutrophil influx and tissue damage. PMID:15743781

  2. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Adrenomedullin on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Carrageenan in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Talero; Rosanna, Di Paola; Emanuela, Mazzon; Esposito, Emanuela; Virginia, Motilva; Salvatore, Cuzzocrea

    2012-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52 amino acid peptide that has shown predominant anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we evaluated the possible therapeutic effect of this peptide in an experimental model of acute inflammation, the carrageenan- (CAR-) induced pleurisy. Pleurisy was induced by injection of CAR into the pleural cavity of mice. AM (200 ng/kg) was administered by intraperitoneal route 1 h after CAR, and the animals were sacrificed 4 h after that. AM treatment attenuated the recruitment of leucocytes in the lung tissue and the generation and/or the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines as well as the expression of the intercellular cell adhesion molecules. Moreover, AM inhibited the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), thereby abating the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and prevented the oxidative and nitroxidative lung tissue injury, as shown by the reduction of nitrotyrosine, malondialdehyde (MDA), and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) levels. Finally, we demonstrated that these anti-inflammatory effects of AM were associated with the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. All these parameters were markedly increased by intrapleural CAR in the absence of any treatment. We report that treatment with AM significantly reduces the development of acute lung injury by downregulating a broad spectrum of inflammatory factors. PMID:22685374

  4. The serpentine path to a novel mechanism-based inhibitor of acute inflammatory lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Comroe lecture on which this review is based described my research path during the past 45 years, beginning with studies of oxidant stress (hyperoxia) and eventuating in the discovery of a synthetic inhibitor of phospholipase A2 activity (called MJ33) that prevents acute lung injury in mice exposed to lipopolysaccharide. In between were studies of lung ischemia, lung surfactant metabolism, the protein peroxiredoxin 6 and its phospholipase A2 activity, and mechanisms for NADPH oxidase activation. These seemingly unrelated research activities provided the nexus for identification of a novel target and a potentially novel therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of acute lung injury. PMID:24744383

  5. Eriodictyol, a plant flavonoid, attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury through its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, GUANG-FA; GUO, HONG-JUAN; HUANG, YAN; WU, CHUN-TING; ZHANG, XIANG-FENG

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by excessive inflammatory responses and oxidative injury in the lung tissue. It has been suggested that anti-inflammatory or antioxidative agents could have therapeutic effects in ALI, and eriodictyol has been reported to exhibit antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of eriodictyol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in a mouse model. The mice were divided into four groups: Phosphate-buffered saline-treated healthy control, LPS-induced ALI, vehicle-treated ALI (LPS + vehicle) and eriodictyol-treated ALI (LPS + eriodictyol). Eriodictyol (30 mg/kg) was administered orally once, 2 days before the induction of ALI. The data showed that eriodictyol pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced ALI through its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity. Furthermore, the eriodictyol pretreatment activated the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in the ALI mouse model, which attenuated the oxidative injury and inhibited the inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. In combination, the results of the present study demonstrated that eriodictyol could alleviate the LPS-induced lung injury in mice by regulating the Nrf2 pathway and inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, suggesting that eriodictyol could be used as a potential drug for the treatment of LPS-induced lung injury. PMID:26668626

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin in lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory in acute lung injury by suppressing COX-2 and NF-kB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Yu-Tao; Xiao, Lu; Zhu, Lingpeng; Wang, Qiujuan; Yan, Tianhua

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory in acute lung injury. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice and the possible mechanisms involved in this protection were investigated. Pretreatment with apigenin prior to the administration of intratracheal LPS significantly induced a decrease in lung wet weight/dry weight ratio in total leukocyte number and neutrophil percent in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and in IL-6 and IL-1β, the tumor neurosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the BALF. These results showed that anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin against the LPS-induced ALI may be due to its ability of primary inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) gene expression of lung. The results presented here suggest that the protective mechanism of apigenin may be attributed partly to decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines through the inhibition of COX-2 and NF-kB activation. The results support that use of apigenin is beneficial in the treatment of ALI.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory reaction in acute lung injury via regulating inflammation and redox status.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xianfeng; Liu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yingxun; Ma, Chunhua

    2015-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) represents a clinical syndrome that results from complex responses of the lung to a multitude of direct and indirect insults. This study aims to evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol (EUL) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory reaction in ALI. ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS (0.5 mg/kg), and EUL (5, and 10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 1h prior to LPS administration. After 6h, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were collected. The findings suggest that the protective mechanism of EUL may be attributed partly to decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines through the regulating inflammation and redox status. The results support that use of EUL is beneficial in the treatment of ALI.

  8. Anti-inflammatory and Anti-oxidative Effects of Dexpanthenol on Lipopolysaccharide Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li-Mei, Wan; Jie, Tan; Shan-He, Wan; Dong-Mei, Meng; Peng-Jiu, Yu

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of dexpanthenol in a model of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Lung injury was induced by exposure to atomized LPS. Mice were randomly divided into four groups: control group; Dxp (500 mg/kg) group; LPS group; LPS + Dxp (500 mg/kg) group. The effects of dexpanthenol on LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment, cytokine levels, total protein concentration, myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione (GSH) contents were examined. Additionally, lung tissue was examined by histology to investigate the changes in pathology in the presence and absence of dexpanthenol. In LPS-challenged mice, dexpanthenol significantly improved lung edema. Dexpanthenol also markedly inhibited the LPS-induced neutrophiles influx, protein leakage, and release of TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Furthermore, dexpanthenol attenuated MPO activity and MDA contents and increased SOD and GSH activity in the LPS-challenged lung tissue. These data suggest that dexpanthenol protects mice from LPS-induced acute lung injury by its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities.

  9. Anti-inflammatory treatment in dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant in meconium-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, D; Drgova, A; Kopincova, J; Pullmann, R; Calkovska, A

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation, oxidation, lung edema, and other factors participate in surfactant dysfunction in meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Therefore, we hypothesized that anti-inflammatory treatment may reverse surfactant dysfunction in the MAS model. Oxygen-ventilated rabbits were given meconium intratracheally (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg; Mec) or saline (Sal). Thirty minutes later, meconium-instilled animals were treated by glucocorticoids budesonide (0.25 mg/kg, i.t.) and dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg, i.v.), or phosphodiesterase inhibitors aminophylline (2 mg/kg, i.v.) and olprinone (0.2 mg/kg, i.v.), or the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (10 mg/kg, i.v.). Healthy, non-ventilated animals served as controls (Con). At the end of experiments, left lung was lavaged and a differential leukocyte count in sediment was estimated. The supernatant of lavage fluid was adjusted to a concentration of 0.5 mg phospholipids/ml. Surfactant quality was evaluated by capillary surfactometer and expressed by initial pressure and the time of capillary patency. The right lung was used to determine lung edema by wet/dry (W/D) weight ratio. Total antioxidant status (TAS) in blood plasma was evaluated. W/D ratio increased and capillary patency time shortened significantly, whereas the initial pressure increased and TAS decreased insignificantly in Sal vs. Con groups. Meconium instillation potentiated edema formation and neutrophil influx into the lungs, reduced capillary patency and TAS, and decreased the surfactant quality compared with both Sal and Con groups (p > 0.05). Each of the anti-inflammatory agents reduced lung edema and neutrophil influx into the lung and partly reversed surfactant dysfunction in the MAS model, with a superior effect observed after glucocorticoids and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine.

  10. Glucocorticoids limit acute lung inflammation in concert with inflammatory stimuli by induction of SphK1

    PubMed Central

    Vettorazzi, Sabine; Bode, Constantin; Dejager, Lien; Frappart, Lucien; Shelest, Ekaterina; Klaßen, Carina; Tasdogan, Alpaslan; Reichardt, Holger M.; Libert, Claude; Schneider, Marion; Weih, Falk; Henriette Uhlenhaut, N.; David, Jean-Pierre; Gräler, Markus; Kleiman, Anna; Tuckermann, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe inflammatory disease for which no specific treatment exists. As glucocorticoids have potent immunosuppressive effects, their application in ALI is currently being tested in clinical trials. However, the benefits of this type of regimen remain unclear. Here we identify a mechanism of glucocorticoid action that challenges the long-standing dogma of cytokine repression by the glucocorticoid receptor. Contrarily, synergistic gene induction of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) by glucocorticoids and pro-inflammatory stimuli via the glucocorticoid receptor in macrophages increases circulating sphingosine 1-phosphate levels, which proves essential for the inhibition of inflammation. Chemical or genetic inhibition of SphK1 abrogates the therapeutic effects of glucocorticoids. Inflammatory p38 MAPK- and mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1)-dependent pathways cooperate with glucocorticoids to upregulate SphK1 expression. Our findings support a critical role for SphK1 induction in the suppression of lung inflammation by glucocorticoids, and therefore provide rationales for effective anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:26183376

  11. Baclofen, a GABABR agonist, ameliorates immune-complex mediated acute lung injury by modulating pro-inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shunying; Merchant, Michael L; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; McLeish, Kenneth R; Lederer, Eleanor D; Torres-Gonzalez, Edilson; Fraig, Mostafa; Barati, Michelle T; Lentsch, Alex B; Roman, Jesse; Klein, Jon B; Rane, Madhavi J

    2015-01-01

    Immune-complexes play an important role in the inflammatory diseases of the lung. Neutrophil activation mediates immune-complex (IC) deposition-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Components of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) signaling, including GABA B receptor 2 (GABABR2), GAD65/67 and the GABA transporter, are present in the lungs and in the neutrophils. However, the role of pulmonary GABABR activation in the context of neutrophil-mediated ALI has not been determined. Thus, the objective of the current study was to determine whether administration of a GABABR agonist, baclofen would ameliorate or exacerbate ALI. We hypothesized that baclofen would regulate IC-induced ALI by preserving pulmonary GABABR expression. Rats were subjected to sham injury or IC-induced ALI and two hours later rats were treated intratracheally with saline or 1 mg/kg baclofen for 2 additional hours and sacrificed. ALI was assessed by vascular leakage, histology, TUNEL, and lung caspase-3 cleavage. ALI increased total protein, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and interleukin-1 receptor associated protein (IL-1R AcP), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Moreover, ALI decreased lung GABABR2 expression, increased phospho-p38 MAPK, promoted IκB degradation and increased neutrophil influx in the lung. Administration of baclofen, after initiation of ALI, restored GABABR expression, which was inhibited in the presence of a GABABR antagonist, CGP52432. Baclofen administration activated pulmonary phospho-ERK and inhibited p38 MAPK phosphorylation and IκB degradation. Additionally, baclofen significantly inhibited pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-1βAcP release and promoted BAL neutrophil apoptosis. Protective effects of baclofen treatment on ALI were possibly mediated by inhibition of TNF-α- and IL-1β-mediated inflammatory signaling. Interestingly, GABABR2 expression was regulated in the type II pneumocytes in lung tissue sections from lung injured patients, further suggesting a

  12. Discovery of a New Inhibitor of Myeloid Differentiation 2 from Cinnamamide Derivatives with Anti-Inflammatory Activity in Sepsis and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gaozhi; Zhang, Yali; Liu, Xing; Fang, Qilu; Wang, Zhe; Fu, Lili; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Yunjie; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2016-03-24

    Acute inflammatory diseases, including acute lung injury and sepsis, remain the most common life-threatening illness in intensive care units worldwide. Cinnamamide has been incorporated in several synthetic compounds with therapeutic potentials including anti-inflammatory properties. However, the possible mechanism and direct molecular target of cinnamamides for their anti-inflammatory effects were rarely investigated. In this study, we synthesized a series of cinnamamides and evaluated their anti-inflammatory activities. The most active compound, 2i, was found to block LPS-induced MD2/TLR4 pro-inflammatory signaling activation in vitro and to attenuate LPS-caused sepsis and acute lung injury in vivo. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that 2i exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by directly targeting and binding MD2 in Arg90 and Tyr102 residues and inhibiting MD2/TLR4 complex formation. Taken together, this work presents a novel MD2 inhibitor, 2i, which has the potential to be developed as a candidate for the treatment of sepsis, and provides a new lead structure for the development of anti-inflammatory agents targeting MD2.

  13. Discovery of new MD2 inhibitor from chalcone derivatives with anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yali; Wu, Jianzhang; Ying, Shilong; Chen, Gaozhi; Wu, Beibei; Xu, Tingting; Liu, Zhiguo; Liu, Xing; Huang, Lehao; Shan, Xiaoou; Dai, Yuanrong; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening acute inflammatory disease with limited options available for therapy. Myeloid differentiation protein 2, a co-receptor of TLR4, is absolutely required for TLR4 sense LPS, and represents an attractive target for treating severe inflammatory diseases. In this study, we designed and synthesized 31 chalcone derivatives that contain the moiety of (E)-4-phenylbut-3-en-2-one, which we consider the core structure of current MD2 inhibitors. We first evaluated the anti-inflammatory activities of these compounds in MPMs. For the most active compound 20, we confirmed that it is a specific MD2 inhibitor through a series of biochemical experiments and elucidated that it binds to the hydrophobic pocket of MD2 via hydrogen bonds with Arg90 and Tyr102 residues. Compound 20 also blocked the LPS-induced activation of TLR4/MD2 -downstream pro-inflammatory MAPKs/NF-κB signaling pathways. In a rat model with ALI induced by intracheal LPS instillation, administration with compound 20 exhibited significant protective effect against ALI, accompanied by the inhibition of TLR4/MD2 complex formation in lung tissues. Taken together, the results of this study suggest the specific MD2 inhibitor from chalcone derivatives we identified is a potential candidate for treating acute inflammatory diseases. PMID:27118147

  14. Tylvalosin exhibits anti-inflammatory property and attenuates acute lung injury in different models possibly through suppression of NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhanzhong; Tang, Xiangfang; Zhao, Xinghui; Zhang, Minhong; Zhang, Weijian; Hou, Shaohua; Yuan, Weifeng; Zhang, Hongfu; Shi, Lijun; Jia, Hong; Liang, Lin; Lai, Zhi; Gao, Junfeng; Zhang, Keyu; Fu, Ling; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    Tylvalosin, a new broad-spectrum, third-generation macrolides, may exert a variety of pharmacological activities. Here, we report on its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages and mouse treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as piglet challenged with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Tylvalosin treatment markedly decreased IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, PGE2, TNF-α and NO levels in vitro and in vivo. LPS and PRRSV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the lipid peroxidation in mice lung tissues reduced after tylvalosin treatments. In mouse acute lung injury model induced by LPS, tylvalosin administration significantly attenuated tissues injury, and reduced the inflammatory cells recruitment and activation. The evaluated phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity and the increased expressions of cPLA2-IVA, p-cPLA2-IVA and sPLA2-IVE were lowered by tylvalosin. Consistent with the mouse results, tylvalosin pretreatment attenuated piglet lung scores with improved growth performance and normal rectal temperature in piglet model induced by PRRSV. Furthermore, tylvalosin attenuated the IκBα phosphorylation and degradation, and blocked the NF-κB p65 translocation. These results indicate that in addition to its direct antimicrobial effect, tylvalosin exhibits anti-inflammatory property and attenuates acute lung injury through suppression of NF-κB activation.

  15. Casticin, an active compound isolated from Vitex Fructus, ameliorates the cigarette smoke-induced acute lung inflammatory response in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeonhoon; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Hangyul; Park, Soojin; Choi, Woosung; Bae, Hyunsu

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine of the effect of casticin, as an anti-inflammatory agent, on an acute lung inflammation in vivo model established through exposure to cigarette smoke (CS). Casticin is a phytochemical from Vitex species such as Vitex rotundifolia and Vitex agnus-castus that was recently shown to exert an anti-inflammatory effect in vivo. To demonstrate the effects of casticin, C57BL/6 mice were whole-body exposed to mainstream CS or fresh air for two weeks and treated with 1, 2, and 10mg/kg casticin via an i.p. injection. Immune cell infiltrations and cytokine productions were assessed from bronchoalveolar lavage Fluid (BALF), and lung histological analysis was performed. Treatment with casticin was observed to significantly inhibit the numbers of total cells, neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes and reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the BALF. In addition, casticin significantly decreased the infiltration of peribronchial and perivascular inflammatory cells and the epithelium thickness. The results of this study indicate that casticin has significant effects on the lung inflammation induced by CS in a mouse model. According to these outcomes, casticin may have therapeutic potential in inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  16. Characterization of the oxidant generation by inflammatory cells lavaged from rat lungs following acute exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Esterline, R.L.; Bassett, D.J.; Trush, M.A.

    1989-06-15

    Following exposure to 2 ppm ozone for 4 hr, two distinct effects on rat lung inflammatory cell oxidant generation were observed. TPA- and opsonized zymosan-stimulated superoxide production by the inflammatory cell population was found to be maximally inhibited 24 hr following ozone exposure. In contrast, luminol-amplified chemiluminescence increased 24 hr following ozone exposure, coinciding with an increase in the percentage of neutrophils and myeloperoxidase in the inflammatory cell population. Supporting the involvement of myeloperoxidase in the enhanced oxidant-generating status of these cells, the luminol-amplified chemiluminescence was found to be azide-, but not superoxide dismutase-inhibitable. Additionally, this cell population was found to generate taurine chloramines, a myeloperoxidase-dependent function which was absent prior to the ozone exposure and also demonstrated enhanced activation of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol to its light-emitting dioxetane intermediate. Addition of myeloperoxidase to control alveolar macrophages resulted in enhanced luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, taurine chloramine generation, and enhanced chemiluminescence from benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol demonstrating that, in the presence of myeloperoxidase, alveolar macrophages are capable of supporting myeloperoxidase-dependent reactions. The possibility of such an interaction occurring in vivo is suggested by the detection of myeloperoxidase activity in the cell-free lavagates of ozone-exposed rats. These studies suggest that neutrophils recruited to ozone-exposed lungs alter the oxidant-generating capabilities in the lung which could further contribute to lung injury or to the metabolism of inhaled xenobiotics.

  17. 2-Chloroadenosine (2-CADO) treatment modulates the pro-inflammatory immune response to prevent acute lung inflammation in BALB/c mice suffering from Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2010-06-01

    Acute lung inflammation (ALI) is a life-threatening pathology and can develop during the course of several clinical conditions such as pneumonia, acid aspiration or sepsis. Adenosine plays a significant role in controlling acute inflammation via binding to A(2A) receptors on inflammatory cells, i.e. neutrophils or macrophages. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of 2-chloroadenosine (2-CADO), alone or in combination with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced acute lung infection in mice. Acute lung infection in mice was induced by directly instilling the selected dose (10(4) colony-forming units/mL) of bacteria intranasally. Histopathological examination of the lungs was performed to reveal neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. In addition to the major pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin (IL)-1alpha, levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were also determined. Intranasal instillation of bacteria caused profound neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli as well as a significant increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (i.e. TNFalpha and IL-1alpha). However, intravenous administration of 2-CADO 10 microg/kg/day, alone or in combination with an antibiotic (i.e. AMC), significantly decreased neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. A significant decrease in TNFalpha and IL-1alpha along with elevation of IL-10 levels in the lung homogenate of mice with acute lung infection was observed upon treatment with 2-CADO alone, with no significant decrease in bacterial counts. Moreover, in combination with AMC, 2-CADO exhibited its immunomodulatory action in acute lung infection and prevented ALI, whilst an antibacterial action was exhibited by AMC.

  18. Ginkgo biloba extracts attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in acute lung injury by inhibiting the COX-2 and NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Chen, Nan; Ma, Chun-Hua; Tao, Jing; Bao, Jian-An; Zong-Qi, Cheng; Chen, Zu-Tao; Miao, Li-Yan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the role of Ginkgo biloba extract in lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS. G. biloba extract (12 and 24 mg·kg(-1)) and dexamethasone (2 mg·kg(-1)), as a positive control, were given by i.p. injection. The cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted. The degree of animal lung edema was evaluated by measuring the wet/dry weight ratio. The superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities were assayed by SOD and MPO kits, respectively. The levels of inflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor-a, interleukin-1b, and interleukin-6, were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pathological changes of lung tissues were observed by H&E staining. The levels of NF-κB p65 and COX-2 expression were detected by Western blotting. Compared to the LPS group, the treatment with the G. biloba extract at 12 and 24 mg·kg(-1) markedly attenuated the inflammatory cell numbers in the BALF, decreased NF-κB p65 and COX-2 expression, and improved SOD activity, and inhibited MPO activity. The histological changes of the lungs were also significantly improved. The results indicated that G. biloba extract has a protective effect on LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice. The protective mechanism of G. biloba extract may be partly attributed to the inhibition of NF-κB p65 and COX-2 activation.

  19. Resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce D; Serhan, Charles N

    2014-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli, or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized proresolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

  20. Resolution of Acute Inflammation In The Lung

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Bruce D.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized pro-resolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung. PMID:24313723

  1. Sarcandra glabra combined with lycopene protect rats from lipopolysaccharide induced acute lung injury via reducing inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Yin; Chen, Shi-Biao

    2016-12-01

    Sarcandra glabra (Chinese name, Zhongjiefeng) is an important herb widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. Lycopene has been shown to be a powerful antioxidant. This study aims to test the hypothesis that Sarcandra glabra combined with lycopene protect rats from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury (ALI). Metabolomics approach combined with pathological inspection, serum biochemistry examination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting were used to explore the protective effects of Sarcandra glabra and lycopene on LPS-induced ALI, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Results showed that Sarcandra glabra and lycopene could significantly ameliorate LPS-induced histopathological injuries, improve the anti-oxidative activities of rats, decrease the levels of TNF-α and IL-6, suppress the activations of MAPK and transcription factor NF-κB and reverse the disturbed metabolism towards the normal status. Taken together, this integrated study revealed that Sarcandra glabra combined with lycopene had great potential in protecting rats from LPS-induced ALI, which would be helpful to guide the clinical medication.

  2. ACUTE OZONE-INDUCED INFLAMMATORY GENE EXPRESSION IN THE RAT LUNG IS NOT RELATED TO LEVELS OF ANTIOXIDANTS IN THE LAVAGE FLUID

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Ozone causes oxidative stress and lung inflammation. We hypothesized that rat strains with or without genetic susceptibility to cardiovascular disease will have different antioxidant levels in alveolar lining, and that ozone induced inflammatory gene expression wil...

  3. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  4. Reduction of Acute Inflammatory Effects of Fumed Silica Nanoparticles in the Lung by Adjusting Silanol Display through Calcination and Metal Doping

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bingbing; Pokhrel, Suman; Dunphy, Darren R.; Zhang, Haiyuan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Meiying; Liao, Yu-Pei; Chang, Chong Hyun; Dong, Juyao; Li, Ruibin; Mädler, Lutz; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Nel, André E.; Xia, Tian

    2015-01-01

    The production of pyrogenic (fumed) silica is increasing worldwide at a 7% annual growth rate, including expanded use in food, pharmaceuticals and other industrial products. Synthetic amorphous silica, including fumed silica, has been generally recognized as safe (GRAS) for use in food products by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, emerging evidence from experimental studies now suggests that fumed silica could be hazardous due to its siloxane ring structure, high silanol density, and “string-of-pearl-like” aggregate structure, which could combine to cause membrane disruption, generation of reactive oxygen species, pro-inflammatory effects, and liver fibrosis. Based on this structure-activity analysis (SAA), we investigated whether calcination and rehydration of fumed silica changes its hazard potential in the lung due to an effect on silanol density display. This analysis demonstrated that the accompanying change in surface reactivity could indeed impact cytokine production in macrophages and acute inflammation in the lung, in a manner that is dependent on siloxane ring reconstruction. Confirmation of this SAA in vivo, prompted us to consider safer design of fumed silica properties by titanium (Ti) and aluminum (Al) doping (0–7%), using flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). Detailed characterization revealed that increased Ti and Al doping could reduce surface silanol density and expression of three-membered siloxane rings, leading to dose-dependent reduction in hydroxyl radical generation, membrane perturbation, potassium efflux, NLRP3 inflammasome activation and cytotoxicity in THP-1 cells. The reduction of NLRP3 inflammasome activation was also confirmed in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). Ti- and to a lesser extent Al-doping, also ameliorated acute pulmonary inflammation, demonstrating the possibility of a safer design approach for fumed silica, should that be required for specific use circumstances. PMID:26200133

  5. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  6. Sevoflurane Inhibits Nuclear Factor-κB Activation in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Inflammatory Lung Injury via Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xi Jia; Li, Xiao Qian; Wang, Xiao Long; Tan, Wen Fei; Wang, Jun Ke

    2015-01-01

    Background Infection is a common cause of acute lung injury (ALI). This study was aimed to explore whether Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) play a role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and potential mechanisms. Methods In vivo: A sensitizing dose of LPS (50 µg) was administered i.p. to female mice before anesthesia with either 3% sevoflurane or phenobarbital i.p. After stabilization, the mice were challenged with 5 µg of intratracheal LPS to mimic inflammatory attack. The effects of sevoflurane were assessed by measurement of airway responsiveness to methacholine, histological examination, and IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Protein and gene expression of TLR4 and NF-κB were also assessed. In vitro: After pre-sensitization of ASMCs and ASM segments for 24h, levels of TLR4 and NF-κB proteins in cultured ASMCs were measured after continuous LPS exposure for 1, 3, 5, 12 and 24h in presence or absence of sevoflurane. Constrictor and relaxant responsiveness of ASM was measured 24 h afterwards. Results The mRNA and protein levels of NF-κB and TLR4 in ASM were increased and maintained at high level after LPS challenge throughout 24h observation period, both in vivo and in vitro. Sevoflurane reduced LPS-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, lung inflammatory cell infiltration and proinflammatory cytokines release in BALF as well as maximal isometric contractile force of ASM segments to acetylcholine, but it increased maximal relaxation response to isoproterenol. Treatment with specific NF-κB inhibitor produced similar protections as sevoflurane, including decreased expressions of TLR4 and NF-κB in cultured ASMCs and improved pharmacodynamic responsiveness of ASM to ACh and isoproterenol. Conclusions This study demonstrates the crucial role of TLR4 activation in ASMCs during ALI in response to LPS. Sevoflurane exerts direct relaxant and anti-inflammatory effects in vivo

  7. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of curcumin on acute lung injury in a rodent model of intestinal ischemia reperfusion by inhibiting the pathway of NF-Kb

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhe; Yao, Jihong; Li, Yang; Hu, Xiaowei; Shao, Huizhu; Tian, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect of curcumin on lung lesion induced by intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury (IIR). Methods: Rats were divided into four groups: sham, intestinal IIR (IIR), 1 mg/kg of curcumin treatment group (1 mg/kg), and 5 mg/kg of curcumin treatment group (5 mg/kg). Curcumin was given respectively (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) following the above doses. IIR was produced by 1 h of intestinal ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion. Rats were sacrificed at the end of reperfusion and lung tissues were collected for biochemical and histopathological examination in 4 groups. Lung tissues histology and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein were assayed. Serum IL-6, lung superoxide dismutase (SOD) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured. The expression level of NF-κB and ICAM-1 (including immunohistochemical analysis and western blot analysis) were also measured. Results: Lung tissue injury induced by IIR was obviously observed through pathology and BALF protein. MPO activity, IL-6 level and ICAM-1 expression were significantly increased with the elevation of NF-κB, simultaneously, SOD activity was decreased. With Treatment of curcumin, pathology and BALF protein of lung tissue were improved clearly. Inflammatory indexes (MPO activity, IL-6 level and ICAM-1) were improved and antioxidant index (SOD activity) was enhanced paralleled with NF-κB. Conclusion: Using curcumin effectively prevented IIR-induced lung injury. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of curcumin could be observed by inhibiting the pathway of NF-κB. PMID:26097529

  8. [Inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung. Case report].

    PubMed

    Santos, Nelson; Guerra, Miguel; Ferreira, Diva; Leal, Francisco; Miranda, José; Shiang, Teresa; Leal, Francisco; Vouga, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung is a rare entity, of unknown etiology and variable clinical evolution. The histological variety of this entity makes the diagnosis difficult, which is generally obtained after surgical removal of the lesion. The authors report the clinical case of a 32 years old woman presenting with hemoptysis and radiologic appearance of aspergilloma. The lesion was surgically removed and the diagnosis of inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung was confirmed by pathologic and immunohistochemical analysis.

  9. Epigenetic regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in acute lung injury: Role of S1P lyase.

    PubMed

    Ebenezer, David L; Fu, Panfeng; Suryadevara, Vidyani; Zhao, Yutong; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2017-01-01

    Cellular level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), the simplest bioactive sphingolipid, is tightly regulated by its synthesis catalyzed by sphingosine kinases (SphKs) 1 & 2 and degradation mediated by S1P phosphatases, lipid phosphate phosphatases, and S1P lyase. The pleotropic actions of S1P are attributed to its unique inside-out (extracellular) signaling via G-protein-coupled S1P1-5 receptors, and intracellular receptor independent signaling. Additionally, S1P generated in the nucleus by nuclear SphK2 modulates HDAC1/2 activity, regulates histone acetylation, and transcription of pro-inflammatory genes. Here, we present data on the role of S1P lyase mediated S1P signaling in regulating LPS-induced inflammation in lung endothelium. Blocking S1P lyase expression or activity attenuated LPS-induced histone acetylation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Degradation of S1P by S1P lyase generates Δ2-hexadecenal and ethanolamine phosphate and the long-chain fatty aldehyde produced in the cytoplasmic compartment of the endothelial cell seems to modulate histone acetylation pattern, which is different from the nuclear SphK2/S1P signaling and inhibition of HDAC1/2. These in vitro studies suggest that S1P derived long-chain fatty aldehyde may be an epigenetic regulator of pro-inflammatory genes in sepsis-induced lung inflammation. Trapping fatty aldehydes and other short chain aldehydes such as 4-hydroxynonenal derived from S1P degradation and lipid peroxidation, respectively by cell permeable agents such as phloretin or other aldehyde trapping agents may be useful in treating sepsis-induced lung inflammation via modulation of histone acetylation. .

  10. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Haji, Altaf Gauhar; Sharma, Shekhar; Vijaykumar, DK; Paul, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. Conclusion The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury, with the majority being linked to whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, involving priming of the inflammatory machinery and then activation of this primed mechanism. Treatment is supportive, with prognosis being substantially better than for most other causes of acute lung injury. PMID:18957111

  11. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Liu, Yong; Peng, XiangPing; Liu, Wei; Zhao, FeiYan; Feng, DanDan; Han, JianZhong; Huang, YanHong; Luo, SiWei; Li, Lian; Yue, Shao Jie; Cheng, QingMei; Huang, XiaoTing; Luo, ZiQiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Large amount of glutamate can overstimulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), causing neuronal injury and death. Recently, NMDAR has been reported to be found in the lungs. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of memantine, a NMDAR channel blocker, on bleomycin-induced lung injury mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were intratracheally injected with bleomycin (BLM) to induce lung injury. Mice were randomized to receive saline, memantine (Me), BLM, BLM plus Me. Lungs and BALF were harvested on day 3 or 7 for further evaluation. Results BLM caused leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary edema and increase in cytokines, and imposed significant oxidative stress (MDA as a marker) in lungs. Memantine significantly mitigated the oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury caused by BLM. Moreover, activation of NMDAR enhances CD11b expression on neutrophils. Conclusions Memantine mitigates oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury in BLM challenged mice. PMID:25942563

  12. CXCR3 May Help Regulate the Inflammatory Response in Acute Lung Injury via a Pathway Modulated by IL-10 Secreted by CD8 + CD122+ Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Nie, Li; Wu, Wei; Lu, Zhibing; Zhu, Gangyan; Liu, Juan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of CXCR3 and IL-10 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). ALI was induced by LPS injection (10 mg/kg) via the tail vein in C57BL/6 mice. Mice were sacrificed after 2 or 12 h to examine the levels of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and histopathologic assessments. At 12 h after LPS injection, mice exhibited more severe lung infiltration by CD8+ T cell and less infiltration by CD8+CD122+ regulatory T cells than at 2 h after LPS challenge or in the control (mice not exposed to LPS). At 12 h, IFN-γ, CXCR3, and CXCL10 were significantly higher in the lungs. IL-10 in the lungs was significantly lower. CXCR3 may help to recruit CD8+ T cells and promotes IFN-γ and CXCL10 release. Such effects could be inhibited by IL-10 secreted by CD8+CD122+ regulatory T cells.

  13. Swine influenza H1N1 virus induces acute inflammatory immune responses in pig lungs: a potential animal model for human H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Mahesh; Dwivedi, Varun; Krakowka, Steven; Manickam, Cordelia; Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lee, Chang-Won

    2010-11-01

    Pigs are capable of generating reassortant influenza viruses of pandemic potential, as both the avian and mammalian influenza viruses can infect pig epithelial cells in the respiratory tract. The source of the current influenza pandemic is H1N1 influenza A virus, possibly of swine origin. This study was conducted to understand better the pathogenesis of H1N1 influenza virus and associated host mucosal immune responses during acute infection in humans. Therefore, we chose a H1N1 swine influenza virus, Sw/OH/24366/07 (SwIV), which has a history of transmission to humans. Clinically, inoculated pigs had nasal discharge and fever and shed virus through nasal secretions. Like pandemic H1N1, SwIV also replicated extensively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and lung lesions were typical of H1N1 infection. We detected innate, proinflammatory, Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, as well as SwIV-specific IgA antibody in lungs of the virus-inoculated pigs. Production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes was also detected. Higher frequencies of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, γδ T cells, dendritic cells, activated T cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in SwIV-infected pig lungs. Concomitantly, higher frequencies of the immunosuppressive T regulatory cells were also detected in the virus-infected pig lungs. The findings of this study have relevance to pathogenesis of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in humans; thus, pigs may serve as a useful animal model to design and test effective mucosal vaccines and therapeutics against influenza virus.

  14. Phosphatidic acid signaling mediates lung cytokine expression and lung inflammatory injury after hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Abraham, E; Bursten, S; Shenkar, R; Allbee, J; Tuder, R; Woodson, P; Guidot, D M; Rice, G; Singer, J W; Repine, J E

    1995-02-01

    Because phosphatidic acid (PA) pathway signaling may mediate many basic reactions involving cytokine-dependent responses, we investigated the effects of CT1501R, a functional inhibitor of the enzyme lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT) which converts lysophosphatidic acid (Lyso-PA) to PA. We found that CT1501R treatment not only prevented hypoxia-induced PA increases and lyso-PA consumption in human neutrophils, but also prevented neutrophil chemotaxis and adherence in vitro, and lung injury and lung neutrophil accumulation in mice subjected to hemorrhage and resuscitation. In addition, CT1501R treatment prevented increases in mRNA levels and protein production of a variety of proinflammatory cytokines in multiple lung cell populations after blood loss and resuscitation. Our results indicate the fundamental role of PA metabolism in the development of acute inflammatory lung injury after blood loss.

  15. NET balancing: a problem in inflammatory lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Olivia Z.; Palaniyar, Nades

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are beneficial antimicrobial defense structures that can help fight against invading pathogens in the host. However, recent studies reveal that NETs exert adverse effects in a number of diseases including those of the lung. Many inflammatory lung diseases are characterized with a massive influx of neutrophils into the airways. Neutrophils contribute to the pathology of these diseases. To date, NETs have been identified in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF), acute lung injury (ALI), allergic asthma, and lungs infected with bacteria, virus, or fungi. These microbes and several host factors can stimulate NET formation, or NETosis. Different forms of NETosis have been identified and are dependent on varying types of stimuli. All of these pathways however appear to result in the formation of NETs that contain DNA, modified extracellular histones, proteases, and cytotoxic enzymes. Some of the NET components are immunogenic and damaging to host tissue. Innate immune collectins, such as pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D), bind NETs, and enhance the clearance of dying cells and DNA by alveolar macrophages. In many inflammatory lung diseases, bronchoalveolar SP-D levels are altered and its deficiency results in the accumulation of DNA in the lungs. Some of the other therapeutic molecules under consideration for treating NET-related diseases include DNases, antiproteases, myeloperoxidase (MPO) inhibitors, peptidylarginine deiminase-4 inhibitors, and anti-histone antibodies. NETs could provide important biological advantage for the host to fight against certain microbial infections. However, too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. Maintaining the right balance of NET formation and reducing the amount of NETs that accumulate in tissues are essential for harnessing the power of NETs with minimal damage to the hosts. PMID:23355837

  16. Cannabidiol improves lung function and inflammation in mice submitted to LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A; Almeida, V I; Costola-de-Souza, C; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Vitoretti, L B; Gimenes-Junior, J A; Akamine, A T; Crippa, J A; Tavares-de-Lima, W; Palermo-Neto, J

    2015-02-01

    We have previously shown that the prophylactic treatment with cannabidiol (CBD) reduces inflammation in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). In this work we analyzed the effects of the therapeutic treatment with CBD in mice subjected to the model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI on pulmonary mechanics and inflammation. CBD (20 and 80 mg/kg) was administered (i.p.) to mice 6 h after LPS-induced lung inflammation. One day (24 h) after the induction of inflammation the assessment of pulmonary mechanics and inflammation were analyzed. The results show that CBD decreased total lung resistance and elastance, leukocyte migration into the lungs, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, protein concentration and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage supernatant. Thus, we conclude that CBD administered therapeutically, i.e. during an ongoing inflammatory process, has a potent anti-inflammatory effect and also improves the lung function in mice submitted to LPS-induced ALI. Therefore the present and previous data suggest that in the future cannabidiol might become a useful therapeutic tool for the attenuation and treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

  17. Therapeutic Potential of Medicinal Plants and Their Constituents on Lung Inflammatory Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Pyo; Lim, Hyun; Kwon, Yong Soo

    2017-01-01

    Acute bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are essentially lung inflammatory disorders. Various plant extracts and their constituents showed therapeutic effects on several animal models of lung inflammation. These include coumarins, flavonoids, phenolics, iridoids, monoterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenoids. Some of them exerted inhibitory action mainly by inhibiting the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and nuclear transcription factor-κB activation. Especially, many flavonoid derivatives distinctly showed effectiveness on lung inflammation. In this review, the experimental data for plant extracts and their constituents showing therapeutic effectiveness on animal models of lung inflammation are summarized. PMID:27956716

  18. Protective effects of imipramine in murine endotoxin-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Qu, Jie-ming; Summah, Hanssa; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Ying-gang; Jiang, Hong-ni

    2010-07-25

    The tricyclic antidepressant imipramine has recently emerged as a cytoprotective agent, exerting beneficial effects in inflammatory tissue injury. The present study aimed to investigate therapeutic effects of imipramine in murine model of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. Mice were administrated intraperitoneally with LPS (lipopolysaccharide) from Escherichia coli or vehicle. Imipramine was administrated intraperitoneally 30 min before LPS challenge. Pretreatment of mice with imipramine reduced lethality. Impramine also significantly attenuated lung inflammation, lung edema, MPO (myeloperoxidase) activity, lung tissue pathological changes and nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding activity. The results of this study suggest that imipramine can exert protective effects in endotoxin-induced acute lung injury by suppressing nuclear factor-kappaB-mediated expression of inflammatory genes. Thus, imipramine could be a potential novel therapeutic agent for the treatment for acute lung injury.

  19. Betulin protects mice from bacterial pneumonia and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianchao; Li, Hongyu; Qiu, Jiaming; Feng, Haihua

    2014-10-01

    Betulin, a naturally occurring triterpene, has shown anti-HIV activity, but details on the anti-inflammatory activity are scanty. In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of Betulin on LPS-induced activation of cell lines with relevance for lung inflammation in vitro and on lung inflammation elicited by either LPS or viable Escherichia coli (E. coli) in vivo. In vitro, Betulin inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and (interleukin) IL-6 levels and up-regulated the level of IL-10. Also Betulin suppressed the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 protein in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. In vivo, Betulin alleviated LPS-induced acute lung injury. Treatment with Betulin diminished pro-inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity and bacterial loads in lung tissue during gram-negative pneumonia. Our findings demonstrated that Betulin inhibits pro-inflammatory responses induced by the gram-negative stimuli LPS and E. coli, suggesting that Betulin may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of lung inflammation.

  20. Overview of current lung imaging in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zompatori, Maurizio; Ciccarese, Federica; Fasano, Luca

    2014-12-01

    Imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and follow-up of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Chest radiography, bedside lung ultrasonography and computed tomography scans can provide useful information for the management of patients and detection of prognostic factors. However, imaging findings are not specific and several possible differential diagnoses should be taken into account. Herein we will review the role of radiological techniques in ARDS, highlight the plain radiological and computed tomography findings according to the pathological stage of the disease (exudative, inflammatory and fibroproliferative), and summarise the main points for the differential diagnosis with cardiogenic oedema, which is still challenging in the acute stage.

  1. Effect of hypertonic saline treatment on the inflammatory response after hydrochloric acid-induced lung injury in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Holms, Carla Augusto; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Kahvegian, Marcia; Massoco, Cristina Oliveira; Fantoni, Denise Tabacchi; Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Junior, Jose Otavio Costa Auler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypertonic saline has been proposed to modulate the inflammatory cascade in certain experimental conditions, including pulmonary inflammation caused by inhaled gastric contents. The present study aimed to assess the potential anti-inflammatory effects of administering a single intravenous dose of 7.5% hypertonic saline in an experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hydrochloric acid. METHODS: Thirty-two pigs were anesthetized and randomly allocated into the following four groups: Sham, which received anesthesia and were observed; HS, which received intravenous 7.5% hypertonic saline solution (4 ml/kg); acute lung injury, which were subjected to acute lung injury with intratracheal hydrochloric acid; and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline, which were subjected to acute lung injury with hydrochloric acid and treated with hypertonic saline. Hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters were recorded over four hours. Subsequently, bronchoalveolar lavage samples were collected at the end of the observation period to measure cytokine levels using an oxidative burst analysis, and lung tissue was collected for a histological analysis. RESULTS: Hydrochloric acid instillation caused marked changes in respiratory mechanics as well as blood gas and lung parenchyma parameters. Despite the absence of a significant difference between the acute lung injury and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline groups, the acute lung injury animals presented higher neutrophil and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage analysis. The histopathological analysis revealed pulmonary edema, congestion and alveolar collapse in both groups; however, the differences between groups were not significant. Despite the lower cytokine and neutrophil levels observed in the acute lung injury + hypertonic saline group, significant differences were not observed among the treated and non-treated groups. CONCLUSIONS: Hypertonic saline

  2. Nilotinib ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nilotinib on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given nilotinib (10 mg/kg) by oral gavage twice daily for 1 week prior to exposure to aerosolized LPS. At 24 h after LPS exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples and lung tissue were collected. The lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio, protein level and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF were determined. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities as well as nitrite/nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -}) levels were measured in lung tissues. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were determined in lung tissues. Treatment with nilotinib prior to LPS exposure significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pulmonary edema, as it significantly decreased lung W/D ratio, protein concentration and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the BALF. This was supported by the histopathological examination which revealed marked attenuation of LPS-induced ALI in nilotinib treated rats. In addition, nilotinib significantly increased SOD and GSH activities with significant decrease in MDA content in the lung. Nilotinib also reduced LPS mediated overproduction of pulmonary NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -} levels. Importantly, nilotinib caused down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and iNOS levels in the lung. Taken together, these results demonstrate the protective effects of nilotinib against the LPS-induced ALI. This effect can be attributed to nilotinib ability to counteract the inflammatory cells

  3. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Role of Oleic Acid-Triggered Lung Injury and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Burth, Patrícia; Castro-Faria, Mauro Velho; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury especially acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be triggered by diverse stimuli, including fatty acids and microbes. ARDS affects thousands of people worldwide each year, presenting high mortality rate and having an economic impact. One of the hallmarks of lung injury is edema formation with alveoli flooding. Animal models are used to study lung injury. Oleic acid-induced lung injury is a widely used model resembling the human disease. The oleic acid has been linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases; here we focus on lung injury. Firstly, we briefly discuss ARDS and secondly we address the mechanisms by which oleic acid triggers lung injury and inflammation. PMID:26640323

  4. Inflammatory lung disease in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Claudio; Rossi, Marcello; Leoncini, Silvia; Chisci, Glauco; Signorini, Cinzia; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Vannuccini, Laura; Spina, Donatella; Ginori, Alessandro; Iacona, Ingrid; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA), upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228) and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228) of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with "high" (39.8%) and "low" (34.8%) patterns dominating over "mixed" (19.6%) and "simple mismatch" (5.9%) types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI), and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG) were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease.

  5. Inflammatory Lung Disease in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Claudio; Rossi, Marcello; Chisci, Glauco; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Vannuccini, Laura; Spina, Donatella; Iacona, Ingrid; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA), upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228) and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228) of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with “high” (39.8%) and “low” (34.8%) patterns dominating over “mixed” (19.6%) and “simple mismatch” (5.9%) types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI), and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG) were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease. PMID:24757286

  6. Galangin dampens mice lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yu-Sheng; Tao, Wei; Miao, Qian-Bing; Lu, Shi-Chun; Zhu, Ya-Bing

    2014-10-01

    Galangin, an active ingredient of Alpinia galangal, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Inflammation and oxidative stress are known to play vital effect in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, we determined whether galangin exerts lung protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Male BALB/c mice were randomized to receive galangin or vehicle intraperitoneal injection 3 h after LPS challenge. Samples were harvested 24 h post LPS administration. Galangin administration decreased biochemical parameters of oxidative stress and inflammation, and improved oxygenation and lung edema in a dose-dependent manner. These protective effects of galangin were associated with inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and upregulation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Galangin reduces LPS-induced ALI by inhibition of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  7. Platelets protect lung from injury induced by systemic inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuhua; Wang, Yabo; An, Qi; Chen, Hao; Zhao, Junfei; Zhang, Jie; Meng, Wentong; Du, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory responses can severely injure lungs, prompting efforts to explore how to attenuate such injury. Here we explored whether platelets can help attenuate lung injury in mice resulting from extracorporeal circulation (ECC)-induced systemic inflammatory responses. Mice were subjected to ECC for 30 min, then treated with phosphate-buffered saline, platelets, the GPIIb/IIIa inhibitor Tirofiban, or the combination of platelets and Tirofiban. Blood and lung tissues were harvested 60 min later, and lung injury and inflammatory status were assessed. As expected, ECC caused systemic inflammation and pulmonary dysfunction, and platelet transfusion resulted in significantly milder lung injury and higher lung function. It also led to greater numbers of circulating platelet-leukocyte aggregates and greater platelet accumulation in the lung. Platelet transfusion was associated with higher production of transforming growth factor-β and as well as lower levels of tumour necrosis factor-α and neutrophil elastase in plasma and lung. None of these platelet effects was observed in the presence of Tirofiban. Our results suggest that, at least under certain conditions, platelets can protect lung from injury induced by systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:28155889

  8. Linking lung function and inflammatory responses in ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Vincenzo; Hantos, Zoltan; Sly, Peter D; Zosky, Graeme R

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury are poorly understood. We used strain-dependent responses to mechanical ventilation in mice to identify associations between mechanical and inflammatory responses in the lung. BALB/c, C57BL/6, and 129/Sv mice were ventilated using a protective [low tidal volume and moderate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers] or injurious (high tidal volume and zero PEEP) ventilation strategy. Lung mechanics and lung volume were monitored using the forced oscillation technique and plethysmography, respectively. Inflammation was assessed by measuring numbers of inflammatory cells, cytokine (IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) levels, and protein content of the BAL. Principal components factor analysis was used to identify independent associations between lung function and inflammation. Mechanical and inflammatory responses in the lung were dependent on ventilation strategy and mouse strain. Three factors were identified linking 1) pulmonary edema, protein leak, and macrophages, 2) atelectasis, IL-6, and TNF-α, and 3) IL-1β and neutrophils, which were independent of responses in lung mechanics. This approach has allowed us to identify specific inflammatory responses that are independently associated with overstretch of the lung parenchyma and loss of lung volume. These data provide critical insight into the mechanical responses in the lung that drive local inflammation in ventilator-induced lung injury and the basis for future mechanistic studies in this field.

  9. Resolvin D1 protects against inflammation in experimental acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Dan; Long, Fei-Wu; Chen, Ke-Ling; Yang, Hong-Wei; Lv, Zhao-Yin; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that may lead to multisystemic organ failure with considerable mortality. Recently, resolvin D1 (RvD1) as an endogenous anti-inflammatory lipid mediator has been confirmed to protect against many inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to investigate the effects of RvD1 in acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury. Acute pancreatitis varying from mild to severe was induced by cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS, respectively. Mice were pretreated with RvD1 at a dose of 300 ng/mouse 30 min before the first injection of cerulein. Severity of AP was assessed by biochemical markers and histology. Serum cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in pancreas and lung were determined for assessing the extent of inflammatory response. NF-κB activation was determined by Western blotting. The injection of cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS resulted in local injury in the pancreas and corresponding systemic inflammatory changes with pronounced severity in the cerulein and LPS group. Pretreated RvD1 significantly reduced the degree of amylase, lipase, TNF-α, and IL-6 serum levels; the MPO activities in the pancreas and the lungs; the pancreatic NF-κB activation; and the severity of pancreatic injury and associated lung injury, especially in the severe acute pancreatitis model. These results suggest that RvD1 is capable of improving injury of pancreas and lung and exerting anti-inflammatory effects through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in experimental acute pancreatitis, with more notable protective effect in severe acute pancreatitis. These findings indicate that RvD1 may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy in the management of severe acute pancreatitis.

  10. Efferent vagal nerve stimulation attenuates acute lung injury following burn: The importance of the gut-lung axis

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Michael J.; Peterson, Carrie Y.; Cheadle, Gerald; Loomis, William; Wolf, Paul; Kennedy, Vince; Putnam, James G.; Bansal, Vishal; Eliceiri, Brian; Baird, Andrew; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess acute lung injury when protection to the gut mucosal barrier offered by vagus nerve stimulation is eliminated by an abdominal vagotomy. Methods Male balb/c mice were subjected to 30% total body surface area steam burn with and without electrical stimulation to the right cervical vagus nerve. A cohort of animals were subjected to abdominal vagotomy. Lung histology, myeloperoxidase and ICAM-1 immune staining, myeloperoxidase enzymatic assay, and tissue KC levels were analyzed 24 hours after burn. Additionally, lung IkB-α, NF-kB immunoblots, and NF-kB-DNA binding measured by photon emission analysis using NF-kB-luc transgenic mice were performed. Results Six hours post burn, phosphorylation of both NF-kB p65 and IkB-α were observed. Increased photon emission signal was seen in the lungs of NF-kB-luc transgenic animals. Vagal nerve stimulation blunted NF-kB activation similar to sham animals whereas abdominal vagotomy eliminated the anti-inflammatory effect. After burn, MPO positive cells and ICAM-1 expression in the lung endothelium was increased, and lung histology demonstrated significant injury at 24 hours. Vagal nerve stimulation markedly decreased neutrophil infiltration as demonstrated by MPO immune staining and enzyme activity. Vagal stimulation also markedly attenuated acute lung injury at 24 hours. The protective effects of vagal nerve stimulation were reversed by performing an abdominal vagotomy. Conclusion Vagal nerve stimulation is an effective strategy to protect against acute lung injury following burn. Moreover, the protective effects of vagal nerve stimulation in the prevention of acute lung injury are eliminated by performing an abdominal vagotomy. These results establish the importance of the gut-lung axis after burn in the genesis of acute lung injury. PMID:21783215

  11. Predictors of Acute Lung Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-26

    model of endotracheal intubation . Anesthesiology 2008; 109(1):88-94. 9. Bernard GR, Artigas A, Brigham KL, Carlet J, Falke K, Hudson L, et al. Report...biomarkers in tracheal secretions. Inflammatory mediators have been studied in tracheal secretions in non- intubated subjects from carefully collected...unlimited. Case Number: 88ABW-2013-3312, 22 Jul 2013 (7,8). Tracheal secretions are easy and simple to obtain from normal care of the intubated

  12. Dihydro-Resveratrol Ameliorates Lung Injury in Rats with Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ze-Si; Ku, Chuen Fai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Shi, Xiao-Ke; Wang, Hong-Qi; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Tsang, Siu Wai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process originated in the pancreas; however, it often leads to systemic complications that affect distant organs. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is indeed the predominant cause of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. In this study, we aimed to delineate the ameliorative effect of dihydro-resveratrol, a prominent analog of trans-resveratrol, against acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury and the underlying molecular actions. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats with repetitive injections of cerulein (50 µg/kg/h) and a shot of lipopolysaccharide (7.5 mg/kg). By means of histological examination and biochemical assays, the severity of lung injury was assessed in the aspects of tissue damages, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. When treated with dihydro-resveratrol, pulmonary architectural distortion, hemorrhage, interstitial edema, and alveolar thickening were significantly reduced in rats with acute pancreatitis. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the activity of myeloperoxidase in pulmonary tissues were notably repressed. Importantly, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation was attenuated. This study is the first to report the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol ameliorated acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury via an inhibitory modulation of pro-inflammatory response, which was associated with a suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  13. Leptin treatment ameliorates acute lung injury in rats with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, Fatma Ayca; Kerem, Mustafa; Tatlicioglu, Ertan; Aricioglu, Aysel; Unsal, Cigdem; Bukan, Neslihan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of exogenous leptin on acute lung injury (ALI) in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into 3 groups. AP was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cerulein (50 μg/kg) four times, at 1 h intervals. The rats received a single i.p. injection of 10 μg/kg leptin (leptin group) or 2 mL saline (AP group) after cerulein injections. In the sham group, animals were given a single i.p. injection of 2 mL saline. Experimental samples were collected for biochemical and histological evaluations at 24 h and 48 h after the induction of AP or saline administration. Blood samples were obtained for the determination of amylase, lipase, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, macrophage inflammatory peptide (MIP)-2 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)-1 levels, while pancreatic and lung tissues were removed for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, nitric oxide (NOx) level, CD40 expression and histological evaluation. RESULTS: Cerulein injection caused severe AP, confirmed by an increase in serum amylase and lipase levels, histopathological findings of severe AP, and pancreatic MPO activity, compared to the values obtained in the sham group. In the leptin group, serum levels of MIP-2, sICMA-1, TNF-α, and IL-1β, pancreatic MPO activity, CD40 expression in pancreas and lung tissues, and NOx level in the lung tissue were lower compared to those in the AP group. Histologically, pancreatic and lung damage was less severe following leptin administration. CONCLUSION: Exogenous leptin attenuates inflamma-tory changes, and reduces pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide levels, and CD40 expression in cerulein-induced AP and may be protective in AP associated ALI. PMID:17589942

  14. Supplementation of parenteral nutrition with fish oil attenuates acute lung injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kohama, Keisuke; Nakao, Atsunori; Terashima, Mariko; Aoyama-Ishikawa, Michiko; Shimizu, Takayuki; Harada, Daisuke; Nakayama, Mitsuo; Yamashita, Hayato; Fujiwara, Mayu; Kotani, Joji

    2014-01-01

    Fish oil rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has diverse immunomodulatory properties and attenuates acute lung injury when administered in enternal nutrition. However, enteral nutrition is not always feasible. Therefore, we investigated the ability of parenteral nutrition supplemented with fish oil to ameliorate acute lung injury. Rats were infused with parenteral nutrition solutions (without lipids, with soybean oil, or with soybean oil and fish oil) for three days. Lipopolysaccharide (15 mg/kg) was then administered intratracheally to induce acute lung injury, characterized by impaired lung function, polymorphonuclear leukocyte recruitment, parenchymal tissue damage, and upregulation of mRNAs for inflammatory mediators. Administration of parenteral nutrition supplemented with fish oil prior to lung insult improved gas exchange and inhibited neutrophil recruitment and upregulation of mRNAs for inflammatory mediators. Parenteral nutrition supplemented with fish oil also prolonged survival. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, leukotriene B4 and leukotriene B5 secretion was measured in neutrophils from the peritoneal cavity. The neutrophils from rats treated with fish oil-rich parenteral nutrition released significantly more leukotriene B5, an anti-inflammatory eicosanoid, than neutrophils isolated from rats given standard parenteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition with fish oil significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury in rats in part by promoting the synthesis of anti-inflammatory eicosanoids. PMID:24688221

  15. The composition of cigarette smoke determines inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung in COPD mouse models

    PubMed Central

    John, Gerrit; Kohse, Katrin; Orasche, Jürgen; Reda, Ahmed; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2013-01-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is caused by exposure to toxic gases and particles, most often CS (cigarette smoke), leading to emphysema, chronic bronchitis, mucus production and a subsequent decline in lung function. The disease pathogenesis is related to an abnormal CS-induced inflammatory response of the lungs. Similar to active (mainstream) smoking, second hand (sidestream) smoke exposure severely affects respiratory health. These processes can be studied in vivo in models of CS exposure of mice. We compared the acute inflammatory response of female C57BL/6 mice exposed to two concentrations [250 and 500 mg/m3 TPM (total particulate matter)] of sidestream and mainstream CS for 3 days and interpreted the biological effects based on physico-chemical differences in the gas and particulate phase composition of CS. BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) was obtained to perform differential cell counts and to measure cytokine release. Lung tissue was used to determine mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory genes and to assess tissue inflammation. A strong acute inflammatory response characterized by neutrophilic influx, increased cytokine secretion [KC (keratinocyte chemoattractant), TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor α), MIP-2 (macrophage inflammatory protein 2), MIP-1α and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1)], pro-inflammatory gene expression [KC, MIP-2 and MMP12 (matrix metalloproteinase 12)] and up-regulated GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) production was observed in the mainstream model. After sidestream exposure there was a dampened inflammatory reaction consisting only of macrophages and diminished GM-CSF levels, most likely caused by elevated CO concentrations. These results demonstrate that the composition of CS determines the dynamics of inflammatory cell recruitment in COPD mouse models. Different initial inflammatory processes might contribute to COPD pathogenesis in significantly varying ways, thereby

  16. The composition of cigarette smoke determines inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung in COPD mouse models.

    PubMed

    John, Gerrit; Kohse, Katrin; Orasche, Jürgen; Reda, Ahmed; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2014-02-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is caused by exposure to toxic gases and particles, most often CS (cigarette smoke), leading to emphysema, chronic bronchitis, mucus production and a subsequent decline in lung function. The disease pathogenesis is related to an abnormal CS-induced inflammatory response of the lungs. Similar to active (mainstream) smoking, second hand (sidestream) smoke exposure severely affects respiratory health. These processes can be studied in vivo in models of CS exposure of mice. We compared the acute inflammatory response of female C57BL/6 mice exposed to two concentrations [250 and 500 mg/m3 TPM (total particulate matter)] of sidestream and mainstream CS for 3 days and interpreted the biological effects based on physico-chemical differences in the gas and particulate phase composition of CS. BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) was obtained to perform differential cell counts and to measure cytokine release. Lung tissue was used to determine mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory genes and to assess tissue inflammation. A strong acute inflammatory response characterized by neutrophilic influx, increased cytokine secretion [KC (keratinocyte chemoattractant), TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor α), MIP-2 (macrophage inflammatory protein 2), MIP-1α and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1)], pro-inflammatory gene expression [KC, MIP-2 and MMP12 (matrix metalloproteinase 12)] and up-regulated GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) production was observed in the mainstream model. After sidestream exposure there was a dampened inflammatory reaction consisting only of macrophages and diminished GM-CSF levels, most likely caused by elevated CO concentrations. These results demonstrate that the composition of CS determines the dynamics of inflammatory cell recruitment in COPD mouse models. Different initial inflammatory processes might contribute to COPD pathogenesis in significantly varying ways, thereby

  17. Early identification of 'acute-onset' chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Park, Susanna B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Distinguishing patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy prior to relapse is often challenging at the onset of their clinical presentation. In the present study, nerve excitability tests were used in conjunction with the clinical phenotype and disease staging, to differentiate between patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy at an early stage, with the aim to better guide treatment. Clinical assessment, staging and nerve excitability tests were undertaken on patients initially fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy soon after symptom onset and their initial presentation. Patients were subsequently followed up for minimum of 12 months to determine if their clinical presentations were more consistent with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Clinical severity as evaluated by Medical Research Council sum score and Hughes functional grading scale were not significantly different between the two cohorts. There was no difference between the time of onset of initial symptoms and nerve excitability test assessment between the two cohorts nor were there significant differences in conventional nerve conduction study parameters. However, nerve excitability test profiles obtained from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy demonstrated abnormalities in the recovery cycle of excitability, including significantly reduced superexcitability (P < 0.001) and prolonged relative refractory period (P < 0.01), without changes in threshold electrotonus. In contrast, in patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, a different pattern occurred with the recovery cycle shifted downward (increased superexcitability, P < 0.05; decreased subexcitability, P < 0.05) and increased

  18. Asialoerythropoietin ameliorates bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in rabbits by reducing inflammation

    PubMed Central

    SONODA, AKINAGA; NITTA, NORIHISA; TSUCHIYA, KEIKO; OTANI, HIDEJI; WATANABE, SHOBU; MUKAISHO, KENICHI; TOMOZAWA, YUKI; NAGATANI, YUKIHIRO; OHTA, SHINICHI; TAKAHASHI, MASASHI; MURATA, KIYOSHI

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury, a critical illness characterized by acute respiratory failure with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, remains unresponsive to current treatments. The condition involves injury to the alveolar capillary barrier, neutrophil accumulation and the induction of proinflammatory cytokines followed by lung fibrosis. In the present study, a rabbit model of bleomycin-induced acute lung injury was established to examine the effects of asialoerythropoietin (AEP), an agent with tissue-protective activities, on pulmonary inflammation. Six Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into two equal groups. Acute lung injury was induced in all rabbits by intratracheally injecting bleomycin. The control group was injected with bleomycin only; the experimental (AEP) group was injected intravenously with AEP (80 μg/kg) prior to the bleomycin injection. Computed tomography (CT) studies were performed seven days later. The CT inflammatory scores of areas exhibiting abnormal density and the pathological inflammatory scores were recorded as a ratio on a 7×7 mm grid. The CT and pathological inflammatory scores were significantly different between the control and AEP groups [122±10 and 16.3±1.5 (controls) vs. 71±8.5 and 9.7±1.4 (AEP), respectively; P<0.01]. Thus, the present study revealed that AEP prevents bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in rabbits. PMID:25289037

  19. The bacterial microbiota in inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Huffnagle, Gary B; Dickson, Robert P

    2015-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920s, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined.

  20. Visualizing the Propagation of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Meeder, Natalie; Zeng, Johnathan; Jiang, YunQing; Hamedani, Hooman; Profka, Harrilla; Kadlecek, Stephen; Clapp, Justin; Deshpande, Charuhas G.; Wu, Jue; Gee, James C.; Kavanagh, Brian P.; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation worsens acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but this secondary ‘ventilator-associated’ injury is variable and difficult to predict. We aimed to visualize the propagation of such ventilator-induced injury, in the presence (and absence) of a primary underlying lung injury, and to determine the predictors of propagation. Methods Anesthetized rats (n=20) received acid aspiration (HCl) followed by ventilation with moderate tidal volume (VT). In animals surviving ventilation for at least two hours, propagation of injury was quantified using serial computed tomography (CT). Baseline lung status was assessed by oxygenation, lung weight, and lung strain (VT/expiratory lung volume). Separate groups of rats without HCl aspiration were ventilated with large (n=10) or moderate (n=6) VT. Results In 15 rats surviving longer than two hours, CT opacities spread outwards from the initial site of injury. Propagation was associated with higher baseline strain (propagation vs. no propagation, mean ± SD: 1.52 ± 0.13 vs. 1.16 ± 0.20, p<0.01), but similar oxygenation and lung weight. Propagation did not occur where baseline strain <1.29. In healthy animals, large VT caused injury that was propagated inwards from the lung periphery; in the absence of preexisting injury, propagation did not occur where strain was <2.0. Conclusions Compared with healthy lungs, underlying injury causes propagation to occur at a lower strain threshold and, it originates at the site of injury; this suggests that tissue around the primary lesion is more sensitive. Understanding how injury is propagated may ultimately facilitate a more individualized monitoring or management. PMID:26536308

  1. IL-17A attracts inflammatory cells in murine lung infection with P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wonnenberg, Bodo; Jungnickel, Christopher; Honecker, Anja; Wolf, Lisa; Voss, Meike; Bischoff, Markus; Tschernig, Thomas; Herr, Christian; Bals, Robert; Beisswenger, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    IL-17A-dependent immunity is of importance in the protection against extracellular bacterial pathogens. However, IL-17A is also suggested to mediate the pathogenesis of lung diseases, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. Here, we studied the role of IL-17A in a mouse model of acute pneumonia. IL-17A mediated the expression of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) and the recruitment of inflammatory cells in mice infected with a sub-lethal dose of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. IL-17A deficiency protected mice from lethal P. aeruginosa lung infection. A sub-lethal infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae resulted in increased bacterial burden associated with increased pulmonary inflammation. Thus, the type of infectious bacteria seemed to influence the way in which IL-17A functions during pulmonary infection. Reducing pulmonary inflammation by targeting IL-17A may be a therapeutic option in acute P. aeruginosa pneumonia.

  2. Neutrophils as early immunologic effectors in hemorrhage- or endotoxemia-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Abraham, E; Carmody, A; Shenkar, R; Arcaroli, J

    2000-12-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by accumulation of neutrophils in the lungs, accompanied by the development of interstitial edema and an intense inflammatory response. To assess the role of neutrophils as early immune effectors in hemorrhage- or endotoxemia-induced lung injury, mice were made neutropenic with cyclophosphamide or anti-neutrophil antibodies. Endotoxemia- or hemorrhage-induced lung edema was significantly reduced in neutropenic animals. Activation of the transcriptional regulatory factor nuclear factor-kappaB after hemorrhage or endotoxemia was diminished in the lungs of neutropenic mice compared with nonneutropenic controls. Hemorrhage or endotoxemia was followed by increases in pulmonary mRNA and protein levels for interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Endotoxin-induced increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression were greater than those found after hemorrhage. The amounts of mRNA or protein for IL-1beta, MIP-2, and TNF-alpha were significantly lower after hemorrhage in the lungs of neutropenic versus nonneutropenic mice. Neutropenia was associated with significant reductions in IL-1beta and MIP-2 but not in TNF-alpha expression in the lungs after endotoxemia. These experiments show that neutrophils play a central role in initiating acute inflammatory responses and causing injury in the lungs after hemorrhage or endotoxemia.

  3. Sex differences in the expression of lung inflammatory mediators in response to ozone.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Noe; Mishra, Vikas; Sinha, Utkarshna; DiAngelo, Susan L; Chroneos, Zissis C; Ekpa, Ndifreke A; Cooper, Timothy K; Caruso, Carla R; Silveyra, Patricia

    2015-11-15

    Sex differences in the incidence of respiratory diseases have been reported. Women are more susceptible to inflammatory lung disease induced by air pollution and show worse adverse pulmonary health outcomes than men. However, the mechanisms underlying these differences remain unknown. In the present study, we hypothesized that sex differences in the expression of lung inflammatory mediators affect sex-specific immune responses to environmental toxicants. We focused on the effects of ground-level ozone, a major air pollutant, in the expression and regulation of lung immunity genes. We exposed adult male and female mice to 2 ppm of ozone or filtered air (control) for 3 h. We compared mRNA levels of 84 inflammatory genes in lungs harvested 4 h postexposure using a PCR array. We also evaluated changes in lung histology and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell counts and protein content at 24 and 72 h postexposure. Our results revealed sex differences in lung inflammation triggered by ozone exposure and in the expression of genes involved in acute phase and inflammatory responses. Major sex differences were found in the expression of neutrophil-attracting chemokines (Ccl20, Cxcl5, and Cxcl2), the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6, and oxidative stress-related enzymes (Ptgs2, Nos2). In addition, the phosphorylation of STAT3, known to mediate IL-6-related immune responses, was significantly higher in ozone-exposed mice. Together, our observations suggest that a differential regulation of the lung immune response could be implicated in the observed increased susceptibility to adverse health effects from ozone observed in women vs. men.

  4. Integrating microRNAs into a system biology approach to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tong; Garcia, Joe G N; Zhang, Wei

    2011-04-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), including the ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are common and complex inflammatory lung diseases potentially affected by various genetic and nongenetic factors. Using the candidate gene approach, genetic variants associated with immune response and inflammatory pathways have been identified and implicated in ALI. Because gene expression is an intermediate phenotype that resides between the DNA sequence variation and the higher level cellular or whole-body phenotypes, the illustration of gene expression regulatory networks potentially could enhance understanding of disease susceptibility and the development of inflammatory lung syndromes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a novel class of gene regulators that play critical roles in complex diseases including ALI. Comparisons of global miRNA profiles in animal models of ALI and VILI identified several miRNAs (eg, miR-146a and miR-155) previously implicated in immune response and inflammatory pathways. Therefore, via regulation of target genes in these biological processes and pathways, miRNAs potentially contribute to the development of ALI. Although this line of inquiry exists at a nascent stage, miRNAs have the potential to be critical components of a comprehensive model for inflammatory lung disease built by a systems biology approach that integrates genetic, genomic, proteomic, epigenetic as well as environmental stimuli information. Given their particularly recognized role in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses, miRNAs also serve as novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers for ALI/ARDS or VILI, thus facilitating the realization of personalized medicine for individuals with acute inflammatory lung disease.

  5. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Inhibitor Is a Novel Therapeutic Candidate in Murine Models of Inflammatory Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Quijada, Hector; Sammani, Saad; Siegler, Jessica; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Deaton, Ryan; Saadat, Laleh; Zaidi, Rafe S.; Messana, Joe; Gann, Peter H.; Machado, Roberto F.; Camp, Sara M.; Wang, Ting

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified the intracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (iNAMPT, aka pre–B-cell colony enhancing factor) as a candidate gene promoting acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) with circulating nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase potently inducing NF-κB signaling in lung endothelium. iNAMPT also synthesizes intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (iNAD) in response to extracellular oxidative stress, contributing to the inhibition of apoptosis via ill-defined mechanisms. We now further define the role of iNAMPT activity in the pathogenesis of ARDS/VILI using the selective iNAMPT inhibitor FK-866. C57/B6 mice were exposed to VILI (40 ml/kg, 4 h) or LPS (1.5 mg/kg, 18 h) after osmotic pump delivery of FK-866 (100 mg/kg/d, intraperitoneally). Assessment of total bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) levels, cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α), lung iNAD levels, and injury scores revealed that FK-866–mediated iNAMPT inhibition successfully reduced lung tissue iNAD levels, BAL injury indices, inflammatory cell infiltration, and lung injury scores in LPS- and VILI-exposed mice. FK-866 further increased lung PMN apoptosis, as reflected by caspase-3 activation in BAL PMNs. These findings support iNAMPT inhibition via FK-866 as a novel therapeutic agent for ARDS via enhanced apoptosis in inflammatory PMNs. PMID:24588101

  6. Contribution of Lung Macrophages to the Inflammatory Responses Induced by Exposure to Air Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    van Eeden, Stephan F.

    2013-01-01

    Large population cohort studies have indicated an association between exposure to particulate matter and cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. The inhalation of toxic environmental particles and gases impacts the innate and adaptive defense systems of the lung. Lung macrophages play a critically important role in the recognition and processing of any inhaled foreign material such as pathogens or particulate matter. Alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial cells are the predominant cells that process and remove inhaled particulate matter from the lung. Cooperatively, they produce proinflammatory mediators when exposed to atmospheric particles. These mediators produce integrated local (lung, controlled predominantly by epithelial cells) and systemic (bone marrow and vascular system, controlled predominantly by macrophages) inflammatory responses. The systemic response results in an increase in the release of leukocytes from the bone marrow and an increased production of acute phase proteins from the liver, with both factors impacting blood vessels and leading to destabilization of existing atherosclerotic plaques. This review focuses on lung macrophages and their role in orchestrating the inflammatory responses induced by exposure to air pollutants. PMID:24058272

  7. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Schweisfurth, H; Sopivnik, I; Moog, R

    2014-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is primarily caused by transfusion of fresh frozen plasma or platelet concentrates and occurs by definition within 6 hours after transfusion with acute shortness of breath, hypoxemia and radiographically detectable bilateral infiltrates of the lung. Mostly leucocyte antibodies in the plasma of the blood donor (immunogenic TRALI) are responsible. Apart from antibodies, other substances such as biologically active lipids, mainly arising from the storage of platelet and red blood cell concentrates, can activate neutrophilic granulocytes and trigger a non-immunogenic TRALI. Pathophysiologically, granulocytes in the capillaries of the lung vessels release oxygen radicals and enzymes which damage the endothelial cells and cause pulmonary edema. Therapeutically, nasal oxygen administration may be sufficient. In severe cases, mechanical ventilation, invasive hemodynamic monitoring and fluid intake are required. Diuretics should be avoided. The administration of glucocorticoids is controversial. Antibody-related TRALI reactions occurred mainly after transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, which had been obtained from womenimmunized during pregnancy against leukocyte antigens. Therefore, in Germany, since 2009 only plasma from female donors without a history of prior or current pregnancy or negative testing for antibodies against HLA I, II or HNA has been used with the result that since then no TRALI-related death has been registered.

  8. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production. PMID:26690120

  9. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-12-04

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production.

  10. Lucinactant attenuates pulmonary inflammatory response, preserves lung structure, and improves physiologic outcomes in a preterm lamb model of RDS

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, Marla R.; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L.; Gregory, Timothy J.; Mazela, Jan; Shaffer, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute inflammatory responses to supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation have been implicated in the pathophysiological sequelae of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Although surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) has contributed to lung stability, the effect on lung inflammation is inconclusive. Lucinactant contains sinapultide (KL4), a novel synthetic peptide that functionally mimics surfactant protein B, a protein with anti-inflammatory properties. We tested the hypothesis that lucinactant may modulate lung inflammatory response to mechanical ventilation in the management of RDS and may confer greater protection than animal-derived surfactants. Methods Preterm lambs (126.8 ± 0.2 SD d gestation) were randomized to receive lucinactant, poractant alfa, beractant, or no surfactant and studied for 4 h. Gas exchange and pulmonary function were assessed serially. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung histology were assessed at termination. Results SRT improved lung compliance relative to no SRT without significant difference between SRT groups. Lucinactant attenuated lung and systemic inflammatory response, supported oxygenation at lower ventilatory requirements, and preserved lung structural integrity to a greater degree than either no SRT or SRT with poractant alfa or beractant. Conclusion These data suggest that early intervention with lucinactant may more effectively mitigate pulmonary pathophysiological sequelae of RDS than the animal-derived surfactants poractant alfa or beractant. PMID:22821059

  11. Increase of Frequency and Modulation of Phenotype of Regulatory T Cells by Atorvastatin Is Associated with Decreased Lung Inflammatory Cell Infiltration in a Murine Model of Acute Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Blanquiceth, Yurany; Rodríguez-Perea, Ana Lucia; Tabares Guevara, Jorge H; Correa, Luis Alfonso; Sánchez, María Dulfary; Ramírez-Pineda, José Robinson; Velilla, Paula Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role by controlling allergic inflammation of airways. Recently, it has been shown that statins have immunomodulatory properties, probably mediated by their effects on Tregs. Therefore, we evaluated the in vivo effect of atorvastatin (ATV) on Tregs and its association with the inflammatory process in a model of allergic asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and then challenged with intranasal OVA. ATV (40 mg/kg) was delivered by daily intraperitoneal injection for 7 or 15 days before each OVA challenge. ATV treatment for 7 days increased the frequency of Tregs in mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) and the interleukin (IL)-10 in lungs. After 15 days of treatment, ATV increased the percentage of glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR+) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1+) Tregs in the lung, without enhancing their suppressive activity, but also increased the percentage of conventional T cells expressing GITR+, PD1+, and OX-40 (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 4). Although no significant changes were observed in the number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), OVA-specific immunoglobulin E in the serum, and type 2 helper (Th2) cytokines in the lungs, there was a significant decrease of peribronchial inflammation that negatively correlated with the Tregs in MLN and the concentration of IL-10 in the lung. These results suggest that ATV has an immunomodulatory role possibly mediated by their effects on Tregs, which could contribute to the control of inflammation during allergic asthma. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the contribution of Treg to immunomodulatory action of statins in the context of allergic asthma.

  12. Increase of Frequency and Modulation of Phenotype of Regulatory T Cells by Atorvastatin Is Associated with Decreased Lung Inflammatory Cell Infiltration in a Murine Model of Acute Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Blanquiceth, Yurany; Rodríguez-Perea, Ana Lucia; Tabares Guevara, Jorge H.; Correa, Luis Alfonso; Sánchez, María Dulfary; Ramírez-Pineda, José Robinson; Velilla, Paula Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role by controlling allergic inflammation of airways. Recently, it has been shown that statins have immunomodulatory properties, probably mediated by their effects on Tregs. Therefore, we evaluated the in vivo effect of atorvastatin (ATV) on Tregs and its association with the inflammatory process in a model of allergic asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and then challenged with intranasal OVA. ATV (40 mg/kg) was delivered by daily intraperitoneal injection for 7 or 15 days before each OVA challenge. ATV treatment for 7 days increased the frequency of Tregs in mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) and the interleukin (IL)-10 in lungs. After 15 days of treatment, ATV increased the percentage of glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR+) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1+) Tregs in the lung, without enhancing their suppressive activity, but also increased the percentage of conventional T cells expressing GITR+, PD1+, and OX-40 (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 4). Although no significant changes were observed in the number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), OVA-specific immunoglobulin E in the serum, and type 2 helper (Th2) cytokines in the lungs, there was a significant decrease of peribronchial inflammation that negatively correlated with the Tregs in MLN and the concentration of IL-10 in the lung. These results suggest that ATV has an immunomodulatory role possibly mediated by their effects on Tregs, which could contribute to the control of inflammation during allergic asthma. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the contribution of Treg to immunomodulatory action of statins in the context of allergic asthma. PMID:28066430

  13. Nitric oxide and hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-wu; Han, Cui-hong; Zhang, Pei-xi; Zheng, Juan; Liu, Kan; Sun, Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) refers to the damage to the lungs secondary to exposure to elevated oxygen partial pressure. HALI has been a concern in clinical practice with the development of deep diving and the use of normobaric as well as hyperbaric oxygen in clinical practice. Although the pathogenesis of HALI has been extensively studied, the findings are still controversial. Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger and has been considered as a signaling molecule involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Although the role of NO in the occurrence and development of pulmonary diseases including HALI has been extensively studied, the findings on the role of NO in HALI are conflicting. Moreover, inhalation of NO has been approved as a therapeutic strategy for several diseases. In this paper, we briefly summarize the role of NO in the pathogenesis of HALI and the therapeutic potential of inhaled NO in HALI. PMID:27867474

  14. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (CD35) in bronchoalveolar lavage of inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, J; Sadallah, S; Schifferli, J A; Villard, J; Nicod, L P

    1998-01-01

    Complement receptor type 1 (CR1) (CD35; C3b/C4b receptor) is a transmembrane protein of many haematopoietic cells. Once cleaved, soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) exerts opposite effects as a powerful inhibitor of complement. This study addressed both the question of whether sCR1 was found in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of normals and patients with various inflammatory disease, and its possible origin. In this retrospective study covering specimen and clinical data of 124 patients with acute and chronic inflammatory lung pathologies, BAL supernatants were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique for sCR1. Correlations were made between the sCR1 levels obtained and the constituents of BAL. Human alveolar macrophages were cultivated in order to determine their secretory capacity of sCR1. Alveolar macrophages from normal subjects were shown to release sCR1 in vitro. In addition, sCR1 was present in BAL of normal controls and was significantly increased in acute inflammatory lung diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), bacterial and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, as well as in chronic inflammatory diseases such as interstitial lung fibrosis and sarcoidosis. In BAL of ARDS, bacterial, and P. carinii pneumonia, there was a good correlation between sCR1 and the absolute neutrophil counts. In sarcoidosis, a correlation was found with BAL lymphocyte counts. Serum sCR1 was not increased in patients compared to controls. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) is found in the bronchoalveolar lavage in health as well as in acute and chronic inflammatory disease. Alveolar macrophages are capable of releasing sCR1 in vitro and may be the main physiological source of sCR1 in the alveoli. The good correlation between sCR1 and the absolute neutrophil or lymphocyte numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage of inflammatory diseases suggests a predominant role of leucocytes for the release of sCR1 in such conditions. The release of this

  15. Functional and inflammatory alterations in the lung following exposure of rats to nitrogen mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel, Kinal J.; Shen, Jianliang; Reimer, David; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard is a vesicant that causes damage to the respiratory tract. In these studies, we characterized the acute effects of nitrogen mustard on lung structure, inflammatory mediator expression, and pulmonary function, with the goal of identifying mediators potentially involved in toxicity. Treatment of rats (male Wistar, 200-225 g) with nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine hydrochloride, i.t., 0.25 mg/kg) resulted in marked histological changes in the respiratory tract, including necrotizing bronchiolitis, thickening of alveolar septa, and inflammation which was evident within 24 h. This was associated with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, confirming injury to alveolar epithelial regions of the lung. Nitrogen mustard administration also resulted in increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, pro-inflammatory proteins implicated in lung injury, in alveolar macrophages and alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Expression of connective tissue growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9, mediators regulating extracellular matrix turnover was also increased, suggesting that pathways leading to chronic lung disease are initiated early in the pathogenic process. Following nitrogen mustard exposure, alterations in lung mechanics and function were also observed. These included decreases in baseline static compliance, end-tidal volume and airway resistance, and a pronounced loss of methacholine responsiveness in resistance, tissue damping and elastance. Taken together, these data demonstrate that nitrogen mustard induces rapid structural and inflammatory changes in the lung which are associated with altered lung functioning. Understanding the nature of the injury induced by nitrogen mustard and related analogs may aid in the development of efficacious therapies for treatment of pulmonary injury resulting from exposure to vesicants.

  16. [The systemic inflammatory response syndrome correction in acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Agapov, M A; Khoreva, M V; Gorskiĭ, V A

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease of variable severity. In which some patients experience mild, self-limited attacks while others manifest a severe, highly morbid, and frequently lethal attack. The exact mechanisms by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. Recent studies have established the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In our research we have estimated influence of not steroid anti-inflammatory preparation on synthesis pro-and anti-inflammatory Cytokines at healthy donors and at patients with Acute pancreatitis.

  17. Acute clinical onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Molín, Jéssica; Márquez, Mercedes; Raurell, Xavier; Matiasek, Kaspar; Ferrer, Isidre; Pumarola, Martí

    2011-09-01

    We report a case of acute-onset ambulatory paraparesis with electrophysiological abnormalities compatible with axonal and demyelinating lesions in a Rottweiler dog. Although the clinical findings were compatible with acute canine idiopathic polyneuropathy, postmortem investigations revealed a chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy affecting the nerve roots. Due to the combination of acute clinical presentation and chronic pathologic features, this case is consistent with the acute-onset form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (A-CIDP).

  18. VEGF Promotes Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carapau, Daniel; Pena, Ana C.; Ataíde, Ricardo; Monteiro, Carla A. A.; Félix, Nuno; Costa-Silva, Artur; Marinho, Claudio R. F.; Dias, Sérgio; Mota, Maria M.

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of the clinical presentation and severity of malaria infections is broad, ranging from uncomplicated febrile illness to severe forms of disease such as cerebral malaria (CM), acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) or severe anemia (SA). Rodent models that mimic human CM, PAM and SA syndromes have been established. Here, we show that DBA/2 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA constitute a new model for malaria-associated ALI. Up to 60% of the mice showed dyspnea, airway obstruction and hypoxemia and died between days 7 and 12 post-infection. The most common pathological findings were pleural effusion, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, consistent with increased lung vessel permeability, while the blood-brain barrier was intact. Malaria-associated ALI correlated with high levels of circulating VEGF, produced de novo in the spleen, and its blockage led to protection of mice from this syndrome. In addition, either splenectomization or administration of the anti-inflammatory molecule carbon monoxide led to a significant reduction in the levels of sera VEGF and to protection from ALI. The similarities between the physiopathological lesions described here and the ones occurring in humans, as well as the demonstration that VEGF is a critical host factor in the onset of malaria-associated ALI in mice, not only offers important mechanistic insights into the processes underlying the pathology related with malaria but may also pave the way for interventional studies. PMID:20502682

  19. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Looney, Mark R; Gropper, Michael A; Matthay, Michael A

    2004-07-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an underreported complication of transfusion therapy, and it is the third most common cause of transfusion-associated death. TRALI is defined as noncardiogenic pulmonary edema temporally related to transfusion therapy. The diagnosis of TRALI relies on excluding other diagnoses such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Supportive diagnostic evidence includes identifying neutrophil or human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies in the donor or recipient plasma. All plasma-containing blood products have been implicated in TRALI, with the majority of cases linked to whole blood, packed RBCs, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of TRALI may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, with the first "hit" being a predisposing inflammatory condition commonly present in the operating room or ICU. The second hit may involve the passive transfer of neutrophil or HLA antibodies from the donor or the transfusion of biologically active lipids from older, cellular blood products. Treatment is supportive, with a prognosis substantially better than most causes of clinical acute lung injury.

  20. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  1. Alveolar edema fluid clearance and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Berthiaume, Yves; Matthay, Michael A

    2007-12-15

    Although lung-protective ventilation strategies have substantially reduced mortality of acute lung injury patients there is still a need for new therapies that can further decrease mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Studies of epithelial ion and fluid transport across the distal pulmonary epithelia have provided important new concepts regarding potential new therapies for acute lung injury. Overall, there is convincing evidence that the alveolar epithelium is not only a tight epithelial barrier that resists the movement of edema fluid into the alveoli, but it is also actively involved in the transport of ions and solutes, a process that is essential for edema fluid clearance and the resolution of acute lung injury. The objective of this article is to consider some areas of recent progress in the field of alveolar fluid transport under normal and pathologic conditions. Vectorial ion transport across the alveolar and distal airway epithelia is the primary determinant of alveolar fluid clearance. The general paradigm is that active Na(+) and Cl(-) transport drives net alveolar fluid clearance, as demonstrated in several different species, including the human lung. Although these transport processes can be impaired in severe lung injury, multiple experimental studies suggest that upregulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) transport might be an effective therapy in acute lung injury. We will review mechanisms involved in pharmacological modulation of ion transport in lung injury with a special focus on the use of beta-adrenergic agonists which has generated considerable interest and is a promising therapy for clinical acute lung injury.

  2. Acute Hemorrhagic Myositis in Inflammatory Myopathy and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Van Gelder, Howard; Wu, Kim M.; Gharibian, Nayiri; Patel, Dharmi B.; Clements, Philip J.; Heinze, Emil R.; Morris, Robert I.; Wong, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    We describe two patients with dermatomyositis that presented with interstitial lung disease, positive V and Shawl sign who developed acute spontaneous abdominal/retroperitoneal bleed. Both patients expired despite aggressive treatment and resuscitation. Hemorrhagic myositis in these two patients with inflammatory myopathy is a very rare complication. The association of anti-Ro52 with this potentially very serious complication remains unclear. This potential relationship should be further evaluated in future studies. PMID:25379317

  3. Hepatic cryoablation-induced acute lung injury: histopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Washington, K; Debelak, J P; Gobbell, C; Sztipanovits, D R; Shyr, Y; Olson, S; Chapman, W C

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown that hepatic cryoablation (cryo), but not partial hepatectomy, induces a systemic inflammatory response, with distant organ injury and overproduction of NF-kappaB-dependent cytokines. Serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) levels are markedly increased 1 h and beyond after cryo compared with partial hepatectomy where no elevation occurs. NF-kappaB activation (by electrophoretic mobility shift assay) is strikingly increased in the noncryo liver (but not in the lung) at 30 min and in both the liver and lung tissue 1 h after cryo, returning to the baseline by 2 h and beyond. The current study investigated the histopathologic changes associated with cryoablation-induced acute lung injury. Animals underwent 35% hepatic resection or a similar volume hepatic cryo and were sacrificed at 1, 2, 6, and 24 h. Pulmonary histologic features were assessed using hematoxylin and eosin and immunoperoxidase staining with a macrophage-specific antibody (anti-lysozyme, 1:200 dilution, Dako, Carpinteria, CA). The following features were graded semiquantitatively (0-3): perivascular lymphoid cuffs, airspace edema and hemorrhage, margination of neutrophils within pulmonary vasculature, and the presence of macrophages with foamy cytoplasm in the pulmonary interstitium. Hepatic resection (n = 21) resulted in slight perivascular edema at 1, 2, 6, and 24 h post-resection, but there were no other significant changes. Pulmonary findings after hepatic cryo (n = 22) included prominent perivascular lymphoid cuffs 1 and 2 h following hepatic injury that were not present at any other time point (P 0.01). Marginating PMNs and foamy macrophages were more common after cryo at all time points (P<0.05, cryo vs resection). Severe lung injury, as evidenced by airspace edema and parenchymal hemorrhage, was present in four of six (67%) animals at 24 h (P 0.03). In follow-up studies immediate resection (n = 15) of the cryo

  4. In vivo effect of surfactant on inflammatory cytokines during endotoxin-induced lung injury in rodents.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Neha; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2011-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a known inducer of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in humans and animals. In this study, ARDS was developed in rats by intratracheal instillation of LPS and the effect of two types of surfactant (natural vs. synthetic) was examined to determine their potential corrective roles in general, as well as to compare the two surfactants against one another in particular, in endotoxin-induced lung injury. Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into four groups, i.e., rats given: buffer controls; 055:B5 E. coli LPS only; LPS and then porcine surfactant (P-SF); or, LPS and then synthetic surfactant (S-SF). In vivo administration of LPS led to an increase in expression of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, interferon-γ, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in the lungs of rats. These effects were confirmed by immunofluorescence in lung tissue sections and/or by protein (Western immunoblot) and mRNA expression (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) analyses of tissue samples. Apart from IL-4, concentrations of each of these cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid recovered from the animals were significantly increased in the LPS-treated hosts. Instillation of either surfactant (70 h after the LPS) into the airways diminished the expression of each of the inducible-cytokines, with the porcine (natural) form seeming having the greater inhibitory effect. These data suggest that surfactant can play an important role in the treatment of endotoxin-induced lung injury and might possess robust anti-inflammatory effects. Further, it seems that both the natural and synthetic surfactants prevent inflammatory outcomes in the lungs by controlling cytokine(s) production by various inflammatory cells. Last, the studies here clearly indicated that in this aspect, natural surfactant appears to be more beneficial compared to synthetic surfactant.

  5. Involvement of exosomes in lung inflammation associated with experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonjoch, Laia; Casas, Vanessa; Carrascal, Montserrat; Closa, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    A frequent complication of acute pancreatitis is the lung damage associated with the systemic inflammatory response. Although various pro-inflammatory mediators generated at both local and systemic levels have been identified, the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease are still poorly understood. In recent years, exosomes have emerged as a new intercellular communication system able to transfer encapsulated proteins and small RNAs and protect them from degradation. Using an experimental model of taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis in rats, we aimed to evaluate the role of exosomes in the extent of the systemic inflammatory response. Induction of pancreatitis increased the concentration of circulating exosomes, which showed a different proteomic profile to those obtained from control animals. A series of tracking experiments using PKH26-stained exosomes revealed that circulating exosomes effectively reached the alveolar compartment and were internalized by macrophages. In vitro experiments revealed that exosomes obtained under inflammatory conditions activate and polarize these alveolar macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Interestingly, the proteomic analysis of circulating exosomes during acute pancreatitis suggested a multi-organ origin with a relevant role for the liver as a source of these vesicles. Tracking experiments also revealed that the liver retains the majority of exosomes from the peritoneal cavity. We conclude that exosomes are involved in the lung damage associated with experimental acute pancreatitis and could be relevant mediators in the systemic effects of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lidocaine against sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Zhou, Jie; Liao, Changli; Li, Xiaobing; Liu, Minghua; Song, Daqiang; Jiang, Xian

    2017-04-01

    Lidocaine (Lido) is reported to suppress inflammatory responses and exhibit a therapeutic effect in models of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). The receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) exerts pro-inflammatory effects by enhancing pro-inflammatory cytokine production. However, the precise mechanism by which Lido confers protection against ALI is not clear. ALI was induced in RAGE WT and RAGE knockout (KO) rats using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) operations for 24 h. The results showed that Lido significantly inhibited CLP-induced lung inflammation and histopathological lung injury. Furthermore, Lido significantly reduced CLP-induced upregulation of HMGB1 and RAGE expression and activation of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. With the use of RAGE KO rats, we demonstrate here that RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lido against CLP-induced lung inflammatory cell infiltration and histopathological lung injury. These results suggest that RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lido against CLP-induced ALI by attenuating the pro-inflammatory cytokines production.

  7. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic plant-derived cannabinoid, decreases inflammation in a murine model of acute lung injury: role for the adenosine A(2A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alison; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Pinheiro, Milena L; Vitoretti, Luana B; Mariano-Souza, Domenica P; Quinteiro-Filho, Wanderley M; Akamine, Adriana T; Almeida, Vinícius I; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Hallak, Jaime E; Zuardi, Antônio W; Crippa, José A; Palermo-Neto, João

    2012-03-05

    Acute lung injury is an inflammatory condition for which treatment is mainly supportive because effective therapies have not been developed. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic cannabinoid component of marijuana (Cannabis sativa), has potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the possible anti-inflammatory effect of cannabidiol in a murine model of acute lung injury. Analysis of total inflammatory cells and differential in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was used to characterize leukocyte migration into the lungs; myeloperoxidase activity of lung tissue and albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were analyzed by colorimetric assays; cytokine/chemokine production in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was also analyzed by Cytometric Bead Arrays and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). A single dose of cannabidiol (20mg/kg) administered prior to the induction of LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced acute lung injury decreases leukocyte (specifically neutrophil) migration into the lungs, albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) 1, 2, and 4days after the induction of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Additionally, adenosine A(2A) receptor is involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol on LPS-induced acute lung injury because ZM241385 (4-(2-[7-Amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol) (a highly selective antagonist of adenosine A(2A) receptor) abrogated all of the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol previously described. Thus, we show that cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory effects in a murine model of acute lung injury and that this effect is most likely associated with an increase in the extracellular adenosine offer and signaling through adenosine A(2A) receptor.

  8. [CT - diagnosis and differential diagnosis of inflammatory acute intestinal conditions].

    PubMed

    Wiesner, W

    2011-08-24

    Multidetector-row CT has shown over the past years that it is able to provide reliable diagnoses in various acute intestinal conditions. The presented article provides an overview of primary and secondary inflammatory acute intestinal pathologies and their differential diagnoses.

  9. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Roberts, George H

    2004-01-01

    Transfusion is an inevitable event in the life of many individuals. Transfusion medicine personnel attempt to provide blood products that will result in a safe and harmless transfusion. However, this is not always possible since no laboratory test gives totally accurate and reliable results all the time and testing in routine transfusion services is devoted primarily to the identification of red blood cell problems. Thus, when patients are transfused, several possible adverse effects may occur in the transfused patient even though quality testing indicates no potential problem. These adverse events include infectious complications, hemolytic reactions, anaphylaxis, urticaria, circulatory overload, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, chills and fever, immunomodulation, and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

  10. Transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Federico, Anne

    2009-02-01

    Approximately one person in 5,000 will experience an episode of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in conjunction with the transfusion of whole blood or blood components. Its hallmarks include hypoxemia, dyspnea, fever, hypotension, and bilateral pulmonary edema (noncardiogenic). The mortality for reported cases is 16.3%. The incidence and mortality may be even higher than estimated because of under-recognition and under-reporting. Although TRALI was identified as a clinical entity in the 1980s, a lack of consensus regarding a definition was present until 2004. An exact cause has yet to be identified; however, there are two theories regarding the etiology: the "antibody" and the "two-hit" theories. These theories involve both donor and recipient factors. Further education and research are needed to assist in the development of strategies for the prevention and treatment of TRALI.

  11. Pro-inflammatory effects of hydrogen sulphide on substance P in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Sidhapuriwala, Jenab N; Ng, Siaw Wei; Tamizhselvi, Ramasamy; Moochhala, Shabbir M

    2008-04-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S), a novel gasotransmitter, has been recognized to play an important role in inflammation. Cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE) is a major H(2)S synthesizing enzyme in the cardiovascular system and DL-propargylglycine (PAG) is an irreversible inhibitor of CSE. Substance P (SP), a product of preprotachykinin-A (PPT-A) gene, is a well-known pro-inflammatory mediator which acts principally through the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). We have shown an association between H(2)S and SP in pulmonary inflammation as well as a pro-inflammatory role of H(2)S and SP in acute pancreatitis. The present study was aimed to investigate the interplay between pro-inflammatory effects of H(2)S and SP in a murine model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced in mice by 10 hourly intraperitoneal injections of caerulein (50 (g/kg). PAG (100 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered either 1 hr before (prophylactic) or 1 hr after (therapeutic) the first caerulein injection. PAG, given prophylactically as well as therapeutically, significantly reduced plasma H(2)S levels and pancreatic H(2)S synthesizing activities as well as SP concentrations in plasma, pancreas and lung compared with caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, prophylactic as well as therapeutic administration of PAG significantly reduced PPT-A mRNA expression and NK-1R mRNA expression in both pancreas and lung when compared with caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. These results suggest that the pro-inflammatory effects of H(2)S may be mediated by SP-NK-1R pathway in acute pancreatitis.

  12. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Seong Ho; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA-Induced Inflammatory Responses and Lung Injury in Thermal Injury Rat Model: Protective Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiqi; Xu, Fei; Si, Si; Zhao, Xueshan; Bi, Siwei; Cen, Ying

    2017-02-06

    Lungs are easily damaged by the inflammatory responses induced after extensive burns. The aim here was to investigate the protective role of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-mediated inflammatory responses and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a rat model of thermal injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to five groups. In the first experiment, a full-thickness thermal injury or control procedure, covering 30% of the TBSA, was inflicted on three groups designated as the thermal injury, EGCG, and sham control groups. In the second experiment, another two groups were established by transfusion with either mtDNA (mtDNA group) or phosphate-buffered saline (phosphate-buffered saline group). Blood samples and lung tissue from all five groups were collected and the plasma concentrations of mtDNA and inflammatory mediators were measured. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected and histological analysis of the lung tissue was performed to evaluate the severity of ARDS. Significant increases in mtDNA and inflammatory mediator plasma concentrations were seen in the thermal injury and EGCG groups when compared with controls (P < .05). The plasma concentrations of mtDNA and inflammatory mediators were significantly decreased after the administration of EGCG (P < .05). EGCG also significantly reduced the severity of acute lung injury (P < .05). Intravenous administration of mtDNA significantly increased concentrations of inflammatory mediators and caused severe ARDS (P < .05). Our results suggest that mtDNA is important for thermal injury-induced inflammation and associated ARDS. EGCG possesses anti-inflammatory and lung-protective properties, and might act by limiting mtDNA release after thermal injury.

  14. The therapeutic effects of tuberostemonine against cigarette smoke-induced acute lung inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Beak, Hyunjung; Park, Soojin; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Jaehoon; Park, Sangwon; Kim, Jinju; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-03-05

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is mainly caused by cigarette smoking and is characterized by the destruction of lung parenchyma, structural alterations of the small airways, and systemic inflammation. Tuberostemonine (TS) is an alkaloid-type phytochemical from Stemona tuberosa. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of TS in a cigarette smoke (CS)-induced mouse model of acute lung inflammation. The mice were whole-body exposed to CS or fresh air for 7 days. TS was administered by an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection 1h before exposure to CS. To test the effects of TS, the numbers of total cells, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were counted. Furthermore, we measured the levels of several chemokines, such as GCP-2, MIP-3α, MCP-1 and KC, in the lung tissue. The cellular profiles and histopathological analysis demonstrated that the infiltration of peribronchial and perivascular inflammatory cells significantly decreased in the TS-treated groups compared with the CS-exposure group. The TS treatment significantly ameliorated the airway epithelial thickness induced by CS exposure and caused a significant decrement in the production of chemokines in the lung. These results suggest that TS has anti-inflammatory effects against CS-induced acute lung inflammation.

  15. RAGE/NF-κB signaling mediates lipopolysaccharide induced acute lung injury in neonate rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhong; Wu, Rong; Tian, Yian; Yu, Min; Tang, Yun; Cheng, Huaipin; Tian, Zhaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to induce acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Accumulating data suggest the crucial role of RAGE in the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. However, the mechanism by which RAGE mediates inflammatory lung injury in the neonates remains elusive. In this study we established LPS-induced ALI model in neonate rats, and investigated the role of RAGE/NF-κB signaling in mediating ALI. We found that RAGE antibody or bortezomib reduced LPS-induced histopathological abnormalities in the lung and lung damage score. RAGE antibody or bortezomib also reduced TNF-α level in both serum and BALF of the rats. Furthermore, RAGE antibody or bortezomib significantly reduced LPS-induced upregulation of RAGE and NF-κB expression in the lung. In conclusion, we established ALI model in neonate rats to demonstrate that LPS induced inflammatory lung injury via RAGE/NF-κB signaling. Interference with RAGE/NF-κB signaling is a potential approach to prevent and treat sepsis-related ALI/ARDS.

  16. Effect of Previous High Glutamine Infusion on Inflammatory Mediators and Mortality in an Acute Pancreatitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Garib, Ricardo; Garla, Priscila; Moretti, Ana I. S.; Machado, Marcel C. C.; Waitzberg, Dan L.

    2016-01-01

    Parenteral glutamine supplementation in acute inflammatory conditions is controversial. We evaluated the inflammatory and survival responses after parenteral glutamine infusion in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) model. Lewis rats received 1 g/kg parenteral glutamine (n = 42), saline (n = 44), or no treatment (n = 45) for 48 h before AP induction. Blood, lung, and liver samples were collected 2, 12, and 24 h after AP to measure serum cytokines levels and tissue heat shock protein (HSP) expression. From each group, 20 animals were not sacrificed after AP for a 7-day mortality study. Serum cytokine levels did not differ among groups at any time point, but the intragroup analysis over time showed higher interferon-γ only in the nontreatment and saline groups at 2 h (versus 12 and 24 h; both p ≤ 0.05). The glutamine group exhibited greater lung and liver HSP90 expression than did the nontreatment group at 2 and 12 h, respectively; greater liver HSP90 and HSP70 expression than did the saline group at 12 h; and smaller lung HSP70 and liver HSP90 expression than did the nontreatment group at 24 h (all p ≤ 0.019). The 7-day mortality rate did not differ among groups. In experimental AP, pretreatment with parenteral glutamine was safe and improved early inflammatory mediator profiles without affecting mortality. PMID:28070142

  17. Role of inflammatory mediators in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Moochhala, Shabbir

    2004-02-01

    Inflammatory response leading to organ dysfunction and failure continues to be the major problem after injury in many clinical conditions such as sepsis, severe burns, acute pancreatitis, haemorrhagic shock, and trauma. In general terms, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an entirely normal response to injury. Systemic leukocyte activation, however, is a direct consequence of a SIRS and if excessive, can lead to distant organ damage and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). When SIRS leads to MODS and organ failure, the mortality becomes high and can be more than 50%. Acute lung injury that clinically manifests as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major component of MODS of various aetiologies. Inflammatory mediators play a key role in the pathogenesis of ARDS, which is the primary cause of death in these conditions. This review summarizes recent studies that demonstrate the critical role played by inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, platelet activating factor (PAF), IL-10, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), C5a, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, substance P, chemokines, VEGF, IGF-I, KGF, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in the pathogenesis of ARDS. It is reasonable to speculate that elucidation of the key mediators in ARDS coupled with the discovery of specific inhibitors would make it possible to develop clinically effective anti-inflammatory therapy.

  18. Downregulation of Mcl-1 has anti-inflammatory pro-resolution effects and enhances bacterial clearance from the lung.

    PubMed

    Lucas, C D; Dorward, D A; Tait, M A; Fox, S; Marwick, J A; Allen, K C; Robb, C T; Hirani, N; Haslett, C; Duffin, R; Rossi, A G

    2014-07-01

    Phagocytes not only coordinate acute inflammation and host defense at mucosal sites, but also contribute to tissue damage. Respiratory infection causes a globally significant disease burden and frequently progresses to acute respiratory distress syndrome, a devastating inflammatory condition characterized by neutrophil recruitment and accumulation of protein-rich edema fluid causing impaired lung function. We hypothesized that targeting the intracellular protein myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) by a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (AT7519) or a flavone (wogonin) would accelerate neutrophil apoptosis and resolution of established inflammation, but without detriment to bacterial clearance. Mcl-1 loss induced human neutrophil apoptosis, but did not induce macrophage apoptosis nor impair phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. Neutrophil-dominant inflammation was modelled in mice by either endotoxin or bacteria (Escherichia coli). Downregulating inflammatory cell Mcl-1 had anti-inflammatory, pro-resolution effects, shortening the resolution interval (Ri) from 19 to 7 h and improved organ dysfunction with enhanced alveolar-capillary barrier integrity. Conversely, attenuating drug-induced Mcl-1 downregulation inhibited neutrophil apoptosis and delayed resolution of endotoxin-mediated lung inflammation. Importantly, manipulating lung inflammatory cell Mcl-1 also accelerated resolution of bacterial infection (Ri; 50 to 16 h) concurrent with enhanced bacterial clearance. Therefore, manipulating inflammatory cell Mcl-1 accelerates inflammation resolution without detriment to host defense against bacteria, and represents a target for treating infection-associated inflammation.

  19. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses. PMID:25978669

  20. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  1. [Positive end-expiratory pressure : adjustment in acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Bruells, C S; Dembinski, R

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of patients suffering from acute lung injury is a challenge for the treating physician. In recent years ventilation of patients with acute hypoxic lung injury has changed fundamentally. Besides the use of low tidal volumes, the most beneficial setting of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been in the focus of researchers. The findings allow adaption of treatment to milder forms of acute lung injury and severe forms. Additionally computed tomography techniques to assess the pulmonary situation and recruitment potential as well as bed-side techniques to adjust PEEP on the ward have been modified and improved. This review gives an outline of recent developments in PEEP adjustment for patients suffering from acute hypoxic and hypercapnic lung injury and explains the fundamental pathophysiology necessary as a basis for correct treatment.

  2. GRANZYME A AND B-CLUSTER DEFICIENCY DELAYS ACUTE LUNG INJURY IN PNEUMOVIRUS-INFECTED MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.M.; Lutter, Rene; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Medema, Jan Paul; Rosenberg, Helene F.; Bos, Albert P.

    2009-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infection by the human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus is a frequent cause of acute lung injury in children. Severe pneumovirus disease in humans is associated with activation of the granzyme pathway by effector lymphocytes, which may promote pathology by exaggerating pro-apoptotic caspase activity and pro-inflammatory activity. The main goal of this study was to determine whether granzymes contribute to the development of acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice. Granzyme-expressing mice and granzyme A, and B-cluster single and double-gene deleted mice were inoculated with the rodent pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice strain J3666, and were studied for markers of lung inflammation and injury. Expression of granzyme A and B is detected in effector lymphocytes in mouse lungs in response to pneumovirus infection. Mice deficient for granzyme A and the granzyme B-cluster have unchanged virus titers in the lungs, but show a significantly delayed clinical response to fatal pneumovirus infection, a feature that is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment, diminished activation of caspase-3 and reduced lung permeability. We conclude that granzyme A and B-cluster deficiency delays the acute progression of pneumovirus disease by reducing alveolar injury. PMID:20018616

  3. Inflammatory effects of inhaled sulfur mustard in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Cervelli, Jessica; Anderson, Dana R.; Holmes, Wesley W.; Conti, Michele L.; Gordon, Ronald E.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-10-15

    Inhalation of sulfur mustard (SM), a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes severe lung damage, is a significant threat to both military and civilian populations. The mechanisms mediating its cytotoxic effects are unknown and were investigated in the present studies. Male rats Crl:CD(SD) were anesthetized, and then intratracheally intubated and exposed to 0.7-1.4 mg/kg SM by vapor inhalation. Animals were euthanized 6, 24, 48 h or 7 days post-exposure and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue collected. Exposure of rats to SM resulted in rapid pulmonary toxicity, including focal ulceration and detachment of the trachea and bronchial epithelia from underlying mucosa, thickening of alveolar septal walls and increased numbers of inflammatory cells in the tissue. There was also evidence of autophagy and apoptosis in the tissue. This was correlated with increased BAL protein content, a marker of injury to the alveolar epithelial lining. SM exposure also resulted in increased expression of markers of inflammation including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), each of which has been implicated in pulmonary toxicity. Whereas COX-2, TNF{alpha} and iNOS were mainly localized in alveolar regions, MMP-9 was prominent in bronchial epithelium. In contrast, expression of the anti-oxidant hemeoxygenase, and the anti-inflammatory collectin, surfactant protein-D, decreased in the lung after SM exposure. These data demonstrate that SM-induced oxidative stress and injury are associated with the generation of cytotoxic inflammatory proteins which may contribute to the pathogenic response to this vesicant.

  4. Clinical and electrophysiological parameters distinguishing acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Annie; Nicolle, Michael W; Hahn, Angelika F

    2010-02-01

    Up to 16% of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) patients may present acutely. We performed a retrospective chart review on 30 acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and 15 acute-onset CIDP (A-CIDP) patients looking for any clinical or electrophysiological parameters that might differentiate AIDP from acutely presenting CIDP. A-CIDP patients were significantly more likely to have prominent sensory signs. They were significantly less likely to have autonomic nervous system involvement, facial weakness, a preceding infectious illness, or need for mechanical ventilation. With regard to electrophysiological features, neither sural-sparing pattern, sensory ratio >1, nor the presence of A-waves was different between the two groups. This study suggests that patients presenting acutely with a demyelinating polyneuropathy and the aforementioned clinical features should be closely monitored as they may be more likely to have CIDP at follow-up.

  5. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production.

  6. Sesamin Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Inhibition of TLR4 Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Li; Yuan, Jiang; Shouyin, Jiang; Yulin, Li; Libing, Jiang; Jian-An, Wang

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies suggested that TLR4 signaling pathways played an important role in the development of LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Sesamin, a sesame lignan exacted from sesame seeds, has been shown to exhibit significant anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of sesamin on LPS-induced ALI in mice. Mice ALI model was induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS. Sesamin was given 1 h after LPS challenge. Our results showed that sesamin inhibited LPS-induced lung pathological change, edema, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Sesamin suppressed LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production. Furthermore, sesamin inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation. In conclusion, the results of this study indicated that sesamin protected against LPS-induced ALI by inhibition of TLR4 signaling pathways.

  7. Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppress oleic acid-induced acute lung injury via protein kinase A

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chaoyun; Huang, Qingxian; Wang, Chunhua; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Duan, Yunfeng; Yuan, Shuai; Bai, Xianyong

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation response and oxidative stress play important roles in acute lung injury (ALI). Activation of the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway may attenuate ALI by suppressing immune responses and inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a natural flavonoid compound that reduces oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine-mediated damage. In this study, we examined whether HSYA could protect the lungs from oleic acid (OA)-induced injury, which was used to mimic ALI, and determined the role of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in this process. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO{sub 2}), carbon dioxide tension, pH, and the PaO{sub 2}/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio in the blood were detected using a blood gas analyzer. We measured wet/dry lung weight ratio and evaluated tissue morphology. The protein and inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were determined using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, PKA, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and the concentrations of cAMP and malondialdehyde in the lung tissue were detected using assay kits. Bcl-2, Bax, caspase 3, and p22{sup phox} levels in the lung tissue were analyzed using Western blotting. OA increased the inflammatory cytokine and ROS levels and caused lung dysfunction by decreasing cAMP synthesis, inhibiting PKA activity, stimulating caspase 3, and reducing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. H-89 increased these effects. HSYA significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, inhibited the inflammatory response via cAMP/PKA pathway activation, and attenuated OA-induced lung injury. Our results show that the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is required for the protective effect of HSYA against ALI. - Highlights: • Oleic acid (OA) cause acute lung injury (ALI) via inhibiting cAMP/PKA signal pathway. • Blocking protein kinase A (PKA) activation may

  8. Operative wound implantation of inflammatory sarcomatoid carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Hata, Atsushi; Sekine, Yasuo; Koh, Eitetsu; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-09-01

    We describe a patient with iatrogenic chest wall implantation of inflammatory sarcomatoid carcinoma. A 43-year-old man underwent right partial lung resection for hemopneumothorax, with large bullae and an alveolar accumulation of histiocytes found on pathology. Three months later, a subcutaneous tumor appeared at a thoracoscopic port site. Needle aspiration of this tumor suggested a malignant neoplasm; therefore, a right upper lobectomy and chest wall resection were performed, and a pathologic diagnosis of sarcomatoid carcinoma was made. Pathologic reexamination of the original sample suggested that the tumor has been implanted in the patient's chest wall at the time of the first operation.

  9. Low Tidal Volume Ventilation in Patients Without Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weibing; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Ye; Zhu, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life threatening respiratory condition characterized by breakdown of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leading to flooding of the alveolar space producing the classical chest radiograph of bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. In this study, we employed lung protective ventilation strategies in patients without acute lung injury (ALI) to determine whether mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volume would provide more clinical benefits to patients without ALI.

  10. Inflammatory lung disease a potential risk factor for onset of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies: results from a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Helmers, Sevim Barbasso; Jiang, Xia; Pettersson, David; Wikman, Anna-Lis; Axelman, Pia; Lundberg, Åsa; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Alfredsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between inflammatory lung disease and the risk of developing idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Methods A population-based case–control study was conducted. Adult myositis cases, identified from the Swedish inpatient registry (diagnosed between 1995 and 1997), and randomly selected controls matched to cases on the date of birth, gender and residency, were asked to fill out a questionnaire with questions on lifestyle, environmental exposures and health. Eventually, 100 cases and 402 controls responded to the questionnaire and were included in the analyses. Exposure was defined as self-reported preceding inflammatory lung diseases (pneumonia, tuberculosis or sarcoidosis). The association between the exposure and risk of developing myositis was evaluated by calculating OR together with 95% CIs in logistic regressions. Results 42 (42%) cases and 112 (28%) controls reported preceding inflammatory lung disease. Median duration between inflammatory lung disease and first symptom of myositis was 30 years. We observed a significant association between self-reported history of lung disease at study inclusion and diagnosis of myositis (crude OR=1.8 (1.1 to 2.9); smoking adjusted OR=1.9 (1.2 to 3.1)). We further identified a modestly increased, yet non-significant, association between preceding inflammatory lung disease (prior to index year) and diagnosis of myositis (smoking adjusted OR=1.6 (0.9 to 2.8)). The association was more pronounced among the cases of myositis with concurrent interstitial lung disease (OR=3.8 (1.0 to 14.5)). Conclusions Patients with preceding inflammatory lung disease tend to have an increased risk of developing myositis compared to those without. The effect was more pronounced among patients with myositis with concurrent interstitial lung disease. Thus inflammatory lung disease may constitute a risk factor for myositis. PMID:28123774

  11. Preventing cleavage of Mer promotes efferocytosis and suppresses acute lung injury in bleomycin treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ye-Ji; Lee, Seung-Hae; Youn, Young-So; Choi, Ji-Yeon; Song, Keung-Sub; Cho, Min-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2012-08-15

    Mer receptor tyrosine kinase (Mer) regulates macrophage activation and promotes apoptotic cell clearance. Mer activation is regulated through proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain. To determine if membrane-bound Mer is cleaved during bleomycin-induced lung injury, and, if so, how preventing the cleavage of Mer enhances apoptotic cell uptake and down-regulates pulmonary immune responses. During bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in mice, membrane-bound Mer expression decreased, but production of soluble Mer and activity as well as expression of disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) were enhanced . Treatment with the ADAM inhibitor TAPI-0 restored Mer expression and diminished soluble Mer production. Furthermore, TAPI-0 increased Mer activation in alveolar macrophages and lung tissue resulting in enhanced apoptotic cell clearance in vivo and ex vivo by alveolar macrophages. Suppression of bleomycin-induced pro-inflammatory mediators, but enhancement of hepatocyte growth factor induction were seen after TAPI-0 treatment. Additional bleomycin-induced inflammatory responses reduced by TAPI-0 treatment included inflammatory cell recruitment into the lungs, levels of total protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in lung tissue. Importantly, the effects of TAPI-0 on bleomycin-induced inflammation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration of specific Mer-neutralizing antibodies. These findings suggest that restored membrane-bound Mer expression by TAPI-0 treatment may help resolve lung inflammation and apoptosis after bleomycin treatment. -- Highlights: ►Mer expression is restored by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►Mer signaling is enhanced by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►TAPI-0 enhances efferocytosis and promotes resolution of lung injury.

  12. Fibrin(ogen) mediates acute inflammatory responses to biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Although "biocompatible" polymeric elastomers are generally nontoxic, nonimmunogenic, and chemically inert, implants made of these materials may trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. Early interactions between implants and inflammatory cells are probably mediated by a layer of host proteins on the material surface. To evaluate the importance of this protein layer, we studied acute inflammatory responses of mice to samples of polyester terephthalate film (PET) that were implanted intraperitoneally for short periods. Material preincubated with albumin is "passivated," accumulating very few adherent neutrophils or macrophages, whereas uncoated or plasma- coated PET attracts large numbers of phagocytes. Neither IgG adsorption nor surface complement activation is necessary for this acute inflammation; phagocyte accumulation on uncoated implants is normal in hypogammaglobulinemic mice and in severely hypocomplementemic mice. Rather, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to be critical: (a) PET coated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma attracts as few phagocytes as does albumin-coated material; (b) in contrast, PET preincubated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma containing physiologic amounts of fibrinogen elicits "normal" phagocyte recruitment; (c) most importantly, hypofibrinogenemic mice do not mount an inflammatory response to implanted PET unless the material is coated with fibrinogen or the animals are injected with fibrinogen before implantation. Thus, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to initiate the acute inflammatory response to an implanted polymer, suggesting an interesting nexus between two major iatrogenic effects of biomaterials: clotting and inflammation. PMID:8245787

  13. PKC δ mediates pro-inflammatory responses in a mouse model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ramnath, Raina Devi; Sun, Jia; Bhatia, Madhav

    2010-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder of the pancreas. Protein kinase C (PKC) δ plays an important role in mediating chemokine production in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. This study aims to investigate the role of PKC δ in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and to explore the mechanisms through which PKC δ mediates pro-inflammatory signaling. Acute pancreatitis was induced in mice by ten hourly intraperitoneal injections of caerulein. PKC δ translocation inhibitor peptide (δV1-1) at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg or Tat (carrier peptide) at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg was administered to mice either 1 h before or 1 h after the first caerulein injection. One hour after the last caerulein injection, the mice were killed and pancreas, lungs, and blood were collected. Prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with δV1-1 attenuated caerulein-induced plasma amylase levels and pancreatic edema. Treatment with δV1-1 decreased myeloperoxidase activity and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels in both pancreas and plasma. PKC δ mediated acute pancreatitis by activating pancreatic nuclear factor κB, activator protein-1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Moreover, blockade of PKC δ attenuated lung myeloperoxidase activity and edema. Histological examination of pancreatic and lung sections confirmed protection against acute pancreatitis. Treatment with Tat had no protective effect on acute pancreatitis. Blockade of PKC δ represents a promising prophylactic and/or therapeutic tool for the treatment of acute pancreatitis.

  14. Adrenomedullin ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takefumi; Obata, Hiroaki; Murakami, Shinsuke; Hamada, Kaoru; Kangawa, Kenji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nagaya, Noritoshi

    2007-08-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), an endogenous peptide, has been shown to have a variety of protective effects on the cardiovascular system. However, the effect of AM on acute lung injury remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated whether AM infusion ameliorates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in rats. Rats were randomized to receive continuous intravenous infusion of AM (0.1 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) or vehicle through a microosmotic pump. The animals were intratracheally injected with either LPS (1 mg/kg) or saline. At 6 and 18 h after intratracheal instillation, we performed histological examination and bronchoalveolar lavage and assessed the lung wet/dry weight ratio as an index of acute lung injury. Then we measured the numbers of total cells and neutrophils and the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In addition, we evaluated BALF total protein and albumin levels as indexes of lung permeability. LPS instillation caused severe acute lung injury, as indicated by the histological findings and the lung wet/dry weight ratio. However, AM infusion attenuated these LPS-induced abnormalities. AM decreased the numbers of total cells and neutrophils and the levels of TNF-alpha and CINC in BALF. AM also reduced BALF total protein and albumin levels. In addition, AM significantly suppressed apoptosis of alveolar wall cells as indicated by cleaved caspase-3 staining. In conclusion, continuous infusion of AM ameliorated LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats. This beneficial effect of AM on acute lung injury may be mediated by inhibition of inflammation, hyperpermeability, and alveolar wall cell apoptosis.

  15. Expression changes of inflammatory factors in the rat lung of decompression sickness induced by fast buoyancy ascent escape.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Tao; Fang, Yi-Qun; You, Pu; Bao, Xiao-Chen; Yuan, Heng-Rong; Ma, Jun; Wang, Fang-Fang; Li, Kai-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Fast buoyancy ascent escape is one of the major naval submarine escape maneuvers. Decompression sickness (DCS) is the major bottleneck to increase the depth of fast buoyancy ascent escape. Rapid decompression induces the release of inflammatory mediators and results in tissue inflammation cascades and a protective anti-inflammatory response. In our previous study, we found that DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape could induce acute lung injury (ALI) and the expression changes of the proinflammatory cytokines: tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in rat lung tissue. In order to study the expression change characteristics of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 in the rat lung of DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape, we detected the rat lung mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 at 0.5 hour after DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape (fast escape group), compared with the normal control group (control group) and diving DCS (decompression group). We observed that DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape could increase the mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and the protein levels of TNF-α, IL-10 in rat lung tissue. At the same time, we found that the protein level of IL-13 was also downregulated in rat lung tissue. TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-13 may be involved in the process of the rat lung injury of DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape. In conclusion, the expression changes of inflammatory factors in the rat lung of DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape were probably different from that in the rat lung of diving DCS, which indicated that the pathological mechanism of DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape might be different from that of diving DCS.

  16. Protease-activated receptors and prostaglandins in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Terence; Henry, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel family of G protein-coupled receptors. Signalling through PARs typically involves the cleavage of an extracellular region of the receptor by endogenous or exogenous proteases, which reveals a tethered ligand sequence capable of auto-activating the receptor. A considerable body of evidence has emerged over the past 20 years supporting a prominent role for PARs in a variety of human physiological and pathophysiological processes, and thus substantial attention has been directed towards developing drug-like molecules that activate or block PARs via non-proteolytic pathways. PARs are widely expressed within the respiratory tract, and their activation appears to exert significant modulatory influences on the level of bronchomotor tone, as well as on the inflammatory processes associated with a range of respiratory tract disorders. Nevertheless, there is debate as to whether the principal response to PAR activation is an augmentation or attenuation of airways inflammation. In this context, an important action of PAR activators may be to promote the generation and release of prostanoids, such as prostglandin E2, which have well-established anti-inflammatory effects in the lung. In this review, we primarily focus on the relationship between PARs, prostaglandins and inflammatory processes in the lung, and highlight their potential role in selected respiratory tract disorders, including pulmonary fibrosis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article is part of a themed issue on Mediators and Receptors in the Resolution of Inflammation. To view this issue visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19845685

  17. Lung Transcriptomics during Protective Ventilatory Support in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Herrera, Marialbert; Lorenzo-Diaz, Fabian; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Corrales, Almudena; Valladares, Francisco; Klassert, Tilman E; Valladares, Basilio; Slevogt, Hortense; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Villar, Jesus; Flores, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe inflammatory process of the lung. The only proven life-saving support is mechanical ventilation (MV) using low tidal volumes (LVT) plus moderate to high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, it is currently unknown how they exert the protective effects. To identify the molecular mechanisms modulated by protective MV, this study reports transcriptomic analyses based on microarray and microRNA sequencing in lung tissues from a clinically relevant animal model of sepsis-induced ALI. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. At 24 hours post-CLP, septic animals were randomized to three ventilatory strategies: spontaneous breathing, LVT (6 ml/kg) plus 10 cmH2O PEEP and high tidal volume (HVT, 20 ml/kg) plus 2 cmH2O PEEP. Healthy, non-septic, non-ventilated animals served as controls. After 4 hours of ventilation, lung samples were obtained for histological examination and gene expression analysis using microarray and microRNA sequencing. Validations were assessed using parallel analyses on existing publicly available genome-wide association study findings and transcriptomic human data. The catalogue of deregulated processes differed among experimental groups. The 'response to microorganisms' was the most prominent biological process in septic, non-ventilated and in HVT animals. Unexpectedly, the 'neuron projection morphogenesis' process was one of the most significantly deregulated in LVT. Further support for the key role of the latter process was obtained by microRNA studies, as four species targeting many of its genes (Mir-27a, Mir-103, Mir-17-5p and Mir-130a) were found deregulated. Additional analyses revealed 'VEGF signaling' as a central underlying response mechanism to all the septic groups (spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated). Based on this data, we conclude that a co-deregulation of 'VEGF signaling' along with 'neuron projection morphogenesis

  18. Macrophage micro-RNA-155 promotes lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Liu, Zhi; Su, Jie; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Bai, San-Xing; Zhang, Jin-Zhou; Yu, Shi-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Micro-RNA (miR)-155 is a novel gene regulator with important roles in inflammation. Herein, our study aimed to explore the role of miR-155 in LPS-induced acute lung injury(ALI). ALI in mice was induced by intratracheally delivered LPS. Loss-of-function experiments performed on miR-155 knockout mice showed that miR-155 gene inactivation protected mice from LPS-induced ALI, as manifested by preserved lung permeability and reduced lung inflammation compared with wild-type controls. Bone marrow transplantation experiments identified leukocytes, but not lung parenchymal-derived miR-155-promoted acute lung inflammation. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of miR-155 in lung tissue was greatly elevated in wild-type mice after LPS stimulation. In situ hybridization showed that miR-155 was mainly expressed in alveolar macrophages. In vitro experiments performed in isolated alveolar macrophages and polarized bone marrow-derived macrophages confirmed that miR-155 expression in macrophages was increased in response to LPS stimulation. Conversely, miR-155 gain-of-function in alveolar macrophages remarkably exaggerated LPS-induced acute lung injury. Molecular studies identified the inflammation repressor suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS-1) as the downstream target of miR-155. By binding to the 3'-UTR of the SOCS-1 mRNA, miR-155 downregulated SOCS-1 expression, thus, permitting the inflammatory response during lung injury. Finally, we generated a novel miR-155 knockout rat strain and showed that the proinflammatory role of miR-155 was conserved in rats. Our study identified miR-155 as a proinflammatory factor after LPS stimulation, and alveolar macrophages-derived miR-155 has an important role in LPS-induced ALI.

  19. Acute lung injury in fulminant hepatic failure following paracetamol poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Baudouin, S. V.; Howdle, P.; O'Grady, J. G.; Webster, N. R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--There is little information on the incidence of acute lung injury or changes in the pulmonary circulation in acute liver failure. The aim of this study was to record the incidence of acute lung injury in fulminant hepatic failure caused by paracetamol poisoning, to document the associated pulmonary circulatory changes, and to assess the impact of lung injury on patient outcome. METHODS--The degree of lung injury was retrospectively assessed by a standard scoring system (modified from Murray) in all patients with fulminant hepatic failure caused by paracetamol poisoning, admitted to the intensive care unit over a one year period. The severity of liver failure and illness, other organ system failure, and patient outcome were also analysed. RESULTS--Twenty four patients with paracetamol-induced liver failure were admitted and nine developed lung injury of whom eight (33%) had severe injury (Murray score > 2.5). In two patients hypoxaemia contributed to death. Patients with lung injury had higher median encephalopathy grades (4 v 2 in the non-injured group) and APACHE II scores (29 v 16). Circulatory failure, requiring vasoconstrictor support, occurred in all patients with lung injury but in only 40% of those without. Cerebral oedema, as detected by abnormal rises in intracranial pressure, also occurred in all patients with lung injury but in only 27% of the non-injured patients. The incidence of renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy was similar in both groups (67% and 47%). Pulmonary artery occlusion pressures were normal in the lung injury group. Cardiac output was high (median 11.2 1/min), systemic vascular resistance low (median 503 dynes/s/cm-5), and pulmonary vascular resistance low (median 70 dynes/s/cm-5), but not significantly different from the group without lung injury. Mortality was much higher in the lung injury group than in the non-injured group (89% v 13%). CONCLUSIONS--Acute lung injury was common in patients with paracetamol

  20. Lung contusion: inflammatory mechanisms and interaction with other injuries.

    PubMed

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Notter, Robert H; Davidson, Bruce A; Helinski, Jadwiga D; Kunkel, Steven L; Knight, Paul R

    2009-08-01

    This article reviews current animal models and laboratory studies investigating the pathophysiology of lung contusion (LC), a common and severe condition in patients with blunt thoracic trauma. Emphasis is on studies elucidating cells, mediators, receptors, and processes important in the innate pulmonary inflammatory response that contribute to LC injury. Surfactant dysfunction in the pathogenesis of LC is also discussed, as is the potential role of epithelial cell or neutrophil apoptosis. Studies examining combination injuries where LC is exacerbated by secondary insults such as gastric aspiration in trauma patients are also noted. The need for continuing mechanism-based research to further clarify the pathophysiology of LC injury, and to define and test potential therapeutic interventions targeting specific aspects of inflammation or surfactant dysfunction to improve clinical outcomes in patients with LC, is also emphasized.

  1. Obesity-induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Causes Lung Endothelial Dysfunction and Promotes Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Guo, Zhi; Sun, Jianxin; Li, Jonathan; Kallen, Caleb B; Naik, Ulhas P; Summer, Ross

    2017-03-09

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. We recently showed that diet-induced obese (DIO) mice exhibit pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction which is associated with enhanced susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Here, we demonstrate that lung endothelial dysfunction in DIO mice coincides with increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Specifically, we observed enhanced expression of the major sensors of misfolded proteins including PERK, IREα and ATF6, in whole lung and in lung endothelial cells isolated from DIO mice. Further, we found that lung endothelial cells exposed to serum from obese mice, or to saturated fatty acids that mimic obese serum, resulted in enhanced expression of markers of ER stress and the induction of other biological responses that typify the lung endothelium of DIO mice. Similar changes were observed in lung endothelial cells and in whole lung tissue after exposure to tunicamycin, a compound that causes ER stress by blocking N-linked glycosylation; indicating that ER stress causes endothelial dysfunction in the lung. Treatment with 4-PBA, a chemical protein chaperone that reduces ER stress, restored vascular endothelial cell expression of adhesion molecules and protected against LPS-induced acute lung injury in DIO mice. Our work indicates that fatty acids in obese serum induce ER stress in the pulmonary endothelium leading to pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. Our work suggests that reducing protein load in the endoplasmic reticulum of pulmonary endothelial cells might protect against ARDS in obese individuals.

  2. Body temperature control in sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Giueng-Chueng; Chi, Wei-Ming; Perng, Wan-Cherng; Huang, Kun-Lun

    2003-12-31

    Body temperature is precisely regulated to maintain homeostasis in homeothermic animals. Although it remains unproved whether change of body temperature constitutes a beneficial or a detrimental component of the septic response, temperature control should be an important entity in septic experiments. We investigated the effect of body temperature control on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Acute lung injury in rats was induced by intratracheal spray of LPS and body temperature was either clamped at 37 degrees C for 5 hours or not controlled. The severity of lung injury was evaluated at the end of the experiment. Intratracheal administration of aerosolized LPS caused a persistent decline in body temperature and a significant lung injury as indicated by an elevation of protein-concentration and LDH activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio of lungs. Administration of LPS also caused neutrophil sequestration and lipid peroxidation in the lung tissue as indicated by increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) production, respectively. Control of body temperature at 37 degrees C after LPS (LPS/BT37, n = 11) significantly reduced acute lung injury as evidenced by decreases in BAL fluid protein concentration (983 +/- 189 vs. 1403 +/- 155 mg/L) and LDH activity (56 +/- 10 vs. 123 +/- 17 deltamAbs/min) compared with the LPS group (n = 11). Although the W/D ratio of lung and MDA level were lower in the rats received temperature control compared with those received LPS only, the differences were not statistically significant. Our results demonstrated that intratracheal administration of aerosolized LPS induced a hypothermic response and acute lung injury in rats and controlling body temperature at a normal range may alleviate the LPS-induced lung injury.

  3. Pentoxifylline attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced acute lung injury, oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Vasanthi R; Vayas, Kinal N; Cervelli, Jessica A; Malaviya, Rama; Hall, LeRoy; Massa, Christopher B; Gow, Andrew J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic alkylating agent that causes damage to the respiratory tract. Evidence suggests that macrophages and inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α contribute to pulmonary injury. Pentoxifylline is a TNFα inhibitor known to suppress inflammation. In these studies, we analyzed the ability of pentoxifylline to mitigate NM-induced lung injury and inflammation. Exposure of male Wistar rats (150-174 g; 8-10 weeks) to NM (0.125 mg/kg, i.t.) resulted in severe histopathological changes in the lung within 3d of exposure, along with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell number and protein, indicating inflammation and alveolar-epithelial barrier dysfunction. This was associated with increases in oxidative stress proteins including lipocalin (Lcn)2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in the lung, along with pro-inflammatory/cytotoxic (COX-2(+) and MMP-9(+)), and anti-inflammatory/wound repair (CD163+ and Gal-3(+)) macrophages. Treatment of rats with pentoxifylline (46.7 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 3d beginning 15 min after NM significantly reduced NM-induced lung injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress, as measured histologically and by decreases in BAL cell and protein content, and levels of HO-1 and Lcn2. Macrophages expressing COX-2 and MMP-9 also decreased after pentoxifylline, while CD163+ and Gal-3(+) macrophages increased. This was correlated with persistent upregulation of markers of wound repair including pro-surfactant protein-C and proliferating nuclear cell antigen by Type II cells. NM-induced lung injury and inflammation were associated with alterations in the elastic properties of the lung, however these were largely unaltered by pentoxifylline. These data suggest that pentoxifylline may be useful in treating acute lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress induced by vesicants.

  4. Therapeutic lymphangiogenesis ameliorates established acute lung allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Monzon-Medina, Maria E.; Padera, Robert F.; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Toprak, Demet; Abdelnour, Elie; D’Agostino, Emmanuel; Goldberg, Hilary J.; Perrella, Mark A.; Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Rosas, Ivan O.; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is the only viable option for patients suffering from otherwise incurable end-stage pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Despite aggressive immunosuppression, acute rejection of the lung allograft occurs in over half of transplant recipients, and the factors that promote lung acceptance are poorly understood. The contribution of lymphatic vessels to transplant pathophysiology remains controversial, and data that directly address the exact roles of lymphatic vessels in lung allograft function and survival are limited. Here, we have shown that there is a marked decline in the density of lymphatic vessels, accompanied by accumulation of low-MW hyaluronan (HA) in mouse orthotopic allografts undergoing rejection. We found that stimulation of lymphangiogenesis with VEGF-C156S, a mutant form of VEGF-C with selective VEGFR-3 binding, alleviates an established rejection response and improves clearance of HA from the lung allograft. Longitudinal analysis of transbronchial biopsies from human lung transplant recipients demonstrated an association between resolution of acute lung rejection and decreased HA in the graft tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that lymphatic vessel formation after lung transplantation mediates HA drainage and suggest that treatments to stimulate lymphangiogenesis have promise for improving graft outcomes. PMID:26485284

  5. Pathophysiological Approaches of Acute Respiratory Distress syndrome: Novel Bases for Study of Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, R.L; Carrasco Loza, R; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Experimental approaches have been implemented to research the lung damage related-mechanism. These models show in animals pathophysiological events for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), such as neutrophil activation, reactive oxygen species burst, pulmonary vascular hypertension, exudative edema, and other events associated with organ dysfunction. Moreover, these approaches have not reproduced the clinical features of lung damage. Lung inflammation is a relevant event in the develop of ARDS as component of the host immune response to various stimuli, such as cytokines, antigens and endotoxins. In patients surviving at the local inflammatory states, transition from injury to resolution is an active mechanism regulated by the immuno-inflammatory signaling pathways. Indeed, inflammatory process is regulated by the dynamics of cell populations that migrate to the lung, such as neutrophils and on the other hand, the role of the modulation of transcription factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS) sources, such as nuclear factor kappaB and NADPH oxidase. These experimental animal models reproduce key components of the injury and resolution phases of human ALI/ARDS and provide a methodology to explore mechanisms and potential new therapies. PMID:26312099

  6. Protective Effect of Isorhamnetin on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Li, Xiao-Ping; Ni, Yun-Feng; Du, Hong-Yin; Wang, Rong; Li, Ming-Jiang; Wang, Wen-Chen; Li, Ming-Ming; Wang, Xu-Hui; Li, Lei; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Jiang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Isorhamnetin has been reported to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-proliferative effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of isorhamnetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice by inhibiting the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The effects of isorhamnetin on LPS-induced lung pathological damage, wet/dry ratios and the total protein level in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inflammatory cytokine release, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA) level were examined. In addition, the COX-2 activation in lung tissues was detected by Western blot. Isorhamnetin pretreatment improved the mice survival rates. Moreover, isorhamnetin pretreatment significantly attenuated edema and the pathological changes in the lung and inhibited protein extravasation in BALF. Isorhamnetin also significantly decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines in BALF. In addition, isorhamnetin markedly prevented LPS-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment significantly suppressed LPS-induced activation of COX-2. Isorhamnetin has been demonstrated to protect mice from LPS-induced ALI by inhibiting the expression of COX-2.

  7. IL-6 ameliorates acute lung injury in influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chung-Teng; Yang, Shiu-Ju; Leu, Chia-Hsing; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is involved in innate and adaptive immune responses to defend against pathogens. It also participates in the process of influenza infection by affecting viral clearance and immune cell responses. However, whether IL-6 impacts lung repair in influenza pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of IL-6 in acute influenza infection in mice. IL-6-deficient mice infected with influenza virus exhibited higher lethality, lost more body weight and had higher fibroblast accumulation and lower extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover in the lung than their wild-type counterparts. Deficiency in IL-6 enhanced proliferation, migration and survival of lung fibroblasts, as well as increased virus-induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. IL-6-deficient lung fibroblasts produced elevated levels of TGF-β, which may contribute to their survival. Furthermore, macrophage recruitment to the lung and phagocytic activities of macrophages during influenza infection were reduced in IL-6-deficient mice. Collectively, our results indicate that IL-6 is crucial for lung repair after influenza-induced lung injury through reducing fibroblast accumulation, promoting epithelial cell survival, increasing macrophage recruitment to the lung and enhancing phagocytosis of viruses by macrophages. This study suggests that IL-6 may be exploited for lung repair during influenza infection. PMID:28262742

  8. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and other inflammatory demyelinating variants.

    PubMed

    Scolding, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated inflammatory central nervous system disorder characterized by acute or subacute onset of multifocal neurologic deficits with headache and impaired conscious level. Acute haemorrhagic leuoko-encephalitis (AHEM) is a more sever, often fatal variant. These disorders often follows a viral illness or vaccination, and are usually monophasic, though (probably more commonly in childhood) a multiphasic variant of ADEM is recognized. Because of the relative non-specificity of the clinical presentation (a sub-acute encephalopathy with focal signs), the differential diagnosis is wide; and distinction from the first episode of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis can occasionally be difficult. Here the clinical and investigational features of these disorders and their treatment are discussed.

  9. Effect of partial liquid ventilation on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema after experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, N R; Kozlowski, J K; Gust, R; Shapiro, S D; Schuster, D P

    2000-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with two different dosages of the perfluorocarbon LiquiVent (perflubron) on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema formation after oleic acid (OA)-induced acute lung injury in dogs. We used imaging with positron emission tomography to measure fractional pulmonary blood flow, lung water concentration (LWC), and the pulmonary transcapillary escape rate (PTCER) of (68)Ga-labeled transferrin at 5 and 21 h after lung injury in five dogs undergoing conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV), five dogs undergoing low-dose PLV (perflubron at 10 ml/kg), and four dogs undergoing high dose PLV (perflubron at 30 ml/kg). A positive end-expiratory pressure of 7.5 cm H(2)O was used in all dogs. After OA (0.08 ml/kg)- induced lung injury, there were no significant differences or trends for PTCER or LWC at any time when the PLV groups were compared with the CMV group. However, lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity was significantly lower in the combined PLV group than in the CMV group (p = 0.016). We conclude that after OA-induced lung injury, the addition of PLV to CMV does not directly attenuate pulmonary vascular leak or lung water accumulation. Rather, the benefits of such treatment may be due to modifications of the inflammatory response.

  10. Fatal transfusion related acute lung injury following coronary artery by-pass surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bawany, Fauzia Ahmad; Sharif, Hasanat

    2008-01-01

    Background Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a potentially fatal Acute Lung Injury following transfusion of blood components. Hypotheses implicate donor-derived anti-human leukocyte antigen or granulocyte antibodies reacting with recipients' leukocytes, releasing inflammatory mediators. Lack of agreement on underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms renders improving transfusion safety difficult and expensive. Case Presentation Literature search has not revealed any case of TRALI from Pakistan. We report the case of fatal TRALI in a 68 year old male who received blood products after coronary artery by-pass surgery. Conclusion This article aims to create awareness about this complication and suggests that post transfusion cardiopulmonary instability should alert to the possibility of TRALI. PMID:19055759

  11. Altered Exosomal RNA Profiles in Bronchoalveolar Lavage from Lung Transplants with Acute Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hoji, Aki; Injean, Patil; Poynter, Steven T.; Briones, Claudia; Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav; Sam Weigt, S.; Shino, Michael Y.; Derhovanessian, Ariss; Saggar, Rajan; Ross, David; Ardehali, Abbas; Lynch, Joseph P.; Belperio, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The mechanism by which acute allograft rejection leads to chronic rejection remains poorly understood despite its common occurrence. Exosomes, membrane vesicles released from cells within the lung allograft, contain a diverse array of biomolecules that closely reflect the biologic state of the cell and tissue from which they are released. Exosome transcriptomes may provide a better understanding of the rejection process. Furthermore, biomarkers originating from this transcriptome could provide timely and sensitive detection of acute cellular rejection (AR), reducing the incidence of severe AR and chronic lung allograft dysfunction and improving outcomes. Objectives: To provide an in-depth analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid exosomal shuttle RNA population after lung transplantation and evaluate for differential expression between acute AR and quiescence. Methods: Serial bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were ultracentrifuged to obtain the exosomal pellet for RNA extraction, on which RNA-Seq was performed. Measurements and Main Results: AR demonstrates an intense inflammatory environment, skewed toward both innate and adaptive immune responses. Novel, potential upstream regulators identified offer potential therapeutic targets. Conclusions: Our findings validate bronchoalveolar lavage fluid exosomal shuttle RNA as a source for understanding the pathophysiology of AR and for biomarker discovery in lung transplantation. PMID:26308930

  12. Lung parenchyma remodeling in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rocco, P R M; Dos Santos, C; Pelosi, P

    2009-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the most severe manifestation of acute lung injury (ALI), is described as a stereotyped response to lung injury with a transition from alveolar capillary damage to a fibroproliferative phase. Most ARDS patients survive the acute initial phase of lung injury and progress to either reparation of the lesion or evolution of the syndrome. Despite advances in the management of ARDS, mortality remains high (40%) and autopsies show extended pulmonary fibrosis in 55% of patients, suggesting the importance of deregulated repair in the morbidity and mortality of these patients. Factors influencing progression to fibroproliferative ARDS versus resolution and reconstitution of the normal pulmonary parenchymal architecture are poorly understood. Abnormal repair and remodeling may be profoundly affected by both environmental and genetic factors. In this line, mechanical ventilation may affect the macromolecules that constitute the extracellular matrix (collagen, elastin, fibronectin, laminin, proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycans), suffer changes and impact the biomechanical behavior of lung parenchyma. Furthermore, evidence suggests that acute inflammation and fibrosis may be partially independent and/or interacting processes that are autonomously regulated, and thus amenable to individual and specific therapies. In this review, we explore recent advances in the field of fibroproliferative ARDS/ALI, with special emphasis on 1) the physiological properties of the extracellular matrix, 2) the mechanisms of remodeling, 3) the impact of mechanical ventilation on lung fibrotic response, and (4) therapeutic interventions in the remodeling process.

  13. Multiphoton microscopy and microspectroscopy for diagnostics of inflammatory and neoplastic lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Flanders, James; Southard, Teresa L.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2012-03-01

    Limitations of current medical procedures for detecting early lung cancers inspire the need for new diagnostic imaging modalities for the direct microscopic visualization of lung nodules. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides for subcellular resolution imaging of intrinsic fluorescence from unprocessed tissue with minimal optical attenuation and photodamage. We demonstrate that MPM detects morphological and spectral features of lung tissue and differentiates between normal, inflammatory and neoplastic lung. Ex vivo MPM imaging of intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence was performed on mouse and canine neoplastic, inflammatory and tumor-free lung sites. Results showed that MPM detected microanatomical differences between tumor-free and neoplastic lung tissue similar to standard histopathology but without the need for tissue processing. Furthermore, inflammatory sites displayed a distinct red-shifted fluorescence compared to neoplasms in both mouse and canine lung, and adenocarcinomas displayed a less pronounced fluorescence emission in the 500 to 550 nm region compared to adenomas in mouse models of lung cancer. These spectral distinctions were also confirmed by two-photon excited fluorescence microspectroscopy. We demonstrate the feasibility of applying MPM imaging of intrinsic fluorescence for the differentiation of lung neoplasms, inflammatory and tumor-free lung, which motivates the application of multiphoton endoscopy for the in situ imaging of lung nodules.

  14. Limited inflammatory response in rats after acute exposure to a silicon carbide nanoaerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laloy, J.; Lozano, O.; Alpan, L.; Masereel, B.; Toussaint, O.; Dogné, J. M.; Lucas, S.

    2015-08-01

    Inhalation represents the major route of human exposure to manufactured nanomaterials (NMs). Assessments are needed about the potential risks of NMs from inhalation on different tissues and organs, especially the respiratory tract. The aim of this limited study is to determine the potential acute pulmonary toxicity in rats exposed to a dry nanoaerosol of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles (NPs) in a whole-body exposure (WBE) model. The SiC nanoaerosol is composed of a bimodal size distribution of 92.8 and 480 nm. The exposure concentration was 4.91 mg/L, close to the highest recommended concentration of 5 mg/L by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Rats were exposed for 6 h to a stable and reproducible SiC nanoaerosol under real-time measurement conditions. A control group was exposed to the filtered air used to create the nanoaerosol. Animals were sacrificed immediately, 24 or 72 h after exposure. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from rat lungs was recovered. Macrophages filled with SiC NPs were observed in the rat lungs. The greatest load of SiC and macrophages filled with SiC were observed on the rat lungs sacrificed 24 h after acute exposure. A limited acute inflammatory response was found up to 24 h after exposure characterized by a lactate dehydrogenase and total protein increase or presence of inflammatory cells in pulmonary lavage. For this study a WBE model has been developed, it allows the simultaneous exposure of six rats to a nanoaerosol and six rats to clean-filtered air. The nanoaerosol was generated using a rotating brush system (RBG-1000) and analyzed with an electrical low pressure impactor in real time.

  15. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): current clinical and pathophysiologic considerations.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Kelly; Dwyre, Denis M; Krochmal, Jessica; Raife, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare transfusion reaction presenting as respiratory distress during or after transfusion of blood products. TRALI varies in severity, and mortality is not uncommon. TRALI reactions have equal gender distributions and can occur in all age groups. All blood products, except albumin, have been implicated in TRALI reactions. TRALI presents as acute respiratory compromise occurring in temporal proximity to a transfusion of a blood product. Other causes of acute lung injury should be excluded in order to definitively diagnose TRALI. Clinically and pathologically, TRALI mimics acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), with neutrophil-derived inflammatory chemokines and cytokines believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of both entities. Anti-HLA and anti-neutrophil antibodies have been implicated in some cases of TRALI. Treatment for TRALI is supportive; prevention is important. It is suspected that TRALI is both underdiagnosed and underreported. One of the difficulties in the evaluation of potential TRALI reactions is, until recently, the lack of diagnostic criteria. A group of transfusion medicine experts, the American-European Consensus Conference (AECC), recently met and developed diagnostic criteria of TRALI, as well as recommendations for management of donors to prevent future TRALI reactions. In light of the AECC consensus recommendations, we report an incident of TRALI in an oncology patient as an example of the potential severity of the lung disease and the clinical and laboratory evaluation of the patient. We also review the literature on this important complication of blood transfusion that internists may encounter.

  16. Myeloid depletion of SOCS3 enhances LPS-induced acute lung injury through CCAAT/enhancer binding protein δ pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunguang; Ward, Peter A.; Wang, Ximo; Gao, Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    Although uncontrolled inflammatory response plays a central role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI), the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the development of this disorder remain poorly understood. SOCS3 is an important negative regulator of IL-6-type cytokine signaling. SOCS3 is induced in lung during LPS-induced lung injury, suggesting that generation of SOCS3 may represent a regulatory product during ALI. In the current study, we created mice lacking SOCS3 expression in macrophages and neutrophils (LysM-cre SOCS3fl/fl). We evaluated the lung inflammatory response to LPS in both LysM-cre SOCS3fl/fl mice and the wild-type (WT) mice (SOCS3fl/fl). LysM-cre SOCS3fl/fl mice displayed significant increase of the lung permeability index (lung vascular leak of albumin), neutrophils, lung neutrophil accumulation (myeloperoxidase activity), and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in bronchial alveolar lavage fluids compared to WT mice. These phenotypes were consistent with morphological evaluation of lung, which showed enhanced inflammatory cell influx and intra-alveolar hemorrhage. We further identify the transcription factor, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) δ as a critical downstream target of SOCS3 in LPS-induced ALI. These results indicate that SOCS3 has a protective role in LPS-induced ALI by suppressing C/EBPδ activity in the lung. Elucidating the function of SOCS3 would represent prospective targets for a new generation of drugs needed to treat ALI.—Yan, C., Ward, P. A., Wang, X., Gao, H. Myeloid depletion of SOCS3 enhances LPS-induced acute lung injury through CCAAT/enhancer binding protein δ pathway. PMID:23585399

  17. Effect of Long-Term Antiorthostatic Suspension in a Murine Model of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae Young; Jung, Ah-Yeoun; Kim, Young Hyo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Antiorthostatic suspension (AOS) is ground-based model of simulated microgravity. There is still no study about the effect of long-term microgravity on the clinical course of acute lung injury. We evaluated the effect of simulated microgravity using AOS in a murine model of acute lung injury by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods Thirty BALB/c mice were used. During 4 weeks, mice were equally allocated to control (free movement), restraint (tail suspended, but hindlimbs not unloaded), and AOS group (hindlimb unloaded). After then, mice got intranasal challenge with LPS (20 mg/kg, 50 μL). We measured: weight gain before and after AOS, the number of inflammatory cells and titers of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, titer of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in serum and lung homogenate, and histopathologic examination of lung tissue. Results AOS group had significant weight loss compared to control and restraint group (P<0.001). AOS group also showed significantly decreased lymphocytes (P=0.023) compared to control group. In AOS group, titer for IL-1β in BAL fluid was significantly lower than restraint group (P=0.049). Titer for serum MPO was significantly decreased in AOS group compared to restraint group (P=0.004). However, there was no significant difference of MPO titers in lung tissue between groups. Histopathologic examination of lung tissue revealed no significant difference in the degree of pulmonary infiltration between restraint and AOS group. Conclusion In spite of modest anti-inflammatory effect, prolonged AOS caused no significant change in LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation. PMID:27334509

  18. Acute coronary syndromes as auto-inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    From the onset to the healing stage of acute coronary syndromes, an endless inflammation has been presented with complex, multiple cross-talk mechanisms at the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. Even though the early reperfusion treatment either by thrombolysis or percutaneous coronary intervention provides the excellent clinical benefits in patients with acute coronary syndromes, ischemia/ reperfusion injury may somewhat offset those great advantages. Inflammation, although potentially protective, has been deeply associated with those detrimental conditions. The hexagonal vascular inflammatory network which is composed of activated various leukocytes, vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, platelets, excess reactive oxygen species, and cholesterol may contribute these vicious circles. To address these complex syndromes with more benefits regarding the prevention and treatment, this review comprehensively updates the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes from the view points of vascular inflammation.

  19. Potential Effects of Medicinal Plants and Secondary Metabolites on Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cornélio Favarin, Daniely; Robison de Oliveira, Jhony; Jose Freire de Oliveira, Carlo; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening syndrome that causes high morbidity and mortality worldwide. ALI is characterized by increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary membrane, edema, uncontrolled neutrophils migration to the lung, and diffuse alveolar damage, leading to acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Although corticosteroids remain the mainstay of ALI treatment, they cause significant side effects. Agents of natural origin, such as medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites, mainly those with very few side effects, could be excellent alternatives for ALI treatment. Several studies, including our own, have demonstrated that plant extracts and/or secondary metabolites isolated from them reduce most ALI phenotypes in experimental animal models, including neutrophil recruitment to the lung, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, edema, and vascular permeability. In this review, we summarized these studies and described the anti-inflammatory activity of various plant extracts, such as Ginkgo biloba and Punica granatum, and such secondary metabolites as epigallocatechin-3-gallate and ellagic acid. In addition, we highlight the medical potential of these extracts and plant-derived compounds for treating of ALI. PMID:24224172

  20. Effects of Liver × receptor agonist treatment on signal transduction pathways in acute lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Liver × receptor α (LXRα) and β (LXRβ) are members of the nuclear receptor super family of ligand-activated transcription factors, a super family which includes the perhaps better known glucocorticoid receptor, estrogen receptor, thyroid receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. There is limited evidence that LXL activation may reduces acute lung inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of T0901317, a potent LXR receptor ligand, in a mouse model of carrageenan-induced pleurisy. Methods Injection of carrageenan into the pleural cavity of mice elicited an acute inflammatory response characterized by: accumulation of fluid containing a large number of neutrophils (PMNs) in the pleural cavity, infiltration of PMNs in lung tissues and subsequent lipid peroxidation, and increased production of nitrite/nitrate (NOx), tumor necrosis factor-α, (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Furthermore, carrageenan induced the expression of iNOS, nitrotyrosine and PARP, as well as induced apoptosis (TUNEL staining and Bax and Bcl-2 expression) in the lung tissues. Results Administration of T0901317, 30 min after the challenge with carrageenan, caused a significant reduction in a dose dependent manner of all the parameters of inflammation measured. Conclusions Thus, based on these findings we propose that LXR ligand such as T0901317, may be useful in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. PMID:20175894

  1. Acute pneumonia in Zimbabwe: bacterial isolates by lung aspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeogu, M O

    1988-01-01

    Forty children, aged 2 months to 11 years, with severe acute pneumonia were investigated by needle aspiration of the lung. Fourteen organisms were isolated in only 13 patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated in six patients, Staphylococcus aureus in three, and Haemophilus influenzae in two. Two patients had mixed organisms. PMID:3196056

  2. Natural Antioxidant Betanin Protects Rats from Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further. PMID:25861636

  3. Niacinamide abrogates the organ dysfunction and acute lung injury caused by endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shang-Jyh; Liu, Demeral David; Su, Chain-Fa; Chen, Hsing I

    2007-09-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) synthabse (PARS) or polymerase (PARP) is a cytotoxic enzyme causing cellular damage. Niacinamide inhibits PARS or PARP. The present experiment tests the effects of niacinamide (NCA) on organ dysfunction and acute lung injury (ALI) following lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS was administered to anesthetized rats and to isolated rat lungs. In anesthetized rats, LPS caused systemic hypotension and increased biochemical factors, nitrate/nitrite (NOx), methyl guanidine (MG), tumor necrosis factoralpha (TNFalpha), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). In isolated lungs, LPS increased lung weight (LW) to body weight ratio, LW gain, protein and dye tracer leakage, and capillary permeability. The insult also increased NOx, MG, TNFalpha, and IL-1beta in lung perfusate, while decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content with an increase in PARP activity in lung tissue. Pathological examination revealed pulmonary edema with inflammatory cell infiltration. These changes were abrogated by posttreatment (30 min after LPS) with NCA. Following LPS, the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression was increased. NCA reduced the iNOS expression. Niacinamide exerts protective effects on the organ dysfunction and ALI caused by endotoxin. The mechanisms may be mediated through the inhibition on the PARP activity, iNOS expression and the subsequent suppression of NO, free radicals, and proinflammatory cytokines with restoration of ATP.

  4. Leptin attenuates lipopolysaccharide or oleic acid-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hai-Ying; Xu, Min; Ji, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Yan-Xia; Dong, Ming-Qing; Liu, Man-Ling; Xu, Dun-Quan; Zhao, Peng-Tao; Liu, Yi; Luo, Ying; Niu, Wen; Zhang, Bo; Ye, Jing; Li, Zhi-Chao

    2013-12-01

    Leptin is reported to be involved in acute lung injury (ALI). However, the role and underlying mechanisms of leptin in ALI remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether leptin deficiency promoted the development of ALI. LPS or oleic acid (OA) were administered to wild-type and leptin deficient (ob/ob) mice to induce ALI. Leptin level, survival rate, and lung injury were examined. Results showed that leptin levels were predominantly increased in the lung, but also in the heart, liver, kidney, and adipose tissue after LPS adminiatration. Compared with wild-type mice, LPS- or OA-induced lung injury was worse and the survival rate was lower in ob/ob mice. Moreover, leptin deficiency promoted the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Exogenous administration of leptin reduced lethality in ob/ob mice and ameliorated lung injury partly through inhibiting the activation of NF-κB, p38, and ERK pathways. These results indicated that leptin deficiency contributed to the development of lung injury by enhancing inflammatory response, and a high level of leptin improved survival and protected against ALI.

  5. Natural antioxidant betanin protects rats from paraquat-induced acute lung injury interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Han, Junyan; Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further.

  6. Type 2 Deiodinase and Host Responses of Sepsis and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shwu-Fan; Xie, Lishi; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Sammani, Saad; Wade, Michael S.; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Siegler, Jessica; Wang, Ting; Infusino, Giovanni; Kittles, Rick A.; Flores, Carlos; Zhou, Tong; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Villar, Jesus; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Dudek, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    The role of thyroid hormone metabolism in clinical outcomes of the critically ill remains unclear. Using preclinical models of acute lung injury (ALI), we assessed the gene and protein expression of type 2 deiodinase (DIO2), a key driver for synthesis of biologically active triiodothyronine, and addressed potential association of DIO2 genetic variants with ALI in a multiethnic cohort. DIO2 gene and protein expression levels in murine lung were validated by microarrays and immunoblotting. Lung injury was assessed by levels of bronchoalveolar lavage protein and leukocytes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped and ALI susceptibility association assessed. Significant increases in both DIO2 gene and D2 protein expression were observed in lung tissues from murine ALI models (LPS- and ventilator-induced lung injury), with expression directly increasing with the extent of lung injury. Mice with reduced levels of DIO2 expression (by silencing RNA) demonstrated reduced thyroxine levels in plasma and increased lung injury (increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and leukocytes), suggesting a protective role for DIO2 in ALI. The G (Ala) allele of the Thr92Ala coding single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs225014) was protective in severe sepsis and severe sepsis–associated ALI after adjustments for age, sex, and genetic ancestry in a logistic regression model in European Americans. Our studies indicate that DIO2 is a novel ALI candidate gene, the nonsynonymous Thr92Ala coding variant of which confers ALI protection. Increased DIO2 expression may dampen the ALI inflammatory response, thereby strengthening the premise that thyroid hormone metabolism is intimately linked to the integrated response to inflammatory injury in critically ill patients. PMID:21685153

  7. Resveratrol ameliorates LPS-induced acute lung injury via NLRP3 inflammasome modulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Kai; Fei, Dongsheng; Gong, Rui; Cao, Yanhui; Pan, Shangha; Zhao, Mingran; Zhao, Mingyan

    2016-12-01

    NLRP3 inflammasome plays a pivotal role in the development of acute lung injury (ALI), accelerating IL-1β and IL-18 release and inducing lung inflammation. Resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin, has anti-inflammatory properties via inhibition of oxidation, leukocyte priming, and production of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of resveratrol on NLRP3 inflammasome in lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI. Mice were intratracheally instilled with 3mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce ALI. Resveratrol treatment alleviated the LPS-induced lung pathological damage, lung edema and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, resveratrol reversed the LPS-mediated elevation of IL-1β and IL-18 level in the BAL fluids. In lung tissue, resveratrol also inhibited the LPS-induced NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1 mRNA and protein expression, and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, resveratrol administration not only suppressed the NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, NF-κB activity and ROS production in the LPS-treated mice, but also inhibited the LPS-induced thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) protein expression and interaction of TXNIP-NLRP3 in lung tissue. Meanwhile, resveratrol obviously induced SIRT1 mRNA and protein expression in the LPS-challenged mice. Taken together, our study suggests that resveratrol protects against LPS-induced lung injury by NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition. These findings further suggest that resveratrol may be of great value in the treatment of ALI and a potential and an effective pharmacological agent for inflammasome-relevant diseases.

  8. Ambient particulate air pollution from vehicles promotes lipid peroxidation and inflammatory responses in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C E L; Heck, T G; Saldiva, P H N; Rhoden, C R

    2007-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of particle-dependent lung injury. Ambient particle levels from vehicles have not been previously shown to cause oxidative stress to the lungs. The present study was conducted to a) determine whether short-term exposure to ambient levels of particulate air pollution from vehicles elicits inflammatory responses and lipid peroxidation in rat lungs, and b) determine if intermittent short-term exposures (every 4 days) induce some degree of tolerance. Three-month-old male Wistar rats were exposed to ambient particulate matter (PM) from vehicles (N = 30) for 6 or 20 continuous hours, or for intermittent (5 h) periods during 20 h for 4 consecutive days or to filtered air (PM <10 microm; N = 30). Rats continuously breathing polluted air for 20 h (P-20) showed a significant increase in the total number of leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage compared to control (C-20: 2.61 x 105 +/- 0.51;P-20: 5.01 x 105 +/- 0.81; P < 0.05) and in lipid peroxidation ([MDA] nmol/mg protein: C-20: 0.148 +/- 0.01; P-20: 0.226 +/- 0.02; P < 0.05). Shorter exposure (6 h) and intermittent 5-h exposures over a period of 4 days did not cause significant changes in leukocytes. Lipid damage resulting from 20-h exposure to particulate air pollution did not cause a significant increase in lung water content. These data suggest oxidative stress as one of the mechanisms responsible for the acute adverse respiratory effects of particles, and suggest that short-term inhalation of ambient particulate air pollution from street with high automobile traffic represents a biological hazard.

  9. A crucial role of nitric oxide in acute lung injury secondary to the acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Yan, Wen-Mao; Yang, Bin; Shi, Jing-dong; Song, Mao-min; Zhao, Yuqian

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in acute lung inflammation and injury secondary to acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), 5% sodium taurocholate was retrogradely injected into the biliopancreatic duct of rats to ANP model. These ANP rats were given L-Arginine (L-Arg, 100 mg/kg), L-NAME (10 mg/kg), or their combination by intraperitoneal injection 30 min prior to ANP induction. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours after ANP induction, lung NO production, and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression were measured. Lung histopathological changes, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein concentration, proinflammatory mediators tumor necrotic factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and lung tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were examined. Results showed that NO production and iNOS mRNA expression in alveolar macrophages (AMs) were significantly increased along with significant increases in lung histological abnormalities and BAL proteins in the ANP group, all of which were further enhanced by pretreatment with L-Arg and attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, respectively. These markers were slightly attenuated by pretreatment with combination of L-Arg + L-NAME, suggesting that NO is required for initiating the acute lung damage in ANP rats, and also that L-Arg-enhanced lung injury is mediated by its NO generation rather than its direct effect. MPO activity and TNF-alpha expression in lung were upregulated in the ANP rats and further enhanced by pretreatment with L-Arg and attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, respectively. These results suggest that overproduction of NO mediated by iNOS in the lung is required for the acute lung inflammation and damage secondary to ANP.

  10. Platelet Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor is a Potential Mediator of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, James P; Ambruso, Daniel R; Voelkel, Norbert F; Silliman, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    Objective The occurrence of non-hemolytic transfusion reactions is highest with platelet and plasma administration. Some of these reactions are characterized by endothelial leak, especially transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). Elevated concentrations of inflammatory mediators secreted by contaminating leukocytes during blood product storage may contribute to such reactions, but platelet-secreted mediators may also contribute. We hypothesized that platelet storage leads to accumulation of the endothelial permeability mediator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and that intravascular administration of exogenous VEGF leads to extensive binding to its lung receptors. Methods Single donor, leukocyte-reduced apheresis platelet units were sampled over 5 days of storage. VEGF protein content of the centrifuged supernatant was determined by ELISA, and the potential contribution of VEGF from contaminating leukocytes was quantified. Isolated-perfused rat lungs were used to study the uptake of radiolabeled VEGF administered intravascularly, and the effect of unlabeled VEGF on lung leak. Results There was a time-dependent release of VEGF into the plasma fraction of the platelet concentrates (62 ± 9 pg/ml on day one, 149 ± 23 pg/ml on day 5; mean ± SEM, p<0.01, n=8) and a contribution by contaminating leukocytes was excluded. Exogenous 125I-VEGF bound avidly and specifically to the lung vasculature, and unlabeled VEGF in the lung perfusate caused vascular leak. Conclusion Rising concentrations of VEGF occur during storage of single donor platelet concentrates due to platelet secretion or disintegration, but not due to leukocyte contamination. Exogenous VEGF at these concentrations rapidly binds to its receptors in the lung vessels. At higher VEGF concentrations, VEGF causes vascular leak in uninjured lungs. These data provide further evidence that VEGF may contribute to the increased lung permeability seen in TRALI associated with platelet products. PMID

  11. Interplay between Cellular and Molecular Inflammatory Mediators in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orozco-Morales, Mario; Soca-Chafre, Giovanny; Barrios-Bernal, Pedro; Hernández-Pedro, Norma; Arrieta, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a component of the tumor microenvironment and represents the 7th hallmark of cancer. Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. Tumor infiltrating inflammatory cells mediate processes associated with progression, immune suppression, promotion of neoangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, remodeling of extracellular matrix, invasion and metastasis, and, lastly, the inhibition of vaccine-induced antitumor T cell response. Accumulating evidence indicates a critical role of myeloid cells in the pathophysiology of human cancers. In contrast to the well-characterized tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), the significance of granulocytes in cancer has only recently begun to emerge with the characterization of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs). Recent studies show the importance of CD47 in the interaction with macrophages inhibiting phagocytosis and promoting the migration of neutrophils, increasing inflammation which can lead to recurrence and progression in lung cancer. Currently, therapies are targeted towards blocking CD47 and enhancing macrophage-mediated phagocytosis. However, antibody-based therapies may have adverse effects that limit its use. PMID:26941482

  12. Lung carcinogenesis from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and contribution of signal transducers and lung stem cells in the inflammatory microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yasuo; Hata, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are closely related. The annual incidence of lung cancer arising from COPD has been reported to be 0.8-1.7 %. Treatment of lung cancer from COPD is very difficult due to low cardiopulmonary function, rapid tumor growth, and resistance to molecularly targeted therapies. Chronic inflammation caused by toxic gases can induce COPD and lung cancer. Carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment occurs during cycles of tissue injury and repair. Cellular damage can induce induction of necrotic cell death and loss of tissue integrity. Quiescent normal stem cells or differentiated progenitor cells are introduced to repair injured tissues. However, inflammatory mediators may promote the growth of bronchioalveolar stem cells, and activation of NF-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) play crucial roles in the development of lung cancer from COPD. Many of the protumorgenic effects of NF-κB and STAT3 activation in immune cells are mediated through paracrine signaling. NF-κB and STAT3 also contribute to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. To improve lung cancer treatment outcomes, lung cancer from COPD must be overcome. In this article, we review the characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment. We also propose the necessity of identifying the mechanisms underlying progression of COPD to lung cancer, and comment on the clinical implications with respect to lung cancer prevention, screening, and therapy.

  13. Inflammatory impact of IFN-γ in CD8+ T cell-mediated lung injury is mediated by both Stat1-dependent and -independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; DeBerge, Matthew P.; Kumar, Aseem; Alia, Christopher S.; Durbin, Joan E.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza infection results in considerable pulmonary pathology, a significant component of which is mediated by CD8+ T cell effector functions. To isolate the specific contribution of CD8+ T cells to lung immunopathology, we utilized a nonviral murine model in which alveolar epithelial cells express an influenza antigen and injury is initiated by adoptive transfer of influenza-specific CD8+ T cells. We report that IFN-γ production by adoptively transferred influenza-specific CD8+ T cells is a significant contributor to acute lung injury following influenza antigen recognition, in isolation from its impact on viral clearance. CD8+ T cell production of IFN-γ enhanced lung epithelial cell expression of chemokines and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells into the airways. Surprisingly, Stat1 deficiency in the adoptive-transfer recipients exacerbated the lung injury that was mediated by the transferred influenza-specific CD8+ T cells but was still dependent on IFN-γ production by these cells. Loss of Stat1 resulted in sustained activation of Stat3 signaling, dysregulated chemokine expression, and increased infiltration of the airways by inflammatory cells. Taken together, these data identify important roles for IFN-γ signaling and Stat1-independent IFN-γ signaling in regulating CD8+ T cell-mediated acute lung injury. This is the first study to demonstrate an anti-inflammatory effect of Stat1 on CD8+ T cell-mediated lung immunopathology without the complication of differences in viral load. PMID:25617378

  14. Fisetin Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury via TLR4-Mediated NF-κB Signaling Pathway in Rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guang; Jiang, Ze-yu; Sun, Bo; Fu, Jie; Li, Tian-zuo

    2016-02-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), a common component of systemic inflammatory disease, is a life-threatening condition without many effective treatments. Fisetin, a natural flavonoid from fruits and vegetables, was reported to have wide pharmacological properties such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. The aim of this study was to detect the effects of fisetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury and investigate the potential mechanism. Fisetin was injected (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg, i.v.) 30 min before LPS administration (5 mg/kg, i.v.). Our results showed that fisetin effectively reduced the inflammatory cytokine release and total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF), decreased the lung wet/dry ratios, and obviously improved the pulmonary histology in LPS-induced ALI. Furthermore, fisetin inhibited LPS-induced increases of neutrophils and macrophage infiltration and attenuated MPO activity in lung tissues. Additionally, fisetin could significantly inhibit the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and the activation of NF-κB in lung tissues. Our data indicates that fisetin has a protective effect against LPS-induced ALI via suppression of TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways, and fisetin may be a promising candidate for LPS-induced ALI treatment.

  15. Peripheral nerve proteins as potential autoantigens in acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jia Pei; Devaux, Jérôme; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and acute motor axonal neuropathy. Whereas autoantibodies to GM1 or GD1a induce the development of acute motor axonal neuropathy, pathogenic autoantibodies have yet to be identified in acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. This review highlights the importance of autoantibodies to peripheral nerve proteins in the physiopathology of acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies. Moreover, we listed up other potential antigens, which may become helpful biomarkers for acquired, dysimmune demyelinating neuropathies based on their critical functions during myelination and their implications in hereditary demyelinating neuropathies.

  16. Transfusion related acute lung injury--TRALI: an under diagnosed entity.

    PubMed

    Moiz, Bushra; Sharif, Hasanat; Bawany, Fauzia Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening complication of transfusion of blood and its components resembling acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or acute lung injury (ALI). TRALI is a particular form of ARDS that follows blood transfusion and is caused by donor-derived antibodies present in the transfused products, reacting with the recipients' blood cells, inducing release of inflammatory mediators thus compromising lung functions. Anti-HLA antibodies are the most frequently indicted inducers in this category. Literature search has not revealed any documented case of TRALI from Pakistan. This in no way implies that TRALI is non existent in this part of the world but rather indicates that many clinicians may be unaware of the condition or may not recognize transfusion as the cause and like in other parts of the world, is almost certainly under-diagnosed. The lack of agreement on the definite cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of TRALI renders the task of improving the safety of blood transfusion far more complex and potentially quite expensive. This review discusses the modern concepts of pathogenesis of TRALI along with its clinicopathological manifestations and management with the aim to improve awareness of our clinicians towards this dreadful and potentially fatal condition.

  17. Clausena anisata-mediated protection against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chan-Mi; Shin, In-Sik; Shin, Na-Rae; Hong, Ju-Mi; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Bach, Tran-The; Hai, Do-Van; Quang, Bui-Hong; Choi, Sang-Ho; Lee, Joongku; Myung, Pyung-Keun; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2016-04-01

    Clausena anisata (Willd.) Hook.f. ex Benth. (CA), which is widely used in traditional medicine, reportedly exerts antitumor, anti-inflammatory and other important therapeutic effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential therapeutic effects of CA in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) and in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered treatments for 3 days by oral gavage. On day 3, the mice were instilled intranasally with LPS or PBS followed 3 h later by oral CA (30 mg/kg) or vehicle administration. In vitro, CA decreased nitric oxide (NO) production and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. CA also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenase-2. In vivo, CA administration significantly reduced inflammatory cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, and IL-1β, as well as reactive oxygen species production in the BALF. CA also effectively reduced airway inflammation in mouse lung tissue of an LPS-induced ALI mouse model, in addition to decreasing inhibitor κB (IκB) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 phosphorylation. Taken together, the findings demonstrated that CA inhibited inflammatory responses in a mouse model of LPS-induced ALI and in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Thus, CA is a potential candidate for development as an adjunctive treatment for inflammatory disorders, such as ALI.

  18. Lung function after acute chlorine exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.N.; Hughes, J.M.; Glindmeyer, H.; Weill, H.

    1986-12-01

    Chlorine gas, spreading from a train derailment, caused the deaths of 8 persons and the hospitalization of 23 with sublethal respiratory injuries. Twenty-five others had at least one sign of lower respiratory abnormality but were not hospitalized. One hundred thirteen who were examined for gas effects in the forty-eight hours after exposure, including 20 of 23 of those hospitalized and 21 of 25 of those not hospitalized but with respiratory abnormality, participated in follow-up studies. Probability of admission to hospital was related to distance from the spill, but by 3 wk after exposure there was no detectable difference in lung function relating to distance or apparent severity of injury. In 60 adults tested multiple times over the following 6 yr, longitudinal change in lung function showed expected differences related to smoking but none related to distance or severity of injury. The average annual change in FEV was -34 ml/yr in current smokers and -18 ml/yr in ex and never-smokers. The lack of a discernible chlorine effect in this cohort accords with the findings in most previous studies. Without pre-exposure measurements, a single, lasting reduction in lung function cannot be excluded, but there is no evidence for a persisting abnormal rate of decline.

  19. Metallothionein-induced zinc partitioning exacerbates hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Min; McLaughlin, Joseph N.; Frederick, Daniel R.; Zhu, Lin; Thambiayya, Kalidasan; Wasserloos, Karla J.; Kaminski, Iris; Pearce, Linda L.; Peterson, Jim; Li, Jin; Latoche, Joseph D.; Peck Palmer, Octavia M.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Fattman, Cheryl L.; Alcorn, John F.; Oury, Tim D.; Angus, Derek C.; Pitt, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Hypozincemia, with hepatic zinc accumulation at the expense of other organs, occurs in infection, inflammation, and aseptic lung injury. Mechanisms underlying zinc partitioning or its impact on extrahepatic organs are unclear. Here we show that the major zinc-binding protein, metallothionein (MT), is critical for zinc transmigration from lung to liver during hyperoxia and preservation of intrapulmonary zinc during hyperoxia is associated with an injury-resistant phenotype in MT-null mice. Particularly, lung-to-liver zinc ratios decreased in wild-type (WT) and increased significantly in MT-null mice breathing 95% oxygen for 72 h. Compared with female adult WT mice, MT-null mice were significantly protected against hyperoxic lung injury indicated by reduced inflammation and interstitial edema, fewer necrotic changes to distal airway epithelium, and sustained lung function at 72 h hyperoxia. Lungs of MT-null mice showed decreased levels of immunoreactive LC3, an autophagy marker, compared with WT mice. Analysis of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the lungs revealed similar levels of manganese-SOD activity between strains under normoxia and hyperoxia. Lung extracellular SOD activity decreased significantly in both strains at 72 h of hyperoxia, although there was no difference between strains. Copper-zinc-SOD activity was ∼4× higher under normoxic conditions in MT-null compared with WT mice but was not affected in either group by hyperoxia. Collectively the data suggest that genetic deletion of MT-I/II in mice is associated with compensatory increase in copper-zinc-SOD activity, prevention of hyperoxia-induced zinc transmigration from lung to liver, and hyperoxia-resistant phenotype strongly associated with differences in zinc homeostasis during hyperoxic acute lung injury. PMID:23275622

  20. Dasatinib Reduces Lung Inflammation and Fibrosis in Acute Experimental Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Horta, Lucas Felipe Bastos; Maia, Lígia de Albuquerque; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; da Silva, André Benedito; Morales, Marcelo Marco; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Takiya, Christina Maeda; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease with no effective treatment. We hypothesized that dasatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, might exhibit therapeutic efficacy in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Silicosis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by a single intratracheal administration of silica particles, whereas the control group received saline. After 14 days, when the disease was already established, animals were randomly assigned to receive DMSO or dasatinib (1 mg/kg) by oral gavage, twice daily, for 14 days. On day 28, lung morphofunction, inflammation, and remodeling were investigated. RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) were incubated with silica particles, followed by treatment or not with dasatinib, and evaluated for macrophage polarization. On day 28, dasatinib improved lung mechanics, increased M2 macrophage counts in lung parenchyma and granuloma, and was associated with reduction of fraction area of granuloma, fraction area of collapsed alveoli, protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β, and reduced neutrophils, M1 macrophages, and collagen fiber content in lung tissue and granuloma in silicotic animals. Additionally, dasatinib reduced expression of iNOS and increased expression of arginase and metalloproteinase-9 in silicotic macrophages. Dasatinib was effective at inducing macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype and reducing lung inflammation and fibrosis, thus improving lung mechanics in a murine model of acute silicosis. PMID:26789403

  1. Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of Lung Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Criteria for diagnosing ALI and predicting...Rationale: Smoke inhalation victims are at high risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Given the delay of 12 or more hours...Background: Although smoke inhalation injury victims frequently develop acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ), no early prognostic

  2. Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of Lung Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Given the delay of 12 or...Keywords: Inhalation Burns, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Interleukin-8, Interleukin- 1 beta. 4/14/2006 Markers of Smoke Inhalation Injury 2...Zimmerman 2005; Park et al., 2001), all hallmarks of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). The general

  3. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R.L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported. PMID:26312100

  4. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of formoterol and ipratropium bromide against acute cadmium-induced pulmonary inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Fievez, Laurence; Cheu, Esteban; Bureau, Fabrice; Rong, Weifang; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yong; Advenier, Charles; Gustin, Pascal

    2010-02-25

    In this study, the anti-inflammatory properties of formoterol and ipratropium bromide, alone or in combination, were investigated in a rat model of acute pulmonary inflammation induced by cadmium inhalation. Airway resistance and inflammatory responses, including matrix metalloproteinease-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinease-9 (MMP-9) activities, were evaluated. Compared to values obtained in rats exposed to cadmium, pretreatment by bronchodilators administered alone significantly prevented the cadmium-induced increase of airway resistance. Formoterol elicited a significant decrease in total cell number, neutrophil and macrophage counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas ipratropium bromide reduced neutrophil numbers. The two compounds administered alone significantly attenuated the lung lesions associated with parenchyma inflammatory cell influx and congestion observed in the cadmium group. The increased MMP-9 activity was significantly attenuated. Although only formoterol induced a decrease protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, both compounds inhibited the pulmonary edema by reducing wet-to-dry weight ratio which returned to values similar to those recorded in the sham group. All the effects of formoterol on the cadmium-induced inflammatory responses were reversed by propranolol. Similar anti-inflammatory effects were obtained in rats pretreated with ilomastat which showed a significant reduction on inflammatory cell infiltration and MMP-9 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Neither synergistic nor additive effects were obtained when the two bronchodilators were administered in combination. In conclusion, formoterol and ipratropium bromide partially protect the lungs against the inflammation by reducing neutrophilic infiltration. This protective effect is associated with reduced MMP-9 activity known to play an important pro-inflammatory role in acute inflammatory process.

  6. Protective Role of Liriodendrin in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Li, Dihua; Zhuo, Yuzhen; Zhang, Shukun; Wang, Ximo; Gao, Hongwei

    2016-10-01

    In current study, we investigated the role of liriodendrin, a constituent isolated from Sargentodoxa cuneata (Oliv.) Rehd. Et Wils (Sargentodoxaceae), in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced acute lung inflammatory response and injury (ALI). The inflammatory mediator levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Pathologic changes in lung tissues were evaluated via pathological section with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. To investigate the mechanism whereby liriodendrin regulates lung inflammation, the phosphorylation of the NF-kB (p65) and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined by western blot assay. We show that liriodendrin treatment significantly improved the survival rate of mice with CLP-induced sepsis. Pulmonary histopathologic changes, alveolar hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration were markedly decreased by liriodendrin. In addition, liriodendrin decreased the production of the proinflammatory mediators including (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, and IL-6) in lung tissues. Vascular permeability and lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) accumulation in the liriodendrin-treated mice were substantially reduced. Moreover, liriodendrin treatment significantly suppressed the expression of VEGF and activation of NF-kB in the lung. We further show that liriodendrin significantly reduced the production of proinflammatory mediators and downregulated NF-kB signaling in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Moreover, liriodendrin prevented the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by upregulating the expression of SIRT1 in RAW 264.7 cells. These findings provide a novel theoretical basis for the possible application of liriodendrin in clinic.

  7. Ketamine effect on HMGB1 and TLR4 expression in rats with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ming-Zhe; Gu, Qiu-Han; Tao, Jun; Song, Xiao-Yang; Gan, Guo-Sheng; Luo, Zhong-Bin; Li, Bi-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common emergency and severe case in clinic. High mobility group protein box 1 (HMGB1) can be treated as a new anti-inflammatory treatment target. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important receptor of HMGB1. Ketamine is a widely used intravenous anesthetic with good anti-inflammatory and immune regulating function. Whether it can protect ALI through inhibiting HMGB1 and TLR4 expression in lung tissue still needs further investigation. Male SD rats were randomly divided into control, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group and ketamine intervention group with 15 rats in each group. The rats were euthanatized at 24 h after modeling and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected for HMGB1 and TLR4 level detection. Western Blot was applied to analyze HMGB1 and TLR4 protein expression in the lung tissue. HMGB1 and TLR4 concentration in BALF were 5.369 ± 1.564 ng/ml and 43.980 ± 7.524 pg/ml in the control, respectively. They were 12.358 ± 4.681 ng/ml and 102.538 ± 8.412 pg/ml in LPS group, and 7.399 ± 2.346 ng/ml and 87.208 ± 7.558 pg/ml in ketamine intervention group, respectively. Their levels increased significantly in LPS group and down-regulated after ketamine intervention. HMGB1 and TLR4 protein expression in lung tissue elevated obviously in LPS group, and decreased after ketamine treatment. HMGB1 and TLR4 protein level showed positive correlation in lung tissue (r = 0.921, P < 0.001). Ketamine can inhibit HMGB1 and TLR4 expression in ALI, and alleviate LPS induced rat lung injury.

  8. Attenuation of acute nitrogen mustard-induced lung injury, inflammation and fibrogenesis by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Venosa, Alessandro; Hall, LeRoy; Gow, Andrew J.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-12-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic vesicant known to cause damage to the respiratory tract. Injury is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In these studies we analyzed the effects of transient inhibition of iNOS using aminoguanidine (AG) on NM-induced pulmonary toxicity. Rats were treated intratracheally with 0.125 mg/kg NM or control. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 1 d–28 d later and lung injury, oxidative stress and fibrosis assessed. NM exposure resulted in progressive histopathological changes in the lung including multifocal lesions, perivascular and peribronchial edema, inflammatory cell accumulation, alveolar fibrin deposition, bronchiolization of alveolar septal walls, and fibrosis. This was correlated with trichrome staining and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) was also increased in the lung following NM exposure, along with levels of protein and inflammatory cells in BAL, consistent with oxidative stress and alveolar-epithelial injury. Both classically activated proinflammatory (iNOS{sup +} and cyclooxygenase-2{sup +}) and alternatively activated profibrotic (YM-1{sup +} and galectin-3{sup +}) macrophages appeared in the lung following NM administration; this was evident within 1 d, and persisted for 28 d. AG administration (50 mg/kg, 2 ×/day, 1 d–3 d) abrogated NM-induced injury, oxidative stress and inflammation at 1 d and 3 d post exposure, with no effects at 7 d or 28 d. These findings indicate that nitric oxide generated via iNOS contributes to acute NM-induced lung toxicity, however, transient inhibition of iNOS is not sufficient to protect against pulmonary fibrosis. -- Highlights: ► Nitrogen mustard (NM) induces acute lung injury and fibrosis. ► Pulmonary toxicity is associated with increased expression of iNOS. ► Transient inhibition of iNOS attenuates acute

  9. [Incidence of acute pancreatitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Stawarski, Andrzej; Iwańczak, Franciszek

    2004-07-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate the frequency of acute pancreatitis and the frequency of increased activity of pancreatic enzymes in serum of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Analysis comprises 101 children aged from 3 to 18-years treated because of IBD in the period of 1998-2002: 79 children with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 22 children Crohn's disease (CD). The authors analyzed together 191 admissions because of UC and 51 because of CD. Acute pancreatitis was observed in 4.5% of children with CD and in 5.1% of children with UC. Significantly more often acute pancreatitis was recognized in children with moderate and severe stage of UC. Hyperamylasemia was observed in 27.3% of children with CD and in 12.7% of children with UC. Hyperlipasemia was observed only in children with UC (3.8%), elevated urinary amylase was observed in 4.5% of children with CD and in 8.86% children with UC. No correlations between the frequency of acute pancreatitis and medication were observed.

  10. Stem cell conditioned medium improves acute lung injury in mice: in vivo evidence for stem cell paracrine action

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Lavinia; Byrne, Roisin N.; van Haaften, Tim; Vadivel, Arul; Alphonse, Rajesh S.; Rey-Parra, Gloria J.; Weissmann, Gaia; Hall, Adam; Eaton, Farah

    2012-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome remain high because of the lack of pharmacological therapies to prevent injury or promote repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) prevent lung injury in various experimental models, despite a low proportion of donor-derived cell engraftment, suggesting that MSCs exert their beneficial effects via paracrine mechanisms. We hypothesized that soluble factors secreted by MSCs promote the resolution of lung injury in part by modulating alveolar macrophage (AM) function. We tested the therapeutic effect of MSC-derived conditioned medium (CdM) compared with whole MSCs, lung fibroblasts, and fibroblast-CdM. Intratracheal MSCs and MSC-CdM significantly attenuated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung neutrophil influx, lung edema, and lung injury as assessed by an established lung injury score. MSC-CdM increased arginase-1 activity and Ym1 expression in LPS-exposed AMs. In vivo, AMs from LPS-MSC and LPS-MSC CdM lungs had enhanced expression of Ym1 and decreased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase compared with untreated LPS mice. This suggests that MSC-CdM promotes alternative macrophage activation to an M2 “healer” phenotype. Comparative multiplex analysis of MSC- and fibroblast-CdM demonstrated that MSC-CdM contained several factors that may confer therapeutic benefit, including insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Recombinant IGF-I partially reproduced the lung protective effect of MSC-CdM. In summary, MSCs act through a paracrine activity. MSC-CdM promotes the resolution of LPS-induced lung injury by attenuating lung inflammation and promoting a wound healing/anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype in part via IGF-I. PMID:23023971

  11. Autophagy in pulmonary macrophages mediates lung inflammatory injury via NLRP3 inflammasome activation during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Gongjian; Dull, Randal O; Schwartz, David E; Hu, Guochang

    2014-07-15

    The inflammatory response is a primary mechanism in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process by which cells break down their own components. We explored the role of autophagy in the mechanisms of mechanical ventilation-induced lung inflammatory injury. Mice were subjected to low (7 ml/kg) or high (28 ml/kg) tidal volume ventilation for 2 h. Bone marrow-derived macrophages transfected with a scrambled or autophagy-related protein 5 small interfering RNA were administered to alveolar macrophage-depleted mice via a jugular venous cannula 30 min before the start of the ventilation protocol. In some experiments, mice were ventilated in the absence and presence of autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (15 mg/kg ip) or trichostatin A (1 mg/kg ip). Mechanical ventilation with a high tidal volume caused rapid (within minutes) activation of autophagy in the lung. Conventional transmission electron microscopic examination of lung sections showed that mechanical ventilation-induced autophagy activation mainly occurred in lung macrophages. Autophagy activation in the lungs during mechanical ventilation was dramatically attenuated in alveolar macrophage-depleted mice. Selective silencing of autophagy-related protein 5 in lung macrophages abolished mechanical ventilation-induced nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation and lung inflammatory injury. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also significantly attenuated the inflammatory responses caused by lung hyperinflation. The activation of autophagy in macrophages mediates early lung inflammation during mechanical ventilation via NLRP3 inflammasome signaling. Inhibition of autophagy activation in lung macrophages may therefore provide a novel and promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of ventilator-induced lung injury.

  12. Rosiglitazone dampens pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mirakaj, Valbona; Mutz, Christian; Vagts, Dierk; Henes, Janek; Haeberle, Helene A; Husung, Susanne; König, Tony; Nöldge-Schomburg, Gabriele; Rosenberger, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The hallmarks of acute lung injury (ALI) are the compromised alveolar-capillary barrier and the extravasation of leukocytes into the alveolar space. Given the fact that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist rosiglitazone holds significant anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone could dampen these hallmarks of local pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of lung injury. For this purpose, we used a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 μg/kg)-induced ALI. One hundred twenty minutes following the infusion of LPS, we started the exposure to rosiglitazone through inhalation or infusion. We found that intravenous rosiglitazone significantly controlled local pulmonary inflammation as determined through the expression of cytokines within the alveolar compartment. Furthermore, we found a significant reduction of the protein concentration and neutrophil activity within the alveolar space. In summary, we therefore conclude that the treatment with rosiglitazone might dampen local pulmonary inflammation during the initial stages of ALI.

  13. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut . E-mail: jaeschke@email.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose.

  14. Dexmedetomidine attenuates inflammatory reaction in the lung tissues of septic mice by activating cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoguo; Wang, Yueping; Wang, Yaoqi; Ning, Qiaoqing; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Chunzhi; Zhao, Wenxiang; Jing, Guangjian; Wang, Qianqian

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine (Dex) is a highly selective α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that is widely used for sedation in intensive care units and in clinical anesthesia. Dex has also been shown to possess anti-inflammatory benefits. However, the underlying mechanism by which Dex relieves the inflammatory reaction in the lung tissues of septic mice has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the protective effects and possible mechanism of Dex on the sepsis-induced lung inflammatory response in mice. Sepsis was induced in mice models through the intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The preemptive administration of Dex substantially abated sepsis-induced pulmonary edema, pulmonary histopathological changes, and NF-κB p65 activity. The production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) at both the mRNA and protein levels was also reduced. Moreover, these effects were significantly blocked by the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) antagonist α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt). α-Bgt aggravated pulmonary edema and pulmonary histopathological changes, as well as increased NF-κB p65 activity and TNF-α and IL-6 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. The overall results demonstrate that Dex inhibits the LPS-induced inflammatory reaction in the lung tissues of septic mice partly through the α7nAChR-dependent cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

  15. Acute anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled budesonide in asthma: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gibson, P G; Saltos, N; Fakes, K

    2001-01-01

    Corticosteroids can have acute effects on airway function and methacholine airway responsiveness in asthma as early as 6 h after dosing, suggesting there may be an acute anti-inflammatory effect of inhaled corticosteroid in asthma. This study aimed to determine the effects of a single dose of inhaled budesonide on sputum eosinophils and mast cells in adults with asthma, and to examine whether the mechanism of clearance of eosinophils was by apoptosis. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was conducted. At the screening visit, adults with stable asthma (n = 41) ceased inhaled corticosteroid therapy for 4 d and those with significant sputum eosinophilia (> or = 7%) were randomized (n = 26) to a single dose of budesonide 2,400 microg or placebo via Turbuhaler, on two separate study days. Symptoms and lung function were followed for 6 h, then sputum was induced and airway responsiveness to hypertonic saline determined. Sputum eosinophils (mean, SE) were significantly lower 6 h after budesonide (25%, 4.5), compared with placebo (37%, 6.2, p < 0.05). There was a 2.2-fold (95% CI 1.45 to 3.33) improvement in airway responsiveness with budesonide. No significant difference was seen on mast cells, apoptotic eosinophils, symptoms, or lung function. In conclusion, a single dose of inhaled corticosteroids has beneficial effects on airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness as early as 6 h after dosing. This may be clinically useful as therapy during mild exacerbations of asthma.

  16. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  17. [Current concept of TRALI (transfusion-related acute lung injury)].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takehiko; Okazai, Hitoshi

    2007-11-01

    It is only 20 years since TRALI was clinically recognized. As it is gradually recognized among Japanese medical community, the number of cases reported is increasing gradually. In the past nine years (1997-2005), Japanese Red Cross confirmed 118 TRALI cases and 38 possible TRALI cases in Japan. Twelve TRALI cases among them occurred during or after anesthesia on the day of operation. Since acute lung injury is caused by multiple pathological factors, it is difficult to identify its main cause as transfusion. Therefore, TRALI has been underdiagnosed and underreported. Several mechanisms have been proposed. Although anti-HLA antibody, anti-HNA antibody, or other immunoreactive substances appear to be involved in developing TRALI, underlying conditions like systemic inflammation may be required for igniting TRALI Although TRALI developed in the operating theater seems to be a small fraction of whole TRALI cases, anesthesiologists should be aware of TRALI, and remember it as one of the causes of acute lung injury.

  18. The nervous system of airways and its remodeling in inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Audrit, Katrin Julia; Delventhal, Lucas; Aydin, Öznur; Nassenstein, Christina

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory lung diseases are associated with bronchospasm, cough, dyspnea and airway hyperreactivity. The majority of these symptoms cannot be primarily explained by immune cell infiltration. Evidence has been provided that vagal efferent and afferent neurons play a pivotal role in this regard. Their functions can be altered by inflammatory mediators that induce long-lasting changes in vagal nerve activity and gene expression in both peripheral and central neurons, providing new targets for treatment of pulmonary inflammatory diseases.

  19. Protective effect of magnolol-loaded polyketal microparticles on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsuimin; Kao, Chen-Yu; Chou, Chun-Liang; Liu, Lu-Chun; Chou, Tz-Chong

    2016-08-01

    Magnolol has shown inhibitory effects on NO production and TNF-alpha production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages and LPS-induced acute lung injury; however, the poor solubility of magnolol has hindered its clinical success. In this study, magnolol-loaded microparticles were prepared via single emulsion method from a polyketal polymer, termed PK3. The particle sizes of magnolol-loaded PK3 microparticle is 3.73 ± 0.41 μm, and was suitable for phagocytosis by macrophages and pulmonary drug delivery. PK3 microparticles exhibited excellent biocompatibility both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, intratracheal delivery of these magnolol-loaded microparticles significantly reduced the lung inflammatory responses at low dosage of magnolol (0.5 mg/kg), and have great clinical potential in treating acute lung injury.

  20. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI): a review.

    PubMed

    Menitove, Jay E

    2007-01-01

    Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury, or TRALI, denotes the most frequently reported fatal complication of blood transfusion. TRALI accounted for 34% of transfusion associated mortalities reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2005. TRALI caused more deaths than those attributed to hemolytic reactions following incorrect blood administration or sepsis resulting from bacterial contamination of platelet and red cell components. (Holness, Leslie. Food and Drug Administration. Personal Communication, 2006) This paper reviews TRALI for the clinical physician.

  1. Presumptive acute lung injury following multiple surgeries in a cat.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Masaaki; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Rieko; Sasaki, Jun; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Uzuka, Yuji; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Nezu, Yoshinori

    2013-04-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.5-kg spayed female domestic shorthair cat had a tracheal mass identified as malignant B-cell lymphoma. The cat had tracheal resection and subsequently developed laryngeal paralysis. Due to multiple episodes of respiratory distress the cat subsequently had tracheal surgeries. Finally, the cat had a sudden onset of severe respiratory distress and collapsed. Computed tomography imaging and arterial blood gas analysis supported a diagnosis of acute lung injury.

  2. Trapa japonica Pericarp Extract Reduces LPS-Induced Inflammation in Macrophages and Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yon-Suk; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Son, Sangkeun; Seo, Il-Bok; Jeong, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ee-Hwa; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2016-03-21

    In this study, we found that chloroform fraction (CF) from TJP ethanolic extract inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular ROS in RAW264.7 cells. In addition, expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) genes was reduced, as evidenced by western blot. Our results indicate that CF exerts anti-inflammatory effects by down-regulating expression of iNOS and COX-2 genes through inhibition of MAPK (ERK, JNK and p38) and NF-κB signaling. Similarly we also evaluated the effects of CF on LPS-induced acute lung injury. Male Balb/c mice were pretreated with dexamethasone or CF 1 h before intranasal instillation of LPS. Eight hours after LPS administration, the inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined. The results indicated that CF inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production in a dose dependent manner. It was also observed that CF attenuated LPS-induced lung histopathologic changes. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the protective effect of CF on LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice might relate to the suppression of excessive inflammatory responses in lung tissue. Thus, it can be suggested that CF might be a potential therapeutic agent for ALI.

  3. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing.

  4. Peptide nanomedicines for treatment of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represent a heterogenous group of lung disease in critically ill patients. Despite the increased understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of ARDS, the mortality remains unacceptably high, ranging from 34% to 64%. Hence, ARDS represents an unmet medical need with an urgency to develop effective pharmacotherapies. Several promising targets that have been identified as potential therapies for ARDS have been limited because of difficulty with delivery. In particular, delivery of peptides and proteins to the lung is an ongoing challenge. Nanobiotechnology and nanoscience are the basis of innovative techniques to deliver drugs targeted to the site of inflamed organs, such as the lungs. Nanoscale drug delivery systems have the ability to improve the pharmacokinetics and pharmakodynamics of agents allowing an increase in the biodistribution of therapeutic agents to target organs, resulting in improved efficacy with reduction in drug toxicity. These systems are exploited for therapeutic purpose to carry the drug in the body in a controlled manner from the site of administration to the therapeutic target. Hence, it is an attractive strategy to test potential targets for ALI/ARDS using nanotechnology. To this end, we have identified several potential targets and proposed the delivery of these agents using nanomicelles to improve the drug delivery.

  5. [Acute lung injury as a consequence of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moyado, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) has been recognized as a consequence of blood transfusion (BT) since 1978; the Food and Drug Administration, has classified it as the third BT mortality issue, in 2004, and in first place related with ALI. It can be mainly detected as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The clinical onset is: severe dyspnea, bilateral lung infiltration and low oxygen saturation. In USA, ARDS has an incidence of three to 22.4 cases/100 000 inhabitants, with 58.3 % mortality. TACO and TRALI are less frequent; they have been reported according to the number of transfusions: one in 1275 to 6000 for TRALI and one in 356 transfusions for TACO. Mortality is reported from two to 20 % in TRALI and 20 % in TACO. Antileukocyte antibodies in blood donors plasma, caused TRALI in 89 % of cases; also it has been found antigen specificity against leukocyte blood receptor in 59 %. The UCI patients who received a BT have ALI as a complication in 40 % of cases. The capillary pulmonary endothelia is the target of leukocyte antibodies and also plasma biologic modifiers of the stored plasma, most probable like a Sanarelli-Shwar-tzman phenomenon.

  6. Stimulation of Brain AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mulchandani, Nikhil; Yang, Weng-Lang; Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Zhang, Fangming; Marambaud, Philippe; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are enormous public health problems with astronomical financial repercussions on health systems worldwide. The central nervous system (CNS) is closely intertwined in the septic process but the underlying mechanism is still obscure. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a ubiquitous energy sensor enzyme and plays a key role in regulation of energy homeostasis and cell survival. In this study, we hypothesized that activation of AMPK in the brain would attenuate inflammatory responses in sepsis, particularly in the lungs. Adult C57BL/6 male mice were treated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR, 20 ng), an AMPK activator, or vehicle (normal saline) by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection, followed by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) at 30 min post-ICV. The septic mice treated with AICAR exhibited elevated phosphorylation of AMPKα in the brain along with reduced serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), compared with the vehicle. Similarly, the expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β, keratinocyte-derived chemokine and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 as well as myeloperoxidase activity in the lungs of AICAR-treated mice were significantly reduced. Moreover, histological findings in the lungs showed improvement of morphologic features and reduction of apoptosis with AICAR treatment. We further found that the beneficial effects of AICAR on septic mice were diminished in AMPKα2 deficient mice, showing that AMPK mediates these effects. In conclusion, our findings reveal a new functional role of activating AMPK in the CNS to attenuate inflammatory responses and acute lung injury in sepsis. PMID:26252187

  7. Acute Lung Injury: Making the Injured Lung Perform Better and Rebuilding Healthy Lungs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    regenerate 3D alveolar lung structure (Figures 4C–4H). To examine this, sorted day 15 Nkx2-1GFP+ ESC-derived cells, delivered by intra-tracheal...indicative of lung and thyroid lineages and can recellularize a 3D lung tissue scaffold. Thus, we have derived a pure population of progenitors able to...Media and Recellularize 3D Lung Tissue Scaffolds A known feature of primary fetal lung epithelial cells late in devel- opment is their capacity to respond

  8. Effects of SDF-1/CXCR4 on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai; Lu, Rujian; Wang, Shuo; Chen, Honglin; Wang, Fei; Liu, Kun

    2017-03-11

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is one of the most important complications after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and the complex pathophysiology remains to be resolved incomplete. SDF-1/CXCR4 chemokine axis can chemotactically accumulate inflammatory cell to local tissue and regulate the release of inflammatory factors, and SDF-1 has a strong chemotaxis effect on neutrophils with CXCR4. Since CPB animal model was difficult to establish, there was still no report about the effect of SDF-1/CXCR4 on neutrophil chemotaxis in ALI after CPB. Here, a stable CPB rat model was constructed to clarify the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in the CPB-induced ALI. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), Western blot analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to detect the changes of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in lung tissues, blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF), and/or isolated neutrophils. SDF-1/CXCR4 was increased after CPB, both of that were increased in blood; CXCR4 was increased in neutrophils; SDF-1/CXCR4 was also increased in BALF of CPB model. Results indicated that SDF-1/CXCR4 axis played a key role in the process of early ALI after CPB, also showed that lung injury was significantly reduce after blocking SDF-1/CXCR4 axis, suggest that CXCR4 might be a new target for ALI treatment.

  9. Eupatorium lindleyanum DC. flavonoids fraction attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chunjun; Yao, Shi; Chen, Jinglei; Wei, Xiaochen; Xia, Long; Chen, Daofeng; Zhang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Eupatorium lindleyanum DC., "Ye-Ma-Zhui" called by local residents in China, showed anti-inflammatory activity and is used to treat tracheitis. We had isolated and identified the flavonoids, diterpenoids and sesquiterpenes compounds from the herb. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of the flavonoids fraction of E. lindleyanum (EUP-FLA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice and the possible underlying mechanisms of action. EUP-FLA could significantly decrease lung wet-to-dry weight (W/D) ratio, nitric oxide (NO) and protein concentration in BALF, lower myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and down-regulate the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Additionally, EUP-FLA attenuated lung histopathological changes and significantly reduced complement deposition with decreasing the levels of Complement 3 (C3) and Complement 3c (C3c) in serum. These results demonstrated that EUP-FLA may attenuate LPS-induced ALI via reducing productions of pro-inflammatory mediators, decreasing the level of complement and affecting the NO, SOD and MPO activity.

  10. Glycyrrhizic Acid Prevents Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury and Mortality in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Zhao, Min; Wang, Yu; Li, Fengchun; Zhang, Zhigang

    2016-02-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), an active ingredient in licorice, has multiple pharmacological activities. However, the effects of GA on sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI) have not been determined. Tthe aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism involved in the effects of GA against sepsis-induced ALI in rats. We found that GA alleviated sepsis-induced ALI through improvements in various pathological changes, as well as decreases in the lung wet/dry weight ratio and total protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and a significant increase in the survival rate of treated rats. Additionally, GA markedly inhibited sepsis-induced pulmonary inflammatory responses. Moreover, we found that treatment with GA inhibited oxidative stress damage and apoptosis in lung tissue induced by ALI. Finally, GA treatment significantly inhibited NF-κ B, JNK and P38 MAPK activation. Our data indicate that GA has a protective effect against sepsis-induced ALI by inhibiting the inflammatory response, damage from oxidative stress, and apoptosis via inactivation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, providing a molecular basis for a new medical treatment for sepsis-induced ALI.

  11. Loss of extracellular superoxide dismutase leads to acute lung damage in the presence of ambient air: a potential mechanism underlying adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Lob, Heinrich E; Landmesser, Ulf; Guzik, Tomasz J; Martin, W David; Ozumi, Kiyoski; Wall, Susan M; Wilson, David Scott; Murthy, Niren; Gravanis, Michael; Fukai, Tohru; Harrison, David G

    2008-10-01

    The extracellular superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD3) is highly expressed in both blood vessels and lungs. In different models of pulmonary injury, SOD3 is reduced; however, it is unclear whether this contributes to lung injury. To study the role of acute SOD3 reduction in lung injury, the SOD3 gene was deleted in adult mice by using the Cre-Lox technology. Acute reduction of SOD3 led to a fivefold increase in lung superoxide, marked inflammatory cell infiltration, a threefold increase in the arterial-alveolar gradient, respiratory acidosis, histological changes similar to those observed in adult respiratory distress syndrome, and 85% mortality. Treatment with the SOD mimetic MnTBAP and intranasal administration of SOD-containing polyketal microparticles reduced mortality, prevented the histological alterations, and reduced lung superoxide levels. To understand how mice with the SOD3 embryonic deletion survived without lung injury, gene array analysis was performed. These data demonstrated the up-regulation of 37 genes and down-regulation of nine genes, including those involved in cell signaling, inflammation, and gene transcription in SOD3-/- mice compared with either mice with acute SOD3 reduction or wild-type controls. These studies show that SOD3 is essential for survival in the presence of ambient oxygen and that acute loss of this enzyme can lead to severe lung damage. Strategies either to prevent SOD3 inactivation or to augment its levels might prove useful in the treatment of acute lung injury.

  12. Early identification of ‘acute-onset’ chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Park, Susanna B.; Kiernan, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy prior to relapse is often challenging at the onset of their clinical presentation. In the present study, nerve excitability tests were used in conjunction with the clinical phenotype and disease staging, to differentiate between patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy at an early stage, with the aim to better guide treatment. Clinical assessment, staging and nerve excitability tests were undertaken on patients initially fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy soon after symptom onset and their initial presentation. Patients were subsequently followed up for minimum of 12 months to determine if their clinical presentations were more consistent with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Clinical severity as evaluated by Medical Research Council sum score and Hughes functional grading scale were not significantly different between the two cohorts. There was no difference between the time of onset of initial symptoms and nerve excitability test assessment between the two cohorts nor were there significant differences in conventional nerve conduction study parameters. However, nerve excitability test profiles obtained from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy demonstrated abnormalities in the recovery cycle of excitability, including significantly reduced superexcitability (P < 0.001) and prolonged relative refractory period (P < 0.01), without changes in threshold electrotonus. In contrast, in patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, a different pattern occurred with the recovery cycle shifted downward (increased superexcitability, P < 0.05; decreased subexcitability, P < 0.05) and increased

  13. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Michalick, Laura; Tang, Christine; Tabuchi, Arata; Goldenberg, Neil; Dan, Qinghong; Awwad, Khader; Wang, Liming; Erfinanda, Lasti; Nouailles, Geraldine; Witzenrath, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Lv, Lu; Lee, Warren L; Zhang, Haibo; Rotstein, Ori; Kapus, Andras; Szaszi, Katalin; Fleming, Ingrid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B; Kuppe, Hermann; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2016-03-01

    The cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is expressed in endothelial and immune cells; however, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. The functional relevance of TRPV4 was assessed in vivo, in isolated murine lungs, and in isolated neutrophils. Genetic deficiency of TRPV4 attenuated the functional, histological, and inflammatory hallmarks of acid-induced ALI. Similar protection was obtained with prophylactic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, GSK2193874; however, therapeutic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, HC-067047, after ALI induction had no beneficial effect. In isolated lungs, platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased vascular permeability in lungs perfused with trpv4(+/+) more than with trpv4(-/-) blood, independent of lung genotype, suggesting a contribution of TRPV4 on blood cells to lung vascular barrier failure. In neutrophils, TRPV4 inhibition or deficiency attenuated the PAF-induced increase in intracellular calcium. PAF induced formation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by neutrophils, which, in turn, stimulated TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, whereas inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation inhibited the Ca(2+) response to PAF. TRPV4 deficiency prevented neutrophil responses to proinflammatory stimuli, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, neutrophil adhesion, and chemotaxis, putatively due to reduced activation of Rac. In chimeric mice, however, the majority of protective effects in acid-induced ALI were attributable to genetic deficiency of TRPV4 in parenchymal tissue, whereas TRPV4 deficiency in circulating blood cells primarily reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Our findings identify TRPV4 as novel regulator of neutrophil activation and suggest contributions of both parenchymal and neutrophilic TRPV4 in the pathophysiology of ALI.

  14. TLR4 signaling induces TLR3 up-regulation in alveolar macrophages during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xibing; Jin, Shuqing; Tong, Yao; Jiang, Xi; Chen, Zhixia; Mei, Shuya; Zhang, Liming; Billiar, Timothy R.; Li, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening inflammatory response caused by severe infection. Toll-like receptors in alveolar macrophages (AMΦ) recognize the molecular constituents of pathogens and activate the host’s innate immune responses. Numerous studies have documented the importance of TLR-TLR cross talk, but few studies have specifically addressed the relationship between TLR4 and TLR3. We explored a novel mechanism of TLR3 up-regulation that is induced by LPS-TLR4 signaling in a dose- and time-dependent manner in AMΦ from C57BL/6 mice, while the LPS-induced TLR3 expression was significantly reduced in TLR4−/− and Myd88−/− mice and following pretreatment with a NF-κB inhibitor. The enhanced TLR3 up-regulation in AMΦ augmented the expression of cytokines and chemokines in response to sequential challenges with LPS and Poly I:C, a TLR3 ligand, which was physiologically associated with amplified AMΦ-induced PMN migration into lung alveoli. Our study demonstrates that the synergistic effect between TLR4 and TLR3 in macrophages is an important determinant in acute lung injury and, more importantly, that TLR3 up-regulation is dependent on TLR4-MyD88-NF-κB signaling. These results raise the possibility that bacterial infections can induce sensitivity to viral infections, which may have important implications for the therapeutic manipulation of the innate immune system. PMID:28198368

  15. Melatonin alleviates acute lung injury through inhibiting the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Xiru; Grailer, Jamison J; Wang, Na; Wang, Mingming; Yao, Jianfei; Zhong, Rui; Gao, George F; Ward, Peter A; Tan, Dun-Xian; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are clinically severe respiratory disorders, and there are currently no Food and Drug Administration-approved drug therapies. Melatonin is a well-known anti-inflammatory molecule, which has proven to be effective in ALI induced by many conditions. Emerging studies suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role during ALI. How melatonin directly blocks activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in ALI remains unclear. In this study, using an LPS-induced ALI mouse model, we found intratracheal (i.t.) administration of melatonin markedly reduced the pulmonary injury and decreased the infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into lung. During ALI, the NLRP3 inflammasome is significantly activated with a large amount of IL-1β and the activated caspase-1 occurring in the lung. Melatonin inhibits the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by both suppressing the release of extracellular histones and directly blocking histone-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Notably, i.t. route of melatonin administration opens a more efficient therapeutic approach for treating ALI.

  16. Pulmonary circulatory parameters as indices for the early detection of acute rejection after single lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Okada, M; Tobe, S; Tsuji, F; Ohbo, H; Nakamura, H; Yamashita, C

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the changes in the pulmonary blood flow and histology during acute rejection following single lung transplantation. In single lung transplantation using adult mongrel dogs, immunosuppression with cyclosporine and azathioprine was discontinued after postoperative day 14 to induce rejection. Doppler flow probes were placed adjacent to the ascending aorta and the left pulmonary artery to measure the blood flow on a daily basis. In addition, chest roentgenograms were also examined daily. The pulmonary pressure was measured using a Swan-Ganz catheter prior to and following the induction of rejection. Open lung biopsies were performed when the left pulmonary artery flow decreased to half of the prerejection value. The pulmonary artery flow decreased to 14.3% of the aortic flow 5 days after the discontinuation of immunosuppression. The graft pulmonary vascular resistance increased significantly compared to the prerejection values (P < 0.001). This was not accompanied by any abnormalities on chest roentgenography. The histology was consistent, with marked perivascular lymphocytic infiltration with little alveolar or interstitial changes. During rejection, the increased pulmonary vascular resistance in the graft was probably the result of perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration, which was seen prior to changes on chest roentgenography. Changes in the left pulmonary artery flow and histology thus appear to be closely correlated in the early stages of acute rejection.

  17. Early inflammatory response to asbestos exposure in rat and hamster lungs: role of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Dörger, Martina; Allmeling, Anne-Marie; Kiefmann, Rainer; Münzing, Silvia; Messmer, Konrad; Krombach, Fritz

    2002-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a role in the development of asbestos-related pulmonary disorders. The pulmonary reactions of rats and hamsters upon exposure to asbestos fibers are well known to be disparate. In addition, in vitro experiments have indicated that mononuclear phagocytes from hamsters, in contrast to those from rats, lack the iNOS pathway. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether rats and hamsters differ in lung iNOS expression in vivo upon exposure to asbestos fibers and whether differences in iNOS induction are associated with differences in the acute pulmonary inflammatory reaction. Body weight, alveolar-arterial oxygen difference, differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, total protein leakage, lung myeloperoxidase activity and lipidperoxidation, wet/dry ratio, iNOS mRNA and protein expression, and nitrotyrosine staining of lung tissue were determined 1 and 7 days after intratracheal instillation of asbestos fibers in CD rats and Syrian golden hamsters. Exposure of rats to asbestos fibers resulted in enhanced pulmonary iNOS expression and nitrotyrosine staining together with an acute inflammation that was characterized by an influx of neutrophils, enhanced myeloperoxidase activity and lipid peroxidation, damage of the alveolar-capillary membrane, edema formation, and impairment of gas exchange. In comparison, instillation of asbestos fibers in hamsters resulted in a significantly milder inflammatory reaction of the lung with no induction of iNOS in pulmonary cells. The data obtained provide important information to understand the underlying mechanisms of species differences in the pulmonary response upon exposure to asbestos fibers.

  18. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Deficient Mice Are Protected from Lipopolysaccharide Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christine M.; Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Ham III, P. Benson; Meadows, Mary Louise; Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Kangath, Archana; Sridhar, Supriya; Lucas, Rudolf; Black, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria induces acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. This injury is associated with lung edema, inflammation, diffuse alveolar damage, and severe respiratory insufficiency. We have previously reported that LPS-mediated nitric oxide synthase (NOS) uncoupling, through increases in asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), plays an important role in the development of ALI through the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Therefore, the focus of this study was to determine whether mice deficient in endothelial NOS (eNOS-/-) are protected against ALI. In both wild-type and eNOS-/- mice, ALI was induced by the intratracheal instillation of LPS (2 mg/kg). After 24 hours, we found that eNOS-/-mice were protected against the LPS mediated increase in inflammatory cell infiltration, inflammatory cytokine production, and lung injury. In addition, LPS exposed eNOS-/- mice had increased oxygen saturation and improved lung mechanics. The protection in eNOS-/- mice was associated with an attenuated production of NO, NOS derived superoxide, and peroxynitrite. Furthermore, we found that eNOS-/- mice had less RhoA activation that correlated with a reduction in RhoA nitration at Tyr34. Finally, we found that the reduction in NOS uncoupling in eNOS-/- mice was due to a preservation of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) activity that prevented the LPS-mediated increase in ADMA. Together our data suggest that eNOS derived reactive species play an important role in the development of LPS-mediated lung injury. PMID:25786132

  19. Regulation of PTEN activity by p38δ-PKD1 signaling in neutrophils confers inflammatory responses in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Ittner, Arne; Block, Helena; Reichel, Christoph A.; Varjosalo, Markku; Gehart, Helmuth; Sumara, Grzegorz; Gstaiger, Matthias; Krombach, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Despite their role in resolving inflammatory insults, neutrophils trigger inflammation-induced acute lung injury (ALI), culminating in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a frequent complication with high mortality in humans. Molecular mechanisms underlying recruitment of neutrophils to sites of inflammation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that p38 MAP kinase p38δ is required for recruitment of neutrophils into inflammatory sites. Global and myeloid-restricted deletion of p38δ in mice results in decreased alveolar neutrophil accumulation and attenuation of ALI. p38δ counteracts the activity of its downstream target protein kinase D1 (PKD1) in neutrophils and myeloid-restricted inactivation of PKD1 leads to exacerbated lung inflammation. Importantly, p38δ and PKD1 conversely regulate PTEN activity in neutrophils, thereby controlling their extravasation and chemotaxis. PKD1 phosphorylates p85α to enhance its interaction with PTEN, leading to polarized PTEN activity, thereby regulating neutrophil migration. Thus, aberrant p38δ–PKD1 signaling in neutrophils may underlie development of ALI and life-threatening ARDS in humans. PMID:23129748

  20. Regulation of PTEN activity by p38δ-PKD1 signaling in neutrophils confers inflammatory responses in the lung.

    PubMed

    Ittner, Arne; Block, Helena; Reichel, Christoph A; Varjosalo, Markku; Gehart, Helmuth; Sumara, Grzegorz; Gstaiger, Matthias; Krombach, Fritz; Zarbock, Alexander; Ricci, Romeo

    2012-11-19

    Despite their role in resolving inflammatory insults, neutrophils trigger inflammation-induced acute lung injury (ALI), culminating in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a frequent complication with high mortality in humans. Molecular mechanisms underlying recruitment of neutrophils to sites of inflammation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that p38 MAP kinase p38δ is required for recruitment of neutrophils into inflammatory sites. Global and myeloid-restricted deletion of p38δ in mice results in decreased alveolar neutrophil accumulation and attenuation of ALI. p38δ counteracts the activity of its downstream target protein kinase D1 (PKD1) in neutrophils and myeloid-restricted inactivation of PKD1 leads to exacerbated lung inflammation. Importantly, p38δ and PKD1 conversely regulate PTEN activity in neutrophils, thereby controlling their extravasation and chemotaxis. PKD1 phosphorylates p85α to enhance its interaction with PTEN, leading to polarized PTEN activity, thereby regulating neutrophil migration. Thus, aberrant p38δ-PKD1 signaling in neutrophils may underlie development of ALI and life-threatening ARDS in humans.

  1. Afatinib-Induced Acute Fatal Pneumonitis in Metastatic Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sang Hoon; Ryu, Jin Ah; Kim, Seo Ree; Oh, Su Yun; Jung, Gu Sung; Lee, Dong Jae; Kwak, Bong Gyu; Nam, Yu Hyun; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Afatinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that inhibit Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR), Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2), and HER4. The common side effects of EGFR TKI are rash, acne, diarrhea, stomatitis, pruritus, nausea, and loss of appetite. Drug induced pneumonitis is the less common adverse effects of EGFR TKI. Afatinib, 2nd generation EGFR TKI is anticipated to overcome drug resistance from 1st generation EGFR TKI according to preclinical study, and several studies are being conducted to compare clinical efficacy between 1st and 2nd EGFR TKI. Several cases of rug induced acute fatal pneumonitis were reported after use of erlotinib or gefitinib. However, a case of acute fatal pneumonitis associated with afatinib was note reported except drug induced pneumonitis in other clinical study. Here, we present a cases of acute severe pneumonitis related with afatinib in metastatic lung adenocarcinoma with literature review. PMID:27900074

  2. Impact of Preexisting Interstitial Lung Disease on Acute, Extensive Radiation Pneumonitis: Retrospective Analysis of Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yuichi; Abe, Takefumi; Omae, Minako; Matsui, Takashi; Kato, Masato; Hasegawa, Hirotsugu; Enomoto, Yasunori; Ishihara, Takeaki; Inui, Naoki; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the clinical characteristics and predictive factors for developing acute extended radiation pneumonitis with a focus on the presence and radiological characteristics of preexisting interstitial lung disease. Methods Of 1429 irradiations for lung cancer from May 2006 to August 2013, we reviewed 651 irradiations involving the lung field. The presence, compatibility with usual interstitial pneumonia, and occupying area of preexisting interstitial lung disease were retrospectively evaluated by pretreatment computed tomography. Cases of non-infectious, non-cardiogenic, acute respiratory failure with an extended bilateral shadow developing within 30 days after the last irradiation were defined as acute extended radiation pneumonitis. Results Nine (1.4%) patients developed acute extended radiation pneumonitis a mean of 6.7 days after the last irradiation. Although preexisting interstitial lung disease was found in 13% of patients (84 patients), 78% of patients (7 patients) with acute extended radiation pneumonitis cases had preexisting interstitial lung disease, which resulted in incidences of acute extended radiation pneumonitis of 0.35 and 8.3% in patients without and with preexisting interstitial lung disease, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that the presence of preexisting interstitial lung disease (odds ratio = 22.6; 95% confidence interval = 5.29–155; p < 0.001) and performance status (≥2; odds ratio = 4.22; 95% confidence interval = 1.06–20.8; p = 0.049) were significant predictive factors. Further analysis of the 84 patients with preexisting interstitial lung disease revealed that involvement of more than 10% of the lung field was the only independent predictive factor associated with the risk of acute extended radiation pneumonitis (odds ratio = 6.14; 95% confidence interval = 1.0–37.4); p = 0.038). Conclusions Pretreatment computed tomography evaluations of the presence of and area size occupied

  3. Thoracic duct ligation in the rat attenuates lung injuries in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Tsui, N; Li, Y; Wang, F

    2013-09-01

    In acute pancreatitis (AP), inflammatory cells and products disseminated in abdominal lymph and blood induce systemic inflammation. Interruption of abdominal lymph flow, and thereby reduction of lymphatic dissemination, could alter the course of the disease. Therefore, we investigated whether thoracic duct ligation (TDL) in a rat model of cerulein-induced AP results in reduced lung damage as a marker for reduction of systemic dissemination through the lymphatic system. Thirty-four male rats were assigned to TDL (TDL-rats, n=8), AP (AP-rats, n=8), TDL+AP (TDL+AP-rats, n=9) or sham TDL (Ctr-rats, n=9) groups. TDL and sham TDL were established first. Two days later, AP was induced in AP- and TDL+AP-rats by a series of subcutaneous injections of cerulein. Vehicle was injected in the same manner in Ctr- and TDL-rats as controls. Rats were sacrificed six hours after the end of the serial injections. Histological examination showed that AP-induced damage to the pancreas and ileum were similar in AP- and TDL+AP-rats whereas lung damage was less severe in TDL+AP-rats than in AP-rats. Assays demonstrated that: hepatic and pulmonary myeloperoxidase activities were increased in AP-rats but not in the TDL+AP-rats; more Il-6 was found in AP-rat than TDL+AP-rat lungs; and lung-lavage fluid from AP-rats yielded more angiopoietin-2 than TDL+AP-rats. In conclusion, prior TDL in the rat attenuates lung damage in acute pancreatitis.

  4. [Lung surfactant changes in acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Uchikov, A; Khristov, Zh; Murdzhev, K; Tar'lov, Z

    2000-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), with mortality rate ranging from 15 to 40 per cent, continues to be a serious challenge to emergency surgeons. Not infrequently, in such cases lesions to the respiratory system develop, with the changes in pulmonary surfactant (PS) occurring during SAP considered as one of the major factors implicated. Alterations in structural phospholipids of PS (lecithin and sphyngomyelin) are assessed under experimental conditions in 26 dogs with modulated SAP at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours, and the obtained results compared to the ones prior to pancreatitis triggering. The animals are divided up into two groups--untreated and given Sandostatin treatment. In either group a reduction of PS fractions is documented, with a statistically significant lesser reduction of the indicators under study being established in the Sandostatin-treated group by comparison with the untreated one. Modulated SAP in dogs accounts for a significant reduction of the surfactant phospholipid values--lecithin and sphyngomyelin--in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL).

  5. The role of C5a in acute lung injury induced by highly pathogenic viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renxi; Xiao, He; Guo, Renfeng; Li, Yan; Shen, Beifen

    2015-01-01

    The complement system, an important part of innate immunity, plays a critical role in pathogen clearance. Unregulated complement activation is likely to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by highly pathogenic virus including influenza A viruses H5N1, H7N9, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus. In highly pathogenic virus-induced acute lung diseases, high levels of chemotactic and anaphylatoxic C5a were produced as a result of excessive complement activaiton. Overproduced C5a displays powerful biological activities in activation of phagocytic cells, generation of oxidants, and inflammatory sequelae named “cytokine storm”, and so on. Blockade of C5a signaling have been implicated in the treatment of ALI induced by highly pathogenic virus. Herein, we review the literature that links C5a and ALI, and review our understanding of the mechanisms by which C5a affects ALI during highly pathogenic viral infection. In particular, we discuss the potential of the blockade of C5a signaling to treat ALI induced by highly pathogenic viruses. PMID:26060601

  6. Gene expression profiling of the effects of organic dust in lung epithelial and THP-1 cells reveals inductive effects on inflammatory and immune response genes.

    PubMed

    Boggaram, Vijay; Loose, David S; Gottipati, Koteswara R; Natarajan, Kartiga; Mitchell, Courtney T

    2016-04-01

    The intensification and concentration of animal production operations expose workers to high levels of organic dusts in the work environment. Exposure to organic dusts is a risk factor for the development of acute and chronic respiratory symptoms and diseases. Lung epithelium plays important roles in the control of immune and inflammatory responses to environmental agents to maintain lung health. To better understand the effects of organic dust on lung inflammatory responses, we characterized the gene expression profiles of A549 alveolar and Beas2B bronchial epithelial and THP-1 monocytic cells influenced by exposure to poultry dust extract by DNA microarray analysis using Illumina Human HT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip. We found that A549 alveolar and Beas2B bronchial epithelial and THP-1 cells responded with unique changes in the gene expression profiles with regulation of genes encoding inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and other inflammatory proteins being common to all the three cells. Significantly induced genes included IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, ICAM-1, CCL2, CCL5, TLR4, and PTGS2. Validation by real-time qRT-PCR, ELISA, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemical staining of lung sections from mice exposed to dust extract validated DNA microarray results. Pathway analysis indicated that dust extract induced changes in gene expression influenced functions related to cellular growth and proliferation, cell death and survival, and cellular development. These data show that a broad range of inflammatory mediators produced in response to poultry dust exposure can modulate lung immune and inflammatory responses. This is the first report on organic dust induced changes in expression profiles in lung epithelial and THP-1 monocytic cells.

  7. Simvastatin Reduces Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Decreasing Neutrophil Recruitment and Radical Formation

    PubMed Central

    Grommes, Jochen; Vijayan, Santosh; Drechsler, Maik; Hartwig, Helene; Mörgelin, Matthias; Dembinski, Rolf; Jacobs, Michael; Koeppel, Thomas Andreas; Binnebösel, Marcel; Weber, Christian; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) remains an unsolved problem in intensive care medicine. As simvastatin exerts protective effects in inflammatory diseases we explored its effects on development of ALI and due to the importance of neutrophils in ALI also on neutrophil effector functions. Methods C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to aerosolized LPS (500 µg/ml) for 30 min. The count of alveolar, interstitial, and intravasal neutrophils were assessed 4 h later by flow cytometry. Lung permeability changes were assessed by FITC-dextran clearance and albumin content in the BAL fluid. In vitro, we analyzed the effect of simvastatin on neutrophil adhesion, degranulation, apoptosis, and formation of reactive oxygen species. To monitor effects of simvastatin on bacterial clearance we performed phagocytosis and bacterial killing studies in vitro as well as sepsis experiments in mice. Results Simvastatin treatment before and after onset of ALI reduces neutrophil influx into the lung as well as lung permeability indicating the protective role of simvastatin in ALI. Moreover, simvastatin reduces the formation of ROS species and adhesion of neutrophils without affecting apoptosis, bacterial phagocytosis and bacterial clearance. Conclusion Simvastatin reduces recruitment and activation of neutrophils hereby protecting from LPS-induced ALI. Our results imply a potential role for statins in the management of ALI. PMID:22701728

  8. Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of Lung Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Laboratory assays on the bronchial lavage samples...at high risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Given the delay of 12 or more hours from exposure to development of ARDS , a...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0673 TITLE : Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of

  9. Andrographolide sulfonate ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice by down-regulating MAPK and NF-κB pathways

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shuang; Hang, Nan; Liu, Wen; Guo, Wenjie; Jiang, Chunhong; Yang, Xiaoling; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe, life-threatening medical condition characterized by widespread inflammation in the lungs, and is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the patient population. New therapies for the treatment of ALI are desperately needed. In the present study, we examined the effect of andrographolide sulfonate, a water-soluble form of andrographolide (trade name: Xi-Yan-Ping Injection), on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI and inflammation. Andrographolide sulfonate was administered by intraperitoneal injection to mice with LPS-induced ALI. LPS-induced airway inflammatory cell recruitment and lung histological alterations were significantly ameliorated by andrographolide sulfonate. Protein levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum were reduced by andrographolide sulfonate administration. mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in lung tissue were also suppressed. Moreover, andrographolide sulfonate markedly suppressed the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) as well as p65 subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In summary, these results suggest that andrographolide sulfonate ameliorated LPS-induced ALI in mice by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK-mediated inflammatory responses. Our study shows that water-soluble andrographolide sulfonate may represent a new therapeutic approach for treating inflammatory lung disorders. PMID:27175331

  10. Enhanced Resolution of Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury as a result of Aspirin Triggered Resolvin D1 Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Ruan; Phillips, Oluwakemi; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Fukumoto, Itsuko; Parthasarathy, Prasanna Tamarapu; Arias, Stephen; Cho, Young; Lockey, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), which presents as acute respiratory failure, is a major clinical problem that requires aggressive care, and patients who require prolonged oxygen exposure are at risk of developing this disease. Although molecular determinants of ALI have been reported, the molecules involved in disease catabasis associated with oxygen toxicity have not been well studied. It has been reported that lung mucosa is rich in omega-3 fatty acid dicosahexanoic acid (DHA), which has antiinflammatory properties. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) is a potent proresolution metabolite of DHA that can curb the inflammatory effects in various acute injuries, yet the effect of AT-RvD1 on hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) or in the oxygen toxicity setting in general has not been investigated. The effects of AT-RvD1 on HALI were determined for the first time in 8- to 10-week-old C57BL/6 mice that were exposed to hyperoxia (≥95% O2) for 48 hours. Mice were given AT-RvD1 (100 ng) in saline or a saline vehicle for 24 hours in normoxic (≈21% O2) conditions after hyperoxia. Lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were collected for analysis associated with proinflammatory signaling and lung inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment resulted in reduced oxidative stress, increased glutathione production, and significantly decreased tissue inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment also significantly reduced the lung wet/dry ratio, protein in BAL fluid, and decreased apoptotic and NF-κB signaling. These results show that AT-RvD1 curbs oxygen-induced lung edema, permeability, inflammation, and apoptosis and is thus an effective therapy for prolonged hyperoxia exposure in this murine model. PMID:25647402

  11. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Bux, Jürgen; Sachs, Ulrich J H

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) has developed from an almost unknown transfusion reaction to the most common cause of transfusion-related major morbidities and fatalities. A clinical definition of TRALI was established in 2004, based on acute respiratory distress, non-cardiogenic lung oedema temporal association with transfusion and hypoxaemia. Histological findings reveal lung oedema, capillary leucostasis and neutrophil extravasation. However, the pathogenesis of TRALI remains controversial. Leucocyte antibodies, present in fresh frozen plasma and platelet concentrates from multiparous donors, and neutrophil priming agents released in stored cellular blood components have been considered to be causative. As neutrophils and endothelial cells are pivotal in the pathogenesis of TRALI, a threshold model was established to try to unify the various reported findings on pathogenesis. This model comprises the priming of neutrophils and/or endothelium by the patient's co-morbidity, neutrophil and/or endothelial cell activation by the transfused blood component, and the severity of the TRALI reaction.

  12. Activation of TRPV1-dependent calcium oscillation exacerbates seawater inhalation-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    LI, CONGCONG; BO, LIYAN; LIU, QINGQING; LIU, WEI; CHEN, XIANGJUN; XU, DUNQUAN; JIN, FAGUANG

    2016-01-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger and it is widely recognized that acute lung injury (ALI) is often caused by oscillations of cytosolic free Ca2+. Previous studies have indicated that the activation of transient receptor potential-vanilloid (TRPV) channels and subsequent Ca2+ entry initiates an acute calcium-dependent permeability increase during ALI. However, whether seawater exposure induces such an effect through the activation of TRPV channels remains unknown. In the current study, the effect of calcium, a component of seawater, on the inflammatory reactions that occur during seawater drowning-induced ALI, was examined. The results demonstrated that a high concentration of calcium ions in seawater increased lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity and the secretion of inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. Further study demonstrated that the seawater challenge elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, indicated by [Ca2+]c, by inducing calcium influx from the extracellular medium via TRPV1 channels. The elevated [Ca2+c] may have resulted in the increased release of TNF-α and IL-1β via increased phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). It was concluded that a high concentration of calcium in seawater exacerbated lung injury, and TRPV1 channels were notable mediators of the calcium increase initiated by the seawater challenge. Calcium influx through TRPV1 may have led to greater phosphorylation of NF-κB and increased release of TNF-α and IL-1β. PMID:26796050

  13. MicroRNA-7 Deficiency Ameliorates the Pathologies of Acute Lung Injury through Elevating KLF4.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juanjuan; Chen, Chao; Guo, Mengmeng; Tao, Yijin; Cui, PanPan; Zhou, Ya; Qin, Nalin; Zheng, Jing; Zhang, Jidong; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence showed that microRNA-7 (miR-7) played an important role in the pathologies of lung-related diseases. However, the potential role of miR-7 in acute lung injury (ALI) still remains poorly understood. Here, we assessed the effect of miR-7 deficiency on the pathology of ALI. We, first, found that the expression of miR-7 was upregulated in lung tissue in murine LPS-induced ALI model. Notably, we generated miR-7 knock down mice by using miRNA-Sponge technique and found that miR-7 deficiency could ameliorate the pathologies of lung as evidenced by accelerated body weight recovery, reduced level of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) proinflammatory cytokines and decreased number of BAL cells in ALI mice. Moreover, the proportion and number of various immune cells in BAL, including innate immune cell F4/80(+) macrophages, γδT cells, NK1.1(+) T cells, and CD11c(+)DCs, as well as adaptive immune cell CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells, also significantly changed, respectively. Mechanistic evidence showed that KLF4, a target molecule of miR-7, was upregulated in lung tissues in ALI model, accompanied by altered transduction of NF-κB, AKT, and ERK pathway. These data provided a previously unknown role of miR-7 in pathology of ALI, which could ultimately aid the understanding of development of ALI and the development of new therapeutic strategies against clinical inflammatory lung diseases.

  14. MicroRNA-7 Deficiency Ameliorates the Pathologies of Acute Lung Injury through Elevating KLF4

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juanjuan; Chen, Chao; Guo, Mengmeng; Tao, Yijin; Cui, PanPan; Zhou, Ya; Qin, Nalin; Zheng, Jing; Zhang, Jidong; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence showed that microRNA-7 (miR-7) played an important role in the pathologies of lung-related diseases. However, the potential role of miR-7 in acute lung injury (ALI) still remains poorly understood. Here, we assessed the effect of miR-7 deficiency on the pathology of ALI. We, first, found that the expression of miR-7 was upregulated in lung tissue in murine LPS-induced ALI model. Notably, we generated miR-7 knock down mice by using miRNA-Sponge technique and found that miR-7 deficiency could ameliorate the pathologies of lung as evidenced by accelerated body weight recovery, reduced level of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) proinflammatory cytokines and decreased number of BAL cells in ALI mice. Moreover, the proportion and number of various immune cells in BAL, including innate immune cell F4/80+ macrophages, γδT cells, NK1.1+ T cells, and CD11c+DCs, as well as adaptive immune cell CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells, also significantly changed, respectively. Mechanistic evidence showed that KLF4, a target molecule of miR-7, was upregulated in lung tissues in ALI model, accompanied by altered transduction of NF-κB, AKT, and ERK pathway. These data provided a previously unknown role of miR-7 in pathology of ALI, which could ultimately aid the understanding of development of ALI and the development of new therapeutic strategies against clinical inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27774091

  15. Proteomic Biomarkers for Acute Interstitial Lung Disease in Gefitinib-Treated Japanese Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takao; Nagasaka, Keiko; Takami, Sachiko; Wada, Kazuya; Tu, Hsiao-Kun; Otsuji, Makiko; Kyono, Yutaka; Dobashi, Tae; Komatsu, Yasuhiko; Kihara, Makoto; Akimoto, Shingo; Peers, Ian S.; South, Marie C.; Higenbottam, Tim; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakata, Koichiro; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kudoh, Shoji; Clausen, Ib Groth; Nishimura, Toshihide; Marko-Varga, György; Kato, Harubumi

    2011-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) events have been reported in Japanese non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We investigated proteomic biomarkers for mechanistic insights and improved prediction of ILD. Blood plasma was collected from 43 gefitinib-treated NSCLC patients developing acute ILD (confirmed by blinded diagnostic review) and 123 randomly selected controls in a nested case-control study within a pharmacoepidemiological cohort study in Japan. We generated ∼7 million tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) measurements with extensive quality control and validation, producing one of the largest proteomic lung cancer datasets to date, incorporating rigorous study design, phenotype definition, and evaluation of sample processing. After alignment, scaling, and measurement batch adjustment, we identified 41 peptide peaks representing 29 proteins best predicting ILD. Multivariate peptide, protein, and pathway modeling achieved ILD prediction comparable to previously identified clinical variables; combining the two provided some improvement. The acute phase response pathway was strongly represented (17 of 29 proteins, p = 1.0×10−25), suggesting a key role with potential utility as a marker for increased risk of acute ILD events. Validation by Western blotting showed correlation for identified proteins, confirming that robust results can be generated from an MS/MS platform implementing strict quality control. PMID:21799770

  16. Imatinib attenuates inflammation and vascular leak in a clinically relevant two-hit model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Alicia N; Sammani, Saad; Esquinca, Adilene E; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Garcia, Joe G N; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Dudek, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), an illness characterized by life-threatening vascular leak, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Recent preclinical studies and clinical observations have suggested a potential role for the chemotherapeutic agent imatinib in restoring vascular integrity. Our prior work demonstrates differential effects of imatinib in mouse models of ALI, namely attenuation of LPS-induced lung injury but exacerbation of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Because of the critical role of mechanical ventilation in the care of patients with ARDS, in the present study we pursued an assessment of the effectiveness of imatinib in a "two-hit" model of ALI caused by combined LPS and VILI. Imatinib significantly decreased bronchoalveolar lavage protein, total cells, neutrophils, and TNF-α levels in mice exposed to LPS plus VILI, indicating that it attenuates ALI in this clinically relevant model. In subsequent experiments focusing on its protective role in LPS-induced lung injury, imatinib attenuated ALI when given 4 h after LPS, suggesting potential therapeutic effectiveness when given after the onset of injury. Mechanistic studies in mouse lung tissue and human lung endothelial cells revealed that imatinib inhibits LPS-induced NF-κB expression and activation. Overall, these results further characterize the therapeutic potential of imatinib against inflammatory vascular leak.

  17. Sleep Disturbance and Older Adults' Inflammatory Responses to Acute Stress

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Kathi L.; Ng, H. Mei; Suhr, Julie A.; France, Christopher R.; Marshall, Gailen D.; Pigeon, Wilfred R.; Moynihan, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Poor sleep diminishes mental and physical health. The objective of this study was to examine associations between sleep disturbance and interleukin-6 (IL-6) responses to acute mental stress in older adults. Design Observational study of community-dwelling, healthy older adults. Setting Participants completed the study in a clinical research laboratory of a mid-sized university. Participants Generally healthy, community-dwelling men and women 50 years of age and older. Measurements IL-6 and negative affect at rest and following a series of challenging cognitive tests; sleep quality; depressive symptoms; perceived stress; loneliness. Results Participants categorized as poor sleepers based on Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores had significantly larger IL-6 responses to the cognitive stressors compared to good sleepers. The association between poor sleep and heightened IL-6 response to acute stress was not explained by other psychosocial factors previously linked to immune dysregulation, including depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and loneliness. Conclusions Findings add to the growing evidence for poor sleep as an independent risk factor for poor mental and physical health. Older adults may be particularly vulnerable to effects of sleep disturbance due to significant age-related changes in both sleep and inflammatory regulation. PMID:22327621

  18. S100A8/A9 and S100A9 reduce acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yuka; Hsu, Kenneth; Tedla, Nicodemus; Wong, Sze Wing; Chow, Sharron; Kawaguchi, Naomi; Geczy, Carolyn L

    2017-01-31

    S100A8 and S100A9 are myeloid cell-derived proteins that are elevated in several types of inflammatory lung disorders. Pro- and anti-inflammatory properties are reported and these proteins are proposed to activate TLR4. S100A8 and S100A9 can function separately, likely through distinct receptors but a systematic comparison of their effects in vivo are limited. Here we assess inflammation in murine lung following S100A9 and S100A8/A9 inhalation. Unlike S100A8, S100A9 promoted mild neutrophil and lymphocyte influx, possibly mediated in part, by increased mast cell degranulation and selective upregulation of some chemokine genes, particularly CXCL-10. S100 proteins did not significantly induce proinflammatory mediators including TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 or serum amyloid A3 (SAA3). In contrast to S100A8, neither preparation induced S100A8 or IL-10 mRNA/protein in airway epithelial cells, or in tracheal epithelial cells in vitro. Like S100A8, S100A9 and S100A8/A9 reduced neutrophil influx in acute lung injury provoked by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge but were somewhat less inhibitory, possibly because of differential effects on expression of some chemokines, IL-1β, SAA3 and IL-10. Novel common pathways including increased induction of an NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase sirtuin-1 that may reduce NF-κB signalling, and increased STAT3 activation may reduce LPS activation. Results suggest a role for these proteins in normal homeostasis and protective mechanisms in the lung.Immunology and Cell Biology advance online publication, 31 January 2017; doi:10.1038/icb.2017.2.

  19. [Ventilation in acute respiratory distress. Lung-protective strategies].

    PubMed

    Bruells, C S; Rossaint, R; Dembinski, R

    2012-11-01

    Ventilation of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with protective ventilator settings is the standard in patient care. Besides the reduction of tidal volumes, the adjustment of a case-related positive end-expiratory pressure and preservation of spontaneous breathing activity at least 48 h after onset is part of this strategy. Bedside techniques have been developed to adapt ventilatory settings to the individual patient and the different stages of ARDS. This article reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and ventilator-induced lung injury and presents current evidence-based strategies for ventilator settings in ARDS.

  20. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) - review].

    PubMed

    Cermáková, Z; Simetka, O; Kořístka, M

    2013-04-01

    TRALI is a major cause of serious morbidity and mortality associated with a blood transfusion. It is clinically manifested by acute respiratory distress within 6 hours of completion of transfusion. Neutrophils have the key role in the pathogenesis. They are activated mostly with leukocyte antibodies (HLA and granulocyte) that are present mainly in plasma containing blood products. TRALI is a clinical diagnosis based on hypoxemia and positive finding on lung X-ray examination. The treatment is only supportive and the mortality is about 5% to 10%. The major preventive measure is transfusing blood products from donors without leukocyte antibodies.

  1. Mechanical Ventilation Induces an Inflammatory Response in Preinjured Lungs in Late Phase of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Wei; Zhou, Quanjun; Yao, Shanglong; Deng, Qingzhu; Wang, Tingting; Wu, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) may amplify the lung-specific inflammatory response in preinjured lungs by elevating cytokine release and augmenting damage to the alveolar integrity. In this study, we test the hypothesis that MV exerts different negative impacts on inflammatory response at different time points of postlung injury. Basic lung injury was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery in rats. Physiological indexes including blood gases were monitored during MV and samples were assessed following each experiment. Low V T (tidal volume) MV caused a slight increase in cytokine release and tissue damage at day 1 and day 4 after sepsis induced lung injury, while cytokine release from the lungs in the two moderately ventilated V T groups was amplified. Interestingly, in the two groups where rats received low V T MV, we found that infiltration of inflammatory cells was only profound at day 4 after CLP. Marked elevation of protein leakage indicated a compromise in alveolar integrity in rats that received moderate V T MV at day 4 following CLP, correlating with architectural damage to the alveoli. Our study indicates that preinjured lungs are more sensitive to mechanical MV at later phases of sepsis, and this situation may be a result of differing immune status.

  2. Activation of adherent vascular neutrophils in the lung during acute endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Vasanthi R; Connor, Agnieszka J; Zhou, Peihong; Gordon, Marion K; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2002-01-01

    Background Neutrophils constitute the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Whereas these cells readily undergo apoptosis under homeostatic conditions, their survival is prolonged during inflammatory reactions and they become biochemically and functionally activated. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of acute endotoxemia on the response of a unique subpopulation of neutrophils tightly adhered to the lung vasculature. Methods Rats were treated with 5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (i.v.) to induce acute endotoxemia. Adherent neutrophils were isolated from the lung vasculature by collagenase digestion and sequential filtering. Agarose gel electrophoresis, RT-PCR, western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to evaluate neutrophil activity. Results Adherent vascular neutrophils isolated from endotoxemic animals exhibited decreased apoptosis when compared to cells from control animals. This was associated with a marked increase in expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. Cells isolated 0.5–2 hours after endotoxin administration were more chemotactic than cells from control animals and expressed increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and protein, demonstrating that they are functionally activated. Endotoxin treatment of the animals also induced p38 and p44/42 mitogen activated protein kinases in the adherent lung neutrophils, as well as nuclear binding activity of the transcription factors, NF-κB and cAMP response element binding protein. Conclusion These data demonstrate that adherent vascular lung neutrophils are highly responsive to endotoxin and that pathways regulating apoptosis and cellular activation are upregulated in these cells. PMID:12204102

  3. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the lung: a reactive lesion or a true neoplasm?

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Gvinianidze, Lasha; Woo, Wen Ling; Borg, Elaine; Lawrence, David

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT) of the lung represents an extremely rare type of inflammatory pseudo tumor that appears most commonly in children and young individuals. There has been an ongoing controversy whether an IMT is a reactive lesion or a true neoplasm making the further management extremely challenging. Purpose of the paper is through a literature review to highlight the existence of this rare tumour along with its key features and the management options available. PMID:26101648

  4. Inflammatory bowel disease of the lung: The role of infliximab?

    PubMed

    Hayek, Adam J; Pfanner, Timothy P; White, Heath D

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary extra-intestinal manifestations (EIM) of inflammatory bowel disease are well described with a variable incidence. We present a case of Crohn's disease with pulmonary EIM including chronic bronchitis with non-resolving bilateral cavitary pulmonary nodules and mediastinal lymphadenopathy successfully treated with infliximab. Additionally, we present a case summary from a literature review on pulmonary EIM successfully treated with infliximab. Current treatment recommendations include an inhaled and/or systemic corticosteroid regimen which is largely based on case reports and expert opinion. We offer infliximab as an adjunctive therapy or alternative to corticosteroids for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease related pulmonary EIM.

  5. Therapeutic Effects of Human Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Acute Lung Injury Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hua; Xiong, Yi; Xia, Yunqiu; Zhang, Rong; Tian, Daiyin; Wang, Ting; Dai, Jihong; Wang, Lijia; Yao, Hongbing; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Ke; Liu, Enmei; Shi, Yujun; Fu, Zhou; Gao, Li; Zou, Lin

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are still very high, but stem cells show some promise for its treatment. Here we found that intratracheal administration of human umbilical cord-mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) significantly improved survival and attenuated the lung inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI mice. We also used the proteins-chip and bioinformatics to analyze interactions between UC-MSCs treatment and immune-response alternations of ALI mice. Then we demonstrated that UC-MSCs could inhibit the inflammatory response of mouse macrophage in ALI mice, as well as enhance its IL-10 expression. We provide data to support the concept that the therapeutic capacity of UC-MSCs for ALI was primarily through paracrine secretion, particularly of prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2). Furthermore, we showed that UC-MSCs might secrete a panel of factors including GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-13 to ameliorate ALI. Our study suggested that UC-MSCs could protect LPS-induced ALI model by immune regulation and paracrine factors, indicating that UC-MSCs should be a promising strategy for ALI/ARDS. PMID:28051154

  6. Role of β-catenin-regulated CCN matricellular proteins in epithelial repair after inflammatory lung injury

    PubMed Central

    McClendon, Jazalle; Aschner, Yael; Briones, Natalie; Young, Scott K.; Lau, Lester F.; Kahn, Michael; Downey, Gregory P.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of the lung epithelium after injury is integral to the pathogenesis and outcomes of diverse inflammatory lung diseases. We previously reported that β-catenin signaling promotes epithelial repair after inflammatory injury, but the β-catenin target genes that mediate this effect are unknown. Herein, we examined which β-catenin transcriptional coactivators and target genes promote epithelial repair after inflammatory injury. Transmigration of human neutrophils across cultured monolayers of human lung epithelial cells resulted in a fall in transepithelial resistance and the formation of discrete areas of epithelial denudation (“microinjury”), which repaired via cell spreading by 96 h. In mice treated with intratracheal (i.t.) LPS or keratinocyte chemokine, neutrophil emigration was associated with increased permeability of the lung epithelium, as determined by increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid albumin concentration, which decreased over 3–6 days. Activation of β-catenin/p300-dependent gene expression using the compound ICG-001 accelerated epithelial repair in vitro and in murine models. Neutrophil transmigration induced epithelial expression of the β-catenin/p300 target genes Wnt-induced secreted protein (WISP) 1 and cysteine-rich (Cyr) 61, as determined by real-time PCR (qPCR) and immunostaining. Purified neutrophil elastase induced WISP1 upregulation in lung epithelial cells, as determined by qPCR. WISP1 expression increased in murine lungs after i.t. LPS, as determined by ELISA of the BAL fluid and qPCR of whole lung extracts. Finally, recombinant WISP1 and Cyr61 accelerated repair, and Cyr61-neutralizing antibodies delayed repair of the injured epithelium in vitro. We conclude that β-catenin/p300-dependent expression of WISP1 and Cyr61 is critical for epithelial repair and represents a potential therapeutic target to promote epithelial repair after inflammatory injury. PMID:23316072

  7. Dual pancreas- and lung-targeting therapy for local and systemic complications of acute pancreatitis mediated by a phenolic propanediamine moiety.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianbo; Zhang, Jinjie; Fu, Yao; Sun, Xun; Gong, Tao; Jiang, Jinghui; Zhang, Zhirong

    2015-08-28

    To inhibit both the local and systemic complications with acute pancreatitis, an effective therapy requires a drug delivery system that can efficiently overcome the blood-pancreas barrier while achieving lung-specific accumulation. Here, we report the first dual pancreas- and lung-targeting therapeutic strategy mediated by a phenolic propanediamine moiety for the treatment of acute pancreatitis. Using the proposed dual-targeting ligand, an anti-inflammatory compound Rhein has been tailored to preferentially accumulate in the pancreas and lungs with rapid distribution kinetics, excellent tissue-penetrating properties and minimum toxicity. Accordingly, the drug-ligand conjugate remarkably downregulated the proinflammatory cytokines in the target organs thus effectively inhibiting local pancreatic and systemic inflammation in rats. The dual-specific targeting therapeutic strategy may help pave the way for targeted drug delivery to treat complicated inflammatory diseases.

  8. Acute pulmonary inflammation induced by lung overloading with selenium particles: leukocyte response and in situ detection of selenium at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Cherdwongcharoensuk, Duangrudee; Upatham, Suchart; Pereira, António Sousa; Aguas, Artur P

    2004-12-15

    The kinetics of the acute inflammatory response of the lung was triggered in CD-1 mice by a single intratracheal instillation of a large amount of Se (10 mg); it was studied by quantitative cytology of bronchoalveolar lavage samples, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy coupled with x-ray elemental microanalysis. Bronchoalveolar lavage leukocytes were mostly neutrophils and increased from 12 to 24 h of Se treatment and decreased at 72 h. Only less than half of the granulocytes showed ingested Se particles; in contrast, virtually all BAL macrophages contained Se particles. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with X-ray elemental microanalysis revealed that the intracellular Se particles were heterogeneous in size (diameters from 0.4 and up to 14 microm), and that Se inclusions were sometimes accumulated at a pole of the cell. At 72 h after instillation of the particles, Se-loaded alveolar macrophages were migrated in the interstitial space of the alveoli. Se-positive regions had a focal distribution in the lung; accumulation of inflammatory cells erased the alveolar architecture of these areas of the deep lung. Our data indicates that Se overloading of the lung results in: (1) an acute inflammatory response that is dominated by neutrophils; (2) early removal of Se done mostly by alveolar macrophages, and (3) formation of focal areas of invasion of the lung parenchyma by inflammatory infiltrates.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells improves survival in LPS-induced acute lung injury acting through inhibition of NETs formation.

    PubMed

    Pedrazza, Leonardo; Cunha, Aline Andrea; Luft, Carolina; Nunes, Nailê Karine; Schimitz, Felipe; Gassen, Rodrigo Benedetti; Breda, Ricardo Vaz; Donadio, Marcio Vinícius Fagundes; de Souza Wyse, Angela Terezinha; Pitrez, Paulo Marcio Condessa; Rosa, Jose Luis; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues

    2017-01-23

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are syndromes of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure resulting from a variety of direct and indirect injuries to the gas exchange parenchyma of the lungs. During the ALI, we have an increase release of proinflammatory cytokines and high reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. These factors are responsible for the release and activation of neutrophil-derived proteases and the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). The excessive increase in the release of NETs cause damage to lung tissue. Recent studies have studies involving the administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the treatment of experimental ALI has shown promising results. In this way, the objective of our study is to evaluate the ability of MSCs, in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI model, to reduce inflammation, oxidative damage, and consequently decrease the release of NETs. Mice were submitted lung injury induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS and subsequently treated or not with MSCs. Treatment with MSCs was able to modulate pulmonary inflammation, decrease oxidative damage, and reduce the release of NETs. These benefits from treatment are evident when we observe a significant increase in the survival curve in the treated animals. Our results demonstrate that MSCs treatment is effective for the treatment of ALI. For the first time, it is described that MSCs can reduce the formation of NETs and an experimental model of ALI. This finding is directly related to these cells modulate the inflammatory response and oxidative damage in the course of the pathology.

  10. Time course changes of oxidative stress and inflammation in hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shouli; Shi, Min; Liu, Changting; Liu, Qinghui; Guo, Jun; Yu, Senyang; Jiang, Tingshu

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Therapies with high levels of oxygen are commonly used in the management of critical care. However, prolonged exposure to hyperoxia can cause acute lung injury. Although oxidative stress and inflammation are purported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury, the exact mechanisms are still less known in the hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI). Materials and Methods: In this study, we investigated the time course changes of oxidative stress and inflammation in lung tissues of rats exposed to >95% oxygen for 12-60 hr. Results: We found that at 12 hr after hyperoxia challenge, the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were significantly reduced with remarkably increased lipid peroxidation. At 12 hr, NF-κB p65 expression was also upregulated, but Iκ-Bα expression showed a remarkable decline. Significant production of inflammatory mediators, e.g, interleukin-1β, occurred 24 hr after hyperoxia exposure. In addition, the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 expression and the activity of myeloperoxidase were significantly increased at 24 hr with a peak at 48 hr. Conclusion: Our data support that hyperoxia-induced oxidative damage and NF-κB pathway activation implicate in the early phase of HALI pathogenesis. PMID:25810882

  11. 'Inflammatory breast cancer' due to metastatic adenocarcinoma of lung.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Jacob; Naik, Vinay; George, Gemy Maria

    2016-09-01

    A 67-year-old woman with a history of lung adenocarcinoma presented with 3 weeks of redness, pain, swelling and skin changes in her right breast. Her vital signs and physical examination were within physiological limits except for the right breast. She had extensive red streaks radiating from the right nipple with peau d'orange appearance of her overlying skin. Her breast was tender on examination and did not have any associated cervical or axillary lymphadenopathy. Her mammography revealed thickening of the skin, increased parenchymal markings and shrinkage the breast. Multiple skin biopsies demonstrated moderately differentiated lung adenocarcinoma with lymphovascular invasion. The patient made an informed decision to undergo radiotherapy following discussion with her oncologist and breast surgeon. She succumbed to her illness 2 months after the diagnosis of metastasis to her breast.

  12. Traumatic forequarter amputation associated acute lung injury (ALI): report of one case.

    PubMed

    Liang, K; Gan, X; Deng, Z

    2012-07-01

    One case of traumatic forequarter amputation associated acute lung injury (ALI) was presented. A discussion reviewing the treatment guidelines for this devastating injury, and pointing out the importance of supporting the lung and preventing the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was included.

  13. Inducible expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase attenuates acute rejection of tissue-engineered lung allografts in rats.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Ammar; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Toolabi, LadanTeimoori; Ghanbari, Hossein; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2016-01-15

    Lung disease remains one of the principal causes of death worldwide and the incidence of pulmonary diseases is increasing. Complexity in treatments and shortage of donors leads us to develop new ways for lung disease treatment. One promising strategy is preparing engineered lung for transplantation. In this context, employing new immunosuppression strategies which suppresses immune system locally rather than systemic improves transplant survival. This tends to reduce the difficulties in transplant rejection and the systemic impact of the use of immunosuppressive drugs which causes side effects such as serious infections and malignancies. In our study examining the immunosuppressive effects of IDO expression, we produced rat lung tissues with the help of decellularized tissue, differentiating medium and rat mesenchymal stem cells. Transduction of these cells by IDO expressing lentiviruses provided inducible and local expression of this gene. To examine immunosuppressive properties of IDO expression by these tissues, we transplanted these allografts into rats and, subsequently, evaluated cytokine expression and histopathological properties. Expression of inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and TNFα were significantly downregulated in IDO expressing allograft. Moreover, acute rejection score of this experimental group was also lower comparing other two groups and mRNA levels of FOXP3, a regulatory T cell marker, upregulated in IDO expressing group. However, infiltrating lymphocyte counting did not show significant difference between groups. This study demonstrates that IDO gene transfer into engineered lung allograft tissues significantly attenuates acute allograft damage suggesting local therapy with IDO as a strategy to reduce the need for systemic immunosuppression and, thereby, its side effects.

  14. Inflammatory and immune processes in the human lung in health and disease: evaluation by bronchoalveolar lavage.

    PubMed Central

    Hunninghake, G. W.; Gadek, J. E.; Kawanami, O.; Ferrans, V. J.; Crystal, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage is an invaluable means of accurately evaluating the inflammatory and immune processes of the human lung. Although lavage recovers only those cells and proteins present on the epithelial surface of the lower respiratory tract, comparison with open lung biopsies shows that these constituents are representative of the inflammatory and immune systems of the alveolar structures. With the use of these techniques, sufficient materials are obtained from normal individuals to allow characterization of not only the types of cells and proteins present but their functions as well. Such observations have been useful in defining the inflammatory and immune capabilities of the normal lung and provide a basis for the study of lung disease. Lavage methods have been used to characterize inflammatory and immune processes of the lower respiratory tract in destructive, infectious, neoplastic, and interstitial disorders. From the data already acquired, it is apparent that bronchoalveolar lavage will yield major insights into the pathogenesis, staging, and therapy decisions involved in these disorders. (Am J Pathol 97:149--206, 1979). Images Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 3 PMID:495693

  15. [The immunological conflict in the transfusion-related acute lung injury or TRALI].

    PubMed

    Drouet, C; Khoy, K; Masson, D; Bardy, B; Giannoli, C; Dubois, V

    2011-04-01

    Despite its underrated incidence, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pulmonary edema in TRALI occurs in the course of the transfusion of apheresis products or erythrocyte concentrates. Its pathogenesis is attributed to the infusion of donor antibodies that recognize leucocyte antigens in the transfused host, with subsequent sequestration of leucocytes in the pulmonary vessels. It is also associated with the passive transfer of lipids and other biological response modifiers that accumulate during the storage or processing of blood components. The innate immunity and inflammatory kinins are key components. The knowledge of its etiopathogenesis must come into play for improving prevention and diagnosis and for application of adapted care of the patient.

  16. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  17. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Kathleen A.; McKay, Ryan T.; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a “snapshot” in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision

  18. The emerging role of microRNAs in regulating immune and inflammatory responses in the lung.

    PubMed

    Foster, Paul S; Plank, Maximilian; Collison, Adam; Tay, Hock L; Kaiko, Gerard E; Li, Jingjing; Johnston, Sebastian L; Hansbro, Philip M; Kumar, Rakesh K; Yang, Ming; Mattes, Joerg

    2013-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases of the lung are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many of these disorders can be attributed to abnormal immune responses to environmental stimuli and infections. As such, understanding the innate host defense pathways and their regulatory systems will be critical to developing new approaches to treatment. In this regard, there is increasing interest in the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of pulmonary innate host defense responses and the inflammatory sequelae in respiratory disease. In this review, we discuss recent findings that indicate an important role for miRNAs in the regulation in mouse models of various respiratory diseases and in host defense against bacterial and viral infection. We also discuss the potential utility and limitations of targeting these molecules as anti-inflammatory strategies and also as a means to improve pathogen clearance from the lung.

  19. The Pig: A Relevant Model for Evaluating the Neutrophil Serine Protease Activities during Acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bréa, Déborah; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Barc, Céline; Pezant, Jérémy; Melo, Sandrine; Olivier, Michel; Delaunay, Rémy; Boulesteix, Olivier; Berthon, Patricia; Rossignol, Christelle; Burlaud Gaillard, Julien; Becq, Frédéric; Gauthier, Francis; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Meurens, François; Berri, Mustapha; Caballero-Posadas, Ignacio; Attucci, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    The main features of lung infection and inflammation are a massive recruitment of neutrophils and the subsequent release of neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs). Anti-infectious and/or anti-inflammatory treatments must be tested on a suitable animal model. Mice models do not replicate several aspects of human lung disease. This is particularly true for cystic fibrosis (CF), which has led the scientific community to a search for new animal models. We have shown that mice are not appropriate for characterizing drugs targeting neutrophil-dependent inflammation and that pig neutrophils and their NSPs are similar to their human homologues. We induced acute neutrophilic inflammatory responses in pig lungs using Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic respiratory pathogen. Blood samples, nasal swabs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected at 0, 3, 6 and 24 h post-insfection (p.i.) and biochemical parameters, serum and BAL cytokines, bacterial cultures and neutrophil activity were evaluated. The release of proinflammatory mediators, biochemical and hematological blood parameters, cell recruitment and bronchial reactivity, peaked at 6h p.i.. We also used synthetic substrates specific for human neutrophil proteases to show that the activity of pig NSPs in BALFs increased. These proteases were also detected at the surface of lung neutrophils using anti-human NSP antibodies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung infection in pigs results in a neutrophilic response similar to that described for cystic fibrosis and ventilator-associated pneumonia in humans. Altogether, this indicates that the pig is an appropriate model for testing anti-infectious and/or anti-inflammatory drugs to combat adverse proteolytic effects of neutrophil in human lung diseases. PMID:27992534

  20. Mast cells modulate acute ozone-induced inflammation of the murine lung

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeberger, S.R.; Seiden, J.E.; Levitt, R.C.; Zhang, L.Y. )

    1993-11-01

    We hypothesized that mast cells modulate lung inflammation that develops after acute ozone (O3) exposure. Two tests were done: (1) genetically mast-cell-deficient (WBB6F1-W/Wv, WCB6F1-SI/SId) and bone-marrow-transplanted W/Wv mice were exposed to O3 or filtered air, and the inflammatory responses were compared with those of mast-cell-sufficient congenic mice (WBB6F1-(+)/+, WCB6F1-(+)/+); (2) genetically O3-susceptible C57BL/6J mice were treated pharmacologically with putative mast-cell modulators or vehicle, and the O3-induced inflammatory responses were compared. Mice were exposed to 1.75 ppm O3 or air for 3 h, and lung inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 6 and 24 h after exposure. Relative to O3-exposed W/Wv and SI/SId mice, the mean numbers of lavageable polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and total BAL protein concentration (a marker of permeability) were significantly greater in the respective O3-exposed normal congenic +/+ mice (p < 0.05). Mast cells were reconstituted in W/Wv mice by transplantation of bone marrow cells from congenic +/+ mice, and O3-induced lung inflammation was assessed in the mast-cell-replete W/Wv mice. After O3 exposure, the changes in lavageable PMNs and total protein of mast-cell-replete W/Wv mice were not different from age-matched normal +/+ control mice, and they were significantly greater than those of sham-transplanted W/Wv mice (p < 0.05). Genetically susceptible C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with a mast-cell stabilizer (nedocromil sodium), secretagogue (compound 48/80), or vehicle, and the mice were exposed to O3.

  1. Early-Age-Related Changes in Proteostasis Augment Immunopathogenesis of Sepsis and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bodas, Manish; Min, Taehong; Vij, Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Background The decline of proteasomal activity is known to be associated with the age-related disorders but the early events involved in this process are not apparent. To address this, we investigated the early-age-related (pediatric vs. adult) mechanisms that augment immunopathogenesis of sepsis and acute lung injury. Methodology/Principal Findings The 3-weeks (pediatric) and 6-months (adult) old C57BL/6 mice were selected as the study groups. Mice were subjected to 1×20 cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) mediated sepsis or intratracheal Psuedomonas aeruginosa (Pa)-LPS induced acute lung injury (ALI).We observed a significant increase in basal levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-6 and neutrophil activity marker, myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the adult mice compared to the pediatric indicating the age-related constitutive increase in inflammatory response. Next, we found that age-related decrease in PSMB6 (proteasomal subunit) expression in adult mice results in accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins that triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR). We identified that Pa-LPS induced activation of UPR modifier, p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein) in the adult mice lungs correlates with increase in Pa-LPS induced NFκB levels. Moreover, we observed a constitutive increase in p-eIF2α indicating a protective ER stress response to accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins. We used MG-132 treatment of HBE cells as an in vitro model to standardize the efficacy of salubrinal (inhibitor of eIF2α de-phosphorylation) in controlling the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the NFκB levels. Finally, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of salubrinal to correct proteostasis-imbalance in the adult mice based on its ability to control CLP induced IL-6 secretion or recruitment of pro-inflammatory cells. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate the critical role of early-age-related proteostasis-imbalance as a novel mechanism that augments the NFκB mediated

  2. S100A8 induces IL-10 and protects against acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yuka; Hsu, Kenneth; Tedla, Nicodemus; Chung, Yuen Ming; Chow, Sharron; Herbert, Cristan; Geczy, Carolyn L

    2014-03-15

    S100A8 is considered proinflammatory by activating TLR4 and/or the receptor for advanced glycation end products. The aim was to investigate inflammatory effects of S100A8 in murine lung. S100A8 was administered to BALB/c mice by nasal inhalation and genes induced over a time-course assessed. LPS was introduced intranasally either alone or 2 h after pretreatment of mice with intranasal application of S100A8 or dexamethasone. A Cys(42)-Ala(42) mutant S100A8 mutant was used to assess whether S100A8's effects were via pathways that were dependent on reactive oxygen species. S100A8 induced IL-10 mRNA, and expression was apparent only in airway epithelial cells. Importantly, it suppressed acute lung injury provoked by LPS inhalation by suppressing mast-cell activation and induction of mediators orchestrating leukocyte recruitment, possibly by reducing NF-κB activation via an IκBα/Akt pathway and by downmodulating pathways generating oxidative stress. The Cys(42)-Ala(42) S100A8 mutant did not induce IL-10 and was less immunosuppressive, indicating modulation by scavenging oxidants. S100A8 inhibition of LPS-mediated injury was as potent, and outcomes were remarkably similar to immunosuppression by dexamethasone. We challenge the notion that S100A8 is an agonist for TLR4 or the receptor for advanced glycation end products. S100A8 induced IL-10 in vivo and initiates a feedback loop that attenuates acute lung injury.

  3. Novel hematologic inflammatory parameters to predict acute mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Toptas, Mehmet; Akkoc, İbrahim; Savas, Yildiray; Uzman, Sinan; Toptas, Yasar; Can, Mehmet Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    Acute mesenteric ischaemia (AMI) is an emergency condition that requires urgent diagnosis. Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) have been studied as inflammatory biomarkers in atherosclerosis, but data regarding AMI are lacking. The study population included patients with AMI (n = 46) versus age and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 46). Computed multidetector tomographic angiography was performed to diagnose AMI. NLR and PLR were calculated using complete blood count. C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were also analyzed. Neutrophil levels and lymphocytes were significantly higher in patients with AMI than in the control individuals (P < 0.001 and P = 0.43, respectively). NLR levels were significantly higher in patients with AMI compared with that in the control individuals (P < 0.001). Platelet levels did not reach statistical significance between the groups (P = 0.709). However, patients with AMI had significantly higher PLR levels than the control group (P = 0.039). CRP levels on admission were higher in patients with AMI in comparison with control individuals. There was also a positive correlation between NLR and CRP (r = 0.548, P < 0.001), and between PLR and CRP (r = 0.528, P < 0.001). NLR level greater than 4.5, measured on admission, yielded an area under the curve value of 0.790 (95% confidence interval 0.681-0.799, sensitivity 77%, specificity 72%), and PLR level of greater than 157 yielded an area under the curve value of 0.604 (95% confidence interval 0.486-0.722, sensitivity 59%, specificity 65%). Patients with AMI had increased NLR, PLR, and CRP levels compared with controls. Increased NLR and PLR was an independent predictor of AMI.

  4. Heme Attenuation Ameliorates Irritant Gas Inhalation-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Lam, Adam; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Carlisle, Matthew A.; Traylor, Amie; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Exposure to irritant gases, such as bromine (Br2), poses an environmental and occupational hazard that results in severe lung and systemic injury. However, the mechanism(s) of Br2 toxicity and the therapeutic responses required to mitigate lung damage are not known. Previously, it was demonstrated that Br2 upregulates the heme degrading enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Since heme is a major inducer of HO-1, we determined whether an increase in heme and heme-dependent oxidative injury underlies the pathogenesis of Br2 toxicity. Results: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to Br2 gas (600 ppm, 30 min) and returned to room air. Thirty minutes postexposure, mice were injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of the heme scavenging protein, hemopexin (Hx) (3 μg/gm body weight), or saline. Twenty-four hours postexposure, saline-treated mice had elevated total heme in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma and acute lung injury (ALI) culminating in 80% mortality after 10 days. Hx treatment significantly lowered heme, decreased evidence of ALI (lower protein and inflammatory cells in BALF, lower lung wet-to-dry weight ratios, and decreased airway hyperreactivity to methacholine), and reduced mortality. In addition, Br2 caused more severe ALI and mortality in mice with HO-1 gene deletion (HO-1−/−) compared to wild-type controls, while transgenic mice overexpressing the human HO-1 gene (hHO-1) showed significant protection. Innovation: This is the first study delineating the role of heme in ALI caused by Br2. Conclusion: The data suggest that attenuating heme may prove to be a useful adjuvant therapy to treat patients with ALI. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 99–112. PMID:26376667

  5. Sinomenine Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice via Adenosine A2A Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Li; He, Xie; Zeng, Yi-Jun; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) is a bioactive alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, which is widely used in the clinical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. In this study, we investigate the role of SIN in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in mice. After ALI, lung water content and histological signs of pulmonary injury were attenuated, whereas the PaO2/FIO2 (P/F) ratios were elevated significantly in the mice pretreated with SIN. Additionally, SIN markedly inhibited inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and IL-1β expression levels as well as neutrophil infiltration in the lung tissues of the mice. Microarray analysis and real-time PCR showed that SIN treatment upregulated adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) expression, and the protective effect of SIN was abolished in A2AR knockout mice. Further investigation in isolated mouse neutrophils confirmed the upregulation of A2AR by SIN and showed that A2AR-cAMP-PKA signaling was involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of SIN. Taken together, these findings demonstrate an A2AR-associated anti-inflammatory effect and the protective role of SIN in ALI, which suggests a potential novel approach to treat ALI. PMID:23555007

  6. Sinomenine protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice via adenosine A(2A) receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Li; He, Xie; Zeng, Yi-Jun; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) is a bioactive alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, which is widely used in the clinical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. In this study, we investigate the role of SIN in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in mice. After ALI, lung water content and histological signs of pulmonary injury were attenuated, whereas the PaO2/FIO2 (P/F) ratios were elevated significantly in the mice pretreated with SIN. Additionally, SIN markedly inhibited inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and IL-1β expression levels as well as neutrophil infiltration in the lung tissues of the mice. Microarray analysis and real-time PCR showed that SIN treatment upregulated adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) expression, and the protective effect of SIN was abolished in A(2A)R knockout mice. Further investigation in isolated mouse neutrophils confirmed the upregulation of A(2A)R by SIN and showed that A(2A)R-cAMP-PKA signaling was involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of SIN. Taken together, these findings demonstrate an A(2A)R-associated anti-inflammatory effect and the protective role of SIN in ALI, which suggests a potential novel approach to treat ALI.

  7. Protective Effects of Cucurbitacin B on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Sepsis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Shu; Liu, Xing; Lv, Shuguang; Wang, Zhifang

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of cucurbitacin B (CuB) on sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats. Material/Methods An ALI model was made by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in SD rats. Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=15 per group): animals undergoing a sham CLP (sham group); animals undergoing CLP (CLP control group); animals undergoing CLP and treated with CuB at 1 mg/kg of body weight (bw) (low-dose CuB [L-CuB] group), animals undergoing CuB at 2 mg/kg of bw (mid-dose CuB [M-CuB] group); and animals undergoing CuB at 5 mg/kg of bw (high-dose CuB [H-CuB] group). Samples of blood and lung tissue were harvested at different time points (6, 12, and 24 hour post-CLP surgery) for the detection of indicators which represented ALI. Five rats were respectively sacrificed at each time point. Pathological changes of lung tissue were observed by H&E staining. Another 50 rats were distributed into the same five groups to record the 72 hour survival rates. Results Treatment with CuB significantly increased the blood gas PaO2 levels and decreased lung wet/dry (W/D) ratio (p<0.05). It significantly reduced protein concentration, accumulation of the inflammatory cells, and levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), (p<0.05), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Pulmonary pathological damage and survival rates at 72 hours were found to be effectively improved by CuB. In addition, CuB performed its pulmonary protection effects in a dose-depended manner. Conclusions CuB can effectively improve the pulmonary gas exchange function, reduce pulmonary edema, and inhibit the inflammatory response in the lung, revealing that CuB may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for sepsis-induced ALI. PMID:28315572

  8. Effects of presurgical exercise training on systemic inflammatory markers among patients with malignant lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Eves, Neil D; Peddle, Carolyn J; Courneya, Kerry S; Haykowsky, Mark; Kumar, Vikaash; Winton, Timothy W; Reiman, Tony

    2009-04-01

    Systemic inflammation plays an important role in the initiation, promotion, and progression of lung carcinogenesis. The effects of interventions to lower inflammation have not been explored. Accordingly, we conducted a pilot study to explore the effects of exercise training on changes in biomarkers of systemic inflammation among patients with malignant lung lesions. Using a single-group design, 12 patients with suspected operable lung cancer were provided with structured exercise training until surgical resection. Participants underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing, 6 min walk testing, pulmonary function testing, and blood collection at baseline and immediately prior to surgical resection. Systemic inflammatory markers included intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, C-reactive protein, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. The overall exercise adherence rate was 78%, with patients completing a mean of 30 +/- 25 sessions. Mean peak oxygen consumption increased 2.9 mL.kg-1.min-1 from baseline to presurgery (p = 0.016). Results indicate that exercise training resulted in a significant reduction in ICAM-1 (p = 0.041). Changes in other inflammatory markers did not reach statistical significance. Change in cardiorespiratory fitness was not associated with change in systemic inflammatory markers. This exploratory study provides an initial step for future studies to elucidate the potential role of exercise, as well as identify the underlying mechanisms of action, as a means of modulating the relationship between inflammation and cancer pathogenesis.

  9. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effects of β-adrenoceptor agonists on human lung macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sharonjit K; Marriott, Helen M; Suvarna, S Kim; Peachell, Peter T

    2016-12-15

    The principal mechanism by which bronchodilator β-adrenoceptor agonists act is to relax airways smooth muscle although they may also be anti-inflammatory. However, the extent of anti-inflammatory activity and the cell types affected by these agonists are uncertain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether β-adrenoceptor agonists prevent pro-inflammatory cytokine generation from activated human lung macrophages. Macrophages were isolated and purified from human lung. The cells were pre-treated with both short-acting (isoprenaline, salbutamol, terbutaline) and long-acting (formoterol, salmeterol, indacaterol) β-agonists before activation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce cytokine (TNFα, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10) generation. The experiments showed that short-acting β-agonists were poor inhibitors of cytokine generation. Of the long-acting β-agonists studied, formoterol was also a weak inhibitor of cytokine generation whereas only indacaterol and salmeterol showed moderate inhibitory activity. Further experiments using the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI-118,551 suggested that the effects of indacaterol were likely to be mediated by β2-adrenoceptors whereas those of salmeterol were not. These findings were corroborated by functional desensitization studies in which the inhibitory effects of indacaterol appeared to be receptor-mediated whereas those of salmeterol were not. Taken together, the data indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of β-adrenoceptor agonists on human lung macrophages are modest.

  10. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Lee, K. Monica; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures. - Highlights: ► Obesity modulates inflammatory markers in BAL fluid after LPS exposure. ► Obese animals have a unique transcriptional signature in lung after LPS exposure. ► Obesity elevates inflammatory stress and reduces antioxidant capacity in the lung

  11. Protective Effect of Amygdalin on LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Inhibiting NF-κB and NLRP3 Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ao; Pan, Weiyun; Lv, Juan; Wu, Hui

    2017-03-16

    The acute lung injury (ALI) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Amygdalin is derived from the bitter apricot kernel, an efficacious Chinese herbal medicine. Although amygdalin is used by many cancer patients as an antitumor agent, there is no report about the effect of amygdalin on acute lung injury. Here we explored the protective effect of amygdalin on ALI using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine model by detecting the lung wet/dry ratio, the myeloperoxidase (MPO) in lung tissues, inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inflammatory cytokines production, as well as NLRP3 and NF-κB signaling pathways. The results showed that amygdalin significantly reduced LPS-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells and the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the BALF. The activity of MPO and lung wet/dry ratio were also attenuated by amygdalin. Furthermore, the western blotting analysis showed that amygdalin remarkably inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB and NLRP3 activation. These findings indicate that amygdalin has a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice. The mechanism may be related to the inhibition of NF-κB and NLRP3 signaling pathways.

  12. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew S.; Yang, Chao; Fung, Ka Yee; Bachem, Annabell; Bourges, Dorothée; Bedoui, Sammy; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; van Driel, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC), which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:27300652

  13. Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 (FGF-10) Mobilizes Lung-resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Protects Against Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lin; Zhou, Jian; Rong, Linyi; Seeley, Eric J; Pan, Jue; Zhu, Xiaodan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Qin; Tang, Xinjun; Qu, Jieming; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-02-12

    FGF-10 can prevent or reduce lung specific inflammation due to traumatic or infectious lung injury. However, the exact mechanisms are poorly characterized. Additionally, the effect of FGF-10 on lung-resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) has not been studied. To better characterize the effect of FGF-10 on LR-MSCs, FGF-10 was intratracheally delivered into the lungs of rats. Three days after instillation, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and plastic-adherent cells were cultured, characterized and then delivered therapeutically to rats after LPS intratracheal instillation. Immunophenotyping analysis of FGF-10 mobilized and cultured cells revealed expression of the MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the absence of the hematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Delivery of LR-MSCs into the lungs after LPS injury reduced the inflammatory response as evidenced by decreased wet-to-dry ratio, reduced neutrophil and leukocyte recruitment and decreased inflammatory cytokines compared to control rats. Lastly, direct delivery of FGF-10 in the lungs of rats led to an increase of LR-MSCs in the treated lungs, suggesting that the protective effect of FGF-10 might be mediated, in part, by the mobilization of LR-MSCs in lungs.

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 (FGF-10) Mobilizes Lung-resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Protects Against Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Lin; Zhou, Jian; Rong, Linyi; Seeley, Eric J.; Pan, Jue; Zhu, Xiaodan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Qin; Tang, Xinjun; Qu, Jieming; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    FGF-10 can prevent or reduce lung specific inflammation due to traumatic or infectious lung injury. However, the exact mechanisms are poorly characterized. Additionally, the effect of FGF-10 on lung-resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) has not been studied. To better characterize the effect of FGF-10 on LR-MSCs, FGF-10 was intratracheally delivered into the lungs of rats. Three days after instillation, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and plastic-adherent cells were cultured, characterized and then delivered therapeutically to rats after LPS intratracheal instillation. Immunophenotyping analysis of FGF-10 mobilized and cultured cells revealed expression of the MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the absence of the hematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Delivery of LR-MSCs into the lungs after LPS injury reduced the inflammatory response as evidenced by decreased wet-to-dry ratio, reduced neutrophil and leukocyte recruitment and decreased inflammatory cytokines compared to control rats. Lastly, direct delivery of FGF-10 in the lungs of rats led to an increase of LR-MSCs in the treated lungs, suggesting that the protective effect of FGF-10 might be mediated, in part, by the mobilization of LR-MSCs in lungs. PMID:26869337

  15. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing.

  16. Pro-inflammatory alterations and status of blood plasma iron in a model of blast-induced lung trauma.

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, N V; McFaul, S J; Januszkiewicz, A; Atkins, J L

    2005-01-01

    Impact of blast shock waves (SW) with the body wall produces blast lung injuries characterized by bilateral traumatic hemorrhages. Such injuries often have no external signs, are difficult to diagnose, and therefore, are frequently underestimated. Predictive assessment of acute respiratory distress syndrome outcome in SW-related accidents should be based on experimental data from appropriate animal models. Blood plasma transferrin is a major carrier of blood iron essential for proliferative "emergency" response of hematopoietic and immune systems as well as injured tissue in major trauma. Iron-transferrin complexes (Fe3+ TRF) can be quantitatively analyzed in blood and tissue samples with low-temperature EPR techniques. We hypothesized that use of EPR techniques in combination with assays for pro-inflammatory cytokines and granulocytes in the peripheral blood and BAL would reveal a pattern of systemic sequestration of (Fe3+)TRF that could be useful for development of biomarkers of the systemic inflammatory response to lung injury. With this goal we (i) analyzed time-dependent dynamics of (Fe3+)TRF in the peripheral blood of rats after impacts of SW generated in a laboratory shock-tube and (ii) assayed the fluctuation of granulocyte (PMN) counts and expression of CD11b adhesion molecules on the surface of PMNs during the first 24 h after SW induced injury. Sham-treated animals were used as control. Exposure to SW led to a significant decrease in the amount of blood (Fe3+)TRF that correlated with the extent of lung injury and developed gradually during the first 24 h. Thus, sequestration of (Fe3+)TRF occurred as early as 3 h post-exposure. At that time, the steady state concentration of (Fe3+)TRF in blood samples decreased from 19.7+/-0.6 microM in controls to 7.5+/-1.3 microM in exposed animals. The levels of (Fe3+)TRF remained decreased throughout the entire study period. PMN counts increased 5-fold and 3.5-fold over controls respectively, at 3 and 6 h postexposure

  17. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-02-04

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM.

  18. Acute lung inflammation in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia and sepsis in BALB/c mice: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    Lungs play an important role in the body's defense against a variety of pathogens, but this network of immune system-mediated defense can be deregulated during acute pulmonary infections. The present study compares acute lung inflammation occurring during Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia and sepsis in BALB/c mice. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal instillation of bacteria (10(4) cfu), while sepsis was developed by placing the fibrin-thrombin clot containing known amount of bacteria (10(2) cfu) into the peritoneal cavity of animals. Mice with sepsis showed 100% mortality within five post-infection days, whereas all the animals with pneumonia survived. In animals suffering from K. pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia, all the inflammatory parameters (TNF-α, IL-1α, MPO, MDA, and NO) were found to be maximum till third post-infection day, after that, a decline was observed, whereas in septic animals, all the above-mentioned markers of inflammation kept on increasing. Histopathological study showed presence of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages (or foam cells) in lungs of mice with pneumonia after third post-infection day, which might have contributed to the induction of resolution of inflammation, but no such observation was made in lungs of septic mice. Hence, during pneumonia, controlled activation of macrophages may lead to resolution of inflammation.

  19. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM. PMID:26841848

  20. A novel imidazopyridine derivative, X22, attenuates sepsis-induced lung and liver injury by inhibiting the inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiangting; Feng, Zhiguo; Xu, Tingting; Wu, Beibei; Chen, Hongjin; Xu, Fengli; Fu, Lili; Shan, Xiaoou; Dai, Yuanrong; Zhang, Yali; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite years of extensive research, effective drugs to treat sepsis in the clinic are lacking. In this study, we found a novel imidazopyridine derivative, X22, which has powerful anti-inflammatory activity. X22 dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in mouse primary peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages. X22 also downregulated the LPS-induced proinflammatory gene expression in vitro. In vivo, X22 exhibited a significant protection against LPS-induced death. Pretreatment or treatment with X22 attenuated the sepsis-induced lung and liver injury by inhibiting the inflammatory response. In addition, X22 showed protection against LPS-induced acute lung injury. We additionally found that pretreatment with X22 reduced the inflammatory pain in the acetic acid and formalin models and reduced the dimethylbenzene-induced ear swelling and acetic acid-increased vascular permeability. Together, these data confirmed that X22 has multiple anti-inflammatory effects and may be a potential therapeutic option in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:27390516

  1. Effect of Thoracentesis on Intubated Patients with Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Matthew B; Serna-Gallegos, Derek; Ault, Mark; Khan, Ahsan; Chung, Rex; Ley, Eric J; Melo, Nicolas; Margulies, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusions occur frequently in mechanically ventilated patients, but no consensus exists regarding the clinical benefit of effusion drainage. We sought to determine the impact of thoracentesis on gas exchange in patients with differing severities of acute lung injury (ALI). A retrospective analysis was conducted on therapeutic thoracenteses performed on intubated patients in an adult surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary center. Effusions judged by ultrasound to be 400 mL or larger were drained. Subjects were divided into groups based on their initial P:F ratios: normal >300, ALI 200 to 300, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) <200. Baseline characteristics, physiologic variables, arterial blood gases, and ventilator settings before and after the intervention were analyzed. The primary end point was the change in measures of oxygenation. Significant improvements in P:F ratios (mean ± SD) were seen only in patients with ARDS (50.4 ± 38.5, P = 0.001) and ALI (90.6 ± 161.7, P = 0.022). Statistically significant improvement was observed in the pO2 (31.1, P = 0.005) and O2 saturation (4.1, P < 0.001) of the ARDS group. The volume of effusion removed did not correlate with changes in individual patient's oxygenation. These data support the role of therapeutic thoracentesis for intubated patients with abnormal P:F ratios.

  2. Recent Treatment of Interstitial Lung Disease with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kawasumi, Hidenaga; Gono, Takahisa; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a prognostic factor for poor outcome in polymyositis (PM)/dermatomyositis (DM). The appropriate management of ILD is very important to improve the prognosis of patients with PM/DM. ILD activity and severity depend on the disease subtype. Therefore, clinicians should determine therapeutic strategies according to the disease subtype in each patient with PM/DM. Anti–melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 antibody and hyperferritinemia predict the development and severity of rapidly progressive (RP) ILD, particularly in East Asian patients. Combination therapy with corticosteroids, intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse, and calcineurin inhibitors should be administered in RP-ILD. In contrast, patients with anti–aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) show better responses to corticosteroids alone. However, ILDs with anti-ARS often display disease recurrence or become refractory to corticosteroid monotherapy. Recent studies have demonstrated that the administration of tacrolimus or rituximab in addition to corticosteroids may be considered in ILD patients with anti-ARS. Large-scale, multicenter randomized clinical trials should be conducted in the future to confirm that the aforementioned agents exhibit efficacy in ILD patients with PM/DM. The pathophysiology of ILD with PM/DM should also be elucidated in greater detail to develop effective therapeutic strategies for patients with ILD in PM/DM. PMID:26279636

  3. Eicosapentaenoic acid attenuates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting ROS-sensitive inflammatory signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-Han; Lin, An-Hsuan; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Peng, Ruo-Yun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Kou, Yu Ru

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes chronic lung inflammation that is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive pathways. Our previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke (CS) activates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling resulting in induction of lung inflammation. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a major type of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is present in significant amounts in marine-based fish and fish oil. EPA has been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo. However, whether EPA has similar beneficial effects against CS-induced lung inflammation remains unclear. Using a murine model, we show that subchronic CS exposure for 4 weeks caused pulmonary inflammatory infiltration (total cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), 11.0-fold increase), increased lung vascular permeability (protein level in BALF, 3.1-fold increase), elevated levels of chemokines (11.4–38.2-fold increase) and malondialdehyde (an oxidative stress biomarker; 2.0-fold increase) in the lungs, as well as lung inflammation; all of these CS-induced events were suppressed by daily supplementation with EPA. Using human bronchial epithelial cells, we further show that CS extract (CSE) sequentially activated NADPH oxidase (NADPH oxidase activity, 1.9-fold increase), increased intracellular levels of ROS (3.0-fold increase), activated both MAPKs and NF-κB, and induced interleukin-8 (IL-8; 8.2-fold increase); all these CSE-induced events were inhibited by pretreatment with EPA. Our findings suggest a novel role for EPA in alleviating the oxidative stress and lung inflammation induced by subchronic CS exposure in vivo and in suppressing the CSE-induced IL-8 in vitro via its antioxidant function and by inhibiting MAPKs/NF-κB signaling. PMID:25452730

  4. Airway pressure release ventilation in morbidly obese surgical patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Testerman, George M; Breitman, Igal; Hensley, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    Morbidly obese patients with body mass index greater than 40 kg/m(2) and respiratory failure requiring critical care services are increasingly seen in trauma and acute care surgical centers. Baseline respiratory pathophysiology including decreased pulmonary compliance with dependent atelectasis and abnormal ventilation-perfusion relationships predisposes these patients to acute lung injury (ALI) and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as well as prolonged stays in the intensive care unit. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is an increasingly used alternative mode for salvage therapy in patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure that also provides lung protection from ventilator-induced lung injury. APRV provides the conceptual advantage of an "open lung" approach to ventilation that may be extended to the morbidly obese patient population with ALI and ARDS. We discuss the theoretical benefits and a recent clinical experience of APRV ventilation in the morbidly obese patient with respiratory failure at a Level I trauma, surgical critical care, and acute care surgery center.

  5. Dexmedetomidine attenuates acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mouse through inhibition of MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingzhen; Zhang, Ruyi; Li, Chunli; Yin, Xue; Lv, Changjun; Wang, Yaoqi; Zhao, Wenxiang; Zhang, Xiuli

    2015-10-01

    Dexmedetomidine (Dex) is widely used for sedation in intensive care units and can be used as an adjunct to anesthetics. Previous studies have demonstrated that Dex has anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we aim to explore the potential therapeutic effects and mechanisms of Dex on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. To induce ALI, mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS, while Dex was treated 1 h before LPS injection. The inflammation of lung tissues was evaluated by HE stain, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained after 6 h to measure protein concentrations. We also used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect the secretion levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the serum. Western blotting method was adopted to observe changes in mitogen-activated protein kinases and downstream nuclear transcription factors. The results showed that pretreatment with Dex considerably reduced neutrophil infiltration and pulmonary edema, and significantly reduced protein concentrations in the BALF, as well as suppressed LPS-induced elevation of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) in the serum. In addition, we observed that the molecular mechanism of Dex-mediated anti-inflammation is associated with decreasing phosphorylation of MKK4, MMK3/6, ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and JNK, and diminishing activation of Elk-1, c-Jun, and ATF-2. Dex could attenuate ALI induced by LPS in mice, and this effect may be mediated through the inhibition of MAPK pathway.

  6. Bufexamac ameliorates LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice by targeting LTA4H

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qiang; Dong, Ningning; Yao, Xue; Wu, Dang; Lu, Yanli; Mao, Fei; Zhu, Jin; Li, Jian; Huang, Jin; Chen, Aifang; Huang, Lu; Wang, Xuehai; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan; Xu, Yong; Lu, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in the occurrence and development of acute lung injury (ALI). Leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a hydrolysis product of epoxide leukotriene A4 (LTA4) catalyzed by LTA4 hydrolase (LTA4H), is one of the most potent chemoattractants for neutrophil. Bufexamac is a drug widely used as an anti-inflammatory agent on the skin, however, the mechanism of action is still not fully understood. In this study, we found bufexamac was capable of specifically inhibiting LTA4H enzymatic activity and revealed the mode of interaction of bufexamac and LTA4H using X-ray crystallography. Moreover, bufexamac significantly prevented the production of LTB4 in neutrophil and inhibited the fMLP-induced neutrophil migration through inhibition of LTA4H. Finally, bufexamac significantly attenuated lung inflammation as reflected by reduced LTB4 levels and weakened neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from a lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI mouse model. In summary, our study indicates that bufexamac acts as an inhibitor of LTB4 biosynthesis and may have potential clinical applications for the treatment of ALI. PMID:27126280

  7. Peripheral blood monocyte-derived chemokine blockade prevents murine transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Christopher G J; Kim, Michael; Singh, Tarandeep K; Milev, Youli; Freedman, John; Semple, John W

    2014-05-29

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality and can occur with any type of transfusion. TRALI is thought to be primarily mediated by donor antibodies activating recipient neutrophils resulting in pulmonary endothelial damage. Nonetheless, details regarding the interactions between donor antibodies and recipient factors are unknown. A murine antibody-mediated TRALI model was used to elucidate the roles of the F(ab')2 and Fc regions of a TRALI-inducing immunoglobulin G anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antibody (34.1.2s). Compared with intact antibody, F(ab')2 fragments significantly increased serum levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2); however, pulmonary neutrophil levels were only moderately increased, and no pulmonary edema or mortality occurred. Fc fragments did not modulate any of these parameters. TRALI induction by intact antibody was completely abrogated by in vivo peripheral blood monocyte depletion by gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) or chemokine blockade with a MIP-2 receptor antagonist but was restored upon repletion with purified monocytes. The results suggest a two-step process for antibody-mediated TRALI induction: the first step involves antibody binding its cognate antigen on blood monocytes, which generates MIP-2 chemokine production that is correlated with pulmonary neutrophil recruitment; the second step occurs when antibody-coated monocytes increase Fc-dependent lung damage.

  8. Potential Application of Viral Empty Capsids for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Prof. Ariella Oppenheim CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Hebrew University of Jerusalem...Lung / 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Prof. Ariella...mechanism elicited by VLPs that attenuate 2CLP-induced sepsis, to be performed as the project continues. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Acute Respiratory Distress

  9. Study of inflammatory responses to crocidolite and basalt wool in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Adamis, Z; Kerényi, T; Honma, K; Jäckel, M; Tátrai, E; Ungváry, G

    2001-03-09

    The subacute effects of crocidolite and basalt wool dusts were studied by nmeans of biochemical, morphological. and histological methods 1 and .3 mo after intrabronchial instillation. The cell count, protein and phospholipid contents, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Both types of fibers induced a prolonged inflammatory reaction in the lung. All the parameters studied in the experimental groups were more markedly elevated after 3 mo. Relative to the control, the protein and LDH values were increased three- to fivefold, the phospholipid content twofold, and the number of free cells in the BAL exceeded the control level up to ninefold. The inflammatory responses to crocidolite and basalt wool in the lung did not differ significantly. In spite of this, basalt wool is recoinmended as an asbestos substitute, as the use of this man-nade fiber may result in a significantly lower release of dust than that from crocidolite.

  10. Veronicastrum axillare Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury via Suppression of Proinflammatory Mediators and Downregulation of the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Quanxin; Yang, Qinqin; Ping, Shun; Shou, Qiyang; Zhou, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Veronicastrum axillare is a traditional medical plant in China which is widely used in folk medicine due to its versatile biological activities, especially for its anti-inflammatory effects. However, the detailed mechanism underlying this action is not clear. Here, we studied the protective effects of V. axillare against acute lung injury (ALI), and we further explored the pharmacological mechanisms of this action. We found that pretreatment with V. axillare suppressed the release of proinflammatory cytokines in the serum of ALI mice. Histological analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that V. axillare inhibited LPS-induced lung injury, improved lung morphology, and reduced the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in the lungs. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory actions of V. axillare were investigated in vitro. We observed that V. axillare suppressed the mRNA expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in RAW264.7 cells challenged with LPS. Furthermore, pretreatment of V. axillare in vitro reduced the phosphorylation of p65 and IκB-α which is activated by LPS. In conclusion, our data firstly demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effects of V. axillare against ALI were achieved through downregulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, thereby reducing the production of inflammatory mediators. PMID:27890971

  11. [Clinical and microbiological study of acute pelvic inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Ovalle, A; Martínez, M A; Casals, A; Yuhaniak, R; Giglio, M S

    1993-01-01

    Upper genital tract infection was investigated in 46 women admitted to hospital with clinic diagnosis of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and 62 control women accepted to hospital for laparoscopy Fallopian tubes sterilization. Diagnosis was ratified by laparoscopy in mild and moderate salpingitis; culdocentesis and ultrasonography were performed in severe salpingitis and endometrial sample was made in endometritis. Microbiological specimens were taken from the cervix and abdomen. Antecedents and complete clinical studies were obtained. Patients were treated with antibiotic association sodic G penicillin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. Risk factors to development PID were: single female (p < 0.05), multiple sexual partner (p < 0.01), previous PID (p < 0.05), infertility (p < 0.05), mean year of IUD use in severe salpingitis (p = 0.05) and mean years of age from women with sexually transmitted bacterias (STB) vs endogenous bacterias (EB) (p < 0.05). In the control group no abdomen bacterias were isolated. In patients with PID, C. trachomatis was detected by serology in 28.3%. N. gonorrhoeae was isolated from the cervix in 23.9% and from the abdomen 17.4%. Besides it was isolated from the abdomen: M. hominis 17.3% and E. coli 15.2%. STB were isolated in 54.3% and EB in 47.8% of the patients. Bacterial association was present on the 37%. Cervix isolation of G. vaginalis and Mycoplasma were not correlated with development of PID. Cervix microbiological samples were useful to know abdomen microbic etiology. They coincide with those in the 90.9%. EB were more frequently isolated from severe salpingitis (p = 0.05) and STB from mild and moderate salpingitis (p = 0.05). Antibiotic association cured all the mild and moderate salpingitis with independence of bacterial etiology. Failure occurred in 2 diffuse peritonitis and 13/14 tubo-ovarian abscesses. Surgery used in severe salpingitis and diffuse peritonitis, principally consisted in anexectomy, peritoneal toilet and

  12. Protective Effects of Platycodin D on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Activating LXRα–ABCA1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Fu, Yunhe; Lu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zecai; Zhang, Wenlong; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of platycodin D (PLD) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) and clarify the possible mechanism. An LPS-induced ALI model was used to confirm the anti-inflammatory activity of PLD in vivo. The A549 lung epithelial cells were used to investigate the molecular mechanism and targets of PLD in vitro. In vivo, the results showed that PLD significantly attenuated lung histopathologic changes, myeloperoxidase activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels, including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. In vitro, PLD inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production in LPS-stimulated A549 lung epithelial cells. Western blot analysis showed that PLD suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB and IRF3 activation. Moreover, PLD did not act though affecting the expression of TLR4. We also showed that PLD disrupted the formation of lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol and prevented LPS-induced TLR4 trafficking to lipid rafts, thereby blocking LPS-induced inflammatory response. Finally, PLD activated LXRα–ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux. Knockdown of LXRα abrogated the anti-inflammatory effects of PLD. The anti-inflammatory effects of PLD was associated with upregulation of the LXRα–ABCA1 pathway, which resulted in disrupting lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol and reducing translocation of TLR4 to lipid rafts. PMID:28096801

  13. Effects of short-term propofol and dexmedetomidine on pulmonary morphofunction and biological markers in experimental mild acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Vinícius; Santos, Cintia Lourenço; Samary, Cynthia Santos; Araújo, Mariana Neves; Heil, Luciana Boavista Barros; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Silva, Pedro Leme; Pelosi, Paolo; Fernandes, Fatima Carneiro; Villela, Nivaldo; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated whether the short-term use of dexmedetomidine and propofol may attenuate inflammatory response and improve lung morphofunction in experimental acute lung injury (ALI). Thirty-six Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups. Control (C) and ALI animals received sterile saline solution and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide by intraperitoneal injection respectively. After 24h, ALI animals were randomly treated with dexmedetomidine, propofol, or thiopental sodium for 1h. Propofol reduced static lung elastance and resistive pressure and was associated with less alveolar collapse compared to thiopental sodium and dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine improved oxygenation, but did not modify lung mechanics or histology. Propofol was associated with lower IL (interleukin)-6 and IL-1β expression, whereas dexmedetomidine led to reduced inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression in lung tissue compared to thiopental sodium. In conclusion, in this model of mild ALI, short-term use of dexmedetomidine and propofol led to different functional effects and activation of biological markers associated with pulmonary inflammation.

  14. Characterization of TLR-induced inflammatory responses in COPD and control lung tissue explants

    PubMed Central

    Pomerenke, Anna; Lea, Simon R; Herrick, Sarah; Lindsay, Mark A; Singh, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Viruses are a common cause of exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). They activate toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3, 7, and 8, leading to a pro-inflammatory response. We have characterized the responses of TLR3 and TLR7/8 in lung tissue explants from COPD patients and control smokers. Methods We prepared lung whole tissue explants (WTEs) from patients undergoing surgery for confirmed or suspected lung cancer. In order to mimic the conditions of viral infection, we used poly(I:C) for TLR3 stimulation and R848 for TLR7/8 stimulation. These TLR ligands were used alone and in combination. The effects of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) neutralization and dexamethasone on TLR responses were examined. Inflammatory cytokine release was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and gene expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results WTEs from COPD patients released higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with WTEs from smokers. Activation of multiple TLRs led to a greater than additive release of TNFα and CCL5. TNFα neutralization and dexamethasone treatment decreased cytokine release. Conclusion This WTE model shows an enhanced response of COPD compared with controls, suggesting an increased response to viral infection. There was amplification of innate immune responses with multiple TLR stimulation. PMID:27729782

  15. Ultrafine particles affect the balance of endogenous pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in the lung: in-vitro and in-vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to ultrafine particles exerts diverse harmful effects including aggravation of pulmonary diseases like asthma. Recently we demonstrated in a mouse model for allergic airway inflammation that particle-derived oxidative stress plays a crucial role during augmentation of allergen-induced lung inflammation by ultrafine carbon particle (UfCP) inhalation. The mechanisms how particle inhalation might change the inflammatory balance in the lungs, leading to accelerated inflammatory reactions, remain unclear. Lipid mediators, known to be immediately generated in response to tissue injury, might be strong candidates for priming this particle-triggered change of the inflammatory balance. Methods We hypothesize that inhalation of UfCP may disturb the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in: i) a model for acute allergic pulmonary inflammation, exposing mice for 24 h before allergen challenge to UfCP inhalation (51.7 nm, 507 μg/m3), and ii) an in-vitro model with primary rat alveolar macrophages (AM) incubated with UfCP (10 μg/1 x 106 cells/ml) for 1 h. Lungs and AM were analysed for pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators, namely leukotriene B4 (LTB4), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), 15(S)-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (15(S)-HETE), lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and oxidative stress marker 8-isoprostane by enzyme immunoassays and immunohistochemistry. Results In non-sensitized mice UfCP exposure induced a light non-significant increase of all lipid mediators. Similarly but significantly in rat AM all lipid mediators were induced already within 1 h of UfCP stimulation. Also sensitized and challenge mice exposed to filtered air showed a partially significant increase in all lipid mediators. In sensitized and challenged mice UfCP exposure induced highest significant levels of all lipid mediators in the lungs together with the peak of allergic airway inflammation on day 7 after UfCP inhalation. The levels of LTB4, 8-isoprostane and PGE2 were significantly

  16. Salidroside alleviates paraquat-induced rat acute lung injury by repressing TGF-β1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoyi; Ding, Limin; Wu, Liqun; Xu, Liying; Zheng, Lanzhi; Huang, Xiaomin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of salidroside (SDS) via suppressing the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in rat acute lung injury (ALI) induced by paraquat (PQ) and to explore the potential molecular mechanisms. Methods: A total of 90 male rats (190-210 g) were randomly and evenly divided into 9 groups: control group, PQ groups (4 groups), and PQ + SDS groups (4 groups). The rats in control group were treated with equal volume of saline intraperitoneally. The rats in PQ groups were exposed to PQ solution (20 mg/kg) by gastric gavage for 1, 6, 24, and 72 hours, respectively. The rats in PQ + SDS groups were intraperitoneally injected once with SDS (10 mg/kg) every 12 hours after PQ perfusion. Pulmonary pathological changes were observed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The expression of TGF-β1 and the mRNA were evaluated by immunohistochemical (IHC) scoring and real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time qRT-PCR), respectively. Results: SDS alleviated the symptoms of PQ induced ALI. Moreover, SDS reduced the expression of the inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 including TGF-β1 IHC scores (at each time point from 6 to 72 hours after PQ perfusion) and mRNA level (at each time point from 1 to 72 hours after PQ perfusion) compared with PQ groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: SDS alleviated the pulmonary symptoms of PQ-induced ALI, at least partially, by repressing inflammatory cell infiltration and the expression of TGF-β1 resulting in delayed lung fibrosis. PMID:25674253

  17. Mesenteric lymph duct drainage attenuates acute lung injury in rats with severe intraperitoneal infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhang, Shukun; Tsui, Naiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the hypothesis that the mesenteric lymphatic system plays an important role in acute lung injury in a rat model induced by severe intraperitoneal infection. Male Wistar rats weighing 250∼300 g were randomly divided into 3 groups and subjected to sham operation, intraperitoneal infection, or mesenteric lymphatic drainage. The activity of diamine oxidase (DAO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured by enzymatic assay. The endotoxin levels in plasma, lymph, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated using the limulus amoebocyte lysate reagent. The cytokines, adhesion factors, chemokines, and inflammatory factors were detected by ELISA. TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 were analyzed by Western blotting. Compared with sham-operated rats, rats with intraperitoneal infection had increased MPO and decreased DAO activity in intestinal tissues. Mesenteric lymph drainage reduced the alterations in MPO and DAO activity induced by intraperitoneal infection. The MPO activity in pulmonary tissue and the permeability of pulmonary blood vessels were also increased, which were partially reversed by mesenteric lymph drainage. The endotoxin levels in lymphatic fluid and alveolar perfusion fluid were elevated after intraperitoneal infection but decreased to control levels after lymph drainage. No alterations in the levels of plasma endotoxin were observed. The number of neutrophils was increased in BALF and lymph in the infected rats, and was also reduced after drainage. Lymph drainage also decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion factors in the plasma, lymph, and BALF, as well as the levels of TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 in pulmonary and intestinal tissues. The mesenteric lymphatic system is the main pathway involved in early lung injury caused by severe intraperitoneal infection, in which activation of the TLR-4 signal pathway may play a role.

  18. Preferential expansion of pro-inflammatory Tregs in human non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Joseph D.; Blatner, Nichole R.; Haghi, Leila; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Meyerson, Shari L.; Heiferman, Michael J.; Heiferman, Jeffrey R.; Gounari, Fotini; Bentrem, David J.; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the USA. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) normally function to temper immune responses and decrease inflammation. Previous research has demonstrated different subsets of Tregs with contrasting anti- or pro-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to determine Treg subset distributions and characteristics present in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Peripheral blood was collected from healthy controls (HC) and NSCLC patients preceding surgical resection, and mononuclear cells were isolated, stained, and analyzed by flow cytometry. Tregs were defined by expression of CD4 and CD25 and classified into CD45RA+Foxp3int (naïve, Fr. I) or CD45RA−Foxp3hi (activated Fr. II). Activated conventional T cells were CD4+CD45RA−Foxp3int (Fr. III). Results Samples from 23 HC and 26 NSCLC patients were collected. Tregs isolated from patients with NSCLC were found to have enhanced suppressive function on naive T cells. Cancer patients had significantly increased frequencies of activated Tregs (fraction II: FrII), 17.5 versus 3.2 % (P < 0.001). FrII Tregs demonstrated increased RORγt and IL17 expression and decreased IL10 expression compared to Tregs from HC, indicating pro-inflammatory characteristics. Conclusions This study demonstrates that a novel subset of Tregs with pro-inflammatory characteristics preferentially expand in NSCLC patients. This Treg subset appears identical to previously reported pro-inflammatory Tregs in human colon cancer patients and in mouse models of polyposis. We expect the pro-inflammatory Tregs in lung cancer to contribute to the immune pathogenesis of disease and propose that targeting this Treg subset may have protective benefits in NSCLC. PMID:26047578

  19. Intra-Peritoneal Administration of Mitochondrial DNA Provokes Acute Lung Injury and Systemic Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 9

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lemeng; Deng, Songyun; Zhao, Shuangping; Ai, Yuhang; Zhang, Lina; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Tan, Hongyi; Wu, Dongdong

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of sepsis is complex. Mitochondrial dysfunction, which is responsible for energy metabolism, intrinsic apoptotic pathway, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammatory responses, is closely related with severe sepsis induced death. Mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) contain un-methylated cytosine phosphate guanine (CpG) motifs, which exhibit immune stimulatory capacities. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and mechanism of mtDNA release on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury (ALI) and systemic inflammation. Following LPS injection, plasma mtDNA copies peak at 8 h. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, mtDNA in toll like receptor 4 knockout (TLR4 KO) mice were significantly decreased. MtDNA intra-peritoneal administration causes apparent ALI as demonstrated by increased lung injury score, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) total protein and wet/dry (W/D) ratio; mtDNA injection also directly provokes systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by increased IL-1β, IL-6, high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) level; while nuclear DNA (nDNA) could not induce apparent ALI and systemic inflammation. However, compared with WT mice, TLR4 KO could not protect from mtDNA induced ALI and systemic inflammation. Specific TLR9 inhibitor, ODN 2088 pretreatment can significantly attenuate mtDNA induced ALI and systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by improved lung injury score, decreased lung wet/dry ratio, BALF total protein concentration, and decreased systemic level of IL-1β, IL-6 and HMGB1. MtDNA administration activates the expression of p-P38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in lung tissue and specific TLR9 inhibitor pretreatment can attenuate this activation. Thus, LPS-induced mtDNA release occurs in a TLR4-dependent manner, and mtDNA causes acute lung injury and systemic inflammation in a TLR9-dependent and TLR4-independent manner. PMID:27589725

  20. The mechanism of development of acute lung injury in lethal endotoxic shock using α-galactosylceramide sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Tumurkhuu, G; Koide, N; Dagvadorj, J; Morikawa, A; Hassan, F; Islam, S; Naiki, Y; Mori, I; Yoshida, T; Yokochi, T

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism underlying acute lung injury in lethal endotoxic shock induced by administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer)-sensitized mice was studied. Sensitization with α-GalCer resulted in the increase of natural killer T (NK T) cells and the production of interferon (IFN)-γ in the lung. The IFN-γ that was produced induced expression of adhesion molecules, especially vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), on vascular endothelial cells in the lung. Anti-IFN-γ antibody inhibited significantly the VCAM-1 expression in α-GalCer-sensitized mice. Very late activating antigen-4-positive cells, as the counterpart of VCAM-1, accumulated in the lung. Anti-VCAM-1 antibody prevented LPS-mediated lethal shock in α-GalCer-sensitized mice. The administration of LPS into α-GalCer-sensitized mice caused local production of excessive proinflammatory mediators, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and nitric oxide. LPS caused microvascular leakage of proteins and cells into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Taken together, sensitization with α-GalCer was suggested to induce the expression of VCAM-1 via IFN-γ produced by NK T cells and recruit a number of inflammatory cells into the lung. Further, LPS was suggested to lead to the production of excessive proinflammatory mediators, the elevation of pulmonary permeability and cell death. The putative mechanism of acute lung injury in LPS-mediated lethal shock using α-GalCer sensitization is discussed. PMID:18307519

  1. Effect of Valproic Acid on Acute Lung Injury in a Rodent Model of Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyuseok; Li, Yongqing; Jin, Guang; Chong, Wei; Liu, Baoling; Lu, Jennifer; Lee, Kyoungbun; deMoya, Marc; Velmahos, George; Alam, Hasan B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Acute lung injury (ALI) is developed in many clinical situations and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Valproic acid (VPA), a well-known anti-epileptic drug, has been shown to have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in various ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) models. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether VPA could affect survival and development of ALI in a rat model of intestinal I/R. Methods Two experiments were performed. Experiment I: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–300 g) were subjected to intestinal ischemia (1 hour) and reperfusion (3 hours). They were randomized into 2 groups (n=7/group) 30 min after ischemia: Vehicle (Veh) and VPA (300 mg/kg, IV). Primary end-point for this study was survival over 4 hours from the start of ischemia. Experiment II: The histological and biochemical effects of VPA treatment on lungs were examined 3 hours (1 hr ischemia + 2 hrs reperfusion) after intestinal I/R injury (Veh vs. VPA, n = 9/group). An objective histological score was used to grade the degree of ALI. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to measure serum levels of cytokine interleukins (IL-6 and 10), and lung tissue of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). In addition, the activity of 8-isoprostane was analyzed for pulmonary oxidative damage. Results In Experiment I, four-hour survival rate was significantly higher in VPA treated animals compared to Veh animals (71.4% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.006). In Experiment II, ALI was apparent in all of the Veh group animals. Treatment with VPA prevented the development of ALI, with a reduction in the histological score (3.4 ± 0.3 vs. 5.3 ± 0.6, p = 0.025). Moreover, compared to the Veh control group the animals from the VPA group displayed decreased serum levels of IL-6 (952 ± 213 vs. 7709 ± 1990 pg/ml, p = 0.011), and lung tissue concentrations of CINC (1188 ± 28 vs. 1298 ± 27, p < 0.05), MPO activity (368 ± 23 vs. 490

  2. Caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis results in mild lung inflammation and altered respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Elder, Alison S F; Saccone, Gino T P; Bersten, Andrew D; Dixon, Dani-Louise

    2011-03-01

    Acute lung injury is a common complication of acute pancreatitis (AP) and contributes to the majority of AP-associated deaths. Although some aspects of AP-induced lung inflammation have been demonstrated, investigation of resultant changes in lung function is limited. The aim of this study was to characterize lung injury in caerulein-induced AP. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 7-8/group) received 7 injections of caerulein (50 μg/kg) at 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, or 120 hours before measurement of lung impedance mechanics. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), plasma, pancreatic, and lung tissue were collected to determine pancreatic and lung measures of acute inflammation. AP developed between 12 and 24 hours, as indicated by increased plasma amylase activity and pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, edema, and abnormal acinar cells, before beginning to resolve by 48 hours. In the lung, MPO activity peaked at 12 and 96 hours, with BAL cytokine concentrations peaking at 12 hours, followed by lung edema at 24 hours, and BAL cell count at 48 hours. Importantly, no significant changes in BAL protein concentration or arterial blood gas-pH levels were evident over the same period, and only modest changes were observed in respiratory mechanics. Caerulein-induced AP results in minor lung injury, which is not sufficient to allow protein permeability and substantially alter respiratory mechanics.

  3. Targeting apoptotic signalling pathway and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression as therapeutic intervention in TPE induced lung damage.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Kishore; Krishnamoorthy, Bhavani; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Balakrishnan, Arun

    2003-01-01

    Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia (TPE) is an occult manifestation of filariasis, brought about by helminth parasites Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi. Treatment of patients suffering from TPE involves the administration of diethyl carbamazine and Ivermectin. Although the drugs are able to block acute inflammation, they are not able to alleviate chronic basal inflammation. We have attempted to examine the disease by targeting two important components; namely filarial parasitic sheath proteins (FPP) induced apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine response in human laryngeal carcinoma cells of epithelial origin (HEp-2) cells an epithelial cell line. Earlier studies by us have shown that FPP exposure induced apoptosis in these cells. In this study with hydrocortisone, calpain inhibitor (ALLN) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treatments we demonstrate that apoptosis is inhibited as shown by [3H] thymidine incorporation studies, propidium iodide staining and Annexin V staining. Hydrocortisone at a dose, which inhibits cell death also down regulated, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings give us insights into the multifaceted approach one may adopt to target critical signalling molecules using appropriate inhibitors, which could eventually be used to reduce lung damage in TPE.

  4. The effects of Gamijinhae-tang on elastase/lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation in an animal model of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gamijinhae-tang (GJHT) has long been used in Korea to treat respiratory diseases. The therapeutic effect of GJHT is likely associated with its anti-inflammatory activity. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its effects are unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of GJHT in a porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) and lipopolysaccharide(LPS) induced animal model of acute lung injury (ALI). Methods In this study, mice were intranasally exposed to PPE and LPS for 4 weeks to induce chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-like lung inflammation. Two hours prior to PPE and LPS administration, the treatment group was administered GJHT extracts via an oral injection. The numbers of neutrophils, lymphocytes, macrophages and total cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were counted, and pro-inflammatory cytokines were also measured. For histologic analysis, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stains were evaluated. Results After inducing ALI by treating mice with PPE and LPS for 4 weeks, the numbers of neutrophils, lymphocytes and total cells were significantly lower in the GJHT group than in the ALI group. In addition, the IL-1β and IL-6 levels were significantly decreased in the GJHT group. The histological results also demonstrated the attenuation effect of GJHT on PPE- and LPS-induced lung inflammation. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that GJHT has significantly reduces PPE- and LPS-induced lung inflammation. The remarkable protective effects of GJHT suggest its therapeutic potential in COPD treatment. PMID:23866260

  5. Enhanced natural killer activity and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice selected for high acute inflammatory response (AIRmax).

    PubMed

    Castoldi, Lindsey; Golim, Marjorie Assis; Filho, Orlando Garcia Ribeiro; Romagnoli, Graziela Gorete; Ibañez, Olga Célia Martinez; Kaneno, Ramon

    2007-03-01

    Strains of mice with maximal and minimal acute inflammatory responsiveness (AIRmax and AIRmin, respectively) were developed through selective breeding based on their high- or low-acute inflammatory responsiveness. Previous reports have shown that AIRmax mice are more resistant to the development of a variety of tumours than AIRmin mice, including spontaneous metastasis of murine melanoma. Natural killer activity is involved in immunosurveillance against tumour development, so we analysed the number and activity of natural killer cells (CD49b(+)), T-lymphocyte subsets and in vitro cytokine production by spleen cells of normal AIRmax and AIRmin mice. Analysis of lymphocyte subsets by flow cytometry showed that AIRmax mice had a higher relative number of CD49b(+) cells than AIRmin mice, as well as cytolytic activity against Yac.1 target cells. The number of CD3(+) CD8(+) cells was also higher in AIRmax mice. These findings were associated with the ability of spleen cells from AIRmax mice in vitro to produce higher levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-12p40 and interferon-gamma but not the anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. Taken together, our data suggest that the selective breeding to achieve the AIRmax and AIRmin strains was able to polarize the genes associated with cytotoxic activity, which can be responsible for the antitumour resistance observed in AIRmax mice.

  6. Diethylcarbamazine inhibits NF-κB activation in acute lung injury induced by carrageenan in mice.

    PubMed

    Santos, Laise Aline Martins; Ribeiro, Edlene Lima; Barbosa, Karla Patrícia Sousa; Fragoso, Ingrid Tavares; Gomes, Fabiana Oliveira Dos Santos; Donato, Mariana Aragão Matos; Silva, Bruna Santos; Silva, Amanda Karolina Soares; Rocha, Sura Wanessa Santos; França, Maria Eduarda Rocha; Rodrigues, Gabriel Barros; Silva, Teresinha Gonçalves; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2014-11-01

    Diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC) is widely used to treat lymphatic filariasis and Tropical Pulmonary Eosinophilia. A number of studies have reported a possible role in the host immune system, but exactly how DEC exerts this effect is still unknown. The present study reports the effects of DEC pretreatment on NF-κB regulation using the pleurisy model induced by carrageenan. Swiss male mice (Mus musculus) were divided into four experimental groups: control (SAL); carrageenan (CAR); diethylcarbamazine (DEC) and curcumin (CUR). The animals were pretreated with DEC (50mg/kg, v.o), CUR (50mg/kg, i.p) or distilled water for three consecutive days before pleurisy. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed by Tukey post-hoc test, and values were considered statistically significant when p<0.05. DEC pretreatment reduced tissue damage and the production of inflammatory markers, such as NO, iNOS, PGE2, COX-2, and PARP induced by carrageenan. Similarly, a known inhibitor of NF-κB pathway (curcumin) was also able to reduce these parameters. Like curcumin, DEC prevents NF-κB activation by reducing NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and IκBα degradation. DEC prevented NF-κB activation via p38 MAPK, but did not interfere in the ERK pathway in this experimental model. However, further studies should be developed to confirm this hypothesis. These findings suggest that DEC could be a promising drug for inflammatory disorders, especially in pulmonary diseases such as Acute Lung Inflammation, due its high anti-inflammatory potential which prevents NF-κB activation.

  7. Ulinastatin post-treatment attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats and human alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunpeng; Che, Wen; Zhao, Mingyan

    2017-01-01

    Ulinastatin (UTI), a serine protease inhibitor, possesses anti-inflammatory properties and has been suggested to modulate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear DNA-binding protein, plays a key role in the development of ALI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether UTI attenuates ALI through the inhibition of HMGB1 expression and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. ALI was induced in male rats by the intratracheal instillation of LPS (5 mg/kg). UTI was administered intraperitoneally 30 min following exposure to LPS. A549 alveolar epithelial cells were incubated with LPS in the presence or absence of UTI. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the levels of inflammatory cytokines. Western blot analysis was performed to detect the changes in the expression levels of Toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) and the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The results revealed that UTI significantly protected the animals from LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the decrease in the lung wet to dry weight ratio, total cells, neutrophils, macrophages and myeloperoxidase activity, associated with reduced lung histological damage. We also found that UTI post-treatment markedly inhibited the release of HMGB1 and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, UTI significantly inhibited the LPS-induced increase in TLR2/4 protein expression and NF-κB activation in lung tissues. In vitro, UTI markedly inhibited the expression of TLR2/4 and the activation of NF-κB in LPS-stimulated A549 alveolar epithelial cells. The findings of our study indicate that UTI attenuates LPS-induced ALI through the inhibition of HMGB1 expression in rats. These benefits are associated with the inhibition of the activation of the TLR2/4-NF-κB pathway by UTI. PMID:27959396

  8. Lung [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and ventilation-perfusion mismatch in the early stage of experimental acute smoke inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Musch, Guido; Winkler, Tilo; Harris, R. Scott; Vidal Melo, Marcos F.; Wellman, Tyler J.; de Prost, Nicolas; Kradin, Richard L.; Venegas, Jose G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) occurs in a third of patients with smoke inhalation injury. Its clinical manifestations usually do not appear until 48 to 72 h after inhalation. Identifying inflammatory changes that occur in pulmonary parenchyma earlier than that could provide insight into the pathogenesis of smoke-induced ALI. Furthermore, noninvasive measurement of such changes might lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment. Because glucose is the main source of energy for pulmonary inflammatory cells, we hypothesized that its pulmonary metabolism is increased shortly after smoke inhalation, when classic manifestations of ALI are not yet expected. Methods In five sheep we induced unilateral injury with 48 breaths of cotton smoke while the contralateral lung served as control. We used positron emission tomography with: 1) [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose to measure pulmonary inflammatory cell metabolic activity; and 2) [13N]nitrogen in saline to measure shunt and ventilation-perfusion distributions separately in the smoke-exposed and control lungs. Results The pulmonary [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake rate was increased at 4 h after smoke inhalation (mean ± SD: 0.0031 ± 0.0013 vs. 0.0026 ± 0.0010 min−1, P < 0.05) mainly as a result of increased glucose phosphorylation. At this stage there was no worsening in lung aeration or shunt. However, there was a shift of perfusion toward units with lower ventilation-to-perfusion ratio (mean ratio ± SD: 0.82 ± 0.10 vs. 1.12 ± 0.02, P < 0.05) and increased heterogeneity of the ventilation-perfusion distribution (mean ± SD: 0.21 ± 0.07 vs. 0.13 ± 0.01, P < 0.05). Conclusion Using noninvasive imaging we demonstrated that increased pulmonary [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and ventilation-perfusion mismatch occur early after smoke inhalation. PMID:24051392

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Apigenin on LPS-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Mediators and AP-1 Factors in Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajeshwari H; Babu, R L; Naveen Kumar, M; Kiran Kumar, K M; Hegde, Shubha M; Nagesh, Rashmi; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Sharma, S Chidananda

    2016-02-01

    Apigenin is one of the plant flavonoids present in fruits and vegetables, acting as an important nutraceutical component. It is recognized as a potential antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory molecule. In the present study, the mechanism of anti-inflammatory action of apigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and activator protein-1 (AP-1) factors in human lung A549 cells was investigated. The anti-inflammatory activity of apigenin on LPS-induced inflammation was determined by analyzing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and different AP-1 factors. Apigenin significantly inhibited the LPS-induced expression of iNOS, COX-2, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α), and AP-1 proteins (c-Jun, c-Fos, and JunB) including nitric oxide production. Study confirms the anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory mediators and AP-1 factors involved in the inflammation and its importance in the treatment of lung inflammatory diseases.

  10. Pathology consultation on transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amy E; Adamski, Jill

    2012-10-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious condition characterized by respiratory distress, hypoxia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, which occur within 6 hours of transfusion. Several theories have been proposed to explain the underlying pathologic mechanisms of TRALI. Immune-mediated TRALI accounts for over 80% of reported cases and is mediated by donor antibodies to HLAs and/or human neutrophil antigens (HNA). Immune-mediated TRALI is most commonly associated with donor plasma transfusion or other blood products from multiparous women, which has led many countries to reduce or exclude women from donating high-volume plasma products. This policy change has resulted in a decrease in the incidence of TRALI and highlighted the importance of nonimmune-mediated TRALI, which is thought to be caused by bioreactive lipids and other biologic response modifiers that accumulate during storage of blood products. When TRALI is suspected, clinical consultation with a transfusion medicine specialist helps differentiate it from other transfusion reactions with similar characteristics.

  11. [Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI): an unrecognised pathology].

    PubMed

    Moalic, V; Vaillant, C; Ferec, C

    2005-03-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but potentially severe complication of blood transfusion, manifested by pulmonary oedema, fever and hypotension. The signs and symptoms are often attributed to other clinical aspects of a patient's condition, and therefore, TRALI may go unrecognised. It has been estimated to be the third cause of transfusion related mortality, so it should be better diagnosed. Cases are related to multiple blood units, such as white blood cells, red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets or intravenous immunoglobulins. Physiopathology of TRALI is poorly understood, and still controversial. It is often due to an immunological conflict between transfused plasma antibodies and recipients' blood cells. These antibodies are either HLA (class I or II) or granulocyte-specific. They appear to act as mediators, which result in granulocytes aggregation, activation and micro vascular pulmonary injury. Lipids or cytokines in blood units are also involved as TRALI priming agents. Diagnosis is based on antibody screening in blood components and on specific-antigen detection in the recipient. The screening of anti-HLA or anti-granulocytes is recommended as part of prevention for female donors who had been pregnant. Preventative measures should also include leucoreduction and measures to decrease the amount of priming agents in blood components. In this article, we summarise what is known about TRALI, and we focus attention on unanswered questions and controversial issues related to TRALI.

  12. SWCNT suppress inflammatory mediator responses in human lung epithelium in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Eva Byrne, Hugh J.; Casey, Alan; Davoren, Maria; Lenz, Anke-Gabriele; Maier, Konrad L.; Duschl, Albert; Oostingh, Gertie Janneke

    2009-02-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have gained enormous popularity due to a variety of potential applications which will ultimately lead to increased human and environmental exposure to these nanoparticles. This study was carried out in order to evaluate the inflammatory response of immortalised and primary human lung epithelial cells (A549 and NHBE) to single-walled carbon nanotube samples (SWCNT). Special focus was placed on the mediating role of lung surfactant on particle toxicity. The toxicity of SWCNT dispersed in cell culture medium was compared to that of nanotubes dispersed in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, the main component of lung lining fluid). Exposure was carried out for 6 to 48 h with the latter time-point showing the most significant responses. Moreover, exposure was performed in the presence of the pro-inflammatory stimulus tumour necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) in order to mimic exposure of stimulated cells, as would occur during infection. Endpoints evaluated included cell viability, proliferation and the analysis of inflammatory mediators such as interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, TNF-{alpha} and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Crocidolite asbestos was included as a well characterised, toxic fibre control. The results of this study showed that HiPco SWCNT samples suppress inflammatory responses of A549 and NHBE cells. This was also true for TNF-{alpha} stimulated cells. The use of DPPC improved the degree of SWCNT dispersion in A549 medium and in turn, leads to increased particle toxicity, however, it was not shown to modify NHBE cell responses.

  13. The inflammatory cytokine interleukin-23 is elevated in lung cancer, particularly small cell type

    PubMed Central

    Cam, Caner; Muftuoglu, Tuba; Bigi, Oguz; Emirzeoglu, Levent; Celik, Serkan; Ozgun, Alpaslan; Tuncel, Tolga; Top, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23 play roles in inflammation and autoimmunity. The function of the IL-17/IL-23 pathway has not been completely evaluated in cancer patients. We aimed to investigate serum IL-17 and IL-23 levels and their relationship with clinicopathological and biochemical parameters in lung cancer patients. Material and methods Forty-five lung cancer patients and 46 healthy volunteers were included in the study. IL-17 and IL-23 measurements were made with the ELISA method. The ages of patients (53–84 years) and healthy subjects (42–82 years) were similar. Results Serum IL-23 levels were higher in lung cancer patients than in healthy subjects (491.27 ±1263.38 pg/ml vs. 240.51 ±233.18 pg/ml; p = 0.032). IL-23 values were higher in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients than in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (1325.30 ±2478.06 pg/ml vs. 229.15 ±103.22 pg/ml; p = 0.043). Serum IL-17 levels were lower in the patients, but the difference was not statistically significant (135.94 ±52.36 pg/ml vs. 171.33 ±133.51 pg/ml; p = 0.124). Presence of comorbid disease (diabetes mellitus, hypertension or chronic obstructive lung disease) did not have any effect on the levels of IL-17 or IL-23. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate values were positively correlated with cytokine levels, but serum albumin levels were negatively correlated. Conclusions Serum IL-23 levels are elevated in lung cancer patients, particularly those with SCLC. IL-17 and IL-23 values are correlated with inflammatory markers in the patients. PMID:27647985

  14. Blocking Cyclic Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose-mediated Calcium Overload Attenuates Sepsis-induced Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Qian-Yi; Zou, Yu; Zhang, Li-Na; Ai, Mei-Lin; Liu, Wei; Ai, Yu-Hang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common complication of sepsis that is associated with high mortality. Intracellular Ca2+ overload plays an important role in the pathophysiology of sepsis-induced ALI, and cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPR) is an important regulator of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. The cluster of differentiation 38 (CD38)/cADPR pathway has been found to play roles in multiple inflammatory processes but its role in sepsis-induced ALI is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether the CD38/cADPR signaling pathway is activated in sepsis-induced ALI and whether blocking cADPR-mediated calcium overload attenuates ALI. Methods: Septic rat models were established by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Rats were divided into the sham group, the CLP group, and the CLP+ 8-bromo-cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (8-Br-cADPR) group. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), cADPR, CD38, and intracellular Ca2+ levels in the lung tissues were measured at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after CLP surgery. Lung histologic injury, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were measured. Results: NAD+, cADPR, CD38, and intracellular Ca2+ levels in the lungs of septic rats increased significantly at 24 h after CLP surgery. Treatment with 8-Br-cADPR, a specific inhibitor of cADPR, significantly reduced intracellular Ca2+ levels (P = 0.007), attenuated lung histological injury (P = 0.023), reduced TNF-α and MDA levels (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively) and recovered SOD activity (P = 0.031) in the lungs of septic rats. Conclusions: The CD38/cADPR pathway is activated in the lungs of septic rats, and blocking cADPR-mediated calcium overload with 8-Br-cADPR protects against sepsis-induced ALI. PMID:27411462

  15. Protective effect of wogonin on endotoxin-induced acute lung injury via reduction of p38 MAPK and JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Sun, Hai-Lun; Yang, Ming-Ling; Yang, Ching-Ping; Chen, Li-You; Li, Yi-Ching; Lee, Chien-Ying; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang

    2017-02-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a serious inflammatory disorder which remains the primary cause of incidence and mortality in patients with acute pulmonary inflammation. However, there is still no effective medical strategy available clinically for the improvement of ALI. Wogonin, isolated from roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, is a common medicinal herb which presents biological and pharmacological effects, including antioxidation, anti-inflammation, and anticancer. Preadministration of wogonin inhibited not only lung edema but also protein leakage into the alveolar space in murine model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Moreover, wogonin not only reduced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 but also inhibited the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced by LPS. We further found wogonin inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and JNK at a concentration lower than ERK. In addition, inhibition of lung edema, protein leakage, expression of iNOS and COX-2, and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and JNK were all observed in a parallel concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that wogonin possesses potential protective effect against LPS-induced ALI via downregulation of iNOS and COX-2 expression by blocking phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and JNK. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 397-403, 2017.

  16. Angiopoietin-1 Modified Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Ning; Li, Dong; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Wang, Ying; Liu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) is a critical factor for vascular stabilization and endothelial survival via inhibition of endothelial permeability and leukocyte- endothelium interactions. Hence, we hypothesized that treatment with umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) carrying the Ang1 gene (UCMSCs-Ang1) might be a potential approach for acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Materials and Methods UCMSCs with or without transfection with the human Ang1 gene were delivered intravenously into rats one hour after intra-abdominal instillation of LPS to induce ALI. After the rats were sacrificed at 6 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours, 8 days, and 15 days post-injection of LPS, the serum, the lung tissues, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were harvested for analysis, respectively. Results Administration of fluorescence microscope confirmed the increased presence of UCMSCs in the injured lungs. The evaluation of UCMSCs and UCMSCs-Ang1 actions revealed that Ang1 overexpression further decreased the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, TGF-β1, and IL-6 and increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the injured lungs. This synergy caused a substantial decrease in lung airspace inflammation and vascular leakage, characterized by significant reductions in wet/dry ratio, differential neutrophil counts, myeloperoxidase activity, and BALF. The rats treated by UCMSCs-Ang1 showed improved survival and lower ALI scores. Conclusion UCMSCs-Ang1 could improve both systemic inflammation and alveolar permeability in ALI. UC-derived MSCs-based Ang1 gene therapy may be developed as a potential novel strategy for the treatment of ALI. PMID:27873515

  17. The Effects of Quercetin on Acute Lung Injury and Biomarkers of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in the Rat Model of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Gerin, Fethullah; Sener, Umit; Erman, Hayriye; Yilmaz, Ahsen; Aydin, Bayram; Armutcu, Ferah; Gurel, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Experimental studies indicate that sepsis causes remote organ injury although the molecular mechanism has not been clearly defined. In this report, the role of oxidative damage, and inflammation on lung injury, following sepsis model by cecal ligation and puncture, and the effects of quercetin, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory flavonoid, in the lung tissue were investigated. In the present study, we found that administration of single-dose quercetin before cecal ligation and puncture procedure, while markedly diminishing the levels of YKL-40 and oxidant molecules (xanthine oxidase (XO), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA)), increases the antioxidant enzymes levels. Quercetin is beneficial to acute lung injury by decreasing the levels of oxidative stress markers and increasing the antioxidant enzyme activities. Quercetin also causes a decrease in the serum levels of YKL-40 and periostin in the oxidative lung injury induced by the experimental sepsis model.

  18. Synergistic effects of anethole and ibuprofen in acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski-Rebecca, Edirlene S; Rocha, Bruno A; Wiirzler, Luiz A M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Velazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2015-12-05

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of anethole and ibuprofen in comparison with monotherapy by either drug alone, using two in vivo inflammatory models, namely the pleurisy and paw edema in rats. We also measured the levels of the TNF protein in plasma, and the ability of anethole to inhibit, in vitro, the activity of the cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes. The test drugs (anethole; ibuprofen; anethole + ibuprofen), at different doses, were administered once (p.o.) 60 min before the induction of the inflammatory response. The association of anethole + ibuprofen inhibited the development of the inflammatory response in both models used. This effect can be partially explained by the inhibitory action on the production of TNF and of COX isoforms. The isobologram analysis evidenced a synergistic effect between ibuprofen and anethole, because the combination of drugs showed a higher inhibitory potential than either drug alone.

  19. Pleural fluid analysis of lung cancer vs benign inflammatory disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, R; Best, L A; Savulescu, D; Gavish, M; Nagler, R M

    2010-01-01

    Background: Correct diagnosis of pleural effusion (PE) as either benign or malignant is crucial, although conventional cytological evaluation is of limited diagnostic accuracy, with relatively low sensitivity rates. Methods: We identified biological markers accurately detected in a simple PE examination. We analysed data from 19 patients diagnosed with lung cancer (nine adeno-Ca, five non-small-cell Ca (not specified), four squamous-cell Ca, one large-cell Ca) and 22 patients with benign inflammatory pathologies: secondary to trauma, pneumonia or TB. Results: Pleural effusion concentrations of seven analysed biological markers were significantly lower in lung cancer patients than in benign inflammatory patients, especially in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-3 and CycD1 (lower by 65% (P<0.000003), 40% (P<0.0007) and 34% (P<0.0001), respectively), and in Ki67, ImAnOx, carbonyls and p27. High rates of sensitivity and specificity values were found for MMP-9, MMP-3 and CycD1: 80 and 100% 87 and 73% and 87 and 82%, respectively. Conclusion: Although our results are of significant merit in both the clinical and pathogenetic aspects of lung cancer, further research aimed at defining the best combination for marker analysis is warranted. The relative simplicity in analysing these markers in any routine hospital laboratory may result in its acceptance as a new diagnostic tool. PMID:20216542

  20. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Park, Soojin; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Ji Min; Yang, Jieun; Cho, Jaeho; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focally irradiated with 75 Gy of X-rays in the lung and administered bvPLA2 six times after radiation. To evaluate the level of inflammation, the number of immune cells, mRNA level of inflammatory cytokine, and histological changes in the lung were measured. BvPLA2 treatment reduced the accumulation of immune cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. In addition, bvPLA2 treatment decreased inflammasome-, chemokine-, cytokine- and fibrosis-related genes’ mRNA expression. The histological results also demonstrated the attenuating effect of bvPLA2 on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Furthermore, regulatory T cell depletion abolished the therapeutic effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced pneumonitis, implicating the anti-inflammatory effects of bvPLA2 are dependent upon regulatory T cells. These results support the therapeutic potential of bvPLA2 in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis treatments. PMID:27144583

  1. LYRM03, an ubenimex derivative, attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice by suppressing the TLR4 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui-qiong; Wu, Ya-xian; Nie, Yun-juan; Wang, Jun; Ge, Mei; Qian, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated signaling plays a critical role in sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI). LYRM03 (3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-phenyl-valyl-isoleucine) is a novel derivative of ubenimex, a widely used antineoplastic medicine. We previously found that LYRM03 has anti-inflammatory effects in cecal ligation puncture mouse model. In this study we determined whether LYRM03 attenuated LPS-induced ALI in mice. LPS-induced ALI mouse model was established by challenging the mice with intratracheal injection of LPS (5 mg/kg), which was subsequently treated with LYRM03 (10 mg/kg, ip). LYRM03 administration significantly alleviated LPS-induced lung edema, inflammatory cell (neutrophils and macrophages) infiltration and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, decreased pro-inflammatory and chemotactic cytokine (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, MIP-2) generation and reduced iNOS and COX-2 expression in the lung tissues. In cultured mouse alveolar macrophages in vitro, pretreatment with LYRM03 (100 μmol/L) suppressed LPS-induced macrophage activation by reducing Myd88 expression, increasing IκB stability and inhibiting p38 phosphorylation. These results suggest that LYRM03 effectively attenuates LPS-induced ALI by inhibiting the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and Myd88-dependent TLR4 signaling pathways in alveolar macrophages. LYRM03 may serve as a potential treatment for sepsis-mediated lung injuries. PMID:28112185

  2. The Protective Effect of Alpha-Lipoic Acid in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury Is Mediated by Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Chieh; Lai, Yuan-Shu; Chou, Tz-Chong

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), occurring naturally in human food, is known to possess antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been reported to exhibit a therapeutic effect in several inflammatory diseases. The aim of study was to test the hypothesis that the protection of ALA against lipopolysaccharide-(LPS-) induced acute lung injury (ALI) is mediated by HO-1. Pre- or posttreatment with ALA significantly inhibited LPS-induced histological alterations of ALI, lung tissue edema, and production of proinflammatory cytokine, cytokine inducible neutrophil chemoattractant-3, and nitrite/nitrate in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, the inflammatory responses including elevation of superoxide formation, myeloperoxidase activity, polymorphonuclear neutrophils infiltration, nitrotyrosine, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in lung tissues of LPS-instilled rats were also markedly reduced by ALA. Interestingly, treatment with ALA significantly increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation and HO-1 expression in lungs of ALI. However, blocking HO-1 activity by tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), an HO-1 inhibitor, markedly abolished these beneficial effects of ALA in LPS-induced ALI. These results suggest that the protection mechanism of ALA may be through HO-1 induction and in turn suppressing NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses. PMID:23573137

  3. Acute Bilateral Renal and Splenic Infarctions Occurring during Chemotherapy for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Noriko; Tomoda, Koichi; Matsuda, Masayuki; Fujita, Yukio; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Hontsu, Shigeto; Tasaki, Masato; Yoshikawa, Masanori; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a rare case of acute bilateral renal and splenic infarctions occurring during chemotherapy for lung cancer. A 60-year-old man presented with acute and intensive upper abdominal and back pain during chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for lung cancer. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed bilateral renal and splenic infarctions. After the administration of unfractionated heparin his pain was relieved with a clearance of the infarctions in the CT findings and a recovery of renal dysfunction. Enhanced coagulation by lung cancer and arterial ischemia by chemotherapy may therefore contribute to the development of these infarctions. PMID:27980265

  4. Peripheral NLCR4 inflammasome participates in the genesis of acute inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Alexandre H; Talbot, Jhimmy; Silva, Rangel L; Lima, Jonilson B; França, Rafael O; Verri, Waldiceu A; Mascarenhas, Danielle P; Ryffel, Bernhard; Cunha, Fernando Q; Zamboni, Dario S; Cunha, Thiago M

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory hyperalgesia is a complex process that depends on the sensitization of primary nociceptive neurons triggered by proinflammatory mediators, such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β). Recently, the peripheral activation of caspase-1 (previously known as IL-1β-converting enzyme) was implicated in the induction of acute inflammatory pain by promoting the processing of IL-1β from its precursor form, pro-IL-1β. Caspase-1 activation in several systems requires the assembly of an intracellular molecular platform called an inflammasome. Inflammasomes consist of 1 nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR), the adapter molecule apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a C-terminal caspase recruitment domain (ASC), and caspase-1. NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes are well described. However, the identity of the inflammasome that is involved in the peripheral activation of caspase-1 that accounts for acute inflammatory hyperalgesia has not been described. The present findings demonstrated that mice deficient in NLRC4 or ASC, but not in NLRP3, present reduced mechanical and thermal acute inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan. The reduced hyperalgesia was accompanied by significant impairments in the levels of mature forms of IL-1β (p17) and caspase-1 (p20) compared to wild-type mice at the inflammatory site. Therefore, these results identified the inflammasome components NLRC4 and ASC as the molecular platform involved in the peripheral activation of caspase-1 and IL-1β maturation, which are responsible for the induction of acute inflammatory pain. In conclusion, our study provides new therapeutic targets for the control of acute inflammatory pain.

  5. Effects of ω-3 fatty acids on toll-like receptor 4 and nuclear factor-κB p56 in lungs of rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Wu, Xiao-Wei; Guo, Mei-Xia; Li, Min-Li; Xu, Xiao-Bing; Jin, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the effects of ω-3 fatty acids (ω-3FA) on the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor κB p56 (NF-κBp56) signal pathway in the lungs of rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS A total of 56 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control group, SAP-saline group, SAP-soybean oil group and SAP-ω-3FA group. SAP was induced by the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. The expression of TLR4 and NF-κBp56 in the lungs was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The levels of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the lungs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS The expression of TLR4 and NF-κBp56 in lungs and of inflammatory cytokines in serum significantly increased in the SAP group compared with the control group (P < 0.05), but was significantly decreased in the ω-3FA group compared with the soybean oil group at 12 and 24 h (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION During the initial stage of SAP, ω-3FA can efficiently lower the inflammatory response and reduce lung injury by triggering the TLR4/NF-κBp56 signal pathway. PMID:27956802

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of methanol extract of Canarium lyi C.D. Dai & Yakovlev in RAW 264.7 macrophages and a murine model of lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ju-Mi; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Shin, In-Sik; Jeon, Chan-Mi; Shin, Na-Rae; Lee, Joongku; Park, Sang-Hong; Bach, Tran The; Hai, Do Van; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Han, Sang-Bae; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2015-05-01

    Canarium lyi C.D. Dai & Yakovlev (CL) is a member of the Anacardiaceae family. To the best of our knowledge, no studies on its anti-inflammatory effects have yet been reported. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of CL on inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mice. CL attenuated the production of LPS-stimulated inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, CL suppressed phosphorylation of the inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α), p38, c-Jun terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), as well as the translocation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 subunit into the nucleus. For the in vivo efficacy, the effect of CL on a mouse model of LPS-induced acute lung injury was assessed. CL treatment of the mice significantly inhibited the inflammatory cell recruitment and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). CL-treated mice also showed a marked inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and phosphorylation of IκB and p65. In addition, CL attenuated lung histopathological changes in LPS-induced ALI mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that CL is a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, including pneumonia.

  7. Increased T cell glucose uptake reflects acute rejection in lung grafts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Delphine L.; Wang, Xingan; Yamamoto, Sumiharu; Carpenter, Danielle; Engle, Jacquelyn T.; Li, Wenjun; Lin, Xue; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Huang, Howard J.; Gelman, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Although T cells are required for acute lung rejection, other graft-infiltrating cells such as neutrophils accumulate in allografts and are also high glucose utilizers. Positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose probe [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) has been employed to image solid organ acute rejection, but the sources of glucose utilization remain undefined. Using a mouse model of orthotopic lung transplantation, we analyzed glucose probe uptake in the grafts of syngeneic and allogeneic recipients with or without immunosuppression treatment. Pulmonary microPET scans demonstrated significantly higher [18F]FDG uptake in rejecting allografts when compared to transplanted lungs of either immunosuppressed or syngeneic recipients. [18F]FDG uptake was also markedly attenuated following T cell depletion therapy in lung recipients with ongoing acute rejection. Flow-cytometric analysis using the fluorescent deoxyglucose analog 2-NBDG revealed that T cells, and in particular CD8+ T cells, were the largest glucose utilizers in acutely rejecting lung grafts followed by neutrophils and antigen presenting cells. These data indicate that imaging modalities tailored toward assessing T cell metabolism may be useful in identifying acute rejection in lung recipients PMID:23927673

  8. Feasibility of (68)Ga-labeled Siglec-9 peptide for the imaging of acute lung inflammation: a pilot study in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Retamal, Jaime; Sörensen, Jens; Lubberink, Mark; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Borges, João Batista; Feinstein, Ricardo; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Antoni, Gunnar; Hedenstierna, Göran; Roivainen, Anne; Larsson, Anders; Velikyan, Irina

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for noninvasive, specific and quantitative imaging of inherent inflammatory activity. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) translocates to the luminal surface of endothelial cells upon inflammatory challenge. We hypothesized that in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), positron emission tomography (PET) with sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 (Siglec-9) based imaging agent targeting VAP-1 would allow quantification of regional pulmonary inflammation. ARDS was induced by lung lavages and injurious mechanical ventilation. Hemodynamics, respiratory system compliance (Crs) and blood gases were monitored. Dynamic examination using [(15)O]water PET-CT (10 min) was followed by dynamic (90 min) and whole-body examination using VAP-1 targeting (68)Ga-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraaza cyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-acetic acid-10-ethylene glycol-conjugated Siglec-9 motif peptide ([(68)Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9). The animals received an anti-VAP-1 antibody for post-mortem immunohistochemistry assay of VAP-1 receptors. Tissue samples were collected post-mortem for the radioactivity uptake, histology and immunohistochemistry assessment. Marked reduction of oxygenation and Crs, and higher degree of inflammation were observed in ARDS animals. [(68)Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET showed significant uptake in lungs, kidneys and urinary bladder. Normalization of the net uptake rate (Ki) for the tissue perfusion resulted in 4-fold higher uptake rate of [(68)Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 in the ARDS lungs. Immunohistochemistry showed positive VAP-1 signal in the injured lungs. Detection of pulmonary inflammation associated with a porcine model of ARDS was possible with [(68)Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET when using kinetic modeling and normalization for tissue perfusion.

  9. Feasibility of 68Ga-labeled Siglec-9 peptide for the imaging of acute lung inflammation: a pilot study in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Jaime; Sörensen, Jens; Lubberink, Mark; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Borges, João Batista; Feinstein, Ricardo; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Antoni, Gunnar; Hedenstierna, Göran; Roivainen, Anne; Larsson, Anders; Velikyan, Irina

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for noninvasive, specific and quantitative imaging of inherent inflammatory activity. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) translocates to the luminal surface of endothelial cells upon inflammatory challenge. We hypothesized that in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), positron emission tomography (PET) with sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 (Siglec-9) based imaging agent targeting VAP-1 would allow quantification of regional pulmonary inflammation. ARDS was induced by lung lavages and injurious mechanical ventilation. Hemodynamics, respiratory system compliance (Crs) and blood gases were monitored. Dynamic examination using [15O]water PET-CT (10 min) was followed by dynamic (90 min) and whole-body examination using VAP-1 targeting 68Ga-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraaza cyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-acetic acid-10-ethylene glycol-conjugated Siglec-9 motif peptide ([68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9). The animals received an anti-VAP-1 antibody for post-mortem immunohistochemistry assay of VAP-1 receptors. Tissue samples were collected post-mortem for the radioactivity uptake, histology and immunohistochemistry assessment. Marked reduction of oxygenation and Crs, and higher degree of inflammation were observed in ARDS animals. [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET showed significant uptake in lungs, kidneys and urinary bladder. Normalization of the net uptake rate (Ki) for the tissue perfusion resulted in 4-fold higher uptake rate of [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 in the ARDS lungs. Immunohistochemistry showed positive VAP-1 signal in the injured lungs. Detection of pulmonary inflammation associated with a porcine model of ARDS was possible with [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET when using kinetic modeling and normalization for tissue perfusion. PMID:27069763

  10. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hodder, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1) an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2) a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician. PMID:27147862

  11. The role and importance of glycosylation of acute phase proteins with focus on alpha-1 antitrypsin in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cormac; Saldova, Radka; Wormald, Mark R; Rudd, Pauline M; McElvaney, Noel G; Reeves, Emer P

    2014-07-03

    Acute phase proteins (APPs) are a group of circulating plasma proteins which undergo changes quantitatively or qualitatively at the time of inflammation. Many of these APPs are glycosylated, and it has been shown that alterations in glycosylation may occur in inflammatory and malignant conditions. Changes in glycosylation have been studied as potential biomarkers in cancer and also in chronic inflammatory conditions and have been shown to correlate with disease severity in certain conditions. Serine protease inhibitors (serpins), many of which are also APPs, are proteins involved in the control of proteases in numerous pathways. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin (AAT) is the most abundant serpin within the circulation and is an APP which has been shown to increase in response to inflammation. The primary role of AAT is maintaining the protease/antiprotease balance in the lung, but it also possesses important anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. Several glycoforms of AAT exist, and they possess differing properties in regard to plasma half-life and stability. Glycosylation may also be important in determining the immune modulatory properties of AAT. The review will focus on the role and importance of glycosylation in acute phase proteins with particular attention to AAT and its use as a biomarker of disease. The review describes the processes involved in glycosylation, how glycosylation changes in differing disease states, and the alterations that occur to glycans of APPs with disease and inflammation. Finally, the review explores the importance of changes in glycosylation of AAT at times of inflammation and in malignant conditions and how this may impact upon the functions of AAT.

  12. Effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in rat lungs* **

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Lopes; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Laste, Gabriela; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress, as quantified by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), in rat lungs. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: acute treatment, comprising rats receiving a single injection of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg i.p.); acute control, comprising rats i.p. injected with saline; chronic treatment, comprising rats receiving methylprednisolone in drinking water (6 mg/kg per day for 30 days); and chronic control, comprising rats receiving normal drinking water. Results: The levels of TRAP were significantly higher in the acute treatment group rats than in the acute control rats, suggesting an improvement in the pulmonary defenses of the former. The levels of lung LPO were significantly higher in the chronic treatment group rats than in the chronic control rats, indicating oxidative damage in the lung tissue of the former. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the acute use of corticosteroids is beneficial to lung tissue, whereas their chronic use is not. The chronic use of methylprednisolone appears to increase lung LPO levels. PMID:25029646

  13. [Target Molecule for a Demyelinating Type of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into demyelinating type, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and axonal form, acute axonal motor neuropathy (AMAN). It has been clearly established that the target molecule for the former is a ganglioside. In contrast, despite years of effort, the target molecule for the latter has not been identified. Recently, molecules around the nodes of Ranvier have entered the spotlight, and "moesin" was reported to be a target molecule for cytomegalovirus associated-AIDP.

  14. [Lung ultrasound in acute and critical care medicine].

    PubMed

    Zechner, P M; Seibel, A; Aichinger, G; Steigerwald, M; Dorr, K; Scheiermann, P; Schellhaas, S; Cuca, C; Breitkreutz, R

    2012-07-01

    The development of modern critical care lung ultrasound is based on the classical representation of anatomical structures and the need for the assessment of specific sonography artefacts and phenomena. The air and fluid content of the lungs is interpreted using few typical artefacts and phenomena, with which the most important differential diagnoses can be made. According to a recent international consensus conference these include lung sliding, lung pulse, B-lines, lung point, reverberation artefacts, subpleural consolidations and intrapleural fluid collections. An increased number of B-lines is an unspecific sign for an increased quantity of fluid in the lungs resembling interstitial syndromes, for example in the case of cardiogenic pulmonary edema or lung contusion. In the diagnosis of interstitial syndromes lung ultrasound provides higher diagnostic accuracy (95%) than auscultation (55%) and chest radiography (72%). Diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary embolism can be achieved at the bedside by evaluating subpleural lung consolidations. Detection of lung sliding can help to detect asymmetrical ventilation and allows the exclusion of a pneumothorax. Ultrasound-based diagnosis of pneumothorax is superior to supine anterior chest radiography: for ultrasound the sensitivity is 92-100% and the specificity 91-100%. For the diagnosis of pneumothorax a simple algorithm was therefore designed: in the presence of lung sliding, lung pulse or B-lines, pneumothorax can be ruled out, in contrast a positive lung point is a highly specific sign of the presence of pneumothorax. Furthermore, lung ultrasound allows not only diagnosis of pleural effusion with significantly higher sensitivity than chest x-ray but also visual control in ultrasound-guided thoracocentesis.

  15. Application of 'omics technologies to biomarker discovery in inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Wheelock, Craig E; Goss, Victoria M; Balgoma, David; Nicholas, Ben; Brandsma, Joost; Skipp, Paul J; Snowden, Stuart; Burg, Dominic; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Horvath, Ildiko; Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Ahmed, Hassan; Ballereau, Stéphane; Rossios, Christos; Chung, Kian Fan; Montuschi, Paolo; Fowler, Stephen J; Adcock, Ian M; Postle, Anthony D; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Rowe, Anthony; Sterk, Peter J; Auffray, Charles; Djukanovic, Ratko

    2013-09-01

    Inflammatory lung diseases are highly complex in respect of pathogenesis and relationships between inflammation, clinical disease and response to treatment. Sophisticated large-scale analytical methods to quantify gene expression (transcriptomics), proteins (proteomics), lipids (lipidomics) and metabolites (metabolomics) in the lungs, blood and urine are now available to identify biomarkers that define disease in terms of combined clinical, physiological and patho-biological abnormalities. The aspiration is that these approaches will improve diagnosis, i.e. define pathological phenotypes, and facilitate the monitoring of disease and therapy, and also, unravel underlying molecular pathways. Biomarker studies can either select predefined biomarker(s) measured by specific methods or apply an "unbiased" approach involving detection platforms that are indiscriminate in focus. This article reviews the technologies presently available to study biomarkers of lung disease within the 'omics field. The contributions of the individual 'omics analytical platforms to the field of respiratory diseases are summarised, with the goal of providing background on their respective abilities to contribute to systems medicine-based studies of lung disease.

  16. Architecture and inflammatory cell composition of the feline lung with special consideration of eosinophil counts.

    PubMed

    Shibly, S; Klang, A; Galler, A; Schwendenwein, I; Christian, M; Guija, A; Tichy, A; Hirt, R A

    2014-05-01

    An increase in the number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) is a hallmark of feline asthma; however, a wide range in the percentage of eosinophils in BALF has been documented in healthy cats. In this study, BALF and lung tissue were collected from 15 cats without respiratory disease, BALF was taken from 15 cats with asthma and lung tissue was collected from six different asthmatic cats. Total nucleated cell count (TNCC) and inflammatory cell percentages were measured in BALF and lung tissue was evaluated microscopically. Asthmatic cats had a significantly higher eosinophil count in lung tissue, but BALF TNCC did not differ significantly between groups. Cats without respiratory signs had significantly more numerous macrophages and lymphocytes in BALF than asthmatics, but significantly lower percentages of eosinophils (4.2 ± 7.8% versus 49.4 ± 20.6%, P <0.001). In healthy feline airways a BALF eosinophil percentage of <5% can be expected. Dominant microscopical findings in feline asthma include high eosinophil counts, airway remodelling and inflammation. There is good correlation between the findings in BALF and tissue in feline asthma.

  17. Inflammatory lipid mediator generation elicited by viable hemolysin- forming Escherichia coli in lung vasculature

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli hemolysin, a transmembrane pore-forming exotoxin, is considered an important virulence factor for E. coli-related extraintestinal infections and sepsis. The possible significance of hemolysin liberation for induction of inflammatory lipid mediators was investigated in isolated rabbit lungs infused with viable bacteria (concentration range, 10(4)-10(7)/ml). Hemolysin-secreting E. coli (E. coli-Hly+), but not an E. coli strain that releases an inactive form of the exotoxin, induced marked lung leukotriene (LT) generation with predominance of cysteinyl LTs. Eicosanoid synthesis was not inhibited in the presence of plasma with toxin-neutralizing capacity. Pre- application of 2 x 10(8) human granulocytes, which sequestered in the lung microvasculature, caused a severalfold increase in leukotriene generation in response to E. coli-Hly+ challenge both in the absence and presence of plasma. Data are presented indicating neutrophil- endothelial cell cooperation in arachidonic acid lipoxygenase metabolism as an underlying mechanism. We conclude that liberation of hemolysin from viable E. coli induces marked lipid mediator generation in lung vasculature, which is potentiated in the presence of neutrophil sequestration and may contribute to microcirculatory disturbances during the course of severe infections. PMID:2120384

  18. Endoscopic lung volume reduction effectively treats acute respiratory failure secondary to bullous emphysema.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Paul; Garrett, Jeffrey E; Rankin, Nigel; Anderson, Graeme

    2010-10-01

    Emphysema often affects the lungs in a heterogeneous fashion, and collapse or removal of severely hyperinflated portions of lung can improve overall lung function and symptoms. The role of lung volume reduction (LVR) surgery in selected patients is well established, but that of non-surgical LVR is still being defined. In particular, use of endobronchial LVR is still under development. This case report describes a 48-year-old non-smoker with severe bullous emphysema complicated by acute hypercapnic respiratory failure, who was successfully treated by endobronchial valve placement while intubated in an intensive care unit.

  19. Acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Quek, Amy May Lin; Soon, Derek; Chan, Yee Cheun; Thamboo, Thomas Paulraj; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-06-15

    Inflammatory neuropathies have been reported to occur in association with nephrotic syndrome. Their underlying immuno-pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. A 50-year-old woman concurrently presented with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and nephrotic syndrome secondary to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Both neuropathy and proteinuria improved after plasma exchange and steroids. Literature review of cases of concurrent inflammatory neuropathies and nephrotic syndrome revealed similar neuro-renal presentations. This neuro-renal condition may be mediated by autoantibodies targeting myelin and podocytes.

  20. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  1. Genome‑wide analysis of DNA methylation in rat lungs with lipopolysaccharide‑induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Qiang; Lv, Chang-Jun; Liu, Xiang-Yong; Hao, Dong; Qin, Jing; Tian, Huan-Huan; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Zhi

    2013-05-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) are associated with high morbidity and mortality in patients, however, the precise pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS remains unknown. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exhibits a number of critical functions and may be associated with the DNA methylation of genes in the lungs. In the present study a genome‑wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed in rat lungs with LPS‑induced ALI/ARDS. Normal and LPS‑induced lung tissues with ALI were analyzed using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and a rat DNA methylation promoter plus CpG island microarray and the candidate genes were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT‑PCR). Aberrant DNA methylation of the promoter regions of 1,721 genes and the CpG islands of 990 genes was identified when normal lung tissues and lung tissues with LPS‑induced ALI/ARDS were compared. These genes were commonly located on chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 (P<0.01). Methylation level and CpG density were compared and it was found that genes associated with high CpG density promoters had a high ratio of methylation. Furthermore, we performed gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. In addition, three genes (Mapk3, Pak1 and Rac2) were validated in the control and lung tissues with ALI by RT‑PCR. The results indicate that aberrant DNA methylation of lung tissues may be involved in the pathophysiology of LPS‑induced ALI/ARDS. Future studies are required to evaluate the therapeutic and prognostic value of the current novel observations in ALI/ARDS.

  2. The role of leukocytes in the pathogenesis of fibrin deposition in bovine acute lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Car, B. D.; Suyemoto, M. M.; Neilsen, N. R.; Slauson, D. O.

    1991-01-01

    The peculiarly fibrinous nature of bovine acute lung injury due to infection with Pasteurella haemolytica A1 suggests an imbalance between leukocyte-directed procoagulant and profibrinolytic influences in the inflamed bovine lung. Calves with experimental pneumonia produced by intratracheal inoculation with P. haemolytica A1 developed acute locally extensive cranioventral fibrinopurulent bronchopneumonia. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) recovered by segmental lavage from affected lung lobes were 30 times more procoagulant than PAM obtained from unaffected lung lobes and 37-fold more procoagulant than PAM from control calf lungs. Unlike the enhancement of procoagulant activity, profibrinolytic activity (plasminogen activator amidolysis) of total lung leukocytes (PAM and plasminogen activator neutrophils [PMN]) was decreased 23 times in cells obtained from affected lung lobes and also was decreased four times in cells obtained from unaffected lobes of infected animals. This marked imbalance in cellular procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity probably contributes significantly to enhanced fibrin deposition and retarded fibrin removal. In addition, PAM from inflamed lungs were strongly positive for bovine tissue factor antigen as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry. Intensely tissue factor-positive PAM enmeshed in fibrinocellular exudates and positive alveolar walls were situated such that they were likely to have, in concert, initiated extrinsic activation of coagulation in the acutely inflamed lung. These data collectively suggest that enhanced PAM-directed procoagulant activity and diminished PAM- and PMN-directed profibrinolytic activity represent important modifications of local leukocyte function in bovine acute lung injury that are central to the pathogenesis of lesion development with extensive fibrin deposition and retarded fibrin removal. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2024707

  3. Dietary inflammatory index is related to asthma risk, lung function and systemic inflammation in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Lisa G; Shivappa, Nitin; Berthon, Bronwyn S; Gibson, Peter G; Hebert, James R

    2014-01-01

    Background Asthma prevalence has increased in recent years and evidence suggests that diet may be a contributing factor. Increased use of processed foods has led to a decrease in diet quality, which may be creating a pro-inflammatory environment, thereby leading to the development and/or progression of various chronic inflammatory diseases and conditions. Recently, the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) has been developed and validated to assess the inflammatory potential of individual diets. Objective This study aimed to examine the DII in subjects with asthma compared to healthy controls and to relate the DII to asthma risk, lung function and systemic inflammation. Methods Subjects with asthma (n=99) and healthy controls (n=61) were recruited. Blood was collected and spirometry was performed. The DII was calculated from food frequency questionnaires administered to study subjects. Results The mean DII score for the asthmatics was higher than the DII score for healthy controls (−1.40 versus −1.86, p=0.04), indicating their diets were more pro-inflammatory. For every 1 unit increase in DII score the odds of having asthma increased by 70% (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.14; p=0.040). FEV1 was significantly associated with DII score (β=−3.44, 95% CI: −6.50,−0.39; p=0.020), indicating that for every 1 unit increase in DII score, FEV1 decreased by 3.44 times. Furthermore, plasma IL-6 concentrations were positively associated with DII score (β=0.13, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.21;p=0.002). Conclusion and clinical relevance As assessed using the DII score, the usual diet consumed by asthmatics in this study was pro-inflammatory relative to the diet consumed by the healthy controls. The DII score was associated with increased systemic inflammation and lower lung function. Hence, consumption of pro-inflammatory foods may contribute to worse asthma status and targeting an improvement in DII in asthmatics, as an indicator of suitable dietary intake, might be a useful strategy for

  4. The innate immune function of airway epithelial cells in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Pieter S.; McCray, Paul B.; Bals, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The airway epithelium is now considered central to the orchestration of pulmonary inflammatory and immune responses, and is also key to tissue remodelling. It acts as a first barrier in the defence against a wide range of inhaled challenges, and is critically involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses to these challenges. Recent progress in our understanding of the developmental regulation of this tissue, the differentiation pathways, recognition of pathogens and antimicrobial responses is now exploited to help understand how epithelial cell function and dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory lung diseases. In the review, advances in our knowledge of the biology of airway epithelium, as well as its role and (dys)function in asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis, are discussed. PMID:25700381

  5. Combined treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and methylprednisolone in paraquat-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficacy of combined treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) transplantation and methylprednisolone (MP) to treat paraquat (PQ)-induced acute lung injury. Materials and methods A total of 102 female rats were randomly divided into five groups: PQ, BMSC, MP, BMSC + MP and normal control. After 14 days of PQ poisoning, the survival of rats, wet/dry weight ratio of lung tissue, serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxidase dismutase (SOD), and the expression of nuclear factor (NF)-кB p65 in lung tissue were determined. Results Rats in BMSC and BMSC + MP groups survived. BMSC transplantation significantly decreased the wet/dry weight ratio of lung tissue, down-regulated NF-кB p65 expression in lung tissue, lowered serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and MDA, and increased serum levels of IL-10 and SOD. These changes were particularly significant on days 7–14 after PQ poisoning. The above changes were more significant in the MP group on days 1–3 after PQ poisoning, compared with those of the BMSC group. However, the BMSC + MP group showed more significant changes on days 1–14 after PQ poisoning than those of both BMSC and MP groups. Conclusions MP inhibits the inflammatory response, reduces the products of lipid peroxidation and promotes survival of transplanted BMSC, thus improving the intermediate and longer term efficacy of BMSC transplantation for treatment of PQ-induced lung injury. PMID:23902576

  6. Rat lung inflammatory responses after in vivo and in vitro exposure to various stone particles.

    PubMed

    Becher, R; Hetland, R B; Refsnes, M; Dahl, J E; Dahlman, H J; Schwarze, P E

    2001-09-01

    Rat lung alveolar macrophages and type 2 cells were exposed for 20 h in vitro to various stone particles with differing contents of metals and minerals (a type of mylonite, gabbro, feldspar, and quartz). The capability to induce the release of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) was investigated. We found marked differences in potency between the various particles, with mylonite being most potent overall, followed by gabbro, and with feldspar and quartz having an approximately similar order of lower potency. The results also demonstrated differences in cytokine release pattern between the two cell types. For all particle types including quartz, type 2 cells showed the most marked increase in MIP-2 and IL-6 secretion, whereas the largest increase in TNF-alpha release was observed in macrophages. To investigate possible correlations between in vitro and in vivo inflammatory responses, rats were instilled with the same types of particles and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected after 20 h. The results demonstrated a correlation between the in vitro cytokine responses and the number of neutrophilic cells in the BAL fluid. The BAL fluid also showed a strong MIP-2 response to mylonite. However, this was the only particle type to give a significant cytokine response in the BAL fluid. We further examined whether a similar graded inflammatory response would be continued in type 2 cells and alveolar macrophages isolated from the exposed animals. Again a differential cytokine release pattern was observed between type 2 cells and macrophages, although the order of potency between particle types was altered. In conclusion, various stone particles caused differential inflammatory responses after both in vitro and in vivo exposure, with mylonite being the most potent stone particle. The results suggest the alveolar type 2 cell to be an important participant in the

  7. Tetrahydroberberrubine attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury by down-regulating MAPK, AKT, and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiu; Yu, Sulan; Chen, Ling; Liu, Han; Zhang, Jian; Ge, Haixia; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2016-08-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening syndrome that is characterized by overwhelming lung inflammation and increased microvascular permeability, which causes a high mortality worldwide. Here, we studied the protective effect of tetrahydroberberrubine (THBru), a berberine derivative, on a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury that was established in our previous studies. The results showed that a single oral administration of THBru significantly decreased the lung wet to dry weight (W/D) ratio at doses of 2, 10 and 50mg/kg administered 1h prior to LPS challenge (30mg/kg, intravenous injection). Histopathological changes, such as pulmonary edema, infiltration of inflammatory cells and coagulation, were also attenuated by THBru. In addition, THBru markedly decreased the total cell counts, total protein and nitrate/nitrite content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), significantly decreased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitrate/nitrite content in the plasma, and reduced the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung tissues. Additionally, THBru (10μM) significantly decreased the content of TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO) in LPS-induced THP-1 cells in vitro. Moreover, THBru significantly suppressed the activation of the MAPKs JNK and p38, AKT, and the NF-κB subunit p65 in LPS-induced THP-1 cells. These findings confirm that THBru attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury by inhibiting the release of inflammatory cytokines and suppressing the activation of MAPKs, AKT, and NF-κB signaling pathways, which implicates it as a potential therapeutic agent for ALI or sepsis.

  8. The role of iron in Libby amphibole-induced acute lung injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shannahan, Jonathan H; Ghio, Andrew J; Schladweiler, Mette C; McGee, John K; Richards, Judy H; Gavett, Stephen H; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2011-05-01

    Complexation of host iron (Fe) on the surface of inhaled asbestos fibers has been postulated to cause oxidative stress contributing to in vivo pulmonary injury and inflammation. We examined the role of Fe in Libby amphibole (LA; mean length 4.99 µm ± 4.53 and width 0.28 µm ± 0.19) asbestos-induced inflammogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. LA contained acid-leachable Fe and silicon. In a cell-free media containing FeCl(3), LA bound #17 µg of Fe/mg of fiber and increased reactive oxygen species generation #3.5 fold, which was reduced by deferoxamine (DEF) treatment. In BEAS-2B cells exposure to LA, LA loaded with Fe (FeLA), or LA with DEF did not increase HO-1 or ferritin mRNA expression. LA increased IL-8 expression, which was reduced by Fe loading but increased by DEF. To determine the role of Fe in LA-induced lung injury in vivo, spontaneously hypertensive rats were exposed intratracheally to either saline (300 µL), DEF (1 mg), FeCl(3) (21 µg), LA (0.5 mg), FeLA (0.5 mg), or LA + DEF (0.5 mg). LA caused BALF neutrophils to increase 24 h post-exposure. Loading of Fe on LA but not chelation slightly decreased neutrophilic influx (LA + DEF > LA > FeLA). At 4 h post-exposure, LA-induced lung expression of MIP-2 was reduced in rats exposed to FeLA but increased by LA + DEF (LA + DEF > LA > FeLA). Ferritin mRNA was elevated in rats exposed to FeLA compared to LA. In conclusion, the acute inflammatory response to respirable fibers and particles may be inhibited in the presence of surface-complexed or cellular bioavailable Fe. Cell and tissue Fe-overload conditions may influence the pulmonary injury and inflammation caused by fibers.

  9. Magnetite Nanoparticles Induce Genotoxicity in the Lungs of Mice via Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Totsuka, Yukari; Ishino, Kousuke; Kato, Tatsuya; Goto, Sumio; Tada, Yukie; Nakae, Dai; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are useful for their characteristic properties and are commonly used in various fields. Nanosized-magnetite (MGT) is widely utilized in medicinal and industrial fields, whereas their toxicological properties are not well documented. A safety assessment is thus urgently required for MGT, and genotoxicity is one of the most serious concerns. In the present study, we examined genotoxic effects of MGT using mice and revealed that DNA damage analyzed by a comet assay in the lungs of imprinting control region (ICR) mice intratracheally instilled with a single dose of 0.05 or 0.2 mg/animal of MGT was approximately two- to three-fold higher than that of vehicle-control animals. Furthermore, in gpt delta transgenic mice, gpt mutant frequency (MF) in the lungs of the group exposed to four consecutive doses of 0.2 mg MGT was significantly higher than in the control group. Mutation spectrum analysis showed that base substitutions were predominantly induced by MGT, among which G:C to A:T transition and G:C to T:A transversion were the most significant. To clarify the mechanism of mutation caused by MGT, we analyzed the formation of DNA adducts in the lungs of mice exposed to MGT. DNA was extracted from lungs of mice 3, 24, 72 and 168 h after intratracheal instillation of 0.2 mg/body of MGT, and digested enzymatically. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and lipid peroxide-related DNA adducts were quantified by stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Compared with vehicle control, these DNA adduct levels were significantly increased in the MGT-treated mice. In addition to oxidative stress- and inflammation related-DNA adduct formations, inflammatory cell infiltration and focal granulomatous formations were also observed in the lungs of MGT-treated mice. Based on these findings, it is suggested that inflammatory responses are probably involved in the genotoxicity induced by MGT in the lungs of mice.

  10. An animal model of chronic inflammatory pain: pharmacological and temporal differentiation from acute models.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Alex W; Medhurst, Stephen J; Dixon, Claire I; Bontoft, Nick C; Winyard, Lisa A; Brackenborough, Kim T; De Alba, Jorge; Clarke, Christopher J; Gunthorpe, Martin J; Hicks, Gareth A; Bountra, Chas; McQueen, Daniel S; Chessell, Iain P

    2006-08-01

    Clinically, inflammatory pain is far more persistent than that typically modelled pre-clinically, with the majority of animal models focussing on short-term effects of the inflammatory pain response. The large attrition rate of compounds in the clinic which show pre-clinical efficacy suggests the need for novel models of, or approaches to, chronic inflammatory pain if novel mechanisms are to make it to the market. A model in which a more chronic inflammatory hypersensitivity phenotype is profiled may allow for a more clinically predictive tool. The aims of these studies were to characterise and validate a chronic model of inflammatory pain. We have shown that injection of a large volume of adjuvant to the intra-articular space of the rat knee results in a prolonged inflammatory pain response, compared to the response in an acute adjuvant model. Additionally, this model also results in a hypersensitive state in the presence and absence of inflammation. A range of clinically effective analgesics demonstrate activity in this chronic model, including morphine (3mg/kg, t.i.d.), dexamethasone (1mg/kg, b.i.d.), ibuprofen (30mg/kg, t.i.d.), etoricoxib (5mg/kg, b.i.d.) and rofecoxib (0.3-10mg/kg, b.i.d.). A further aim was to exemplify the utility of this chronic model over the more acute intra-plantar adjuvant model using two novel therapeutic approaches; NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonism and iNOS inhibition. Our data shows that different effects were observed with these therapies when comparing the acute model with the model of chronic inflammatory joint pain. These data suggest that the chronic model may be more relevant to identifying mechanisms for the treatment of chronic inflammatory pain states in the clinic.

  11. Systemic inflammatory response and downmodulation of peripheral CD25+Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells in patients undergoing radiofrequency thermal ablation for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Fietta, Anna Maria; Morosini, Monica; Passadore, Ileana; Cascina, Alessandro; Draghi, Paola; Dore, Roberto; Rossi, Sandro; Pozzi, Ernesto; Meloni, Federica

    2009-07-01

    Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) is a local tumor-destructing technique that can potentially modulate the host immune response through mechanisms that are not clearly defined. We assessed whether RFTA could affect multiple systemic inflammatory and immunological parameters, including CD25+Foxp+ cells, in patients with primary or metastatic lung tumors. Three days after RFTA, a moderate and temporary systemic inflammatory response developed, as demonstrated by the increase in peripheral neutrophils and monocytes and in plasma levels of proinflammatory chemokines (MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, eotaxin, and interleukin[IL]-8) and acute phase reactants (complement C3 and C4, serum amyloid, alpha1 antichymotrypsin, and C-reactive protein). Moreover, we found a concomitant release of the anti-inflammatory factor IL-10. Thirty days after RFTA, a significant reduction in CD25+Foxp3+ counts with an increase in CD4+ T-cell proliferation and number of interferon-gamma-secreting cells was observed. The reduction in CD25+Foxp3+ cells lasted up to 90 days after treatment. The use of RFTA in lung cancer patients has an immunomodulatory activity: it induces a self-limiting systemic inflammation early and later a reduction of circulating CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs. In addition to tumor ablation, downmodulation of this regulatory subset might be an important mechanism involved in the long-term clinical efficacy of RFTA.

  12. Acute secondary effects in the esophagus in patients undergoing radiotherapy for carcinoma of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, F.; Silvestre, M.E.; Sa da Costa, M.; Grima, N.; Campos, C.; Chaves, P.

    1989-02-01

    The incidence and nature of acute secondary irradiation esophagitis was studied in a series of 38 patients undergoing 60Co teletherapy for carcinoma of the lung. Thirty-four patients were male and four female, with ages ranging from 38 to 78 years. The mediastinum being irradiated in the process, all the patients underwent endoscopy for signs of esophagitis and/or gastritis after a dose of 30-40 Gy was delivered to the esophagus. Eighteen patients complained of dysphagia, but only in 12 of them did endoscopy show esophagitis. Of the remaining patients without complaints five had endoscopic signs of esophagitis. Gastritis was found in 18 cases and confirmed histologically in 14. In 17 cases, esophagitis and/or gastritis were confirmed histologically. It is believed that there is a fairly close correlation among clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings to support the claim that esophagitis in these patients is radiation induced. However, the cause of gastritis is not well understood. Data in the literature suggest that nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agents can act as prophylactic means of preventing radiation esophagitis.

  13. Genetic Determinants and Ethnic Disparities in Sepsis-associated Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2005-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common and devastating illness that occurs in the context of sepsis and other systemic inflammatory disorders. In systemic illnesses like sepsis, only a subset of patients develops ALI even when pathologic stimuli are apparently equivalent, suggesting that there are genetic features that may influence its onset. Considerable obstacles in defining the exact nature of the pathogenesis of ALI include substantial phenotypic variance, incomplete penetrance, complex gene–environment interactions and a strong potential for locus heterogeneity. Moreover, ALI arises in a critically ill population with diverse precipitating factors and appropriate controls that best match the reference population have not been agreed upon. The sporadic nature of ALI precludes conventional approaches such as linkage mapping for the elucidation of candidate genes, but tremendous progress has been made in combining robust, genomic tools such as high-throughput, expression profiling with case-control association studies in well characterized populations. Similar to trends observed in common, complex traits such as hypertension and diabetes, some of these studies have highlighted differences in allelic variant frequencies between European American and African American ALI patients for novel genes which may explain, in part, the complex interplay between ethnicity, sepsis and the development of ALI. In trying to understand the basis for contemporary differences in allelic frequency, which may lead to differences in susceptibility, the potential role of positive selection for genetic variants in ancestral populations is considered. PMID:16222037

  14. Neutrophil extracellular traps are indirectly triggered by lipopolysaccharide and contribute to acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Su, Xiaoli; Pan, Pinhua; Zhang, Lemeng; Hu, Yongbin; Tan, Hongyi; Wu, Dongdong; Liu, Ben; Li, Haitao; Li, Haosi; Li, Yi; Dai, Minhui; Li, Yuanyuan; Hu, Chengping; Tsung, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) facilitate the extracellular killing of pathogens. However, excessive NETs formation and poor degradation are associated with exacerbated immune responses and tissue injury. In this study, we investigated the role of NETs in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated acute lung injury (ALI) and assessed the use of DNase I, for the treatment of ALI. Additionally, we focused on the controversial issue of whether LPS directly induces NETs release in vitro. NETs formation was detected in murine ALI tissue in vivo and was associated with increased NETs markers, citrullinated-histone H3 tissue levels and NET-DNA levels in BALF. Treatment with DNase I significantly degraded NETs and reduced citrullinated-histone H3 levels, which protected against ALI and ameliorated pulmonary oedema and total protein in BALF. In addition, DNase I significantly reduced IL-6 and TNF-α levels in plasma and BALF. In vitro, LPS-activated platelets rather than LPS alone efficiently induced NETs release. In conclusion, NETs formed during LPS-induced ALI, caused organ damage and initiated the inflammatory response. NETs degradation by DNase I promoted NET-protein clearance and protected against ALI in mice; thus, DNase I may be a new potential adjuvant for ALI therapy. Specifically, LPS induced NETs formation in an indirect manner via platelets activation. PMID:27849031

  15. Clinical review: the implications of experimental and clinical studies of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, Enrique; Villagrá, Ana; López-Aguilar, Josefina; Blanch, Lluis

    2004-04-01

    Mechanical ventilation can cause and perpetuate lung injury if alveolar overdistension, cyclic collapse, and reopening of alveolar units occur. The use of low tidal volume and limited airway pressure has improved survival in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The use of recruitment maneuvers has been proposed as an adjunct to mechanical ventilation to re-expand collapsed lung tissue. Many investigators have studied the benefits of recruitment maneuvers in healthy anesthetized patients and in patients ventilated with low positive end-expiratory pressure. However, it is unclear whether recruitment maneuvers are useful when patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome are ventilated with high positive end-expiratory pressure, and in the presence of lung fibrosis or a stiff chest wall. Moreover, it is unclear whether the use of high airway pressures during recruitment maneuvers can cause bacterial translocation. This article reviews the intrinsic mechanisms of mechanical stress, the controversy regarding clinical use of recruitment maneuvers, and the interactions between lung infection and application of high intrathoracic pressures.

  16. Polymer-surfactant treatment of meconium-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, K W; William Taeusch, H; Robertson, B; Goerke, J; Clements, J A

    2000-08-01

    Substances (for example, serum proteins or meconium) that interfere with the activity of pulmonary surfactant in vitro may also be important in the pathogenesis or progression of acute lung injury. Addition of polymers such as dextran or polyethylene glycol (PEG) to surfactants prevents and reverses surfactant inactivation. The purpose of this study was to find out whether surfactant/polymer mixtures are more effective for treating one form of acute lung injury than is surfactant alone. Acute lung injury in adult rats was created by tracheal instillation of human meconium. Injured animals, which were anesthetized, paralyzed, and ventilated with 100% oxygen and not treated with surfactant mixtures, remained hypoxic and required high ventilator pressures to maintain Pa(CO(2)) in the normal range over the 3 h of the experiment. Uninjured animals maintained normal values for oxygen and compliance of the respiratory system. The greatest improvement in both oxygenation (178%) and compliance (42%) occurred in animals with lung injury that were treated with Survanta and PEG (versus untreated control animals; p < 0.01), whereas little improvement was found after treatment with Survanta alone. Similar results were found when postmortem pulmonary pressure-volume curves and histology were examined. We conclude that adding PEG to Survanta improves gas exchange, pulmonary mechanics, and histologic appearance of the lungs in a rat model of acute lung injury caused by meconium.

  17. Pathophysiological mechanisms of acute pancreatitis define inflammatory markers of clinical prognosis.

    PubMed

    Minkov, Georgi A; Halacheva, Krasimira S; Yovtchev, Yovcho P; Gulubova, Maya V

    2015-07-01

    Development of acute pancreatitis illustrates the need to understand the basic mechanisms of disease progression to drive the exploration of therapeutic options. Cytokines play a major role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis as underlying systemic inflammatory response, tissue damage, and organ dysfunction. However, little is known about circulating concentrations of these inflammatory markers and their real impact on clinical practice. Experimental studies have suggested that the prognosis for acute pancreatitis depends on the degree of pancreatic necrosis and the intensity of multisystem organ failure generated by the systemic inflammatory response. This suggests an intricate balance between localized tissue damage with proinflammatory cytokine production and a systemic anti-inflammatory response that restricts the inappropriate movement of proinflammatory agents into the circulation. Implication of such mediators suggests that interruption or blunting of an inappropriate immune response has the potential to improve outcome. A detailed understanding of pathophysiological processes and immunological aspects in patients with acute pancreatitis is the basis for the development of therapeutic strategies that will provide significant reductions in morbidity and mortality.

  18. Inflammatory triggers of acute rejection of organ allografts

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Daniel N.; Kreisel, Daniel; Fullerton, James N.; Gilroy, Derek W.; Goldstein, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Solid organ transplantation is a vital therapy for end stage diseases. Decades of research has established that the components of the adaptive immune system are critical for transplant rejection, but the role of the innate immune system in organ transplantation is just emerging. Accumulating evidence indicates that the innate immune system is activated at the time of organ implantation by the release of endogenous inflammatory triggers. This review discusses the nature of these triggers in organ transplantation and also potential mediators that may enhance inflammation resolution after organ implantation. PMID:24517430

  19. Inflammation-associated repression of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) reduces alveolar-capillary barrier function during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Henes, Janek; Schmit, Marthe A.; Morote-Garcia, Julio C.; Mirakaj, Valbona; Köhler, David; Glover, Louise; Eldh, Therese; Walter, Ulrich; Karhausen, Jörn; Colgan, Sean P.; Rosenberger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory disorder associated with reduced alveolar-capillary barrier function, increased pulmonary vascular permeability, and infiltration of leukocytes into the alveolar space. Pulmonary function might be compromised, its most severe form being the acute respiratory distress syndrome. A protein central to physiological barrier properties is vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). Given the fact that VASP expression is reduced during periods of cellular hypoxia, we investigated the role of VASP during ALI. Initial studies revealed reduced VASP expressional levels through cytokines in vitro. Studies in the putative human VASP promoter identified NF-κB as a key regulator of VASP transcription. This VASP repression results in increased paracellular permeability and migration of neutrophils in vitro. In a model of LPS-induced ALI, VASP−/− mice demonstrated increased pulmonary damage compared with wild-type animals. These findings were confirmed in a second model of ventilator-induced lung injury. Studies employing bone marrow chimeric animals identified tissue-specific repression of VASP as the underlying cause of decreased barrier properties of the alveolar-capillary barrier during ALI. Taken together these studies identify tissue-specific VASP as a central protein in the control of the alveolar-capillary barrier properties during ALI.—Henes, J., Schmit, M. A., Morote-Garcia, J. C., Mirakaj, V., Köhler, D., Glover, L., Eldh, T., Walter, U., Karhausen, J., Colgan, S. P., Rosenberger, P. Inflammation-associated repression of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) reduces alveolar-capillary barrier function during acute lung injury. PMID:19690214

  20. Aging predisposes to acute inflammatory induced pathology after tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Sckisel, Gail D; Chen, Mingyi; Mirsoian, Annie; Zamora, Anthony E; Maverakis, Emanual; Wilkins, Danice E C; Alderson, Kory L; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Weiss, Jonathan M; Monjazeb, Arta M; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L; Blazar, Bruce R; Wiltrout, Robert H; Redelman, Doug; Taub, Dennis D; Murphy, William J

    2013-10-21

    Cancer commonly occurs in the elderly and immunotherapy (IT) is being increasingly applied to this population. However, the majority of preclinical mouse tumor models assessing potential efficacy and toxicities of therapeutics use young mice. We assessed the impact of age on responses to systemic immune stimulation. In contrast to young mice, systemic cancer IT regimens or LPS given to aged mice resulted in rapid and lethal toxicities affecting multiple organs correlating with heightened proinflammatory cytokines systemically and within the parenchymal tissues. This inflammatory response and increased morbidity with age was independent of T cells or NK cells. However, prior in vivo depletion of macrophages in aged mice resulted in lesser cytokine levels, increased survival, and decreased liver histopathology. Furthermore, macrophages from aged mice and normal human elderly volunteers displayed heightened TNF and IL-6 production upon in vitro stimulation. Treatment of both TNF knockout mice and in vivo TNF blockade in aged mice resulted in significant increases in survival and lessened pathology. Importantly, TNF blockade in tumor-bearing, aged mice receiving IT displayed significant anti-tumor effects. These data demonstrate the critical role of macrophages in the age-associated hyper-inflammatory cytokine responses to systemic immunostimulation and underscore the importance of performing preclinical assessments in aged mice.

  1. Aging predisposes to acute inflammatory induced pathology after tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Chen, Mingyi; Mirsoian, Annie; Zamora, Anthony E.; Maverakis, Emanual; Wilkins, Danice E.C.; Alderson, Kory L.; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Redelman, Doug; Taub, Dennis D.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer commonly occurs in the elderly and immunotherapy (IT) is being increasingly applied to this population. However, the majority of preclinical mouse tumor models assessing potential efficacy and toxicities of therapeutics use young mice. We assessed the impact of age on responses to systemic immune stimulation. In contrast to young mice, systemic cancer IT regimens or LPS given to aged mice resulted in rapid and lethal toxicities affecting multiple organs correlating with heightened proinflammatory cytokines systemically and within the parenchymal tissues. This inflammatory response and increased morbidity with age was independent of T cells or NK cells. However, prior in vivo depletion of macrophages in aged mice resulted in lesser cytokine levels, increased survival, and decreased liver histopathology. Furthermore, macrophages from aged mice and normal human elderly volunteers displayed heightened TNF and IL-6 production upon in vitro stimulation. Treatment of both TNF knockout mice and in vivo TNF blockade in aged mice resulted in significant increases in survival and lessened pathology. Importantly, TNF blockade in tumor-bearing, aged mice receiving IT displayed significant anti-tumor effects. These data demonstrate the critical role of macrophages in the age-associated hyper-inflammatory cytokine responses to systemic immunostimulation and underscore the importance of performing preclinical assessments in aged mice. PMID:24081947

  2. Corticosteroids prevent acute lung dysfunction caused by thoracic irradiation in unanesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Loyd, J.E.; Bolds, J.M.; Wickersham, N.; Malcolm, A.W.; Brigham, K.L.

    1988-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of corticosteroid therapy in a new acute model of oxidant lung injury, thoracic irradiation in awake sheep. Sheep were irradiated with 1,500 rads to the whole chest except for blocking the heart and adjacent ventral lung. Seven experimental sheep were given methylprednisolone (1 g intravenously every 6 h for four doses) and thoracic irradiation; control sheep received only irradiation. In irradiated control sheep, lung lymph flow increased from baseline (7.6 ml/h) to peak at 3 h (13.2), and lung lymph protein clearance increased from 5.1 to 9.7 ml/h. Mean pulmonary artery pressure increased in the irradiated control sheep from 19 to 32.4 cm H/sub 2/O, whereas the lung lymph thromboxane concentration increased from 0.09 to 6.51 ng/ml at 3 h. Arterial oxygen tension in irradiated control sheep fell gradually from 86 mm Hg at baseline to 65 mm Hg at 8 h. Methylprednisolone administration significantly prevented the increase in lung lymph protein clearance, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and lung lymph thromboxane concentration. Methylprednisolone also prevented the fall in arterial oxygen tension after thoracic irradiation, but did not prevent a further decrease in lymphocytes in blood or lung lymph after radiation. We conclude that corticosteroid therapy prevents most of the acute physiologic changes caused by thoracic irradiation in awake sheep.

  3. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  4. The Effects of Dexamethasone and L-NAME on Acute Lung Injury in Rats with Lung Contusion.

    PubMed

    Kozan, Ahmet; Kilic, Nermin; Alacam, Hasan; Guzel, Ahmet; Guvenc, Tolga; Acikgoz, Mehmet

    2016-10-01

    The therapeutic efficiency of an anti-inflammatory agent, dexamethasone (DXM), and a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), in lung tissue injury after lung contusion was investigated. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), YKL-40, an inflammatory peptide, inducible NOS (iNOS), and Clara cell protein 16 (CC-16) were evaluated. Immunohistochemical analyses were also performed, and the lung tissue was examined histopathologically. The study consisted of eight groups of Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10 in each group), weighing 250-300 g: (1) control, (2) contusion, (3) control + DXM, (4) contusion + DXM, (5) control + L-NAME (6) contusion + L-NAME, (7) control + DXM + L-NAME, and (8) contusion + DXM + L-NAME. A previously developed lung contusion model was used, in addition to the control group. The rats were administered DXM and L-NAME intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 15 and 60 mg/kg/day, respectively. DXM and L-NAME administration decreased the iNOS level in the contusion groups. DXM increased the levels of YKL-40 and IL-10 in both the control and contusion groups, with higher levels in the contusion groups. L-NAME increased the serum level of IL-10 in the lung contusion groups. DXM increased the synthesis of CC-16 in the control and contusion groups. The combined use of a high-dose steroid and NOS inhibitor resulted in the death of the rats. Steroids can increase the level of cytokines, such as YKL-40 and IL-10, and the synthesis of CC-16 and prevent pneumonia, ALI/ARDS, and sepsis in lung contusion.

  5. Chemomics-Integrated Proteomics Analysis of Jie-Geng-Tang to Ameliorate Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jin; Nie, Yan; Ma, Xiaoyao; Ding, Guoyu; Gao, Jie; Jiang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Jie-Geng-Tang (JGT), a classic and famous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription composed of Platycodon grandiflorum (Jacq.) A. DC. (PG) and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. (GU), is well known for “clearing heat and relieving toxicity” and its ability to “diffuse the lung and relieve sore throat.” However, the mechanism underlying its action remains unclear. In this study, potential anti-inflammatory ingredients were screened and submitted to PharmMapper and the KEGG bioinformatics website to predict the target proteins and related pathways, respectively. Differentially expressed candidate proteins from acute lung injury (ALI) mice treated with JGT were identified by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and LC Triple-TOF. Eleven potential anti-inflammatory ingredients were found, including the derivatives of glycyrrhizic acid, licorice-saponin, liquiritin, and platycodigenin. A total of sixty-seven differentially expressed proteins were confirmed after JGT treatment with four therapeutic functions, including immunoregulation, anti-inflammation, ribosome, and muscle contraction. PG and GU comediate PI3K/Akt signal pathway inhibition of NF-κB, VCAM1, and ICAM1 release which primarily act on PI3K, PDK1, AKT, and GSK3β. GU markedly inhibits the ERK/MAPK signaling pathways and primarily acts on LCK, RAS, and MEK. A network was constructed using bioactive ingredients, targets, and pathways to determine the mechanism underlying JGT treatment of ALI. PMID:27579049

  6. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Tilton, Susan C; Waters, Katrina M; Karin, Norman J; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; Zangar, Richard C; Lee, K Monica; Bigelow, Diana J; Pounds, Joel G; Corley, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures.

  7. Pro-inflammatory phenotype of COPD fibroblasts not compatible with repair in COPD lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wu, Lian; Qu, Jie-ming; Bai, Chun-xue; Merrilees, Mervyn J; Black, Peter N

    2012-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by loss of elastic fibres from small airways and alveolar walls, with the decrease in elastin increasing with disease severity. It is unclear why there is a lack of repair of elastic fibres. We have examined fibroblasts cultured from lung tissue from subjects with or without COPD to determine if the secretory profile explains lack of tissue repair. In this study, fibroblasts were cultured from lung parenchyma of patients with mild COPD [Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 1, n= 5], moderate to severe COPD (GOLD 2-3, n= 12) and controls (non-COPD, n= 5). Measurements were made of proliferation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase-1, mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-8, MMP-1, tropoelastin and versican, and protein levels for IL-6, IL-8, PGE(2,) tropoelastin, insoluble elastin, and versican. GOLD 2-3 fibroblasts proliferated more slowly (P < 0.01), had higher levels of senescence-associated β-galactosidase-1 (P < 0.001) than controls and showed significant increases in mRNA and/or protein for IL-6 (P < 0.05), IL-8 (P < 0.01), MMP-1 (P < 0.05), PGE(2) (P < 0.05), versican (P < 0.05) and tropoelastin (P < 0.05). mRNA expression and/or protein levels of tropoelastin (P < 0.01), versican (P < 0.05), IL-6 (P < 0.05) and IL-8 (P < 0.05) were negatively correlated with FEV1% of predicted. Insoluble elastin was not increased. In summary, fibroblasts from moderate to severe COPD subjects display a secretory phenotype with up-regulation of inflammatory molecules including the matrix proteoglycan versican, and increased soluble, but not insoluble, elastin. Versican inhibits assembly of tropoelastin into insoluble elastin and we conclude that the pro-inflammatory phenotype of COPD fibroblasts is not compatible with repair of elastic fibres.

  8. Diet-Induced Obesity Reprograms the Inflammatory Response of the Murine Lung to Inhaled Endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Lee, Monika K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures.

  9. Amine modification of nonporous silica nanoparticles reduces inflammatory response following intratracheal instillation in murine lungs.

    PubMed

    Morris, Angie S; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Lehman, Sean E; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Thorne, Peter S; Larsen, Sarah C; Salem, Aliasger K

    2016-01-22

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) possess unique material properties that make them ideal for many different applications. However, the impact of these materials on human and environmental health needs to be established. We investigated nonporous silica NPs both bare and modified with amine functional groups (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)) in order to evaluate the effect of surface chemistry on biocompatibility. In vitro data showed there to be little to no cytotoxicity in a human lung cancer epithelial cell line (A549) for bare silica NPs and amine-functionalized NPs using doses based on both mass concentration (below 200μg/mL) and exposed total surface area (below 14m(2)/L). To assess lung inflammation, C57BL/6 mice were administered bare or amine-functionalized silica NPs via intra-tracheal instillation. Two doses (0.1 and 0.5mg NPs/mouse) were tested using the in vivo model. At the higher dose used, bare silica NPs elicited a significantly higher inflammatory response, as evidence by increased neutrophils and total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid compared to amine-functionalized NPs. From this study, we conclude that functionalization of nonporous silica NPs with APTES molecules reduces murine lung inflammation and improves the overall biocompatibility of the nanomaterial.

  10. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: Updates on an inflammatory CNS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Daniela; Alper, Gulay; Van Haren, Keith; Kornberg, Andrew J; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Tenembaum, Silvia; Belman, Anita L

    2016-08-30

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated demyelinating CNS disorder with predilection to early childhood. ADEM is generally considered a monophasic disease. However, recurrent ADEM has been described and defined as multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis. ADEM often occurs postinfectiously, although a causal relationship has never been established. ADEM and multiple sclerosis are currently viewed as distinct entities, generally distinguishable even at disease onset. However, pathologic studies have demonstrated transitional cases of yet unclear significance. ADEM is clinically defined by acute polyfocal neurologic deficits including encephalopathy. MRI typically demonstrates reversible, ill-defined white matter lesions of the brain and often also the spinal cord, along with frequent involvement of thalami and basal ganglia. CSF analysis may reveal a mild pleocytosis and elevated protein, but is generally negative for intrathecal oligoclonal immunoglobulin G synthesis. In the absence of a specific diagnostic test, ADEM is considered a diagnosis of exclusion, and ADEM mimics, especially those requiring a different treatment approach, have to be carefully ruled out. The role of biomarkers, including autoantibodies like anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of ADEM is currently under debate. Based on the presumed autoimmune etiology of ADEM, the current treatment approach consists of early immunotherapy. Outcome of ADEM in pediatric patients is generally favorable, but cognitive deficits have been reported even in the absence of other neurologic sequelae. This review summarizes the current knowledge on epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, neuroimaging features, CSF findings, differential diagnosis, therapy, and outcome, with a focus on recent advances and controversies.

  11. beta2 adrenergic agonists in acute lung injury? The heart of the matter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae W

    2009-01-01

    Despite extensive research into its pathophysiology, acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) remains a devastating syndrome with mortality approaching 40%. Pharmacologic therapies that reduce the severity of lung injury in vivo and in vitro have not yet been translated to effective clinical treatment options, and innovative therapies are needed. Recently, the use of beta2 adrenergic agonists as potential therapy has gained considerable interest due to their ability to increase the resolution of pulmonary edema. However, the results of clinical trials of beta agonist therapy for ALI/ARDS have been conflicting in terms of benefit. In the previous issue of Critical Care, Briot and colleagues present evidence that may help clarify the inconsistent results. The authors demonstrate that, in oleic acid lung injury in dogs, the inotropic effect of beta agonists may recruit damaged pulmonary capillaries, leading to increased lung endothelial permeability.

  12. First-pass studies of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chu, R Y; Sidhu, N; Basmadjian, G; Burow, R; Allen, E W

    1993-10-01

    Mild hydrochloric acid was introduced to a caudal lung section in each of eight dogs to induce injury. Transits of 99mTc-labeled red blood cells (RBC) and [123I]iodoantipyrine (IAP) injected intravenously were recorded by a scintillation camera. Lungs and blood samples were analyzed post-mortem. Peak-to-equilibrium ratios (P/E) of RBC time-activity curves were computed to be 3.83 +/- 0.54 for the control lung, 2.58 +/- 0.55 for the injured lung and 2.23 +/- 0.58 for the injured caudal section. For IAP, the respective results were 3.78 +/- 0.29, 2.02 +/- 0.18 and 1.77 +/- 0.17. The decrease of P/E in injured areas was attributed to reduced blood flow. Using mean transit times of the tracers, we computed extravascular lung water per unit blood volume to be 0.35 +/- 0.18 for the control lungs and an increased value of 0.68 +/- 0.24 for the injured lungs. These results displayed sensitivity to injury, but were gross underestimates relative to the corresponding values of 2.04 +/- 0.54 and 4.56 +/- 1.85 in post-mortem analyses.

  13. Passive targeting of phosphatiosomes increases rolipram delivery to the lungs for treatment of acute lung injury: An animal study.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Wen, Chih-Jen; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Sung, Calvin T; Huang, Chun-Lin; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-09-10

    A novel nanovesicle carrier, phosphatiosomes, was developed to enhance the targeting efficiency of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor to the lungs for treating acute lung injury (ALI) by intravenous administration. Phosphatiosomes were the basis of a niosomal system containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) and distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine polyethylene glycol (DSPE-PEG). Rolipram was used as the model drug loaded in the phosphatiosomes. Bioimaging, biodistribution, activated neutrophil inhibition, and ALI treatment were performed to evaluate the feasibility of phosphatiosomes as the lung-targeting carriers. An encapsulation percentage of >90% was achieved for rolipram-loaded nanovesicles. The vesicle size and zeta potential of the phosphatiosomes were 154 nm and -34 mV, respectively. Real-time imaging in rats showed a delayed and lower uptake of phosphatiosomes by the liver and spleen. Ex vivo bioimaging demonstrated a high accumulation of phosphatiosomes in the lungs. In vivo biodistribution exhibited increased lung accumulation and reduced brain penetration of rolipram in phosphatiosomes relative to the control solution. Phosphatiosomes improved the lungs/brain ratio of the drug by more than 7-fold. Interaction with pulmonary lipoprotein surfactants and the subsequent aggregation may be the mechanisms for facilitating lung targeting by phosphatiosomes. Rolipram could continue to inhibit active neutrophils after inclusion in the nanovesicles by suppressing O2(-) generation and elevating cAMP. Phosphatiosomes significantly alleviated ALI in mice as revealed by examining their pulmonary appearance, edema, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and histopathology. This study highlights the potential of nanovesicles to deliver the drug for targeting the lungs and attenuating nervous system side effects.

  14. N-acetyl-heparin attenuates acute lung injury caused by acid aspiration mainly by antagonizing histones in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanlin; Zhao, Zanmei; Guan, Li; Mao, Lijun; Li, Shuqiang; Guan, Xiaoxu; Chen, Ming; Guo, Lixia; Ding, Lihua; Cong, Cuicui; Wen, Tao; Zhao, Jinyuan

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Extracellular histones have recently been recognized to be pivotal inflammatory mediators. Heparin and its derivatives can bind histones through electrostatic interaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate 1) the role of extracellular histones in the pathogenesis of ALI caused by acid aspiration and 2) whether N-acetyl-heparin (NAH) provides more protection than heparin against histones at the high dose. ALI was induced in mice via intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid (HCl). Lethality rate, blood gas, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, lung edema and pathological changes were used to evaluate the degree of ALI. Heparin/NAH was administered intraperitoneally, twice a day, for 3 days or until death. Acid aspiration caused an obvious increase in extracellular histones. A significant correlation existed between the concentration of HCl aspirated and the circulating histones. Heparin/NAH (10 mg/kg) improved the lethality rate, blood gas, MPO activity, lung edema and pathological score. At a dose of 20 mg/kg, NAH still provided protection, however heparin tended to aggravate the injury due to hemorrhagic complications. The specific interaction between heparin and histones was verified by the binding assay. In summary, high levels of extracellular histones can be pathogenic in ALI caused by acid aspiration. By neutralizing extracellular histones, heparin/NAH can offer similar protection at the moderate doses. At the high dose, NAH provides better protection than heparin.

  15. α1-Antitrypsin Activates Protein Phosphatase 2A to Counter Lung Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Patrick; Eden, Edward; Pillai, Manju; Campos, Michael; McElvaney, Noel G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: α1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) was identified as a plasma protease inhibitor; however, it is now recognized as a multifunctional protein that modulates immunity, inflammation, proteostasis, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Like A1AT, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major serine-threonine phosphatase, regulates similar biologic processes and plays a key role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Objectives: Given their common effects, this study investigated whether A1AT acts via PP2A to alter tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling, inflammation, and proteolytic responses in this disease. Methods: PP2A activity was measured in peripheral blood neutrophils from A1AT-deficient (PiZZ) and healthy (PiMM) individuals and in alveolar macrophages from normal (60 mg/kg) and high-dose (120 mg/kg) A1AT-treated PiZZ subjects. PP2A activation was assessed in human neutrophils, airway epithelial cells, and peripheral blood monocytes treated with plasma purified A1AT protein. Similarly, lung PP2A activity was measured in mice administered intranasal A1AT. PP2A was silenced in lung epithelial cells treated with A1AT and matrix metalloproteinase and cytokine production was then measured following TNF-α stimulation. Measurements and Main Results: PP2A was significantly lower in neutrophils isolated from PiZZ compared with PiMM subjects. A1AT protein activated PP2A in human alveolar macrophages, monocytes, neutrophils, airway epithelial cells, and in mouse lungs. This activation required functionally active A1AT protein and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B expression. A1AT treatment acted via PP2A to prevent p38 and IκBα phosphorylation and matrix metalloproteinase and cytokine induction in TNF-α–stimulated epithelial cells. Conclusions: Together, these data indicate that A1AT modulates PP2A to counter inflammatory and proteolytic responses induced by TNF signaling in the lung. PMID:25341065

  16. Acute Lung Injury Accompanying Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Flu Vaccination in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Etsuko; Nei, Takahito; Kuzu, Shinichi; Chubachi, Kumi; Nojima, Daisuke; Taniuchi, Namiko; Yamano, Yoshimitsu; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Flu vaccinations are administered worldwide every winter for prevention. We herein describe a case of acute lung injury resulting from a pathologically confirmed alveolar hemorrhage, which may have been closely related to a preceding vaccination for pandemic influenza A of 2009/10. The present patient had been hospitalized with an acute lung injury after flu vaccination one year prior to the present hospitalization, however, he received another flu vaccination. We should consider a vaccine-related adverse reaction as a potential cause of pulmonary disease if patients present with this illness during the winter season.

  17. Short people got no reason: gender, height, and disparities in the management of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Robert P; Hyzy, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Though the benefits of lung protective ventilation (LPV) in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) have been known for more than a decade, widespread clinical adoption has been slow. Han and colleagues demonstrate that women with ALI/ARDS are less likely than men to receive LPV, though this disparity resolves when the analysis is adjusted for patient height. This analysis identifies patient height as a significant factor in predicting provider adherence with LPV guidelines, and illuminates why some disparities in intensive care exist and how they may be resolved via improved utilization of evidence-driven protocols.

  18. Relevance of Lung Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Acute Respiratory Failure*

    PubMed Central

    Mezière, Gilbert A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study assesses the potential of lung ultrasonography to diagnose acute respiratory failure. Methods: This observational study was conducted in university-affiliated teaching-hospital ICUs. We performed ultrasonography on consecutive patients admitted to the ICU with acute respiratory failure, comparing lung ultrasonography results on initial presentation with the final diagnosis by the ICU team. Uncertain diagnoses and rare causes (frequency < 2%) were excluded.Weincluded 260 dyspneic patients with a definite diagnosis. Three items were assessed: artifacts (horizontal A lines or vertical B lines indicating interstitial syndrome), lung sliding, and alveolar consolidation and/or pleural effusion. Combined with venous analysis, these items were grouped to assess ultrasound profiles. Results: Predominant A lines plus lung sliding indicated asthma (n = 34) or COPD (n = 49) with 89% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Multiple anterior diffuse B lines with lung sliding indicated pulmonary edema (n = 64) with 97% sensitivity and 95% specificity. A normal anterior profile plus deep venous thrombosis indicated pulmonary embolism (n = 21) with 81% sensitivity and 99% specificity. Anterior absent lung sliding plus A lines plus lung point indicated pneumothorax (n = 9) with 81% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Anterior alveolar consolidations, anterior diffuse B lines with abolished lung sliding, anterior asymmetric interstitial patterns, posterior consolidations or effusions without anterior diffuse B lines indicated pneumonia (n = 83) with 89% sensitivity and 94% specificity. The use of these profiles would have provided correct diagnoses in 90.5% of cases. Conclusions: Lung ultrasound can help the clinician make a rapid diagnosis in patients with acute respiratory failure, thus meeting the priority objective of saving time. PMID:18403664

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Properties of NAP in Acute Toxoplasma Gondii-Induced Ileitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Heimesaat, Markus M; Fischer, André; Kühl, Anja A; Göbel, Ulf B; Gozes, Illana; Bereswill, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    The octapeptide NAP has been shown to exert neuroprotective properties. Here, we investigated potential anti-inflammatory effects of NAP in an acute ileitis model. To address this, C57BL/6j mice were perorally infected with Toxoplasma gondii (day 0). Within 1 week postinfection (p.i.), placebo (PLC)-treated mice developed acute ileitis due to Th1-type immune responses. Mice that were subjected to intraperitoneal NAP treatment from day 1 until day 6 p.i., however, developed less distinct macroscopic and microscopic disease as indicated by less body weight loss, less distinct histopathological ileal changes, and lower ileal apoptotic, but higher proliferating cell numbers, less abundance of neutrophils, macrophages, monocytes, and T lymphocytes, but higher numbers of regulatory T cells in the ileal mucosa and lamina propria, and lower concentrations of pro-inflammatory mediators in the ilea as compared to PLC controls at day 7 p.i. Remarkably, NAP-mediated anti-inflammatory effects could also be observed in extra-intestinal compartments including liver and spleen. Strikingly, lower MCP-1, TNF, and IL-12p70 serum concentrations in NAP as compared to PLC-treated mice at day 7 p.i. indicate a pronounced systemic anti-inflammatory effect of NAP in acute ileitis. These findings provide first evidence for NAP as a potential novel treatment option in intestinal inflammation.

  20. Nitrogen dioxide-induced acute lung injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, A J; Mayorga, M A

    1994-05-20

    Lung mechanics, hemodynamics and blood chemistries were assessed in sheep (Ovis aries) before, and up to 24 h following, a 15-20 min exposure to either air (control) or approximately 500 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Histopathologic examinations of lung tissues were performed 24 h after exposure. Nose-only and lung-only routes of exposure were compared for effects on NO2 pathogenesis. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from air- and NO2-exposed sheep were analyzed for biochemical and cellular signs of NO2 insult. The influence of breathing pattern on NO2 dose was also assessed. Five hundred ppm NO2 exposure of intubated sheep (lung-only exposure) was marked by a statistically significant, albeit small, blood methemoglobin increase. The exposure induced an immediate tidal volume decrease, and an increase in both breathing rate and inspired minute ventilation. Pulmonary function, indexed by lung resistance and dynamic lung compliance, progressively deteriorated after exposure. Maximal lung resistance and dynamic lung compliance changes occurred at 24 h post exposure, concomitant with arterial hypoxemia. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid epithelial cell number and total protein were significantly increased while macrophage number was significantly decreased within the 24 h post-exposure period. Histopathologic examination of lung tissue 24 h after NO2 revealed patchy edema, mild hemorrhage and polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocyte infiltration. The NO2 toxicologic profile was significantly attenuated when sheep were exposed to the gas through a face mask (nose-only exposure). Respiratory pattern was not significantly altered, lung mechanics changes were minimal, hypoxemia did not occur, and pathologic evidence of exudation was not apparent in nose-only, NO2-exposed sheep. The qualitative responses of this large animal species to high-level NO2 supports the concept of size dependent species sensitivity to NO2. In addition, when inspired minute ventilation was used as a dose

  1. Nitrogen Dioxide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Sheep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    subsequent to inhalation expo- sure. Non- cardiogenic pulmonary edema is produced by brief exposure and unlike hyperoxia (Newman et al., 1983; Fukushima...macrophage number significantly decreased within the 24-h post-exposure period. Examination of lung tissue 24 after NO2 revealed patchy edema , mild hemorrhage...examination of lung tissue 24 h after NO, revealed patchy edema , mild hemorrhage and polymorphonuclear c, and mononuclear leukocyte infiltration. The NO

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of melatonin in a rat model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Cristina; Marchena, Ana M; Holguín-Arévalo, María S; Martín-Partido, Gervasio; Rodríguez, Ana B; Paredes, Sergio D; Pariente, José A

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the protective effect of melatonin in a rat model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. For the induction of experimental acute pancreatitis, four subcutaneous injections of caerulein (20 mgkg–1 body weight) were given to Wistar rats at 2-h intervals. Melatonin was injected intraperitoneally (25 mg kg–1 body weight) 30 min before each caerulein injection. After 12 h, rats were sacrificed by decapitation. Blood and pancreas samples were collected and processed for serological and histopathological studies,respectively. Lipase, a-amylase, corticosterone, total antioxidant power and cytokines interleukin (IL)-1b, IL-4 and tumour necrosis factor(TNF)-a were determined using commercial kits. ANOVA and Tukey tests (P<0.05) were performed for the statistical analysis of the results.Results showed that the administration of melatonin reduced histological damage induced by caerulein treatment as well as the hyperamylasemia and hyperlipidemia. Corticosterone and antioxidant total power were also reverted to basal activities. Furthermore, melatonin pre-treatment reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1b and TNF-a and increased the serum levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4. In conclusion,the findings suggest that the protective effect of melatonin in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis is mediated by the anti-inflammatory ability of this indolamine. Thus, melatonin may have a protective effect against acute pancreatitis.

  3. The Impact of Acute Matriptase Inhibition in Hepatic Inflammatory Models

    PubMed Central

    Szombath, Gergely; Rokonál, Patrik; Mátis, Gábor; Neogrády, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Dysfunction of matriptase-2 can be involved in iron regulatory disorder via downregulation of hepcidin expression. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 3-amidinophenylalanine-derived matriptase inhibitors on porcine hepatic inflammatory cell models. Methods. Hepatocyte-Kupffer cell cocultures (ratio of 2 : 1 and 6 : 1) were treated with four structurally related matriptase inhibitors at 50 μM. Cell cytotoxicity and relative expressions of IL-6 and IL-8 and the levels of hepcidin were determined by MTS and porcine-specific ELISA. The extracellular H2O2 contents were analyzed by Amplex Red method. Results. Matriptase inhibitors at 50 µM for 24 h did not increase cell death rate. The elevated ROS production observed after short-term application of inhibitor MI-441 could be correlated with lowered hepcidin expression. MI-460 could significantly enhance hepcidin levels in the supernatants of cocultures (by 62.21 ± 26.8% in hepatocyte-Kupffer cell, 2 : 1, and by 42.6 ± 14.3% in hepatocyte-Kupffer cell, 6 : 1, cocultures, resp.). No significant changes were found in IL-6 and IL-8 levels in cocultures exposed to matriptase inhibitors. Conclusions. Based on in vitro findings, administration of MI-460 via modulation of hepcidin expression without cytotoxic and oxidative stress inducing properties might be a reliable alternative to treat iron overload in human and veterinary clinical practice. PMID:27642598

  4. ACUTE CONSTRICTIVE PERICARDITIS FOLLOWING LUNG TRANSPLANTATION FOR LYMPHANGIOLEIOMYOMATOSIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Martha E.; Mulligan, Michael; Raghu, Ganesh

    2009-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare cystic progressive lung disease with many extra-pulmonary manifestations which may complicate allograft function after transplantation. We present a LAM patient, one-year status-post bilateral lung transplant, with new dyspnea and declining spirometry without rejection, infection or recurrence. Investigation revealed acute constrictive pericarditis which has not previously been reported in LAM lung transplant patients. This represents a novel complication likely due to progression of extra-pulmonary LAM that should be considered in LAM transplant patients with dyspnea. PMID:19134542

  5. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for acute fulminant inflammatory cardiomyopathy: Series of six patients and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Goland, Sorel; Czer, Lawrence SC; Siegel, Robert J; Tabak, Steven; Jordan, Stanley; Luthringer, Daniel; Mirocha, James; Coleman, Bernice; Kass, Robert M; Trento, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although an autoimmune mechanism has been postulated for myocarditis and acute-onset inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), immunomodulatory treatment strategies are still under investigation. METHODS AND RESULTS: The clinical data of six patients with acute inflammatory DCM referred for evaluation for possible heart transplantation were reviewed. All patients were admitted with acute congestive heart failure and severely impaired left ventricular (LV) function and were treated with high-dose (2 g/kg) intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The diagnosis of acute inflammatory DCM was based on recent onset of congestive heart failure (New York Heart Association functional class III or IV) with severely depressed LV ejection fraction ([LVEF] 30% or lower) occurring shortly after viral-like illness. All patients had inflammation on endomyocardial biopsy or elevated cardiac enzymes, as well as a normal coronary angiogram. All patients were in New York Heart Association class I or II at the time of hospital discharge. The mean LVEF improved from 21.7±7.5% at baseline to 50.3±8.6% at discharge (P=0.005). Four patients had complete recovery (LVEF 50% or higher) and two patients had partial LV recovery. Patients were followed for a median 13.2 months (range two to 24 months) and had a mean LVEF of 53±6% (P not significant versus LVEF at discharge). CONCLUSIONS: Therapy with intravenous high-dose IVIG may be a potentially useful treatment in selected patients if given early in the course of acute fulminant inflammatory DCM. A randomized, prospective trial is warranted to prove the real benefit of IVIG in this patient population. PMID:18612500

  6. Flaxseed Mitigates Acute Oxidative Lung Damage in a Mouse Model of Repeated Radiation and Hyperoxia Exposure Associated with Space Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2015-01-01

    Background Spaceflight missions may require crewmembers to conduct extravehicular activities (EVA). Pre-breathe protocols in preparation for an EVA entail 100% hyperoxia exposure that may last for a few hours and be repeated 2-3 times weekly. Each EVA is associated with additional challenges such as low levels of total body cosmic/galactic radiation exposure that may present a threat to crewmember health. We have developed a mouse model of total body radiation and hyperoxia exposure and identified acute damage of lung tissues. In the current study we evaluated the usefulness of dietary flaxseed (FS) as a countermeasure agent for such double-hit exposures. Methods We evaluated lung tissue changes 2 weeks post-initiation of exposure challenges. Mouse cohorts (n=5/group) were pre-fed diets containing either 0% FS or 10% FS for 3 weeks and exposed to: a) normoxia (Untreated); b) >95% O2 (O2); c) 0.25Gy single fraction gamma radiation (IR); or d) a combination of O2 and IR (O2+IR) 3 times per week for 2 consecutive weeks, where 8-hour hyperoxia treatments were spanned by normoxic intervals. Results At 2 weeks post challenge, while control-diet fed mice developed significant lung injury and inflammation across all challenges, FS protected lung tissues by decreasing bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils (p<0.003) and protein levels, oxidative tissue damage, as determined by levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.008) and nitrosative stress as determined by nitrite levels. Lung hydroxyproline levels, a measure of lung fibrosis, were significantly elevated in mice fed 0% FS (p<0.01) and exposed to hyperoxia/radiation or the combination treatment, but not in FS-fed mice. FS also decreased levels of a pro-inflammatory, pro-fibrogenic cytokine (TGF-β1) gene expression levels in lung. Conclusion Flaxseed mitigated adverse effects in lung of repeat exposures to radiation/hyperoxia. This data will provide useful information in the design of countermeasures to early

  7. Identification of target proteins of mangiferin in mice with acute lung injury using functionalized magnetic microspheres based on click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiajia; Nie, Yan; Li, Yunjuan; Hou, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Wei; Deng, Jiagang; Wang, Peng George; Bai, Gang

    2015-11-18

    Prevention of the occurrence and development of inflammation is a vital therapeutic strategy for treating acute lung injury (ALI). Increasing evidence has shown that a wealth of ingredients from natural foods and plants have potential anti-inflammatory activity. In the present study, mangiferin, a natural C-glucosyl xanthone that is primarily obtained from the peels and kernels of mango fruits and the bark of the Mangifera indica L. tree, alleviated the inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI mice. Mangiferin-modified magnetic microspheres (MMs) were developed on the basis of click chemistry to capture the target proteins of mangiferin. Mass spectrometry and molecular docking identified 70 kDa heat-shock protein 5 (Hspa5) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (Ywhae) as mangiferin-binding proteins. Furthermore, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) indicated that mangiferin exerted its anti-inflammatory effect by binding Hspa5 and Ywhae to suppress downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Thoroughly revealing the mechanism and function of mangiferin will contribute to the development and utilization of agricultural resources from M. indica L.

  8. Therapeutic effect of inhaled budesonide (Pulmicort® Turbuhaler) on the inflammatory response to one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Ju, N Y; Gao, H; Huang, W; Niu, F F; Lan, W X; Li, F; Gao, W

    2014-01-01

    This prospective, double-blind trial was designed to evaluate the effect of inhaled budesonide on lung function and the inflammatory response to one-lung ventilation. One hundred patients scheduled for lobectomy were allocated randomly to pre-operative nebulised budesonide or saline. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were collected from either the collapsed or the ventilated lung both before one-lung ventilation and 30 min after re-expansion of the lung. The concentrations of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytokines were determined. Budesonide treatment, compared with saline, reduced both peak (mean (SD) 3.7 (0.4) vs 2.5 (0.2) kPa) and plateau (mean (SD) 3.1 (0.2) vs 2.2 (0.1) kPa, respectively, p < 0.001 for both) ventilatory pressures. Thirty minutes after re-expansion, lung compliance increased in the budesonide group compared with saline (57.5 (4.1) vs 40.1 (3.5) ml.cmH(2) O(-1), respectively p < 0.001). Budesonide also reduced the concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, but increased interleukin-10 30 min after re-expansion (p < 0.05 for all measures). Pre-operative nebulisation of budesonide may be effective in improving ventilatory mechanics and reducing the inflammatory response to one-lung ventilation during thoracic surgery.

  9. Mouse lung slices: An ex vivo model for the evaluation of antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; An, Liwei; Liu, Ge; Li, Xiaoyu; Tang, Wei; Chen, Xulin

    2015-08-01

    The influenza A virus is notoriously known for its ability to cause recurrent epidemics and global pandemics. Antiviral therapy is effective when treatment is initiated within 48h of symptom onset, and delaying treatment beyond this time frame is associated with decreased efficacy. Research on anti-inflammatory therapy to ameliorate influenza-induced inflammation is currently underway and seems important to the impact on the clinical outcome. Both antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently needed. Current methods for evaluating the efficacy of anti-influenza drugs rely mostly on transformed cells and animals. Transformed cell models are distantly related to physiological and pathological conditions. Although animals are the best choices for preclinical drug testing, they are not time- or cost-efficient. In this study, we established an ex vivo model using mouse lung slices to evaluate both antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza virus infection. Both influenza virus PR8 (H1N1) and A/Human/Hubei/3/2005 (H3N2) can replicate efficiently in mouse lung slices and trigger significant cytokine and chemokine responses. The induction of selected cytokines and chemokines were found to have a positive correlation between ex vivo and in vivo experiments, suggesting that the ex vivo cultured lung slices may closely resemble the lung functionally in an in vivo configuration when challenged by influenza virus. Furthermore, a set of agents with known antiviral and/or anti-inflammatory activities were tested to validate the ex vivo model. Our results suggested that mouse lung slices provide a robust, convenient and cost-efficient model for the assessment of both antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza virus infection in one assay. This ex vivo model may predict the efficacy of drug candidates' antiviral and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo.

  10. Gene Expression Changes during the Development of Acute Lung Injury Role of Transforming Growth Factor β

    PubMed Central

    Wesselkamper, Scott C.; Case, Lisa M.; Henning, Lisa N.; Borchers, Michael T.; Tichelaar, Jay W.; Mason, John M.; Dragin, Nadine; Medvedovic, Mario; Sartor, Maureen A.; Tomlinson, Craig R.; Leikauf, George D.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Acute lung injury can occur from multiple causes, resulting in high mortality. The pathophysiology of nickel-induced acute lung injury in mice is remarkably complex, and the molecular mechanisms are uncertain. Objectives: To integrate molecular pathways and investigate the role of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in acute lung injury in mice. Methods: cDNA microarray analyses were used to identify lung gene expression changes after nickel exposure. MAPPFinder analysis of the microarray data was used to determine significantly altered molecular pathways. TGF-β1 protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as the effect of inhibition of TGF-β, was assessed in nickel-exposed mice. The effect of TGF-β on surfactant-associated protein B (Sftpb) promoter activity was measured in mouse lung epithelial cells. Measurements and Main Results: Genes that decreased the most after nickel exposure play important roles in lung fluid absorption or surfactant and phospholipid synthesis, and genes that increased the most were involved in TGF-β signaling. MAPPFinder analysis further established TGF-β signaling to be significantly altered. TGF-β–inducible genes involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix function and fibrinolysis were significantly increased after nickel exposure, and TGF-β1 protein was also increased in the lavage fluid. Pharmacologic inhibition of TGF-β attenuated nickel-induced protein in bronchoalveolar lavage. In addition, treatment with TGF-β1 dose-dependently repressed Sftpb promoter activity in vitro, and a novel TGF-β–responsive region in the Sftpb promoter was identified. Conclusions: These data suggest that TGF-β acts as a central mediator of acute lung injury through the alteration of several different molecular pathways. PMID:16100012

  11. Use of Lung Ultrasound For Diagnosing Acute Heart Failure in Emergency Department of Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mrigakshi; Vijan, Vikrant; Vupputuri, Anjith; Chintamani, Sanjeev; Rajendran, Bishnukiran; Thachathodiyal, Rajesh; Chandrasekaran, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diagnosing heart failure is often a challenge for the healthcare providers due to it’s non-specific and usually subtle physical presentations. The outcomes for treatment are strongly related to the stage of the disease. Considering the importance of early and accurate diagnosis, it is important to have an easy, inexpensive, non-invasive, reliable and reproducible method for diagnosis of heart failure. Recent advancement in radiology and cardiology are supporting the emerging technique of lung ultrasound through B-line evaluation for identifying extravascular lung water. Aim To establish lung ultrasound as an easy, inexpensive, non-invasive, reliable and reproducible method for diagnosing Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (ADHF) in emergency department. Materials and Methods The study was a cross-sectional, prospective, observational, diagnostic validation study of lung ultrasound for diagnosis of acute heart failure in an emergency department and was performed at Amrita Institute of Medical Science, Kochi, Kerala, India. A total of 42 patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute decompensated heart failure were evaluated by plasma B-type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP), Echocardiography (ECHO) and X-ray. Lung ultrasound was done to look for the presence of B-lines. Statistical Analysis Sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of diagnostic modalities were calculated using Mc Nemar’s Chi-square test for the presence and absence of heart failure. Results Lung ultrasound showed a sensitivity of 91.9% and a specificity of 100% in diagnosing acute heart failure comparable to plasma BNP which had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 60%. It was also superior to other methods of diagnosing ADHF namely X-ray and ECHO and showed a good association. Conclusion Lung ultrasound and its use to detect ultrasonographic B-lines is an early, sensitive and an equally accurate predictor of ADHF in the emergency setting as compared to BNP. PMID:28050472

  12. N-acetylcysteine alleviates the meconium-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, D; Drgova, A; Petras, M; Mokry, J; Antosova, M; Calkovska, A

    2015-01-01

    Meconium aspiration in newborns causes lung inflammation and injury, which may lead to meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). In this study, the effect of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine on respiratory and inflammatory parameters were studied in a model of MAS. Oxygen-ventilated rabbits were intratracheally given 4 mL/kg of meconium (25 mg/mL) or saline. Thirty minutes later, meconium-instilled animals were administered N-acetylcysteine (10 mg/kg; i.v.), or were left without treatment. The animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 h. Ventilatory pressures, oxygenation, right-to-left pulmonary shunts, and leukocyte count were measured. At the end of experiment, trachea and lung were excised. The left lung was saline-lavaged and a total and differential count of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) was determined. Right lung tissue strips were used for detection of lung edema (expressed as wet/dry weight ratio) and peroxidation (expressed by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, TBARS). In lung and tracheal strips, airway reactivity to acetylcholine was measured. In addition, TBARS and total antioxidant status were determined in the plasma. Meconium instillation induced polymorphonuclear-derived inflammation and oxidative stress. N-acetylcysteine improved oxygenation, reduced lung edema, decreased polymorphonuclears in BAL fluid, and diminished peroxidation and meconium-induced airway hyperreactivity compared with untreated animals. In conclusion, N-acetylcysteine effectively improved lung functions in an animal model of MAS.

  13. Lung xenotransplantation: recent progress and current status.

    PubMed

    Harris, Donald G; Quinn, Kevin J; Dahi, Siamak; Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Pierson, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    Xenotransplantation has undergone important progress in controlling initial hyperacute rejection in many preclinical models, with some cell, tissue, and organ xenografts advancing toward clinical trials. However, acute injury, driven primarily by innate immune and inflammatory responses, continues to limit results in lung xenograft models. The purpose of this article is to review the current status of lung xenotransplantation--including the seemingly unique challenges posed by this organ-and summarize proven and emerging means of overcoming acute lung xenograft injury.

  14. Biomarkers and Autoantibodies of Interstitial Lung Disease with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Yoshifuji, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Various autoantibodies are seen in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Among myositis-specific antibodies, anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and anti-melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5) antibodies are associated with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Anti-MDA5 antibodies are associated with dermatomyositis (DM) or clinically amyopathic DM complicated with rapidly progressive ILD. In anti-MDA5-positive patients, a random ground-glass attenuation pattern is a characteristic finding of ILD in chest high-resolution computed tomography. Conversely, anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase antibodies are not associated with rapidly progressive ILD but with chronic ILD. DM or clinically amyopathic DM patients with anti-MDA5, and characteristic high-resolution computed tomography findings are highly likely to have devastating ILD and need aggressive treatment. PMID:27081322

  15. Additive anti-inflammatory effect of formoterol and budesonide on human lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Spoelstra, F; Postma, D; Hovenga, H; Noordhoek, J; Kauffman, H

    2002-01-01

    Background: It has been shown that treatment with a long acting ß2 agonist in addition to a glucocorticoid is beneficial in the treatment of asthma. In asthma inflammatory cells, particularly eosinophils, migrate into the pulmonary tissue and airway lumen by means of adhesion molecules expressed on resident tissue cells—that is, fibroblasts—and become activated by cytokines and adhesive interactions. A study was undertaken to determine whether an interaction exists between the long acting ß2 agonist formoterol and the glucocorticoid budesonide on inhibition of adhesion molecule expression, as well as chemo/cytokine production by human lung fibroblasts. Methods: Lung fibroblasts were preincubated with therapeutically relevant drug concentrations of 10-8 M to 10-10 M. Cells were stimulated with interleukin (IL)-1ß (1 or 10 U/ml) for 8 hours and supernatants were collected for measurement of GM-CSF and IL-8 concentrations. The cells were fixed and subjected to a cell surface ELISA technique to measure the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Results: Formoterol exerted an additive effect on the inhibition of IL-1ß stimulated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 upregulation and GM-CSF production by budesonide in concentrations of 10-9 M and above (p<0.05). IL-8 production was not influenced by formoterol. Conclusion: Formoterol exerts an additive effect on the anti-inflammatory properties of budesonide. In vitro data support the finding that the combination of budesonide and formoterol in asthma treatment strengthens the beneficial effect of either drug alone. PMID:11867828

  16. Carbon fullerenes (C60s) can induce inflammatory responses in the lung of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hero; Kim, Younghun; Yi, Jongheop; Choi, Kyunghee; Park, Kwangsik

    2010-04-15

    Fullerenes (C60s) occur in the environment due to natural and anthropogenic sources such as volcanic eruptions, forest fires, and the combustion of carbon-based materials. Recently, production and application of engineered C60s have also rapidly increased in diverse industrial fields and biomedicine due to C60' unique physico-chemical properties, so toxicity assessment on environmental and human health is being evaluated as a valuable work. However, data related to the toxicity of C60s have not been abundant up to now. In this study, we studied the immunotoxic mechanism and change of gene expression caused by the instillation of C60s. As a result, C60s induced an increase in sub G1 and G1 arrest in BAL cells, an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, TNF-alpha, and IL-6, and an increase of Th1 cytokines such as IL-12 and IFN-r in BAL fluid. In addition, IgE reached the maximum at 1 day after treatment in both BAL fluid and the blood, and decreased in a time-dependent manner. Gene expression of the MHC class II (H2-Eb1) molecule was stronger than that of the MHC class I (H2-T23), and an increase in T cell distribution was also observed during the experiment period. Furthermore, cell infiltration and expression of tissue damage related genes in lung tissue were constantly observed during the experiment period. Based on this, C60s may induce inflammatory responses in the lung of mice.

  17. Luteolin protects mice from severe acute pancreatitis by exerting HO-1-mediated anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Wang, Kezhou; Yuan, Chunxiao; Xing, Rong; Ni, Jianbo; Hu, Guoyong; Chen, Fengling; Wang, Xingpeng

    2017-01-01

    Reseda odorata L. has long been used in traditional Asian medicine for the treatment of diseases associated with oxidative injury and acute inflammation, such as endotoxemia, acute lung injury, acute myocardial infarction and hepatitis. Luteolin, the main component of Reseda odorata L., which is also widely found in many natural herbs and vege tables, has been shown to induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression to exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of luteolin on mice with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Cerulein and lipopolysaccharide were used to induce SAP in male Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice in the SAP group. The SAP group was divided into 4 subgroups, as follows: the vehicle, luteolin, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) only, and luteolin (Lut) + ZnPP (luteolin plus zinc protoporphyrin treatment) groups. The wet/dry weight ratios, hematoxylin and eosin staining and pathological scores of pancreatic tissues were assessed and compared to those of the control mice. Amylase, lipase, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and myeloperoxidase activities, and malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and HO-1 levels, as well as the expression of HO-1 were determined in serum and/or pancreatic tissue samples. SAP was successfully induced in male mice compared to normal control mice. The wet/dry weight ratios, pathological scores, and amylase and lipase activity, as well as the levels of TNFα and IL-6 were significantly reduced in the pancreatic tissues of the mice in the Lut group compared with those of the mice in the vehicle group. The Lut group exhibited a significant increase in HO-1 expression in the pancreas and enhanced serum HO-1 and IL-10 levels compared with the vehicle group. The suppression of HO-1 activity in the ZnPP group significantly abolished the protective effects of luteolin. NF-κB expression in the pancreatic tissues

  18. Inflammatory response to isocyanates and onset of genomic instability in cultured human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mishra, P K; Bhargava, A; Raghuram, G V; Gupta, S; Tiwari, S; Upadhyaya, R; Jain, S K; Maudar, K K

    2009-02-10

    Lungs comprise the primary organ exposed to environmental toxic chemicals, resulting in diverse respiratory ailments and other disorders, including carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage phenomenon, which involves a series of genetic alterations that begin with genomic instability provoked by certain factors such as inflammation and DNA damage and end with the development of cancer. Isocyanates such as methyl isocyanate are the chief metabolic intermediates in many industrial settings with diverse applications; exposure to them can lead to severe hypersensitive, mutagenic and genotoxic alterations. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying isocyanate-mediated inflammatory responses and their probable role in the onset of genomic instability in cultured IMR-90 human lung fibroblasts. The isocyanates induced inflammation, resulting in extensive DNA damage, evidenced by increases in ATM, ATR, gammaH2AX, and p53 expression levels. The apoptotic index also increased. Chromosomal anomalies in treated cells included over-expression of centrosome protein and variable amplification of inter-simple sequence repeats, further demonstrating isocyanate-induced genomic instability. This information could be useful in the design of new approaches for risk assessment of potential industrial disasters.

  19. MATRILYSIN PARTICIPATES IN THE ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY OIL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ROLE OF MATRILYSIN IN THE ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY OIL COMBUSTION PARTICLES.

    K L Dreher1, WY Su2 and C L Wilson3. 1US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC; 2Duke University, Durham, NC;3Washington University, St. Louis, MO.

    Mechanisms by ...

  20. Mechanism of Tissue Remodeling in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    acute lung injury have been identified (e.g., infection, trauma ), little is known about the factors that control the tissue remodeling response. This...in fibroblasts. This suggests that the main player in this process is acetaldehyde . To test this, we exposed cells to acetaldehyde and found that this

  1. ROLE OF CELL SIGNALING IN PROTECTION FROM DIESEL AND LPS INDUCED ACUTE LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously demonstrated in CD-1 mice that pre-administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor (SB203580) reduces acute lung injury and inflammation following pulmonary exposures to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here ...

  2. Praeruptorin D and E attenuate lipopolysaccharide/hydrochloric acid induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng-Jiu; Li, Jing-Rong; Zhu, Zheng-Guang; Kong, Huan-Yu; Jin, Hong; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Tian, Yuan-Xin; Li, Zhong-Huang; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Jia-Jie; Wu, Shu-Guang

    2013-06-15

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening syndrome characterized by overwhelming lung inflammation and increased microvascular permeability, which causes a high mortality rate worldwide. The dry root of Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn has been long used to treat respiratory diseases in China. In the present study, Praeruptorin A, C, D and E (PA, PC, PD and PE), four pyranocoumarins extracted from this herb, have been investigated for the pharmacological effects in experimental lung injury mouse models. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged mice, PA and PC did not show protective effect against lung injury at the dose of 80 mg/kg. However, PD and PE significantly inhibited the infiltration of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at the same dose. There was no statistically significant difference between PD and PE group. Further study demonstrated that PD and PE suppressed protein extravasations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, attenuated myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the pathological changes in the lung. Both PD and PE suppressed LPS induced Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway activation in the lung by decreasing the cytoplasmic loss of Inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α) protein and inhibiting the translocation of p65 from cytoplasm to nucleus. We also extended our study to acid-induced acute lung injury and found that these two compounds protected mice from hydrochloric acid (HCl)-induced lung injury by inhibiting PMNs influx, IL-6 release and protein exudation. Taken together, these results suggested that PD and PE might be useful in the therapy of lung injury.

  3. Spred-2 Deficiency Exacerbates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Ito, Toshihiro; Fushimi, Soichiro; Takahashi, Sakuma; Itakura, Junya; Kimura, Ryojiro; Sato, Miwa; Mino, Megumi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Matsukawa, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe and life-threatening acute lung injury (ALI) that is caused by noxious stimuli and pathogens. ALI is characterized by marked acute inflammation with elevated alveolar cytokine levels. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are involved in cytokine production, but the mechanisms that regulate these pathways remain poorly characterized. Here, we focused on the role of Sprouty-related EVH1-domain-containing protein (Spred)-2, a negative regulator of the Ras-Raf-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-MAPK pathway, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung inflammation. Methods Wild-type (WT) mice and Spred-2−/− mice were exposed to intratracheal LPS (50 µg in 50 µL PBS) to induce pulmonary inflammation. After LPS-injection, the lungs were harvested to assess leukocyte infiltration, cytokine and chemokine production, ERK-MAPK activation and immunopathology. For ex vivo experiments, alveolar macrophages were harvested from untreated WT and Spred-2−/− mice and stimulated with LPS. In in vitro experiments, specific knock down of Spred-2 by siRNA or overexpression of Spred-2 by transfection with a plasmid encoding the Spred-2 sense sequence was introduced into murine RAW264.7 macrophage cells or MLE-12 lung epithelial cells. Results LPS-induced acute lung inflammation was significantly exacerbated in Spred-2−/− mice compared with WT mice, as indicated by the numbers of infiltrating leukocytes, levels of alveolar TNF-α, CXCL2 and CCL2 in a later phase, and lung pathology. U0126, a selective MEK/ERK inhibitor, reduced the augmented LPS-induced inflammation in Spred-2−/− mice. Specific knock down of Spred-2 augmented LPS-induced cytokine and chemokine responses in RAW264.7 cells and MLE-12 cells, whereas Spred-2 overexpression decreased this response in RAW264.7 cells. Conclusions The ERK-MAPK pathway is involved in LPS-induced acute lung inflammation. Spred-2 controls the

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of Justicia prostrata gamble in acute and sub-acute models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sanmugapriya, E; Shanmugasundaram, P; Venkataraman, S

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the aqueous (AQJP) and alcoholic (ALJP) extracts of the whole plant of Justicia prostrata Gamble (Acanthaceae) were screened for their acute and subacute anti-inflammatory activities using carrageenan-induced acute inflammation and cotton-pellet-induced granuloma (subacute inflammation), respectively, in rats. In the carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema model, both extracts were found to exhibit maximum reduction in paw volume at the first hour in a dose-dependent manner. At the dose of 500 mg/kg p.o., both extracts AQJP and ALJP showed maximum inhibition (51.39% and 62.5%, respectively) in rat paw oedema volume at the first hour of carrageenan-induced acute inflammation. In the cotton pellet granuloma assay, AQJP and ALJP at the dose of 500 mg/kg p.o. suppressed the transudative, exudative and proliferative phases of chronic inflammation. These extracts were able to (i) reduce the lipid peroxide content of exudates and liver and (ii) normalize the increased activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases in serum and liver of cotton pellet granulomatous rats. Preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of lignans, triterpenes and phenolic compounds in ALJP, whereas phenolic compounds and glycosides in AQJP. The anti-inflammatory properties of these extracts may possibly be due to the presence of phenolic compounds. The anti-inflammatory effects produced by the extracts at the dose of 500 mg/kg, p.o. was comparable with the reference drug diclofenac sodium (5 mg/kg p.o.).

  5. SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN THE BRAIN AND LUNG LEADS TO DIFFERENTIAL TYPE I INTERFERON SIGNALING DURING ACUTE INFECTION*

    PubMed Central

    Alammar, Luna; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E.

    2011-01-01

    Using an accelerated and consistent simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) pigtailed macaque model of HIV associated neurological disorders, we have demonstrated that virus enters the brain during acute infection. However, neurological symptoms do not manifest until late stages of infection, suggesting that immunological mechanisms exist within the central nervous system (CNS) that control viral replication and associated inflammation. We have shown that interferon beta, a type I interferon central to viral innate immunity, is a major cytokine present in the brain during acute infection and is responsible for limiting virus infection and inflammatory cytokine expression. However, the induction and role of interferon alpha in the CNS during acute SIV infection has never been examined in this model. In the classical model of interferon signaling, interferon beta signals through the interferon α/β receptor, leading to expression of interferon alpha. Surprisingly, although interferon beta is up regulated during acute SIV infection, we found that interferon alpha is down regulated. We demonstrate that this down regulation is coupled with a suppression of signaling molecules downstream of the interferon receptor, namely tyk2, STAT1 and IRF7, as indicated by either lack of protein phosphorylation, lack of nuclear accumulation, or transcriptional and/or translational repression. In contrast to brain, interferon alpha is up regulated in lung and accompanied by activation of tyk2 and STAT1. These data provide a novel observation that during acute SIV infection in the brain there is differential signaling through the interferon α/β receptor that fails to activate expression of interferon alpha in the brain. PMID:21368232

  6. Inflammatory and Antioxidant Pattern Unbalance in “Clopidogrel-Resistant” Patients during Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Anna Maria; Cecchettini, Antonella; Parodi, Guido; Marcucci, Rossella; Parolini, Marina; Romagnuolo, Ilaria; Citti, Lorenzo; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. In acute coronary syndrome (ACS), inflammation and redox response are associated with increased residual platelet reactivity (RPR) on clopidogrel therapy. We investigated whether clopidogrel interaction affects platelet function and modulates factors related to inflammation and oxidation in ACS patients differently responding to clopidogrel. Material and Methods. Platelet aggregation was measured in 29 ACS patients on dual (aspirin/clopidogrel) antiplatelet therapy. Nonresponders (NR) were defined as RPR ≥70% by ADP. Several inflammatory and redox parameters were assayed and platelet proteome was determined. Results. Eight (28%) out of 29 ACS patients resulted NR to clopidogrel. At 24 hours, the levels of Th2-type cytokines IL-4, IFNγ, and MCP-1 were higher in NR, while blood GSH (r-GSHbl) levels were lower in NR than responders (R). Proteomic analysis evidenced an upregulated level of platelet adhesion molecule, CD226, and a downregulation of the antioxidant peroxiredoxin-4. In R patients the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 decreased, while the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-1Ra increased. Conclusions. In patients with high RPR on clopidogrel therapy, an unbalance of inflammatory factors, platelet adhesion molecules, and circulatory and platelet antioxidant molecules was observed during the acute phase. Proinflammatory milieu persists in nonresponders for a long time after the acute event while antioxidant blood factors tend to conform to normal responsiveness. PMID:25873769

  7. Carbon dioxide is largely responsible for the acute inflammatory effects of tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Laurent; Guais, Adeline; Chaumet-Riffaud, Philippe; Grévillot, Georges; Sasco, Annie J; Molina, Thierry Jo; Mohammad, Abolhassani

    2010-06-01

    Tobacco smoking is responsible for a vast array of diseases, particularly chronic bronchitis and lung cancer. It is still unclear which constituent(s) of the smoke is responsible for its toxicity. The authors decided to focus on carbon dioxide, since its level of concentration in mainstream cigarette smoke is about 200 times higher than in the atmosphere. The authors previously demonstrated that inhalation of carbon dioxide concentrations above 5% has a deleterious effect on lungs. In this study, the authors assessed the inflammatory potential of carbon dioxide contained in cigarette smoke. Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke containing a high or reduced CO(2) level by filtration through a potassium hydroxyde solution. The inflammatory response was evaluated by histological analysis, protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A) and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion measurements. The data show that the toxicity of cigarette smoke may be largely due to its high level of CO(2). Pulmonary injuries consequent to tobacco smoke inhalation observed by histology were greatly diminished when CO(2) was removed. Cigarette smoke exposure causes an inflammatory response characterized by PP2A and NF-kappaB activation followed by proinflammatory cytokine secretion. This inflammatory response was reduced when the cigarette smoke was filtered through a potassium hydroxide column, and reestablished when CO(2) was injected downstream from the filtration column.Given that there is an extensive literature linking a chronic inflammatory response to the major smoking-related diseases, these data suggest that carbon dioxide may play a key role in the causation of these diseases by tobacco smoking.

  8. Differential anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of dexamethasone and N-acetylcysteine in endotoxin-induced lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rocksén, D; Lilliehöök, B; Larsson, R; Johansson, T; Bucht, A

    2000-01-01

    Inhalation of bacterial endotoxin induces an acute inflammation in the lower respiratory tract. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the glucocorticoid dexamethasone were investigated in mice exposed to aerosolized endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)). Powerful reduction of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained by a single i.p. injection of dexamethasone (10 mg/kg), whereas treatment with NAC only resulted in reduction of neutrophils when administered at a high dose (500 mg/kg). Measurement of cytokine and chemokine expression in lung tissue revealed a significant decrease of tumour necrosis factor-alpha, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, and MIP-1α mRNA when mice where treated with dexamethasone but not when treated with NAC. Analysis of oxidative burst demonstrated a remarkable reduction of oxygen radicals in BALF neutrophils after treatment with dexamethasone, whereas the effect of NAC was not significantly different from that in untreated animals. In conclusion, dexamethasone exerted both anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects in acute airway inflammation, probably by blocking early events in the inflammatory cascade. In contrast, treatment with NAC resulted in a weak reduction of the inflammatory response but no inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines or reduction of oxidative burst in neutrophils. These results demonstrate dramatic differences in efficiency and also indicate that the two drugs have different actions. Combined treatment with NAC and dexamethasone revealed an additive action but no synergy was observed. PMID:11091282

  9. Acute inflammatory response secondary to intrapleural administration of two types of talc.

    PubMed

    Rossi, V F; Vargas, F S; Marchi, E; Acencio, M M P; Genofre, E H; Capelozzi, V L; Antonangelo, L

    2010-02-01

    Intrapleural instillation of talc has been used in the treatment of recurrent pleural effusions but can, in rare instances, result in respiratory failure. Side-effects seem to be related to composition, size and inflammatory power of talc particles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory response to intrapleural injection of talc containing small particles (ST) or talc containing particles of mixed size (MT). 100 rabbits received intrapleural talc, 50 with ST (median 6.41 mum) and 50 with MT (median 21.15 mum); the control group was composed of 35 rabbits. Cells, lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor were evaluated in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage at 6, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. Lung histology and the presence of talc were also analysed. Statistics were performed using ANOVA and an unpaired t-test. Most of the parameters showed greater levels in the animals injected with talc than in the controls, suggesting a systemic and pulmonary response. Higher serum levels of CRP and IL-8 were observed in the animals injected with ST. Talc particles were observed in both lungs with no differences between groups. Lung cell infiltrate was more evident in the ST group. In conclusion, talc with larger particles should be the preferred choice in clinical practice in order to induce safer pleurodesis.

  10. Short women with severe sepsis-related acute lung injury receive lung protective ventilation less frequently: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lung protective ventilation (LPV) has been shown to improve survival and the duration of mechanical ventilation in acute lung injury (ALI) patients. Mortality of ALI may vary by gender, which could result from treatment variability. Whether gender is associated with the use of LPV is not known. Methods A total of 421 severe sepsis-related ALI subjects in the Consortium to Evaluate Lung Edema Genetics from seven teaching hospitals between 2002 and 2008 were included in our study. We evaluated patients' tidal volume, plateau pressure and arterial pH to determine whether patients received LPV during the first two days after developing ALI. The odds ratio of receiving LPV was estimated by a logistic regression model with robust and cluster options. Results Women had similar characteristics as men with the exception of lower height and higher illness severity, as measured by Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score. 225 (53%) of the subjects received LPV during the first two days after ALI onset; women received LPV less frequently than men (46% versus 59%, P < 0.001). However, after adjustment for height and severity of illness (APACHE II), there was no difference in exposure to LPV between men and women (P = 0.262). Conclusions Short people are less likely to receive LPV, which seems to explain the tendency of clinicians to adhere to LPV less strictly in women. Strategies to standardize application of LPV, independent of differences in height and severity of illness, are necessary. PMID:22044724

  11. Pediatric Artificial Lung: A Low-Resistance Pumpless Artificial Lung Alleviates an Acute Lamb Model of Increased Right Ventricle Afterload.

    PubMed

    Alghanem, Fares; Bryner, Benjamin S; Jahangir, Emilia M; Fernando, Uditha P; Trahanas, John M; Hoffman, Hayley R; Bartlett, Robert H; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Hirschl, Ronald B

    Lung disease in children often results in pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure. The availability of a pediatric artificial lung (PAL) would open new approaches to the management of these conditions by bridging to recovery in acute disease or transplantation in chronic disease. This study investigates the efficacy of a novel PAL in alleviating an animal model of pulmonary hypertension and increased right ventricle afterload. Five juvenile lambs (20-30 kg) underwent PAL implantation in a pulmonary artery to left atrium configuration. Induction of disease involved temporary, reversible occlusion of the right main pulmonary artery. Hemodynamics, pulmonary vascular input impedance, and right ventricle efficiency were measured under 1) baseline, 2) disease, and 3) disease + PAL conditions. The disease model altered hemodynamics variables in a manner consistent with pulmonary hypertension. Subsequent PAL attachment improved pulmonary artery pressure (p = 0.018), cardiac output (p = 0.050), pulmonary vascular input impedance (Z.0 p = 0.028; Z.1 p = 0.058), and right ventricle efficiency (p = 0.001). The PAL averaged resistance of 2.3 ± 0.8 mm Hg/L/min and blood flow of 1.3 ± 0.6 L/min. This novel low-resistance PAL can alleviate pulmonary hypertension in an acute animal model and demonstrates potential for use as a bridge to lung recovery or transplantation in pediatric patients with significant pulmonary hypertension refractory to medical therapies.

  12. Effects of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 in murine acute lung injury models.

    PubMed

    Üstün, Sevdican; Lassnig, Caroline; Preitschopf, Andrea; Mikula, Mario; Müller, Mathias; Hengstschläger, Markus; Weichhart, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key signaling kinase associated with a variety of cellular functions including the regulation of immunological and inflammatory responses. Classic mTOR inhibitors such as rapamycin or everolimus are commonly used in transplant as well as cancer patients to prevent transplant rejection or cancer progression, respectively. Noninfectious drug-induced pneumonitis is a frequent side effect in mTOR-inhibitor-treated patients. Therefore, we tested the effects of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and the novel dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 in a murine lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury model. C57BL/6 mice were treated with either everolimus or NVP-BEZ235 on two consecutive days prior to intratracheal administration of LPS. LPS administration induced a significant increase in total cell, neutrophil and erythrocyte numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Histological examination revealed a serious lung injury as shown by interstitial edema, vascular congestion and mononuclear cell infiltration in these mice after 24h. Everolimus as well as NVP-BEZ235 did not noticeably affect overall histopathology of the lungs in the lung injury model. However, NVP-BEZ235 enhanced IL-6 and TNF-α expression after 24h. In contrast, everolimus did not affect IL-6 and TNF-α levels. Interestingly, both inhibitors reduced inflammatory cytokines in an LPS/oleic acid-induced lung injury model. In conclusion, the mTOR inhibitors did not worsen the overall histopathological severity, but they exerted distinct effects on proinflammatory cytokine expression in the lung depending on the lung injury model applied.

  13. Kinetics and Role of Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression in Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Albert T.; Barrett, Christopher D.; DeBusk, M. George; Ellson, Christian D.; Gautam, Shiva; Talmor, Daniel S.; Gallagher, Diana C.; Yaffe, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Primed neutrophils that are capable of releasing matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) into the circulation are thought to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that direct measurement of plasma MMP-9 activity may be a predictor of incipient tissue damage and subsequent lung injury, which was investigated in both an animal model of ARDS and a small cohort of 38 critically ill human patients. In a mouse model of ARDS involving instillation of intratracheal LPS to induce lung inflammation, we measured neutrophil-mediated inflammation, along with MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue and MMP-9 expression in the plasma. Neutrophil recruitment, inflammation, and MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue increased throughout the 72 hours after LPS instillation, while plasma MMP-9 expression was greatest at 12–24 hours after LPS instillation. The results suggest that the peak in plasma MMP-9 activity may precede the peak of neutrophil inflammation in the airways and lung tissue in the setting of ARDS. Based on this animal study, a retrospective observational cohort study involving 38 patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) at a tertiary care university hospital with acute respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation was conducted. Plasma samples were collected daily, and MMP-9 activity was compared with lung function as determined by the PaO2/FiO2 ratio. In patients that developed ARDS, a notable increase in plasma MMP-9 activity on a particular day correlated with a decrease in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio on the following day (r = −0.503, p < 0.006). Taken together, these results suggest that plasma MMP-9 activity changes as a surrogate for primed neutrophils may have predictive value for the development of ARDS in a selected subset of critically ill patients. PMID:26009816

  14. Kinetics and Role of Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression in Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Albert T; Barrett, Christopher D; DeBusk, George M; Ellson, Christian D; Gautam, Shiva; Talmor, Daniel S; Gallagher, Diana C; Yaffe, Michael B

    2015-08-01

    Primed neutrophils that are capable of releasing matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) into the circulation are thought to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that direct measurement of plasma MMP-9 activity may be a predictor of incipient tissue damage and subsequent lung injury, which was investigated in both an animal model of ARDS and a small cohort of 38 critically ill human patients. In a mouse model of ARDS involving instillation of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce lung inflammation, we measured neutrophil-mediated inflammation, along with MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue and MMP-9 expression in the plasma. Neutrophil recruitment, inflammation, and MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue increased throughout the 72 h after LPS instillation, whereas plasma MMP-9 expression was greatest at 12 to 24 h after LPS instillation. The results suggest that the peak in plasma MMP-9 activity may precede the peak of neutrophil inflammation in the airways and lung tissue in the setting of ARDS. Based on this animal study, a retrospective observational cohort study involving 38 patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit at a tertiary care university hospital with acute respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation was conducted. Plasma samples were collected daily, and MMP-9 activity was compared with lung function as determined by the PaO2/FiO2 ratio. In patients who developed ARDS, a notable increase in plasma MMP-9 activity on a particular day correlated with a decrease in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio on the following day (r = -0.503, P < 0.006). Taken together, these results suggest that plasma MMP-9 activity changes, as a surrogate for primed neutrophils may have predictive value for the development of ARDS in a selected subset of critically ill patients.

  15. Modifications of lung clearance mechanisms by acute influenza A infection

    SciTech Connect

    Levandowski, R.A.; Gerrity, T.R.; Garrard, C.S.

    1985-10-01

    Four volunteers with naturally acquired, culture-proved influenza A infection inhaled a radiolabeled aerosol to permit investigation of lung mucociliary clearance mechanisms during and after symptomatic illness. Mucus transport in the trachea was undetectable when monitored with an external multidetector probe within 48 hours of the onset of the illness, but was found at a normal velocity by 1 week in three of the four subjects. In two volunteers who coughed 23 to 48 times during the 4.5-hour observation period, whole lung clearance was as fast within the first 48 hours of illness as during health 3 months later in spite of the absence of measurable tracheal mucus transport. Conversely, in spite of the return 1 week later of mucus transport at velocities expected in the trachea, whole lung clearance for the 4.5-hour period was slowed in two volunteers who coughed less than once an hour. The data offer evidence that cough is important in maintaining lung clearance for at least several days after symptomatic influenza A infection when other mechanisms that depend on ciliary function are severely deficient.

  16. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in acute hyperoxic mouse lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Barazzone, C; Belin, D; Piguet, P F; Vassalli, J D; Sappino, A P

    1996-01-01

    Hyperoxia-induced lung disease is associated with prominent intraalveolar fibrin deposition. Fibrin turnover is tightly regulated by the concerted action of proteases and antiproteases, and inhibition of plasmin-mediated proteolysis could account for fibrin accumulation in lung alveoli. We show here that lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia overproduce plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and that PAI-1 upregulation impairs fibrinolytic activity in the alveolar compartment. To explore whether increased PAI-1 production is a causal or only a correlative event for impaired intraalveolar fibrinolysis and the development of hyaline membrane disease, we studied mice genetically deficient in PAI-1. We found that these mice fail to develop intraalveolar fibrin deposits in response to hyperoxia and that they are more resistant to the lethal effects of hyperoxic stress. These observations provide clear and novel evidence for the pathogenic contribution of PAI-1 in the development of hyaline membrane disease. They identify PAI-1 as a major deleterious mediator of hyperoxic lung injury. PMID:8981909

  17. Thick lung wedge resection for acute life-threatening massive hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Tomomi; Ikeda, Akihiko; Konishi, Taisuke; Matsuzaki, Kanji

    2016-01-01

    Massive hemoptysis from an aortobronchial fistula due to thoracic aortic dissection is an extremely rare symptom, but is a potentially life-threatening condition. We report a case of acute massive hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula that was successfully controlled by a simple and rapid thick wedge resection of the lung with hematoma by using the black cartilage stapler. A 65-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute massive hemoptysis. After tracheal intubation, chest computed tomography revealed hematoma in the left lung and ruptured aortic dissection from the distal arch to the descending aorta. He was diagnosed with aortobronchial fistula and underwent an emergency surgery on the same day. We performed posterolateral thoracotomy. A dissecting aortic aneurysm (diameter, ~80 mm) with adhesion of the left upper lobe and the superior segment of the lower lobe was found. The lung parenchyma expanded with the hematoma. We stapled the upper and lower lobes by using the black cartridge stapler along the aortopulmonary window. Massive hemoptysis disappeared, and the complete aortic dissection appeared. Aortic dissection with adherent lung was excised, and graft replacement of the distal arch and descending thoracic aorta was performed. Proximal lung wedge resection using black cartridge stapler is a simple and quick method to control massive hemoptysis from aortic dissection; hence, this procedure is an effective option to control massive hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula. This technique could rapidly stop massive hemoptysis and prevent dissection of the adherent lung tissue and intra-thoracic bleeding. PMID:27747035

  18. Volume Exercise in Older Athletes Influences Inflammatory and Redox Responses to Acute Exercise.

    PubMed

    Estrela, Andre L; Zaparte, Aline; da Silva, Jefferson D; Moreira, José C; Turner, James E; Bauer, Moisés E

    2017-02-09

    To examine whether the volume of previous exercise training in older athletes influences inflammatory, redox and hormonal profiles, forty trained marathon runners were divided into higher-volume (HVG, ~480 min/week) and lower-volume groups (LVG, ~240 min/week). Plasma inflammatory proteins, redox biomarkers and salivary testosterone and cortisol, were assessed at rest and following two maximal acute exercise bouts. At rest, the LVG exhibited higher CRP, higher protein carbonyls and lower SOD activity compared to the HVG (p's<0.05). In response to exercise, TNF- declined similarly in both groups whereas CRP increased differentially (+60% LVG; +24% HVG; p's<0.05). Protein carbonyls decreased and thiols increased similarly in both groups, but SOD declined differentially between groups (-14% LVG; -20% HVG; p's<0.05). Salivary testosterone decreased similarly in both groups, whereas cortisol did not change. Higher-volume of training is associated with favorable inflammatory and redox profiles at rest, perhaps mediated by small inflammatory responses to acute exercise.

  19. Novel Polymorphisms in the Myosin Light Chain Kinase Gene Confer Risk for Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Grant, Audrey; Halder, Indrani; Brower, Roy; Sevransky, Jonathan; Maloney, James P.; Moss, Marc; Shanholtz, Carl; Yates, Charles R.; Meduri, Gianfranco Umberto; Shriver, Mark D.; Ingersoll, Roxann; Scott, Alan F.; Beaty, Terri H.; Moitra, Jaideep; Ma, Shwu Fan; Ye, Shui Q.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2006-01-01

    The genetic basis of acute lung injury (ALI) is poorly understood. The myosin light chain kinase (MYLK) gene encodes the nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase isoform, a multifunctional protein involved in the inflammatory response (apoptosis, vascular permeability, leukocyte diapedesis). To examine MYLK as a novel candidate gene in sepsis-associated ALI, we sequenced exons, exon–intron boundaries, and 2 kb of 5′ UTR of the MYLK, which revealed 51 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Potential association of 28 MYLK SNPs with sepsis-associated ALI were evaluated in a case-control sample of 288 European American subjects (EAs) with sepsis alone, subjects with sepsis-associated ALI, or healthy control subjects, and a sample population of 158 African American subjects (AAs) with sepsis and ALI. Significant single locus associations in EAs were observed between four MYLK SNPs and the sepsis phenotype (P < 0.001), with an additional SNP associated with the ALI phenotype (P = 0.03). A significant association of a single SNP (identical to the SNP identified in EAs) was observed in AAs with sepsis (P = 0.002) and with ALI (P = 0.01). Three sepsis risk-conferring haplotypes in EAs were defined downstream of start codon of smooth muscle MYLK isoform, a region containing putative regulatory elements (P < 0.001). In contrast, multiple haplotypic analyses revealed an ALI-specific, risk-conferring haplotype at 5′ of the MYLK gene in both European and African Americans and an additional 3′ region haplotype only in African Americans. These data strongly implicate MYLK genetic variants to confer increased risk of sepsis and sepsis-associated ALI. PMID:16399953

  20. Noninvasive assessment for acute allograft rejection in a rat lung transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hiroaki; Zhao, Xiangdong; Chen, Fengshi; Fujinaga, Takuji; Shoji, Tsuyoshi; Bando, Toru; Wada, Hiromi; Date, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract After lung transplantation, early detection of acute allograft rejection is important not only for timely and optimal treatment, but also for the prediction of chronic rejection which is a major cause of late death. Many biological and immunological approaches have been developed to detect acute rejection; however, it is not well known whether lung mechanics correlate with disease severity, especially with pathological rejection grade. In this study, we examined the relationship between lung mechanics and rejection grade development in a rat acute rejection model using the forced oscillation technique, which provides noninvasive assessment of lung function. To this end, we assessed lung resistance and elastance (RL and EL) from implanted left lung of these animals. The perivascular/interstitial component of rejection severity grade (A‐grade) was also quantified from histological images using tissue fraction (TF; tissue + cell infiltration area/total area). We found that TF, RL, and EL increased according to A‐grade. There was a strong positive correlation between EL at the lowest frequency (Elow; EL at 0.5 Hz) and TF (r2 = 0.930). Furthermore, the absolute difference between maximum value of EL (Emax) and Elow (Ehet; Emax − Elow) showed the strong relationship with standard deviation of TF (r2 = 0.709), and A‐grade (Spearman's correlation coefficients; rs = 0.964, P < 0.0001). Our results suggest that the dynamic elastance as well as its frequency dependence have the ability to predict A‐grade. These indexes should prove useful for noninvasive detection and monitoring the progression of disease in acute rejection. PMID:25524280

  1. Lung inflammatory and oxidative alterations after exogenous surfactant therapy fortified with budesonide in rabbit model of meconium aspiration syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincová, J; Košútová, P; Čierny, D; Čalkovská, A; Mokrá, D

    2016-12-22

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) triggers inflammatory and oxidative pathways which can inactivate both pulmonary surfactant and therapeutically given exogenous surfactant. Glucocorticoid budesonide added to exogenous surfactant can inhibit inflammation and thereby enhance treatment efficacy. Neonatal meconium (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg) was administered intratracheally (i.t.) to rabbits. When the MAS model was prepared, animals were treated with budesonide i.t. (Pulmicort, 0.25 mg/kg, M+B); with surfactant lung lavage (Curosurf®, 10 ml/kg, 5 mg phospholipids/ml, M+S) followed by undiluted Curosurf® i.t. (100 mg phospholipids/kg); with combination of budesonide and surfactant (M+S+B); or were untreated (M); or served as controls with saline i.t. instead of meconium (C). Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 h. Cell counts in the blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), lung edema formation (wet/dry weight ratio), oxidative damage of lipids/ proteins and inflammatory expression profiles (IL-2, IL-6, IL-13, TNF-alpha) in the lung homogenate and plasma were determined. Combined surfactant+budesonide therapy was the most effective in reduction of neutrophil counts in BAL, oxidative damage, levels and mRNA expression of cytokines in the lung, and lung edema formation compared to untreated animals. Curosurf fortified with budesonide mitigated lung inflammation and oxidative modifications what indicate the perspectives of this treatment combination for MAS therapy.

  2. Akt2 deficiency protects from acute lung injury via alternative macrophage activation and miR-146a induction in mice.

    PubMed

    Vergadi, Eleni; Vaporidi, Katerina; Theodorakis, Emmanuel E; Doxaki, Christina; Lagoudaki, Eleni; Ieronymaki, Eleftheria; Alexaki, Vassilia I; Helms, Mike; Kondili, Eumorfia; Soennichsen, Birte; Stathopoulos, Efstathios N; Margioris, Andrew N; Georgopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsatsanis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of respiratory failure, with limited effective treatments available. Alveolar macrophages participate in the pathogenesis of ARDS. To investigate the role of macrophage activation in aseptic lung injury and identify molecular mediators with therapeutic potential, lung injury was induced in wild-type (WT) and Akt2(-/-) mice by hydrochloric acid aspiration. Acid-induced lung injury in WT mice was characterized by decreased lung compliance and increased protein and cytokine concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Alveolar macrophages acquired a classical activation (M1) phenotype. Acid-induced lung injury was less severe in Akt2(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. Alveolar macrophages from acid-injured Akt2(-/-) mice demonstrated the alternative activation phenotype (M2). Although M2 polarization suppressed aseptic lung injury, it resulted in increased lung bacterial load when Akt2(-/-) mice were infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. miR-146a, an anti-inflammatory microRNA targeting TLR4 signaling, was induced during the late phase of lung injury in WT mice, whereas it was increased early in Akt2(-/-) mice. Indeed, miR-146a overexpression in WT macrophages suppressed LPS-induced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and promoted M2 polarization, whereas miR-146a inhibition in Akt2(-/-) macrophages restored iNOS expression. Furthermore, miR-146a delivery or Akt2 silencing in WT mice exposed to acid resulted in suppression of iNOS in alveolar macrophages. In conclusion, Akt2 suppression and miR-146a induction promote the M2 macrophage phenotype, resulting in amelioration of acid-induced lung injury. In vivo modulation of macrophage phenotype through Akt2 or miR-146a could provide a potential therapeutic approach for aseptic ARDS; however, it may be deleterious in septic ARDS because of impaired bacterial clearance.

  3. Protective effect of Xuebijing injection against acute lung injury induced by left ventricular ischemia/reperfusion in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    JI, MINGLI; WANG, YUXIA; WANG, LEI; CHEN, LIPING; LI, JING

    2016-01-01

    Xuebijing (XBJ) is a Chinese herbal preparation. Previous studies have demonstrated that XBJ injection is able to inhibit the uncontrolled release of endogenous inflammatory mediators, attenuate inflammation, and alleviate organ damage. However, there are no relevant reports on the protective effect of XBJ against left ventricular ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of XBJ on ALI induced by left ventricular I/R, and provide evidence for the clinical application of XBJ. In the present study, 120 healthy rabbits of mixed gender were randomly assigned to a normal control group, ischemia group, I/R group (I/RG) and XBJ-injection treatment group (TG). In addition, each group was further divided into three subgroups (n=10/subgroup), namely, 30 min pre-ischemia, 30 min post-ischemia and 30 min post-reperfusion subgroups. Blood samples (5 ml) were collected from the jugularis externa and carotis communis of the rabbits at the three time points, and a blood gas analyzer was used to measure the arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and carbon dioxide (PaCO2). Following sacrifice, the lungs of the rabbits were removed and a bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was immediately performed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the BAL fluid (BALF) and peripheral blood. In addition, the lower lobe of the right lung was removed in order to measure the protein expression levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and TNF-α. The results demonstrated that in the rabbits of the TG PaO2 was increased, PaCO2 was decreased, the lung tissue congestion edema was attenuated, the expression levels of TNF-α in the peripheral blood and BALF were reduced and the protein expression levels of ICAM-1 and TNF-α in the lung tissue samples were decreased, as compared with those in the I/RG rabbits. These

  4. Acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in hantavirus and hepatitis B virus coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jong Youb; Lim, Young-Ho; Choi, Eun-Hi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired autoimmune disorder with progressive weakness. Acute-onset CIDP resembles Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a rapidly progressive disorder, and follows a chronic course. To our knowledge, no case of acute-onset CIDP in hantavirus and hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection has been reported previously. Clinical findings: We report a case of acute-onset CIDP that was initially diagnosed as GBS. Diagnoses: A 44-year-old male logger complained of acute quadriplegia and dyspnea. Mechanical ventilation was initiated. He was an HBV carrier with mild elevation of hepatic enzyme, and positive for hantavirus antibody. He was diagnosed with GBS and immunoglobulin therapy was administered. Interventions: After 8 months, quadriplegia and hypesthesia recurred. Immunoglobulin therapy at this time had no effect, but steroid therapy had some effect. Outcomes: A diagnosis of CIDP was made. After 2 months, severe extremity pain and dyspnea developed again, and steroid pulse therapy was initiated. Conclusion: Besides GBS, acute-onset CIDP can occur with hantavirus and HBV coinfection. Patients with this coinfection in whom GBS has been initially diagnosed should be followed up for a long time, because of the possibility of relapse or deterioration, and acute-onset CIDP should always be considered. PMID:27930572

  5. High-fat diet induces lung remodeling in ApoE-deficient mice: an association with an increase in circulatory and lung inflammatory factors.

    PubMed

    Naura, Amarjit S; Hans, Chetan P; Zerfaoui, Mourad; Errami, Youssef; Ju, Jihang; Kim, Hogyoung; Matrougui, Khalid; Kim, Jong G; Boulares, A Hamid

    2009-11-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is increasingly considered the basis for not only cardiovascular pathologies but also several complications affecting other organs such as lungs. In this study, we examined the effect of hypercholesterolemia on lung integrity using a mouse model (ApoE(-/-)) of high-fat (HF) diet-induced atherosclerosis. A 12-week HF diet regimen induced systemic production of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, GMC-SF, RANTES, IL-1alpha, IL-2 and IL-12 with TNF-alpha as the predominant cytokine in ApoE(-/-) mice. Concomitantly, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and MIP-1alpha were detected in brochoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids of these mice, coinciding with lung inflammation consisting primarily of monocytes/macrophages. Such lung inflammation correlated with marked collagen deposition and an increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in ApoE(-/-)mice without mucus production. Although TGF-beta1 was undetectable in the BAL fluid of ApoE(-/-) mice on HF diet, it showed a much wider tissue distribution compared with that of control animals. Direct exposure of smooth muscle cells to oxidized-LDL, in vitro, induced a time-dependent expression of TNF-alpha. Direct intratracheal TNF-alpha-administration induced a lung inflammation pattern in wild-type mice that was strikingly similar to that induced by HF diet in ApoE(-/-) mice. TNF-alpha administration induced expression of several factors known to be critically involved in lung remodeling, such as MCP-1, IL-1beta, TGF-beta1, adhesion molecules, collagen type-I and TNF-alpha itself in the lungs of treated mice. These results suggest that hypercholesterolemia may promote chronic inflammatory conditions in lungs that are conducive to lung remodeling potentially through TNF-alpha-mediated processes.

  6. Parecoxib Reduces Systemic Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury in Burned Animals with Delayed Fluid Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Si Jack; Wu, Jian; Lu, Jia; Moochhala, Shabbir M.

    2014-01-01

    Burn injuries result in the release of proinflammatory mediators causing both local and systemic inflammation. Multiple organ dysfunctions secondary to systemic inflammation after severe burn contribute to adverse outcome, with the lungs being the first organ to fail. In this study, we evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of Parecoxib, a parenteral COX-2 inhibitor, in a delayed fluid resuscitation burned rat model. Anaesthetized Sprague Dawley rats were inflicted with 45% total body surface area full-thickness scald burns and subsequently subjected to delayed resuscitation with Hartmann's solution. Parecoxib (0.1, 1.0, and 10 mg/kg) was delivered intramuscularly 20 min after injury followed by 12 h interval and the rats were sacrificed at 6 h, 24 h, and 48 h. Burn rats developed elevated blood cytokines, transaminase, creatinine, and increased lung MPO levels. Animals treated with 1 mg/kg Parecoxib showed significantly reduced plasma level of CINC-1, IL-6, PGEM, and lung MPO. Treatment of 1 mg/kg Parecoxib is shown to mitigate systemic and lung inflammation without significantly affecting other organs. At present, no specific therapeutic agent is available to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response secondary to burn injury. The results suggest that Parecoxib may have the potential to be used both as an analgesic and ameliorate the effects of lung injury following burn. PMID:24579056

  7. The Role of Inflammasome in Inflammatory Macrophage in Mycobacterium Avium Complex-lung Disease and Mycobacterium Abscessus-lung Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-27

    To Investigate the Inflammasome Response of Inflammatory and Resting Macrophage; To Compare the Difference of Inflammasome Response of Inflammatory Macrophage; To Study the Diagnostic Aid From Immunological Markers in Inflammasome Response

  8. A preclinical rodent model of acute radiation-induced lung injury after ablative focal irradiation reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Lee, Hae-June; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Eun, Sung Ho; Lee, Jung Il; Park, Kwangwoo; Lee, Ji Min; Cho, Jaeho

    2014-07-01

    In a previous study, we established an image-guided small-animal micro-irradiation system mimicking clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The goal of this study was to develop a rodent model of acute phase lung injury after ablative irradiation. A radiation dose of 90 Gy was focally delivered to the left lung of C57BL/6 mice using a small animal stereotactic irradiator. At days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 14 after irradiation, the lungs were perfused with formalin for fixation and paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome. At days 7 and 14 after irradiation, micro-computed tomography (CT) images of the lung were taken and lung functional measurements were performed with a flexiVent™ system. Gross morphological injury was evident 9 days after irradiation of normal lung tissues and dynamic sequential events occurring during the acute phase were validated by histopathological analysis. CT images of the mouse lungs indicated partial obstruction located in the peripheral area of the left lung. Significant alteration in inspiratory capacity and tissue damping were detected on day 14 after irradiation. An animal model of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in the acute phase reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy was established and validated with histopathological and functional analysis. This model enhances our understanding of the dynamic sequential events occurring in the acute phase of radiation-induced lung injury induced by ablative dose focal volume irradiation.

  9. Effect of nebulized budesonide on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome: Randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Hatem Saber; Meguid, Mona Mohamed Abdel

    2017-01-01

    Background: We tested the hypothesis that nebulized budesonide would improve lung mechanics and oxygenation in patients with early acute lung injury (ALI) and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) during protective mechanical ventilation strategy without adversely affecting systemic hemodynamics. Methods: Patients with ALI/ARDS were included and assigned into two groups; budesonide group (30 cases) in whom 1 mg–2 ml budesonide suspension was nebulized through the endotracheal tube and control group (30 cases) in whom 2 ml saline (placebo) were nebulized instead of budesonide. This regimen was repeated every 12 h for three successive days alongside with constant ventilator settings in both groups. Hemodynamics, airway pressures, and PaO2/FiO2 were measured throughout the study period (72 h) with either nebulized budesonide or saline. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were analyzed serologically as markers of inflammation at pre- and post-nebulization sessions. Results: We found a significant difference between the two groups regarding PaO2/FiO2 (P = 0.023), peak (P = 0.021), and plateau (P = 0.032) airway pressures. Furthermore, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were significantly reduced after budesonide nebulizations. No significant difference was found between the two groups regarding hemodynamic variables. Conclusion: Nebulized budesonide improved oxygenation, peak, and plateau airway pressures and significantly reduced inflammatory markers (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) without affecting hemodynamics. Trial Registry: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR) at the number: ACTRN12615000373572. PMID:28217046

  10. Vapors Produced by Electronic Cigarettes and E-Juices with Flavorings Induce Toxicity, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammatory Response in Lung Epithelial Cells and in Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Chad A.; Sundar, Isaac K.; Yao, Hongwei; Gerloff, Janice; Ossip, Deborah J.; McIntosh, Scott; Robinson, Risa; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are the key events in the pathogenesis of chronic airway diseases. The consumption of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) with a variety of e-liquids/e-juices is alarmingly increasing without the unrealized potential harmful health effects. We hypothesized that electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS)/e-cigs pose health concerns due to oxidative toxicity and inflammatory response in lung cells exposed to their aerosols. The aerosols produced by vaporizing ENDS e-liquids exhibit oxidant reactivity suggesting oxidants or reactive oxygen species (OX/ROS) may be inhaled directly into the lung during a “vaping” session. These OX/ROS are generated through activation of the heating element which is affected by heating element status (new versus used), and occurs during the process of e-liquid vaporization. Unvaporized e-liquids were oxidative in a manner dependent on flavor additives, while flavors containing sweet or fruit flavors were stronger oxidizers than tobacco flavors. In light of OX/ROS generated in ENDS e-liquids and aerosols, the effects of ENDS aerosols on tissues and cells of the lung were measured. Exposure of human airway epithelial cells (H292) in an air-liquid interface to ENDS aerosols from a popular device resulted in increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Furthermore, human lung fibroblasts exhibited stress and morphological change in response to treatment with ENDS/e-liquids. These cells also secrete increased IL-8 in response to a cinnamon flavored e-liquid and are susceptible to loss of cell viability by ENDS e-liquids. Finally, exposure of wild type C57BL/6J mice to aerosols produced from a popular e-cig increase pro-inflammatory cytokines and diminished lung glutathione levels which are critical in maintaining cellular redox balance. Thus, exposure to e-cig aerosols/juices incurs measurable oxidative and inflammatory responses in lung cells and tissues that could lead to

  11. Aged neutrophils contribute to the first line of defense in the acute inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Bernd; Vadlau, Yannick; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Nekolla, Katharina; Sharaf, Kariem; Gaertner, Florian; Massberg, Steffen; Krombach, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Under steady-state conditions, aged neutrophils are removed from the circulation in bone marrow, liver, and spleen, thereby maintaining myeloid cell homeostasis. The fate of these aged immune cells under inflammatory conditions, however, remains largely obscure. Here, we demonstrate that in the acute inflammatory response during endotoxemia, aged neutrophils cease returning to the bone marrow and instead rapidly migrate to the site of inflammation. Having arrived in inflamed tissue, aged neutrophils were found to exhibit a higher phagocytic activity as compared with the subsequently recruited nonaged neutrophils. This distinct behavior of aged neutrophils under inflammatory conditions is dependent on specific age-related changes in their molecular repertoire that enable these “experienced” immune cells to instantly translate inflammatory signals into immune responses. In particular, aged neutrophils engage Toll-like receptor-4- and p38 MAPK-dependent pathways to induce conformational changes in β2 integrins that allow these phagocytes to effectively accomplish their mission in the front line of the inflammatory response. Hence, ageing in the circulation might represent a critical process for neutrophils that enables these immune cells to properly unfold their functional properties for host defense. PMID:27609642

  12. Protective effects of pogostone against LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice via regulation of Keap1-Nrf2/NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao-Yue; Xu, Lie-Qiang; Zhang, Zhen-Biao; Chen, Chao-Hui; Huang, Yong-Zhong; Su, Zu-Qing; Guo, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Xie; Liu, Yu-Hong; Chen, Jian-Nan; Lai, Xiao-Ping; Li, Yu-Cui; Su, Zi-Ren

    2016-03-01

    Pogostone, a major component of Pogostemon cablin, has been demonstrated to possess antibacterial, anti-fungal, immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. To investigate the potential therapeutic effect of pogostone on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI), mice were pretreated with pogostone prior to LPS exposure. After LPS challenge, the lungs were excised and the histological changes, wet to dry weight ratios, MPO activity reflecting neutrophil infiltration, and MDA activity reflecting oxidative stress were examined. The inflammatory cytokines in the BALF were determined by ELISA assay. Moreover, the expressions of p65 and phosphorylated p65 subunit of NF-κB, and Nrf2 in the nucleus in lung tissues were measured by Western blot analysis, and meanwhile the dependent genes of NF-κB and Nrf2 were assessed by RT-qPCR. The results showed that pretreatment with pogostone markedly improved survival rate, attenuated the histological alterations in the lung, reduced the MPO and MDA levels, decreased the wet/dry weight ratio of lungs, down-regulated the level of pro-inflammatory mediators including TNF-a, IL-1β and IL-6. Furthermore, pretreatment with pogostone enhanced the Nrf2 dependent genes including NQO-1, GCLC and HO-1 but suppressed NF-κB regulated genes including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. The mechanism behind the protective effect was correlated with its regulation on the balance between Keap1-Nrf2 and NF-κB signaling pathways. Therefore, pogostone may be considered as a potential therapeutic agent for preventing and treating ALI.

  13. c-ANCA-induced neutrophil-mediated lung injury: a model of acute Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Hattar, K; Oppermann, S; Ankele, C; Weissmann, N; Schermuly, R T; Bohle, R M; Moritz, R; Krögel, B; Seeger, W; Grimminger, F; Sibelius, U; Grandel, U

    2010-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA) targeting proteinase 3 (PR3) are implicated in the pathogenesis of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). Fulminant disease can present as acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, a model of ALI in WG was developed using isolated rat lungs. Isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were primed with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) to induce surface expression of PR3. Co-perfusion of TNF-primed neutrophils and monoclonal anti-PR3 antibodies induced a massive weight gain in isolated lungs. This effect was not observed when control immunoglobulin G was co-perfused with TNF-primed PMNs. The c-ANCA-induced oedema formation was paralleled by an increase in the capillary filtration coefficient as a marker of increased pulmonary endothelial permeability. In contrast, pulmonary artery pressure was not affected. In the presence of the oxygen radical scavenger superoxide dismutase and a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, c-ANCA-induced lung oedema could be prevented. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase was equally effective in preventing c-ANCA-induced lung injury. In conclusion, anti-PR3 antibodies induced neutrophil mediated, elastase- and oxygen radical-dependent ALI in the isolated lung. This experimental model supports the hypothesis of a pathogenic role for c-ANCA in WG and offers the possibility of the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of lung injury in fulminant WG.

  14. Inflammatory Cytokine Gene Expression in Mesenteric Adipose Tissue during Acute Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mustain, W. Conan; Starr, Marlene E.; Valentino, Joseph D.; Cohen, Donald A.; Okamura, Daiki; Wang, Chi; Evers, B. Mark; Saito, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Background Production of inflammatory cytokines by mesenteric adipose tissue (MAT) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Animal models of colitis have demonstrated inflammatory changes within MAT, but it is unclear if these changes occur in isolation or as part of a systemic adipose tissue response. It is also unknown what cell types are responsible for cytokine production within MAT. The present study was designed to determine whether cytokine production by MAT during experimental colitis is depot-specific, and also to identify the source of cytokine production within MAT. Methods Experimental colitis was induced in 6-month-old C57BL/6 mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (2% in drinking water) for up to 5 days. The induction of cytokine mRNA within various adipose tissues, including mesenteric, epididymal, and subcutaneous, was analyzed by qRT-PCR. These adipose tissues were also examined for histological evidence of inflammation. The level of cytokine mRNA during acute colitis was compared between mature mesenteric adipocytes, mesenteric stromal vascular fraction (SVF), and mesenteric lymph nodes. Results During acute colitis, MAT exhibited an increased presence of infiltrating mononuclear cells and fibrotic structures, as well as decreased adipocyte size. The mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were significantly increased in MAT but not other adipose tissue depots. Within the MAT, induction of these cytokines was observed mainly in the SVF. Conclusions Acute experimental colitis causes a strong site-specific inflammatory response within MAT, which is mediated by cells of the SVF, rather than mature adipocytes or mesenteric lymph nodes. PMID:24386254

  15. Evidences of Herbal Medicine-Derived Natural Products Effects in Inflammatory Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mernak, Márcia Isabel B.; Martins, Mílton A.; Lago, João H. G.; Tibério, Iolanda F. L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammation is a hallmark of many respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and acute respiratory syndrome distress (ARDS). Most of these diseases are treated with anti-inflammatory therapy in order to prevent or to reduce the pulmonary inflammation. Herbal medicine-derived natural products have been used in folk medicine and scientific studies to evaluate the value of these compounds have grown in recent years. Many substances derived from plants have the biological effects in vitro and in vivo, such as flavonoids, alkaloids, and terpenoids. Among the biological activities of natural products derived from plants can be pointed out the anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antiplatelet, antitumor anti-allergic activities, and antioxidant. Although many reports have evaluated the effects of these compounds in experimental models, studies evaluating clinical trials are scarce in the literature. This review aims to emphasize the effects of these different natural products in pulmonary diseases in experimental models and in humans and pointing out some possible mechanisms of action. PMID:27445433

  16. Transfusion of Human Platelets Treated with Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology Does Not Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Caudrillier, Axelle; Mallavia, Beñat; Rouse, Lindsay; Marschner, Susanne; Looney, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction technology (PRT) has been developed in an effort to make the blood supply safer, but there is controversy as to whether it may induce structural or functional changes to platelets that could lead to acute lung injury after transfusion. In this study, we used a commercial PRT system to treat human platelets that were then transfused into immunodeficient mice, and the development of acute lung injury was determined. P-selectin expression was higher in the Mirasol PRT-treated platelets compared to control platelets on storage day 5, but not storage day 1. Transfusion of control vs. Mirasol PRT-treated platelets (day 5 of storage, 109 platelets per mouse) into NOD/SCID mice did not result in lung injury, however transfusion of storage day 5 platelets treated with thrombin receptor-activating peptide increased both extravascular lung water and lung vascular permeability. Transfusion of day 1 platelets did not produce lung injury in any group, and LPS priming 24 hours before transfusion had no effect on lung injury. In a model of transfusion-related acute lung injury, NOD/SCID mice were susceptible to acute lung injury when challenged with H-2Kd monoclonal antibody vs. isotype control antibody. Using lung intravital microscopy, we did not detect a difference in the dynamic retention of platelets in the lung circulation in control vs. Mirasol PRT-treated groups. In conclusion, Mirasol PRT produced an increase in P-selectin expression that is storage-dependent, but transfusion of human platelets treated with Mirasol PRT into immunodeficient mice did not result in greater platelet retention in the lungs or the development of acute lung injury.

  17. Association between inflammatory mediators and response to inhaled nitric oxide in a model of endotoxin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Trachsel, Sebastien; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Maurenbrecher, Edwige; Nys, Monique; Lamy, Maurice; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) allows selective pulmonary vasodilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome and improves PaO2 by redistribution of pulmonary blood flow towards better ventilated parenchyma. One-third of patients are nonresponders to INO, however, and it is difficult to predict who will respond. The aim of the present study was to identify, within a panel of inflammatory mediators released during endotoxin-induced lung injury, specific mediators that are associated with a PaO2 response to INO. Methods After animal ethics committee approval, pigs were anesthetized and exposed to 2 hours of endotoxin infusion. Levels of cytokines, prostanoid, leucotriene and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were sampled prior to endotoxin exposure and hourly thereafter. All animals were exposed to 40 ppm INO: 28 animals were exposed at either 4 hours or 6 hours and a subgroup of nine animals was exposed both at 4 hours and 6 hours after onset of endotoxin infusion. Results Based on the response to INO, the animals were retrospectively placed into a responder group (increase in PaO2 ≥ 20%) or a nonresponder group. All mediators increased with endotoxin infusion although no significant differences were seen between responders and nonresponders. There was a mean difference in ET-1, however, with lower levels in the nonresponder group than in the responder group, 0.1 pg/ml versus 3.0 pg/ml. Moreover, five animals in the group exposed twice to INO switched from responder to nonresponder and had decreased ET-1 levels (3.0 (2.5 to 7.5) pg/ml versus 0.1 (0.1 to 2.1) pg/ml, P < 0.05). The pulmonary artery pressure and ET-1 level were higher in future responders to INO. Conclusions ET-1 may therefore be involved in mediating the response to INO. PMID:18954441

  18. CCR2+Ly6Chi Inflammatory Monocyte Recruitment Exacerbates Acute Disability Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Matthew D.; Taylor, Roslyn A.; Mullen, Michael T.; Ai, Youxi; Aguila, Hector L.; Mack, Matthias; Kasner, Scott E.; McCullough, Louise D.

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating type of stroke that lacks a specific treatment. An intense immune response develops after ICH, which contributes to neuronal injury, disability, and death. However, the specific mediators of inflammation-induced injury remain unclear. The objective of the present study was to determine whether blood-derived CCR2+Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes contribute to disability. ICH was induced in mice and the resulting inflammatory response was quantified using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and neurobehavioral testing. Importantly, blood-derived monocytes were distinguished from resident microglia by differential CD45 staining and by using bone marrow chimeras with fluorescent leukocytes. After ICH, blood-derived CCR2+Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes trafficked into the brain, outnumbered other leukocytes, and produced tumor necrosis factor. Ccr2−/− mice, which have few circulating inflammatory monocytes, exhibited better motor function following ICH than control mice. Chimeric mice with wild-type CNS cells and Ccr2−/− hematopoietic cells also exhibited early improvement in motor function, as did wild-type mice after inflammatory monocyte depletion. These findings suggest that blood-derived inflammatory monocytes contribute to acute neurological disability. To determine the translational relevance of our experimental findings, we examined CCL2, the principle ligand for the CCR2 receptor, in ICH patients. Serum samples from 85 patients were collected prospectively at two hospitals. In patients, higher CCL2 levels at 24 h were independently associated with poor functional outcome at day 7 after adjusting for potential confounding variables. Together, these findings suggest that inflammatory monocytes worsen early disability after murine ICH and may represent a therapeutic target for patients. PMID:24623768

  19. Effect of IMOD™ on the inflammatory process after acute ischemic stroke: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Considering the role of inflammation in acute cerebrovascular accidents, anti-inflammatory treatment has been considered as an option in cerebrovascular diseases. Regarding the properties of Setarud (IMOD™) in immune regulation, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of this medication in treating patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods In this randomized clinical trial, 99 patients with their first ever acute ischemic stroke were divided into two groups of IMOD™ (n = 49) and control (n = 50). The control group underwent routine treatment and the intervention group underwent routine treatment plus daily intermittent infusion of IMOD™ (250mg on the first day and then 375mg into DW5% serum during a 30-minute period for 7 days). The serum levels of inflammatory markers were evaluated on the first day (baseline) and on 4th and 7th days. Data were analyzed and the results were compared. Results and major conclusion 58 males (58.6%) and 41 females (41.4%) with a mean age of 67.00 ± 8.82 years, who had their first ever stroke attack, were enrolled in this trial. Treatment with IMOD™ showed a decreasing trend in IL-6 levels compared to the control group (p = 0.04). In addition, the treatment resulted in the control of increasing serum levels of hsCRP after 7 days compared to the control group (p = 0.02). There was an insignificant decrease in TNF-α and IL-1 levels in the IMOD™ group. Considering the prominent role of inflammation after an ischemic cerebral damage, it appears that treatment with IMOD™ improves the inflammatory profile. Therefore, IMOD™ (Setarud) might be considered as a therapeutic option in the acute ischemic stroke. However, future studies are necessary on its long-term results and clinical efficacy. PMID:23514014

  20. Pro-inflammatory responses of human bronchial epithelial cells to acute nitrogen dioxide exposure.

    PubMed

    Ayyagari, Vijayalakshmi N; Januszkiewicz, Adolph; Nath, Jayasree

    2004-04-15

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental oxidant, known to be associated with lung epithelial injury. In the present study, cellular pro-inflammatory responses following exposure to a brief high concentration of NO2 (45 ppm) were assessed, using normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells as an in vitro model of inhalation injury. Generation and release of pro-inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), IL-8, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-1beta were assessed at different time intervals following NO2 exposure. Effects of a pre-existing inflammatory condition was tested by treating the NHBE cells with different inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-gamma, IL-8, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, either alone or in combination, before exposing them to NO2. Immunofluorescence studies confirmed oxidant-induced formation of 3-nitrotyrosine in the NO2-exposed cells. A marked increase in the levels of nitrite (as an index of NO) and IL-8 were observed in the NO2-exposed cells, which were further enhanced in the presence of the cytokines. Effects of various NO inhibitors combined, with immunofluorescence and Western blotting data, indicated partial contribution of the nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) toward the observed increase in nitrite levels. Furthermore, a significant increase in IL-1beta and TNF-alpha generation was observed in the NO2-exposed cells. Although NO2 exposure alone did induce slight cytotoxicity (<12%), but presence of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma resulted in an increased cell death (28-36%). These results suggest a synergistic role of inflammatory mediators, particularly of NO and IL-8, in NO2-mediated early cellular changes. Our results also demonstrate an increased sensitivity of the cytokine-treated NHBE cells toward NO2, which may have significant functional implications in vivo.