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Sample records for acute inpatient psychiatric

  1. Switch Function and Pathological Dissociation in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chui-De; Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    Swift switching, along with atypical ability on updating and inhibition, has been found in non-clinical dissociators. However, whether swift switching is a cognitive endophenotype that intertwines with traumatisation and pathological dissociation remains unknown. Unspecified acute psychiatric patients were recruited to verify a hypothesis that pathological dissociation is associated with swift switching and traumatisation may explain this relationship. Behavioural measures of intellectual function and three executive functions including updating, switching and inhibition were administered, together with standardised scales to evaluate pathological dissociation and traumatisation. Our results showed superior control ability on switching and updating in inpatients who displayed more symptoms of pathological dissociation. When all three executive functions were entered as predictors, in addition to intellectual quotient and demographic variables to regress upon pathological dissociation, switching rather than updating remained the significant predictor. Importantly, the relationship between pathological dissociation and switching became non-significant when the effect of childhood trauma were controlled. The results support a trauma-related switching hypothesis which postulates swift switching as a cognitive endophenotype of pathological dissociation; traumatisation in childhood may explain the importance of swift switching. PMID:27123578

  2. Clinical Application of the "Scribble Technique" with Adults in an Acute Inpatient Psychiatric Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanes, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    The "scribble technique," described by Florence Cane's book, "The Artist in Each of Us" (1983), has historically been employed by art therapists as a technique to reduce inhibitions and liberate spontaneous imagery from the unconscious. Reviews the technique and presents examples produced by adult patients in an acute inpatient psychiatric ward.…

  3. A Systematic Review of Music Therapy Practice and Outcomes with Acute Adult Psychiatric In-Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. Review Methods A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. Results 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. Conclusions No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to

  4. Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD): A confirmatory factor analysis with 1442 psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Ian H; Rufino, Katrina A; Rogers, Megan L; Ellis, Thomas E; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD) is a newly proposed diagnostic entity that characterizes rapid onset suicidal intent. This study aims to confirm the factor structure of ASAD among psychiatric inpatients, and to determine the clinical utility of ASAD in predicting suicide attempt status. Overall, 1442 psychiatric inpatients completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing symptoms theorized to comprise the ASAD construct. Utilizing these data, a confirmatory factor analysis with a one-factor solution was performed. Regression analyses were employed to determine if the ASAD construct predicted past suicide attempts, and analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were employed to determine if ASAD symptoms differed by the presence and number of past suicide attempts. The one-factor solution indicated good fit: χ(2)(77) = 309.1, p < 0.001, Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI) = 0.96, comparative fit index (CFI) = 0.97, root-mean-square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.05. Controlling for depressive disorders and current symptoms, the ASAD construct significantly predicted the presence of a past suicide attempt. Moreover, ASAD differentiated in the expected directions between individuals with a history of multiple suicide attempts, individuals with a single suicide attempt, and individuals with no history of a suicide attempt. Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD) appears to be a unified construct that predicts suicidal behavior and is distinct from an already-defined mood disorder. PMID:27344228

  5. Challenges in Obtaining HIV Testing in an Acute Involuntary Inpatient Psychiatric Setting.

    PubMed

    Weller, Jennifer; Levitt, Gwen; Myers, Robert; Riley, Aaron; Gesmundo, Celsius-Kit

    2016-01-01

    Even in health care professions, a stigma remains for patients with co-occurring HIV and serious mental illness. Researchers at a large, urban medical center encountered this stigma when they attempted to initiate a study of cognition in psychiatric inpatients with and without HIV who were seen as vulnerable in the context of research. Education efforts and advocacy on the part of the research team was instrumental and resulted in system-wide changes in the hospital, including the addition of HIV testing to the psychiatric admission laboratory panel. Within the first year that routine laboratory orders included an HIV test, the rate of testing ordered by inpatient-attending psychiatrists reached 60% of admissions. As of 2014, 13 HIV tests were found to be HIV seropositive in inpatients, with four of those cases classified as new-onset, as opposed to two positive tests in the year prior to our study. PMID:27426407

  6. Inpatient Suicide in a Chinese Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jie; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Hao, Yuantao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Guo, Yangbo; Su, Jinghua; Lu, Huixian

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the risk factors for suicide among psychiatric inpatients in China. In this study we identified the risk factors of suicide among psychiatric inpatients at Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital. All psychiatric inpatients who died by suicide during the 1956-2005 period were included in this study. Using a case-control design, 64…

  7. 'Shared-rhythm cooperation' in cooperative team meetings in acute psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Vuokila-Oikkonen, P; Janhonen, S; Vaisanen, L

    2004-04-01

    The cooperative team meeting is one of the most important interventions in psychiatric care. The purpose of this study was to describe the participation of patients and significant others in cooperative team meetings in terms of unspoken stories. The narrative approach focused on storytelling. The data consisted of videotaped cooperative team meetings (n = 11) in two acute closed psychiatric wards. The QRS NVivo computer program and the Holistic Content Reading method were used. During the process of analysis, the spoken and unspoken stories were analysed at the same time. According to the results, while there was some evident shared-rhythm cooperation (the topics of discussion were shared and the participants had eye contact), there were many instances where the interaction was controlled and defined by health care professionals. This lack of shared rhythm in cooperation, as defined in terms of storytelling, was manifested as monologue and the following practices: the health care professionals controlled the storytelling by sticking to their opinions, by giving the floor or by pointing with a finger and visually scanning the participants, by interrupting the speaker or by allowing the other experts to sit passively. Implications for mental health nursing practice are discussed.

  8. Improving acute psychiatric hospital services according to inpatient experiences. A user-led piece of research as a means to empowerment.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jim; Boyle, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This paper has been undertaken by people with experience with mental health issues and mental health care systems. The aim of the research was to explore psychiatric inpatients' strategies for coping with mental ill health and in what ways acute inpatient psychiatric hospital services are facilitative to the individual attempting recovery. Ten focus groups were facilitated and data were analysed through systematic content analysis. Findings revealed that the main areas of concern for inpatients were: information, communication, relationships, activities, self-help, patient involvement in care treatment plans, and the physical environment. The authors also make a case to improve the status of user-led research as a means to understand the needs of mental health service users. PMID:19148819

  9. The Effectiveness of Client Feedback Measures with Adolescents in an Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Mindy Chaky

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing need for the measurement of therapeutic outcomes and the therapeutic alliance in inpatient mental health services with the adolescent population. This dissertation extends the literature on the use of client feedback measures with adolescents by investigating the use of the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Session Rating Scale…

  10. Prosecuting Assaultive Forensic and Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Kerri C.; Reddon, John R.; Chudleigh, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Inpatient assault of forensic and psychiatric staff is a complex and multifaceted issue. Hence, the consequences reported in the literature regarding prosecuting assaultive inpatients are quite variable. In this article, issues pertaining to the prosecution of violent inpatients are reviewed. Illustrative cases, challenges of prosecution,…

  11. Forensic psychiatric aspects of inpatient violence.

    PubMed

    Quanbeck, Cameron

    2006-09-01

    Inpatient aggression jeopardizes the safety of psychiatric clinicians and patients. A minority of psychiatric inpatients is responsible for most of inpatient assaults; this subset of repetitively assaultive patients warrants greater attention in the form of systematic study. In developing treatment approaches for assaultive inpatients, it is important to characterize the primary motivation driving aggressive behavior. There are many pharmacologic agents and psychotherapeutic approaches available to address inpatients who engage in impulsive and psychotic violence, but the treatment of inpatients with antisocial or psychopathy personality remain limited, and further study is needed. To protect the safety of patients and staff, criminal prosecution of inpatient assaults is clinically justified if an assailant continues to be aggressive despite appropriate clinical interventions or commits an act of planned aggression so egregious that prosecution is the only reasonable alternative.

  12. A CBT Approach to Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Kim J.

    2005-01-01

    During a psychiatric hospitalization of 5 to 10 days, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) strategies can be used for the management of inpatients and to support the transition to outpatient treatment. This format was chosen after several years of frustration dealing with crisis inpatient care. The use of CBT is well known, and it seemed that an…

  13. Violent psychiatric inpatients in a public hospital.

    PubMed

    Morrison, E F

    1990-01-01

    Violence in inpatient psychiatric settings is a clinically significant and relevant problem requiring attention by the psychiatric community. Despite the prevalence of research on violent behavior, few nursing studies have been conducted that explore the components of nursing care that may influence the amount of violence occurring in inpatient psychiatric settings. The purpose of the study was to identify the characteristics of violent patients and the components of nursing care that are related to violent patient behavior. A qualitative study was conducted using participant observation and grounded theory methodology. Data were collected in a metropolitan public hospital over a 9-month period. Six categories of violent patients were identified during data analysis: (1) the user, (b) the outlaw, (c) the rebel without a cause, (d) the little big man, (e) the child, and (6) the vamp. Implications of the study for clinicians working in inpatient psychiatric settings are discussed.

  14. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  15. 'She's manipulative and he's right off': a critical analysis of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language in the acute inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bridget; Manias, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Remarks such as 'she's manipulative' and 'he's right off' are familiar to psychiatric nurses. This paper critiques the language nurses use in acute inpatient psychiatry services, highlighting the diverse discourses implicated in nurses' writing and speaking about patients. Based on a review of the literature, this paper examines ethnographic studies and discourse analyses of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language. A prominent debate in the literature surrounds nurses' use of standardized language, which is the use of set terms for symptoms and nursing activities. This review of spoken descriptions of patients highlights nurses' use of informal and local descriptions, incorporating elements of moral judgement, common sense language and empathy. Research into written accounts in patient files and records show nurses' use of objectifying language, the dominance of medicine and the emergence of the language of bureaucracy in health services. Challenges to the language of psychiatry and psychiatric nursing arise from fields as diverse as bioscience, humanism and social theory. Authors who focus on the relationship between language, power and the discipline of nursing disagree in regard to their analysis of particular language as a constructive exercise of power by nurses. Thus, particular language is in some instances endorsed and in other instances censured, by nurses in research and practice. In this paper, a Foucauldian analysis provides further critique of taken-for-granted practices of speech and writing. Rather than censoring language, we recommend that nurses, researchers and educators attend to nurses' everyday language and explore what it produces for nurses, patients and society.

  16. 'She's manipulative and he's right off': a critical analysis of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language in the acute inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bridget; Manias, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Remarks such as 'she's manipulative' and 'he's right off' are familiar to psychiatric nurses. This paper critiques the language nurses use in acute inpatient psychiatry services, highlighting the diverse discourses implicated in nurses' writing and speaking about patients. Based on a review of the literature, this paper examines ethnographic studies and discourse analyses of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language. A prominent debate in the literature surrounds nurses' use of standardized language, which is the use of set terms for symptoms and nursing activities. This review of spoken descriptions of patients highlights nurses' use of informal and local descriptions, incorporating elements of moral judgement, common sense language and empathy. Research into written accounts in patient files and records show nurses' use of objectifying language, the dominance of medicine and the emergence of the language of bureaucracy in health services. Challenges to the language of psychiatry and psychiatric nursing arise from fields as diverse as bioscience, humanism and social theory. Authors who focus on the relationship between language, power and the discipline of nursing disagree in regard to their analysis of particular language as a constructive exercise of power by nurses. Thus, particular language is in some instances endorsed and in other instances censured, by nurses in research and practice. In this paper, a Foucauldian analysis provides further critique of taken-for-granted practices of speech and writing. Rather than censoring language, we recommend that nurses, researchers and educators attend to nurses' everyday language and explore what it produces for nurses, patients and society. PMID:16643343

  17. Randomised controlled trial of day patient versus inpatient psychiatric treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Creed, F; Black, D; Anthony, P; Osborn, M; Thomas, P; Tomenson, B

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the proportion of acutely ill psychiatric patients who can be treated in a day hospital and compare the outcome of day patient and inpatient treatment. DESIGN--Prospective randomised controlled trial of day patient versus inpatient treatment after exclusion of patients precluded by severity of illness or other factors from being treated as day patients. All three groups assessed at three and 12 months. SETTING--Teaching hospital serving small socially deprived inner city area. Day hospital designed to take acute admissions because of few beds. PATIENTS--175 Patients were considered, of whom 73 could not be allocated. Of the remaining 102 patients, 51 were allocated to each treatment setting but only 89 became established in treatment--namely, 41 day patients and 48 inpatients. 73 Of these 89 patients were reassessed at three months and 70 at one year. INTERVENTIONS--Standard day patient and inpatient treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Discharge from hospital and return to previous level of social functioning; reduction of psychiatric symptoms, abnormal behaviour, and burden on relatives. RESULTS--33 Of 48 inpatients were discharged at three months compared with 17 of 41 day patients. But at one year 9 of 48 inpatients and three of 41 day patients were in hospital. 18 Of 35 day patients and 16 of 39 inpatients were at their previous level of social functioning at one year. The only significant difference at three months was a greater improvement in social role performance in the inpatients. At one year there was no significant difference between day patients and inpatients in present state examination summary scores and social role performance, burden, or behaviour. CONCLUSIONS--Roughly 40% of all acutely ill patients presenting for admission to a psychiatric unit may be treated satisfactorily in a well staffed day hospital. The outcome of treatment is similar to that of inpatient care but might possibly reduce readmissions. The hospital costs

  18. Impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Müller, Astrid; Rein, Katharina; Kollei, Ines; Jacobi, Andrea; Rotter, Andrea; Schütz, Patricia; Hillemacher, Thomas; de Zwaan, Martina

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in a European psychiatric inpatient sample. Two hundred thirty four consecutive psychiatric inpatients (62% female) were examined using a module of the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) that has been developed for ICDs (SCID-ICD). In addition to intermittent explosive disorder, pyromania, kleptomania, pathological gambling, and trichotillomania, the proposed ICDs not otherwise specified were assessed, including compulsive buying, nonparaphilic compulsive sexual behavior, pathological internet use, and pathological skin picking. Based on the SCID-ICD, a lifetime ICD rate of 23.5% and a current ICD rate of 18.8% were found. The most frequent ICDs were pathological skin picking (lifetime 7.3%, current 6.8%), compulsive buying (lifetime 6.8%, current 6.0%), and intermittent explosive disorder (lifetime 5.6%, current 3.4%). In contrast, referring to admission diagnoses taken from patients' charts only 3.8% of the inpatients were diagnosed with any current ICD. Individuals with comorbid ICD were significantly younger and had more admission diagnoses other than ICD. The results suggest high rates of ICDs among psychiatric inpatients that remain to be under-diagnosed in clinical routine.

  19. Profiling psychiatric inpatient suicide attempts in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ikeshita, Katsumi; Shimoda, Shigero; Norimoto, Kazunobu; Arita, Keisuke; Shimamoto, Takuya; Murata, Kiyoshi; Makinodan, Manabu; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Suicide is an adverse event that can occur even when patient are hospitalized in psychiatric facilities. This study delineates the demographic characteristics of suicide attempts in mental hospitals and psychiatric wards of general hospitals in Japan, a country where the suicide rate is remarkably high. Analyses of incident reports on serious suicide attempts in psychiatric inpatients were performed using prefectural incident records between April 1, 2001, and December 31, 2012. Suicide reports were included for 35 incidents that occurred over 11 years, and demonstrated that 83% of patients (n = 29) committed suicide and 17% (n = 6) survived their attempt with serious aftereffects, such as cognitive impairment or persistent vegetative state. The male/female ratio of inpatient suicide was 1.5:1. The mean age of the attempters was 50.5 years (SD = 18.2). The most common psychiatric diagnoses for those with suicide incident reports were schizophrenia spectrum disorders (51.4%) and affective disorders (40%). Hanging (60%) was the most common method of suicide attempt, followed by jumping in front of moving objects (14.3%) and jumping from height (11.4%). Fifty-four percent of suicides (n = 19) occurred within hospital sites and the remainder (46%; n = 16) occurred outside hospital sites (e.g., on medical leave or elopement) while they were still inpatients. PMID:25345233

  20. [Actual problems of inpatient psychiatric care in Russia].

    PubMed

    Iastrebov, V S; Mitikhin, V G; Solokhina, T A; Shevchenko, L S; Tvorogova, N A

    2013-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of inpatient psychiatric care in Russia and some other countries is presented. A systematic analysis of the performance of psychiatric hospitals is conducted. The process of the deinstitutionalization in Russian psychiatry is highlighted. A range of problems hindering a reform of inpatient psychiatric service of the country is singled out. PMID:24300798

  1. AIDS antibody tests on inpatient psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Binder, R L

    1987-02-01

    An antibody test for the causative virus of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) became commercially available in 1985. The author discusses the use of the AIDS antibody test on inpatient psychiatric units. She reviews the controversial legal and ethical questions related to its use, addressing such questions as Who should be tested for the AIDS antibody? When and to whom should the results of the test be disclosed? and How should the doctrine of "right to privacy" be balanced with the "duty to warn"?

  2. PRN prescribing in psychiatric inpatients: potential for pharmacokinetic drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Davies, Simon J C; Lennard, Martin S; Ghahramani, Parviz; Pratt, Peter; Robertson, Andrea; Potokar, John

    2007-03-01

    Medications are commonly prescribed to psychiatric inpatients on a PRN (pro re nata/as required) basis, allowing drugs to be administered on patient request or at nurses' discretion for psychiatric symptoms, treatment side effects or physical complaints. However, there has been no formal study of the pharmacokinetic implications of PRN prescribing. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of PRN drug prescription and administration, and to assess the potential for interactions involving CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 between drugs prescribed and administered to inpatients on psychiatry wards.A cross-sectional survey of prescriptions on general adult and functional elderly psychiatric wards in one city was carried out. Data were recorded from prescription charts of 323 inpatients (236 on general adult and 87 on functional elderly wards). Of 2089 prescriptions, 997 (48%) of prescriptions were on a PRN basis (most commonly benzodiazepines and other hypnotic agents, antipsychotics, analgesics and anticholinergic agents), but only 143 (14%) of these had been administered in the previous 24 hours. One fifth of patients were prescribed drug combinations interacting with CYP2D6 or CYP3A4 of potential clinical importance which included one or more drugs prescribed on a PRN basis.PRN prescribing is common among inpatients in psychiatry, and may lead to cytochrome P450 mediated interactions. Prescribers should be aware of the potential for unpredictability in plasma concentrations, side effects and efficacy which PRN prescribing may cause through these interactions, particularly in old age psychiatry and in treatment of acute psychosis.

  3. Substance abuse in an inpatient psychiatric sample.

    PubMed

    Brady, K; Casto, S; Lydiard, R B; Malcolm, R; Arana, G

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between psychoactive drug abuse and psychopathology is complex. There have been few systematic explorations of substance abuse in psychiatric populations since the recent epidemic of cocaine abuse. To update and further explore the relationship between psychiatric illness and substance abuse, 100 consecutively admitted patients to an inpatient psychiatry unit were administered a drug and alcohol use/abuse questionnaire. Sixty-four percent endorsed current or past problems with substance abuse and 29% met DSM-III-R criteria for substance abuse in the 30 days prior to admission. For the major diagnostic categories, there were no significant differences between groups in percentages of patients with substance abuse disorders. There was a trend (p less than or equal to .2) toward an increased number of lifetime psychiatric hospitalizations in the substance-abusing group. Alcohol was the most common drug of choice followed by stimulants, cannabis, and sedative hypnotics. Differences in drug choices between diagnostic categories are discussed. Forty-three percent of urine drug screens obtained were positive, and of those with positive urine drug screens, 42% denied drug use upon admission. Only 40% of patients with current or past substance abuse problems had received treatment for their chemical dependency. In our sample, while substance abuse was very prevalent, it was underreported and undertreated.

  4. Pro re nata medication for psychiatric inpatients: time to act.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Michael F; Whiteford, Harvey A

    2008-07-01

    Pro re nata (PRN; 'as needed') medication is an archetypal mainstay for managing acute psychiatric inpatient symptoms and behaviours. Psychiatric and mental health nursing practices have circumnavigated the development of a uniform medical-ethical standard for the administration of PRN psychotropic medication. This paper examines the evidence for administration of PRN psychotropic medications and, in the context of evidence-based best practice, current mental health policy and professional ethics, proposes a standardized Australian PRN administration protocol. The procedures and circumstances leading to a nurse administering psychotropic PRN medication are divided into five simple steps, namely (i) medical prescription; (ii) nurse evaluation of patient indications for an intervention; (iii) nurse consideration of therapeutic options; (iv) obtaining patient informed consent; and (v) documentation of outcomes of PRN administration. The literature associated with each step is reviewed, along with national and international professional ethics, guidelines and patient rights documents pertaining to the care of mental health patients. Recommendations for best-practise care are discussed for each step. There is a lacuna of published evidence supporting the use of PRN medications in psychiatric inpatients. Yet there is published evidence that PRN medications are associated with increased risks of morbidity, inappropriate use, may result in above-recommended dosages or polypharmacy, and complicate the assessment of efficacy of regular scheduled medicines. Alternative non-pharmacological treatment options to PRN medication are effective and associated with fewer side-effects. There are no national explicit standards, operational criteria or quality assurance for the use of PRN medication in inpatient psychiatric units. Contemporary PRN practices are largely unregulated and driven by essentially anecdotal evidence, leaving the clinicians and the service open to claims of poor

  5. Substance use disorders in an adolescent inpatient psychiatric population.

    PubMed

    Deas-Nesmith, D; Campbell, S; Brady, K T

    1998-04-01

    This study examined the comorbidity of substance use disorders and other psychiatric disorders in adolescent populations. The study population was comprised of 100 consecutive admissions, ages 13 to 17, to an acute care adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit for substance use disorders. Patients were assessed using the Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire (PESQ) and the substance-use disorder portion of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM III-R (SCID-R). Thirty-three (33%) patients were identified as having a substance abuse or dependence diagnosis. There was no significant difference in the age between substance users and nonsubstance users. There were significantly more whites in the substance-using group. Sixty percent of all adolescents interviewed had histories of sexual or physical trauma, with trauma being significantly more common in the substance-using group. There were no significant differences in the number or type of other Axis I or Axis II diagnoses between the two groups. While substance users and nonsubstance users had no significant difference in the number of past psychiatric hospitalizations, nonsubstance users had significantly more past medical hospitalizations. These results indicate that high rates of comorbid substance abuse and psychiatric disorders exist in adolescents, and more in-depth study of comorbidity among adolescents is warranted. PMID:9581443

  6. Substance use disorders in an adolescent inpatient psychiatric population.

    PubMed Central

    Deas-Nesmith, D.; Campbell, S.; Brady, K. T.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the comorbidity of substance use disorders and other psychiatric disorders in adolescent populations. The study population was comprised of 100 consecutive admissions, ages 13 to 17, to an acute care adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit for substance use disorders. Patients were assessed using the Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire (PESQ) and the substance-use disorder portion of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM III-R (SCID-R). Thirty-three (33%) patients were identified as having a substance abuse or dependence diagnosis. There was no significant difference in the age between substance users and nonsubstance users. There were significantly more whites in the substance-using group. Sixty percent of all adolescents interviewed had histories of sexual or physical trauma, with trauma being significantly more common in the substance-using group. There were no significant differences in the number or type of other Axis I or Axis II diagnoses between the two groups. While substance users and nonsubstance users had no significant difference in the number of past psychiatric hospitalizations, nonsubstance users had significantly more past medical hospitalizations. These results indicate that high rates of comorbid substance abuse and psychiatric disorders exist in adolescents, and more in-depth study of comorbidity among adolescents is warranted. PMID:9581443

  7. A Controlled Comparison of Psychiatric Day Treatment and Inpatient Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Stephen; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Seriously ill female psychiatric patients (N=59) were randomly assigned to an inpatient or day service. Data indicate the day treatment is, on the whole, superior to inpatient treatment in subjective distress, community functioning, family burden, total hospital cost, and days of attachment to the hospital program. (Author)

  8. A prevalence study of bestiality (zoophilia) in psychiatric in-patients, medical in-patients, and psychiatric staff.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, W A; Freinhar, J P

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of bestiality (both actual sexual contacts and sexual fantasy) was investigated in an experimental group (psychiatric in-patients) and two control populations (medical in-patients and psychiatric staff). Psychiatric patients were found to have a statistically significant higher prevalence rate (55%) of bestiality than the control groups (10% and 15% respectively). Implications of these findings are discussed. It is recommended that due to the obvious prevalence of this condition, questions exploring this previously ignored topic should be routinely included in the psychiatric interview.

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine use by psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Gary; Rajab, M Hasan; Marcus, Joel

    2005-02-01

    82 psychiatric inpatients hospitalized for acute care were interviewed about their use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities. The clinical diagnoses of respondents included Depressive Disorder (61%), Substance Abuse (26%), Schizophrenia (9%), and Anxiety Disorders (5%). Analysis indicated that 63% used at least one CAM modality within the previous 12 mo. The most frequently used modality was herbal therapies (44%), followed by mind-body therapies such as relaxation or mental imagery, hypnosis, meditation, biofeedback (30%), and spiritual healing by another (30%). Physical modalities such as massage, chiropractic treatment, acupuncture, and yoga were used by 21% of respondents. CAM therapies were used for a variety of reasons ranging from treatment of anxiety and depression to weight loss. However, most respondents indicated they did not discuss such use with their psychiatrist or psychotherapist.

  10. Acute inpatient presentation of scurvy.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Allison M; Hughey, Lauren C

    2010-10-01

    Scurvy is a well-known disease of vitamin C deficiency that still occurs in industrialized countries. The clinical manifestations of follicular hyperkeratosis, perifollicular petechiae, corkscrew hairs, and easy bruising are due to defective collagen synthesis and can be mistaken for small vessel vasculitis. Populations at risk for development of scurvy include elderly patients, alcohol and drug users, individuals who follow restrictive diets or have eating disorders, patients with malabsorption, and individuals with mental illness. We report an acute case of scurvy presenting in the inpatient/hospital setting with clinical findings initially thought to represent vasculitis. A high index of suspicion for scurvy must be kept in the appropriate clinical context, and a thorough medical history and physical examination are vital to make the diagnosis.

  11. Effects of a complete smoking ban on inpatients at an intermediate to long-term psychiatric facility.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip H; Homish, Gregory G; Kozlowski, Lynn T; Spacone, Celia; Trigoboff, Eileen; Joffe, Susan

    2013-04-01

    The majority of research on reactions to smoking bans in psychiatric facilities focuses on staff feedback in acute inpatient settings. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess inpatient attitudes about a complete smoking ban in an intermediate to long-term psychiatric facility. One hundred inpatients were surveyed via questionnaire. Inpatients reported changes in smoking and improvements in health as a result of the ban, despite evidence of non-compliant smoking at the facility. There was evidence that inpatients perceived others' attitudes about the ban to be worse than reality. The findings from this pilot study suggest that consequences of smoking bans in psychiatric facilities are not as negative as some perceive. Smoking bans in intermediate to long-term settings may result in improvements in health among both smoking and non-smoking patients.

  12. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.160 Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. “Inpatient psychiatric... Rehabilitation Facilities, or by any other accrediting organization, with comparable standards, that...

  13. Locked doors in acute inpatient psychiatry: a literature review.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, M; Bowers, L; Jones, J; Simpson, A; Haglund, K

    2009-04-01

    Many acute inpatient psychiatric wards in the UK are permanently locked, although this is contrary to the current Mental Health Act Code of Practice. To conduct a literature review of empirical articles concerning locked doors in acute psychiatric inpatient wards, an extensive literature search was performed in SAGE Journals Online, EBM Reviews, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE Psychiatry, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google, using the search terms 'open$', 'close$', '$lock$', 'door', 'ward', 'hospital', 'psychiatr', 'mental health', 'inpatient' and 'asylum'. A total of 11 empirical papers were included in the review. Both staff and patients reported advantages (e.g. preventing illegal substances from entering the ward and preventing patients from absconding and harming themselves or others) and disadvantages (e.g. making patients feel depressed, confined and creating extra work for staff) regarding locked doors. Locked wards were associated with increased patient aggression, poorer satisfaction with treatment and more severe symptoms. The limited literature available showed the urgent need for research to determine the real effects of locked doors in inpatient psychiatry.

  14. Locked doors in acute inpatient psychiatry: a literature review.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, M; Bowers, L; Jones, J; Simpson, A; Haglund, K

    2009-04-01

    Many acute inpatient psychiatric wards in the UK are permanently locked, although this is contrary to the current Mental Health Act Code of Practice. To conduct a literature review of empirical articles concerning locked doors in acute psychiatric inpatient wards, an extensive literature search was performed in SAGE Journals Online, EBM Reviews, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE Psychiatry, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google, using the search terms 'open$', 'close$', '$lock$', 'door', 'ward', 'hospital', 'psychiatr', 'mental health', 'inpatient' and 'asylum'. A total of 11 empirical papers were included in the review. Both staff and patients reported advantages (e.g. preventing illegal substances from entering the ward and preventing patients from absconding and harming themselves or others) and disadvantages (e.g. making patients feel depressed, confined and creating extra work for staff) regarding locked doors. Locked wards were associated with increased patient aggression, poorer satisfaction with treatment and more severe symptoms. The limited literature available showed the urgent need for research to determine the real effects of locked doors in inpatient psychiatry. PMID:19291159

  15. Profiles of Personal Resiliency in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Geetha; Steer, Robert A.; Gulab, Nazli A.

    2010-01-01

    To ascertain whether children and adolescents whose ages ranged from 9 to 17 years described distinct profiles of personal resiliency, the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents (RSCA) were administered to 100 youth who were admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit and were diagnosed with various "DSM-IV-TR" disorders along with the Beck…

  16. Psychiatric Inpatient Admissions of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Predictive Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Amy; Newton, Jonathan; Sturmey, Peter; Bouras, Nick; Holt, Geraldine

    2005-01-01

    Information on admission to psychiatric inpatient units is lacking from the literature on contemporary services for people with intellectual disability and mental health needs. Here we report on predictors of admission for a cohort of 752 adults from this population living in community settings; 83 were admitted. We also report on two subsamples…

  17. Assessment of Mode of Anger Expression in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cautin, Robin L.; Overholser, James C.; Goetz, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated internalized and externalized anger in adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Results indicated that internalized anger led to depression and feelings of hopelessness and increased chances of suicide attempts. In contrast, externalized anger was related to alcohol-related problems. Thus, different modes of anger expression appear to be…

  18. Stress, Coping, and Suicide Risk in Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josepho, Sharon A.; Plutchik, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Investigated relationship between interpersonal problems, coping style, and suicide risk among 71 adult psychiatric inpatients. Patients admitted with history of suicidal attempts were compared with patients admitted for other reasons. Interpersonal problems were significantly and positively related to suicide risk. Coping style of suppression was…

  19. Psychiatric Inpatient MMPI Profiles: An Exploration for Potential Racial Bias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark E.; Brems, Christiane

    1990-01-01

    Examined presence of racial bias in Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory's (MMPI) use with 22 Black and 22 White inpatient psychiatric patients. Found no statistically or clinically significant differences between 2 races on MMPI. Suggests that differences in previous studies may be attributable to variables other than race. (Author/PVV)

  20. Managing Bipolar Youths in a Psychiatric Inpatient Emergency Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Gabriele; Mucci, Maria; Pias, Paola; Muratori, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Among the youths referred to our Psychiatric Inpatient Emergency Service, we focused on bipolar disorder (BD), to explore predictive elements for the outcome. Fifty-one patients (30 males, 21 females, age range 8-18 years, mean age 14.2 plus or minus 3.1 years) received a diagnosis of BD, according to historical information, prolonged…

  1. Metabolic syndrome among psychiatric inpatients with schizophrenia in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Marthoenis, Marthoenis; Aichberger, Marion C; Puteh, Ibrahim; Syahrial, Syahrial; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2015-06-01

    Despite the fact that antipsychotic medication increases the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS), the rate of MetS among psychiatric patients in Indonesia is rarely reported. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of MetS among inpatients with schizophrenia in Indonesia. Eighty-six hospitalised psychiatric patients with schizophrenia were randomly recruited, and underwent physical examination including a blood test. MetS was assessed based on the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria for South Asia. Among the sample, only eight patients (9.3%) met the IDF criteria for MetS. Women have a higher rate of MetS than men (23.8% vs 4.6%; p=0.02). Reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was the most frequent (81.4%) metabolic abnormality among them, followed by central obesity (29.1%), raised triglycerides (23.3%), raised fasting plasma glucose (12.8%), and raised blood pressure (10.5%). Among the various antipsychotics, no differences in MetS prevalence were observed in this population. The rate of MetS among the psychiatric inpatients in this study is lower compared both to the previously reported rate in the general population and to the findings among psychiatric patients with schizophrenia in developed countries. Several factors related to the reduced rate of MetS in this psychiatric inpatient population will be discussed.

  2. Cost effectiveness of day and inpatient psychiatric treatment: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Creed, F.; Mbaya, P.; Lancashire, S.; Tomenson, B.; Williams, B.; Holme, S.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare direct and indirect costs of day and inpatient treatment of acute psychiatric illness. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with outcome and costs assessed over 12 months after the date of admission. SETTING: Teaching hospital in an inner city area. SUBJECTS: 179 patients with acute psychiatric illness referred for admission who were suitable for random allocation to day hospital or inpatient treatment. 77 (43%) patients had schizophrenia. INTERVENTIONS: Routine inpatient or day hospital treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Direct and indirect costs over 12 months, clinical symptoms, social functioning, and burden on relatives over the follow up period. RESULTS: Clinical and social outcomes were similar at 12 months, except that inpatients improved significantly faster than day patients and burden on relatives was significantly less in the day hospital group at one year. Median direct costs to the hospital were 1923 pounds (95% confidence interval 750 pounds to 3174 pounds) per patient less for day hospital treatment than inpatient treatment. Indirect costs were greater for day patients; when these were included, overall day hospital treatment was 2165 pounds cheaper than inpatient treatment (95% confidence interval of median difference 737 pounds to 3593 pounds). Including costs to informants when appropriate meant that day hospital treatment was 1994 pounds per patient cheaper (95% confidence interval 600 pounds to 3543 pounds). CONCLUSIONS: Day patient treatment is cheaper for the 30-40% of potential admissions that can be treated in this way. Carers of day hospital patients may bear additional costs. Carers of all patients with acute psychiatric illness are often themselves severely distressed at the time of admission, but day hospital treatment leads to less burden on carers in the long term. PMID:9161310

  3. An acute in-patient psychiatric service for 16- to 17-year-old adolescents in the UK: a descriptive evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Duddu, Venu; Rhouma, Abdulhakim; Qureshi, Masood; Chaudhry, Imran Bashir; Drake, Terry; Sumra, Altaf; Husain, Nusrat

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method The need for an age-appropriate in-patient service for 16- to 17-year-olds led to the development of a 6-bed acute admissions unit in a non-metropolitan county in the UK. We provide a descriptive evaluation of the first 2 years of its operation. All admissions from April 2010 to March 2012 were reviewed, clinical details systematically recorded and descriptively analysed. Results Ninety-seven young people were admitted during this period (a third were compulsorily detained under the Mental Health Act 1983). The average length of stay was 3–4 weeks. The most common presenting complaints were self-harm and low mood, usually in the context of life events and childhood adversity. Nearly half had substance misuse and other risk-taking behaviours. A third presented with psychotic symptoms. Adjustment and anxiety disorders were most common, followed by alcohol/substance use disorders, depressive illnesses and psychotic illnesses. Comorbidity was the rule rather than the exception. Most patients improved by the time of discharge. Clinical implications The unit provides an accessible and effective age-appropriate service and is likely to constitute an important component of the comprehensive child and adolescent mental health service strategy in the county. PMID:27752345

  4. [German pilot study of psychiatric inpatients with histories of migration].

    PubMed

    Koch, E; Hartkamp, N; Siefen, R G; Schouler-Ocak, M

    2008-03-01

    The work group on psychiatry and migration of the Conference of Directors of Psychiatric Hospitals in Germany conducted a study on the use of inpatient psychiatric services by migrants in 12 psychiatric and psychotherapeutic hospitals and hospital departments. In contrast to previous studies the proportion of migrants in psychiatric hospitals (17.4%) equaled that of migrants in the general population. However there still was a high rate of diagnostic and treatment problems resulting from cultural differences and, to a lesser extent, from language problems. A high proportion of migrants suffered from delusional and schizophrenic disorders, while there were considerable differences in the distribution of diagnoses between different groups of migrants, e.g. those from Turkey and eastern Europe, respectively. Roughly half of all migrants studied had German citizenship. Among the migrants of Turkish background, a high proportion was born in Germany. The number of asylum seekers and refugees was disproportionately high.

  5. [Dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients: prevalence and general characteristics].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Roberto; Aragüés, María; Jiménez-Arriero, Miguel Angel; Ponce, Guillermo; Muñoz, Antonio; Bagney, Alexandra; Hoenicka, Janet; Palomo, Tomás

    2008-06-01

    Comorbidity between a substance use disorder (SUD) and another psychiatric disorder is known as dual diagnosis. It is of great relevance due to its important clinical consequences and costs of care. There are practically no published studies on dual diagnosis prevalence in patients admitted to psychiatric hospitalization units in general hospitals (PHUGH) in our country. The objectives were to estimate the prevalence of dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients admitted consecutively to a Psychiatric Hospitalization Unit (Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain) in one year, to compare clinical and sociodemographic variables between the dual diagnosis group (DD group) and the group with a psychiatric disorder but no SUD (PD group), and to study the types of substances used. This is a retrospective study, based on the review of the clinical charts of the 257 patients admitted to this PHUGH in one year. The results showed that, excluding nicotine dependence, 24.9% of our inpatients had a SUD as well as another psychiatric disorder. A statistically significant predominance of men was found in the DD group, as well as a younger age at the time of the study, at the beginning of their psychiatric attention and on their first psychiatric admission, and they had received diagnoses of schizophrenia or related psychoses more often than the PD group, who had mostly affective disorders. The substances most frequently used in the DD group were alcohol (78.1%), cannabis (62.5%), and cocaine (51.6%). Due to the high prevalence and repercussions of dual diagnosis, it would be advisable to have specialized therapeutic programs for its treatment. PMID:18717266

  6. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on Medicare reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Daly, J; Golinger, R C

    1994-01-01

    Funding for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C-L) services has been a difficult problem. It has been suggested that the identification of psychiatric co-morbidities in Medicare patients on medical services could generate incremental hospital revenue by moving patients from a lower to a higher paying Diagnostic Related Group (DRG). This increased revenue could be used as a means of supporting the psychiatric C-L service. This study documents the financial impact of screening for and documenting psychiatric co-morbidities on a general acute medical service. We clinically assessed 100 consecutive Medicare admissions and found 25 psychiatric co-morbidities in 20 patients. In only one case did the psychiatric diagnosis result in moving the case to a higher DRG. However, the need for psychiatric consultation remains evident as there was significant lack of recognition and documentation of the psychiatric diagnoses by the medical team. The authors discuss both the financial and clinical implications of screening medical inpatients for psychiatric co-morbidities and propose directions for further studies in this area.

  7. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on Medicare reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Daly, J; Golinger, R C

    1994-01-01

    Funding for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C-L) services has been a difficult problem. It has been suggested that the identification of psychiatric co-morbidities in Medicare patients on medical services could generate incremental hospital revenue by moving patients from a lower to a higher paying Diagnostic Related Group (DRG). This increased revenue could be used as a means of supporting the psychiatric C-L service. This study documents the financial impact of screening for and documenting psychiatric co-morbidities on a general acute medical service. We clinically assessed 100 consecutive Medicare admissions and found 25 psychiatric co-morbidities in 20 patients. In only one case did the psychiatric diagnosis result in moving the case to a higher DRG. However, the need for psychiatric consultation remains evident as there was significant lack of recognition and documentation of the psychiatric diagnoses by the medical team. The authors discuss both the financial and clinical implications of screening medical inpatients for psychiatric co-morbidities and propose directions for further studies in this area. PMID:8039679

  8. Non-Psychiatric Health Problems among Psychiatric Inpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlot, L.; Abend, S.; Ravin, P.; Mastis, K.; Hunt, A.; Deutsch, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Physical distress resulting from medical problems has been found to cause increased behaviour problems in patients with intellectual disabilities (ID). Despite this fact, little has been documented on the medical problems of individuals with ID admitted for inpatient psychiatric care. We conducted an exploratory investigation based on…

  9. [What do psychiatric patients expect of inpatient psychiatric hospital treatment?].

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Heribert

    2003-05-01

    Patients are mostly passive utilizer of the health-care-system. They are confronted with a supply of medical service and they are allowed to show their satisfaction with it retrospectively. Our medical system has in future to develop itself from an effective perspective to an utilizer orientated medicine. Orientation to the utilizers means to ask for the expectations of the patients for supply (at customer's option). Aim of our investigation was to check the subjective expectations of the patients before the beginning of in-patient treatment: 1. What is their opinion about the label of the disorder, they are suffering. 2. Of what therapeutic measures do they expect help for theirselves. 3. Do they want to play a part in planning of therapeutic measures. 209 of 344 (61%) of the patients were at admission ready for answering a self designed questionnaire. Only 4% of the patients said, that their disorder is called insanity. They preferred labels like mental illness (45%), somatic illness (43%) and mental health problem (42%). A pharmacological therapy expected in totally 61% of the patients. Mostly were expected drugs against depressive disorders (32%), drugs against addiction (31%) and tranquilizers (29%). Only 10% of the patients expected to get antipsychotic drugs. A verbal therapeutic intervention expected 76% of the patients. To have a speak with the doctor is with 69% a first rank desire, followed by speaking with the psychologist (60%), the nurses (58%) and the patients comrades (56%). Psychotherapy in a narrower sense expect only 40% of the patients. Furthermore there are privacy and recreation through promenades in front of the expectations (69%), followed by relaxation (59%), occupational therapy (55%) and sports or active exercise therapy (54%). 75% of the patients want to be informed about the therapy. 69% want to cooperate with planning of the therapy. Only 21% commit the therapy to the doctor. About one third of the patients expect a consultation with

  10. The prosecution of violent psychiatric inpatients: one respectable intervention.

    PubMed

    Rachlin, S

    1994-01-01

    Is arrest and prosecution an acceptable response to assault committed by a psychiatric inpatient? The first reported case of such a response was in 1978, and the second not until seven years later. Soon after, an inconclusive debate over the propriety of prosecuting patients, with additional illustrative examples, took place in the psychiatric literature. The present author adds three more case reports in this communication, as well as outlines what actually occurs in his state. Three very recent publications have clarified the conflicts and ethical issues in this still-delicate discussion. It is concluded that predatory patient behavior should, in selected circumstances, correctly lead to the imposition of criminal sanctions, whether initiated by victims or clinicians.

  11. Exploring the Lived Experience of Difficult Sleep and Good Sleep Among Psychiatric Inpatients.

    PubMed

    Zust, Barbara Lois; Gruenberg, Marjorie E; Sendelbach, Susan Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore psychiatric inpatients' reflections on their experiences with sleep throughout their lives. Fourteen patients in an acute care behavioral health unit agreed to participate in this study. Participants met individually with a researcher to reflect on times in their lives when they experienced good sleep; times when they had difficulty sleeping; and times when difficult sleep was resolved. The major findings of the study indicated that feeling alone with life problems triggered difficult sleep; while feelings of belonging and purpose were associated with good sleep.

  12. Reliability and Validity of the Beck Depression Inventory--II with Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, Augustine; Kopper, Beverly A; Barrios, Frank; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Bagge, Courtney L.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to validate the Beck Depression Inventory--II (BDI-II; A. T. Beck, R. A. Steer, & G. K. Brown, 1996) in samples of adolescent psychiatric inpatients. The sample in each substudy was primarily Caucasian. In Study 1, expert raters (N=7) and adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N=13) evaluated the BDI-II items to assess…

  13. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.160 Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. “Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21” means services that— (a) Are provided under the direction of a... under age 21. 440.160 Section 440.160 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES,...

  14. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.160 Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. “Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21” means services that— (a) Are provided under the direction of a... under age 21. 440.160 Section 440.160 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES,...

  15. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.160 Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. “Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21” means services that— (a) Are provided under the direction of a... under age 21. 440.160 Section 440.160 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES,...

  16. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.160 Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. “Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21” means services that— (a) Are provided under the direction of a... under age 21. 440.160 Section 440.160 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES,...

  17. Characterizing Aggressive and Noncompliant Behaviors in a Children's Psychiatric Inpatient Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Cardona, Laurie; Martin, Andres

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate aggression and noncompliance among child psychiatric inpatients in relation to demographic, clinical, and hospitalization characteristics, including the use of restraints and seclusion. Eighty six children (10.8 plus or minus 2.4 years old, 67% male) consecutively admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit were…

  18. Sensory rooms in psychiatric inpatient care: Staff experiences.

    PubMed

    Björkdahl, Anna; Perseius, Kent-Inge; Samuelsson, Mats; Lindberg, Mathilde Hedlund

    2016-10-01

    There is an increased interest in exploring the use of sensory rooms in psychiatric inpatient care. Sensory rooms can provide stimulation via sight, smell, hearing, touch and taste in a demand-free environment that is controlled by the patient. The rooms may reduce patients' distress and agitation, as well as rates of seclusion and restraint. Successful implementation of sensory rooms is influenced by the attitudes and approach of staff. This paper presents a study of the experiences of 126 staff members who worked with sensory rooms in a Swedish inpatient psychiatry setting. A cross-sectional descriptive survey design was used. Data were collected by a web based self-report 12-item questionnaire that included both open- and closed-ended questions. Our findings strengthen the results of previous research in this area in many ways. Content analyses revealed three main categories: hopes and concerns, focusing on patients' self-care, and the room as a sanctuary. Although staff initially described both negative and positive expectations of sensory rooms, after working with the rooms, there was a strong emphasis on more positive experiences, such as letting go of control and observing an increase in patients' self-confidence, emotional self-care and well-being. Our findings support the important principals of person-centred nursing and recovery-oriented mental health and the ability of staff to implement these principles by working with sensory rooms.

  19. The dynamic appraisal of situational aggression: an instrument to assess risk for imminent aggression in psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Ogloff, James R P; Daffern, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Considerable research has attempted to delineate the demographic and clinical characteristics of high-risk psychiatric patients and identify salient modifiable aspects of aggression prone environments. Recently, there has also been increased interest in the development and testing of structured schemes for the assessment of risk for aggression within inpatient psychiatric settings. Although some of these methods show acceptable predictive validity, their ability to inform day-to-day treatment and management decisions is limited. The current research was designed to identify existing and novel risk factors that would assist staff to identify and manage the risk for aggression in psychiatric inpatient populations. Results showed that assessments supported by structured risk measures were more accurate than unaided clinical judgements based only on nurses' clinical experience and knowledge of the patient alone. Seven test items emerged that were maximally effective at identifying acute psychiatric patients at risk for engaging in inpatient violence within 24 hours; these items have been combined in the development of the Dynamic Appraisal of Situational Aggression. Empirical analyses and clinical experience support the efficacy of the instrument in assisting clinical staff in the identification and management of inpatient aggression.

  20. Psychiatric Correlates of Nonsuicidal Cutting Behaviors in an Adolescent Inpatient Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Lance P.; Spirito, Anthony; Dyl, Jennifer; Kittler, Jennifer; Hunt, Jeffrey I.

    2008-01-01

    This archival study of 288 adolescent psychiatric inpatients examined the psychiatric correlates of cutting behavior. Participants were categorized into Threshold cutters (n = 61), Subthreshold cutters (n = 43), and Noncutters (n = 184). Groups were compared on psychiatric diagnoses, suicidality, and self-reported impairment. Results demonstrated…

  1. Day hospital versus admission for acute psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Max; Crowther, Ruth; Sledge, William Hurt; Rathbone, John; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Background Inpatient treatment is an expensive way of caring for people with acute psychiatric disorders. It has been proposed that many of those currently treated as inpatients could be cared for in acute psychiatric day hospitals. Objectives To assess the effects of day hospital versus inpatient care for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2010) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO. We approached trialists to identify unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of day hospital versus inpatient care, for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Studies were ineligible if a majority of participants were under 18 or over 65, or had a primary diagnosis of substance abuse or organic brain disorder. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted and cross-checked data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We calculated weighted or standardised means for continuous data. Day hospital trials tend to present similar outcomes in slightly different formats, making it difficult to synthesise data. We therefore sought individual patient data so that we could re-analyse outcomes in a common format. Main results Ten trials (involving 2685 people) met the inclusion criteria. We obtained individual patient data for four trials (involving 646 people). We found no difference in the number lost to follow-up by one year between day hospital care and inpatient care (5 RCTs, n = 1694, RR 0.94 CI 0.82 to 1.08). There is moderate evidence that the duration of index admission is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (4 RCTs, n = 1582, WMD 27.47 CI 3.96 to 50.98). There is very low evidence that the duration of day patient care (adjusted days/month) is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (3 RCTs, n = 265, WMD 2.34 days

  2. Improving Awareness of an Acute Psychiatric Unit's Capacity for Admission.

    PubMed

    Benolkin, Lauren; Kinstler, Dan; Delaney, Kathleen R

    2015-08-01

    New admissions to psychiatric inpatient units can significantly impact the environment and level of safety. Maintaining safety is a core and critical responsibility of nursing, but nurses are often overlooked in the decision to admit a patient. Missed opportunities for dialogue between nurses and the admitting physician challenge nurses' ability to proactively manage the therapeutic environment. When nurses are limited in this ability, the outcome can be an unpredictable and unstable milieu. In a 25-bed acute psychiatric inpatient unit, a formalized communication system among the multidisciplinary admission team was developed. Data collected over 1 year demonstrated improved safety. Increasing the admitting provider's awareness of the current unit acuity and involving the nursing staff early in the admission process improved collaboration among care team members and reduced risks to maintaining milieu safety. PMID:26268479

  3. Epidemiology, symptoms, and treatment characteristics of hyponatremic psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Lange-Asschenfeldt, Christian; Kojda, Georg; Cordes, Joachim; Hellen, Florence; Gillmann, Andreas; Grohmann, Renate; Supprian, Tillmann

    2013-12-01

    Hyponatremia is a common phenomenon in psychiatry occurring as an adverse effect to drugs or following polydipsia. We performed a retrospective in-depth analysis of hyponatremia cases in a large unselected population of psychiatric inpatients. During a 3-year period, all cases of hyponatremia were identified among patients admitted to a large psychiatric state and university hospital by the institution's electronic laboratory database. Demographic, treatment-related, and laboratory data were obtained by consecutive chart review, respectively. Hyponatremia occurred in 347 (4.9%) of 7113 cases, of which the majority (78%) displayed only a mild manifestation. Symptoms were recorded in 28.8% of cases, already occurred in mild forms, and comprised gait impairment (45%, including falls), confusion (30%), sedation (26%), and dyspepsia (41%). Age, female sex, nonpsychiatric drug polypharmacy-particularly with thiazides and/or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors-and diagnosis of a mood disorder were associated with more severe hyponatremia, respectively. The proportion of hyponatremic patients treated with venlafaxine, trazodone, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and first-generation antipsychotics, respectively, was significantly higher in the hyponatremia sample than in the normonatremic population. This was, surprisingly, not the case with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or any other antidepressant drug class. We found prescription with second-generation antipsychotics to be significantly associated with less severe hyponatremia.Hyponatremia may be mainly attributed to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, as indicated by decreased serum osmolarity in our sample. Besides old age and female sex, treatment with certain drugs-rather than whole drug classes-carries a substantially increased risk.

  4. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.428 Section 412.428 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES...

  5. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals. 424.13 Section 424.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... PAYMENT Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.13 Requirements for inpatient services of...

  6. Developmental Differences in the Symptomatology of Psychiatric Inpatients with and without Mild Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Marion; Zigler, Edward

    1995-01-01

    The symptomatology of 93 psychiatric inpatients with mild mental retardation was compared with that of a matched sample of inpatients without mental retardation. Patients with retardation displayed more outwardly directed and less inwardly directed symptoms; more symptoms involving action than thought; and psychotic symptom pictures which more…

  7. The Relationship between Seclusion and Restraint Use and Childhood Abuse among Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Joseph H.; Springer, Justin; Beck, Niels C.; Menditto, Anthony; Coleman, James

    2011-01-01

    Seclusion and restraint (S/R) is a controversial topic in the field of psychiatry, due in part to the high rates of childhood physical and sexual abuse found among psychiatric inpatients. The trauma-informed care perspective suggests that the use of S/R with previously abused inpatients may result in retraumatization due to mental associations…

  8. Aerobic exercise improves gastrointestinal motility in psychiatric inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Song, Bong Kil; Oh, Ji Sun; Woo, Seung Seok

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the benefit of aerobic exercise on colonic transit time (CTT) for psychiatric inpatients in a closed ward. METHODS: Sixty consecutive adult inpatients of the Somang Hospital Psychiatry Unit (Eumsung-gun, South Korea), without CTT-related diseases or drug therapies, were recruited for study from March to June of 2012. Upon enrollment, the patients were randomly assigned to partake in a 12-wk instructor-led group aerobic exercise program (exercise group; n = 30) or to maintain their ordinary daily activities (control group; n = 30). The exercise program was structured as 10 min warm-up (stretching), 40 min exercise, and 10 min cool-down (stretching) for three days each week. The exercise sessions consisted of walking only in week one and aerobics from weeks two to 12, with increasing intensity (50% heart rate reserve (HRR) for weeks one to four, 60% HRR for weeks five to eight, and 70% HRR for weeks nine to 12). CTT was measured before (baseline) and after (week 12) the exercise program, in duplicate (on days four and seven), using abdominal radiography and the multiple radio-opaque marker technique. Changes in the exercising patients’ CTT and weight-, cardiovascular- and fitness-related parameters were statistically assessed. RESULTS: The study dropout rate was 30.0%, with 23 patients in the exercise group and 19 patients in the control group completing the study. At week 12, the exercise group showed decreases in body weight (mean ± SE) baseline: 69.4 ± 2.8 vs study-end: 67.6 ± 2.7; P < 0.635) and body mass index (BMI) (25.2 ± 1.1 vs 24.9 ± 0.8; P < 0.810), but the extent of change was not significantly different from that experienced by the control group (body weight: 68.8 ± 4.0 vs 68.8 ± 3.9; BMI: 24.3 ± 1.1 vs 24.4 ± 1.2). However, the exercise group showed significant improvements in leg muscle strength (baseline: 41.7 ± 4.3 vs study-end: 64.1 ± 5.0; P < 0.001), cardio-respiratory endurance (120.5 ± 4.5 vs 105.4 ± 2.8; P < 0

  9. A safe electric medical bed for an acute inpatient behavioral health care setting.

    PubMed

    Wagner, John J; Ingram, Todd N

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the process of developing a safe electric bed for a traditional acute care adult behavioral health inpatient unit. Many articles and studies exist related to creating a safe environment on acute care psychiatric units, but very few address the use of electric hospital beds. The process of adapting a traditional electric bed for inpatient use by the nursing management team of the Behavioral Health Service at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics is described, including specific safety features in the prototype bed. Policy changes during implementation and safety data after 12 months of bed use on the units are also presented. Results indicate that traditional electric hospital beds can be safely adapted for use on traditional acute care psychiatric units.

  10. The Amusement Park Technique in the Treatment of Dually Diagnosed, Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrenko, Kathy D.; Willis, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Identifies common imagery created by psychiatric inpatients through the amusement park technique; demonstrates how the artwork serves to identify the psychodynamic concerns of the mentally ill substance abuser. Connections are examined relating patients choice of image, psychiatric diagnosis, and drug of choice. This technique offers promise for…

  11. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... benefits for 190 days of care in a psychiatric hospital, no further benefits of that type are available to... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Scope of Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days...

  12. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... benefits for 190 days of care in a psychiatric hospital, no further benefits of that type are available to... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Scope of Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days...

  13. Gender Differences in Psychiatric Diagnoses among Inpatients with and without Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Yona; Bradley, Elspeth A.; Gracey, Carolyn D.; Durbin, Janet; Koegl, Chris

    2009-01-01

    There are few published studies on the relationship between gender and psychiatric disorders in individuals with intellectual disabilities. Adults (N = 1,971) with and without intellectual disabilities who received inpatient services for psychiatric diagnosis and clinical issues were examined. Among individuals with intellectual disabilities,…

  14. The Use of the Addiction Severity Index Psychiatric Composite Scores to Predict Psychiatric Inpatient Admissions.

    PubMed

    Drymalski, Walter M; Nunley, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders indicates a need for integrated behavioral health treatment that addresses both types of disorder simultaneously. One component of this integrated treatment is the use of an assessment process that can concurrently identify the presence of each class of disorder. The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) has been extensively used and researched in the field of substance use disorders for over 30 years. The ASI has seven sections, including a section on substance use disorders and a section on psychiatric symptoms, making it a potential candidate for a co-occurring screen during intake. The following study utilized a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to determine an optimal cutoff score on the ASI psychiatric composite score to identify which individuals seeking substance use disorder treatment were admitted to the Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division's psychiatric hospital in the year subsequent to their ASI administration. Of the 19,320 individuals who completed an initial ASI in our system, 343 had an inpatient admission. The receiver operating characteristic curve was statistically significant, with an area under the curve of 0.75. A cutoff of 0.27 had a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.61, such that over 60% (11,963/19,320) of the sample was excluded. These results suggest that the ASI psychiatric composite score may be a useful initial screen to identify those with potential mental health problems/needs in a behavioral health system attempting to integrate addiction and mental health services. PMID:27580192

  15. The Use of the Addiction Severity Index Psychiatric Composite Scores to Predict Psychiatric Inpatient Admissions.

    PubMed

    Drymalski, Walter M; Nunley, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders indicates a need for integrated behavioral health treatment that addresses both types of disorder simultaneously. One component of this integrated treatment is the use of an assessment process that can concurrently identify the presence of each class of disorder. The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) has been extensively used and researched in the field of substance use disorders for over 30 years. The ASI has seven sections, including a section on substance use disorders and a section on psychiatric symptoms, making it a potential candidate for a co-occurring screen during intake. The following study utilized a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to determine an optimal cutoff score on the ASI psychiatric composite score to identify which individuals seeking substance use disorder treatment were admitted to the Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division's psychiatric hospital in the year subsequent to their ASI administration. Of the 19,320 individuals who completed an initial ASI in our system, 343 had an inpatient admission. The receiver operating characteristic curve was statistically significant, with an area under the curve of 0.75. A cutoff of 0.27 had a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.61, such that over 60% (11,963/19,320) of the sample was excluded. These results suggest that the ASI psychiatric composite score may be a useful initial screen to identify those with potential mental health problems/needs in a behavioral health system attempting to integrate addiction and mental health services.

  16. "There's no such thing as a patient": reflections on the significance of the work of D. W. Winnicott for modern inpatient psychiatric treatment.

    PubMed

    Casher, Michael Ira

    2013-01-01

    The writings of D. W. Winnicott, British pediatrician and psychoanalyst, focus on the details of the early dyadic mother-child relationship and how impingements on the smooth unfolding of the developmental process can lead to psychopathology. Several of his concepts, such as holding environment and transitional object, have permeated into psychiatric theory and practice. The scope of his creative theoretical and clinical thinking goes far beyond these well-known terms and has particular relevance to the acute inpatient psychiatric setting. This article outlines the significance of Winnicott's major ideas and how they can be used to better understand the mutative factors of inpatient treatment, to illuminate complex clinical interactions, and to assist in guiding care of psychiatric inpatients. PMID:24651506

  17. Patterns of Utilization and Outcomes of Inpatient Psychiatric Treatment in Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin E.; Saw, Anne; Zane, Nolan W.; Murphy, Beth L.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the knowledge of racial/ethnic disparities in mental health treatment utilization comes from studies examining outpatient services, and less is known about these disparities in inpatient services. This empirical gap may limit our understanding of these disparities since inpatient treatment is the most intensive form of specialty mental health care for patients with psychological disorders. We conducted a systematic chart review of 129 Asian American and 198 White American psychiatric inpatients to examine patterns of inpatient psychiatric treatment utilization. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from admission and discharge records during a two-year timeframe. Patterns of diagnoses revealed that Asian American patients utilized inpatient services for more severe psychiatric diagnoses compared to White American patients. Despite this, there were no racial/ethnic differences in levels of functional impairment at admission, and there were no racial/ethnic differences in length of treatment stay. For Asian American patients, level of psychosocial functioning at admission predicted length of stay. A better understanding of patterns of inpatient treatment use is needed to meet the clinical needs of Asian Americans with psychiatric disorders. PMID:25984267

  18. Psychiatric illness in inpatients with neurological disorders: patients' views on discussion of emotional problems with neurologists.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, K W; Goldberg, D P

    1984-01-01

    The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in inpatients with neurological disorders and the extent to which it is detected by neurologists were measured by using a two stage model of psychiatric assessment and from information recorded in the patients' medical notes. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was estimated as 39%, of which 72% was unrecognised by the neurologists. Only a minority of patients with an uncertain physical diagnosis had a psychiatric illness, showing the error in assuming that a patient's physical symptoms arise from a psychological disturbance if an organic aetiology cannot be determined. When the patients were interviewed on their discharge from hospital they were divided on whether they had wished to discuss their mood with neurologists while they were in hospital. The reasons that they gave suggested that interactions between patients and doctors and the lack of ward facilities for private consultations with doctors are important determinants of hidden psychiatric morbidity in medical inpatients. PMID:6434026

  19. Quality of interactions influences everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care—patients’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Molin, Jenny; Graneheim, Ulla H.; Lindgren, Britt-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Everyday life consists of daily activities that are taken for granted. It forms the foundation for human efforts and contains elements of both comfort and boredom. Because everyday life escapes no one, life in a psychiatric ward will become ordinary while staying there. This study aims to explore everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care based on patients’ experiences. We individually interviewed 16 participants with experiences of psychiatric inpatient care and analysed the data in accordance with the methods of grounded theory. Data collection and analysis continued in parallel in accordance with the method. Our results showed that everyday life is linked to the core category quality of interactions influences everyday life, and three constructed categories—staff makes the difference, looking for shelter in a stigmatizing environment, and facing a confusing care content—were related to the core category. Our results highlight the importance of ordinary relationships between staff and patients in psychiatric inpatient care. These results can be used to develop nursing interventions to improve psychiatric inpatient care and might also be used as a basis for reflective dialogues among staff. PMID:26806313

  20. Validity and reliability of an inpatient severity of psychiatric illness measure.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Bentson H; Kovas, Anne E; Haugan, Shelby L; Pollack, David A; Mahler, Jo M

    2005-01-01

    Inpatient psychiatric severity measures are often used but few psychometric data are available. This study evaluated the psychometric properties (reliability and validity) of a measure used to assess severity of psychiatric illness among inpatients. Using the severity measure, minimally trained raters conducted retrospective patient record reviews to assess medical necessity for psychiatric hospitalization. The data analysis compared 135 civilly committed psychiatric inpatients with a heterogeneous group of 248 psychiatric inpatients at a general hospital. The severity measure showed acceptable inter-rater reliability in both populations. Two-way analysis of variance showed that the intra-class correlation coefficient for the total score was 0.65 for general hospital subjects and 0.63 for civilly committed subjects. Differences in mean scores were substantial (15 out of a possible 75 points for general hospital subjects versus 42 for civilly committed subjects, Mann-Whitney U = 562, p < 0.001). As expected, all civilly committed subjects were well above admission cut-off score of 12, versus only 64% of the general hospital patients. The measure is appropriate for retrospective severity assessment and may also be useful for pre-admission screening.

  1. Self-reported peer victimization and suicidal ideation in adolescent psychiatric inpatients: the mediating role of negative self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Jones, Heather A; Bilge-Johnson, Sumru; Rabinovitch, Annie E; Fishel, Hazel

    2014-10-01

    The current study investigated relationships among self-reported peer victimization, suicidality, and depression in adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Sixty-seven adolescent psychiatric inpatients at a Midwestern children's hospital completed measures of bullying and peer victimization, suicidal ideation, and depression during their inpatient stay. Analyses indicated significant moderate correlations among victimization, suicidal ideation, and depression in adolescents. Results from mediational analyses found that negative self-esteem mediated the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation. To date, this study is the first to directly examine the mechanisms underlying the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation in adolescent psychiatric inpatients. PMID:23827938

  2. Intervention to reduce inpatient psychiatric admission in a metropolitan city.

    PubMed

    Amirsadri, Alireza; Mischel, Edward; Haddad, Luay; Tancer, Manuel; Arfken, Cynthia L

    2015-02-01

    When psychiatric hospitalization is over-used, it represents a financial drain and failure of care. We evaluated implementation and cessation of transporting people medically certified for psychiatric hospitalization to a central psychiatric emergency service for management and re-evaluation of hospitalization need. After implementation, the hospitalization rate declined 89% for 346 transported patients; only four of the nonhospitalized patients presented in crisis again in the next 30 days. Following cessation, the hospitalization rate jumped 59% compared to the preceding year. Costs declined 78.7% per diverted patient. The findings indicate that it is possible to reduce hospitalization and costs, and maintain quality care.

  3. Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in psychiatric inpatients in a northern Mexican city

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Alanis-Quiñones, Olga-Patricia; Arreola-Valenzuela, Miguel-Ángel; Rodríguez-Briones, Alfredo; Piedra-Nevarez, Luis-Jorge; Duran-Morales, Ehecatl; Estrada-Martínez, Sergio; Martínez-García, Sergio-Arturo; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Background Patients with psychiatric disorders were found to show a high seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection. There is scarce information about the epidemiology of T. gondii infection in psychiatric patients in Mexico. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalence of T. gondii infection and associated socio-demographic, clinical and behavioural characteristics in a population of psychiatric patients in Durango City, Mexico. Seroprevalence in patients was compared with that obtained in a control population. Methods One hundred and thirty seven inpatients of a public psychiatric hospital and 180 controls were examined for the presence of IgG and IgM antibodies against T. gondii by enzyme-linked immunoassay (Diagnostic Automation Inc., Calabasas, CA, USA). The control population consisted of blood donors of a public blood bank and elderly persons attending a senior center in the same city. Age in controls (42 years +/- 20.2) was comparable with that of the psychiatric patients (43.7 years +/-13.8) (p = 0.42). Socio-demographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics from the patients were also obtained. Results Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies indicating latent infection with T. gondii was found in 25 (18.2%) of 137 psychiatric inpatients and 16 (8.9%) of 180 controls (p = 0.02). Ten (26.3%) of 38 schizophrenic patients had latent infection and this prevalence was also significantly higher than that observed in controls (p = 0.005). Prevalence of anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies was comparable among patients and controls (4.4% vs 2.2%, respectively, p = 0.22). Multivariate analysis showed that T. gondii infection in inpatients was positively associated with sexual promiscuity (adjusted OR = 15.8; 95% CI: 3.8–64.8), unwashed raw fruit consumption (adjusted OR = 5.19; 95% CI: 2.3–11.3), and a history of surgery (adjusted OR = 6.5; 95% CI: 2.6–16), and negatively associated with lamb meat consumption (adjusted OR = 0.26; 95% CI: 0.10–0.63). Conclusion In

  4. Family Burden of Demented and Depressed Elderly Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liptzin, Benjamin; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Found no significant differences in burden for relatives of demented and depressed patients admitted to geriatric psychiatry inpatient unit. Although at follow-up depressed patients were more improved than demented patients, their caregivers did not experience any greater decrease in burden. Families of depressed patients may require as much…

  5. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hospital wage index and information regarding whether an adjustment to the Federal per diem base rate is... national urban and rural cost to charge ratio median and ceilings. CMS will apply the national cost to charge ratio to— (1) New inpatient psychiatric facilities that have not submitted their first...

  6. Observations on the theoretical bases for seclusion of the psychiatric inpatient.

    PubMed

    Gutheil, T G

    1978-03-01

    Contemporary controversy concerning the seclusion of psychiatric inpatients is focused primarily on the issues of civil rights and behavior control. The author believes that we are in danger of losing sight of the therapeutic aspects of this treatment modality. He offers a brief review of the theoretical and clinical rationale for seclusion.

  7. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR...'s payment is based on the excluded hospital with capital market basket under the update methodology... cost report. (2) Inpatient psychiatric facilities whose operating or capital cost to charge ratio is...

  8. Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Admission Rates and Subsequent One-Year Mortality in England: 1998-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Anthony; Clacey, Joe; Seagroatt, Valerie; Goldacre, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a time of very rapid change not only in physical but also psychological development. During the teenage years there is a reported rise in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate age- and sex-specific National Health Service (NHS) hospital inpatient admission rates for psychiatric…

  9. Construct Validity of a Self-Report Measure of Alexithymia in a Psychiatric Inpatient Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Robert F.; O'Neill, Richard M.

    1993-01-01

    Examined construct validity of Shipko and Noviello's alexithymia scale (SNALEX), designed to assess one's difficulty identifying and expressing feelings, in 101 psychiatric inpatients. SNALEX scores correlated positively with Rorschach index of verbal productivity and negatively with subject age. Results do not support construct validity of SNALEX…

  10. Differing Levels of Superstitious Beliefs among Three Groups: Psychiatric Inpatients, Churchgoers, and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Sheryl L.

    This study investigated the level of superstitious belief among 175 persons in three categories: persons undergoing inpatient psychiatric treatment, churchgoers, and college students. A 50-item inventory consisting of positive and negative common superstitions, including a 5-item invalidity subscale, was administered. Using a 2 (male, female) x 3…

  11. Prevalence of dissociative disorders among psychiatric inpatients in a German university clinic.

    PubMed

    Gast, U; Rodewald, F; Nickel, V; Emrich, H M

    2001-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of dissociative disorders among psychiatric inpatients in Germany and to investigate the relationship between childhood trauma and dissociation. The German version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), the Fragebogen für Dissoziative Symptome (FDS), was used to screen 115 consecutive inpatients admitted to the psychiatric clinic of a university hospital. Patients with FDS scores higher than 20 were interviewed by a trained clinician, using the German translation of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D-R). The German version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) was administered to investigate prevalence of childhood trauma and relations between childhood trauma and dissociation in adult life. Twenty-five of the 115 patients (21.7%) had a score higher than 20 on the FDS. Of these, 15 patients were interviewed with the SCID-D-R. One patient was diagnosed with a dissociative identity disorder, three with dissociative disorders not otherwise specified, and one patient with depersonalization disorder. All diagnoses were confirmed clinically. A significant positive relationship was found between the severity of childhood trauma and dissociation. Dissociative disorders are common among German psychiatric inpatients. Clinicians who work in psychiatric inpatient units should be mindful of these disorders.

  12. Resigned Professionalism? Non-Acute Inpatients and Resident Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanstone, Meredith; Watling, Christopher; Goldszmidt, Mark; Weijer, Charles; Lingard, Lorelei

    2014-01-01

    A growing group of inpatients on acute clinical teaching units have non-acute needs, yet require attention by the team. While anecdotally, these patients have inspired frustration and resource pressures in clinical settings, little is known about the ways in which they influence physician perceptions of the learning environment. This qualitative…

  13. Forensic psychiatric inpatients served in the United States: regional and system differences.

    PubMed

    Way, B B; Dvoskin, J A; Steadman, H J

    1991-01-01

    This research note presents data about regional and system variations in psychiatric inpatient services for forensic patients provided in state operated psychiatric inpatient programs in the United States in 1986. Patient census by legal status and service provision information were collected from state forensic directors. In 1986, about 5,400 patients found not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI) and 3,200 patients found incompetent to stand trial (IST) were being served in state operated inpatient units. About 70 percent of both groups were being served in designated forensic beds. There were wide differences among the states in the volume and rates for NGRI, IST, forensic exams, and dangerous civil patients (DCP). The regional analyses revealed large variability among states within each region.

  14. A guest in the house: nursing instructors' experiences of the moral distress felt by students during inpatient psychiatric clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Wojtowicz, Bernadine; Hagen, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Significant research has been done on the impact of moral distress among nurses, particularly in acute and intensive care settings. However, little research to date has investigated the experiences that nursing students have with moral distress. Additionally, there is a dearth of research on the role of nursing instructors' perceptions of their responsibilities to their students when encountering morally distressing situations. This manuscript describes a qualitative study conducted with eight mental health nursing instructors who acknowledged a responsibility for helping students deal with moral distress and ethical issues, but who also struggled with ways to do so. Additionally, instructors expressed frustration with their "guest" status on inpatient psychiatric units and their powerlessness to effect moral change in a medical model of psychiatric care.

  15. The psychiatric inpatient physical health assessment sheet (PIPHAS): a useful tool to improve the speed, efficiency, and documentation of physical examination in new psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Pettipher, Alexander; Ovens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    There is increased morbidity and mortality among patients suffering from mental illness. This is believed to be multi-factorial. Poor access to healthcare, the stigma of mental illness, reduced clinic attendance, lifestyle factors, and side effects of medications are cited as possible contributing factors. It is therefore vital to perform a physical examination to identify previously undiagnosed conditions during the admission of a psychiatric inpatient. The Royal College of Psychiatrists recommends that all patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital should receive a full physical examination on admission, or within twenty-four hours of admission. A snapshot audit was carried out at Prospect Park Hospital in Reading, which highlighted that The Royal College of Psychiatrist's recommendation, along with Trust guidelines regarding physical examination were not being met, with only 78 out of 111 patients (70.3%) undergoing an examination during their admission. In addition to this, examinations were often poorly documented and not covering all examination domains. A psychiatric inpatient physical health assessment sheet (PIPHAS) was designed and introduced, providing a quick and standardised approach to the documentation of a physical examination. After the intervention was put into practice, its impact was assessed by performing a retrospective review of the admission clerking notes of the next 100 admissions to Prospect Park Hospital. Following the introduction of the PIPHAS form there was an increase in the number of patients undergoing physical examination on admission to hospital (75 out of 100 patients, 75%). There was also an increase in the thorough documentation of all examination domains (e.g. respiratory examination) for patients that had a completed PIPHAS form scanned within their medical records. This quality improvement project demonstrates that the PIPHAS form is a useful tool to improve the speed, efficiency, and documentation of a thorough physical

  16. How can we reduce violence and aggression in psychiatric inpatient units?

    PubMed

    Antonysamy, Arokia

    2013-01-01

    The inpatient environments in psychiatric units are not always conducive to patients' recovery. Male patients can easily feel bored especially when they are not interested in indoor activities like arts and crafts. Outdoor activities were little explored in our psychiatric intensive care unit and partly this may reflect a 'risk averse' approach. Like a pressure cooker, the patients' anger and frustration build up and unfortunately they may lash out on staff and other patients placing them at risk. The incidents of violence and aggression in our unit rose to 482 in 2011. The Blackpool zoo was close to our unit and it was felt that our patients may benefit a weekly trip to the zoo. Other activities like computer and gym sessions were maintained. Although there were initial reluctance and anxiety amongst staff to escort patients outside the unit, regular support and encouragement made them more confident and less risk averse. Our patients provided lots of positive feedback and felt better equipped to 'fit in' with their community after discharge. The initial discrimination against our patients at the zoo slowly transformed into partnership working and the authorities at the zoo have offered a training programme for our patients on animal care and hygiene. Over a period of 12 months, the incidence of aggression and violence in the ward reduced to 126. The average length of stay reduced by about 50%. We also discharged patients who recovered remarkably well, directly from the unit rather than stepping down to acute wards. Staff motivation and enthusiasm continued to improve and this was reflected in the reduction in staff sickness rates by more than 50%. Student nurses and doctors were able to understand the positive aspects of patients' lives and skills and felt able to boost their hope and determination. PMID:26734168

  17. Ethnicity and coercion among involuntarily detained psychiatric in-patients.

    PubMed

    Bennewith, Olive; Amos, Tim; Lewis, Glyn; Katsakou, Christina; Wykes, Til; Morriss, Richard; Priebe, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    We assessed whether adult Black and minority ethnic (BME) patients detained for involuntary psychiatric treatment experienced more coercion than similar White patients. We found no evidence of this from patient interviews or from hospital records. The area (mental health trust) where people were treated was strongly associated with both the experience of coercion and the recording of a coercive measure in their records. Regarding charges of institutional racism in psychiatry, this study highlights the importance of investigating the role of area characteristics when assessing the relationship between ethnicity and patient management.

  18. Interpersonal trauma, attachment insecurity and anxiety in an inpatient psychiatric population.

    PubMed

    Wiltgen, Anika; Arbona, Consuelo; Frankel, Leslie; Frueh, B Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Current research suggests that interpersonal trauma has an impact on insecure attachment and anxiety. Some research further suggests that attachment may play a mediating role between traumatic events and psychopathology. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the experience of interpersonal trauma, attachment anxiety, attachment avoidance and clinical anxiety severity among adult psychiatric inpatients who reported having experienced interpersonal trauma after the age of 16. It was hypothesized that attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance would mediate the relationship between interpersonal trauma and clinical anxiety level. This study used archival data on 414 adult psychiatric inpatients in a large city in the Southwest U.S. Results suggest that interpersonal trauma was correlated to attachment avoidance but not to attachment anxiety and that attachment avoidance partially mediated the relation of interpersonal trauma to anxiety. The attachment framework appositely explains how a negative model of other contributes to the relation between experiences of interpersonal trauma and anxiety in adulthood.

  19. A brief behavioral activation treatment for depression. A randomized pilot trial within an inpatient psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Hopko, Derek R; Lejuez, C W; LePage, James P; Hopko, Sandra D; McNeil, Daniel W

    2003-09-01

    The brief behavioral activation treatment for depression (BATD) is a relatively uncomplicated, time-efficient, and cost-effective method for treating depression. Because of these features, BATD may represent a practical intervention within managed care-driven, inpatient psychiatric hospitals. Based on basic behavioral theory and empirical evidence supporting activation strategies, we designed a treatment to increase systematically exposure to positive activities and thereby help to alleviate depressive affect. This study represents a pilot study that extends research on this treatment into the context of an inpatient psychiatric unit. Results demonstrate effectiveness and superiority of BATD as compared with the standard supportive treatment provided within the hospital. A large effect size was demonstrated, despite a limited sample size. The authors discuss the limitations of the study and future directions.

  20. Differentiation of psychotic from nonpsychotic psychiatric inpatients: the Rorschach Perceptual Thinking Index.

    PubMed

    Benedik, Emil; Čoderl, Sana; Bon, Jure; Smith, Bruce L

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the validity of the Rorschach Perceptual Thinking Index (PTI) to detect psychotic perceptual and thought disturbance in a sample of Slovene psychiatric inpatients. Using a sample of 275 adult psychiatric inpatients of both sexes, we examined the differences between patients with psychosis (PP) and patients with no psychotic features (NP) from various diagnostic groups on the global PTI and its subcomponent variables. PPs obtained significantly higher PTI scores, indicating more disturbed perception and more thinking disturbance, than NPs. No differences were found for diagnostic differences within the PP and NP groups. Results are in accordance with previous studies of the PTI as a valid cross-cultural index of perceptual and thinking disturbance. PMID:23410237

  1. Taking personal responsibility: Nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Olsson, Malin

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic nurse-patient relationships are considered essential for good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care. Previous research suggests that inpatient care fails to fulfil patients' expectations in this regard, and that nurses might experience the reality of inpatient care as an obstruction. The aim of the present study was to explore nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in the specific context of psychiatric inpatient care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 skilled, relationship-oriented nurses and assistant nurses in order to explore their experiences with nursing practice related to psychiatric inpatient care. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using an interpretive descriptive approach. Findings describe good nursing practice as a matter of nurses and assistant nurses taking personal responsibility for their actions and for the individual patient as a person. Difficulties in providing dignified nursing care and taking personal responsibility cause them to experience feelings of distress and frustration. Shared values and nursing leadership supports being moral and treating patients with respect, having enough time supports being present and connecting with patients, and working as a part of a competent team with critical daily discussions and diversity supports being confident and building trust. The findings suggest that taking personal responsibility is integral to good nursing practice. If unable to improve poor circumstances, nurses might be forced to promote their own survival by refuting or redefining their responsibility. Nurses need to prioritize being with patients and gain support in shaping their own nursing practice. Nursing leadership should provide moral direction and defend humanistic values. PMID:27378375

  2. Taking personal responsibility: Nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Olsson, Malin

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic nurse-patient relationships are considered essential for good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care. Previous research suggests that inpatient care fails to fulfil patients' expectations in this regard, and that nurses might experience the reality of inpatient care as an obstruction. The aim of the present study was to explore nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in the specific context of psychiatric inpatient care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 skilled, relationship-oriented nurses and assistant nurses in order to explore their experiences with nursing practice related to psychiatric inpatient care. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using an interpretive descriptive approach. Findings describe good nursing practice as a matter of nurses and assistant nurses taking personal responsibility for their actions and for the individual patient as a person. Difficulties in providing dignified nursing care and taking personal responsibility cause them to experience feelings of distress and frustration. Shared values and nursing leadership supports being moral and treating patients with respect, having enough time supports being present and connecting with patients, and working as a part of a competent team with critical daily discussions and diversity supports being confident and building trust. The findings suggest that taking personal responsibility is integral to good nursing practice. If unable to improve poor circumstances, nurses might be forced to promote their own survival by refuting or redefining their responsibility. Nurses need to prioritize being with patients and gain support in shaping their own nursing practice. Nursing leadership should provide moral direction and defend humanistic values.

  3. Self-harm and attempted suicide within inpatient psychiatric services: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    James, Karen; Stewart, Duncan; Bowers, Len

    2012-08-01

    Self harm is a major public health concern, yet there are considerable challenges in providing support for those who self harm within psychiatric inpatient services. This paper presents the first review of research into self harm within inpatient settings. Searches of the main electronic databases were conducted using key words for self harm and inpatient care. There was substantial variation in the rates of self-harm and attempted suicide between studies, but rates were highest on forensic wards. There was no evidence of differences in prevalence of self-harm between men and women; women, however, were at increased risk of attempting suicide. People were more likely to self-harm in private areas of the ward and in the evening hours, and often self-harmed in response to psychological distress, or elements of nursing care that restricted their freedom. Wards used a variety of strategies to prevent self-harm; however, there is little research into their effectiveness.

  4. Patients' own statements of their future risk for violent and self-harm behaviour: a prospective inpatient and post-discharge follow-up study in an acute psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Roaldset, John Olav; Bjørkly, Stål

    2010-06-30

    Recently patients' responsibility for and ownership of their own treatment have been emphasised. A literature search on patients'' structured self-reported assessment of future risk of violent, suicidal or self mutilating behaviour failed to disclose any published empirical research. The present prospective naturalistic study comprised all involuntary and voluntary acutely admitted patients (n=489) to a psychiatric hospital during one year. Patients' self-reported risks of violence and self-harm at admission and at discharge were compared with episodes recorded during hospital stay and 3 months post-discharge. Patients' predictions were significant concerning violent, suicidal and self-injurious behaviour, with AUC values of 0.73 (95%CI=0.61-0.85), 0.92 (95%CI=0.88-0.96) and 0.82 (95%CI=0.67-0.98) for hospital stay, and 0.67 (95%CI=0.58-0.76), 0.63 (95%CI=0.55-0.72) and 0.66 (95%CI=0.57-0.76) after 3 months, respectively. Moderate or higher risk predictions remained significant in multivariate analysis, and risk of violence even after gender stratification. Self-harm predictions were significant for women. Moderate or higher risk scores remained significant predictors of violence one year post-discharge. Controlling for readmissions the results remained the same. Low sensitivity limits the clinical value, but relatively high positive predictive values might be clinically important. Still future research is recommended to explore if self prediction is a valid adjuvant method to established risk assessment procedures.

  5. Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in a German psychiatric inpatient sample.

    PubMed

    Kollei, Ines; Martin, Alexandra; Rein, Katharina; Rotter, Andrea; Jacobi, Andrea; Mueller, Astrid

    2011-08-30

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a distressing or impairing preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance. Only a few studies have examined BDD prevalence in psychiatric settings. Prevalence rates vary widely and most studies have been conducted in outpatient samples. In the current study, we examined 155 adult psychiatric inpatients. Diagnostic criteria of BDD were assessed with the BDD module of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. The prevalence of lifetime BDD was 2.6% (95% CI=0.1-5.1%). Currently 1.9% of the patients suffered from BDD (95% CI=0.0-4.0%). None of these patients were diagnosed with BDD on admission or during hospitalization. The BDD rates found in this study are considerably lower than lifetime and current prevalence rates reported by two other studies conducted in adult psychiatric inpatient settings (Grant et al., 2001; Conroy et al., 2008). The differences may be explained by divergent sample compositions and variation in diagnostic measures. The findings of the current study underline the need for further studies examining BDD prevalence in psychiatric settings and suggest using a combination of screening questionnaire and follow-up interview to diagnose BDD.

  6. Patterns of psychotropic medication use in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alosaimi, Fahad D; Alhabbad, Abdulhadi; Abalhassan, Mohammed F; Fallata, Ebtihaj O; Alzain, Nasser M; Alassiry, Mohammad Zayed; Haddad, Bander Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the pattern of psychotropic medication use and compare this pattern between inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia. Method This cross-sectional observational study was conducted between July 2012 and June 2014 on patients seeking psychiatric advice at major hospitals in five main regions of Saudi Arabia. Male (n=651) and female (n=594) patients who signed the informed consent form and were currently or had been previously using psychotropic medications, irrespective of the patient’s type of psychiatric diagnosis and duration of the disease, were included. A total of 1,246 patients were found to be suitable in the inclusion criteria of whom 464 were inpatients while 782 were outpatients. Results Several studied demographic factors have shown that compared with outpatients, inpatients were more likely to be male (P=0.004), unmarried (P<0.001), have less number of children (1–3; P=0.002), unemployed (P=0.001), have a lower family income (<3,000 SR; P<0.001), live in rural communities (P<0.001), have a lower body mass index (P=0.001), and are smokers (P<0.001); however, there were no differences with regard to age or educational levels. The current frequency of use of psychotropic medications in overall patients was antipsychotics (76.6%), antidepressants (41.4%), mood stabilizers (27.9%), and antianxiety (6.2%). However, compared to outpatients, the current use of medications for inpatients was more frequent (93.8% vs 89.9%, P=0.019) with inpatients more likely to be treated with multiple medications (2.1 vs 1.8 medications). A similar trend was observed in the case of antipsychotics, high potency first-generation antipsychotics, second-generation antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and antianxiety medicines where inpatients were more frequently treated with these medications for all psychiatric diagnoses when compared with outpatients. On the contrary, in the case of antidepressant treatment, an opposite trend was observed

  7. Use of Inpatient Psychiatric Services by Children and Youth under Age 18, United States, 1980. Mental Health Statistical Note No. 175.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milazzo-Sayre, Laura J.; And Others

    The report examines data from three sample surveys of admissions during 1980 to the inpatient psychiatric services of state and mental hospitals and private psychiatric hospitals and the separate inpatient psychiatric services of non-federal general hospitals. Findings revealed that an estimated 81,532 persons under 18 years were admitted to…

  8. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... stay was for diagnosis or treatment of mental illness. (2) After entitlement, all psychiatric care days... for a mental condition and, after 10 days, transferred to a participating psychiatric hospital. The... 150-day pre-entitlement period have no effect on the inpatient hospital benefit days available to...

  9. Is Exposure to Domestic Violence and Violent Crime Associated with Bullying Behaviour among Underage Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustanoja, Susanna; Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Hakko, Helina; Rasanen, Pirkko; Saavala, Hannu; Riala, Kaisa

    2011-01-01

    We examined the relationship of exposure to domestic violence and violence occurring outside home to bullying behaviour in a sample (508; 40.9% males, 59.1% females) of underage psychiatric inpatient adolescents. Participants were interviewed using K-SADS-PL to assess DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses and to gather information about domestic and other…

  10. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the... hospital on the first day of Medicare entitlement and for any of the 150 days immediately before that first... participating in Medicare as a psychiatric hospital on the individual's first day of entitlement. (3)...

  11. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the... hospital on the first day of Medicare entitlement and for any of the 150 days immediately before that first... participating in Medicare as a psychiatric hospital on the individual's first day of entitlement. (3)...

  12. Clinician perceptions of personal safety and confidence to manage inpatient aggression in a forensic psychiatric setting.

    PubMed

    Martin, T; Daffern, M

    2006-02-01

    Inpatient mental health clinicians need to feel safe in the workplace. They also require confidence in their ability to work with aggressive patients, allowing the provision of therapeutic care while protecting themselves and other patients from psychological and physical harm. The authors initiated this study with the predetermined belief that a comprehensive and integrated organizational approach to inpatient aggression was required to support clinicians and that this approach increased confidence and staff perceptions of personal safety. To assess perceptions of personal safety and confidence, clinicians in a forensic psychiatric hospital were surveyed using an adapted version of the Confidence in Coping With Patient Aggression Instrument. In this study clinicians reported the hospital as safe. They reported confidence in their work with aggressive patients. The factors that most impacted on clinicians' confidence to manage aggression were colleagues' knowledge, experience and skill, management of aggression training, use of prevention and intervention strategies, teamwork and the staff profile. These results are considered with reference to an expanding literature on inpatient aggression. It is concluded that organizational resources, policies and frameworks support clinician perceptions of safety and confidence to manage inpatient aggression. However, how these are valued by clinicians and translated into practice at unit level needs ongoing attention.

  13. Effects of a single-session assertiveness music therapy role playing protocol for psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement and measure the effectiveness of a single-session assertiveness music therapy role playing protocol for psychiatric inpatients. Participants (N=133) were randomly assigned by group to one of three conditions: (a) Assertiveness Music Therapy, (b) No Music Assertiveness, or (c) Music No Assertiveness. Participants in both assertiveness conditions role played a number of different commonly occurring scenarios at an inpatient psychiatric facility and in the community. There were no significant between-group differences in posttest quality of life, locus of control, or other subscales. However, participants in both assertiveness conditions tended to have slightly higher internal locus of control and overall quality of life scores than participants in the music no assertiveness condition. Additionally, the assertiveness music therapy condition had higher attendance rates than the other conditions. A higher percentage of participants from both the assertiveness music therapy and music no assertiveness conditions indicated they thought their session was the most helpful/therapeutic group therapy session in which they had participated; this was not the case for the assertiveness no music condition. Future research is warranted to measure the effects of protocols that can help psychiatric patients generalize skills learned in treatment.

  14. Identification of Trauma Exposure and PTSD in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Havens, Jennifer F.; Gudiño, Omar G.; Biggs, Emily A.; Diamond, Ursula N.; Weis, J. Rebecca; Cloitre, Marylene

    2013-01-01

    Trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), though prevalent among adolescent psychiatric inpatients, are under-identified in standard clinical practice. In a retrospective chart review of 140 adolescents admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit, we examine associations between probable PTSD identified through the Child PTSD Symptom Scale and adolescents' service use and clinical characteristics. Results suggest a large discrepancy between rates of probable PTSD identified through standardized assessment and during the emergency room psychiatric evaluation (28.6% vs. 2.2%). Adolescents with probable PTSD had greater clinical severity and service utilization, an increased likelihood of being diagnosed with bipolar disorder (27.5% vs. 9.2%) and being prescribed antipsychotic medications (47.5% vs. 27.6%), and were prescribed more psychotropic medications. Upon discharge, those with probable PTSD were more likely to be assigned a diagnosis of PTSD (45% vs. 7.1%), a comorbid diagnoses of major depressive disorder (30% vs. 14.3%), to be prescribed an antidepressant medication (52.5% vs. 33.7%), and they continued to be prescribed more medications. The under-identification of trauma exposure and PTSD have important implications for the care of adolescents given that accurate diagnosis is a prerequisite for providing effective care. Improved methods for identifying trauma-related problems in standard clinical practice are needed. PMID:22522731

  15. Inpatient psychiatric care in the 21st century: the need for reform.

    PubMed

    Glick, Ira D; Sharfstein, Steven S; Schwartz, Harold I

    2011-02-01

    Driven by financial pressures, the sole focus of psychiatric inpatient treatment has become safety and crisis stabilization. Data are lacking on outcomes of ultrashort-stay hospitalizations; however, such stays may diminish opportunities for a sustained recovery. In the absence of an evidence base to guide clinicians and policy makers, mental health professionals have an ethical obligation to promote what they consider to be best practice. This Open Forum focuses on the need to reconsider the current model of inpatient hospitalization in order to maximize positive outcomes and emphasize appropriate transition to the community and less intensive levels of care. A model of care is presented based on rapid formulation of diagnosis, goals, and treatment modalities before treatment begins. Three phases are described--assessment, implementation, and resolution--with specific principles to guide length-of-stay decisions and requirements for staffing.

  16. [Effectiveness of an inpatient multimodal psychiatric-psychotherapeutic program for the treatment of job burnout].

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Kathleen; Conrad, Nathalie; Straus, Doris; Porschke, Hildburg; von Känel, Roland

    2016-03-16

    We studied the clinical course and long-term effects of inpatient treatment in 723 patients with job burnout referred with an ICD-10 F diagnosis and Z73.0 code («overwhelming exhaustion») to a Swiss hospital specialized in the treatment of job stress-related disorders. Patients were characterized in terms of age, gender, socioeconomic status. Self-rated psychological measures related to general and burnout-specific symptoms (i. e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished personal accomplishments) were applied before and after a six-week treatment program, as well as at 15 months after hospital discharge in 232 patients. The results show that the multimodal inpatient psychiatric-psychotherapeutic treatment was successful with a sustainable effect on psychological well-being (>90 %), including improvements regarding emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishments as well as professional reintegration in 71 % of cases.

  17. [Effects of Ward Interventions on Repeated Critical Incidents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care].

    PubMed

    Ulke, Christine; Klein, Annette M; von Klitzing, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Effects of Ward Interventions on Repeated Critical Incidents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several ward interventions (transition to an open ward concept, individualized treatment plans, tiered crisis-management, staff training, quality control) on repeated critical incidents, non-restrictive and restrictive measures. The outcome variables were compared in two time periods, 2007 and 2011. The study included 74 critical incident reports of 51 child and adolescent inpatients that had at least one hospital stay and one critical incident in the selected time periods. Aggressive, self-harming, and absconding incidents were included. The quantitative results suggest that ward interventions can contribute to a reduction of repeated critical incidents and restrictive measures. The qualitative evaluation suggests a cultural change of crisis management.

  18. [Effectiveness of an inpatient multimodal psychiatric-psychotherapeutic program for the treatment of job burnout].

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Kathleen; Conrad, Nathalie; Straus, Doris; Porschke, Hildburg; von Känel, Roland

    2016-03-16

    We studied the clinical course and long-term effects of inpatient treatment in 723 patients with job burnout referred with an ICD-10 F diagnosis and Z73.0 code («overwhelming exhaustion») to a Swiss hospital specialized in the treatment of job stress-related disorders. Patients were characterized in terms of age, gender, socioeconomic status. Self-rated psychological measures related to general and burnout-specific symptoms (i. e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished personal accomplishments) were applied before and after a six-week treatment program, as well as at 15 months after hospital discharge in 232 patients. The results show that the multimodal inpatient psychiatric-psychotherapeutic treatment was successful with a sustainable effect on psychological well-being (>90 %), including improvements regarding emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishments as well as professional reintegration in 71 % of cases. PMID:26980682

  19. Use of novel psychoactive substances by inpatients on general adult psychiatric wards

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jack L; Mogford, Daniel V; Lawrence, Rebecca J; Lawrie, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Non-illicit alternatives to controlled drugs, known as novel psychoactive substances (NPS), have recently risen to prominence. They are readily available, with uncertain pharmacology and no widely available assay. Given that psychiatric patients are at risk of comorbid substance abuse, we hypothesised that NPS use would be present in the psychiatric population, and sought to determine its prevalence and investigate the characteristics of those who use these drugs with a retrospective review of discharge letters. Setting General adult inpatient wards of a psychiatric hospital in a Scottish city. Participants All adult inpatients (18–65) discharged from general psychiatric wards between 1 July 2014 and 31 December 2014. Of the 483 admissions identified, 46 were admissions for maintenance electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and were excluded. Of the remaining 437 admissions, 49 discharge letters were unobtainable, leaving 388 admissions to analyse. Primary outcome measure The mention, or lack thereof, of NPS use in discharge letters was our planned primary outcome measure and was also the primary outcome measure we used in our analysis. Results NPS use was identified in 22.2% of admissions, contributing to psychiatric symptoms in 59.3%. In comparison to non-users, NPS users were younger (p<0.01), male and more likely to have a forensic history ((p<0.001) for both). The diagnosis of drug-induced psychosis was significantly more likely in NPS users (p<0.001, OR 18.7, 95% CI 8.1 to 43.0) and the diagnosis of depression was significantly less likely (p<0.005, OR 0.133, CI 0.031 to 0.558). Use of cannabis was significantly more likely in NPS users (p<0.001, OR 4.2, CI 2.5 to 7.1), as was substitute opiate prescribing (p<0.001, OR 3.7, CI 1.8 to 7.4). Conclusions NPS use was prevalent among young, male psychiatric inpatients, in particular those with drug-induced psychosis and often occurred alongside illicit drug use. PMID:27165643

  20. Antipsychotic Medication Prescribing Practices Among Adult Patients Discharged From State Psychiatric Inpatient Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    HOLLEN, VERA; SCHACHT, LUCILLE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to explore antipsychotic medication prescribing practices in a sample of 86,034 patients discharged from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals and to find the prevalence of patients discharged with no antipsychotic medications, on antipsychotic monotherapy, and on antipsychotic polypharmacy. For patients discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the study explored the adjusted rates of antipsychotic polypharmacy, the reasons patients were discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the proportion of antipsychotic polypharmacy by mental health disorder, and the characteristics associated with being discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed all discharges for adult patients (18 to 64 y of age) from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals between January 1 and December 31, 2011. The relationship among variables was explored using χ2, t test, and analysis of variance. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Results: The prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was 12%. Of the discharged patients receiving at least 1 antipsychotic medication (adjusted rate), 18% were on antipsychotic polypharmacy. The strongest predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy being prescribed were having a diagnosis of schizophrenia and a length of stay of 90 days or more. Patients were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy primarily to reduce their symptoms. Conclusions: Antipsychotic polypharmacy continues at a high enough rate to affect nearly 10,000 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia each year in state psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Further analysis of the clinical presentation of these patients may highlight particular aspects of the illness and its previous treatment that are contributing to practices outside the best-practice guideline. An increased understanding of trend data, patient characteristics, and national benchmarks provides an opportunity for

  1. Relationship between Psychiatric Nurse Work Environments and Nurse Burnout in Acute Care General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Aiken, Linda H.; McClaine, Lakeetra; Hanlon, Alexandra L

    2010-01-01

    Following deinstitutionalization, inpatient psychiatric services moved from state institutions to general hospitals. Despite the magnitude of these changes, evaluations of the quality of inpatient care environments in general hospitals are limited. This study examined the extent to which organizational factors of the inpatient psychiatric environments are associated with psychiatric nurse burnout. Organizational factors were measured by an instrument endorsed by the National Quality Forum. Robust clustered regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between organizational factors in 67 hospitals and levels of burnout for 353 psychiatric nurses. Lower levels of psychiatric nurse burnout was significantly associated with inpatient environments that had better overall quality work environments, more effective managers, strong nurse-physician relationships, and higher psychiatric nurse-to-patient staffing ratios. These results suggest that adjustments in organizational management of inpatient psychiatric environments could have a positive effect on psychiatric nurses’ capacity to sustain safe and effective patient care environments. PMID:20144031

  2. Serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) genotype, childhood abuse, and suicide attempts in adult psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Brandon E; McGeary, John E; Beevers, Christopher G; Miller, Ivan W

    2006-12-01

    There is growing evidence that a functional polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) moderates the impact of negative life events (e.g., childhood abuse) on the development of depression. However, it is unclear whether the gene x environment interaction predicts suicide attempts specifically. In addition, previous studies have not examined different forms of childhood abuse separately. In the current study, we found that 5-HTTLPR genotype moderated the link between childhood physical and sexual, but not emotional, abuse and adult psychiatric inpatients' histories of suicide attempts.

  3. [Treatment in psychiatric day hospital in comparison with inpatient wards in different European health care systems--objectives of EDEN project].

    PubMed

    Kiejna, Andrzej; Kallert, Thomas W; Rymaszewska, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the objectives and design of an ongoing multicenter randomized, controlled trial EDEN (European Day Hospital EvaluatioN). The EDEN-study aims to evaluate the efficacy of acute psychiatric treatment in a day hospital setting in five European centres: Dresden, London, Michalovce, Prague and Wroclaw. The main hypothesis is that day hospital treatment for acute psychiatric patients is as effective as conventional inpatient hospital care. The objectives of the study are to evaluate the viability and effectiveness of day hospitals for acute psychiatric treatment, to identify subgroups of patients with a more or less favourable outcome so that the treatment setting might be specifically applied and to ascertain the cost-effectiveness of day hospital treatment compared to conventional inpatient treatment. The study utilises a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) design with repeated measures at a maximum of six time points: at admission (t1), one week after admission (t2), four weeks after admission (t3), discharge (t4), three months after discharge (t5), and 12 months after discharge (t6). A combination of well-established standardised assessment instruments and open questions is used in 6 time periods. If the findings accept the main hypothesis of the study, some practical consequences could be inevitable: at a mental health policy level, these results could lead to an increase in the capacity of day hospitals; at the clinical level clinicians could redefine their concepts of care to consider the day hospital as an alternative to conventional inpatient treatment; from economic point of view could lead to reduction of treatment costs.

  4. Non-suicidal self-injury, attempted suicide, and suicidal intent among psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Andover, Margaret S; Gibb, Brandon E

    2010-06-30

    Although attempted suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) differ in several important ways, a significant number of individuals report histories of both behaviors. The current study further examined the relations between NSSI and attempted suicide among psychiatric inpatients. Self-report questionnaires were administered to 117 psychiatric inpatients at a general hospital (M=39.45 years old, S.D.=12.84 years, range=17-73 years). We found that presence and number of NSSI episodes were significantly related to presence and number of suicide attempts. Supporting the importance of NSSI assessment, patients' history of NSSI (presence and frequency) was more strongly associated with history of suicide attempts than were patients' depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and symptoms of borderline personality disorder, and as strongly associated with suicide attempt history as current levels of suicidal ideation. Finally, among patients with a history of suicide attempts, those with an NSSI history reported significantly greater lethal intent for their most severe attempt, and patients' number of prior NSSI episodes was positively correlated with the level of lethal intent associated with their most severe suicide attempt.

  5. Use of video feedback intervention in an inpatient perinatal psychiatric setting to improve maternal parenting.

    PubMed

    Bilszta, Justin L C; Buist, Anne E; Wang, Fandy; Zulkefli, Nur Rusydina

    2012-08-01

    This study utilizes video feedback to improve maternal parenting behavior in clinically depressed mothers admitted to a perinatal inpatient psychiatric unit. Depressed mothers (n = 74) were randomized to "video" (n = 25), "verbal" (n = 26), or "standard care" (n = 23). "Video" mothers were taped playing with their infant; interaction was reviewed with a mental health specialist. "Verbal" mothers only discussed interaction with their infant. "Standard care" mothers received only routine inpatient care. Mothers were assessed for mental health status, perceptions of baby behavior, and parenting competence. There was significant improvement in mental health status of all participants, regardless of intervention. Neither intervention had an advantage, compared to standard care, in improving parenting confidence or perceptions of infant behavior. Video mothers were more likely to report no change in their parenting confidence the more feedback sessions completed. The number of intervention sessions for each participant was limited by the duration of their inpatient admission. Most participants were on simultaneous pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, as well as receiving intensive mothercraft assistance; this may have influenced intervention effectiveness. Results suggest that this type of intervention may be beneficial, but in the current format does not add sufficiently to standard care to be detected by the measures used.

  6. Reducing the use of seclusion and restraint in psychiatric emergency and adult inpatient services- improving patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Wale, Joyce B; Belkin, Gary S; Moon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of seclusion and restraint (S/R) use has been given national priority by the US government, The Joint Commission, and patient advocacy groups. It is associated with high rates of patient and staff injuries and is a coercive and potentially traumatizing intervention. The New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) is the largest municipal health care system in the country, with 11 HHC facilities operating psychiatric emergency services and inpatient psychiatric services. HHC operates 1117 adult inpatient psychiatric beds with an average length of stay of 22.2 days that generated over 19,000 discharges in 2009. In 2009, there were over 36,000 psychiatric emergency services visits. HHC's Office of Behavioral Health provides strategic leadership, planning, and support for the operations and quality objectives of these services. In January 2007, the corporate office initiated the Seclusion and Restraint Reduction Initiative, with a sequenced, intensive series of interventions and strategies to help focus the behavioral health leadership and staff on the need for continued culture change toward a more patient-centered and safe system of psychiatric emergency and adult inpatient care. From 2007 to 2009, there was a substantial decline in HHC's overall rate of S/R incidents in inpatient units. The more substantial impact was in the reduced overall time spent in S/R; the reduced frequency of use of S/R; and the reduced likelihood of patient injury from S/R use. PMID:21841927

  7. Association of Family Structure to Later Criminality: A Population-Based Follow-Up Study of Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients in Northern Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikaheimo, Olli; Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helina; Rasanen, Pirkko

    2013-01-01

    The influence of family structure on criminality in adolescents is well acknowledged in population based studies of delinquents, but not regarding adolescent psychiatric inpatients. The association of family structure to criminality was examined among 508 adolescents receiving psychiatric inpatient treatment between 2001 and 2006. Family structure…

  8. A contact-based intervention for people recently discharged from inpatient psychiatric care: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bennewith, Olive; Evans, Jonathan; Donovan, Jenny; Paramasivan, Sangeetha; Owen-Smith, Amanda; Hollingworth, William; Davies, Rosemary; O'Connor, Susan; Hawton, Keith; Kapur, Navneet; Gunnell, David

    2014-01-01

    People recently discharged from inpatient psychiatric care are at high risk of suicide and self-harm, with 6% of all suicides in England occurring in the 3 months after discharge. There is some evidence from a randomized trial carried out in the United States in the 1960s-70s that supportive letters sent by psychiatrists to high-risk patients in the period following hospital discharge resulted in a reduction in suicide. The aim of the current pilot study was to assess the feasibility of conducting a similar trial, but in a broader group of psychiatric discharges, in the context of present day UK clinical practice. The intervention was piloted on 3 psychiatric inpatient wards in southwest England. On 2 wards a series of 8 letters were sent to patients over the 12 months after discharge and 6 letters were sent from the third ward over a 6 month period. A total of 102 patients discharged from the wards received at least 1 letter, but only 45 (44.1%) received the full series of letters. The main reasons for drop-out were patient opt-out (n = 24) or readmission (n = 26). In the context of a policy of intensive follow-up post-discharge, qualitative interviews with service users showed that most already felt adequately supported and the intervention added little to this. Those interviewed felt that it was possible that the intervention might benefit people new to or with little follow-up from mental health services but that fewer letters should be mailed. PMID:24673299

  9. Vitamin D status of adolescent inpatients in a secure psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Simon A.; Riordan-Eva, Elliott; Bhandari, Bharathi; Ferdinandez, Uresh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to use routinely collected data on vitamin D levels of adolescents detained in a secure psychiatric hospital to see if this at-risk group for vitamin D deficiency do in fact have low vitamin D levels. Methods: Vitamin D blood levels were collated from clinical records of inpatients admitted to Bluebird House, a medium secure adolescent unit, since 2012. Corresponding data were gathered to include gender, ethnic status and age. Blood levels were assessed on admission to the unit and after treatment with vitamin D supplementation, if indicated. Results: Only 3 out of the 35 patients (8.6%) had adequate vitamin D levels (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25-OHD] > 50 nmol/l). A total of 23 patients (65.7%) had levels consistent with deficiency (25-OHD < 30 nmol/l) with the remaining 9 patients (25.7%) showing levels indicating possible deficiency (25-OHD 30–50 nmol/l. Conclusions: Vitamin D levels were low in our sample of young people admitted to a secure psychiatric hospital. This is the first published study of vitamin D levels in a secure adolescent psychiatric hospital. The results point to the need for routine prescription of vitamin D to adolescents held in secure conditions such as hospitals, secure children’s homes and youth offender institutes. PMID:27536343

  10. Handover of patient information from the crisis assessment and treatment team to the inpatient psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Waters, Amanda; Sands, Natisha; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Henderson, Kathryn

    2015-06-01

    Handover, or the communication of patient information between clinicians, is a fundamental component of health care. Psychiatric settings are dynamic environments relying on timely and accurate communication to plan care and manage risk. Crisis assessment and treatment teams are the primary interface between community and mental health services in many Australian and international health services, facilitating access to assessment, treatment, and admission to hospital. No previous research has investigated the handover between crisis assessment and treatment teams and inpatient psychiatric units, despite the importance of handover to care planning. The aim of the present study was to identify the nature and types of information transferred during these handovers, and to explore how these guides initial care planning. An observational, exploratory study design was used. A 20-item handover observation tool was used to observe 19 occasions of handover. A prospective audit was undertaken on clinical documentation arising from the admission. Clinical information, including psychiatric history and mental state, were handed over consistently; however, information about consumer preferences was reported less consistently. The present study identified a lack of attention to consumer preferences at handover, despite the current focus on recovery-oriented models for mental health care, and the centrality of respecting consumer preferences within the recovery paradigm. PMID:25438620

  11. Psychiatric and Cognitive Functioning in Adolescent Inpatients with Histories of Dating Violence Victimization

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Christie J.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Spirito, Anthony; Thompson, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    The presence of dating violence victimization as well as its relation to psychiatric diagnosis and cognitive processes was examined in a sample of 155 adolescents hospitalized in a psychiatric facility. Participants and their parents completed semi-structured diagnostic interviews. Participants also completed self-report measures of dating violence victimization and cognitive functioning. Seventy-seven percent of adolescents who had initiated dating reported psychological, physical, and/or sexual abuse by a dating partner over the past year. Victims of psychological abuse alone as well as physical and/or sexual violence endorsed higher rates of major depressive disorder compared to non-victims. Physical/sexual dating violence victims also endorsed significantly higher rates of PTSD and alcohol use disorders, more frequent co-occurrence of externalizing and internalizing disorders, and more frequent negative cognitive biases, relative to non-victimized adolescents. Findings suggest that psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents with dating violence histories represent a subgroup of adolescent inpatients with a particularly serious clinical picture. PMID:20824193

  12. Psychiatric In-Patients Away from Home: Accounts by People with Intellectual Disabilities in Specialist Hospitals outside Their Home Localities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Deborah; Hall, Ian; Ali, Afia; Hassell, Holly; Patkas, Iannis

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study reflects a growing concern with the placement of people with intellectual disabilities and complex mental health problems in out of area placements at a distance from their families and communities. Materials and methods: We interviewed service users (n = 17) living in out of area in-patient psychiatric units using a…

  13. Ringleader bullying: association with psychopathic narcissism and theory of mind among child psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Stellwagen, Kurt K; Kerig, Patricia K

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the association of ringleader bullying with psychopathic traits and theory of mind among 100 youth aged 10-15 (62 boys and 38 girls) receiving inpatient psychiatric services at a state facility. Results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated a positive association between ringleader bullying and psychopathic narcissism, and a significant interaction effect between narcissism and theory of mind. More specifically, narcissism moderated the relationship between theory of mind and ringleader bullying such that theory of mind was positively associated with ringleader bullying when levels of narcissism were high, and theory of mind was negatively associated ringleader bullying when levels of narcissism were low. The discussion of these results focuses on the importance of developing effective treatment techniques for youth whose bullying behavior is associated with narcissistic features and social acuity.

  14. Validation of the Suicide Resilience Inventory-25 (SRI-25) in adolescent psychiatric inpatient samples.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Peter M; Freedenthal, Stacey; Wong, Jane L; Osman, Augustine; Norizuki, Tamami

    2012-01-01

    Resilience has been associated with a markedly decreased chance for risky behaviors following a trauma or other negative life event. This study examined the factor structure and psychometric properties of a self-report measure of resilience, the Suicide Resilience Inventory-25 (SRI-25; Osman et al., 2004 ), among psychiatric inpatient adolescents. In Study 1, we conducted confirmatory factor analysis to provide additional empirical support for the structure and invariance of the 3-factor model of the SRI-25 in youth samples, ages 14 to 17 years (N = 152 boys, 220 girls). Scale reliability analyses provided good evidence for internal consistency reliability of scores on the SRI-25 total and scales. In Study 2 (N = 30 boys, 40 girls), we presented data in support for the concurrent validity (i.e., known groups) of scores on the SRI-25. Additionally, we identified potential correlates for the SRI-25 total scale scores. PMID:22176266

  15. Associations between sleep disturbance and suicidal ideation in adolescents admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sebastian G; Ali, Shahzad K; Simpson, Brittany; Britt, Victoria; McCall, W Vaughn

    2014-01-01

    The goals of our study were to: 1) describe the incidence of disturbances in sleep quality, sleep hygiene, sleep-related cognitions and nightmares; and 2) investigate the association between these sleep-related disturbances and suicidal ideation (SI), in adolescents admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Our sample consisted of 50 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 years (32 females and 18 males; 41 Caucasian and nine African American). Our cross-sectional design involved the administration of the Adolescent Sleep Wake Scale (ASWS), the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHS), the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep-Short version for use with children (DBAS-C10), the Disturbing Dreams and Nightmare Scale (DDNSI), and the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire Jr (SIQ-JR). Analyses were conducted using Pearson correlations, as well as univariate and multivariate regression. Results indicated that our sample experienced sleep disturbances and SI to a greater degree than non-clinical samples. Sleep quality was correlated with nightmares, while sleep quality and nightmares were each correlated with SI. Sleep quality, dysfunctional beliefs, and nightmares each independently predicted SI. Our study was the first to use the four sleep measures with an adolescent psychiatric inpatient sample. It is important to develop sleep-related assessment tools in high-risk populations given the link between sleep disturbances and suicidality. Furthermore, a better understanding of the relationships between SI and sleep quality, sleep-related cognitions, and nightmares is needed to develop potential prevention and treatment options for suicidality in adolescents. PMID:24356389

  16. Universal parent training as a supplement to inpatient psychiatric treatment for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schwenck, Christina; Schneider, Wolfgang; Reichert, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Parent trainings constitute an effective method to target aspects of parenting in child and adolescent psychiatric and psychotherapeutic care. Past research has mainly been conducted in outpatient contexts, with parents of children with externalizing disorders and often included only small sample sizes. The aim of the current study was first to assess the effectiveness of a novel parent training which is characterized by a universal approach, an open group concept, and short duration, and second to identify variables that have an influence on the effectiveness. A sample of n = 151 parent-child dyads treated in an inpatient clinic was included in the study and randomly assigned to a treatment group and a waiting-list control group. As dependent measures served child behavior problems, dysfunctional parenting, parental mental health, and parental self-efficacy measured with parent-rated questionnaires prior to the training, post training and 3 months after discharge of the clinic. Additionally, a parent-child-interaction observation was conducted and rated by blind raters. Results indicated a general inpatient treatment effect on all dependent measures assessed with questionnaires. An additional effect of the parent training was only shown for parenting and parental mental health with the treatment group revealing better outcomes post training and at follow-up. No effects were found for the measures assessed by interaction observation. Out of a number of variables, only a low monthly income was associated with a higher reduction of dysfunctional parenting. Results indicate that parent training does not contribute additionally to standard inpatient care with respect to child behavior, but does have an influence on parental well-being, which might have a positive effect on the long run. PMID:26707493

  17. Course of health care costs before and after psychiatric inpatient treatment: patient-reported vs. administrative records

    PubMed Central

    Zentner, Nadja; Baumgartner, Ildiko; Becker, Thomas; Puschner, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is limited evidence on the course of health service costs before and after psychiatric inpatient treatment, which might also be affected by source of cost data. Thus, this study examines: i) differences in health care costs before and after psychiatric inpatient treatment, ii) whether these differences vary by source of cost-data (self-report vs. administrative), and iii) predictors of cost differences over time. Methods: Sixty-one psychiatric inpatients gave informed consent to their statutory health insurance company to provide insurance records and completed assessments at admission and 6-month follow-up. These were compared to the self‐reported treatment costs derived from the "Client Socio-demographic and Service Use Inventory" (CSSRI‐EU) for two 6‐month observation periods before and after admission to inpatient treatment to a large psychiatric hospital in rural Bavaria. Costs were divided into subtypes including costs for inpatient and outpatient treatment as well as for medication. Results: Sixty-one participants completed both assessments. Over one year, the average patient‐reported total monthly treatment costs increased from € 276.91 to € 517.88 (paired Wilcoxon Z = ‐2.27; P = 0.023). Also all subtypes of treatment costs increased according to both data sources. Predictors of changes in costs were duration of the index admission and marital status. Conclusion: Self-reported costs of people with severe mental illness adequately reflect actual service use as recorded in administrative data. The increase in health service use after inpatient treatment can be seen as positive, while the pre-inpatient level of care is a potential problem, raising the question whether more or better outpatient care might have prevented hospital admission. Findings may serve as a basis for future studies aiming at furthering the understanding of what to expect regarding appropriate levels of post-hospital care, and what factors may help or

  18. Comorbid internet addiction in male clients of inpatient addiction rehabilitation centers: psychiatric symptoms and mental comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Wölfling, Klaus; Beutel, Manfred E; Koch, Andreas; Dickenhorst, Ulrike; Müller, Kai W

    2013-11-01

    Addictive Internet use has recently been proposed to be included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Still, little is known about its nosological features, including comorbidity with other mental disorders and disorder-specific psychopathological symptoms. To investigate whether Internet addiction (IA) is an issue in patients in addiction treatment, 1826 clients were surveyed in 15 inpatient rehabilitation centers. Male patients meeting criteria for comorbid IA (n = 71) were compared with a matched control group of male patients treated for alcohol addiction without addictive Internet use (n = 58). The SCL-90-R, the Patient Health Questionnaire, and the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder were used to assess associated psychiatric symptoms and further comorbid disorders. Comorbid IA was associated with higher levels of psychosocial symptoms, especially depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and interpersonal sensitivity. Moreover, the patients with IA more frequently met criteria for additional mental disorders. They display higher rates of psychiatric symptoms, especially depression, and might be in need of additional therapeutic treatment. In rehabilitation centers, a regular screening for IA is recommended to identify patients with this (non-substance-related) addiction and supply them with additional disorder-specific treatment.

  19. How Patients and Nurses Experience an Open Versus an Enclosed Nursing Station on an Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    PubMed

    Shattell, Mona; Bartlett, Robin; Beres, Kyle; Southard, Kelly; Bell, Claire; Judge, Christine A; Duke, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The inpatient environment is a critical space for nurses and patients in psychiatric settings. In this article, we describe nurses' and patients' perceptions of the inpatient environment both before the removal of a Plexiglas enclosure around a nurses' station and after its removal. Nurses had mixed feelings about the enclosure, reporting that it provided for confidentiality and a concentrated work space but also acknowledged the challenge of the barrier for communication with their patients. Patients unanimously preferred the nurses' station without the barrier, reporting increased feelings of freedom, safety, and connection with the nurses after its removal. It is important to consider the implications of environmental decisions in inpatient settings in order to promote a healthy workplace and healing environment for all community members.

  20. How Patients and Nurses Experience an Open Versus an Enclosed Nursing Station on an Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    PubMed

    Shattell, Mona; Bartlett, Robin; Beres, Kyle; Southard, Kelly; Bell, Claire; Judge, Christine A; Duke, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The inpatient environment is a critical space for nurses and patients in psychiatric settings. In this article, we describe nurses' and patients' perceptions of the inpatient environment both before the removal of a Plexiglas enclosure around a nurses' station and after its removal. Nurses had mixed feelings about the enclosure, reporting that it provided for confidentiality and a concentrated work space but also acknowledged the challenge of the barrier for communication with their patients. Patients unanimously preferred the nurses' station without the barrier, reporting increased feelings of freedom, safety, and connection with the nurses after its removal. It is important to consider the implications of environmental decisions in inpatient settings in order to promote a healthy workplace and healing environment for all community members. PMID:26597907

  1. Examining attitudes about and influences on research participation among forensic psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Magyar, Melissa S; Edens, John F; Epstein, Monica; Stiles, Paul G; Poythress, Norman G

    2012-01-01

    Although a growing body of research has examined various types of coercive practices that may occur among psychiatric patients over the years, almost no attention has been given to coercive influences that may occur specifically in the context of recruitment into research projects. Particularly for those who are institutionalized (e.g., in-patient insanity acquittees), there are significant concerns that their autonomous decision-making to consent or not may be significantly impaired due to the highly restrictive and controlled environment in which they live. This exploratory study sought to examine patients' perceptions of coercive influences by presenting them with hypothetical research vignettes regarding possible recruitment into either a biomedical or social-behavioral research project. Among 148 multi-ethnic male and female participants across two facilities, participants reported relatively minimal perceptions that their autonomous decision-making would be impacted or that various potentially coercive factors (e.g., pressures from staff) would impair their free choice to participate (or not) in such research. To the extent that such perceptions of coercion did occur, they were moderately associated with patients' more general personality traits and attitudinal variables, such as alienation and external locus of control. Limitations of this study and their implications for future research are discussed.

  2. Changes in the condition of psychiatric inpatients after the complex Fukushima disaster.

    PubMed

    Wada, Akira; Kunii, Yasuto; Matsumoto, Junya; Itagaki, Shuntaro; Yabe, Hirooki; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Niwa, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    After the high magnitude earthquake and the subsequent tsunami in Japan on March 11, 2011, the residents of Fukushima Prefecture suffered not only from tremendous physical injury caused by the earthquake and tsunami but also from the effects of radiation contamination after a hydrogen explosion at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on March 12, 2011. The complex Fukushima disaster is characterized by additional stress due to the fear of continued exposure to invisible radiation. We investigated whether there were any changes in the clinical mental state of patients in the inpatient ward of Fukushima Medical University Hospital, Japan, 7 days after the earthquake. There was no obvious change in the condition of two-thirds of the patients. Whereas one-third of patients had any change in their condition, several cases showed dramatic symptomatic improvement after the earthquake. Anxiety levels in the patients who originally showed coexisting anxiety disorders became exaggerated. The depressive state was improved after the earthquake in one patient with depression. One patient with restrictive-type anorexia nervosa resumed food consumption. These findings suggest that caregivers should be attentive to any symptomatic changes among patients with psychiatric disorders after sudden disasters. PMID:23842513

  3. Catatonia in inpatients with psychiatric disorders: A comparison of schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sandeep; Chakrabarti, Subho; Ghormode, Deepak; Agarwal, Munish; Sharma, Akhilesh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-10-30

    This study aimed to evaluate the symptom threshold for making the diagnosis of catatonia. Further the objectives were to (1) to study the factor solution of Bush Francis Catatonia Rating Scale (BFCRS); (2) To compare the prevalence and symptom profile of catatonia in patients with psychotic and mood disorders among patients admitted to the psychiatry inpatient of a general hospital psychiatric unit. 201 patients were screened for presence of catatonia by using BFCRS. By using cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, ROC curve, sensitivity and specificity analysis, data suggested that a threshold of 3 symptoms was able to correctly categorize 89.4% of patients with catatonia and 100% of patients without catatonia. Prevalence of catatonia was 9.45%. There was no difference in the prevalence rate and symptom profile of catatonia between those with schizophrenia and mood disorders (i.e., unipolar depression and bipolar affective disorder). Factor analysis of the data yielded 2 factor solutions, i.e., retarded and excited catatonia. To conclude this study suggests that presence of 3 symptoms for making the diagnosis of catatonia can correctly distinguish patients with and without catatonia. This is compatible with the recommendations of DSM-5. Prevalence of catatonia is almost equal in patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders.

  4. Psychiatric Inpatient Bedside Handoff: Implementation of a Quality Improvement Project and Nurses' Responses.

    PubMed

    Givens, Sarah E; Skully, Cathy; Bromley, Gail

    2016-07-01

    Psychiatric inpatient unit nurses implemented a quality improvement project to explore strategies to enhance the effectiveness of the change of shift communication between nurses and patients and obtain goals of care information. Three nurses championed a 6-month project to implement more efficient, patient-centered communication; influence patient outcomes; and assess nurses' perceptions about patient satisfaction. A survey established the level of nurse satisfaction regarding the length of time spent at change of shift obtaining patient information. Following a literature review, nurses used a standardized approach for their change of shift report, which they called patient bedside handoff. Nurses reported increased satisfaction with the length of time spent with the patient bedside handoff from a pre-implementation average score of 5.7 (somewhat satisfied) to a post-implementation score of 8.3 (very satisfied). This nurse-led quality improvement project helped illuminate perceived barriers to the implementation of patient bedside handoff and the changes in nurses' perceptions over time. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(7), 33-37.]. PMID:27362383

  5. Cost accounting methodologies in price setting of acute inpatient services in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Gaal, Peter; Stefka, Nóra; Nagy, Júlia

    2006-08-01

    On the basis of documentary analysis and interviews with decision makers, this paper discusses the cost accounting methodologies used for price setting of inpatient services in the Hungarian health care system focusing on sector of acute inpatient care, which is financed through the Hungarian adaptation of Diagnosis Related Groups since 1993. Hungary has a quite sophisticated DRG system, which had a deep impact on the efficiency of the acute inpatient care sector. Nevertheless, the system requires continuous maintenance, where the cooperation of hospitals, as well as the minimisation of political influence are critical success factors.

  6. Nursing care process for releasing psychiatric inpatients from long-term seclusion in Japan: modified grounded theory approach.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yutaka; Hasegawa, Masami

    2014-09-01

    Based on a modified grounded theory approach, in this study, we sought to elucidate the nursing care process used to guide psychiatric inpatients in long-term seclusion towards release from seclusion. Participant observations and interviews were conducted with a total of 18 nurses from three long-term psychiatric wards at two institutions from September 2011 to November 2012, to collect data on the nursing care they provided for psychiatric patients in long-term seclusion. Consequently, four categories and 15 concepts were extracted. The nurses viewed "a mature therapeutic environment that utilizes flexible apportionment of care" as the foundation (i.e. the core category) in guiding psychiatric inpatients towards release from long-term seclusion. The results revealed a care structure in which nurses in such a treatment environment provided care by flexible apportionment of three types of care: care aimed at avoiding mental and physical exhaustion, standardized care that does not confer a disadvantage to patients, and immediately responding to prevent problematic behaviors.

  7. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Disease FR Federal Register HAI Healthcare-Associated Infection HBIPS Hospital-Based Inpatient Psychiatric... INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2012-9985 of May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27870), there were a number of....asp . III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2012-9985 of May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27870), make the...

  8. Decision-making capacity for treatment in psychiatric and medical in-patients: cross-sectional, comparative study†

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Gareth S.; Szmukler, George; Richardson, Genevra; David, Anthony S.; Raymont, Vanessa; Freyenhagen, Fabian; Martin, Wayne; Hotopf, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Background Is the nature of decision-making capacity (DMC) for treatment significantly different in medical and psychiatric patients? Aims To compare the abilities relevant to DMC for treatment in medical and psychiatric patients who are able to communicate a treatment choice. Method A secondary analysis of two cross-sectional studies of consecutive admissions: 125 to a psychiatric hospital and 164 to a medical hospital. The MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool - Treatment and a clinical interview were used to assess decision-making abilities (understanding, appreciating and reasoning) and judgements of DMC. We limited analysis to patients able to express a choice about treatment and stratified the analysis by low and high understanding ability. Results Most people scoring low on understanding were judged to lack DMC and there was no difference by hospital (P = 0.14). In both hospitals there were patients who were able to understand yet lacked DMC (39% psychiatric v. 13% medical in-patients, P<0.001). Appreciation was a better ‘test’ of DMC in the psychiatric hospital (where psychotic and severe affective disorders predominated) (P<0.001), whereas reasoning was a better test of DMC in the medical hospital (where cognitive impairment was common) (P = 0.02). Conclusions Among those with good understanding, the appreciation ability had more salience to DMC for treatment in a psychiatric setting and the reasoning ability had more salience in a medical setting. PMID:23969482

  9. Does psychopathology at admission predict the length of inpatient stay in psychiatry? Implications for financing psychiatric services

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The debate on appropriate financing systems in inpatient psychiatry is ongoing. In this context, it is important to control resource use in terms of length of stay (LOS), which is the most costly factor in inpatient care and the one that can be influenced most easily. Previous studies have shown that psychiatric diagnoses provide only limited justification for explaining variation in LOS, and it has been suggested that measures such as psychopathology might be more appropriate to predict resource use. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between LOS and psychopathological syndromes or symptoms at admission as well as other characteristics such as sociodemographic and clinical variables. Methods We considered routine medical data of patients admitted to the Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich in the years 2008 and 2009. Complete data on psychopathology at hospital admission were available in 3,220 inpatient episodes. A subsample of 2,939 inpatient episodes was considered in final statistical models, including psychopathology as well as complete datasets of further measures (e.g. sociodemographic, clinical, treatment-related and psychosocial variables). We used multivariate linear as well as logistic regression analysis with forward selection procedure to determine the predictors of LOS. Results All but two syndrome scores (mania, hostility) were positively related to the length of stay. Final statistical models showed that syndromes or symptoms explained about 5% of the variation in length of stay. The inclusion of syndromes or symptoms as well as basic treatment variables and other factors led to an explained variation of up to 25%. Conclusions Psychopathological syndromes and symptoms at admission and further characteristics only explained a small proportion of the length of inpatient stay. Thus, according to our sample, psychopathology might not be suitable as a primary indicator for estimating LOS and contingent costs. This might be

  10. Predictive validity of dynamic factors: assessing violence risk in forensic psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Catherine M; Desmarais, Sarah L; Nicholls, Tonia L; Hart, Stephen D; Brink, Johann

    2013-12-01

    There is general consensus that dynamic factors ought to be considered in the assessment of violence risk, but little direct evidence exists to demonstrate that within-individual fluctuations in putative dynamic factors are associated with changes in risk. We examined these issues in a sample of 30 male forensic psychiatric inpatients using a pseudoprospective design. Static and dynamic factors were coded on the basis of chart review using 2 structured measures of violence risk: Version 2 of the Historical-Clinical-Risk Management-20 (HCR-20; C. D. Webster, K. S. Douglas, D. Eaves, & S. D. Hart, 1997, HCR-20: Assessing risk for violence, Version 2, Vancouver, BC, Canada: Mental Health, Law, and Policy Institute, Simon Fraser University) and the Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START; C. D. Webster, M. L. Martin, J. Brink, T. L. Nicholls, & S. L. Desmarais, 2009, Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability [START], Version 1.1, Coquitlam, BC, Canada: British Columbia Mental Health and Addiction Services). HCR-20 and START assessments were repeated every 3 months for a period of 1 year. Institutional violence in the 3 months following each assessment was coded using a modified version of the Overt Aggression Scale (S. C. Yudofsky, J. M. Silver, W. Jackson, J. Endicott, & D. W. Williams, 1986, The Overt Aggression Scale for the objective rating of verbal and physical aggression, The American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 143, pp. 35-39). Dynamic risk and strength factors showed predictive validity for institutional aggression. Results of event history analyses demonstrated that changes in dynamic risk factors significantly predicted institutional violence, even after controlling for static risk factors. This is one of the first studies to provide clear and direct support for the utility of dynamic factors in the assessment of violence risk. PMID:23815092

  11. Neuropsychological and psychiatric profiles in acute encephalitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Pewter, Stephen M; Williams, W Huw; Haslam, Catherine; Kay, Janice M

    2007-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is an inflammation of brain tissue that can result from activity in the central nervous system (CNS) of a number of viruses. Although the neurological and psychiatric effects of encephalitis in the acute phase of the illness are well-known (Caroff, Mann, Gliatto, Sullivan, & Campbell, 2001), larger scale studies of the pattern of neuropsychological and psychiatric impairment following recovery from the acute inflammatory phase are less apparent. This paper reports the results of neuropsychological testing with a range of standardised cognitive measures in a case series of long-term post-acute participants. Psychiatric abnormality is examined using the SCL-90-R self-report scale of distress (Derogatis, 1983). We also examined the role of emerging insight in the aetiology of depression in this population. Two clusters of cognitive dysfunction were observed, one group of primarily herpes simplex cases showing a severe generalised deficit across a number of cognitive domains and a second cluster showing a variety of more isolated disorders of executive function. Abnormally high levels of distress were reported by participants, with depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity and phobic anxiety most significantly increased. Depression was found to be least severe in those with most accurate insight into their problems. Examining the correlations between cognitive and psychiatric test results demonstrates a relationship between depression and interpersonal anxiety and specific cognitive measures. Obsessive-compulsive behaviour and phobic anxiety, however, appear to exist independently of the assessed cognitive deficits.

  12. Neuropsychological and psychiatric profiles in acute encephalitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Pewter, Stephen M; Williams, W Huw; Haslam, Catherine; Kay, Janice M

    2007-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is an inflammation of brain tissue that can result from activity in the central nervous system (CNS) of a number of viruses. Although the neurological and psychiatric effects of encephalitis in the acute phase of the illness are well-known (Caroff, Mann, Gliatto, Sullivan, & Campbell, 2001), larger scale studies of the pattern of neuropsychological and psychiatric impairment following recovery from the acute inflammatory phase are less apparent. This paper reports the results of neuropsychological testing with a range of standardised cognitive measures in a case series of long-term post-acute participants. Psychiatric abnormality is examined using the SCL-90-R self-report scale of distress (Derogatis, 1983). We also examined the role of emerging insight in the aetiology of depression in this population. Two clusters of cognitive dysfunction were observed, one group of primarily herpes simplex cases showing a severe generalised deficit across a number of cognitive domains and a second cluster showing a variety of more isolated disorders of executive function. Abnormally high levels of distress were reported by participants, with depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity and phobic anxiety most significantly increased. Depression was found to be least severe in those with most accurate insight into their problems. Examining the correlations between cognitive and psychiatric test results demonstrates a relationship between depression and interpersonal anxiety and specific cognitive measures. Obsessive-compulsive behaviour and phobic anxiety, however, appear to exist independently of the assessed cognitive deficits. PMID:17676531

  13. Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy: A Brief Intervention for Psychiatric Inpatients Admitted After a Suicide Attempt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Cox, Daniel W.; Greene, Farrah N.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no empirically based inpatient intervention for individuals who have attempted suicide exists. We present an overview of a novel psychotherapeutic approach, Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), currently under development and empirical testing for inpatients who have been admitted for a recent suicide attempt. PACT is adapted from an…

  14. The Involuntary Treatment of Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients--A Nation-Wide Survey from Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellila, Heikki Toivo; Sourander, Andre; Valimaki, Maritta; Warne, Tony; Kaivosoja, Matti

    2008-01-01

    This national cross-sectional study investigates the prevalence rates, regional differences and factors associated with the involuntary inpatient treatment of adolescents in Finland on a chosen day in 2000. The proportion of inpatients with involuntary legal status was 29.5% (n=82) giving a prevalence rate of 2.5 per 10,000/12-17 years old…

  15. Relationship between mean daily ambient temperature range and hospital admissions for schizophrenia: Results from a national cohort of psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tzu-I; Chen, Mu-Jean; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Lung, Shih-Chun; Su, Huey-Jen

    2011-12-01

    Environmental temperature is known to correlate with schizophrenia, but little is known about the association with changes in temperature. This 12-year study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the mean daily range of ambient temperature and schizophrenia admissions in a national cohort of psychiatric inpatients in Taiwan. Meteorological data provided by the Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan were interpolated to create representative estimates. Psychiatric inpatient admissions in all hospitals with medical services enrolled in the current health care insurance system were retrieved from the 1996-2007 Psychiatric Inpatient Medical Claim dataset of the National Health Insurance Research Database. Generalized linear models with Poisson distributions were used to analyze the impact of mean diurnal change of temperature on schizophrenia admissions, controlling for internal correlations and demographic covariates. The daily temperature range varied between 1.7°C and 12.1°C (1st to 99th percentile). The relative risk of schizophrenia admission was significantly increased at a temperature range of 3.2°C (10th percentile), and the maximum was at 12.1°C (99th percentile); however, no such association was found with schizoaffective disorder. When restricted to the capital and largest city, the effects of temperature range were prominent and may correlate with temperature itself. The joint effect of temperature and temperature range was associated with elevated risk, particularly at cooler temperatures. A positive correlation was found between increasing temperature range and schizophrenia admissions. The increase in morbidity at high percentiles suggests that the increasing dynamics of temperature range are a valid reflection of risk, highlighting the need for precautionary action. PMID:22018962

  16. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  17. READMIT: a clinical risk index to predict 30-day readmission after discharge from acute psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Vigod, Simone N; Kurdyak, Paul A; Seitz, Dallas; Herrmann, Nathan; Fung, Kinwah; Lin, Elizabeth; Perlman, Christopher; Taylor, Valerie H; Rochon, Paula A; Gruneir, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to create a clinically useful risk index, administered prior to discharge, for determining the probability of psychiatric readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge for general psychiatric inpatients. We used population-level sociodemographic and health administrative data to develop a predictive model for 30-day readmission among adults discharged from an acute psychiatric unit in Ontario, Canada (2008-2011), and converted the final model into a risk index system. We derived the predictive model in one-half of the sample (n = 32,749) and validated it in the other half of the sample (n = 32,750). Variables independently associated with 30-day readmission (forming the mnemonic READMIT) were: (R) Repeat admissions; (E) Emergent admissions (i.e. harm to self/others); (D) Diagnoses (psychosis, bipolar and/or personality disorder), and unplanned Discharge; (M) Medical comorbidity; (I) prior service use Intensity; and (T) Time in hospital. Each 1-point increase in READMIT score (range 0-41) increased the odds of 30-day readmission by 11% (odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.10-1.12). The index had moderate discriminative capacity in both derivation (C-statistic = 0.631) and validation (C-statistic = 0.630) datasets. Determining risk of psychiatric readmission for individual patients is a critical step in efforts to address the potentially avoidable high rate of this negative outcome. The READMIT index provides a framework for identifying patients at high risk of 30-day readmission prior to discharge, and for the development, evaluation and delivery of interventions that can assist with optimizing the transition to community care for patients following psychiatric discharge.

  18. Pharmacist-initiated prior authorization process to improve patient care in a psychiatric acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Shari N; Ojong-Salako, Mebanga

    2015-02-01

    A prior authorization (PA) is a requirement implemented by managed care organizations to help provide medications to consumers in a cost-effective manner. The PA process may be seen as a barrier by prescribers, pharmacists, pharmaceutical companies, and consumers. The lack of a standardized PA process, implemented prior to a patient's discharge from a health care facility, may increase nonadherence to inpatient prescribed medications. Pharmacists and other health care professionals can implement a PA process specific to their institution. This article describes a pharmacist-initiated PA process implemented at an acute care psychiatric hospital. This process was initiated secondary to a need for a standardized process at the facility. To date, the process has been seen as a valuable aspect to patient care. Plans to expand this process include collecting data with regards to adherence and readmissions as well as applying for a grant to help develop a program to automate the PA program at this facility.

  19. [A social psychiatric study on foreign-born inpatients at Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa hospital].

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Y; Hayashi, N; Ebata, K; Kaneko, T

    1994-01-01

    The authors carried out a chart review study of 293 foreign-born patients who were admitted to Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital from January 1986 to December 1992. We divided the subjects into three groups according to their living status in Japan, Immigrant group: 66 long-term residents, Resident group: 188 short-term residents with purposes of work or study, and Visitor group: 39 temporary visitors for sightseeing or business. The subjects came from 43 countries in the world, 70.3% (206/293) of whom were those from Asian countries. The subjects grew in number every year and the noticeable feature was a drastic increase in the number of Resident group (e.g. 6 patients in 1986, 63 in 1992). The mean duration (SD) of hospitalization for Immigrant group was the longest among the groups (Immigrant group: 58.7 (55.0) days, Resident group: 31.9 (35.0) days, Visitor group: 19.0 (16.3) days). The frequent diagnoses at discharge based on ICD-9, were schizophrenia (59.7%) and reactive psychosis (19.1%). The significantly larger proportion of Visitor group had previous psychiatric histories in their homeland than other groups (Visitor group: 56.4%, Immigrant group: 24.2%, Resident group: 23.9%). 70.0% (205/293) of the subjects could not use Japanese in usual settings and the number of them had been increasing every year. This communication difficulty had caused serious inconvenience in the treatment. All of Visitor group, and 71.8% (135/188) of Resident group could not receive social securities, and there were difficulties for them to raise money for their medical treatment and living expenses. 92.3% among Visitor group, 91.0% of Resident group and 21.2% of Immigrant group returned to their homeland after inpatient treatment. The result indicated that we must immediately establish the interpreter dispatch system for foreign-born patients and that of the social securities guaranteeing their medical care and living expenses.

  20. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Tuvesson; Mona, Eklund

    2014-01-01

    The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment. PMID:24448633

  1. Psychosocial work environment, stress factors and individual characteristics among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Tuvesson; Mona, Eklund

    2014-01-20

    The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics--Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience--are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff's perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  2. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... individual's name, email address, telephone number, and physical mailing address; (4) A summary of the reason... psychiatric facility's reconsideration request, such as emails and other documents. (c) An...

  3. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... individual's name, email address, telephone number, and physical mailing address; (4) A summary of the reason... psychiatric facility's reconsideration request, such as emails and other documents. (c) An...

  4. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... individual's name, email address, telephone number, and physical mailing address; (4) A summary of the reason... psychiatric facility's reconsideration request, such as emails and other documents. (c) An...

  5. Medicare program; inpatient psychiatric facilities prospective payment system--update for rate year beginning July 1, 2011 (RY 2012). Final rule.

    PubMed

    2011-05-01

    This final rule updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs) for discharges occurring during the rate year (RY) beginning July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012. The final rule also changes the IPF prospective payment system (PPS) payment rate update period to a RY that coincides with a fiscal year (FY). In addition, the rule implements policy changes affecting the IPF PPS teaching adjustment. It also rebases and revises the Rehabilitation, Psychiatric, and Long-Term Care (RPL) market basket, and makes some clarifications and corrections to terminology and regulations text. PMID:21548399

  6. Stability of Diagnosis: A 20-Year Retrospective Cohort Study of Israeli Psychiatric Adolescent Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valevski, Avi; Ratzoni, Gideon; Sever, Jonathan; Apter, Alan; Zalsman, Gil; Shiloh, Roni; Weizman, Abraham; Tyano, Sam

    2001-01-01

    Outcome according to diagnosis and stability of diagnosis were investigated in a follow-back study, with a duration of 15-19 years, of 351 adolescents with various psychiatric disorders hospitalized in a closed psychiatric ward. Findings indicated that transient adolescent psychosis is associated with a relatively good prognosis and should…

  7. Inpatient stays for patients diagnosed with severe psychiatric disorders and substance abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, C J; Zarkin, G A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To empirically determine if a substance abuse comorbidity is related to longer inpatient stays for patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and affective psychoses. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional analysis of patients in three states: Maryland, California, and Arizona. Using multivariate techniques, we control for the effects of patient severity, insurance, and hospital characteristics on length of stay. DATA COLLECTION: We used a patient-level and state-specific hospital discharge database merged with hospital characteristics from the American Hospital Association. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The conventional wisdom is that patients with a substance abuse comorbidity have longer inpatient stays than similar patients without a substance abuse comorbidity. We did not observe this trend. We found wide variation in length of stay by state and patients' health insurance. In some cases, length of stay was statistically shorter for patients with a substance abuse comorbidity. CONCLUSIONS: Our research demonstrates that a substance abuse comorbidity does not necessarily equate to longer inpatient stays and that previous studies may overstate the impact of substance abuse on inpatient care utilization. In addition, we find that a relationship between substance abuse and length of stay may not be generalizable across states, diagnoses, hospitals, and/or insurance types. Future studies of the impact of substance abuse on inpatient stays need to control for these important covariates. PMID:8885855

  8. Attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In psychiatry, most of the focus on patient aggression has been in adolescent and adult inpatient settings. This behaviour is also common in elderly people with mental illness, but little research has been conducted into this problem in old age psychiatry settings. The attitudes of clinical staff toward aggression may affect the way they manage this behaviour. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient settings. Methods A convenience sample of clinical staff were recruited from three locked acute old age psychiatry inpatient units in Melbourne, Australia. They completed the Management of Aggression and Violence Scale, which assessed the causes and managment of aggression in psychiatric settings. Results Eighty-five staff completed the questionnaire, comprising registered nurses (61.1%, n = 52), enrolled nurses (27.1%, n = 23) and medical and allied health staff (11.8%, n = 10). A range of causative factors contributed to aggression. The respondents had a tendency to disagree that factors directly related to the patient contributed to this behaviour. They agreed patients were aggressive because of the environment they were in, other people contributed to them becoming aggressive, and patients from certain cultural groups were prone to these behaviours. However, there were mixed views about whether patient aggression could be prevented, and this type of behaviour took place because staff did not listen to patients. There was agreement medication was a valuable approach for the management of aggression, negotiation could be used more effectively in such challenging behaviour, and seclusion and physical restraint were sometimes used more than necessary. However, there was disagreement about whether the practice of secluding patients should be discontinued. Conclusions Aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units occurs

  9. Oral health status and treatment needs among psychiatric inpatients in Rennes, France: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe mental disorders have a chronic course associated with a high risk for co-morbid somatic illnesses and premature mortality and oral health is critical for overall systemic health. But general health care needs in this population are often neglected. Some studies have aimed at determining the oral health status of psychiatric in-patients but to date, no emphasis has been placed on oral health of psychiatric patients in France. The goal of this study was to assess the oral health and treatment needs of institutionalized patients in a large psychiatric hospital, where a dental service was available and free, to compare it with the average population, with psychiatric in-patients in other countries and to provide recommendations for psychiatrists and care-giving staff. Methods The dental status (DMFT), the oral hygiene (OHIS: Simplified Oral Hygiene Index), the saliva flow rate were recorded on a randomized patient sample. Demographic and medical data were retrieved from the institutional clinical files. Results Among the 161 examined patients, 95 (59.0%) were men and 66 (41.0%) were women. The mean age was 46.9 ± 17.5 years. The majority was diagnosed schizophrenia (36.6%) or mood disorders (21.1%). The mean OHIS was 1.7 ± 1.1. Among the 147 patients who agreed to carry out the salivary examination, the average saliva flow rate was 0.3 g ± 0.3 g/min. Saliva flow under the average rest saliva flow (0.52 mg/min) was found for 80.3% of the patient. The mean DMFT was 15.8 ± 8.8 (D = 3.7 ± 4.4, M = 7.3 ± 9.4, F = 4.7 ± 4.9) and significantly increased with age (p < 0.001) and degree of disability (p = 0.003) (stepwise linear regression). Eighteen patients (11.2%) were edentulous. Conclusions The DMFT was similar to low income French population but psychiatric patients had almost 4 times more decayed teeth, slightly less missing teeth and 1.5 times less filled teeth. Oral health appeared to be better than in most other countries. But compared to

  10. The association of non-suicidal self-injury and suicidal behavior according to DSM-5 in adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Groschwitz, Rebecca C; Kaess, Michael; Fischer, Gloria; Ameis, Nina; Schulze, Ulrike M E; Brunner, Romuald; Koelch, Michael; Plener, Paul L

    2015-08-30

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal behaviors frequently occur among adolescent psychiatric patients. Although those behaviors are distinct with regards to intent, NSSI has been shown to be an important risk-factor for suicide attempts. However, the association of NSSI and Suicidal Behavior Disorder (SBD) according to DSM-5 criteria has not yet been investigated. For investigating distinctive features and mutual risk-factors of NSSI-disorder and SBD, adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N=111, aged 12-19 years; 65.8% females) were interviewed using the Self-Injurious-Thoughts-And-Behaviors-Interview-German (SITBI-G). NSSI started significantly earlier in life (M=12.5 years, SD=2.2) than first suicide attempts (M=14.1 years, SD=2.0). Patients meeting NSSI-disorder and/or SBD were significantly more likely to be female and to be diagnosed with an affective disorder. NSSI-disorder and SBD seem to have several distinctive features (i.e. age of onset or frequency), but also seem to share certain mutual risk-factors (i.e. affective disorders, female gender). While both NSSI and SBD seem to be maintained by mainly automatic negative reinforcement, positive automatic and social functions were rated significantly higher for NSSI. Most importantly, NSSI seems to be a strong risk factor for the occurrence of SBD (even when controlling for suicidal ideation) and should therefore always be assessed when dealing with psychiatric adolescent patients.

  11. Association of family background with adolescent smoking and regular use of illicit substances among underage psychiatric in-patients.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether adolescent's family type was associated with regular smoking or the use of illicit substances (cannabis or hard drugs) among underage adolescent psychiatric in-patients. The sample consisted of 471 adolescents aged 12-17 years admitted to psychiatric hospital between April 2001 and March 2006 at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. The information on family factors and substance use was based on the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime interview and the European modification of the Addiction Severity Index questionnaire. Compared to adolescent boys from two-parent families, those from child welfare placement were more likely to regularly use both cannabis (odds ratio [OR]=4.4; 95%confidence interval [CI]=1.4-13.7; P=.012) and hard drugs (OR=8.4; 95% CI=1.7-42.1; P=.01).Among girls, no association was found between family type and the use of illicit substances. Two-parent or foster family units may protect adolescents from involvement with illicit substances. In clinical adolescent psychiatric practice more attention should be paid to family interventions and parental support. PMID:19062350

  12. Association of family background with adolescent smoking and regular use of illicit substances among underage psychiatric in-patients.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether adolescent's family type was associated with regular smoking or the use of illicit substances (cannabis or hard drugs) among underage adolescent psychiatric in-patients. The sample consisted of 471 adolescents aged 12-17 years admitted to psychiatric hospital between April 2001 and March 2006 at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. The information on family factors and substance use was based on the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime interview and the European modification of the Addiction Severity Index questionnaire. Compared to adolescent boys from two-parent families, those from child welfare placement were more likely to regularly use both cannabis (odds ratio [OR]=4.4; 95%confidence interval [CI]=1.4-13.7; P=.012) and hard drugs (OR=8.4; 95% CI=1.7-42.1; P=.01).Among girls, no association was found between family type and the use of illicit substances. Two-parent or foster family units may protect adolescents from involvement with illicit substances. In clinical adolescent psychiatric practice more attention should be paid to family interventions and parental support.

  13. 77 FR 4908 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled... Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2012 Rates; Corrections AGENCY: Centers...

  14. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free public access... CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et. al Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year...

  15. 78 FR 38679 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... Program. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2013-10234 of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27486... errors. ] III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2013-10234 of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27486), make the...-AR53 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  16. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Printing Office Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  17. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2012-19079 of August 31, 2012 (77 FR 53258), there were a... effective date requirements. ] IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2012-19079 of August 31, 2012 (77 FR...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  18. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ...We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine......

  19. Borderline personality disorder associates with violent criminality in women: A population based follow-up study of adolescent psychiatric inpatients in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Arola, Riikka; Antila, Henna; Riipinen, Pirkko; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa; Kantojärvi, Liisa

    2016-09-01

    Various psychiatric problems in adolescence and early adulthood have been shown to associate with criminal behaviour. In this study the association of personality disorders (PDs) with criminal behaviour was examined in adolescents treated in psychiatric hospitals. The study sample consisted of 508 adolescents (age 13-17) admitted to acute psychiatric impatient care between April 2001 and March 2006. Crime data was obtained from the Finnish Legal Register Centre on September 2013. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) was used to assess psychiatric diagnoses in adolescence. The information on PDs in early adulthood was based on follow-up information on psychiatric treatments in either out- or inpatient settings until the end of 2012, and was extracted from the National Care Register for Health Care provided by the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare. A total of 22 (39%) of the 57 subjects with PD had committed a crime. In women, the likelihood for violent criminality was significantly increased in those with Borderline PD (OR 6.09, CI 1.24-29.84, p=0.009) and was also associated with conduct disorder (OR 4.26, CI 1.38-13.19, p=0.012), child welfare placement (OR 11.82, CI 3.61-38.76, p<0.001) and parent's substance use disorder (OR 7.74, CI 2.30-26.10, p=0.001). In men, no association was observed between PD and any kind of criminal behaviour. Significant predictors for violent criminality in males were conduct disorder (OR 4.05, CI 1.75-9.38, p=0.001), substance use disorder (OR 2.51, CI 1.22-5.17, p=0.012) and special services at school (OR 2.58, CI 1.16-5.76, p=0.021). Females with Borderline PD showed an increased risk for violent offending. This suggests Borderline PD as a potential explanatory factor for violent assaults by females and highlights the importance of recognizing the risk for violence in young women with a Borderline PD.

  20. Borderline personality disorder associates with violent criminality in women: A population based follow-up study of adolescent psychiatric inpatients in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Arola, Riikka; Antila, Henna; Riipinen, Pirkko; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa; Kantojärvi, Liisa

    2016-09-01

    Various psychiatric problems in adolescence and early adulthood have been shown to associate with criminal behaviour. In this study the association of personality disorders (PDs) with criminal behaviour was examined in adolescents treated in psychiatric hospitals. The study sample consisted of 508 adolescents (age 13-17) admitted to acute psychiatric impatient care between April 2001 and March 2006. Crime data was obtained from the Finnish Legal Register Centre on September 2013. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) was used to assess psychiatric diagnoses in adolescence. The information on PDs in early adulthood was based on follow-up information on psychiatric treatments in either out- or inpatient settings until the end of 2012, and was extracted from the National Care Register for Health Care provided by the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare. A total of 22 (39%) of the 57 subjects with PD had committed a crime. In women, the likelihood for violent criminality was significantly increased in those with Borderline PD (OR 6.09, CI 1.24-29.84, p=0.009) and was also associated with conduct disorder (OR 4.26, CI 1.38-13.19, p=0.012), child welfare placement (OR 11.82, CI 3.61-38.76, p<0.001) and parent's substance use disorder (OR 7.74, CI 2.30-26.10, p=0.001). In men, no association was observed between PD and any kind of criminal behaviour. Significant predictors for violent criminality in males were conduct disorder (OR 4.05, CI 1.75-9.38, p=0.001), substance use disorder (OR 2.51, CI 1.22-5.17, p=0.012) and special services at school (OR 2.58, CI 1.16-5.76, p=0.021). Females with Borderline PD showed an increased risk for violent offending. This suggests Borderline PD as a potential explanatory factor for violent assaults by females and highlights the importance of recognizing the risk for violence in young women with a Borderline PD. PMID:27399875

  1. Mood and Anxiety Symptoms in Psychiatric Inpatients with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlot, Lauren; Deutsch, Curtis K.; Albert, Aranya; Hunt, Anne; Connor, Daniel F.; McIlvane, William J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may experience depression at a high frequency, yet few published studies address this issue, especially among adults. In the current investigation, we reviewed features of depression and comorbid traits among depressed inpatients with intellectual disabilities (ID) as a…

  2. "Helicobacter Pylori" Infection in Five Inpatient Units for People with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, David; Vemuri, Murali; Gunatilake, Deepthi; Tewari, Sidhartha

    2008-01-01

    Background: A high prevalence of "Helicobacter pylori" infection has been reported among people with intellectual disability, especially those residing in hospital and similar settings. Surveys of inpatients have found unusually high rates of gastrointestinal malignancy, to which "H. pylori" infection predisposes. Methods: "Helicobacter pylori"…

  3. Use of movies for group therapy of psychiatric inpatients: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Esra; Ulus, Fuat; Selvitop, Rabia; Yazici, Ahmet Bülent; Aydin, Nazan

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports on the use of cinema therapy at a psychiatry clinic for inpatients. The program, "Watching Cinema Group Therapy," was used with over 500 inpatients over the course of one year. We found that using movies for group psychotherapy sessions encouraged the patients to talk about their beliefs, thoughts, and feelings while discussing the characters and stories. We also used the movies as a reward for patients who had developed a therapeutic alliance. It motivated the patients to be active instead of simply remaining in their rooms. As a follow-up to full-length films, it was more useful to show short scenes to patients who had been administered high doses of drugs. Movies can be an important, positive, and productive means of treatment and teaching.

  4. Is exposure to domestic violence and violent crime associated with bullying behaviour among underage adolescent psychiatric inpatients?

    PubMed

    Mustanoja, Susanna; Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Hakko, Helinä; Räsänen, Pirkko; Säävälä, Hannu; Riala, Kaisa

    2011-08-01

    We examined the relationship of exposure to domestic violence and violence occurring outside home to bullying behaviour in a sample (508; 40.9% males, 59.1% females) of underage psychiatric inpatient adolescents. Participants were interviewed using K-SADS-PL to assess DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses and to gather information about domestic and other violence and bullying behaviour. Witnessing interparental violence increased the risk of being a victim of bullying up to 2.5-fold among boys. For girls, being a victim of a violent crime was an over 10-fold risk factor for being a bully-victim. Gender differences were seen in witnessing of a violent crime; girls were more likely to be bullies than boys. Further, as regards being a victim of a violent crime outside home and physical abuse by parents at home, girls were significantly more often bully-victims than boys. When interfering and preventing bullying behaviour, it is important to screen adolescents' earlier experiences of violence.

  5. Efficacy of Group Motivational Interviewing (GMI) for Psychiatric Inpatients with Chemical Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Ana, Elizabeth J.; Wulfert, Edelgard; Nietert, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Dually diagnosed patients with chemical dependency and a comorbid psychiatric disorder typically show poor compliance with aftercare treatment, which may result in costly and pervasive individual and societal problems. In this study, the authors investigated the effect of adding motivational interviewing in a group format to standard treatment for…

  6. Which Family Factors Predict Children's Externalizing Behaviors Following Discharge from Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blader, Joseph C.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Parents' behavior management practices, parental stress, and family environment are highly pertinent to children's conduct problems. Preadolescents' psychiatric hospitalization usually arises because of severe conduct problems, so the relationships of family-related variables to postdischarge functioning warrant investigation. This…

  7. Psychiatric wards: places of safety?

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience.

  8. Psychiatric wards: places of safety?

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience. PMID:20465757

  9. A prospective study of lipids and serotonin as risk markers of violence and self-harm in acute psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Roaldset, John O; Bakken, Anne M; Bjørkly, Stål

    2011-04-30

    Cross-sectional studies have reported an association between lipids and serotonin levels and aggression, but a literature search revealed a paucity of prospective studies. Subjects of the present naturalistic study were 254 of all (489) involuntary and voluntary acutely admitted patients to a psychiatric hospital during 1year. Serum lipids and platelet serotonin at admission were prospectively compared with recorded intra-institutional and 1-year post-discharge violence and self-harm. Total cholesterol had a significant negative relationship to inpatient suicidal behaviour and inpatient violent behaviour and to 3-month post-discharge violent behaviour. Triglycerides were a significant marker of inpatient self-mutilation and of self-mutilation in combination with suicidal behaviour at 3 and 12 months of follow-up. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) had a significant negative relationship to violence at 12-months, and to repeated violence in seven patients with two or more admissions. The post-discharge relationships between total cholesterol and violence and between triglycerides and self-harm remained significant even when controlling for other possible explanatory variables in a multivariate model. Results did not change after controlling for current medication at admission. There was no association between platelet serotonin and violence or self-harm. Future research may examine if lipid measurements add incremental validity to established clinical risk assessment procedures of violent and self-harm behaviour.

  10. The Role of Parenting Styles in the Relation Between Functions of Aggression and Internalizing Symptoms in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Population.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Casey A; Rathert, Jamie L; Fite, Paula J; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric inpatient hospitalization is a costly intervention for youth. With rates of hospitalization rising, efforts to refine prevention and intervention are necessary. Aggression often precedes severe internalizing behaviors, and proactive and reactive functions of aggression are differentially associated with internalizing symptomatology. Thus, further understanding of the links between functions of aggression and internalizing symptomatology could aid in the improvement of interventions for hospitalized youth. The current study examined parenting styles, gender, and age as potential moderators of the relations between proactive and reactive aggression and internalizing symptoms. Participants included 392 children, 6-12 years of age admitted consecutively to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Reactive aggression was uniquely associated with anxiety symptoms. However, proactive aggression was associated with internalizing problems only when specific parenting styles and demographic factors were present. Although both proactive and reactive subtypes of aggression were associated with internalizing symptoms, differential associations were evident. Implications of findings are discussed.

  11. Associations of the Dopamine D4 Receptor Gene VNTR Polymorphism with Drug Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    McGeary, John E.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Spirito, Anthony; Monti, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Background The VNTR polymorphism in the Dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4) has been associated with differential urge for substances across multiple methodologies ranging from neuroimaging to assessment in the natural environment. It is unclear whether the DRD4 gene is a marker for an underlying propensity for greater urge or whether the DRD4 gene differentially moderates the neuroadaptive effects of extended substance use on urge. Examination of the DRD4 in an adolescent sample may provide evidence of a mechanism of this putative relationship. Method Data from a subset of 77 participants in a larger assessment study characterized adolescents for substance-related behaviors by DRD4 genotype. The psychiatrically admitted adolescents were genotyped for the variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism in the DRD4 gene (L ≥ 7 [n = 25], S = < 7 [n = 52]). Associations of the DRD4 with scores on the SASSI, and ADI were examined as well as selected individual items thought to be most related to the intermediate phenotype of urge. Results The DRD4 gene was not associated with any DSM-IV substance misuse diagnostic classification. Individual items related to urge were also nonsignificantly related to DRD4 status. Carriers of the long variant of the DRD4 polymorphism were more likely to have used hard drugs within the previous 6 months and scored higher on the self-medication subscale of the ADI compared to short variant homozygotes. Discussion Preliminary results provide little evidence for the DRD4 VNTR polymorphism to be related to urge-related phenomena in hospitalized adolescents on a psychiatric inpatient unit. The association of the DRD4 gene with hard drug use may support literature linking this gene to impulsivity. Subscale findings may suggest a role of negative affect in previous DRD4 urge findings. PMID:17175015

  12. Undertreatment of human immunodeficiency virus in psychiatric inpatients: a cross-sectional study of seroprevalence and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Torres, Miguel Angel; Salazar, Miguel Angel; Imaz, Manuel; Inchausti, Lucía; Ibañez, Berta; Fernandez-Rivas, Aranzazu; Pastor, Javier; Anguiano, Bosco; Muñoz, Pedro; Ruiz, Eduardo; Oraa, Rodrigo; Bustamante, Sonia; de Eulate, Sofia Alvarez; Cisterna, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of HIV and its associated demographic and clinical factors among psychiatric inpatients of a general hospital. Methods This was a single-center, observational, cross-sectional study that included patients consecutively admitted to our unit aged 16 years or older and with no relevant cognitive problems. The patients were evaluated using a semistructured interview and an appropriate test for HIV infection. Results Of the 637 patients who were screened, 546 (86%) who consented to participate were included in the analyses. Twenty-five (4.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.0–6.8) patients were HIV-positive. The prevalence was higher among patients with substance misuse (17.4%, 95% CI 9.7–28.8). All except one of the 25 patients knew of their seropositive condition prior to participation in the study. Only 14 (56%) of the 25 seropositive patients had previously received pharmacological treatment for their infection. According to the multiple logistic regression analysis, the likelihood of HIV infection was lower in patients with higher levels of education and higher among patients who were single, had history of intravenous drug use, and had an HIV-positive partner, particularly if they did not use condoms. Among the patients with HIV infection, 18 (72%) had a history of suicide attempts compared with 181 (34.7%) of the patients without HIV infection (relative risk 2.1, 95% CI 1.6–2.7; P<0.001). Conclusion HIV infection is highly prevalent in patients admitted to a psychiatric unit, especially those with a diagnosis of substance misuse. Seropositive patients show very poor treatment adherence. The risk of suicide seems to be very high in this population. Implementing interventions to reduce the suicide risk and improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy and psychotropic medications seems crucial. PMID:26089670

  13. "Eat your lunch!" - controversies in the nutrition of the acutely, non-critically ill medical inpatient.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    There is no doubt about the strong association of malnutrition and adverse medical outcomes including mortality, morbidity and quality of life. Particularly in the elderly and frail medical inpatient population, loss of appetite due to the acute illness further aggravates nutritional status. In fact, this relationship between acute disease and eating behaviour / nutritional status may well be bidirectional, with not only illness affecting nutritional status, but also dietary factors influencing the course of illness. Whether loss of appetite associated with acute illness is indeed a protective physiological response or a therapeutic target needing early corrective nutritional therapy is a matter of current debate and can only be resolved within a large and well-designed randomised controlled trial comparing early nutritional therapy with "appetite-guided" nutrition in this patient population. Apart from in critical care, where various large trials have recently been published, there is an important lack of high quality data from large randomised trials in unselected acutely ill medical inpatients to support the early use of nutritional therapy, to shed light on the optimal type, caloric amount and timing of nutritional therapy and to answer ultimately the question as to which patient population will in fact benefit from nutritional interventions. Currently, the EFFORT trial is enrolling patients and aims to fill these literature gaps. The aim of this review is to discuss the current evidence regarding nutritional therapy in acutely ill medical inpatients, and to recommend whether or not, based on today's available evidence, physician should indeed encourage their malnourished patients to "…finish their lunch". PMID:25906253

  14. Correlation between levels of conflict and containment on acute psychiatric wards: the city-128 study.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Len; Stewart, Duncan; Papadopoulos, Chris; Iennaco, Joanne DeSanto

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Attainment of safe, calm inpatient psychiatric wards that are conducive to positive therapeutic care is crucial. On such wards, rates of coerced medication, seclusion, manual restraint and other types of containment are comparatively low, and, usually, rates of conflict-for example, aggression, substance use, and absconding-are also low. Sometimes, however, wards maintain low rates of containment even when conflict rates are high. This study investigated wards with the counterintuitive combination of low containment and high conflict or high containment and low conflict. METHODS The authors conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected from 136 acute psychiatric wards across England in 2004-2005. The wards were categorized into four groups on the basis of median splits of containment and conflict rates: high conflict and high containment, high conflict and low containment, low conflict and low containment, and low conflict and high containment. Features significantly associated with these ward types were identified. RESULTS Among the variables significantly associated with the various typologies, some-for example, environmental quality-were changeable, and others-such as social deprivation of the area served-were fixed. High-conflict, low-containment wards had higher rates of male staff and lower-quality environments than other wards. Low-conflict, high-containment wards had higher numbers of beds. High-conflict, high-containment wards utilized more temporary staff as well as more unqualified staff. No overall differences were associated with low-conflict, low-containment wards. CONCLUSIONS Wards can make positive changes to achieve a low-containment, nonpunitive culture, even when rates of patient conflict are high.

  15. Outpatient mental health service use by older adults after acute psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Proctor, Enola; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    This study described outpatient mental health service used by elderly patients discharged from acute inpatient psychiatric treatment for depression, assessed services barriers, and identified factors related to the use of outpatient mental health services. The sample consisted of 199 elderly patients discharged home from a geropsychiatric unit of an urban midwestern hospital. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with use of various mental health services. Almost three quarters of the elderly patients saw a psychiatrist within 6 weeks postdischarge, but few used other outpatient mental health services. The most frequently reported barriers to use included (1) cost of services, (2) personal belief that depression would improve on its own, and (3) lack of awareness of available services. The use of various outpatient services was differentially related to predisposing, need, and enabling factors. Female patients, those residing in rural areas, and those who wanted to solve their problems on their own were less likely to use outpatient mental health services. Patients who reported greater levels of functional impairment, resided in rural areas, and perceived that getting services required too much time were less likely to see a psychiatrist in the postacute period. African American patients were more likely than whites to use day treatment programs. This may be related to the fact that most day treatment centers were located in areas where the majority of residents were African Americans.

  16. A Prospective Examination of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behavior Among Psychiatric Adolescent Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Czyz, Ewa K.; Berona, Johnny; King, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of identifying suicide risk in adolescents, and particularly among high-risk subgroups such as adolescent inpatients, calls for further study of models of suicidal behavior that could meaningfully aid in the prediction of risk. This study examined how well the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behavior (IPTS)—with its constructs of thwarted belongingness (TB), perceived burdensomeness (PB), and an acquired capability (AC) for lethal self-injury—predicts suicide attempts among adolescents (N = 376) 3 and 12 months after hospitalization. The three-way interaction between PB, TB, and AC, defined as a history of multiple suicide attempts, was not significant. However, there were significant 2-way interaction effects, which varied by sex: girls with low AC and increasing TB, and boys with high AC and increasing PB, were more likely to attempt suicide at 3 months. Only high AC predicted 12-month attempts. Results suggest gender-specific associations between theory components and attempts. The time-limited effects of these associations point to TB and PB being dynamic and modifiable in high-risk populations, whereas the effects of AC are more lasting. The study also fills an important gap in existing research by examining IPTS prospectively. PMID:25263410

  17. Socio-economic status and mental disorder--profile of a Nigerian psychiatric inpatient population.

    PubMed

    Ihezue, U H; Kumaraswamy, N; Onuora, A N

    1986-01-01

    A study of the socio-economic and diagnostic profile of psychiatric patients treated at a mental hospital in Nigeria over a period of six months was conducted. Schizophrenia, organic psychosis, and mental sub-normality were found to have been diagnosed more often among under privileged persons from lower socio-economic classes; while affective disorder (manic depression) and neurotic illness were commoner among persons from economically more fortunate higher social classes. Males exceeded females in the cohort and the patients generally exhibited upward social mobility when compared with their parents. Possible socio-cultural factors contributing to the findings have been discussed. A suggestion is made for a more elaborate field work to study the relationship between socio-economic class and psychopathology in a developing country like Nigeria. PMID:3700008

  18. Some aspects of self-destructive behavior in forensic psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Sendula-Jengić, Vesna; Bosković, Gordan; Dodig, Goran; Weiner-Crnja, Milica

    2004-06-01

    In this study authors have analysed a group of patients (N=65) that were treated at the Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Psychiatric Hospital Rab, during the period of 1998-2000. Detailed analysis of all anamnestic and hetero-anamnestic data as well as the observations during the treatment separated few significant patterns of self-destructive behaviour of various intensity and different possible consequences. The results showed out that within the first group of patients with self-destructive behaviour was noticed a significant increased number of younger age patients who were diagnosed with personality disorder especially borderline and antisocial type. Additionally facing difficulties with alcohol abuse and drug addiction. In a second group there were older patients with serious attempt of suicide dominantly diagnosed with endogenous psychosis, especially schizophrenia.

  19. Impact of the Creation and Implementation of a Clinical Management Guideline for Personality Disorders in Reducing Use of Mechanical Restraints in a Psychiatric Inpatient Unit

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Rivas, Aranzazu; Bustamante, Sonia; Rico-Vilademoros, Fernando; Vivanco, Esther; Martinez, Karmele; Angel Vecino, Miguel; Martín, Melba; Herrera, Sonia; Rodriguez, Jorge; Saenz, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of the implementation of a guideline for the management of personality disorders on reducing the frequency of use of mechanical restraints in a psychiatric inpatient unit. Method: This retrospective study was conducted in a psychiatric inpatient unit with 42 beds, which serves an urban area of 330,000 inhabitants. The sample consisted of all patients with a clinical diagnosis of personality disorder (DSM-IV-TR criteria) who were admitted to the unit from January 2010 to December 2010 and from January 2011 to December 2011 (ie, before and after, respectively, the implementation of the guideline). The guideline focused on cluster B disorders and follows a psychodynamic perspective. Results: Restraint use was reduced from 38 of 87 patients with personality disorders (43.7%) to 3 of 112 (2.7%), for a relative risk of 0.06 (95% CI, 0.02–0.19) and an absolute risk reduction of 41% (95% CI, 29.9%–51.6%). The risk of being discharged against medical advice increased after the intervention, with a relative risk of 1.84 (95% CI, 0.96–3.51). Restraint use in patients with other diagnoses was also reduced to a similar extent. Conclusions: The use of mechanical restraints was dramatically reduced after the implementation of a clinical practice guideline on personality disorders, suggesting that these coercive measures might be decreased in psychiatric inpatient units. PMID:25834763

  20. A Description of Walter Reed Army Medical Center's In-Patient Psychiatric Service Population 1973 to 1975

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James L.; Wells, John D.; Pearson, David

    1977-01-01

    A three-year evaluation of demographic and diagnostic patterns in a large Army psychiatric in-patient facility is described. Active duty personnel accounted for 83.6 percent of patient episodes. No simple catchment area could be defined for this facility. Active duty patient episodes tended to be with younger, junior enlisted men whose sicknesses were most frequently diagnosed as schizophrenia. The diseases of blacks were diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenia more frequently than in whites. Latent schizophrenia or undifferentiated schizophrenia were diagnosed more frequently in whites than in blacks. The illnesses of active duty female military personnel were more frequently diagnosed as neurotic than as schizophrenic. Of the patient episodes during the three-year period, 12.1 percent were about dependents. They were usually the wives of older, senior enlisted men or senior officers and they stayed an average of 12 days in the hospital. On the other hand, 4.3 percent of the patient episodes were about retired personnel. They came from Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) as did their dependents, and the most frequent diagnosis was alcoholism. Their median stay was 15 days. Subsequent studies will attempt to further clarify these initial findings. PMID:904006

  1. Impact of psychotic symptoms on cognitive functioning in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients with severe mood disorders.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, James B; Weiss, Shira R; Segovich, Kristin T; Barbot, Baptiste

    2016-10-30

    Despite established differences in cognitive functioning of adults with mood disorder-related psychosis and those with non-affective psychotic disorders, there is limited evidence of the impact of psychotic symptoms on the cognitive functioning of children and adolescents with mood disorders. This study investigates IQ, working memory, and processing speed scores in 80 child and adolescent inpatients discharged from an intermediate care state psychiatric hospital, using a retrospective chart review. Associations between diagnosis based on DSM-IV criteria (7 with Major Depression- MDD; 43 with Bipolar Disorders-BD, and 30 with Mood Disorders Not Otherwise Specified-NOS), presence of current psychotic features, and cognitive functioning (WISC-IV IQ, Coding, Symbol Search, and Digit Span) were investigated using Multivariate Analyses of Variance. No differences were found in cognitive functioning between patients with MDD and BD, or between those with severe Mood Disorders (MDD or BD) and those with NOS, when controlling for age, gender, and presence of psychotic features. However, patients with severe mood disorders and psychotic features showed lower IQs and greater working memory deficits than those without psychotic features or NOS. Results are discussed in terms of treatment planning for children and adolescents at risk for developing psychotic symptoms and severe mood disorders.

  2. The Psychosocial Characteristics Associated with NSSI and Suicide Attempt of Youth Admitted to an In-patient Psychiatric Unit

    PubMed Central

    Preyde, Michèle; Vanderkooy, John; Chevalier, Pat; Heintzman, John; Warne, Amanda; Barrick, Kendra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of self-harm and the psychosocial factors associated with self-harming behaviours in youth admitted to an in-patient psychiatric unit. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys of standardized measures were administered to youth and a separate survey to their caregivers while the youth were in hospital. Results: The mean age of the 123 youth who participated was 15.74 (SD 1.51) years, and 90 of 121 (74.38%) reported being female. Of the 115 who completed this question, 101 (87.83%) indicated that they thought of injuring themselves and 89 (77.39%) did engage in NSSI within the past month, and 78 of 116 (67%) reported that they had made an attempt to take their life. Youth who reported that they had attempted suicide (lifetime) reported significantly less difficulty with emotion regulation than youth who engaged in NSSI only, or both NSSI and suicide attempts. Conclusions: These youth reported a very high prevalence of self-harm, and in general substantial difficulty with regulating their emotions, and difficulty with their interpersonal relationships. The psychosocial distinctions evident between groups may have practical utility. PMID:24872825

  3. An in-house prevocational training program for newly discharged psychiatric inpatients: exploring its employment outcomes and the predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Fang; Hwang, Eric; Lee, Hui-Ling; Wu, Shang-Liang

    2015-06-01

    Individuals with severe mental disorders continue to experience low employment rates. Occupational therapists play an important role in helping these individuals develop the skills and obtain the supports necessary for productive living. This retrospective cohort study aimed to explore employment outcomes and identify factors predictive of the outcomes of an in-house prevocational training program designed for newly discharged psychiatric inpatients. Data retrieved from the files of 58 participants including demographics, diagnostic history, physical fitness, functional assessment results, the use of vocational counselling service and employment status were analyzed. The overall employment rates among the participants were high (67.2-79.3%) within the 6 months following the prevocational training program. No significant differences were found in the employment rates across the 1, 3 and 6-month time periods post-training. Vocational counselling service post-training and hand function were two factors predictive of participants' employment outcomes. Occupational therapists should attend to the clients' need for continuous vocational support and carefully identify the personal, functional and environmental factors contributing to successful employment. Caution in interpreting the results is warranted because of the lack of control and randomization in this retrospective study. Additional longitudinal cohort or experimental studies would add further certainty to the current findings. PMID:25783143

  4. Bullying behavior in relation to psychiatric disorders and physical health among adolescents: a clinical cohort of 508 underage inpatient adolescents in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Räsänen, Pirkko; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa

    2010-06-30

    The aim was to investigate the association of bullying behavior with psychiatric disorders and physical health in a sample of adolescent psychiatric patients, as there have to our knowledge been no previous studies using actual psychiatric diagnoses examining this relationship in boys and girls. We studied 508 Finnish adolescents (age 12-17) admitted to psychiatric inpatient care between April 2001 and March 2006 from the geographically large area of Northern Finland. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) was used to obtain psychiatric diagnoses of adolescents according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) and information on bullying behavior. Logistic regression analyses showed that having an externalizing disorder increased the likelihood of being a bully or a bully-victim (i.e. a person who is both a bully and a victim of bullying) among both the boys (odds ratio, OR=14.4, P=0.001) and the girls (OR=10.0, P<0.001). In addition, having an internalizing disorder increased the likelihood of being a victim of bullying among the boys (OR=3.4, P=0.008), but not the girls. Chronic somatic diseases were also significantly associated with being bullied among the boys (OR=2.5, P=0.041). Our results suggest that adolescents who are involved in bullying behavior should be evaluated psychiatrically, as this might be an early marker of psychiatric disorders.

  5. Inpatient Opioid Withdrawal Management of Street Children and Adolescents Admitted to Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Ward: A Preliminary Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Firouzkouhi Moghadam, Mahboubeh; Hashemian, Seyed-Sepehr; Pishjoo, Masoud; Ghasemi, Sanaz; Hajebi, Ahmad; Noroozi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background About 10 million children worldwide live or work on the street. International reports estimate the prevalence of substance use among street children to be between 25% - 90%, which is who were referredntal disorders and high-risk behaviors. Objectives The objective of this study was to report the outcomes of assisted withdrawal of opioid-dependent vulnerable children and adolescents who were referred to child and adolescent psychiatric ward of Ali Ebne Abitaleb hospital, an academic hospital in Zahedan city. Methods Clinical chart abstractions were performed on a convenience sample of 40 serial opioid-dependent street children and adolescents (mean age: 11.14 ± 3.6 years) who were referred to child and adolescent psychiatric ward of Ali Ebne Abitaleb treatment and research center from November 2014 to May 2015. The demographic data, drug use history, comorbid physical and psychiatric conditions, symptomatology of opioid withdrawal syndrome, pharmacotherapies and psychosocial services, length of hospital stay, and any adverse events were extracted from the patients’ files using a checklist developed by the authors. Results Twenty-four (60%) patients were male, and 16 (40%) were female. The main drug used by all patients was opioids. Heroin Kerack (which has a street name of crystal in southeast Iran) was the most common (75%) drug of use, followed by opium (10%) and opium residue (7.5%). None of the participants self-reported using injected drugs. The high rate of a lack of eligibility for guardianship was documented among parents (87.5%) mainly due to their use of illegal drugs. Musculoskeletal pain and diarrhea were the most common withdrawal symptoms of the patients upon admission. The mean length of stay was 10.8 (± 7.30) days, and no significant adverse events were reported during the symptomatic treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to report on the safety and feasibility of inpatient

  6. Loss of appetite in acutely ill medical inpatients: physiological response or therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Schütz, Philipp; Bally, Martina; Stanga, Zeno; Keller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Loss of appetite and ensuing weight loss is a key feature of severe illnesses. Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) contributes significantly to the adverse outcome of these conditions. Pharmacological interventions to target appetite stimulation have little efficacy but considerable side effects. Therefore nutritional therapy appears to be the logical step to combat inadequate nutrition. However, clinical trial data demonstrating benefits are sparse and there is no current established standard algorithm for use of nutritional support in malnourished, acutely ill medical inpatients. Recent high-quality evidence from critical care demonstrating harmful effects when parenteral nutritional support is used indiscriminately has led to speculation that loss of appetite in the acute phase of illness is indeed an adaptive, protective response that improves cell recycling (autophagy) and detoxification. Outside critical care, there is an important gap in high quality clinical trial data shedding further light on these important issues. The selection, timing, and doses of nutrition should be evaluated as carefully as with any other therapeutic intervention, with the aim of maximising efficacy and minimising adverse effects and costs. In light of the current controversy, a reappraisal of how nutritional support should be used in acutely ill medical inpatients outside critical care is urgently required. The aim of this review is to discuss current pathophysiological concepts of PEM and to review the current evidence for the efficacy of nutritional support regarding patient outcomes when used in an acutely ill medical patient population outside critical care. PMID:24782139

  7. Readmission to Acute Care Hospital during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Flora M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Ryser, David K.; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate frequency, reasons, and factors associated with readmission to acute care (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants 2,130 consecutive admissions for TBI rehabilitation. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. Results 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total 210 episodes. 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. Mean days from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22 days (SD 22). Mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7 days (SD 8). 84 participants (46%) had >1 RTAC episode for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had >1 RTAC for surgical reasons, and RTAC reason was unknown for 6 (3%) participants. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were: neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurologic (23%), and cardiac (12%). Older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission predicted patients with RTAC. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission Functional Independence Measure Motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Conclusion(s) Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experience RTAC during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation due to RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. PMID:26212405

  8. Which values are important for patients during involuntary treatment? A qualitative study with psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Emanuele; Giacco, Domenico; Katasakou, Christina; Priebe, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Involuntary hospital treatment is practised throughout the world. Providing appropriate treatment in this context is particularly challenging for mental health professionals, who frequently face ethical issues as they have to administer treatments in the absence of patient consent. We have explored the views of 59 psychiatric patients who had been involuntarily admitted to hospital treatment across England. Moral deliberation theory, developed in the field of clinical bioethics, was used to assess ethical issues. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and analysed through thematic content analysis. We have detected a number of circumstances in the hospital that were perceived as potentially conflictual by patients. We have established which patient values should be considered by staff when deliberating on ethically controversial issues in these circumstances. Patients regarded as important having freedom of choice and the feeling of being safe during their stay in the hospital. Patients also valued non-paternalistic and respectful behaviour from staff. Consideration of patient values in moral deliberation is important to manage ethical conflicts. Even in the ethically challenging context of involuntary treatment, there are possibilities to increase patient freedoms, enhance their sense of safety and convey respect.

  9. Reducing the rates of prescribing high-dose antipsychotics and polypharmacy on psychiatric inpatient and intensive care units: results of a 6-year quality improvement programme

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no conclusive evidence that either high doses or combinations of antipsychotics are more effective than standard doses or monotherapy alone. Nonetheless, prescription of both remains prevalent in the UK. In 2006 the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLAM) participated in a national survey of prescription of antipsychotic medications, organized by the Prescribing Observatory for Mental Health. Over half of the patients on SLAM inpatient or psychiatric intensive care units were prescribed a high-dose antipsychotic or a combination of antipsychotics. Prescribing high-dose antipsychotics and polypharmacy in SLAM was found to be among the highest in the UK. Aim: To assess the impact of a 6-year quality improvement programme aimed at reducing the rates of prescribing high-dose antipsychotics and polypharmacy on SLAM inpatients and psychiatric intensive care units. Results: There was a significant reduction between baseline and final survey in the rates of prescription of both high-dose antipsychotics and polypharmacy on SLAM inpatients and intensive care units (58% versus 10% p < 0.0001 and 57% versus 16%, p < 0.0001 respectively). The proportion of patients at final survey prescribed a high-dose antipsychotic and a combination was substantially lower in SLAM than in the national sample (10% versus 28%, p < 0.0001 and 16% versus 38%, p < 0.0001 respectively). Clinical implications: A sustained change in the prescribing culture of an organization can be achieved through a targeted improvement programme. PMID:25653825

  10. Ready, aim fire! Mental health nurses under siege in acute inpatient facilities.

    PubMed

    Ward, Louise

    2013-04-01

    It has been clearly acknowledged and well-documented that physical, emotional, and psychological violence is a central theme and an expected workplace hazard for registered nurses working in acute inpatient mental health care facilities. Limited research, however, has focused on how registered nurses have been able to cope within this environment and adequately protect themselves from harm. A critical feminist research project recently explored the lived experience of 13 Australian, female, registered nurses working in a busy metropolitan acute inpatient mental health care facility. "Fear" was exposed as the precursor to violence and aggression, both "fear as experienced by the nurse" and "fear as experienced by the patient." The participants reported experiencing a sense of fear when they could not accurately or confidently anticipate a patient response or reaction. They identified this relationship with fear as being "part of the job" and part of the unpredictable nature of caring for people experiencing complex distortions in thinking and behavior. The participants believed, however, that additional workplace pressures complicated the therapeutic environment, resulting in a distraction from patient care and observation. This distraction could lead to nurse-patient miscommunication and the potential for violence. This article discusses a major theme to emerge from this study, "Better the devil you know!" The theme highlights how mental health nurses cope with violence and why they choose to continue working in this complex care environment. PMID:23566191

  11. Acute care inpatients with long-term delayed-discharge: evidence from a Canadian health region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute hospital discharge delays are a pressing concern for many health care administrators. In Canada, a delayed discharge is defined by the alternate level of care (ALC) construct and has been the target of many provincial health care strategies. Little is known on the patient characteristics that influence acute ALC length of stay. This study examines which characteristics drive acute ALC length of stay for those awaiting nursing home admission. Methods Population-level administrative and assessment data were used to examine 17,111 acute hospital admissions designated as alternate level of care (ALC) from a large Canadian health region. Case level hospital records were linked to home care administrative and assessment records to identify and characterize those ALC patients that account for the greatest proportion of acute hospital ALC days. Results ALC patients waiting for nursing home admission accounted for 41.5% of acute hospital ALC bed days while only accounting for 8.8% of acute hospital ALC patients. Characteristics that were significantly associated with greater ALC lengths of stay were morbid obesity (27 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±14.6), psychiatric diagnosis (13 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±6.2), abusive behaviours (12 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±10.7), and stroke (7 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±5.0). Overall, persons with morbid obesity, a psychiatric diagnosis, abusive behaviours, or stroke accounted for 4.3% of all ALC patients and 23% of all acute hospital ALC days between April 1st 2009 and April 1st, 2011. ALC patients with the identified characteristics had unique clinical profiles. Conclusions A small number of patients with non-medical days waiting for nursing home admission contribute to a substantial proportion of total non-medical days in acute hospitals. Increases in nursing home capacity or changes to existing funding arrangements should target the sub-populations identified in this

  12. The training value of working with armed forces inpatients in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    de Burgh, H Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Over the last 10 years, the UK armed forces (UKAF) have been involved in operations worldwide. Mental health in the armed forces (AF) has been the subject of considerable interest in part because of a perceived added risk of psychological distress in this population. Inpatient psychiatric services are provided through partnerships with NHS hospitals. The Cavell Centre, Peterborough's acute inpatient psychiatric unit has up to four beds for service personnel, under the care of a civilian consultant psychiatrist and his AF Foundation Year 2 doctor (F2). This was the only Ministry of Defence (MoD) inpatient unit which had a training post for an AF doctor, but the post ended in August 2014 with the closure of MoD Hospital Unit Peterborough (MDHU(P)). This article outlines the differences in civilian and AF inpatient care and discusses the training value of AF doctors managing service personnel who are psychiatric inpatients.

  13. Inpatient management of children with severe acute malnutrition: a review of WHO guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Tickell, Kirkby D

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand how the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) guidelines on the inpatient care of children with complicated severe acute malnutrition may be strengthened to improve outcomes. Methods In December 2015, we searched Google scholar and WHO’s website for WHO recommendations on severe acute malnutrition management and evaluated the history and cited evidence behind these recommendations. We systematically searched WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, clinicaltrials.gov and the Controlled Trials metaRegister until 10 August 2015 for recently completed, ongoing, or pending trials. Findings WHO’s guidelines provide 33 recommendations on the topic. However, 16 (48.5%) of these recommendations were based solely on expert opinion – unsupported by published evidence. Another 11 (33.3%) of the recommendations were supported by the results of directly relevant research – i.e. either randomized trials (8) or observational studies (3). The other six recommendations (18.2%) were based on studies that were not conducted among children with complicated severe malnutrition or studies of treatment that were not identical to the recommended intervention. Trials registries included 20 studies related to the topic, including nine trials of alternative feeding regimens. Acute medical management and follow-up care studies were minimally represented. Conclusion WHO’s guidelines on the topic have a weak evidence base and have undergone limited substantive adjustments over the past decades. More trials are needed to make that evidence base more robust. If the mortality associated with severe malnutrition is to be reduced, inpatient and post-discharge management trials, supported by studies on the causes of mortality, are needed. PMID:27708469

  14. County variation in use of inpatient and ambulatory psychiatric care in New York State 1999-2001: need and supply influences in a structural model.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Ellermann, Raymond

    2009-06-01

    This study investigates the potential for ecological studies to contribute useful information on variations in service use, both across areas and across different types of psychiatric care. The analysis uses data for the 62 counties of New York State, which include both urbanised and rural areas, with widely differing social, household and ethnic structures. We analysed data on service use by patients aged 15-64 years for several psychiatric conditions combined. The research reported here used an approach which for several reasons is innovative, compared with other ecological studies of psychiatric service use. First, the impact of population variables on both ambulatory and hospitalisation rates is considered, whereas many previous studies are confined to hospital use. Second, our method combines and weights population variables in the 'need index' in a way that (a) reflects geographical variations in service use rates in both hospital and ambulatory sectors (b) controls for service configuration and access as well as (c) allowing for spatial autocorrelation in the need index. To demonstrate this method, four simple indicators of poverty, social isolation, concentration of racial minorities and population density, were used in combination to define a 'needs' index that predicts use of psychiatric services at county level. Comparison with alternative methods of measuring need, using the same data but based on more conventional strategies, resulted in significantly different need rankings of areas. Our composite index of 'underlying need' showed a positive association with service use (hospital and ambulatory care for men and for women). This relationship controls for access to services, and allows for spatial correlation in the need construct. Controlling for underlying population 'need', a measure of spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds had an independent effect, being associated positively with hospital inpatient use, and negatively with

  15. Symptom, Family, and Service Predictors of Children's Psychiatric Rehospitalization within One Year of Discharge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blader, Joseph C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate predictors of readmission to inpatient psychiatric treatment for children aged 5 to 12 discharged from acute-care hospitalization. Method: One hundred nine children were followed for 1 year after discharge from inpatient care. Time to rehospitalization was the outcome of interest. Predictors of readmission, examined via…

  16. Severity of Spatial Neglect During Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Predicts Community Mobility After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Oh-Park, Mooyeon; Hung, Cynthia; Chen, Peii; Barrett, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether stroke survivors with more severe spatial neglect during their acute inpatient rehabilitation had poorer mobility after returning to their communities. Design A prospective observational study. Setting Acute inpatient rehabilitation and follow-up in the community. Participants Thirty-one consecutive stroke survivors with right-brain damage (women, n = 15 [48.4%]), with the mean (standard deviation) age of 60 ± 11.5 years, were included in the study if they demonstrated spatial neglect within 2 months after stroke. Methods Spatial neglect was assessed with the Behavioral Inattention Test (BIT) (range, 0-146 [a lower score indicates more severity]) and the Catherine Bergego Scale (range, 0-30 [a higher score indicates more severity]). A score of the Behavioral Inattention Test <129 or of the Catherine Bergego Scale >0 defined the presence of spatial neglect. Main Outcome Measurements The outcome measure is community mobility, defined by the extent and frequency of traveling within the home and in the community, and is assessed with the University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging Life-Space Assessment (range, 0-120 [a lower score indicates less mobile]). This measure was assessed after participants returned home ≥6 months after stroke. The covariates were age, gender, functional independence at baseline; follow-up interval; and depressed mood, which may affect the relationship between spatial neglect and community mobility. Results A lower Behavioral Inattention Test score was a significant predictor of a lower Life-Space Assessment score after controlling for all the covariates (β = 0.009 [95% confidence interval, 0.008-0.017]); P = .020). The proportion of participants unable to travel independently beyond their homes was 0%, 27.3%, and 72.7% for those with mild, moderate, and severe acute neglect, respectively (Catherine Bergego Scale range, 1-10, 11-20, and 21-30, respectively). Conclusions Our result indicates that acute

  17. Psychometric properties of the forensic inpatient quality of life questionnaire: quality of life assessment for long-term forensic psychiatric care

    PubMed Central

    Vorstenbosch, Ellen C.W.; Bouman, Yvonne H.A.; Braun, Peter C.; Bulten, Erik B.H.

    2014-01-01

    A substantial group of forensic psychiatric patients require (life)long forensic psychiatric care. Instead of aiming at re-entry into society, treatment in long-term forensic psychiatric care (LFPC) is principally aimed at medical and psychiatric care and optimising quality of life (QoL). To assess QoL in LFPC, the influence of both the mental disorder and the restrictive context should be considered. Therefore, a new instrument was developed: the Forensic inpatient QoL questionnaire (FQL). The FQL is based on the results of concept-mapping with patients and staff within LFPC. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the psychometric properties of the FQL. One hundred and sixty-three FQLs, filled out by 98 male long-term forensic psychiatric patients, were included for testing reliability and content validity. For testing construct validity, 53 patients additionally completed the World Health Organisation Quality of Life-Brief version and 50 of them the Affect Balance Scale. Outcomes indicate that the FQL has good psychometric properties. Fifteen of the 16 FQL domains showed adequate to good reliability (Cronbach's α range .69–.91) and 9 domains met the criteria for homogeneity. Content validity was demonstrated by exploratory factor analysis, which revealed a three-factor structure: social well-being, physical well-being and leave. Construct validity was supported by 59% correctly hypothesised inter- and intrascale Pearson's correlation coefficients. Good psychometric properties and its clinical-based development make the FQL a valid and useful instrument for QoL assessment in LFPC. The FQL could therefore contribute to evidence-based and more advanced treatment programmes in LFPC. PMID:25750786

  18. Effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in patients on an acute care psychiatric unit: a randomized three group effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Stigma is a major social barrier that can restrict access to and willingness to seek psychiatric care. Psychiatric consumers may use secrecy and withdrawal in an attempt to cope with stigma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in acute care psychiatric inpatients using a randomized design with wait-list control. Participants (N=83) were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three single-session group-based conditions: music therapy, education, or wait-list control. Participants in the music therapy and education conditions completed only posttests while participants in the wait-list control condition completed only pretests. The music therapy condition was a group songwriting intervention wherein participants composed lyrics for "the stigma blues." Results indicated significant differences in measures of discrimination (experienced stigma), disclosure (self-stigma), and total stigma between participants in the music therapy condition and participants in the wait-list control condition. From the results of this randomized controlled investigation, music therapy may be an engaging and effective psychosocial technique to treat stigma. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for clinical practice and psychiatric music therapy research are provided.

  19. Improving smoking cessation policy by assessing user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service in adult psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kathy; Creamer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Smoking rates are higher among people with mental health conditions compared to the general population. Smoking reduces physical, mental and financial well-being, and interacts with psychotropic drugs. An inpatient admission provides an opportunity to engage and support smokers in smoking cessation. Compliance with Trust/NICE smoking cessation guidelines was assessed in two inpatient wards, and a questionnaire evaluated user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service. A need for improved documentation of smoking status to identify and treat smokers routinely was revealed. A new electronic health form was designed and introduced, and a clear pathway for onward referrals was developed. This intervention preceded the introduction of the Trust-wide smoke free policy from October 2014. The intervention doubled rates of documentation of smoking status, cessation advice and offer of NRT/referral. There were large differences between the two wards, highlighting the need for a tailored approach. PMID:26734337

  20. Improving smoking cessation policy by assessing user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service in adult psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kathy; Creamer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Smoking rates are higher among people with mental health conditions compared to the general population. Smoking reduces physical, mental and financial well-being, and interacts with psychotropic drugs. An inpatient admission provides an opportunity to engage and support smokers in smoking cessation. Compliance with Trust/NICE smoking cessation guidelines was assessed in two inpatient wards, and a questionnaire evaluated user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service. A need for improved documentation of smoking status to identify and treat smokers routinely was revealed. A new electronic health form was designed and introduced, and a clear pathway for onward referrals was developed. This intervention preceded the introduction of the Trust-wide smoke free policy from October 2014. The intervention doubled rates of documentation of smoking status, cessation advice and offer of NRT/referral. There were large differences between the two wards, highlighting the need for a tailored approach.

  1. Numbing scale scores in female psychiatric inpatients diagnosed with self-injurious behavior, dissociative identity disorder, and major depression.

    PubMed

    Glover, H; Lader, W; Walker-O'Keefe, J; Goodnick, P

    1997-05-01

    Female inpatients engaged in self-injurious behavior (SIB) and females diagnosed with Dissociative Identify Disorder (DID) scored higher on the Glover Numbing Scale (GNS) than female inpatients diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The DID sample showed a multi-modal distribution of scores, and the MDD sample showed a bimodal distribution with a significant difference between the means of the two subgroups. An additional subsample of outpatient males diagnosed with MDD also evidenced a bimodal distribution of scores with a similar spread between the two means. Scores on the Beck Depression Inventory did not discriminate the latter two subgroups.

  2. Acute paediatric bite injuries treated on inpatient basis: a 10-year retrospective study and criteria for hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Shipkov, Hristo; Stefanova, Penka; Sirakov, Vladimir; Stefanov, Rumen; Dachev, Dimitar; Simeonov, Martin; Ivanov, Biser; Nenov, Momchil

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute bite wounds in children treated on an inpatient basis over a 10-year period and the criteria for inpatient treatment. This study comprised all acute mammalian bite injuries in relation to all paediatric bite injuries seen at the Emergency Surgical Department (ESD). Inclusion criteria were: aged between 0-18 years; acute human or animal bite injuries (presenting for the first time); and inpatient treatment. Exclusion criteria were: bite wounds treated elsewhere and referred for complications; bites treated on an outpatient basis referred for complications; and all insect bites. Over 10 years, 12,948 children were seen at the ESD. There were 167 children (0.77%) with mammalian bite wounds. Twelve of them responded to the inclusion criteria. They presented 7.18% of all mammalian bite injuries and 0.09% of all paediatric emergency visits at the ESD. The average age was 3.82 ± 1.63 years (from 1.3-7 years). The time elapsed between the accident to the wound debridement was 118.64 ± 101.39 minutes. There were 10 dogs, one horse, and one rabbit bite. Surgical treatment comprised debridement, saline irrigation, and primary closure or reconstruction. All patients received antibiotics in the postoperative period. The average hospital stay was 5.92 ± 2.39 days. In one case a partial distal flap necrosis occurred. Animal bite injuries treated on an inpatient basis are predominantly dog bites in young children under 10 years of age, with deep, extended, and commonly multiple injuries. Only 7% of paediatric bite injuries require inpatient treatment.

  3. Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Other Clinically Significant Body Image Concerns in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyl, Jennifer; Kittler, Jennifer; Phillips, Katharine A.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study assessed prevalence and clinical correlates of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), eating disorders (ED), and other clinically significant body image concerns in 208 consecutively admitted adolescent inpatients. It was hypothesized that adolescents with BDD would have higher levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidality.…

  4. Nurse-police coalition: improves safety in acute psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Diane E; Harris, Frank N; de Nesnera, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Although police officers protect and secure the safety of citizens everywhere, nurses are the primary guardians of patient safety within the treatment milieu. At New Hampshire Hospital, both nurses and police officers share ownership of this responsibility, depending on the needs that arise specific to each profession. Psychiatric nurses take pride in their ability to de-escalate agitated and potentially aggressive patients; however, times arise when the best efforts of nurses fail, or when a situation requires intervention from police officers. Nurses and police officers at New Hampshire Hospital have worked together for many years to develop a trusting, respectful alliance. This coalition has resulted in a safe, clear, orderly process for transfer of authority from nurses to police during violent, clinically unmanageable psychiatric emergencies. Nurses and police officers work collaboratively toward the common goal of ensuring safety for patients and staff, while also acknowledging the unique strengths of each profession.

  5. Diagnostic delays and dilemmas. Management of affected patients in the psychiatric inpatient unit of a general children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Fennig, S; Fennig, S

    1999-01-01

    We present the role of the medical-psychiatric unit in the management of children and adolescents with somatic symptoms in whom diagnosis remains uncertain or delayed, which can lead to severe impairment in the child's normal development and functioning and cause anger and hostility in the families. We describe two patients, one with cyclic vomiting syndrome, considered a medical disorder, and the other with conversion disorder, considered a psychiatric disorder. Both patients had had multiple ER admissions and outpatient visits with elaborate and expensive diagnostic workups. On admission to our unit, a coherent and integrated treatment plan was finally formulated and successfully implemented. We discuss the advantage of the medical-psychiatric unit for simultaneous medical and psychosocial intervention early in the development of symptoms and signs. The units need to be ready and able to cope with a wide range of medical and psychiatric disorders with different levels of gravity. PMID:10228893

  6. Summary of prospective quantification of reimbursement recovery from inpatient acute care outliers.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Gerald S; Paulson, Albert S

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and quantify inpatient acute care hospital cases that are eligible for additional financial reimbursement. Acute care hospitals are reimbursed by third-party payers on behalf of their patients. Reimbursement is a fixed amount dependent primarily upon the diagnostic related group (DRG) of the case and the service intensity weight of the individual hospital. This method is used by nearly all third-party payers. For a given case, reimbursement is fixed (all else being equal) until a certain threshold level of charges, the cost outlier threshold, is reached. Above this amount the hospital is partially reimbursed for additional charges above the cost outlier threshold. Hospital discharge information has been described as having an error rate of between 7 and 22 percent in attribution of basic case characteristics. It can be expected that there is a significant error rate in the attribution of charges as well. This could be due to miscategorization of the case, misapplication of charges, or other causes. Identification of likely cases eligible for additional reimbursement would alleviate financial pressure where hospitals would have to absorb high expenses for outlier cases. Determining predicted values for total charges for each case was accomplished by exploring associative relationships between charges and case-specific variables. These variables were clinical, demographic, and administrative. Year-by-year comparisons show that these relationships appear stable throughout the five-year period under study. Beta coefficients developed in Year 1 are applied to develop predictions for Year 3 cases. This was also done for year pairs 2 and 4, and 3 and 5. Based on the predicted and actual value of charges, recovery amounts were calculated for each case in the second year of the year pairs. The year gap is necessary to allow for collection and analysis of the data of the first year of each pair. The analysis was performed in two parts

  7. Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

    2014-05-01

    This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused. PMID:24779763

  8. Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

    2014-05-01

    This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused.

  9. Characteristics of patients frequently subjected to pharmacological and mechanical restraint--a register study in three Norwegian acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Mjøsund, Nina Helen; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2014-01-30

    This retrospective study from three catchment-area-based acute psychiatric wards showed that of all the pharmacologically and mechanically restrained patients (n=373) 34 (9.1%) had been frequently restrained (6 or more times). These patients accounted for 39.2% of all restraint episodes during the two-year study period. Adjusted binary logistic regression analyses showed that the odds for being frequently restrained were 91% lower among patients above 50 years compared to those aged 18-29 years; a threefold increase (OR=3.1) for those admitted 3 times or more compared to patients with only one stay; and, finally, a threefold increase (OR=3.1) if the length of stay was 16 days or more compared to those admitted for 0-4 days. Among frequently restrained patients, males (n=15) had significantly longer stays than women (n=19), and 8 of the females had a diagnosis of personality disorder, compared to none among males. Our study showed that being frequently restrained was associated with long inpatient stay, many admissions and young age. Teasing out patient characteristics associated with the risk of being frequently restraint may contribute to reduce use of restraint by developing alternative interventions for these patients.

  10. Safety Planning for Military (SAFE MIL): rationale, design, and safety considerations of a randomized controlled trial to reduce suicide risk among psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Brown, Gregory K; Currier, Glenn W; Brenner, Lisa; Knox, Kerry L; Grammer, Geoffrey; Carreno-Ponce, Jaime T; Stanley, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Mental health related hospitalizations and suicide are both significant public health problems within the United States Department of Defense (DoD). To date, few evidence-based suicide prevention programs have been developed for delivery to military personnel and family members admitted for psychiatric inpatient care due to suicidal self-directed violence. This paper describes the rationale and detailed methodology for a study called Safety Planning for Military (SAFE MIL) which involves a randomized controlled trial (RCT) at the largest military treatment facility in the United States. The purpose of this study is to test the efficacy of a brief, readily accessible, and personalized treatment called the Safety Planning Intervention (Stanley and Brown, 2012). Primary outcomes, measured by blinded assessors at one and six months following psychiatric discharge, include suicide ideation, suicide-related coping, and attitudes toward help seeking. Additionally, given the study's focus on a highly vulnerable patient population, a description of safety considerations for human subjects' participation is provided. Based on this research team's experience, the implementation of an infrastructure in support of RCT research within DoD settings and the processing of regulatory approvals for a clinical trial with high risk suicidal patients are expected to take up to 18-24 months. Recommendations for expediting the advancement of clinical trials research within the DoD are provided in order to maximize cost efficacy and minimize the research to practice gap.

  11. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Physician Order and Certification for Payment of Hospital Inpatient Services under Medicare Part A Issues. Susanne Seagrave, (410) 786-0044, Physician Order and Certification for Payment of Inpatient... line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full-time equivalent FUH...

  12. Social climate of acute old age psychiatry inpatient units: staff perceptions within the context of patient aggression.

    PubMed

    McCann, T; Baird, J; Muir-Cochrane, E C

    2015-03-01

    Patient aggression occurs in old age psychiatry and is contrary to their recovery and to the well-being of staff. A favourable social climate can contribute to a reduction in aggression. The aim of this study was to examine the perceptions of clinical staff about the social climate of acute old age psychiatry inpatient units. Eighty-five clinicians were recruited from these facilities. They completed a survey questionnaire about the social climate or ward atmosphere of inpatient units. The findings showed that, to some extent, respondents' perceived patient cohesion and mutual support were evident, units were perceived somewhat positively as safe environments for patients and staff, and the ward climate helped meet patients' therapeutic needs. Overall, clinicians were somewhat positive about the social climate of the units, and this has implications for the perception of aggression in old age psychiatry inpatient settings. As there is a direct relationship between social climate and aggression, clinicians should consider adopting a broad-based, person-centred approach to the promotion of a favourable social climate in old age psychiatry inpatient settings.

  13. Inpatient deaths from acute myocardial infarction, 1982-92: analysis of data in the Nottingham heart attack register.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, N.; Young, T.; Gray, D.; Skene, A. M.; Hampton, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess longitudinal trends in admissions, management, and inpatient mortality from acute myocardial infarction over 10 years. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis based on the Nottingham heart attack register. SETTING: Two district general hospitals serving a defined urban and rural population. SUBJECTS: All patients admitted with a confirmed acute myocardial infarction during 1982-4 and 1989-92 (excluding 1991, when data were not collected). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Numbers of patients, background characteristics, time from onset of symptoms to admission, ward of admission, treatment, and inpatient mortality. RESULTS: Admissions with acute myocardial infarction increased from 719 cases in 1982 to 960 in 1992. The mean age increased from 62.1 years to 66.6 years (P < 0.001), the duration of stay fell from 8.7 days to 7.2 days (P < 0.001), and the proportion of patients aged 75 years and over admitted to a coronary care unit increased significantly from 29.1% to 61.2%. A higher proportion of patients were admitted to hospital within 6 hours of onset of their symptoms in 1989-92 than in 1982-4, but 15% were still admitted after the time window for thrombolysis. Use of beta blockers increased threefold between 1982 and 1992, aspirin was used in over 70% of patients after 1989, and thrombolytic use increased 1.3-fold between 1989 and 1992. Age and sex adjusted odds ratios for inpatient mortality remained unchanged over the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Despite an increasing uptake of the "proved" treatments, inpatient mortality from myocardial infarction did not change between 1982 and 1992. PMID:9251546

  14. The Contribution of Children's Temperamental Fear and Effortful Control to Restraint and Seclusion during Inpatient Treatment in a Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgett, David J.; Valentino, Kristin; Hayden, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined temperament characteristics as risk factors for restraint and seclusion (R/S) events in psychiatrically hospitalized youth, extending work that has sought to identify R/S risk factors and research examining temperament-behavior problem associations that has largely relied upon community samples. It was anticipated that…

  15. The quality of patient experience of short-stay acute medical admissions: findings of the Adult Inpatient Survey in England.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Paul; Harris, Mary L; Bell, Derek

    2013-12-01

    Introduction of the specialty of acute medicine and of acute medical units (AMUs) in the UK have been associated with improvements in mortality, length of stay and flow, but there is no literature on the patient experience during the early phase of acute medical admissions. We analysed the Adult Inpatient Survey (AIPS) findings for short-stay unscheduled medical admissions who did not move from their first admission ward (n=3325) and therefore are likely to have been managed entirely in the AMU. We compared these with short-stay emergencies in other specialties (n=3420) and short-stay scheduled admissions (n=10,347). Scheduled admissions reported a better experience for all survey items. Scores for unscheduled admissions were worse in medical patients compared with other specialties for pain control, privacy, involvement, information, and for a number of questions relating to information on discharge. The specialty of acute medicine should work to improve future patient experience.

  16. [Factors influencing the course and duration of inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric treatment: between empiricism and clinical reality].

    PubMed

    Branik, Emil

    2003-09-01

    In the last two decades considerable changes influenced the scope of inpatient treatment in child and adolescent psychiatry. Proceeding from a literature review dilemmas between available research data and clinical practice will be pointed out. Proposals will be made to take into account the complex developmental processes, the individuality and the social context by psychic impaired children and adolescents requiring hospitalisation. This could improve the transfer of research findings into the clinical practice. It will be argued against a confusion of economical interests with research findings.

  17. Accessing inpatient rehabilitation after acute severe stroke: age, mobility, prestroke function and hospital unit are associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe stroke (Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke ≤ 15). Physiotherapists assessed patients on day 3 poststroke, collecting demographic information and information relating to their prestroke status, social status and current status. Stepwise logistic-regression modelling was used to examine the association between age, type of stroke, prestroke living situation, comorbidities, availability of carer on discharge, current mobility, bladder continence, bowel continence, cognition and communication and the dependent variable, discharge destination (rehabilitation/other). The resulting model was analysed using hierarchical logistic regression with hospital unit as the clustering variable. Of the 108 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria, 70 (64.8%) were discharged to rehabilitation. The variables independently associated with discharge to rehabilitation were younger age [odds ratio (OR)=0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.83-0.95, P=0.001], independent premorbid functional status (OR=14.92, 95% CI=2.43-91.60, P=0.004) and higher level of current mobility (OR=1.31, 95% CI=1.02-1.66, P<0.03). The multilevel model estimated that 12% of the total variability in discharge destination was explained by differences between the hospital units (ρ=0.12, 95% CI=0.02-0.55, P=0.048). The results indicate that the variables associated with discharge to rehabilitation following severe stroke are younger age, independent prestroke functional status and higher level of current mobility. In addition, organizational factors play a role in selection for rehabilitation, suggesting inequity in access for this patient group. PMID:22728683

  18. Reduced acute inpatient care was largest savings component of Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Daniel D; Khan, Nazmul; Tomcavage, Janet; Graf, Thomas R; Davis, Duane E; Steele, Glenn D

    2015-04-01

    Early evidence suggests that the patient-centered medical home has the potential to improve patient outcomes while reducing the cost of care. However, it is unclear how this care model achieves such desirable results, particularly its impact on cost. We estimated cost savings associated with Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home clinics by examining longitudinal clinic-level claims data from elderly Medicare patients attending the clinics over a ninety-month period (2006 through the first half of 2013). We also used these data to deconstruct savings into its main components (inpatient, outpatient, professional, and prescription drugs). During this period, total costs associated with patient-centered medical home exposure declined by approximately 7.9 percent; the largest source of this savings was acute inpatient care ($34, or 19 percent savings per member per month), which accounts for about 64 percent of the total estimated savings. This finding is further supported by the fact that longer exposure was also associated with lower acute inpatient admission rates. The results of this study suggest that patient-centered medical homes can lead to sustainable, long-term improvements in patient health outcomes and the cost of care.

  19. Reduced acute inpatient care was largest savings component of Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Daniel D; Khan, Nazmul; Tomcavage, Janet; Graf, Thomas R; Davis, Duane E; Steele, Glenn D

    2015-04-01

    Early evidence suggests that the patient-centered medical home has the potential to improve patient outcomes while reducing the cost of care. However, it is unclear how this care model achieves such desirable results, particularly its impact on cost. We estimated cost savings associated with Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home clinics by examining longitudinal clinic-level claims data from elderly Medicare patients attending the clinics over a ninety-month period (2006 through the first half of 2013). We also used these data to deconstruct savings into its main components (inpatient, outpatient, professional, and prescription drugs). During this period, total costs associated with patient-centered medical home exposure declined by approximately 7.9 percent; the largest source of this savings was acute inpatient care ($34, or 19 percent savings per member per month), which accounts for about 64 percent of the total estimated savings. This finding is further supported by the fact that longer exposure was also associated with lower acute inpatient admission rates. The results of this study suggest that patient-centered medical homes can lead to sustainable, long-term improvements in patient health outcomes and the cost of care. PMID:25847647

  20. Patient Management and Psychopharmacological Treatment Associated to Smoking Ban in an Acute Psychiatric Unit.

    PubMed

    Bergé, Daniel; Mané, Anna; Fonseca, Francina; Toll, Alba; Merino, Ana; Pérez, Victor; Bulbena, Antoni

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates differences in terms of clinical and treatment management in psychiatric hospitalization associated to smoking ban. We collected data regarding medication, socio-demographic and admission characteristics from all patients admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital before and after a smoking ban was in force. We also assessed a limited sample of patients before and after the ban regarding nicotine dependence, motivation to quit smoking and attitudes towards the ban. More number of leaves of absence and movement restrictions during the ban period occurred in comparison to the pre-ban period. On the contrary a lack of significant differences in terms of hospital stay (duration, rate of voluntary admissions and voluntary discharges), use of sedatives and doses of antipsychotics was found. A period of adjustment regarding the deal with leave of access and facilitate nicotine replacement treatment may help future psychiatric facilities planning smoking free policies.

  1. Women in acute psychiatric units, their characteristics and needs: a review

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Michaela; Lau, Yasmine; Sethi, Faisil

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method Recent policy guidelines published by the Department of Health highlight the need to develop gender-sensitive psychiatric services. However, very little is currently known about the specific characteristics and needs of female patients entering acute psychiatric wards, particularly psychiatric intensive care units. This article aims to review the current literature on what is known about this group of patients. PubMed, Embase and PsycINFO were systematically searched using a number of key terms. Results A total of 27 articles were obtained. The findings were divided into four categories: admission characteristics, treatment needs, risk management and outcomes after discharge. Gender differences were found in diagnosis and presentation. Clinical implications The differences observed in the reviewed studies suggest that women may have different assessment and treatment needs, and ultimately, different philosophies of care. A dearth of studies in this area indicates that if services are to develop in line with government policies, more research is needed. PMID:27752346

  2. Well-Being and Safety Among Inpatient Psychiatric Staff: The Impact of Conflict, Assault, and Stress Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Erin L; Fenwick, Karissa; Brekke, John S; Novaco, Raymond W

    2016-09-01

    Psychiatric staff are faced with multiple forms of hostility, aggression, and assault at work, collectively referred to as workplace violence, which typically is activated by patients but can also come from coworkers and supervisors. Whether workplace violence adversely affects staff well-being may be related not only to its presence, but also to an individual's stress reactivity. At a large public psychiatric hospital, an online survey was completed by 323 clinical care staff, of whom 69.5 % had experienced physical assault in the previous 12 months. Staff well-being (depression, anger, and physical health) and staff safety concerns were adversely affected by conflicts with other staff members and by individual reactivity to social conflict and to assault. To improve staff well-being, in addition to safety protocols, interventions should target staff relationships, personal health maintenance practices, and individual coping skills for dealing with adverse workplace experiences. PMID:26377816

  3. A randomized trial of a mental health consumer-managed alternative to civil commitment for acute psychiatric crisis.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Thomas K; Stoneking, Beth C; Humphreys, Keith; Sundby, Evan; Bond, Jason

    2008-09-01

    This experiment compared the effectiveness of an unlocked, mental health consumer-managed, crisis residential program (CRP) to a locked, inpatient psychiatric facility (LIPF) for adults civilly committed for severe psychiatric problems. Following screening and informed consent, participants (n = 393) were randomized to the CRP or the LIPF and interviewed at baseline and at 30-day, 6-month, and 1-year post admission. Outcomes were costs, level of functioning, psychiatric symptoms, self-esteem, enrichment, and service satisfaction. Treatment outcomes were compared using hierarchical linear models. Participants in the CRP experienced significantly greater improvement on interviewer-rated and self-reported psychopathology than did participants in the LIPF condition; service satisfaction was dramatically higher in the CRP condition. CRP-style facilities are a viable alternative to psychiatric hospitalization for many individuals facing civil commitment. PMID:18626766

  4. [Neurological and psychiatric disorders following acute arsine poisoning (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Frank, G

    1976-07-15

    Follow-up study of 6 workers, who after survival of an acute arsine poisoning, developed psychopathologic and neurologic abnormalities. The symptoms appeared after a latency of 1 to 6 months indicating a toxic polyneuropathy and a mild psycho-organic syndrome. The severity of these reversible manifestations was directly related to the period of time of exposure to arsine. The clinical picture of arsine polyneuropathy was similar to that observed in arsenic poisoning, suggesting that arsine polyneuropathy is due to the action of arsenic. The psychopathologic syndrome corresponds to the so-called "Vergiftungsspätfolgesyndrom" and therefore does not appear to be a specific sequel of arsine poisoning.

  5. Optimizing managed care peer reviews: turning a "Doc to Doc" talk into better advocacy for psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Stuart L; Blank, Alvin R; Cirelli, Robert J; Friedman, Sara R; Green, Frederick C; Lopez, William M; Massey, Anthony G; Nemecek, Douglas A; Papatola, Kathleen J; Patel, Narendra H; Qayyam, Mohsin; Shah, Vikram N; Sipahimalini, Anil; Shampaine, Victoria C

    2013-08-01

    Clinicians often resent behavioral health managed care peer reviews. However, such reviews need not be onerous. This Open Forum, written by managed care physician reviewers, attempts to help attending psychiatrists, specifically those on inpatient units, achieve more satisfying outcomes for patients by adhering to a few basic principles. Beyond the level-of-care guidelines, attending psychiatrists are advised to focus on immediate acuity, along with specific life events that may have immediate impact on the patient's well-being. A clear diagnosis, relevant treatment plan, salient updates, and strategies for preventing readmission can justify additional treatment time. By contrast, "time-based treatments," dispositional issues, or a patient's lack of acceptance or effective use of treatment are harder to justify.

  6. 75 FR 71441 - Universal Health Services, Inc. and Psychiatric Solutions, Inc.; Analysis of Agreement Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... facilities that would be eliminated by the proposed acquisition. In each of the local markets, consumers have... operating in three local acute inpatient psychiatric care markets to acquirers who receive the approval of... removing an actual, direct, and substantial competitor from three local markets for acute...

  7. Less Is More: Inpatient Management of a Child with Complex Pharmacotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Varley, Christopher; Cummins, Thomas K.; Martin, Andres

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a case of an 11-year-old boy who was admitted to an acute inpatient psychiatric setting because of a recent exacerbation of physical aggression, accompanied by long-standing problems with verbal aggression, irritability, dysphoria, and sleep disturbance. His family history was notable for domestic violence, substance abuse by…

  8. Assessing the contribution of borderline personality disorder and features to suicide risk in psychiatric inpatients with bipolar disorder, major depression and schizoaffective disorder.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ruifan; Cohen, Lisa J; Tanis, Thachell; Qizilbash, Azra; Lopatyuk, Yana; Yaseen, Zimri S; Galynker, Igor

    2015-03-30

    Suicidal behavior often accompanies both borderline personality disorder (BPD) and severe mood disorders, and comorbidity between the two appears to further increase suicide risk. The current study aims to quantify the risk of suicidality conferred by comorbid BPD diagnosis or features in three affective disorders: major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder (BP) and schizoaffective disorder. One hundred forty-nine (149) psychiatric inpatients were assessed by SCID I and II, and the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Logistic regression analyses investigated the associations between previous suicide attempt and BPD diagnosis or features in patients with MDD, BP, and schizoaffective disorder, as well as a history of manic or major depressive episodes, and psychotic symptoms. Comorbid BPD diagnosis significantly increased suicide risk in the whole sample, and in those with MDD, BP, and history of depressive episode or psychotic symptoms. Each additional borderline feature also increased risk of past suicide attempt in these same groups (excepting BP) and in those with a previous manic episode. Of the BPD criteria, only unstable relationships and impulsivity independently predicted past suicide attempt. Overall, among patients with severe mood disorders, the presence of comorbid BPD features or disorder appears to substantially increase the risk of suicide attempts.

  9. Acute care nurse practitioners: creating and implementing a model of care for an inpatient general medical service.

    PubMed

    Howie, Jill N; Erickson, Mitchel

    2002-09-01

    Changes in medical education and healthcare reimbursement are recent threats to most academic medical centers' dual mission of patient care and education. Financial pressures stem from reduced insurance reimbursement, capitation, and changes in public funding for medical residency education. Pressures for innovation result from increasing numbers of patients, higher acuity of patients, an aging population of patients with complex problems, and restrictions on residency workloads. A framework for addressing the need for innovation in the medical service at a large academic medical center is presented. The framework enables acute care nurse practitioners to provide inpatient medical management in collaboration with a hospitalist. The model's development, acceptance, successes, pitfalls, and evaluation are described. The literature describing the use of nurse practitioners in acute care settings is reviewed.

  10. Inpatient diagnoses during Adolf Meyer's tenure as director of the Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, 1913-1940.

    PubMed

    Stephens, J H; Ota, K Y; More, W W; Shaffer, J W; Covi, L

    1986-12-01

    Between 1936 and 1950, detailed abstracts were prepared on all patients admitted to The Phipps Psychiatric Clinic from its opening in 1913 through 1950. Of these abstracts, 74% contained follow-up reports. Except for four papers on schizophrenia and affective disorders published between 1939 and 1943, none of this material has ever been analyzed. The present paper, the first of a series, examines the 8172 first admissions from 1913 through 1940, the period of Adolf Meyer's tenure as Clinic Director. Based on discharge diagnoses, we have sorted the patients into eight diagnostic groups with the following frequencies; schizophrenia, 17%; paranoid state, 3%; manic-depressive, 7%; depression, 27%; organic, 20%; neuroses, 15%; substance abuse, 6%; psychopath, 5%. Our manic-depressive group contains cases discharged primarily as hyperthymergasia, mania, or manic depressive insanity (MDI). Of the 349 cases diagnosed MDI at discharge, 10 had neither a history of nor present symptoms of mania, and these were put in the depression group. Frequencies for most of the diagnoses remained remarkably stable over the 28-year period. Only 9% were discharged recovered, whereas 43% were rated unimproved. Mean length of hospitalization was 76 days, with 10% of the patients readmitted. The mean length of follow-up was 9 years. Correlations of diagnoses, year of admission, length of stay, condition at discharge, age, sex, readmissions, change of diagnoses, somatic treatment, length of follow-up, and deaths in the clinic are presented. Meyer's influence on diagnostic practice is discussed.

  11. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    .... Background In FR Doc. 2010-19092 of August 16, 2010 (75 FR 50042), there were a number of technical errors... FR Doc. 2010-19092 of August 16, 2010, make the following corrections: A. Corrections to the Preamble..., 485, and 489 RIN 0938-AP80; RIN 0938-AP33 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective...

  12. 76 FR 59263 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... care hospital quality measures. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective... requirements. IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), make...

  13. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... Inpatient Services under Medicare Part A. Ann Marshall, (410) 786-3059, Requirement for Physician Order for... fiscal year FPL Federal poverty line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full... Provider-Specific File PS&R Provider Statistical and Reimbursement PQRS Physician Quality Reporting...

  14. Treatment needs, diagnoses and use of services for acutely admitted psychiatric patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We compared demography, diagnoses and clinical needs in acutely admitted psychiatric hospital patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway. Method All acutely admitted psychiatric patients in 1 psychiatric hospital in north-west Russia and 2 in northern Norway were in a three months period assessed with HoNOS and a Norwegian form developed to study acute psychiatric services (MAP). Data from a total of 841 patients were analysed (377 Norwegian, 464 Russian) with univariate and multivariate statistics. Results Russian patients were more often males who had paid work. 2/3 were diagnosed with alcohol and organic disorders, and 70% reported problems related to sleep. Depression was widespread, as were problems associated with occupation. Many more Norwegian patients were on various forms of social security and lived in community supported homes. They had a clinical profile of affective disorders, use of drugs, suicidality and problems with activities involved of daily life. Slightly more Norwegian patients were involuntary admitted. Conclusion Acutely admitted psychiatric patients in North West Russia and Northern Norwegian showed different clinical profiles: alcohol, depression and organic disorders characterised Russian patients, affective disorders, suicidality and use of drugs characterised the Norwegians. Whereas Norwegian patients are mainly referred from GPs the Russians come via 1.line psychiatric services (“dispensaries”). Average length of stay for Russian patients was 2.5 times longer than that of the Norwegian. PMID:23317010

  15. Doing their best: strategies used by South African clinicians in working with psychiatric inpatients across a language barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kilian, Sanja; Swartz, Leslie; Chiliza, Bonginkosi

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives South Africa has 11 official languages, but most psychiatrists can speak only English and Afrikaans and there are no formal interpreter posts in the mental healthcare system. As a result clinicians communicate with patients who have limited English language proficiency (LEP) without the use of interpreters. We present case material, constituting recordings of interactions between clinicians and LEP patients in a public psychiatric institution. The aim is to have a better understanding of how these clinical encounters operated and what communicative strategies clinicians used. Design We used the Roter interaction analysis system (RIAS) to evaluate clinicians’ conversational strategies and to analyze interactions between clinicians and patients. Results Clinicians showed a high degree of tenacity in trying to engage patients in the clinical conversation, build rapport, and gather crucial diagnostic information. However, patients often responded briefly and monosyllabically, or kept quiet. In psychiatry where commonality of language cannot be assumed, it is not possible to determine the clinical significance of these responses. Discussion Clinicians went to great lengths to understand LEP patients. It is also clear that patients were often not optimally understood. Clinicians would try to gain valid information in a polite manner, but would abandon these attempts repeatedly as it became clear that proper communication was not possible. Conclusions Our findings suggest that in the absence of interpreter services, the communication between clinicians and LEP patients is sparse and yields limited clinical information. The lack of proper language services stands in the way of optimal clinical care and requires urgent attention. PMID:26507606

  16. Understanding the prevalence of inpatient falls associated with toileting in adult acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study determined the prevalence of inpatient falls that were associated with toileting in a Michigan community hospital. Of all falls, 45.2% were related to toileting. The most common theme was falling on the way from the bed or chair to the bathroom. Nurses should focus on safe patient transfers and on using the completed risk assessment and should develop an individualized prevention plan for each patient based on their needs. PMID:19553863

  17. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing.

  18. Content-Area Framework for Conducting Family Meetings for Acutely Ill Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Pon, Natalie C; Gordon, Mollie R; Coverdale, John; Nguyen, Phuong T

    2016-09-01

    Family meetings are a critically important component of managing acutely psychiatrically ill patients, and learning how to conduct such a meeting is critically important in the training of psychiatrists. Because we found no published comprehensive tools that dealt with the biopsychosocial content areas to be covered in family meetings in acute psychiatric settings, we developed and present such a comprehensive tool that is based in part on a review of existing tools utilized by other disciplines. This article describes the specific steps involved in premeeting planning, the formal topic areas that might be canvassed during the meeting, and postmeeting documentation and debriefing. The general content areas for discussion during the meeting include the setting of goals and expectations, relevant history-gathering, assessment of the family's understanding of the issues at stake, formal psychoeducation, and review of specific treatment strategies and clinical progress. The meeting may also include a discussion of resources available to the patient and family members and a review of issues related to the safety of the patient and others, management of early warning signs, and sensitive topics such as trauma, abuse, or violence that may play a role in the presentation or treatment of the patient to best translate established goals into a longer term plan of care. Implementation of this comprehensive and necessarily structured model should enhance the patient's and family's understanding of the issues at stake and should improve satisfaction, promote trust and an effective working alliance, and enhance the quality of the biopsychosocial care plan. PMID:27648507

  19. A retrospective population-based data analyses of inpatient care use and medical expenditure in people with intellectual disability co-occurring schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chia-Im; Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Chien, Wu-Chien; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    The paper aims to analyze the hospital inpatient care use and medical fee of people with ID co-occurring with schizophrenia in Taiwan. A nationwide data were collected concerning hospital admission and medical expenditure of people with ID (n = 2565) among national health insurance beneficiaries in Taiwan. Multiple regression analyses were undertaken to determine the role of the explanatory variables to hospital psychiatric inpatient care and medical expenditure. We found that there were 2565 individuals with ID used hospital psychiatric inpatient care among people with ID in 2005, and 686 cases (26.7%) co-occurring with schizophrenia according to hospital discharge claims. Those ID patients co-occurring with schizophrenia consumed more annual inpatient fee than those without schizophrenia (251,346 vs. 126,666 NTD) (p < 0.001). We found factors of female cases, longer hospital stay in chronic ward and general ward users among ID patients co-occurring with schizophrenia used more hospital inpatient care (R(2) = 0.417). Annual hospital inpatient days were significantly affected by factors of severe illness card holder, annual inpatient care fee, longer hospital stay in acute or chronic ward (R(2) = 0.746). Those factors of female cases, high inpatient care users, longer hospital stay in acute ward and general ward were consuming more medical care fee than their counterparts (R(2) = 0.620). The study highlights the future study should examine the efficacy of hospital inpatient care for people with ID and schizophrenia.

  20. Recovery-oriented care in older-adult acute inpatient mental health settings in Australia: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brian; Furness, Trentham; Dhital, Deepa; Ireland, Susan

    2014-10-01

    Recovery-oriented care acknowledges the unique journey that consumers lead with the aim of regaining control of their lives in order to live a good life. Recovery has become a dominant policy-directed model of many mental health care organizations, but in older-adult acute mental health inpatient settings, nurses do not have a clear description of how to be recovery-oriented. The aims of this study were to determine the extent to which elements of existing nursing practice resemble the domains of recovery-oriented care and provide a baseline understanding of practice in preparation for transformation to recovery-oriented mental health care provision. An exploratory, qualitative research design was used to meet the research aims. A purposive sample of mental health nurses (N = 12) participated in focus groups in three older-adult inpatient settings in Australia. A general inductive approach was used to analyze the qualitative data. The mental health nurses in this study readily discussed aspects of their current practice within the recovery domains. They described pragmatic ways to promote a culture of hope, collaborative partnerships, meaningful engagement, autonomy and self-determination, and community participation and citizenship. Nurses also discussed challenges and barriers to recovery-oriented care in older-adult acute mental health settings. This study identified a reasonable baseline understanding of practice in preparation for transformation to recovery-oriented older-adult mental healthcare provision. A concerted drive focused on recovery education is required to effectively embed a recovery-orientated paradigm into older-adult mental health settings.

  1. Changing model of nursing care from individual patient allocation to team nursing in the acute inpatient environment.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Greg; Jones, Aaron; Rivas, Ketty

    2010-06-01

    Agreement was reached with 12 acute medical and surgical wards/units at Sydney's Prince of Wales Hospital to participate in a trial of team nursing (TN). Six units employed action research principles to undertake a change to a team nursing model and six remained with the pre-existing individual patient allocation (IPA) model. Task-based teaming was widely discarded by the team nursing units in favour of allocating patients within the team and introducing more supportive and communicative processes aimed at fostering responsibility sharing. Localised team-based models of care arose in the change wards and were outlined, implemented and refined using social action research principles. A 12-month prospective experimental comparison of job satisfaction and staff retention between the TN and IPA groups indicated statistically significant job satisfaction benefits and practically important staff retention benefits associated with moving away from an IPA model of nursing care delivery towards a team-based model of care delivery. Perhaps not surprisingly, job satisfaction gains were most marked among new graduate nurses, who reported real benefits from a teaming inspired shift in model of care in the acute inpatient environment. PMID:20950201

  2. Acute lead poisoning in nursing home and psychiatric patients from the ingestion of lead-based ceramic glazes.

    PubMed

    Vance, M V; Curry, S C; Bradley, J M; Kunkel, D B; Gerkin, R D; Bond, G R

    1990-10-01

    To our knowledge, acute inorganic lead poisoning from single ingestions of lead compounds has been only rarely reported. During a 14-month period, we were contacted regarding eight instances of acute ingestions of liquid lead-based ceramic glazes by mentally impaired residents of nursing homes or psychiatric facilities participating in ceramic arts programs. While some ingestions did not cause toxic effects, some patients developed acute lead poisoning characterized by abdominal pain, anemia, and basophilic stippling of red blood cells. In the blood of several patients, lead concentrations were far above normal (4 to 9.5 mumol/L). Urinary lead excretions were tremendously elevated during chelation therapy, with one patient excreting 535.9 mumol/L of lead during a 6-day period, the largest lead excretion ever reported in a patient suffering from acute lead poisoning, to our knowledge. All patients recovered following supportive care and appropriate use of chelating agents. Lead-based glazes are commonly found in nursing homes and psychiatric facilities. We suspect that acute or chronic lead poisoning from the ingestion(s) of lead-based ceramic glazes may be an unrecognized but not uncommon problem among such residents. We urge physicians to take ingestions of lead-based glazes seriously and to consider the diagnosis of lead poisoning in nursing home and psychiatric patients who have participated in ceramic crafts programs. PMID:2222094

  3. Orthopaedic inpatient rehabilitation conducted by nursing staff in acute orthopaedic wards in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pi-Chu; Wang, Ching-Hui; Liu, Yo-Yi; Chen, Chyang-Shiong

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the postoperative rehabilitation patterns of orthopaedic patients and to explore factors which affected the patients' functional recovery. A descriptive study with convenience sampling was performed. Study participants included orthopaedic inpatients from two hospitals in Taipei. In total, 100 patients were selected with an average age of 60.88 ± 17.61 years, of which the most common type of surgery was a total knee replacement (49.0%). Among these participants, 79.0% received rehabilitation guided by nursing staff, while only 6.0% were instructed by a physical therapist. The predictive factor for the time to first ambulation was the intensity of pain experienced on the second day after the operation, which accounted for 4.5% of the total variance. As for the functional status prior to discharge, predictive factors included the time to first ambulation and whether nursing staff provided instructions on rehabilitation, which accounted for 11.2% of the total variance. We recommend that professional staff should promote patient guidance toward postoperative rehabilitation, assistance in achieving the first ambulation and a resolution of obstacles to rehabilitation.

  4. Mechanical and pharmacological restraints in acute psychiatric wards--why and how are they used?

    PubMed

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Helen Mjøsund, Nina; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2013-08-30

    Restraint use has been reported to be common in acute psychiatry, but empirical research is scarce concerning why and how restraints are used. This study analysed data from patients' first episodes of restraint in three acute psychiatric wards during a 2-year study period. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors for type and duration of restraint. The distribution of restraint categories for the 371 restrained patients was as follows: mechanical restraint, 47.2%; mechanical and pharmacological restraint together, 35.3%; and pharmacological restraint, 17.5%. The most commonly reported reason for restraint was assault (occurred or imminent). It increased the likelihood of resulting in concomitant pharmacological restraint. Female patients had shorter duration of mechanical restraint than men. Age above 49 and female gender increased the likelihood of pharmacological versus mechanical restraint, whereas being restrained due to assault weakened this association. Episodes with mechanical restraint and coinciding pharmacological restraint lasted longer than mechanical restraint used separately, and were less common among patients with a personality disorder. Diagnoses, age and reason for restraint independently increased the likelihood for being subjected to specific types of restraint. Female gender predicted type of restraint and duration of episodes.

  5. Finding solutions through empowerment: a preliminary study of a solution-orientated approach to nursing in acute psychiatric settings.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, C; Jackson, S; Barker, P

    2003-12-01

    Acute inpatient care is not a therapeutic milieu, perhaps owing to the lack of nursing skills. Solution-focused therapy (SFT) has been successful in US inpatient facilities in relation to both objective and subjective 'measures'. This paper reports a study of SFT in a UK context, with the aim of developing a user-friendly SFT training course and assessing its impact on both nurses and clients, via a multifaceted, triangulated data collection design. Nurses' knowledge and clinical performance were assessed, as was the client's perspective. There was a significant difference in nurses' SFT knowledge after training and strong evidence of the model being used in practice during the course of training, although nursing documentation was not fully completed. Eighty-three per cent of nurses said that they would continue using the model, and clients found the SFT approach helpful. The findings match the US experience of using SFT.

  6. Update of Inpatient Treatment for Refractory Chronic Daily Headache.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tzu-Hsien; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a group of headache disorders, in which headaches occur daily or near-daily (>15 days per month) and last for more than 3 months. Important CDH subtypes include chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, hemicrania continua, and new daily persistent headache. Other headaches with shorter durations (<4 h/day) are usually not included in CDH. Common comorbidities of CDH are medication overuse headache and various psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Indications of inpatient treatment for CDH patients include poor responses to outpatient management, need for detoxification for overuse of specific medications (particularly opioids and barbiturates), and severe psychiatric comorbidities. Inpatient treatment usually involves stopping acute pain, preventing future attacks, and detoxifying medication overuse if present. Multidisciplinary integrated care that includes medical staff from different disciplines (e.g., psychiatry, clinical psychology, and physical therapy) has been recommended. The outcomes of inpatient treatment are satisfactory in terms of decreasing headache intensity or frequency, withdrawal from medication overuse, reducing disability, and improving life quality, although long-term relapse is not uncommon. In conclusion, inpatient treatment may be useful for select patients with refractory CDH and should be incorporated in a holistic headache care program.

  7. Nurses' experiences of restraint and seclusion use in short-stay acute old age psychiatry inpatient units: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Muir-Cochrane, E C; Baird, J; McCann, T V

    2015-03-01

    Restraint and seclusion are often ineffective and can affect patients adversely. In this study, we explored nurses' experiences of restraint and seclusion in short-stay acute old age psychiatry inpatient units and how these experiences underpin resistance to eliminating these practices. Qualitative interviews were conducted with nurses in three old age psychiatry units in Melbourne, Australia. The results provide one overarching theme, lack of accessible alternatives to restraint and seclusion, indicating that nurses believe there are no effective, accessible alternatives to these practices. Three related themes contribute to this perception. First, an adverse interpersonal environment contributes to restraint and seclusion, which relates to undesirable consequences of poor staff-to-patient relationships. Second, an unfavourable physical environment contributes to aggression and restraint and seclusion use. Third, the practice environment influences the adoption of restraint and seclusion. The findings contribute to the limited evidence about nurses' experiences of these practices in short-stay old age psychiatry, and how account needs to be taken of these experiences and contextual influences when introducing measures to address these practices. Policies addressing these measures need to be accompanied by wide-ranging initiatives to deal with aggression, including providing appropriate education and support and addressing ethical and workplace cultural issues surrounding these practices.

  8. Norms, Reliability, and Item Analysis of the Hopelessness Scale in General Psychiatric, Forensic Psychiatric, and College Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Thomas W.

    1982-01-01

    Administered the Hopelessness Scale to criminal psychiatric inpatients, general psychiatric inpatients, and college students. Both psychiatric groups endorsed significantly more items in the hopeless direction. Found the scale more reliable with the psychiatric patients. Item analysis of the Hopelessness Scale suggests that three items were not…

  9. The Evolving Role of the Acute Assessment Unit - from inpatient to outpatient care.

    PubMed

    Connolly, V; Hamad, M; Scott, Y; Bramble, M

    2005-01-01

    Acute Assessment Units (AAUs) have been developed to meet the demand for emergency care. Traditionally, AAUs have been an admission route to secondary care but the role is now evolving to assessment. AAUs are complex and have many interactions both in hospitals and the community. The effective functioning of an AAU requires excellent clinical leadership, appropriate facilities, timely access to diagnostics and input from the multi-disciplinary team. Increasingly, AAUs will have to develop services which are not dependent on using hospital beds. A variety of emergency medical presentations can, with the appropriate resources, be delivered in an out-patient setting. PMID:21655513

  10. What happens when 55% of acute psychiatric beds are closed in six days: an unexpected naturalistic observational study

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Matt; Mitchell, Anji; Parkin, Lindsay; Confue, Phil; Shankar, Rohit; Wilson-James, Diane; Marshall, Mike; Edgecombe, Maria; Keaney, Bernie; Gill, Kiran; Harrison, Juliet

    2016-01-01

    Objective The sudden closure of 30 out of 54 acute psychiatric beds in Cornwall presented a stressful challenge to staff but also a natural experiment on how a service dealt with this situation. We aimed to evaluate the outcomes of patients needing to leave the closed ward, how bed occupancy rates were affected and the impact on admission rates. Design A service evaluation of the impact of the ward closure. Setting A comprehensive secondary NHS mental health service in Cornwall serving 550,000 population. Main outcome measures The destination of the patients needing to leave the acute unit, the effect of the closure on bed occupancy, admission rates and serious untoward incidents. Results Of 26 patients needing to be moved from the acute ward, only 10 needed an acute psychiatric bed. None of the seven patients who had been on the ward longer than nine weeks needed an acute unit. Admission rates fell over the subsequent three months. There was no increase in serious incidents due to the closure. Conclusions This naturalistic event suggests that many patients on acute units could be cared for elsewhere, especially recovery/rehabilitation care environments, if political and financial urgency is present. Admission rates are responsive to the pressure on beds. PMID:27757241

  11. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  12. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  13. Acute effects of electroconvulsive therapy on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in psychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Prohovnik, I.; Alderson, P.O.; Sackheim, H.A.; Decina, P.; Kahn, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is frequently used in the treatment of major depression and other psychiatric disorders; its mechanism of action is not established, but previous evidence suggests that it is associated with postictal metabolic suppression. The authors have used measurements of rCBF as an index of cortical metabolic activity to study the acute effects of ECT. Measurements of rCBF were made in 32 cortical regions in 10 patients (pts) following one minute breathing of Xe-133 (5mCi/L); the measurements were performed 30min before and 50min after ECT. Bilateral ECT was administered to six pts (five diagnosed as major depressives and one schizophrenic) and unilateral ECT to four (all diagnosed as unipolar or bipolar affective disorder). The total rCBF material consists of 52 measurements in these pts, made before and after 16 bilateral and 10 unilateral treatments. ECT was found to cause significant reduction of rCBF. Mean hemispheric flows (using the Initial Slope Index to measure grey-matter flow) were reduced by about 5% in both hemispheres following bilateral treatment. Unilateral treatment caused a 9% reduction of flow in the treated hemisphere, but only 2% contralaterally. Regional patterns of flow decreases also differed between the two treatment modes: bilateral frontal reductions were found after bilateral treatment, whereas unilateral ECT caused a widespread flow reduction in the treated hemisphere, and almost no effect contralaterally. These results suggest that rCBF studies are useful for assessing ECT, and indicate that the acute cerebral effects of ECT vary with the mode of treatment.

  14. Neural network modeling of the level of observation decision in an acute psychiatric ward.

    PubMed

    Penny, W D; Frost, D P

    1997-02-01

    Patients in an acute psychiatric ward need to be observed with varying levels of closeness. We report a series of experiments in which neural networks were trained to model this "level of observation" decision. One hundred eighty-seven such clinical decisions were used to train and test the networks which were evaluated by a multitrial v-fold cross-validation procedure. One neural network modeling approach was to break down the decision process into four subproblems, each of which was solved by a perceptron unit. This resulted in a hierarchical perceptron network having a structure that was equivalent to a sparsely connected two-layer perceptron. Neural network approaches were compared with nearest neighbor, linear regression, and naive Bayes classifiers. The hierarchical and sparse neural networks were the most accurate classifiers. This shows that the decision process is nonlinear, that neural nets can be more accurate than other statistical approaches, and that hierarchical decomposition is a useful methodology for neural network design.

  15. Retrospective analysis of absconding behaviour by acute care consumers in one psychiatric hospital campus in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mosel, Krista A; Gerace, Adam; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2010-06-01

    Absconding is increasingly being recognized as a problem within mental health settings with significant risks for consumers. This study examines absconding behaviours across three acute care wards within an Australian psychiatric hospital campus over a 12-month period. A descriptive statistical analysis determined the rate of absconding from 49 consumers who absconded 64 times. The absconding rate was 13.33% (absconding events), with most absconding events arising from males diagnosed with schizophrenia (57.14%) aged between 20 and 29 years, and with 62.50% of absconding events occurring whilst consumers were on their first 21-day detention order. Nearly half of all absconding events were by consumers who had absconded previously, with the highest proportion of events occurring during nursing handover. A profile of people who abscond, time of day of absconding, legal status and repeated absconding behaviours are described. The emergent profile of consumers who absconded within this study bears some similarities to that described in overseas research, although in this study consumers were slightly older and 25% of absconders were female. Of particular interest are findings that identify the timings of absconding events in relation to a consumer's legal status. Implications for practice, including assessment of risk of absconding and management, are considered.

  16. Patients' lived seclusion experience in acute psychiatric hospital in the United States: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ezeobele, I E; Malecha, A T; Mock, A; Mackey-Godine, A; Hughes, M

    2014-05-01

    The findings revealed that the patients perceived seclusion as an intervention that is punitive and a means used by the staff to exert control. Patients perceived that staff incitements and lack of communication skills led to their being secluded. The findings provided recommendations and strategies for seclusion reduction that were based on the patients' first-hand seclusion experiences. This phenomenological study used Husserlian's philosophy to explore and describe the lived experiences of psychiatric patients who were secluded at a free-standing acute care hospital located in South-western United States (US). The study is crucial because very few studies have been conducted in this area in the US. The study examined a purposive sample of 20 patients, 3 days post-seclusion. Data were generated through face-to-face, semi-structured interviews incorporating open-ended questions and probes to facilitate discussion until saturation was reached. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and data analysed using Colaizzi's seven steps method. Results were described according to the themes and subthemes identified. Findings uncovered four themes: (1) alone in the world; (2) staff exert power and control; (3) resentment towards staff; and (4) time for meditation. The findings from this study illuminated the views surrounding patients' seclusion experience. It provided first-hand information on the patients' seclusion experience that might be helpful to the mental health professionals in the seclusion reduction process.

  17. Development of Inpatient Risk Stratification Models of Acute Kidney Injury for Use in Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; Miller, Randolph A.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Waitman, Lemuel R.; Denny, Joshua C.; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Dittus, Robert S.; Peterson, Josh F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased mortality and further medical complications. Evaluating these patients with a prediction tool easily implemented within an electronic health record (EHR) would identify high risk patients prior to the development of AKI, and could prevent iatrogenically induced episodes of AKI and improve clinical management. Methods We used structured clinical data acquired from an EHR to identify patients with normal kidney function for admissions from August 1st, 1999 to July 31st, 2003. Using administrative, computerized provider order entry, and laboratory test data, we developed a 3-level risk stratification model to predict each of two severity levels of in-hospital AKI as defined by RIFLE criteria. The severity levels were defined as 150% or 200% of baseline serum creatinine. Model discrimination and calibration was evaluated using 10-fold cross-validation. Results Cross-validation of the models resulted in area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) curves of 0.75 (150% elevation) and 0.78 (200% elevation). Both models were adequately calibrated as measured by the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test chi-squared values of 9.7 (p = 0.29) and 12.7 (p = 0.12), respectively. Conclusions We generated risk prediction models for hospital-acquired AKI using only commonly available electronic data. The models identify patients at high risk for AKI who might benefit from early intervention or increased monitoring. PMID:20354229

  18. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention. Materials and Methods A national retrospective cohort of 1,620,898 patient hospitalizations from 116 Veterans Affairs hospitals was assembled from electronic health record (EHR) data collected from 2003 to 2012. HA-AKI was defined at stage 1+, stage 2+, and dialysis. EHR-based predictors were identified through logistic regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso) regression, and random forests, and pair-wise comparisons between each were made. Calibration and discrimination metrics were calculated using 50 bootstrap iterations. In the final models, we report odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and importance rankings for predictor variables to evaluate their significance. Results The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the different model outcomes ranged from 0.746 to 0.758 in stage 1+, 0.714 to 0.720 in stage 2+, and 0.823 to 0.825 in dialysis. Logistic regression had the best AUC in stage 1+ and dialysis. Random forests had the best AUC in stage 2+ but the least favorable calibration plots. Multiple risk factors were significant in our models, including some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medications, antibiotics, and intravenous fluids given during the first 48 h of admission. Conclusions This study demonstrated that, although all the models tested had good discrimination, performance characteristics varied between methods, and the random forests models did not calibrate as well as the lasso or logistic regression models. In addition, novel modifiable risk factors were explored and found to be significant. PMID:26104740

  19. Acute exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms during influenza treatment with oseltamivir in chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chen-Chia; Liu, Chia-Chien; Chen, Ying-Sheue

    2015-06-01

    Influenza treatment and prophylaxis with oseltamivir are critically important in reducing the morbidity and mortality of patients in chronic psychiatric facilities. Abnormal behavior, delusions, perceptual disturbances, mania, and depression have all been reported as oseltamivir-related psychiatric side effects. We hereby report two chronic schizophrenia patients in Taiwan manifesting psychiatric instability who were being treated with oseltamivir for suspected influenza infection, and further discuss other potential contributing factors. The possibility that oseltamivir can cause psychotic or affective symptoms suggests that additional caution is necessary for its use in patients with an established psychiatric diagnosis. PMID:25823677

  20. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  1. Deprivation of liberty in psychiatric hospital care: the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kuosmanen, Lauri; Hätönen, Heli; Malkavaara, Heikki; Kylmä, Jari; Välimäki, Maritta

    2007-09-01

    Deprivation of liberty in psychiatric hospitals is common world-wide. The aim of this study was to find out whether patients had experienced deprivation of their liberty during psychiatric hospitalization and to explore their views about it. Patients (n = 51) in two acute psychiatric inpatient wards were interviewed in 2001. They were asked to describe in their own words their experiences of being deprived of their liberty. The data were analysed by inductive content analysis. The types of deprivation of liberty in psychiatric hospital care reported by these patients were: restrictions on leaving the ward and on communication, confiscation of property, and various coercive measures. The patients' experiences of being deprived of their liberty were negative, although some saw the rationale for using these interventions, considering them as part of hospital care.

  2. Psychiatric personnel, risk management and the new institutionalism.

    PubMed

    Hazelton, M

    1999-12-01

    This article reports the findings of a series of ethnographic research interviews conducted with psychiatric personnel in one region of Tasmania between 1995 and 1997. These interviews formed part of a more wide-ranging project examining changes in the regulatory practices of psychiatric personnel in the light of the professional, media and policy discourses that inform them, especially in relation to the impact of social justice reforms spelt out in recent Australian mental health policy. In discussing the nature of psychiatric work the personnel interviewed returned repeatedly to the themes of safety and risk management. The study presents an analysis of discourses deployed around these themes and argues that concerns over safety and risk are central to the emergence of a new institutionalism in acute in-patient psychiatric services.

  3. Mobile phone text message reminders of antipsychotic medication: is it time and who should receive them? A cross-sectional trust-wide survey of psychiatric inpatients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to antipsychotic medication is a widespread problem, and the largest predictor of relapse in patients with psychosis. Electronic reminders are increasingly used to improve medication adherence for a variety of medical conditions, but have received little attention in the context of psychotic disorders. We aimed to explore the feasibility and acceptability of including short message service (SMS) medication reminders in the aftercare plan of service users discharged from inpatient care on maintenance antipsychotic medication. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, trust-wide survey in the inpatient units of the Oxleas National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust in the UK between June 29 and August 3, 2012. Using a self-report questionnaire and the Drug Attitude Inventory, we examined inpatient attitudes towards antipsychotic drugs, past adherence to antipsychotic medication, frequency of mobile phone ownership, and interest in receiving SMS medication reminders upon discharge from the ward. Predictors of a patient’s interest in receiving electronic reminders were examined using simple logistic regression models. Results Of 273 inpatients, 85 met eligibility criteria for the survey, showed decisional capacity, and agreed to participate. Of the 85 respondents, over a third (31-35%) admitted to have forgotten to take/collect their antipsychotic medication in the past, and approximately half (49%) to have intentionally skipped their antipsychotics or taken a smaller dose than prescribed. Male patients (55%), those with negative attitudes towards antipsychotics (40%), and those unsatisfied with the information they received on medication (35%) were approximately 3 to 4 times more likely to report past intentional poor adherence. The large majority of respondents (80-82%) reported having a mobile phone and knowing how to use SMS, and a smaller majority (59%) expressed an interest in receiving SMS medication reminders after discharge. No

  4. A comparison of acute psychiatric care under Medicaid carve-outs, HMOs, and fee-for-service.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Christopher G; Chafets, Julia

    2010-11-01

    This study compares the use of acute psychiatric hospitalization; selected outcomes, including rehospitalization; as well as costs associated with the health maintenance organization (HMO), carve-out, and fee-for-service models as implemented in the Massachusetts Medicaid program between FY1994 and FY2000. This is a longitudinal analysis that primarily uses unduplicated individual data from the Massachusetts Case Mix database. Analyses focus on 56,518 individuals who were psychiatrically hospitalized on acute units within 57 hospitals. They employ Cox regression to compare rehospitalization among the three programs. The hypotheses were strongly supported: HMOs have the most substantial impacts in minimizing service provision, with the carve-out program having an impact intermediate between the HMO and fee-for-service programs. Lower utilization rates were associated with lower overall rates of hospitalization, shorter lengths of stay, fewer repeated stays, and less geographic access and greater displacement of psychiatric patients to medical units. The final model of rehospitalization has an overall predictive accuracy of 59.6%.

  5. Multifaceted Inpatient Psychiatry Approach to Reducing Readmissions: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Timothy P.; Rohrer, James E.; Rioux, Pierre A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Access to psychiatric services, particularly inpatient psychiatric care, is limited and lacks comprehensiveness in rural areas. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact on readmission rates of a multifaceted inpatient psychiatry approach (MIPA) offered in a rural hospital. Methods: Readmissions within 30 days of…

  6. "We Have to Be Satisfied with the Scraps": South African Nurses' Experiences of Care on Adult Psychiatric Intellectual Disability Inpatient Wards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capri, Charlotte; Buckle, Chanellé

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migrating nursing labour inadvertently reinforces South Africa's care drain, contributes to a global care crisis and forces us to reconsider migration motivation. This paper highlights issues that complicate psychiatric intellectual disability nursing care and identifies loci for change in an attempt to redress this care challenge.…

  7. [Social integration and contacts to reference persons of the normal social environment in inpatient treatment in the psychiatric hospital. A prospective catamnestic study of patients admitted for the first time with schizophrenic and cyclothymic psychoses].

    PubMed

    Böcker, F M

    1984-01-01

    Fifty first-admission inpatients (27 women, 23 men; mean age 35.1 years) with schizophrenia (n = 35) or affective disorders (n = 15) participated in a standardized, half-open interview about contact with people outside the hospital. The frequency of contact was compared with outcome, as based on a 1-year follow-up. Nearly all patients (48 of 50) had "direct" contact with relatives and friends during the week (means = 3/week): 45 patients had visitors, 13 went home on weekends. Thirty-five patients had contact with the outside by telephone, and 21 by letter; only 12 patients indicated no "indirect" contact. The frequency of contact had no relationship to sex, age or diagnosis. The significant factors were: structure of the patient's family, his/her educational and occupational level, social network, means of admission, conditions of hospitalization, and length of stay. The distance between the patient's residence and the hospital markedly influenced the frequency of visits and weekend holidays. The importance of frequent interaction with the usual social environment was verified by follow-up: 11 patients with rare or only average contact had unfavorable results (readmission or suicide by 1 year after discharge or long-term hospitalization); on the other hand, none of the patients with frequent direct contact outside the hospital showed poor results. There is no reason for indiscriminate criticism of the relatives of psychiatric inpatients according to etiological hypotheses of "family research"; above all, patients without relationships with a family or friends have to be regarded as at risk.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6526062

  8. Physician leadership and quality improvement in the acute child and adolescent psychiatric care setting.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Erin; Butt, Shiraz; Sorter, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Inpatient child and adolescent psychiatry leadership roles are often multifaceted, necessitating strong clinical knowledge and skills, organizational and leadership abilities, and in the academic setting the desire and skill in teaching and research. Early career psychiatrists who do possess these attributes may find themselves unprepared for such challenges as dealing with complex administrative and economic issues, accreditation, legal matters, and multitasking. This article offers a primer addressing these basic issues and in managing change through quality improvement processes.

  9. Treatments for common psychiatric conditions among adults during acute, rehabilitation, and reintegration phases.

    PubMed

    Difede, Joann; Cukor, Judith; Lee, Francis; Yurt, Roger

    2009-12-01

    Common and pernicious adult psychiatric disorders consequent to burn injury include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and new-onset substance abuse disorder. Diagnosing and treating these disorders is complicated by the complex psychosocial issues associated with burns including grief, pain, role impairment, disfigurement, dysfunction, stigma, as well as financial and legal issues. Additionally, pre-morbid psychiatric and neurological illnesses are risk factors for burns, adding to the challenge of diagnosis and treatment. This article will focus on the diagnosis and treatment of PTSD and MDD consequent to burn trauma, as these are the major psychiatric outcomes, addressing the attendant psychosocial problems as threads in this post-trauma tapestry.

  10. The outcomes of psychiatric inpatients by proportion of experienced psychiatrists and nurse staffing in hospital: New findings on improving the quality of mental health care in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Sun Jung; Jang, Sung-In; Hahm, Myung-Il; Kim, Seung Ju; Lee, Seo Yoon; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2015-10-30

    Readmission rates for mental health care are higher in South Korea than other Organization for Economic Development (OECD) countries. Therefore, it is worthwhile to continue investigating how to reduce readmissions. Taking a novel approach, we determined the relationship between psychiatrist experience and mental health care readmission rates. We used National Health Insurance claim data (N=21,315) from 81 hospitals to analyze readmissions within 30 days of discharge for "mood disorders" or "schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders" during 2010-2013. In this study, multilevel models that included both patient and hospital-level variables were analyzed to examine associations with readmission. Readmissions within 30 days of discharge accounted for 1079 (5.1%) claims. Multilevel analysis demonstrated that the proportion of experienced psychiatrists at a hospital was inversely associated with risk of readmission (OR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.74-0.84 per 10% increase in experienced psychiatrists). Readmission rates for psychiatric disorders within 30 days of discharge were lower in hospitals with a higher number of nurses (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.94-0.96 per 10 nurses). In conclusion, health policymakers and hospital managers should make an effort to reduce readmissions for psychiatric disorders and other diseases by considering the role that physician experience plays and nurse staffing. PMID:26260566

  11. [Inpatient psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Spitzer, C; Rullkötter, N; Dally, A

    2016-01-01

    In German-speaking countries inpatient psychotherapy plays a major role in the mental healthcare system. Due to its characteristic features, i. e. multiprofessionalism, multimodality and method integration, the inpatient approach represents a unique and independent type of psychotherapy. In order to be helpful, the manifold verbal and non-verbal methods need to be embedded into an overall treatment plan. Additionally, the therapeutic milieu of the hospital represents an important effective factor and its organization requires a more active construction. The indications for inpatient psychotherapy are not only based on the mental disorder but also on illness, setting and healthcare system-related criteria. In integrative concepts, the multiprofessional team is a key component with many functions. The effectiveness of psychotherapeutic hospital treatment has been proven by meta-analysis studies; however, 20-30% of patients do not benefit from inpatient psychotherapy and almost 13% drop-out prematurely.

  12. Educating Mental Health Clinicians About Sensory Modulation to Enhance Clinical Practice in a Youth Acute Inpatient Mental Health Unit: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Julie; McKenna, Brian; Jackson, Brian; Hitch, Danielle; Benitez, Jessica; McLennan, Cathy; Furness, Trentham

    2016-07-01

    There is an emergence of literature describing effective sensory modulation (SM) interventions to de-escalate violence and aggression among mental health inpatients. However, the evidence is limited to adult settings, with the effect of SM in youth acute settings unknown. Yet, before SM may be used as a de-escalation intervention in youth acute settings, multidisciplinary staff need to be educated about and supported in the clinical application of SM. In the current study, an online SM education package was developed to assist mental health staff understand SM. This was blended with action learning sets (ALS), small group experiential opportunities consisting staff and consumers to learn about SM resources, and the support of SM trained nurses. The aims of the study were to evaluate the effectiveness of this SM education intervention in (a) transferring knowledge of SM to staff, and (b) translating this knowledge into practice in a youth acute inpatient mental health unit. A mixed methods research design with an 11-item pre- and post-education questionnaire was used along with three-month follow-up focus groups. The SM education improved understanding about SM (all 11-items p ≤ 0.004, r ≥ 0.47). Three-months after SM education, four themes evident in the focus group data emerged about the practice and process of SM; (1) translating of learning into practice, (2) SM in practice, (3) perceptions of SM benefits, and (4) limitations of SM. A blended SM education process enhanced clinical practice in the unit, yet participants were mindful of limitations of SM in situations of distress or escalating agitation. PMID:27253182

  13. Vitamin B12 and folate status in acute geropsychiatric inpatients: affective and cognitive characteristics of a vitamin nondeficient population.

    PubMed

    Bell, I R; Edman, J S; Marby, D W; Satlin, A; Dreier, T; Liptzin, B; Cole, J O

    1990-01-15

    This chart review study examined the serum vitamin B12 and folate status of 102 geriatric patients newly admitted to a private psychiatric hospital. Only 3.7% were B12 deficient and 1.3% were folate deficient; 4% were anemic. Nevertheless, those with below-median values of both vitamins had significantly lower Mini-Mental State scores than patients higher in one or both vitamins. Patients with "organic psychosis" with a negative family history for psychiatric disorder had significantly lower B12 levels than those with a positive family history. In major depression, folate levels correlated negatively with age at onset of psychiatric illness and length of hospitalization. These data suggest that (1) biochemically interrelated vitamins such as B12 and folate may exert both a separate and a concomitant influence on affect and cognition; (2) poorer vitamin status may contribute to certain geropsychiatric disorders that begin at a later age and lack a familial predisposition.

  14. Interpersonal Change Following Intensive Inpatient Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, Joshua D.; Grubaugh, Anouk L.; Allen, Jon G.; Oldham, John M.; Fowler, J. Christopher; Hardesty, Susan; Frueh, B. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Persons admitted for inpatient psychiatric care often present with interpersonal difficulties that disrupt adaptive social relations and complicate the provision of treatment. Whereas domains of psychosocial functioning in this population demonstrate clear growth in response to intervention, the impact of treatment on more complex patterns of interpersonal behavior has been largely overlooked within the existing literature. Interpersonal profiles characteristic of psychiatric inpatients were identified in the current study to determine rates of transition to adaptive functioning following hospitalization. Methods: Personality disturbance was assessed in 513 psychiatric inpatients using the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems. Scores were analyzed within a series of latent profile models to isolate unique interpersonal profiles at admission and at discharge. Longitudinal modeling was then employed to determine rates of transition from dysfunctional to adaptive profiles. Relationships with background characteristics, clinical presentation, and treatment response were explored. Results: Normative, Submissive, and Hostile/Withdrawn profiles emerged at both admission and discharge. Patients in the Normative profile demonstrated relatively moderate symptoms. Submissive and Hostile/Withdrawn profiles were related to known risk factors and elevated psychopathology. Approximately half of patients identified as Submissive or Hostile/Withdrawn transitioned to the Normative profile by discharge. Transition status evidenced modest associations with background characteristics and clinical presentation. Treatment engagement and reduction of clinical symptoms were strongly associated with adaptive transition. Conclusion: Maladaptive interpersonal profiles characteristic of psychiatric inpatients demonstrated categorical change following inpatient hospitalization. Enhanced therapeutic engagement and overall reductions in psychiatric symptoms appear to increase potential

  15. Keeping patient beds in a low position: an exploratory descriptive study to continuously monitor the height of patient beds in an adult acute surgical inpatient care setting.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Prakash, Atul; Brehob, Mark; Devecsery, David Andrew; Anderson, Allison; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2012-06-01

    This descriptive study was intended to measure the percentage of the time that patient beds were kept in high position in an adult acute inpatient surgical unit with medical overflow in a community hospital in Michigan, United States. The percentage of the time was calculated for morning, evening, and night shifts. The results showed that overall, occupied beds were in a high position 5.6% of the time: 5.40% in the day shift, 6.88% in the evening shift, and 4.38% in the night shift. It is recognized that this study was unable to differentiate whether those times patient beds being kept in a high position were appropriate for an elevated bed height (e.g., staff were working with the patient). Further research is warranted. Falls committees may conduct high-bed prevalence surveys in a regular basis as a proxy to monitor staff members' behaviors in keeping beds in a high position.

  16. The permeable institution: an ethnographic study of three acute psychiatric wards in London.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Alan; Lelliott, Paul; Seale, Clive

    2006-10-01

    In Asylums, Goffman [1961. Asylums. London: Penguin] identified some permeable features of the old mental hospitals but presented them as exceptions to the rule and focused on their impermeable aspects. We argue that this emphasis is no longer valid and offer an alternative ideal type that better represents the reality of everyday life in contemporary 'bricks and mortar' psychiatric institutions. We call this the "permeable institution". The research involved participant observation of between 3 and 4 months and interviews with patients, patient advocates and staff on 3 psychiatric wards. Evidence for permeability includes that ward membership is temporary and changes rapidly (patients tend to have very short stays and staff turnover is high); patients maintain contact with the outside world during their stay; and institutional identities are blurred to the point where visitors or new patients can easily mistake staff and patients for one another. Permeability has both positive consequences (e.g., reduced risk of institutionalism), and negative consequences (e.g., unwanted people coming into hospital to cause trouble, and illicit drug use among patients). Staff employ various methods to regulate their ward's permeability, within certain parameters. The metaphor of the total/closed institution remains valuable, but it fails to capture the highly permeable nature of the psychiatric institutions we studied. Analysts may therefore find the permeable institution a more helpful reference point or ideal type against which to examine and compare empirical cases. Perhaps most helpful is to conceptualise a continuum of institutional permeability with total and permeable institutions at each extreme.

  17. Influence of drugs of abuse and alcohol upon patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards: physician's assessment compared to blood drug concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mordal, Jon; Medhus, Sigrid; Holm, Bjørn; Mørland, Jørg; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2013-06-01

    In acute psychiatric services, rapid and accurate detection of psychoactive substance intake may be required for appropriate diagnosis and intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between (a) drug influence as assessed by physicians and (b) blood drug concentrations among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards. We also explored the possible effects of age, sex, and psychotic symptoms on physician's assessment of drug influence. In a cross-sectional study, the sample comprised 271 consecutive admissions from 2 acute psychiatric wards. At admission, the physician on call performed an overall judgment of drug influence. Psychotic symptoms were assessed with the positive subscale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Blood samples were screened for a wide range of psychoactive substances, and quantitative results were used to calculate blood drug concentration scores. Patients were judged as being under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol in 28% of the 271 admissions. Psychoactive substances were detected in 56% of the blood samples. Altogether, 15 different substances were found; up to 8 substances were found in samples from 1 patient. Markedly elevated blood drug concentration scores were estimated for 15% of the patients. Physician's assessment was positively related to the blood drug concentration scores (r = 0.52; P < 0.001), to symptoms of excitement, and to the detection of alcohol, cannabis, and amphetamines. The study demonstrates the major impact of alcohol and drugs in acute psychiatric settings and illustrates the challenging nature of the initial clinical assessment.

  18. "Talking in a new way": older individuals' experiences of group work in an acute psychiatric ward.

    PubMed

    Partington, Jennifer; Gee, Susan; Leith, Anne-Marie; Croucher, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Group work is frequently used in mental health, however qualitative studies on service-users' views are rare. Semistructured interviews explored 12 participants' experiences of a café-style social group and a mutual-aid group offered on an older persons psychiatric ward in Christchurch, New Zealand. The values of the strengths-based approach underpinning the groups were reflected back in the experience of an affirming environment, an exchange of strengths, and the capacity to change. The appeal of the café-style may be culturally specific to European women however, reinforcing the importance of an awareness of culture and diversity.

  19. Psychiatric Patients Experiences with Mechanical Restraints: An Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Lanthén, Klas; Rask, Mikael; Sunnqvist, Charlotta

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine psychiatric patients' experience of mechanical restraints and to describe the care the patients received. Background. All around the world, threats and violence perpetrated by patients in psychiatric emergency inpatient units are quite common and are a prevalent factor concerning the application of mechanical restraints, although psychiatric patients' experiences of mechanical restraints are still moderately unknown. Method. A qualitative design with an inductive approach were used, based on interviews with patients who once been in restraints. Results. This study resulted in an overbridging theme: Physical Presence, Instruction and Composed Behaviour Can Reduce Discontent and Trauma, including five categories. These findings implicated the following: information must be given in a calm and sensitive way, staff must be physically present during the whole procedure, and debriefing after the incident must be conducted. Conclusions. When mechanical restraints were unavoidable, the presence of committed staff during mechanical restraint was important, demonstrating the significance of training acute psychiatric nurses correctly so that their presence is meaningful. Nurses in acute psychiatric settings should be required to be genuinely committed, aware of their actions, and fully present in coercive situations where patients are vulnerable. PMID:26199931

  20. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a beneficiary under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  1. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a beneficiary under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  2. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a beneficiary under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  3. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a recipient under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  4. Effects of Educational Music Therapy on State Hope for Recovery in Acute Care Mental Health Inpatients: A Cluster-Randomized Effectiveness Study

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been an increasing emphasis on recovery as the expectation for people with mental health disorders. Purpose: The purpose of this effectiveness study is to determine if group-based educational music therapy can immediately impact state hope for recovery in acute care mental health patients. Research questions included: will acute care mental health inpatients who participate in a single music therapy session have higher agency and pathway aspects of state hope for recovery than patients in a control condition? Will there be differences in state hope for recovery as a result of hope-oriented songwriting or lyric analysis interventions? Method: Participants (N = 169) were cluster randomized to one of three single-session conditions: lyric analysis, songwriting, or wait-list control. Results: There was no significant between-group difference. However, both music therapy conditions tended to have slightly higher mean pathway, agency, and total state hope scores than the control condition even within the temporal parameters of a single music therapy session. There was no between-group difference in the songwriting and lyric analysis interventions. Conclusion: Although not significant, results support that educational music therapy may impact state hope for recovery within the temporal parameters of a single session. The specific type of educational music therapy intervention did not affect results. Implications for practice, limitations, and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:27774084

  5. Dietary Issues Inpatients Face With Being Vegetarian

    PubMed Central

    Potter-Dunlop, Julie A.; Tse, Alice M.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the literature from 1985 through 2010 on research related to the dietary issues vegetarian inpatients may encounter in the acute care setting. A thematic portrayal of vegetarianism in the context of the inpatient setting is described. Implications for future research and nursing practice are identified. PMID:22157507

  6. Inpatient Mental Health Services in Rural Areas: An Interregional Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagenfeld, Morton O.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A classification of nonmetropolitan counties based on type of economy, socioeconomic level, and land use was applied to inpatient psychiatric services data of the National Institute of Mental Health. The scarce inpatient mental health services in nonmetropolitan areas were located mostly in nonfederal general hospitals in specialized-government…

  7. Homeless and Housed Inpatients with Schizophrenia: Disparities in Service Access upon Discharge from Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burra, Tara A.; Hwang, Stephen W.; Rourke, Sean B.; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in services available at the time of discharge for homeless and housed psychiatric inpatients. Participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from a general hospital psychiatric inpatient unit. Thirty homeless individuals and 21 housed controls (matched for diagnosis, gender,…

  8. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

    PubMed Central

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  9. Diagnosing personality disorders in psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Jackson, H J; Whiteside, H L; Bates, G W; Bell, R; Rudd, R P; Edwards, J

    1991-03-01

    This study investigated assumptions made by DSM-III and DSM-III-R regarding Axis I-Axis II associations and sex differences for the 11 personality disorders (PD). A total of 112 patients formed 4 Axis I diagnostic groups: recent-onset schizophrenia (n = 35); recent-onset mania (n = 26); unipolar affective disorder (n = 30); and a mixed diagnostic group (n = 21). The prevalence of PD was determined using the Structured Interview for DSM-III Personality Disorders (SIDP). Schizophrenia was associated with antisocial PD and schizotypal PD; manic disorder was associated with histrionic PD; and unipolar affective disorder was associated with borderline, dependent and avoidant PD. Some of these results were consistent with DSM-III/DSM-III-R postulates. However, there was little support for the DSM-III/DSM-III-R statements on sex differences in the prevalence of PD, except for antisocial PD. The implications of the results for DSM-III/DSM-III-R assumptions are discussed.

  10. Use of second-generation antipsychotics in the acute inpatient management of schizophrenia in the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Alkhadhari, Sulaiman; Al Zain, Nasser; Darwish, Tarek; Khan, Suhail; Okasha, Tarek; Ramy, Hisham; Tadros, Talaat Matar

    2015-01-01

    Background Management of acute psychotic episodes in schizophrenic patients remains a significant challenge for clinicians. Despite treatment guidelines recommending that second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) should be used as monotherapy, first-generation antipsychotics, polypharmacy, and lower than recommended doses are frequently administered in clinical practice. Minimal data exist regarding the use of SGAs in the Middle East. The objective of this study was to examine the discrepancies between current clinical practice and guideline recommendations in the region. Methods RECONNECT-S Beta was a multicenter, noninterventional study conducted in Egypt, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates to observe the management of schizophrenic patients who were hospitalized due to an acute psychotic episode. Patients underwent one visit on the day of discharge. Demographic and medical history, together with data on antipsychotic treatment and concomitant medication during the hospitalization period and medication recommendations at discharge were recorded. Results Of the 1,057 patients, 180 (17.0%) and 692 (65.5%) received SGAs as monotherapy and in combination therapy, respectively. Overall, the most frequently administered medications were given orally, and included risperidone (40.3%), olanzapine (32.5%), and quetiapine (24.6%); the doses administered varied between countries and deviated from the recommended guidelines. Upon discharge, 93.9% of patients were prescribed SGAs as maintenance therapy, and 84.8% were prescribed the same medication(s) as during hospitalization. Conclusion Current clinical practice in the Middle East differs from guideline recommendations. Patients frequently received antipsychotics in combination therapy, by various methods of administration, and at doses above and below the recommended guidelines for the management of their acute psychotic episodes. PMID:25897227

  11. Inpatient Management of Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis in the developed world. Guillain-Barré syndrome typically presents with ascending paralysis and is usually severe enough to warrant hospital admission for management. In the United States alone, GBS results in more than 6000 hospitalizations each year. Although GBS patients were historically cared for at tertiary referral centers, changing treatment practices have broadened the number of neurologists who care for the disease. This article provides a review of key issues in the inpatient management of GBS. A survey of the evidence base for treatment with plasma exchange or intravenous immunoglobulins is presented. Although either of these treatments can limit the severity of GBS, patients are still at risk for a broad range of complications, including respiratory failure, autonomic dysfunction, thromboembolic disease, pain, and psychiatric disorders. Awareness of these complications, their detection and management, may help limit the morbidity of GBS. PMID:23983841

  12. Psychiatric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Wheat, Santina; Dschida, Dorothy; Talen, Mary R

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are acute disturbances in thought, behavior, mood, or social relationship that require immediate intervention as defined by the patient, family, or social unit to save the patient and/or others from imminent danger. Ensuring the safety of the patient, surrounding persons, and the medical team is the first step of evaluation. Treatment focuses on stabilization of the patient, then on specific symptoms and ultimately the cause of symptoms. There are important legal considerations, particularly regarding involuntary admissions. It is important to debrief with the patient, surrounding family, and the health care team to ensure a continued therapeutic alliance and the emotional health of all involved. PMID:27262012

  13. Predictors of Specialized Inpatient Admissions for Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modi, Miti; McMorris, Carly; Palucka, Anna; Raina, Poonam; Lunsky, Yona

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) have complex mental health needs and may seek specialized ID psychiatric services. This study reports on predictors of specialized inpatient admissions for 234 individuals with ID who received outpatient services at a psychiatric hospital. Overall, from 2007-2012, 55 of the 234 outpatients were triaged…

  14. AN ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALIZATIONS.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B L

    1968-10-01

    In order to develop some understanding of community social structure and its association with psychiatric inpatient medical care patterns, first admission rates for psychiatric disorders into both public and private facilities were determined for each of the 33 census tracts of Pueblo, Colorado. At the same time a cluster analysis was made of the structure of these tracts. Four well- defined clusters were identified (socio-economic affluence, young marrieds, social isolation, and social disequilibrium) and strikingly high differential relationships found between the cluster scores and psychiatric inpatient care patterns. Implications of the findings for preventive strategies and for. social etiology hypotheses are presented.

  15. Associations among Major Psychiatric Diagnoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Abraham W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined the frequency and associations of multiple diagnoses in 205 psychiatric inpatients, assessing past and current episodes of illness. Over one-half of the sample received more than one diagnosis. Alcoholism, antisocial personality, and drug dependence formed one group; primary depression, primary mania, and secondary affective disorder,…

  16. The reimbursement blues. A psychiatric hospital copes with decreasing reimbursement and declining admissions.

    PubMed

    Hume, S K

    1991-03-01

    Beginning in 1989, Harbor View Mercy Hospital, a freestanding psychiatric facility in Fort Smith, AR, saw a flattening of growth in inpatient days and declines in discharges. In addition to decreasing admissions, it faces the problems of decreasing reimbursement, the need to provide more services with fewer resources, and greater government regulations. The greatest problem is inadequate reimbursement. Psychiatric hospitals fare worse than their acute care counterparts under both Medicaid and Medicare. To fulfill its mission to serve those in need, Harbor View has allocated 43 percent of its revenue budget this year to cover charity care, bad debt, etc. Ron Summerhill, the hospital's chief administrative officer, predicts a slowdown in the growth and profitability of psychiatric services in both the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors. But he is combating this trend by increasing use of managed care arrangements, diversifying, offering more outpatient services, and advocating for change in the reimbursement situation. PMID:10109228

  17. [Comparison of ambulatory and inpatient treatment of acute deep venous thrombosis of the leg: subjective and economic aspects].

    PubMed

    Frank, D; Blättler, W

    1998-09-01

    The frequency of clinical recurrence and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute deep venous thrombosis is reduced to the same extent by hospital treatment (with unfractionated heparin) as by treatment at home (with low-molecular-weight heparin). Very few data on subjective parameters of effectiveness have been published. We performed a prospective randomized trial comparing outpatient with in-hospital treatment in 28 patients. Six clinical and quality-of-life related parameters of effectiveness were assessed quantitatively: clinical course (with a score system), pain of venous congestion of the calf muscles (with Lowenberg's test), subjective perception of pain and general well-being (with visual analogue scales), satisfaction with the care provided, and absence from work. Subjective effectiveness was compared with the costs of each form of treatment. Outpatient treatment was significantly more effective than in-hospital treatment with regard to the objective parameters. It was, however, associated with less well-being and more pain than in-hospital treatment. The discrepancy is explained by eventually insufficient adjuvant treatment measures (which consisted of external leg compression by stockings and forced walking) and by anxiety brought on by the information that potentially lethal pulmonary embolism could occur despite anticoagulant therapy. Outpatient treatment was less costly. On the average and per patient it was CHF 3944 less expensive than treatment in hospital. An estimation reveals that the Swiss health care system would save about CHF 25 million per year if the 85% of patients with deep-vein thrombosis suitable for home care were given this form of treatment. We conclude that outpatient management is subjectively cost-effective but should be optimised to eliminate certain drawbacks associated with it. PMID:9784675

  18. Cost effectiveness of community-based and in-patient therapeutic feeding programs to treat severe acute malnutrition in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study estimated the cost effectiveness of community-based therapeutic care (CTC) for children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in Sidama Zone, Ethiopia compared to facility based therapeutic feeding center (TFC). Methods A cost effectiveness analysis comparing costs and outcomes of two treatment programmes was conducted. The societal perspective, which considers costs to all sectors of the society, was employed. Outcomes and health service costs of CTC and TFC were obtained from Save the Children USA (SC/USA) CTC and TFC programme, government health services and UNICEF(in kind supplies) cost estimates of unit costs. Parental costs were estimated through interviewing 306 caretakers. Cost categories were compared and a single cost effectiveness ratio of costs to treat a child with SAM in each program (regardless of outcome) was computed and compared. Results A total of 328 patient cards/records of children treated in the programs were reviewed; out of which 306 (157 CTC and 149 TFC) were traced back to their households to interview their caretakers. The cure rate in TFC was 95.36% compared to 94.30% in CTC. The death rate in TFC was 0% and in CTC 1.2%. The mean cost per child treated was $284.56 in TFC and $134.88 in CTC. The institutional cost per child treated was $262.62 in TFC and $128.58 in CTC. Out of these institutional costs in TFC 46.6% was personnel cost. In contrast, majority (43.2%) of the institutional costs in CTC went to ready to use therapeutic food (RUTF). The opportunity cost per caretaker in the TFC was $21.01 whereas it was $5.87 in CTC. The result of this study shows that community based CTC was two times more cost effective than TFC. Conclusion CTC was found to be relatively more cost effective than TFC in this setting. This indicates that CTC is a viable approach on just economic grounds in addition to other benefits such improved access, sustainability and appropriateness documented elsewhere. If costs of RUTF can be

  19. Aggression on inpatient units: Clinical characteristics and consequences.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Laoise; Stewart, Duncan; Richardson, Michelle; Lavelle, Mary; James, Karen; Hardy, Claire; Price, Owen; Bowers, Len

    2016-08-01

    Aggression and violence are widespread in UK Mental Health Trusts, and are accompanied by negative psychological and physiological consequences for both staff and other patients. Patients who are younger, male, and have a history of substance use and psychosis diagnoses are more likely to display aggression; however, patient factors are not solely responsible for violence, and there are complex circumstances that lead to aggression. Indeed, patient-staff interactions lead to a sizeable portion of aggression and violence on inpatient units, thus they cannot be viewed without considering other forms of conflict and containment that occur before, during, and after the aggressive incident. For this reason, we examined sequences of aggressive incidents in conjunction with other conflict and containment methods used to explore whether there were particular profiles to aggressive incidents. In the present study, 522 adult psychiatric inpatients from 84 acute wards were recruited, and there were 1422 incidents of aggression (verbal, physical against objects, and physical). Cluster analysis revealed that aggressive incident sequences could be classified into four separate groups: solo aggression, aggression-rule breaking, aggression-medication, and aggression-containment. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find physical aggression dominant in the aggression-containment cluster, and while verbal aggression occurred primarily in solo aggression, physical aggression also occurred here. This indicates that the management of aggression is variable, and although some patient factors are linked with different clusters, these do not entirely explain the variation.

  20. Aggression on inpatient units: Clinical characteristics and consequences.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Laoise; Stewart, Duncan; Richardson, Michelle; Lavelle, Mary; James, Karen; Hardy, Claire; Price, Owen; Bowers, Len

    2016-08-01

    Aggression and violence are widespread in UK Mental Health Trusts, and are accompanied by negative psychological and physiological consequences for both staff and other patients. Patients who are younger, male, and have a history of substance use and psychosis diagnoses are more likely to display aggression; however, patient factors are not solely responsible for violence, and there are complex circumstances that lead to aggression. Indeed, patient-staff interactions lead to a sizeable portion of aggression and violence on inpatient units, thus they cannot be viewed without considering other forms of conflict and containment that occur before, during, and after the aggressive incident. For this reason, we examined sequences of aggressive incidents in conjunction with other conflict and containment methods used to explore whether there were particular profiles to aggressive incidents. In the present study, 522 adult psychiatric inpatients from 84 acute wards were recruited, and there were 1422 incidents of aggression (verbal, physical against objects, and physical). Cluster analysis revealed that aggressive incident sequences could be classified into four separate groups: solo aggression, aggression-rule breaking, aggression-medication, and aggression-containment. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find physical aggression dominant in the aggression-containment cluster, and while verbal aggression occurred primarily in solo aggression, physical aggression also occurred here. This indicates that the management of aggression is variable, and although some patient factors are linked with different clusters, these do not entirely explain the variation. PMID:26892149

  1. Local inpatient units may increase patients’ utilization of outpatient services: a comparative cohort-study in Nordland County, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Myklebust, Lars Henrik; Sørgaard, Knut; Wynn, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the last few decades, there has been a restructuring of the psychiatric services in many countries. The complexity of these systems may represent a challenge to patients that suffer from serious psychiatric disorders. We examined whether local integration of inpatient and outpatient services in contrast to centralized institutions strengthened continuity of care. Methods Two different service-systems were compared. Service-utilization over a 4-year period for 690 inpatients was extracted from the patient registries. The results were controlled for demographic variables, model of service-system, central inpatient admission or local inpatient admission, diagnoses, and duration of inpatient stays. Results The majority of inpatients in the area with local integration of inpatient and outpatient services used both types of care. In the area that did not have beds locally, many patients that had been hospitalized did not receive outpatient follow-up. Predictors of inpatients’ use of outpatient psychiatric care were: Model of service-system (centralized vs decentralized), a diagnosis of affective disorder, central inpatient admission only, and duration of inpatient stays. Conclusion Psychiatric centers with local inpatient units may positively affect continuity of care for patients with severe psychiatric disorders, probably because of a high functional integration of inpatient and outpatient care. PMID:26604843

  2. Psychiatric home care: a new tool for crisis intervention.

    PubMed

    Spiro, A H

    1994-03-01

    The cost of psychiatric care has been rapidly increasing in recent years. Between 1984 and 1987, there was a 46 percent increase in psychiatric hospitals beds and a 60 percent increase in psychiatric units in general hospitals. This reflected a recognition by many health care systems that psychiatric patients were a good source of revenue. With this push toward more and more inpatient programs, crucial aspects of psychiatric care were left behind. Specifically, the limitations of inpatient therapy have not been recognized. Within the past five years, a new program has been developed and pioneered to use home care to prevent psychiatric hospitalizations and to also prevent the difficult transitions for psychiatric patients. Over a two-year period, this program was studied for its impact on the quality and cost of psychiatric care.

  3. Psychiatric home care: a new tool for crisis intervention.

    PubMed

    Spiro, A H

    1994-03-01

    The cost of psychiatric care has been rapidly increasing in recent years. Between 1984 and 1987, there was a 46 percent increase in psychiatric hospitals beds and a 60 percent increase in psychiatric units in general hospitals. This reflected a recognition by many health care systems that psychiatric patients were a good source of revenue. With this push toward more and more inpatient programs, crucial aspects of psychiatric care were left behind. Specifically, the limitations of inpatient therapy have not been recognized. Within the past five years, a new program has been developed and pioneered to use home care to prevent psychiatric hospitalizations and to also prevent the difficult transitions for psychiatric patients. Over a two-year period, this program was studied for its impact on the quality and cost of psychiatric care. PMID:10132548

  4. Comparison of assessment and management of suicidal risk for acute psychiatric assessment between two state sponsored hospitals in England and Italy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranbir; Verdolini, Norma; Agius, Mark; Moretti, Patrizia; Quartesan, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The risk of suicide is one of the most important risk factors looked into for acute psychiatric assessments that influences the management plan. The prevalence of suicide is on a rise across European countries; as a consequence, the different countries have created specific guidelines and policies in order to prevent suicides in the acute settings. These guidelines are based on both different cultural aspects as well as the different organization of the mental health system in the different countries. This paper wants to present the comparison between the guidelines of two European countries, England and Italy, in order to evaluate the systems, understand differences and common contact points. The different European countries could learn one from the other and a European shared point of view may be a way forward to create better understanding and preventing the risk of suicide across the population. PMID:26417782

  5. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago.

  6. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago. PMID:26668224

  7. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We

  8. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We

  9. Inpatient verbal aggression: content, targets and patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D; Bowers, L

    2013-04-01

    Verbally aggressive behaviour on psychiatric wards is more common than physical violence and can have distressing consequences for the staff and patients who are subjected to it. Previous research has tended to examine incidents of verbal aggression in little detail, instead combining different types of aggressive behaviour into a single measure. This study recruited 522 adult psychiatric inpatients from 84 acute wards. Data were collected from nursing and medical records for the first 2 weeks of admission. Incidents of verbal aggression were categorized and associations with patient characteristics examined. There were 1398 incidents of verbal aggression in total, reported for half the sample. Types of verbal aggression were, in order of prevalence: abusive language, shouting, threats, expressions of anger and racist comments. There were also a large number of entries in the notes which did not specify the form of verbal aggression. Staff members were the most frequent target of aggression. A history of violence and previous drug use were consistently associated with verbal aggression. However, there were also some notable differences in patient variables associated with specific types of verbal aggression. Future studies should consider using multidimensional measures of verbal aggression.

  10. The Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry - II (ASAP-II): a comparative study of psychiatric intensive care units in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Schoevers, Robert; van Wijk, Cecile Gijsbers; Mulder, Wijnand; Hornbach, Annett; Barkhof, Emile; Klaassen, André; van Egmond, Marieke; van Venrooij, Janine; Bijpost, Yan; Nusselder, Hans; van Herrewaarden, Marjan; Maksimovic, Igor; Achilles, Alexander; Dekker, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Background The number of patients in whom mental illness progresses to stages in which acute, and often forced treatment is warranted, is on the increase across Europe. As a consequence, more patients are involuntarily admitted to Psychiatric Intensive Care Units (PICU). From several studies and reports it has become evident that important dissimilarities exist between PICU's. The current study seeks to describe organisational as well as clinical and patient related factors across ten PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region, adjusted for or stratified by level of urbanization. Method/Design This paper describes the design of the Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry II (ASAP-II). This study is a prospective observational cohort study comparing PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region on various patient characteristics, treatment aspects and recovery related variables. Dissimilarities were measured by means of collecting standardized forms which were filled out in the framework of care as usual, by means of questionnaires filled out by mental health care professionals and by means of extracting data from patient files for every consecutive patient admitted at participating PICU's during a specific time period. Urbanization levels for every PICU were calculated conform procedures as proposed by the Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics (CBS). Discussion The current study may provide a deeper understanding of the differences between psychiatric intensive care units that can be used to promote best practice and benchmarking procedures, and thus improve the standard of care. PMID:19725981

  11. Rehospitalization During the 9-Months Following Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Flora M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Seel, Ronald T.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Corrigan, John D.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Cullen, Nora; Sommerfeld, Teri; Brandstater, Murray E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate frequency of, causes for, and factors associated with acute rehospitalization following discharge from inpatient rehabilitation during the 9-months after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Multi-center observational cohort. Setting Community. Participants 1,850 individuals with TBI admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) Occurrences of proxy or self-report of post-rehabilitation acute care rehospitalization, and length of and causes for rehospitalizations. Results 510 participants (28%) had experienced 775 acute rehospitalizations. All experienced 1 admission (510 participants; 66%), while 154 (20%) had 2 admissions, 60 (8%) had 3, 23 (3%) had 4, 27 had between 5 and 11, and 1 had 12. The most common rehospitalization causes were: infection (15%), neurologic issues (13%), neurosurgical procedures (11%), injury (7%), psychiatric (7%), and orthopedic (7%). Mean days from rehabilitation discharge to first rehospitalization was 113 days. Mean rehospitalization duration was 6.5 days. Logistic regression revealed increasing age, history of seizures prior to injury or during acute care or rehabilitation, history of previous brain injuries, and non-brain injury medical severity increased the risk of rehospitalization. Injury etiology of motor vehicular crash and high motor functioning at discharge decreased rehospitalization risk. Conclusion(s) Approximately 28% of TBI patients were rehospitalized within 9-months of TBI rehabilitation discharge due to a wide variety of medical and surgical reasons. Future research should evaluate if some of these occurrences may be preventable (such as infections, injuries, and psychiatric readmissions), and should evaluate the extent that persons at risk may benefit from additional screening, surveillance, and treatment protocols. PMID:26212407

  12. Improving surgical inpatient ward lists in a large acute hospital: a simple yet effective process to save the time of junior house officers.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Ross; Johnston, Carolyn; Qureshi, Imran

    2014-01-01

    In order for the smooth running of a surgical firm, an effective ward list must be created, updated, and edited each day, often by junior medical personnel. Ward lists are used by various healthcare professionals including consultants, specialist nurses, and pharmacists. Over time ward inpatient lists can become increasingly difficult to use and lacking in vital information. Baseline measurement revealed the extent of the problem with junior house officers spending on average 95 minutes per day maintaining the ward list. After a period of research and learning, a bespoke inpatient list was created containing all of the vital information required. Criteria to fulfil included being straightforward to manipulate, easy to input new patients and aesthetically pleasing. After a trial period with modifications, an improved inpatient ward list was successfully implemented. Post-intervention data collection revealed a reduction of 42 minutes per day on average spent maintaining the list, with a 100% increase in satisfaction, and reduction in problems encountered from daily to weekly. Following this success, the general surgery weekend handover list was improved using the same prototype. This led to a saving of 8 minutes per day on average and increased doctor satisfaction. The process of creating an effective, easy to use, and useful inpatient ward list can lead to large amount of time saved each day for the staff responsible for its management. This time can then be reinvested on clinical duties, or education, to further improve the healthcare service we provide. PMID:26734290

  13. The periodicities in and biometeorological relationships with bed occupancy of an acute psychiatric ward in Antwerp, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, M.; de Meyer, F.; Peeters, D.; Meltzer, H.; Schotte, C.; Scharpe, S.; Cosyns, P.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, some investigators have established a seasonal pattern in normal human psychology, physiology and behaviour, and in the incidence of psychiatric psychopathology. In an attempt to elucidate the chronopsy and meteotropism in the latter, we have examined the chronograms of, and the biometeorological relationships to bed occupancy of the psychiatric ward of the Antwerp University Hospital during three consecutive calendar years (1987 1989). Weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological station and comprise mean atmospheric pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and minutes of sunlight and precipitation/day. The number of psychiatric beds occupied during the study period exhibited a significant seasonal variation. Peaks in bed occupancy were observed in March and November, with lows in August. An important part of the variability in the number of beds occupied could be explained by the composite effects of weather variables of the preceding weeks. Our results suggest that short-term fluctuations in atmospheric activity may dictate some of the periodicities in psychiatric psychopathology.

  14. An Outcome Evaluation of an Inpatient Crisis Stabilization and Assessment Program for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenham, Stephanie L.; Bisnaire, Lise

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe characteristics and outcomes of youth aged 7 to 17 who received inpatient psychiatric and mental health services along different clinical pathways of a new service delivery model. Method: Participants included 211 admissions to an inpatient crisis stabilization and assessment program over a one-year period. Standardized…

  15. A cross-sectional prospective study of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication in acute psychiatric wards: patient, staff and ward characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research on mental health care has shown considerable differences in use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication among different wards and geographical areas. This study investigates to what extent use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication for involuntary admitted patients in Norwegian acute psychiatric wards is associated with patient, staff and ward characteristics. The study includes data from 32 acute psychiatric wards. Methods Multilevel logistic regression using Stata was applied with data from 1016 involuntary admitted patients that were linked to data about wards. The sample comprised two hierarchical levels (patients and wards) and the dependent variables had two values (0 = no use and 1 = use). Coercive measures were defined as use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary depot medication during hospitalization. Results The total number of involuntary admitted patients was 1214 (35% of total sample). The percentage of patients who were exposed to coercive measures ranged from 0-88% across wards. Of the involuntary admitted patients, 424 (35%) had been secluded, 117 (10%) had been restrained and 113 (9%) had received involuntary depot medication at discharge. Data from 1016 patients could be linked in the multilevel analysis. There was a substantial between-ward variance in the use of coercive measures; however, this was influenced to some extent by compositional differences across wards, especially for the use of restraint. Conclusions The substantial between-ward variance, even when adjusting for patients' individual psychopathology, indicates that ward factors influence the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication and that some wards have the potential for quality improvement. Hence, interventions to reduce the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication should take into account organizational and environmental factors. PMID:20370928

  16. [DRGs in psychiatric hospital financing exemplified by Hungary. A model for Germany?].

    PubMed

    Maylath, E

    2000-12-01

    One of the most important provisions incorporated in the reform of the German health sector has been the introduction of a per case prospective payment system for hospitals with the exception of admissions to psychiatric care. The reasons for the exclusion of psychiatric care are unclear, but it is as a result all the more interesting to look at the experience of Hungary, where in-patient psychiatric care has been financed on the basis of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) for the past seven years. The article describes how in the early 1990's the funding of the Hungarian health service was reorganized from being a state-financed system with a set budget to a system financed by contributions. Parallel to this development, service-related financing was introduced. In the hospital sector this involved DRGs. At the beginning of 1993 the Hungarian DRGs comprised only 437 categories, but this has since increased to 758. Furthermore, other characteristics are listed which, apart from the number of groups, differentiate the Hungarian DRGs from the AP-DRGs. Among other things, service-related financing includes non-typical areas such as psychiatry. In this case, it covers in-patient psychiatric care in an unusual combination of DRGs in the acute case category (50% of all beds in psychiatric units in Hungary are for acute cases) with daily nursing charges in the chronic case category. An analysis is given in the article of 16 homogeneous diagnostic categories in psychiatric care, followed by experiences gathered in conjunction with the application of this approach in this particular sphere, with special reference to three problem areas. These are as follows: the trend towards diagnoses with a relatively high weighting; the practice of charging for psychiatric DRGs in somatic wards; and, finally, the perpetuation of poor service structures and practices through DRGs. In general, evidently the introduction of psychiatric DRGs may also be recommended in Germany because of the

  17. Predictors of quality of life in inpatients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Koichiro; Morinobu, Shigeru; Yamashita, Hidehisa; Takahashi, Terumichi; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2012-05-30

    Shortening hospital stays has become a key focus in psychiatric care in recent years. However, patients with schizophrenia account for about 60% of inpatients in psychiatry departments in Japan. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between quality of life (QOL) and key indicators for long-term hospital stays among schizophrenia inpatients. A further aim was to elucidate the clinical determinants of QOL among long-stay inpatients. The study sample consisted of 217 inpatients with schizophrenia. Age, duration of illness, duration of hospitalization, years of education, body mass index, neurocognitive function, drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms, involuntary movements, psychiatric symptoms, and dose equivalents of antipsychotics and anticholinergic agents were used as index factors. Pearson linear correlation and regression analyses were performed to examine the associations between QOL and the above-mentioned factors. Negative symptoms, psychological discomfort, and resistance as rated on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) were correlated with all subscale scores of the Japanese version of the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale (JSQLS). Stepwise regression showed that negative symptoms, psychological discomfort, and resistance predicted the dysfunction of psycho-social activity score and the dysfunction of motivation and energy score on the JSQLS. This study shows that active treatment for negative symptoms, psychological discomfort, and resistance should be recommended to improve QOL among inpatients with schizophrenia.

  18. Feasibility of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Adolescent Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Laurence Y.; Cox, Brian J.; Gunasekara, Shiny; Miller, Alec L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) implementation in a general child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit and to provide preliminary effectiveness data on DBT versus treatment as usual (TAU). Method: Sixty-two adolescents with suicide attempts or suicidal ideation were admitted to one of two…

  19. Negotiating Time: The Significance of Timing in Ending Inpatient Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sarah Gustavus

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses work with young people during their stay on an NHS psychiatric inpatient unit, especially focusing on the end of treatment and the appropriate timing of discharge into the community. When approaching the end of an admission, various factors are considered that seem particularly relevant to the decision of when a young person…

  20. Clinical outcomes and mortality associated with weekend admission to psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Chesney, Edward; Cullen, Alexis E.; Tulloch, Alex D.; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals. Aims To investigate whether weekend admission to a psychiatric hospital is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Method Data were obtained from 45 264 consecutive psychiatric hospital admissions. The association of weekend admission with in-patient mortality, duration of hospital admission and risk of readmission was investigated using multivariable regression analyses. Secondary analyses were performed to investigate the distribution of admissions, discharges, in-patient mortality, episodes of seclusion and violent incidents on different days of the week. Results There were 7303 weekend admissions (16.1%). Patients who were aged between 26 and 35 years, female or from a minority ethnic group were more likely to be admitted at the weekend. Patients admitted at the weekend were more likely to present via acute hospital services, other psychiatric hospitals and the criminal justice system than to be admitted directly from their own home. Weekend admission was associated with a shorter duration of admission (B coefficient −21.1 days, 95% CI −24.6 to −17.6, P<0.001) and an increased risk of readmission in the 12 months following index admission (incidence rate ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.18, P<0.001), but in-patient mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.23, P = 0.30) was not greater than for weekday admission. Fewer episodes of seclusion occurred at the weekend but there was no significant variation in deaths during hospital admission or violent incidents on different days of the week. Conclusions Being admitted at the weekend was not associated with an increased risk of in-patient mortality. However, patients admitted at the weekend had shorter admissions and were more likely to be readmitted, suggesting that they may represent a

  1. Competency-based training for PMH nurse generalists: inpatient intervention and prevention of suicide.

    PubMed

    Puntil, Cheryl; York, Janet; Limandri, Barbara; Greene, Pamela; Arauz, Eric; Hobbs, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States. Approximately 90,000 psychiatric mental health (PMH) nurse generalists work in hospitals in the United States, mostly on inpatient psychiatric units where the most acutely suicidal patients are hospitalized. Although competencies have been developed for mental health clinicians in assessing and managing suicide risk, there are no standard competencies for PMH nurse generalists. Widely accepted nursing practices do not meet suicide-specific standards of care or evidence-based criteria. Although both the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education Essentials for Baccalaureate Education and the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies stress the necessity for comprehensive assessment, safe clinical practices, patient-centered care, evidence-based interventions, and interprofessional communication and collaboration, there are no specific requirements for suicide prevention training in educational and clinical programs. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association has an opportunity to provide leadership in developing, implementing, and evaluating competency-based training for nurses and partner with the national effort to increase the competencies in suicide prevention in the behavioral health workforce. PMID:23950543

  2. Competency-based training for PMH nurse generalists: inpatient intervention and prevention of suicide.

    PubMed

    Puntil, Cheryl; York, Janet; Limandri, Barbara; Greene, Pamela; Arauz, Eric; Hobbs, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States. Approximately 90,000 psychiatric mental health (PMH) nurse generalists work in hospitals in the United States, mostly on inpatient psychiatric units where the most acutely suicidal patients are hospitalized. Although competencies have been developed for mental health clinicians in assessing and managing suicide risk, there are no standard competencies for PMH nurse generalists. Widely accepted nursing practices do not meet suicide-specific standards of care or evidence-based criteria. Although both the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education Essentials for Baccalaureate Education and the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies stress the necessity for comprehensive assessment, safe clinical practices, patient-centered care, evidence-based interventions, and interprofessional communication and collaboration, there are no specific requirements for suicide prevention training in educational and clinical programs. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association has an opportunity to provide leadership in developing, implementing, and evaluating competency-based training for nurses and partner with the national effort to increase the competencies in suicide prevention in the behavioral health workforce.

  3. The impact of medical issues in inpatient geriatric psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Inventor, Ben Remor E; Henricks, John; Rodman, Leslie; Imel, Joel; Holemon, Lance; Hernandez, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    At an advanced age, serious medical and psychiatric illnesses frequently coalesce. Often, the need for admission to inpatient geriatric psychiatric care arises from coexisting medical problems. While cognitive and behavioral interventions are important, the complexity of physical comorbidities usually becomes the focus of hospitalization and requires intensive medical treatments. This paper describes adaptations made in one metropolitan geriatric psychiatry unit in order to better treat complex patients who experience both medical and psychiatric illness. The need for all members of the interdisciplinary team to expand their practice and the importance of complementary approaches of psychiatry and medicine are emphasized.

  4. Psychiatric diagnosis, psychiatric power and psychiatric abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, T

    1994-01-01

    Psychiatric abuse, such as we usually associate with practices in the former Soviet Union, is related not to the misuse of psychiatric diagnoses, but to the political power intrinsic to the social role of the psychiatrist in totalitarian and democratic societies alike. Some reflections are offered on the modern, therapeutic state's proclivity to treat adults as patients rather than citizens, disjoin rights from responsibilities, and thus corrupt the language of political-philosophical discourse. PMID:7996558

  5. Perceived relationships with parents among adolescent inpatients with depressive preoccupations and depressed mood.

    PubMed

    Frank, S J; Poorman, M O; Van Egeren, L A; Field, D T

    1997-06-01

    Hypothesized that two types of "depressogenic" preoccupations (self-critical and interpersonal), measured by the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire for adolescents (DEQ-A; Blatt, Shaffer, Bars, & Quinlan, 1992), would mediate associations between perceived difficulties with parents and adolescent depression. Adolescent inpatients between 11 and 17 years of age (N = 295; 158 girls) in an acute-care psychiatric hospital completed the DEQ-A, a Reynolds (1986, 1989) depression questionnaire, and measures that assess experiences of alienation (vs. dependency) and separation-individuation conflicts in the adolescent-parent relationship. Alienation and counterdependency in relation to parents were associated with self-critical concerns; excessive closeness and dependency with interpersonal concerns; and separation-individuation conflicts with both types of concerns. Self-critical and interpersonal concerns were linked to adolescent depression and accounted for most of the variance initially explained by difficulties with parents.

  6. Understanding those who seek frequent psychiatric hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Phyllis; Kirkpatrick, Helen

    2002-02-01

    In the period after deinstitutionalization, there has been a rise in hospital readmission rates. It is estimated that the readmission rate for individuals who are frequent users of psychiatric inpatient services is approximately 40% to 50% within 1 year of hospital discharge. Attempts to determine predictors of recidivism have identified multiple variables, some of which are mutually contradictory. Furthermore, comparison among studies is difficult given methodological and theoretical limitations. Despite such issues, however, one consistent predictor of frequent rehospitalization is a person's history of past psychiatric hospital admissions. It seems that those who have shown a pattern of seeking inpatient services in the past tend to repeat this treatment-seeking behavior. The aim of this report is to critically examine some of the predictors of rehospitalization. A better understanding of those who engage in the persistent pattern of seeking inpatient services may assist nurses in planning care that is more suited for their needs. PMID:11877602

  7. Psychiatric nurses' self-rated competence.

    PubMed

    Ewalds-Kvist, Beatrice; Algotsson, Martina; Bergström, Annelie; Lützén, Kim

    2012-07-01

    This study explored the self-rated competence of 52 Swedish psychiatric nurses in three clinical environments: forensic psychiatry, general psychiatric inpatient care, and clinical non-residential psychiatric care. A questionnaire wtih 56 statements from nine areas of expertise was completed. Forensic nurses were more skilled in safety and quality and in dealing with violence and conflicts. Non-specialist nurses appreciated their skills more so than specialist nurses in health promotion and illness prevention and conduct, information, and education. Women were inclined to invite patients' relatives for education and information. Men attended to a patients' spiritual needs; they also coped with violence and managed conflicts. PMID:22757599

  8. Psychiatric disorders in individuals diagnosed with infantile autism as children: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben; Nedergaard, Niels Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence and types of psychiatric disorders in a clinical sample of 118 individuals diagnosed as children with infantile autism (IA) with psychiatric disorders in 336 matched controls from the general population using data from the nationwide Danish Psychiatric Central Register. The average observation time was 32.5 years, and mean age at follow-up was 40.6 years (range 25-55 years). Of the 118 individuals with IA, 57 (48.3%) had been in contact with psychiatric hospitals (inpatient hospitalization or outpatient visits) during the follow-up period, compared with 20/336 (6.0%) in the control group (p < 0.0001). This observation should alert general psychiatrists to the possibility of additional treatable psychiatric disorders occurring in individuals with IA. Of the 118 individuals in the IA group, 20 individuals (17%) had been given a comorbid psychiatric diagnosis during the observation period, compared with 9 individuals (2.7%) in the control group. Of the subjects with IA, 3.4% had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia (F20) at least once since the index admission in childhood, 0.8% had been diagnosed with delusional disorder (F22), 0.8% with acute psychotic disorder (F23), and 1.6% with unspecified non-organic psychosis (F29). In the control group, 0.9% had been diagnosed with schizophrenia (p = 0.08). In the group with IA, 3.4% had received a diagnosis in the broad category of affective disorders compared with 1.2% in the control group (p = 0.21). Issues associated with using registers in the ascertainment of co-occurring psychiatric disorders in IA are discussed.

  9. An Update on Inpatient Hypertension Management.

    PubMed

    Axon, R Neal; Turner, Mason; Buckley, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent affecting nearly one third of the US adult population. Though generally approached as an outpatient disorder, elevated blood pressure is observed in a majority of hospitalized patients. The spectrum of hypertensive disease ranges from patients with hypertensive emergency including markedly elevated blood pressure and associated end-organ damage to asymptomatic patients with minimally elevated pressures of unclear significance. It is important to note that current evidence-based hypertension guidelines do not specifically address inpatient hypertension. This narrative review focuses primarily on best practices for diagnosing and managing nonemergent hypertension in the inpatient setting. We describe examples of common hypertensive syndromes, provide suggestions for optimal post-acute management, and point to evidence-based or consensus guidelines where available. In addition, we describe a practical approach to managing asymptomatic elevated blood pressure observed in the inpatient setting. Finally, arranging effective care transitions to ensure optimal ongoing hypertension management is appropriate in all cases. PMID:26362300

  10. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P < 0.000) compared to the fifth post-operative hour. The number of patients with complete analgesia decreased on the third post-operative day (P = 0.001 compared to fifth post-operative day). The Spearman correlation coefficient between pain score on the third post-operative day and level of satisfaction with nurse's response, doctor's response to pain and the overall pain management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management. PMID:27761037

  11. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2017 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Graduate Medical Education; Hospital Notification Procedures Applicable to Beneficiaries Receiving Observation Services; Technical Changes Relating to Costs to Organizations and Medicare Cost Reports; Finalization of Interim Final Rules With Comment Period on LTCH PPS Payments for Severe Wounds, Modifications of Limitations on Redesignation by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board, and Extensions of Payments to MDHs and Low-Volume Hospitals. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2017. Some of these changes will implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Notice of Observation Treatment and Implications for Care Eligibility Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are providing the estimated market basket update to apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2017. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2017. In addition, we are making changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education payments; establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities), including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program; implementing statutory provisions that require hospitals and CAHs to furnish notification to Medicare beneficiaries, including Medicare Advantage enrollees, when the beneficiaries receive outpatient observation services for more than 24 hours; announcing the implementation of the Frontier Community Health Integration Project Demonstration; and

  12. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2017 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Graduate Medical Education; Hospital Notification Procedures Applicable to Beneficiaries Receiving Observation Services; Technical Changes Relating to Costs to Organizations and Medicare Cost Reports; Finalization of Interim Final Rules With Comment Period on LTCH PPS Payments for Severe Wounds, Modifications of Limitations on Redesignation by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board, and Extensions of Payments to MDHs and Low-Volume Hospitals. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2017. Some of these changes will implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Notice of Observation Treatment and Implications for Care Eligibility Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are providing the estimated market basket update to apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2017. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2017. In addition, we are making changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education payments; establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities), including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program; implementing statutory provisions that require hospitals and CAHs to furnish notification to Medicare beneficiaries, including Medicare Advantage enrollees, when the beneficiaries receive outpatient observation services for more than 24 hours; announcing the implementation of the Frontier Community Health Integration Project Demonstration; and

  13. Developing an Inpatient Group Psychotherapy Program: Challenges and Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    Razaghi, Emran Mohammad; Tabatabaee, Maryam; Pourramzani, Ali; Shirali Mohammadpour, Reza; Mousazade Moghaddam, Arezou; Yahyavi, Seyyed Taha

    2015-01-01

    In Iran, inpatient group psychotherapy has been limited to transient practices for research purposes or fulfilling personal interest of therapists. The goal of this paper is to share and explain the experience of developing an inpatient group psychotherapy program in Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, Iran. After theoretical delineation and preparation of a draft of the program guideline, two pilot sessions were held. Based on this initial experience a final treatment guideline was prepared. Afterwards, the program was continued for more than 1 year in a female ward at Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital. The output of this exercise was a guideline that covers important topics in development of inpatient group psychotherapy. It is concluded that inpatient group psychotherapy has its unique challenges. Of the most important challenges that can be mentioned in this regard are the participation of patients with significant differences in levels of psychopathology and psychiatric signs and symptoms, and high comorbidity with specific personality traits or disorders. Other challenges relevant to the structure of the group include items such as very limited time for working through and inevitable out-of-group contacts. PMID:26576176

  14. Acute psychosis in a verified Huntington disease gene carrier with subtle motor signs: psychiatric criteria should be considered for the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nagel, M; Rumpf, H J; Kasten, M

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, progressive, autosomal dominant disorder. Some patients develop severe chorea or cognitive symptoms. The genetic defect causes progressive atrophy of the striatum, the cortex and extrastriatal structures (Sheperd GM. Corticostriatal connectivity and its role in disease. Nat Rev Neurosci 2013;14:278-91). The precise timing of clinical diagnosis of HD is poorly characterized and is mainly based on motor symptoms (Huntington, Study and Group. Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale: reliability and consistency. Huntington Study Group. Mov Discord 1996:136-42). Patients suffering from HD frequently show cognitive or affective symptoms even before manifesting motor signs. Psychiatric symptoms like depression, apathy, aggression, and disinhibition are common, and suicide rates are over four times higher than in the general population (Di Maio L, Squitieri F, Napolitano G, Campanella G, Trofatter JA, Conneally PM. Suicide risk in Huntington's disease. J Med Genet 1993;30:293-5). This case report of a female patient with genetically proven HD is of special interest because motor or cognitive impairment were absent whereas she suffered from symptoms of an acute and severe psychosis likely to be symptomatic signs of HD.

  15. Analytic and Special Studies Reports; Utilization of Psychiatric Facilities by Children: Current Status, Trends, Implications. Mental Health Statistics, Series B, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Beatrice M.; And Others

    Data are presented concerning the total number of children served in psychiatric facilities and the utilization of specific facilities, including outpatient psychiatric clinics, state and county mental hospitals, private mental hospitals, inpatient psychiatric services of general hospitals, psychiatric day-night services, private psychiatric…

  16. Validation of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) with Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Lance P.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Hollander, Beth L. G.; Dyl, Jennifer; Rizzo, Christie J.; Steinley, Douglas L.; Spirito, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the concurrent validity of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) for adolescent inpatients aged 12 to 18. The results reveal moderate agreement between ChIPS diagnoses and Schedule for Affective Disorder sand Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime version diagnoses.

  17. Private in-patient psychiatry in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Russakoff, L. Mark

    2014-01-01

    The US healthcare system is in the midst of major changes driven by four forces: the growing consensus in the country that the current system is financially unsustainable; managed care and parity legislation; the Affordable Care Act 2010; and the ageing of the ‘baby boomer’ generation. How these forces will combine and interact is unclear. The current state of in-patient psychiatric care and trends affecting the private practice of in-patient psychiatry over the next few years will be described. PMID:25285222

  18. Nursing interventions for substance use during psychiatric hospital admissions: Clinical context and predictors.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Duncan; Warren, Jonathan; Odubanwo, Adewunmi; Bowers, Len

    2015-12-01

    Empirical information about how nurses manage substance use on psychiatric wards is lacking. The aims of the study were to identify the frequency and clinical features of incidents among a sample of inpatients over a 12-month period and how nursing staff intervened. Electronic, anonymized inpatient records were searched for incidents of substance use on 17 acute psychiatric wards in four hospitals in London. Searches were conducted for all patients admitted during 2012 and details of incidents and patient characteristics were extracted for analysis. Substance use was reported for 291 patients, with 25 incidents per 100 patients admitted to hospital. Only half of the incidents were followed by a response that specifically addressed the patients' substance use behaviour. These interactions usually concerned the circumstances and reasons for use, but rarely involved specific support for patients' substance use problems. The likelihood of staff taking any form of action was increased if the patient had been formally admitted, and was reduced if the patient was subject to containment during the shift or had a history of self-harm. The results demonstrate that nurses require specific training and guidance on supporting substance using patients. PMID:26300518

  19. Psychiatric comorbidity in forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Palijan, Tija Zarković; Muzinić, Lana; Radeljak, Sanja

    2009-09-01

    For the past several years a numerous studies in the field of forensic psychiatry confirmed a close relationship between violent offenders and comorbid substance abuse. The comorbid substance abuse in violent offenders was usually unrecognized and misdiagnosed. Furthermore, comorbidity in forensic psychiatry describes the co-occurrence of two or more conditions or psychiatric disorder known in the literature as dual diagnosis and defined by World Health Organization (WHO). In fact, many violent offenders have multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Recent studies have confirmed causal relationship between major psychiatric disorders and concomitant substance abuse (comorbidity) in 50-80% of forensic cases. In general, there is a high level of psychiatric comorbidity in forensic patients with prevalence of personality disorders (50-90%), mood disorders (20-60%) and psychotic disorders (15-20%) coupled with substance abuse disorders. Moreover, the high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities could be found in mentally retarded individuals, as well as, in epileptic patients. Drugs and alcohol abuse can produce serious psychotoxic effects that may lead to extreme violent behavior and consequently to serious criminal offence such as physical assault, rape, armed robbery, attempted murder and homicide, all due to an altered brain function and generating psychotic-like symptoms. Studies have confirmed a significant statistical relevance in causal relationship between substance abuse and violent offences. In terms of forensic psychiatry, the comorbidity strongly contributes in the process of establishing psychiatric diagnosis of diminished mental capacity or insanity at the time of the offence in the course of clinical assessment and evaluation of violent offenders. Today, the primary focus of forensic psychiatry treatment services (in-patient or community) is management of the violent offenders with psychiatric comorbidity which requires a multilevel, evidence based approach to

  20. Prevalence and Predictors of Domestic-Violence towards Wives by their Psychiatric Hospitalized Husbands

    PubMed Central

    Sahraian, Ali; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Hashemi, Seyed Hamzeh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadzadeh, Laaya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Violence imposed on wives by their inpatient psychiatric husbands has not been studied yet. The current study surveyed the rates and predictors of violence committed by inpatient psychiatric husbands towards their wives. Methods: A convenient sample of wives of 209 married male psychiatric inpatients completed a self-reported questionnaire. They were asked about physical, emotional, social and economic abuse. Results: More than 80% of the husbands socially abused their wives; 73.0% of the wives had been regularly beaten by their husbands; the rate for humiliation was 77.2%; and only 14.1% of the wives reported that their sexual relationship with their husbands is with desire. Conclusion There is a dramatic high rate of different types of abuse toward wives by their inpatient psychiatric husbands. They are commonly victimized by their husbands. Moreover, different types of violence always co-occur. Future studies should consider this important issue which is unfortunately an ignored research area. PMID:27006668

  1. Development of the Riverview Psychiatric Inventory.

    PubMed

    Haley, Glenn M T; Iverson, Grant L; Moreau, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    The present study describes the development and initial validation of a behavioral rating scale, the Riverview Psychiatric Inventory (RPI). The RPI is a 36-item scale that is scored into four subscales covering daily routine problems, psychological symptoms, social interaction problems, and aggressive behavior. Interrater reliability using 70 pairs of raters assessing 145 patients resulted in a reliability coefficient of .89. Internal consistency for the total score was high (alpha = .93) and each of the subscales showed alpha coefficients ranging from .76 to .87. Validity was evaluated on a sample of 359 adult psychiatric inpatients. The RPI total score significantly distinguished three groups of patients on hospital units designed to treat differing levels of psychiatric illness. The RPI is superior to other behavioral rating scales employed by mental health clinicians because it does not require lengthy training in administration and scoring. The scale is useful for routine assessments on a busy psychiatric unit. PMID:12143086

  2. PCL-R Psychopathy Predicts Disruptive Behavior Among Male Offenders in a Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Martin; De Ruiter, Corine; Nijman, Henk

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between psychopathy, according to the Dutch language version of Hare's Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), and various types of disruptive behavior during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment is investigated. Ninety-two male participants were administered the PCL-R following admission to an inpatient forensic…

  3. Specificity of childhood maltreatment and emotion deficit in nonsuicidal self-injury in an inpatient sample of youth.

    PubMed

    Thomassin, Kristel; Shaffer, Anne; Madden, Amber; Londino, Donna L

    2016-10-30

    The present study investigated the function of two specific emotion-related skills, emotion expressivity and emotion coping, as potential mediators in the relations between childhood sexual, physical, and emotional abuse and NSSI. A robust body of work supports the role of emotion regulation in nonsuicidal self-injury, but additional research is warranted to tease apart the role of specific emotion regulation deficits as predictors of NSSI. Participants included 95 youth (Mage=14.22, SDage=1.67; 58% female) hospitalized on one of two acute care psychiatric inpatient units. Participants completed self-report questionnaires related to childhood experiences of trauma, current emotion expressivity and coping, and lifetime frequency of NSSI. Path analytic models indicated that only child emotional abuse was directly associated with NSSI when all abuse subtypes were examined simultaneously. Results also indicated that poor emotion expressivity, but not emotion coping, mediated the relation between childhood experiences of emotional abuse and NSSI.

  4. Specificity of childhood maltreatment and emotion deficit in nonsuicidal self-injury in an inpatient sample of youth.

    PubMed

    Thomassin, Kristel; Shaffer, Anne; Madden, Amber; Londino, Donna L

    2016-10-30

    The present study investigated the function of two specific emotion-related skills, emotion expressivity and emotion coping, as potential mediators in the relations between childhood sexual, physical, and emotional abuse and NSSI. A robust body of work supports the role of emotion regulation in nonsuicidal self-injury, but additional research is warranted to tease apart the role of specific emotion regulation deficits as predictors of NSSI. Participants included 95 youth (Mage=14.22, SDage=1.67; 58% female) hospitalized on one of two acute care psychiatric inpatient units. Participants completed self-report questionnaires related to childhood experiences of trauma, current emotion expressivity and coping, and lifetime frequency of NSSI. Path analytic models indicated that only child emotional abuse was directly associated with NSSI when all abuse subtypes were examined simultaneously. Results also indicated that poor emotion expressivity, but not emotion coping, mediated the relation between childhood experiences of emotional abuse and NSSI. PMID:27479099

  5. Marginal revenue and length of stay in inpatient psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Pletscher, Mark

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the changes in marginal revenue during psychiatric inpatient stays in a large Swiss psychiatric hospital after the introduction of a mixed reimbursement system with tariff rates that vary over length of stay. A discrete time duration model with a difference-in-difference specification and time-varying coefficients is estimated to assess variations in policy effects over length of stay. Among patients whose costs are fully reimbursed by the mixed scheme, the model demonstrates a significant effect of marginal revenue on length of stay. No significant policy effects are found among patients for whom only health insurance rates are delivered as mixed tariffs and government contributions are made retrospectively. The results indicate that marginal revenue can affect length of stay in inpatient psychiatry facilities, but that the reduction in marginal revenue must be sufficiently large.

  6. Clinical Outcomes of a Specialised Inpatient Unit for Adults with Mild to Severe Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Y.; White, S. E.; Palucka, A. M.; Weiss, J.; Bockus, S.; Gofine, T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Limitations of general psychiatric services have led to the development of specialised psychiatric programmes for patients with intellectual disability (ID) and mental health needs. Few studies have examined treatment outcomes of specialised inpatient units, and no studies have explored how the effects of intervention may differ for…

  7. Passive therapeutic gardens. A study on an inpatient geriatric ward.

    PubMed

    Pachana, Nancy A; McWha, J Lindsay; Arathoon, Maureen

    2003-05-01

    A brief history of the link between horticultural activities and care of patients, particularly psychiatric patients, is reviewed in this article. Past research on both passive and active garden activities is examined in terms of physical and psychological benefits to patients. A passive garden intervention on an inpatient geriatric ward is described. Participants in this study were patients on a geriatric inpatient ward in a mid-sized regional hospital in New Zealand. Behavioral observations of patient movement on the ward were used to demonstrate the effects on patient behavior in response to the presence of the conservatory garden. Results showed a positive reaction to the conservatory, which was maintained 6 months after the initial plants were installed. The benefits of such garden installations are discussed, and areas for further research are outlined. Procedures, ethical concerns, and practical considerations of setting up such a conservatory on an inpatient ward are discussed.

  8. Top 10 milieu interventions for inpatient child/adolescent treatment.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Kathleen R

    2006-11-01

    Presented in this article are 10 interventions to deal with children and adolescents on inpatient psychiatric units. The 10 are divided into three categories: behavioral, cognitive, and affective. The interventions discussed are particularly relevant to staff in their efforts to help children and adolescents achieve control over their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Each intervention includes a summary of the theory that supports its efficacy, a brief explanation of the intervention, and methods for applying the technique in clinical situations.

  9. Heart Failure Update: Inpatient Management.

    PubMed

    Korabathina, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (HF) is one of most common reasons for hospitalization among individuals older than 65 years. A thorough evaluation, including history, physical examination, and laboratory assessment, is required to optimize care of these patients. In uncertain cases, serum brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal proBNP level, stress testing, and/or invasive coronary angiography may be helpful in establishing the diagnosis. The hospital setting provides an opportunity to identify etiologies and stabilize the patient. The primary goal of inpatient HF therapy is systemic and pulmonary decongestion, achieved most effectively using intravenous diuretic therapy. Rate and rhythm control may be needed for patients with concurrent atrial fibrillation and, in American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association stage D HF, intravenous inotropes may become necessary. New pharmacologic or device therapies also are considered as a means of transitioning patients, especially those with severe disease, to the outpatient setting. Patients hospitalized for acute decompensated HF have high postdischarge mortality and rehospitalization rates and, thus, should be monitored carefully. PMID:26974002

  10. Clinical presentation and management of acute gastro-enteritis in in-patient children at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, A M

    1990-01-01

    In a retrospective survey, case notes of all children with acute gastro-enteritis (AGE) admitted to our hospital between 1984 and 1988 were reviewed. The total number of cases was 300. The mean age was 14 months (range 1-60 mths): 67% of cases were boys and 33% girls. Eleven per cent were exclusively breastfed. The clinical presentation was diarrhoea and vomiting in 81%, diarrhoea alone in 15%, and vomiting primarily in 4%. All children had good nutritional status, i.e. both their height and weight were between the 5th and 90th percentile for their age and none showed signs of marasmus or kwashiorkor. Forty-six per cent of the children had AGE without dehydration. Mild, moderate and severe dehydration was present in 41%, 10% and 3% of cases, respectively. Isotonic, hypotonic and hypernatraemic dehydration was present in 95%, 3% and 2% of cases of dehydration, respectively. Sixty-five per cent of cases were given intravenous (IV) fluids. The mean duration of IV administration was 1 day, with a range of 1-7 days. Twenty-two per cent of the children were given oral rehydration solution (ORS) initially, and 13% were given IV plus ORS. None of the children died of gastro-enteritis. It is concluded that there was excessive use of IV fluids, and that there is an urgent need to encourage the use of ORS.

  11. Influence of psychiatric comorbidity on 30-day readmissions for heart failure, myocardial infarction, and pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedani, Brian K.; Solberg, Leif I.; Copeland, Laurel; Fang, Ying; Stewart, Christine; Hu, Jianhui; Nerenz, David R.; Williams, L. Keoki; Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E.; Waxmonsky, Jeanette; Lu, Christine Y.; Waitzfelder, Beth E.; Owen-Smith, Ashli A.; Coleman, Karen J.; Lynch, Frances L.; Ahmed, Ameena T.; Beck, Arne L.; Rossom, Rebecca C.; Simon, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented a policy in 2012 that penalizes hospitals for ‘excessive’ all-cause hospital readmissions within 30 days after discharge for heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and pneumonia. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of psychiatric comorbidities on 30-day all-cause readmissions for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Methods Longitudinal study from 2009-2011 within 11 Mental Health Research Network (MHRN) affiliated health systems. Data were derived from the HMO Research Network Virtual Data Warehouse. Participants were individuals admitted to the hospital for HF, AMI, and pneumonia. All index inpatient hospitalizations for HF, AMI and pneumonia were captured (n=160,169 patient index admissions). Psychiatric diagnoses were measured for the year prior to admission. All-cause readmissions within 30 days of discharge were the outcome variable. Results Approximately 18% of all individuals with these conditions were readmitted within 30-days. The rate was 5% greater for individuals with a past-year psychiatric comorbidity (21.7%) than for those without (16.5%; p<.001). Depression, anxiety, and dementia were associated with more readmissions for those with index hospitalizations for all three conditions independently and combined (p<.05). Substance use and bipolar disorders were linked with higher readmissions for those with initial HF and pneumonia hospitalizations (p<.05). Readmission rates declined overall from 2009-2011. Conclusions Individuals with HF, AMI, and pneumonia experience high rates of readmission, but psychiatric comorbidities appear to increase that risk. Future readmission interventions should consider adding mental health components. PMID:25642610

  12. 76 FR 34633 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-9644 of May 5, 2011 (76 FR 25788), there were a number...InpatientPPS/01_overview.asp ). III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2011-9644 of May 5, 2011 (76 FR 25788... Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute...

  13. What are the potential outcomes of integrating emotionally competent behaviours into the care of psychiatric patients?

    PubMed

    Doas, M D

    2013-04-01

    This descriptive study explored the concept of emotional competence in inpatient psychiatric nurse's daily interactions. Psychiatric registered nurses were asked to identify interactions of emotional competence they experienced on the nursing unit. Content analysis revealed deficits in self-awareness, mood management and managing relationships. PMID:22676309

  14. Applied Behavior Analysis in the Treatment of Severe Psychiatric Disorders: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scotti, Joseph R.; And Others

    Clinical research in the area of severe psychiatric disorders constituted the major focus for the discipline of applied behavior analysis during the early 1960s. Recently, however, there appears to be a notable lack of a behavioral focus within many inpatient psychiatric settings and a relative dearth of published behavioral treatment studies with…

  15. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods

    PubMed Central

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. Method: User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Results: Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Conclusions: Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users. PMID:26886239

  16. Neurological Impairment and Hypersensitivity among Psychiatrically Disturbed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurber, Steven; Hollingsworth, David K.

    1994-01-01

    Because of recent developments in measurements, investigated possible covariation between hyperactivity and cerebral deficits in adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Used several different measures on 45 patients (32 boys, 13 girls). The limited amount of covariation found suggests that neuropsychological deficits may be a diffuse problem that…

  17. Experiences of Forgiveness among Nonclergy Clients Receiving Residential Psychiatric Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivett, Melissa; Powers, Robin

    2009-01-01

    In response to the growing importance focused on forgiveness in clinical work (R. D. Enright, 2000), the relevance of forgiveness to 54 clients receiving inpatient psychiatric treatment was examined. The authors used a reflective questionnaire developed by M. J. Brenneis (2002) to gain a qualitative understanding of forgiveness in the sample.…

  18. Effects of Multiple Maltreatment Experiences among Psychiatrically Hospitalized Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxer, Paul; Terranova, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Relying on indicators coded from information collected routinely during intake assessments at a secure inpatient psychiatric facility, this study examined the extent to which different forms of maltreatment accounted for variations in youths' emotional and behavioral problems. Methods: Clinical information was reviewed for a large (N =…

  19. Suicide Probability Scale and Its Utility with Adolescent Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eltz, Michael; Evans, Allison Schettini; Celio, Mark; Dyl, Jennifer; Hunt, Jeffrey; Armstrong, Laura; Spirito, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Suicide Probability Scale (SPS) in a sample of 226 (80 male, 146 female) adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Confirmatory factor analyses provided only some support for the original subscales. Exploratory factor analyses revealed some overlap with the original scales, but…

  20. Children in Foster Care: Before, during, and after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persi, Joe; Sisson, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that foster children are at greater risk for mental health problems than are children in the general population, very little is known about the smaller group of foster children admitted to psychiatric hospitals. The present study sought to determine whether foster children admitted to inpatient care are a distinct…

  1. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various…

  2. Cognitive predictors of violent incidents in forensic psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Brugman, Suzanne; Lobbestael, Jill; von Borries, A Katinka L; Bulten, Berend Erik H; Cima, Maaike; Schuhmann, Teresa; Dambacher, Franziska; Sack, Alexander T; Arntz, Arnoud

    2016-03-30

    This study tested the predictive value of attentional bias, emotion recognition, automatic associations, and response inhibition, in the assessment of in-clinic violent incidents. Sixty-nine male forensic patients participated and completed an Emotional Stroop to measure attentional bias for threat and aggression, a Single Target - Implicit Association Task to assess automatic associations, a Graded Emotional Recognition Task to measure emotion recognition, and an Affective Go/NoGo to measure response inhibition. Violent incidents were derived from patient files and scored on severity level. The predictive value of level of psychopathy was tested with the Psychopathy Checklist - Revised (PCL-R). Generalized linear mixed model analyses showed that increased attention towards threat and aggression, difficulty recognizing sad faces and factor 2 of the PCL-R predicted the sum of violent incidents. Specifically, verbal aggression was predicted by increased attention towards threat and aggression, difficulty to recognize sad and happy faces, and PCL-R factor 2; physical aggression by decreased response inhibition, higher PCL-R factor 2 and lower PCL-R factor 1 scores; and aggression against property by difficulty recognizing angry faces. Findings indicate that cognitive tasks could be valuable in predicting aggression, thereby extending current knowledge on dynamic factors predicting aggressive behavior in forensic patients. PMID:26850647

  3. The Spectrum of Psychiatric Pathology in a Patient with Genetically Verified Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alkabie, Samir; Singh, Daljinder; Hernandez, Amy; Dumenigo, Rhaisa

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric and behavioral disturbances are common in Huntington's disease (HD) and contribute significantly to its morbidity and mortality. We herein present the case of a 43-year-old woman with genetically verified HD, whose deteriorating psychiatric condition necessitated multiple inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations and featured a clinical spectrum of neuropsychiatric disturbances classically associated with HD. This paper reviews the literature concerning Huntington's psychopathology and provides an illustrative case example of its clinical nature. PMID:26451266

  4. Implementing a Music Therapy Program at a New 72-Hour Acute Psychiatric Admissions Unit: A Case Study of a Patient Who Was Malingering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the relatively poor treatment available, the high financial costs of hospitalization, multiple and complex issues of persons with severe mental illnesses, and advancements in pharmacotherapy, psychiatric patients are often only hospitalized for a few days before they are discharged. Thus, brief psychosocial interventions for persons who…

  5. Revisiting the Association of Aggression and Suicidal Behavior in Schizophrenic Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuner, Tanja; Hubner-Liebermann, Bettina; Hausner, Helmut; Hajak, Goran; Wolfersdorf, Manfred; Spiessl, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Our study investigated the association of aggression and suicidal behavior in schizophrenic inpatients. Eight thousand nine hundred one admissions for schizophrenia (1998-2007) to a psychiatric university hospital were included. Schizophrenic suicides (n = 7)/suicide attempters (n = 40) were compared to suicides (n = 30)/suicide attempters (n =…

  6. Experiential Therapy with Troubled Youth: The Ropes Course for Adolescent Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Charles W.

    This paper provides information about conducting adventure-based counseling using a ropes course with adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Active learning in the process of therapy is widely accepted, but it is not clear how the complex nature of that relationship works and how programs should be structured to facilitate change. Theoretical…

  7. Specialized Inpatient Psychiatry for Serious Behavioral Disturbance in Autism and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Matthew; Milligan, Briana; Chemelski, Bruce; Payne, David; Ellsworth, Beth; Harmon, Jamie; Teer, Olivia; Smith, Kahsi A.

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization of children with autism spectrum disorder and/or intellectual disability is common, however, the effectiveness of this intervention is largely unknown. Thirty-eight clinically-referred children 8-19 years old admitted to a specialized inpatient psychiatry unit were assessed by a consistent caregiver on the Aberrant…

  8. Caregiver Perspectives during the Post Inpatient Hospital Transition: A Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blizzard, Angela M.; Weiss, Catherine L.; Wideman, Rukiya; Stephan, Sharon H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of caregiver perspectives of their psychosocial resources and needs during the post inpatient psychiatric hospitalization is limited. Examining caregivers' perspectives of the transition period may be a critical step in improving the transition success of children with emotional and behavioral disorders. Using quantitative…

  9. 76 FR 59256 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System for Federal Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... Rehabilitation Units and Inpatient Psychiatric Units,'' (hereinafter FY 2012 IRF PPS final rule (76 FR 47836... the August 5, 2011 FY 2012 IRF PPS final rule (76 FR 47836). These technical errors are identified and... rule (76 FR 47836), we applied our established formula for calculating the relative weight values...

  10. Written treatment contracts: their use in planning treatment programmes for in-patients.

    PubMed

    Rosen, B

    1978-11-01

    The formation of a therapeutic relationship involves the negotiation of a treatment contract which conforms to the general principles of any contractual agreement. Attempts have been made to formalize the therapeutic alliance, and this paper reports the development of a written contract for psychiatric in-patients. PMID:728689

  11. Dissociative disorders among Chinese inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A; Keyes, Benjamin B; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study were 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria of Mental Disorders, Version 3. All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation (the Dissociative Experiences Scale), and none had a prior diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. A total of 96 randomly selected participants were interviewed with a structured interview (the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule) and a clinical interview. These 96 patients did not differ significantly from the 473 patients who were not interviewed on any demographic measures or who did not complete the self-report dissociation measure. A total of 28 patients (15.3%, after weighting of the data) received a clinical diagnosis of a dissociative disorder based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.) criteria. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in 2 patients (0.53%, after weighting). Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder, patients with dissociative disorders were significantly more likely to report childhood abuse (57.1% vs. 22.1%), but the 2 groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measures. Dissociative disorders were readily identified in an inpatient psychiatric population in China.

  12. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Certification of need for hospitalization when a SNF bed is not available. (1) The physician may certify or... treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for the... physician is expected to continue efforts to place the patient in a participating SNF as soon as a...

  13. Inpatient management of acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Perry, Elizabeth C

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol withdrawal is a common condition encountered in the hospital setting after abrupt discontinuation of alcohol in an alcohol-dependent individual. Patients may present with mild symptoms of tremulousness and agitation or more severe symptoms including withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens. Management revolves around early identification of at-risk individuals and symptom assessment using a validated tool such as the revised Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol score. Benzodiazepines remain the mainstay of treatment and can be administered using a front-loading, fixed-dose, or symptom-triggered approach. Long-acting benzodiazepines such as chlordiazepoxide or diazepam are commonly used and may provide a smoother withdrawal than shorter-acting benzodiazepines, but there are no data to support superiority of one benzodiazepine over another. Elderly patients or those with significant liver disease may have increased accumulation and decreased clearance of the long-acting benzodiazepines, and lorazepam or oxazepam may be preferred in these patients. Patients with symptoms refractory to high doses of benzodiazepines may require addition of a rescue medication such as phenobarbital, propofol or dexmedetomidine. Anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, valproate, gabapentin) may have a role in the management of mild to moderate withdrawal. Other medications such as β-antagonists or neuroleptics may offer additional benefit in select patients but should not be used a monotherapy.

  14. Crisis hospitalization on a psychiatric emergency service.

    PubMed

    Breslow, R E; Klinger, B I; Erickson, B J

    1993-09-01

    The availability of short-stay beds for brief admissions to a Psychiatric Emergency Service (PES) is a model that meets a variety of patient and system needs, allowing time to develop alternatives to hospitalization or gain diagnostic clarity, serving a respite function, providing a hospital setting that does not gratify dependency needs, and relieving inpatient census pressures. An eight-bed service for brief inpatient stays of up to 3 days was developed on a PES which serves a large nine-country catchment area in northeastern New York State. Admissions to this unit would otherwise have gone to a medical school teaching hospital psychiatric unit or a state psychiatric center. Fifty-one consecutive admissions were studied. The majority of patients were dischargeable in the short time frame and did not require transfer for longer-term care. The patients as a group showed improvement in psychiatric symptomatology and rated high satisfaction with the program. Most patients were diagnosed with schizophrenia or personality disorder (PD). Suicidality and substance abuse were frequent. The PD patients had a strong association with suicidality and some association with substance abuse, whereas the schizophrenics had more psychiatric symptomatology. PD patients were more likely to be discharged, leading us to propose a rationale for why this group may be uniquely suited to this approach. The study was replicated after a year on another sample of 51 consecutive admissions, confirming the earlier results and providing a 1-year follow-up on the program.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8307344

  15. Parental psychiatric disorders and autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jokiranta, Elina; Brown, Alan S.; Heinimaa, Markus; Cheslack-Postava, Keely; Partanen, Auli; Sourander, Andre

    2013-01-01

    The present population-based, case-control study examines associations between specific parental psychiatric disorders and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) including childhood autism, Asperger’s syndrome and pervasive developmental disorder (PDD-NOS). The cohort includes 4713 children born between 1987 and 2005 with diagnoses of childhood autism, Asperger’s syndrome or PDD-NOS. Cases were ascertained from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register, and each was matched to four controls by gender, date of birth, place of birth, and residence in Finland. Controls were selected from the Finnish Medical Birth Register. Parents were identified through the Finnish Medical Birth Register and Finnish Central Population Register. Parental psychiatric diagnoses from inpatient care were collected from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess whether parents’ psychiatric disorders predicted ASD after controlling for parents’ age, smoking during pregnancy and weight for gestational age. In summary, parental schizophrenia spectrum disorders and affective disorders were associated with the risk of ASD regardless of the subgroup. PDD-NOS was associated with all parental psychiatric disorders investigated. Further studies are needed to replicate these findings. These results may facilitate the investigation of shared genetic and familial factors between ASD and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:23391634

  16. Positive behavioral support planning in the inpatient treatment of severe disruptive behaviors: A description of service features.

    PubMed

    Hamlett, Nakia M; Carr, Erika R; Hillbrand, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Positive behavior support (PBS) plans are increasingly used on inpatient units to assess and treat serious and dangerous behaviors displayed by patients with serious psychiatric impairment. A contemporary extension of traditional applied behavior analytic procedures, PBS plans integrate theories from several domains with perspectives on community psychology, positive psychology, and recovery-oriented care. Because there is little evidence to suggest that more invasive, punitive disciplinary strategies lead to long-term positive behavioral change (Parkes, 1996), PBS plans have emerged as an alternative to the use of seclusion and restraint or other forms of restrictive measures typically used on inpatient psychiatric units (Hammer et al., 2011). Moreover, PBS plans are a preferred method of intervention because more invasive interventions often cause more harm than good to all involved (Elliott et al., 2005). This article seeks to provide an integrated framework for the development of positive behavior support plans in inpatient psychiatric settings. In addition to explicating the philosophy and core elements of PBS plans, this work includes discussion of the didactic and pragmatic aspects of training clinical staff in inpatient mental health settings. A case vignette is included for illustration and to highlight the use of PBS plans as a mechanism for helping patients transition to less restrictive settings. This work will add to the scant literature examining the use of positive behavioral support plans in inpatient psychiatric settings. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27148952

  17. The Effects of Sociodemographic Factors on Psychiatric Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal Rye; Eun, Hun-Jeong; Yoo, Tai P.; Yun, Youngmi; Wood, Christopher; Kase, Michael; Park, Jong-Il

    2012-01-01

    Objective Several studies have reported that ethnic differences influence psychiatric diagnoses. Some previous studies reported that African Americans and Hispanics are diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders more frequently than Caucasians, and that Caucasians are more likely to be diagnosed with affective disorders than other ethnic groups. We sought to identify associations between sociodemographic factors and psychiatric diagnosis. Methods We retrospectively examined the medical records of all psychiatric inpatients (ages over 18 years) treated at Kern county mental hospital (n=2,051) between July 2003 and March 2007 for demographic, clinical information, and discharge diagnoses. Results African American and Hispanic males were more frequently diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders than Caucasians, whereas Caucasian females were more frequently diagnosed with affective disorders than females in the other ethnic groups, suggesting that patient ethnicity and gender may influence clinical diagnoses. Demographic variables, that is, a lower education, failure of marriage, homelessness, and low quality insurance, were found to be significantly associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum disorders after adjusting for clinical variables. And, the presence of a family psychiatric history, failure of marriage, not-homelessness, and quality insurance were found to be associated with a diagnosis of affective disorders. Conclusion Our results show that these demographic factors, including ethnicity, have effects on diagnoses in psychiatric inpatients. Furthermore, these variables may help prediction of psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:22993517

  18. Use of VA and Medicare Services By Dually Eligible Veterans with Psychiatric Problems

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Kathleen; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Rosen, Amy K; Christiansen, Cindy L; Loveland, Susan; Ettner, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine how service accessibility measured by geographic distance affects service sector choices for veterans who are dually eligible for veterans affairs (VA) and Medicare services and who are diagnosed with mental health and/or substance abuse (MH/SA) disorders. Data Sources Primary VA data sources were the Patient Treatment (acute care), Extended Care (long-term care), and Outpatient Clinic files. VA cost data were obtained from (1) inpatient and outpatient cost files developed by the VA Health Economics and Resource Center and (2) outpatient VA Decision Support System files. Medicare data sources were the denominator, Medicare Provider Analysis Review (MEDPAR), Provider-of-Service, Outpatient Standard Analytic and Physician/Supplier Standard Analytic files. Additional sources included the Area Resource File and Census Bureau data. Study Design We identified dually eligible veterans who had either an inpatient or outpatient MH/SA diagnosis in the VA system during fiscal year (FY)'99. We then estimated one- and two-part regression models to explain the effects of geographic distance on both VA and Medicare total and MH/SA costs. Principal Findings Results provide evidence for substitution between the VA and Medicare, demonstrating that poorer geographic access to VA inpatient and outpatient clinics decreased VA expenditures but increased Medicare expenditures, while poorer access to Medicare-certified general and psychiatric hospitals decreased Medicare expenditures but increased VA expenditures. Conclusions As geographic distance to VA medical facility increases, Medicare plays an increasingly important role in providing mental health services to veterans. PMID:18355256

  19. Inpatient Rehabilitation Performance of Patients with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jack B.; Raj, Vishwa S.; Asher, Arash; Lee, Jay; Guo, Ying; Konzen, Benedict S.; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional improvement of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Design Retrospective Review Setting Three tertiary referral based hospitals. Interventions Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for demographic, laboratory, medical and functional data. Main Outcome Measure Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Participants Cancer rehabilitation inpatients admitted to three different cancer centers with a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (n=7). Results All 7 patients were white females. Median age was 62. Primary cancers included ovarian carcinoma (2), small cell lung cancer (2), uterine carcinoma (2), and invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Mean admission total FIM score was 61.0 (SD=23.97). Mean discharge total FIM score was 73.6 (SD=29.35). The mean change in total FIM score was 12.6 (p=.0018). The mean length of rehabilitation stay was 17.1 days. The mean total FIM efficiency was 0.73. 5/7 (71%) patients were discharged home. 1/7 (14%) was discharged to a nursing home. 1/7 (14%) transferred to the primary acute care service. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the functional performance of a group of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Despite the poor neurologic prognosis associated with this syndrome, these patients made significant functional improvements on inpatient rehabilitation. When appropriate, inpatient rehabilitation should be considered. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. PMID:25051460

  20. Practice of Acute and Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Psychiatric Clinic of a University Hospital from Turkey: between 2007 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Melike Ceyhan Balci; Kenar, Ayse Nur Inci; Hanci, Ezgi; Sendur, İbrahim; Sengul, Cem; Herken, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be given as the form of acute, continuation or maintenance ECT according to the process of administration. We report our 7 years’ observation with acute and maintenance ECT in a university hospital in Turkey. Methods The medical records of the hospitalized patients treated with acute or maintenance ECT between the years 2007 and 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. The sociodemographic characteristics, diagnosis, data of ECT and the co-administered psychotropic drugs were recorded. The frequency of ECT was calculated by identifying the total number of the hospitalized patients during the study period from the hospital records. Results A total number of 1,432 female and 1,141 male patients hospitalized in a period of 7 years, with a total number of 111 patients treated with ECT. The ratio of ECT was 4%, maintenance/acute ECT 11%. For acute ECT, affective disorders (65.3%) and psychotic disorders (21.6%) were among the leading diagnoses. Maintenance ECT, the diagnosis was; 6 affective disorders, 4 psychotic disorders and 1 obsessive compulsive disorder. There was a significant difference between the patients receiving acute and maintenance ECT in terms of age, duration of illness, and number of previous hospitalizations and ECTs. Conclusion The percentage of patients treated with acute ECT is lower in our institution than that in many other institutions from our country. Acute and maintenance ECT should be considered as an important treatment option particularly for patients with long disease duration, a high number of hospitalizations and a history of benefiting from previous ECTs. PMID:26792041

  1. [150 years of psychiatric therapy].

    PubMed

    von Keyserlingk, H

    1976-06-01

    The treatment of insane persons in the last century is briefly described. A more liberal and unrestrained treatment was introduced at the turn of the century, and chiefly agriculturally oriented insane asylums were established at that time. The question of persons trained to care for subjects afflicted with insanity was increasingly gaining in importance, and the aim was to have available a pool of skilled nursing personnel. Treatment by inducing artificial fever is outlined in addition to a brief description of a more activ treatment of patients by the Simon-Gütersloh method. In 1925, a "neuro-psychiatric dispensary" was established in the Soviet Union. Later, there were introduced such methods as insulin shock treatment and electroconvulsive therapy and, more recently, treatment with psychopharmaceuticals, the latter being drugs used in the treatment of emotional disorders in modern psychiatric hospitals. Inpatient and outpatient treatment is further developed with the establishment of day/night hospitals, and the need is pointed out to develop a system of care for mental patients on the model of that which exists in the Soviet Union.

  2. The health-care environment on a locked psychiatric ward: an ethnographic study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Inger M; Skärsäter, Ingela; Danielson, Ella

    2006-12-01

    Recent changes in psychiatric hospital care involving a reduction in the number of beds and time spent in hospital motivated the study of conditions of inpatient care on such wards. An ethnographic study of a locked, acute psychiatric ward in a department of psychiatry was performed with the aim of describing the health-care environment in such a ward. The ward admitted patients on both a voluntarily and involuntarily basis. Data were collected by means of 3.5 months of participant observations. The results showed a health-care environment that was overshadowed by control. Staff were in control but they also lacked control; they attempted to master the situation in line with organizational demands and they sometimes failed. At the same time, the staff tried to share the responsibility of caring for patients and next of kin. Patients were controlled by staff; they were the underdogs and dependent on staff for their care and the freedom to leave the ward. Patients tried to make themselves heard and reacted to the control by developing counter-strategies. What this study adds to earlier research is patients' pressure on staff and sometimes quite an open struggle for more control, which may be an expression for an unacceptable imbalance in power between patients and staff.

  3. Impact of risperidone long acting injection on resource utilization in psychiatric secondary care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M; Currie, A; Lloyd, K; Price, M; Peperell, Kate

    2008-03-01

    Risperidone long acting injection (RLAI) is the only long acting atypical antipsychotic available in the UK. Its impact on NHS resource use has not been widely studied. This review of medical records was conducted to quantify the impact of RLAI on NHS psychiatric secondary care resource use, primarily in terms of episodes of inpatient hospital care 12 months before and 12 months after RLAI initiation. Data on number of hospitalizations and hospital bed days were collected retrospectively, from patient notes and hospital databases in four acute psychiatric units in the UK for all individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who were prescribed RLAI more than 12 months previously. Data were collected on 100 individuals (58 male) with a mean age 40.8 years (range 19-70). The median duration of illness before RLAI initiation was 12 years (range six months to 43 years). There were 62 admissions in the 12 months pre-RLAI, falling to 22 admissions in the 12 months post-RLAI. Number of admissions, we argue, offer a more reliable indicator of the impact of treatment than total hospital bed days in this type of study. In this study there were 40 fewer admissions in the 12 months after RLAI was initiated compared with the previous 12 months. This is important as readmission is a good proxy measure of relapse, and adherence to medication is known to be a key factor in relapse prevention. PMID:18308820

  4. Correlates of hopelessness in psychiatrically hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Kashani, J H; Soltys, S M; Dandoy, A C; Vaidya, A F; Reid, J C

    1991-01-01

    The importance of hopelessness within the study of childhood psychiatric disorders is becoming increasingly apparent. The present study divides a child inpatient sample (age 7 to 12 years) into two groups based on scores from the Kazdin Hopelessness Scale for Children. Comparisons made between the two groups on various measures showed that children with high hopelessness had lower cognitive ability, "difficult child" temperament characteristics, more anxiety, lower self-esteem, and a higher degree of psychopathology than the low-hopelessness group. The role of hopelessness in academic success and future psychopathology are discussed.

  5. [Psychiatric disorders in children of alcoholic parents].

    PubMed

    Elpers, M; Lenz, K

    1994-06-01

    The role of parental alcohol abuse was investigated in children and adolescents seen as inpatients or outpatients at our child psychiatry unit in 1992. Data were obtained from our clinical documentation system, which is based on WHO recommendations. The control group consisted of patients in whose families there was neither substance abuse nor another serious medical problem. The groups differed significantly on axis V of the Multi-axial Classification Scheme (associated abnormal psychosocial situations) but not in psychopathology or psychiatric diagnosis. PMID:8053265

  6. 75 FR 23851 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ...We are proposing to revise the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In addition, in the Addendum to this proposed rule, we describe the proposed changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute......

  7. 'Therapeutic landscapes' and the importance of nostalgia, solastalgia, salvage and abandonment for psychiatric hospital design.

    PubMed

    Wood, Victoria J; Gesler, Wil; Curtis, Sarah E; Spencer, Ian H; Close, Helen J; Mason, James; Reilly, Joe G

    2015-05-01

    We examine emotional reactions to changes to medical spaces of care, linked with past experiences. In this paper we draw on findings from a qualitative study of the transfer of psychiatric inpatient care from an old to a newly built facility. We show how the meanings attributed to 'therapeutic landscapes' from one׳s past can evoke emotions and memories, manifesting in ideas about nostalgia, solastalgia, salvage and abandonment, which can impinge on one׳s present therapeutic experience. We reflect on how consideration of these ideas might contribute to better future design of psychiatric inpatient facilities and the wellbeing of those using them.

  8. Elements of Successful School Reentry after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization is an intensive intervention designed to stabilize adolescents who are experiencing an acute mental health crisis. Reintegrating to school after discharge from psychiatric hospitalization can be overwhelming for many adolescents (E. V. Clemens, L. E. Welfare, & A. M. Williams, 2010). The authors used a consensual…

  9. Irresistible impulse: psychiatric viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Weil, F

    1989-01-01

    The responses of the psychiatric profession to the legal criteria applied to irresistible impulse in cases of psychotic offenders are examined. An illustrative case, and its legal consequences, support the desirability of the psychiatric approach.

  10. [Acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Burgmann, Konstantin; Schoepfer, Alain

    2014-09-01

    Diarrhea, defined as three or more loose or watery stools per day, represents a frequent problem in outpatients as well as inpatients. As most of the patients with acute diarrhea show a self-limiting disease course, the main challenge for the physician is to discriminate patients for whom symptomatic therapy is sufficient from those with severe disease course and threatening complications. This review aims to provide a practical guidance for such decisions.

  11. The influence of institutional characteristics on length of stay for psychiatric patients: a national database study in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woojin; Cho, Woo Hyun; Yoon, Chung Won

    2009-03-01

    The institutionalization of psychiatric patients has put a tremendous burden on many societies, but few studies have examined the effects of institutional characteristics on patient length of stay (LOS). This paper investigated the association between institutional characteristics and LOS for 160,517 psychiatric patients in South Korea by applying a two-level modeling technique to administrative claims databases covering the entire patient population. Patient LOS, expressed in terms of days, was analyzed by taking account of institutional type, ownership, location, inpatient capacity, staffing, and patient demographics. The characteristics of inpatients were used as control variables and consisted of gender, age, sub-diagnosis, and the type of national health security program. The main findings of this study are: (1) patient LOS was 69% longer at psychiatric hospitals than at tertiary-care hospitals; (2) neither location nor inpatient capacity was associated with LOS; (3) larger staffs reduced LOS; and (4), LOS increased with a higher proportion of male inpatients, inpatients > or =65 years old, or inpatients diagnosed with organic or schizophrenic disorders, possibly through contextual effects. The results of this study suggest that researchers and policy makers could improve their assessment of psychiatric patient LOS and its association with health outcome by taking into account institutional characteristics and using multi-level analyses.

  12. Inpatient treatment for depressed children and adolescents: preliminary evaluations.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R M; Powers, J M; Cleveland, P H; Thyer, B A

    1990-01-01

    Reported are the results of two uncontrolled outcome studies that evaluate the effectiveness of inpatient psychiatric treatment of children and adolescents suffering from clinical depression. Study 1 employed a sample of 7 children and measured outcome with the Depression Self-rating Scale (DSRS), the Hopelessness Scale for Children (HSC), and the Global Asssessment of Functioning (GAF) scale, which were administered to each child upon admission and again at discharge. Inpatient treatment involved multiple interventions, including individual psychotherapy, medication, milieu therapy and token economy, and other procedures. At discharge, statistically significant improvements were found on the patients' GAF and HSC scores, but not on their DSRS scores. Study 2 used a sample of 15 adolescents, also admitted for clinical depression. Administered at each patient's admission and discharge, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Generalized Contentment Scale (GCS), and Index of Self-esteem (ISE) were used to measure outcome. The multi-modal treatment program offered to the sample in Study 2 was similar to that offered the sample in Study 1. At discharge all three outcome measures reflected statistically significant improvements in the patients studies; therefore, these results provide addmtional support for the inpatient treatment of depressed children and adolescents.

  13. Quality Metrics in Inpatient Neurology.

    PubMed

    Dhand, Amar

    2015-12-01

    Quality of care in the context of inpatient neurology is the standard of performance by neurologists and the hospital system as measured against ideal models of care. There are growing regulatory pressures to define health care value through concrete quantifiable metrics linked to reimbursement. Theoretical models of quality acknowledge its multimodal character with quantitative and qualitative dimensions. For example, the Donabedian model distils quality as a phenomenon of three interconnected domains, structure-process-outcome, with each domain mutually influential. The actual measurement of quality may be implicit, as in peer review in morbidity and mortality rounds, or explicit, in which criteria are prespecified and systemized before assessment. As a practical contribution, in this article a set of candidate quality indicators for inpatient neurology based on an updated review of treatment guidelines is proposed. These quality indicators may serve as an initial blueprint for explicit quality metrics long overdue for inpatient neurology.

  14. The effect of songwriting on knowledge of coping skills and working alliance in psychiatric patients: a randomized clinical effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a songwriting intervention on psychiatric patients' knowledge of coping skills and working alliance. Participants were randomly assigned to scripted and manualized experimental (n=48) or control (n=41) conditions. The experimental condition was a group psychoeducational music therapy songwriting session concerning coping skills while the control condition was a group psychoeducational session concerning coping skills. Both conditions were single-session therapy with patients on an acute adult psychiatric unit. Results indicated no significant between group differences in measures of knowledge of coping skills, consumer working alliance, or perception of enjoyment (p>.05), although the experimental condition tended to have slightly higher mean scores than the control group for these measures. There was a significant between group difference in measures of therapist working alliance (p<.001), with the therapist scoring the experimental group higher than the control group. Although the music therapy group had a higher mean rate of previous psychiatric hospitalizations, their perception of enjoyment scores were still higher than those of the control condition, a finding incongruent in the literature. Furthermore, despite the increased number of previous hospitalizations, the music therapy condition had higher attendance rates than the control condition, thus possibly providing incentives for funding. It seems that group songwriting about coping skills can be as effective a psychosocial intervention as traditional talk-based psychoeducation to teach psychiatric inpatients how to proactively manage their illness. Additionally, music therapy can be as effective as talk-based psychoeducation in establishing working alliance. Implications for clinical practice, limitations, and suggestions for future research are provided.

  15. Adolescent Inpatient Behavioral Health Clients: Risk Factors and Methods of Preventing an Increase in HIV Infection among Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackerman, Ann E.

    2002-01-01

    There has been a surge in the rates of adolescents who are becoming infected with HIV. This study of 214 at risk clients being treated on an inpatient psychiatric hospitalization basis examines why such clients continue to engage in high-risk behaviors. Results and suggestions for a psychoeducational curriculum for professionals are included.…

  16. The Use of Murals in Preadolescent Inpatient Groups: An Art Therapy Approach to Cumulative Trauma. Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Nicole; McCarthy, James B.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a small group of preadolescent, psychiatric inpatients and their collaborative painting of a memorial mural about the September 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. Through an immersion in the group experience, the group members became increasingly introspective about their feelings of loss and their…

  17. Assessment of aggression in inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Barbara E; Holoyda, Brian J

    2014-10-01

    The threat of violence is a major concern for all individuals working or receiving treatment in an inpatient psychiatric setting. One major focus in forensic psychology and psychiatry over the past several decades has been the development of risk assessments to aid in the identification of those individuals most at risk of exhibiting violent behavior. So-called second- and third-generation risk assessments were developed to improve the accuracy of decision making. While these instruments were developed for use in the community, many have proven to be effective in identifying patients more likely to exhibit institutional aggression. Because the purpose of risk assessment is the reduction of violence, dynamic factors were included in third-generation risk instruments to provide opportunities for intervention and methods for measuring change. Research with these instruments indicates that both static factors (second-generation) and dynamic factors (third-generation) are important in identifying those patients most likely to engage in institutional aggression, especially when the aggression is categorized by type (impulsive/reactive, organized/predatory/instrumental, psychotic). Recent research has indicated that developing a typology of aggressive incidents may provide insight both into precipitants to assaults as well as appropriate interventions to reduce such aggression. The extant literature suggests that both static and dynamic risk factors are important, but may be differentially related to the type of aggression exhibited and the characteristics of the individuals exhibiting the aggression. PMID:25296966

  18. Assessing overall functioning with adolescent inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Greg; Forlenza, Nicholas; Poland, Charlotte; Ray, Sagarika; Zodan, Jennifer; Mehra, Ashwin; Goyal, Ajay; Baity, Matthew R.; Siefert, Caleb J.; Sobin, Sean; Leite, David; Sinclair, Samuel J.

    2014-01-01

    The current study looks to evaluate the validity and reliability of a brief measure of overall functioning for adolescents. Clinicians were asked to complete the Overall Functioning Scale for 72 adolescents consecutively admitted to the adolescent psychiatric inpatient service of a community safety net medical center. The results revealed that this new measure is related to the patients’ length of stay, clinician-rated measures of social cognition and object relations, Global Assessment of Functioning score at admission, and global rating of engagement in individual psychotherapy. Results also showed that the OFS was related to patients’ history of non-suicidal self-harm as well as treatment outcome as assessed by measures of psychological health and well-being and symtomatology. Hierarchical regressions reveal that the OFS shows incremental validity above the admission GAF score in predicting length of stay. The results also showed that the OFS demonstrates inter-rater reliability in the excellent range (ICC 1,2) of .88. Clinical implications of the use of this tool as well as areas of future research are discussed. PMID:25259948

  19. Person-environment interaction in a new secure forensic state psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Jon E; Kelly, Sean P; Margiotta, David T; Hegvik, Donna K; Vaher, Kairi A; Kaya, Rachel Tamiko

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the person-environment interaction effects of environmental design on ward climate, safety, job satisfaction, and treatment outcomes within a new high security forensic psychiatric facility. Participants included male and female adult psychiatric inpatients and staff members at different security stages. Data were collected once before and twice after the experimental group moved into the new building. The control group remained in the same facilities. Contrary to expectations, the new building had limited effects on the measured variables.

  20. Psychosocial functioning of individuals with schizophrenia in community housing facilities and the psychiatric hospital in Zurich.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Matthias; Briner, David; Kawohl, Wolfram; Seifritz, Erich; Baumgartner-Nietlisbach, Gabriela

    2015-12-15

    Individuals with severe mental illness frequently have difficulties in obtaining and maintaining adequate accommodation. If they are not willing or able to adapt to requirements of traditional supported housing institutions they may live in sheltered and emergency accommodation. Adequate mental health services are rarely available in these facilities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mental health, functional and social status of individuals living in community sheltered housing facilities. A cross-sectional survey of n=338 individuals in sheltered housing compared to a sample of patients at intake in acute inpatient psychiatry (n=619) concerning clinical and social variables was carried out in the catchment area of Zurich. Matched subsamples of individuals with schizophrenia (n=168) were compared concerning functioning and impairments on the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Individuals with schizophrenia in sheltered housing (25% of the residents) have significantly more problems concerning substance use, physical illness, psychopathological symptoms other than psychosis and depression, and relationships, daily activities and occupation than patients with schizophrenia at intake on an acute psychiatric ward. Community sheltered accommodation although conceptualized to prevent homelessness in the general population de facto serve as housing facilities for individuals with schizophrenia and other severe mental illness.

  1. Psychosocial functioning of individuals with schizophrenia in community housing facilities and the psychiatric hospital in Zurich.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Matthias; Briner, David; Kawohl, Wolfram; Seifritz, Erich; Baumgartner-Nietlisbach, Gabriela

    2015-12-15

    Individuals with severe mental illness frequently have difficulties in obtaining and maintaining adequate accommodation. If they are not willing or able to adapt to requirements of traditional supported housing institutions they may live in sheltered and emergency accommodation. Adequate mental health services are rarely available in these facilities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mental health, functional and social status of individuals living in community sheltered housing facilities. A cross-sectional survey of n=338 individuals in sheltered housing compared to a sample of patients at intake in acute inpatient psychiatry (n=619) concerning clinical and social variables was carried out in the catchment area of Zurich. Matched subsamples of individuals with schizophrenia (n=168) were compared concerning functioning and impairments on the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Individuals with schizophrenia in sheltered housing (25% of the residents) have significantly more problems concerning substance use, physical illness, psychopathological symptoms other than psychosis and depression, and relationships, daily activities and occupation than patients with schizophrenia at intake on an acute psychiatric ward. Community sheltered accommodation although conceptualized to prevent homelessness in the general population de facto serve as housing facilities for individuals with schizophrenia and other severe mental illness. PMID:26416587

  2. [Suicide in psychiatric hospitals : Results, risk factors and therapeutic measures].

    PubMed

    Wolfersdorf, M; Vogel, R; Vogl, R; Grebner, M; Keller, F; Purucker, M; Wurst, F M

    2016-05-01

    Suicide prevention is a core responsibility of psychiatry and psychotherapy. Periods of change in psychiatric inpatient treatment concepts are usually also accompanied by an increase in psychopathological behavior and with increased suicide rates in psychiatric hospitals, as seen in the 1970s and 1980s in Germany. That this represented a real increase of inpatient suicides during those years was confirmed and subsequently the number and rate of inpatient suicides has decreased from approximately 280 out of 100,000 admissions of patients in 1980 to approximately 50 in 2014. Death can also occur in psychiatric hospitals and an absolute prevention is not possible even under optimal conditions of therapy and nursing, communication and security. The suicide rate has clearly decreased over the last two decades in relation to admissions. The group of young male schizophrenic patients newly identified as having a high clinical suicide risk has decreased among the suicide victims whereas the percentage of severely depressed patients with delusions has increased. This reduction could be associated with the comprehensive improvements in educational and training programs in the field of suicide and suicide prevention, objectification of coping methods, development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, improvements in therapy and relationship possibilities and a general reduction in the number of suicides in Germany. PMID:27090898

  3. The effect of animal-assisted activity on inpatients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cheng-I; Liu, Chao-Yin; Sun, Chi-Tzu; Lin, Jung

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of animal-assisted activity on self-esteem, control over activities of daily living, and other psycho-physiological aspects among Taiwanese inpatients with schizophrenia. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to either the treatment or control group. A weekly animal-assisted activity program was arranged for patients in the treatment group for 2 months. A questionnaire assessing self-esteem, self-determination, social support, and psychiatric symptoms was completed the week before and the week after the animal-assisted activity. Compared with the control group, the treatment group showed significant improvement on all measures except for social support and negative psychiatric symptoms. The results of this study showed that animal-assisted activity can promote significant improvements in many clinical aspects among inpatients with schizophrenia. Therefore, animal-assisted activity should be integrated into the treatment of institutionalized patients with schizophrenia.

  4. Which factors influence psychiatric diagnosing in substance abuse treatment?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of diagnosing and treating co-occurring psychiatric disorders among substance abusers in treatment has received much attention. The aim of this study was to investigate to which extent co-occurring psychiatric disorders are diagnosed in a clinical population of substance abusers, and which factors (including the use of MINI-Plus) that influence the diagnosing of co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Methods Patients (N = 275) who received inpatient substance use treatment in five different units in Northern Norway participated in the study. The patients’ clinicians gave information on diagnoses given during the stay in the units, and whether a systematic diagnostic tool was used for the diagnosing (MINI-Plus). Predictors of independent co-occurring psychiatric disorders were examined utilizing hierarchical regression analysis. Results One third of the patients were given an independent psychiatric diagnosis. Less than half of the patients were assessed using a diagnostic tool. The main predictor of diagnosing of independent psychiatric disorders was the use of the diagnostic tool MINI-Plus. Younger patients and patients that used less alcohol, were given independent psychiatric diagnoses more frequently. Conclusions The number of co-occurring independent psychiatric diagnoses was lower compared to other studies using standardized diagnostic tools. The low number of patients assessed by such a tool, and the strong relationship between the use of such a tool and the diagnosing of co-occurring psychiatric disorders, suggest that the implementation of standardized diagnostic tools should be addressed in the units. Generally, patients suffering from substance use disorders should be systematically screened for other psychiatric disorders, in order to improve their treatment and health. PMID:23742628

  5. A comparison of symptoms and drug use between patients with methamphetamine associated psychoses and patients diagnosed with schizophrenia in two acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Medhus, Sigrid; Mordal, Jon; Holm, Bjørn; Mørland, Jørg; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2013-03-30

    Psychosis induced by the use of amphetamine or methamphetamine leads to dramatic symptoms and frequent readmissions and poses diagnostic challenges. Earlier studies have often relied on history taking and/or urine samples to reveal drug use. The aim of this study was to compare the psychotic symptoms of two groups: (1) acutely admitted patients who tested positive for methamphetamines and were diagnosed with drug-induced or methamphetamine-induced psychoses and (2) acutely admitted patients who tested negative for methamphetamines and were diagnosed with schizophrenia. Blood and urine samples were used. In addition, we investigated whether the severity of symptoms, in those who tested positive, was related to the blood concentration of methamphetamine. Of 285 patients who volunteered blood and/or urine samples within 48h of admission, 37 (13%) had recently taken methamphetamine. Positive psychotic symptoms between the two groups were compared by PANSS using the positive subscale. The results showed no differences in positive psychotic symptoms between the two groups. The severity of positive psychotic symptoms in patients with three different levels of urine/blood methamphetamine concentrations, were compared. We found no clinically or statistically significant relationship between blood methamphetamine levels and severity of psychotic symptoms.

  6. An Inpatient Vocational Rehabilitation Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielefeld, Martin

    This paper describes the Cleveland Veterans Administration inpatient Vocational Rehabilitation Unit (VRU), an intensive vocational assessment and counseling program designed to maximize the self-reliance and productivity of patients. The VRU is presented as a minimal care, 3-month maximum treatment program in which patients work on incentive pay…

  7. Psychiatric Consultation and Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Specker, Sheila; Meller, William H.; Thurber, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Background A substantial number of patients in general hospitals will evince substance abuse problems but a majority is unlikely to be adequately identified in the referral-consultation process. This failure may preclude patients from receiving effective interventions for substance use disorders. Objectives 1. To evaluate all referred patients for possible substance use disorders. 2. To ascertain the degree of convergence between patients referred for chemical problems and the corresponding DSM diagnosis. 3. To compare demographic data for substance abusing patients and referrals not so classified. 4. To evaluate conditions concomitant with substance use disorders. Method Consecutive one-year referrals (524) to consultation-liaison psychiatric services were scrutinized for chemically-related problems by psychiatric consultants. Results Of the referrals, 176 met criteria for substance use disorders (SUD) (57% alcohol; 25% other drugs; 18% both alcohol and other drugs). Persons diagnosed with SUD tended to be younger, male, non-Caucasian, unmarried, and unemployed. They were more likely to be depressed, have liver and other gastrointestinal problems, and to have experienced traumatic events; they also tended to have current financial difficulties. Most were referred for SUD evaluation by personnel in general medicine and family practice. Following psychiatric consultation, SUD designated patients were referred mainly to substance abuse treatment programs. The only variable related to recommended inpatient versus outpatient services for individuals with SUD was the Global Assessment of Functioning Axis (GAF) with persons having lower estimated functioning more likely to be referred for inpatient interventions. Conclusions These data are similar to the results of past studies in this area. Unlike previous investigations in the domain of consultative-liaison psychiatry, financial stressors and specific consultant recommendations were included in data gathering. Although

  8. Oppositional defiant disorder symptoms in relation to psychopathic traits and aggression among psychiatrically hospitalized children: ADHD symptoms as a potential moderator.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen P; Luebbe, Aaron M; Fite, Paula J; Greening, Leilani; Stoppelbein, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is associated with elevated rates of psychopathic traits and aggression. However, it remains unclear if attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms exacerbate these relations, particularly in samples of children who are severely clinically distressed. The purpose of the present study was to test ADHD symptoms as a potential moderator of the relations of ODD symptoms to psychopathic traits (i.e., callous-unemotional [CU] traits, narcissism) and to aggressive subtypes (i.e., proactive, reactive aggression) in a large sample of children in an acute psychiatric inpatient facility (n = 699; ages 6-12). Multiple regression analyses indicated that, after controlling for child demographic variables, ADHD symptoms marginally exacerbated the relation between ODD symptoms and CU traits. Both ODD and ADHD symptoms had an additive, but not a multiplicative effect, in predicting narcissism. In addition, for a subset of the full sample for whom data were available (n =351), ADHD symptoms exacerbated the relation between ODD symptoms and both reactive and proactive aggression. These results suggest that ADHD symptoms tend to have a negative effect on the relation between ODD symptoms and markers of antisociality among children receiving acute psychiatric care.

  9. Psychiatric caregiver stress: clinical implications of compassion fatigue.

    PubMed

    Franza, Francesco; Del Buono, Gianfranco; Pellegrino, Ferdinando

    2015-09-01

    The capacity to work productively is a key component of health and emotional well-being. People who work in health care can be exposed to the fatigue of care. Compassion fatigue has been described as an occupational hazard specific to clinical work related severe emotional distress. In our study, we have evaluated compassion fatigue in a mental health group (47 psychiatric staff) and its relationship with inpatients (237 inpatients) affected by some psychiatric disorders. At baseline, the more significant data indicate a high percentage of Job Burnout and Compassion Fatigue in psychiatric nurses (respectively, 39.28%, 28.57%). Significant Compassion Fatigue percentage is present also in psychologist group (36.36%). Finally, in psychiatrists, the exposure to patients increased vicarious trauma (28.57%), but not job burnout. After a year of participation in Balint Groups, the psychiatric staff presented an overall reduction in total mean score in any administered scale (CBI: p<0.0000045; sCFs: (Vicarious Trauma: p<0.0288; Job Burnout: p<0.000001)). Thus, compassion fatigue causes concern among mental health professionals, and Balint Groups may represent a therapeutic strategy to help health professionals to face difficulties in challenging work environments. PMID:26417788

  10. Psychiatric morbidity in prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sandeep Kumar; Singh, Paramjit; Gargi, Parshotam D.; Goyal, Samta; Garg, Aseem

    2011-01-01

    Context: The prevalence of psychiatric illness in correctional settings is significantly elevated, with higher than community rates reported for most mental disorders. Aims: (1) To examine the socio-demographic profile of convicted prisoners. (2) To evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in convicted prisoners. Materials and Methods: 500 convicts were assessed for psychiatric morbidity with the help of (a) Socio-demographic proforma, (b) Pareek Udai and Trivedi G's socio-economic status scale (rural) (household schedule), (c) Kuppuswamy's economic status scale (urban) and (d) Present State Examination (PSE). Results: 23.8% of the convicted prisoners were suffering from psychiatric illness excluding substance abuse. 56.4% of the prisoners had history of substance abuse / dependence prior to incarceration. Conclusions: The results suggest that a substantial burden of psychiatric morbidity exists in the prison population of India and the burden of psychiatric illness in this vulnerable and marginalized population poses a serious challenge to psychiatrists. PMID:22135446

  11. Predictors of Treatment Response for Suicidal Youth Referred for Emergency Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huey, Jr., Stanley J.; Henggeler, Scott W.; Rowland, Melisa D.; Halliday-Boykins, Colleen A.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Pickrel, Susan G.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated factors that predicted poor treatment response for 70 suicidal youth (ages 10 to 17 years; 67% African American) who received either multisystemic therapy (MST) or inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Following treatment, suicidal youth were classified as either treatment responders or nonresponders based on caregiver or…

  12. Cluster Analytic Methods Applied to the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory in a Psychiatric Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thieret, Nancy Lee; Anderson, Douglas H.

    1985-01-01

    Cluster analysis and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory were used together to determine whether heterogeneous diagnostic groups could be identified in an inpatient psychiatric population. Comparison of four clustering techniques showed cluster analysis to be a poor diagnostic discriminator when compared to diagnostic groups. (NRB)

  13. 76 FR 60136 - Reasonable Charges for Inpatient MS-DRGs and SNF Medical Services; V3.8, 2012 Fiscal Year Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... the Federal Register on December 27, 2010 (75 FR 81335). Based on the methodologies set forth in 38... AFFAIRS Reasonable Charges for Inpatient MS-DRGs and SNF Medical Services; V3.8, 2012 Fiscal Year Update... where the care is provided (See Table ``N'' Acute Inpatient and Table ``O'' SNF geographic factors...

  14. 77 FR 55269 - Reasonable Charges for Inpatient MS-DRGs and SNF Medical Services; V3.11, 2013; Fiscal Year Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... the Federal Register on December 12, 2011 (76 FR 77328). ] Based on the methodologies set forth in 38... AFFAIRS Reasonable Charges for Inpatient MS-DRGs and SNF Medical Services; V3.11, 2013; Fiscal Year Update... where the care is provided (See Table ``N'' Acute Inpatient and Table ``O'' SNF geographic factors...

  15. Diversion from custody. I: Psychiatric assessment at the magistrates' court.

    PubMed

    Joseph, P L; Potter, M

    1993-03-01

    The homeless mentally disordered defendant facing minor charges poses considerable problems regarding appropriate disposal. Psychiatric assessment may be required in order to facilitate the court's decision, but this is often available only after remand in custody. A psychiatric assessment service based at two inner-London magistrates' courts is described. Over 18 months, 201 defendants were referred. They were predominantly male, single, and of no fixed abode, suffering from serious psychiatric disorder; these defendants had often received previous in-patient treatment, frequently as detained patients. They typically were recidivists charged with minor offences. Following initial assessment, 25% were admitted to hospital, 50% were released, and 25% returned to custody. The Crown Prosecution Service discontinued 29% of cases. For those admitted directly to hospital, the mean (s.d.) time from arrest to hospital admission was 5.8 (6.8) days, significantly quicker than with prison-based assessments.

  16. Risk factors associated with psychiatric readmission.

    PubMed

    Lorine, Kim; Goenjian, Haig; Kim, Soeun; Steinberg, Alan M; Schmidt, Kendall; Goenjian, Armen K

    2015-06-01

    The present study focused on identifying risk factors for early readmission of patients discharged from an urban community hospital. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted on 207 consecutive inpatient psychiatric admissions that included patients who were readmitted within 15 days, within 3 to 6 months, and not admitted for at least 12 months post-discharge. Findings indicated that a diagnosis of schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder (OR = 18; 95% CI 2.70-117.7; p < 0.05), history of alcohol abuse (OR = 9; 95% CI 1.80-40.60; p < 0.05), number of previous psychiatric hospitalizations (OR = 2; 95% CI 1.28-3.73; p < 0.05), and type of residence at initial admission (e.g., homeless, OR = 29; 95% CI 3.99-217; p < 0.05) were significant risk factors for early readmission, where OR compares readmission group 1 versus group 3 in the multinomial logistic regression. Initial positive urine drug screen, history of drug abuse or incarceration, and legal status at initial admission did not predict early readmission. Reducing the risk factors associated with psychiatric readmissions has the potential to lead to the identification and development of preventative intervention strategies that can significantly improve patient safety, quality of care, well-being, and contain health care expenditures. PMID:25974053

  17. Risk of violence of inpatients with severe mental illness--do patients with schizophrenia pose harm to others?

    PubMed

    Edlinger, Monika; Rauch, Anna-Sophia; Kemmler, Georg; Yalcin-Siedentopf, Nursen; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Hofer, Alex

    2014-11-30

    Individuals suffering from schizophrenia are frequently considered to be dangerous. The current longitudinal chart review was carried out to investigate the diagnostic mix of patients who were admitted to the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy at the Medical University Innsbruck due to risk of harm to others. The sample consisted of all adult inpatients admitted to psychiatric acute care units in the years 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2007. Data collection included diagnoses, criteria for risk of harm to others, and the use of mechanical restraint. Altogether, 7222 admissions were reviewed. Of these, 529 patients had to be admitted to a locked unit because of risk of harm to others. Among those mechanical restraint was more often used in patients with organic mental disorders, Cluster B personality disorders, and mania than in patients with schizophrenia. Patients suffering from schizophrenia with comorbid psychoactive substance use constitute a potentially harmful population and are therefore frequently admitted to locked units due to risk of harm to others. However, in the current study additional coercive measures were more commonly applied in patients suffering from personality disorders and organic mental disorders.

  18. Subjective Motives for Requesting In-Patient Treatment in Female with Anorexia Nervosa: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Gorse, Pauline; Nordon, Clementine; Rouillon, Frederic; Pham-Scottez, Alexandra; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder mainly affecting women. Its treatment is long and accepted with much difficulty, in particular in-patient treatment. Aims To describe the subjective motives of women with anorexia nervosa for requesting in-patient admission, from a qualitative analysis of application letters. Methods Participants were adult women (18 years and older) with anorexia nervosa who were admitted as in-patients in a referral hospital unit in France from January 2008 to December 2010. The application letters, prerequisites to admission, were studied by the interpretative phenomenological method of content analysis. Results 63 letters have been analysed, allowing the identification of six themes related to requests for in-patient care: loss of control of behaviour, and of thoughts, mental exhaustion, isolation, inner struggle and fear of recovery. Conclusions Requests for in-patient admission were motivated by very personal, subjective experiences, unrelated to medical reasons for admission. These results may help improve pre-admission motivational work with individuals, by basing it on their subjective experience. PMID:24204951

  19. Suicide among young men: psychiatric illness, deviant behaviour and substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Allebeck, P; Allgulander, C

    1990-06-01

    The role of psychiatric illness versus social and behavioural risk factors for suicide in young men was analysed in a longitudinal study of 50,465 conscripts. Data collected in 1969-1970 on social background, personality characteristics, use of alcohol and drugs, psychological assessment and psychiatric diagnosis were linked to records from the national psychiatric case register and the national cause-of-death register through 1983. A total of 247 deaths from suicide occurred in the cohort during the follow-up. By means of multivariate analysis, the role of different social and behavioural characteristics was assessed in relation to that of psychiatric diagnoses, with suicide as dependent variable. A psychiatric diagnosis in inpatient care (n = 2247) was the strongest predictor of suicide, with an odds ratio (OR) of 11.3 (8.3-15.4), controlling for social and behavioural risk factors. Schizophrenia was the diagnosis with the highest suicide risk: OR = 13.3 (8.2-21.6). A psychiatric diagnosis at conscription (n = 5877) was not associated with a significantly increased risk of suicide. Several indicators of poor social background, deviant behaviour, substance abuse and disrupted interpersonal relations were associated with a significantly increased suicide risk, also after controlling for psychiatric illness. Although mental illness requiring inpatient treatment was the most powerful predictor of suicide, less than half the cohort had received such treatment. Social and behavioural risk factors are thus important for prevention on the population level. PMID:2378251

  20. Psychotropic Medication Use during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Flora M.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Shea, Timothy; Seel, Ronald T.; McAlister, Thomas W.; Kaelin, Darryl; Ryser, David; Corrigan, John D.; Cullen, Nora; Horn, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe psychotropic medication administration patterns during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their relationship to patient pre-injury and injury characteristics. Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting multiple acute inpatient rehabilitation units or hospitals. Participants 2,130 individuals with TBI (complicated mild, moderate, or severe) admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Interventions NA Main Outcome Measure(s) NA Results Most frequently administered was narcotic analgesics (72% of sample) followed by antidepressants (67%), anticonvulsants (47%), antianxiolytics (33%), hypnotics (30%), stimulants (28%), antipsychotics (25%), antiparkinson agents (25%), and miscellaneous psychotropics (18%). The psychotropic agents studied were administered to 95% of the sample with 8.5% receiving only 1 and 31.8% receiving 6 or more. Degree of psychotropic medication administration varied widely between sites. Univariate analyses indicated younger patients were more likely to receive anxiolytics, antidepressants, antiparkinson agents, stimulants, antipsychotics, and narcotic analgesics, while those older were more likely to receive anticonvulsants and miscellaneous psychotropics. Men were more likely to receive antipsychotics. All medication classes were less likely administered to Asians, and more likely to those with more severe functional impairment. Use of anticonvulsants was associated with having seizures at some point during acute care or rehabilitation stays. Narcotic analgesics were more likely for those with history of drug abuse, history of anxiety and depression (premorbid or during acute care), and severe pain during rehabilitation. Psychotropic medication administration increased rather than decreased during the course of inpatient rehabilitation in each of the medication categories except for narcotics. This observation was also true for medication administration within admission functional levels (defined

  1. Is an interest in computers or individual/team sports associated with adolescent psychiatric disorders?

    PubMed

    Harju, Outi; Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Hakko, Helinä; Räsänen, Pirkko; Riala, Kaisa

    2011-01-01

    The Internet plays a major role in adolescents' free time activities and communication nowadays. The aim here was to investigate the possibility of an association of computers and video games or sports (team, individual) with psychiatric disorders among underage psychiatric inpatients. The series of adolescents (n = 508) had been diagnosed using semistructured interviews (K-SADS-PL). The results showed that an interest in computers and video games did not increase the risk of any specific psychiatric disorder among these adolescent inpatients, but the likelihood of a substance-related disorder was statistically significantly lower among the boys with computers as a hobby. Team sports were related to increased likelihood of conduct disorder among the boys, whereas the likelihood of an affective disorder was reduced. No such association was found in individual sports or among the girls. We conclude that social contacts and peers play an important role in preventing adolescent depression.

  2. Rehabilitation programs for elderly women inpatients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carlos M; Palha, António P; Gonçalves, Daniela C; Pachana, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to describe rehabilitation and resocialization methods we believe to be appropriate for application to female patients with schizophrenia, in a psychiatric unit with a predominantly older population. We briefly describe the unit and the interventions used as an example of the proposed rehabilitation and resocialization methods applied. The article provides an overview to guide accurate intervention, particularly in inpatient women, in different types of cognitive impairment under the broad category of schizophrenia. Our clinical approach includes a token economy approach, cognitive remediation therapy, and social skills training. The token economy intervention is particularly directed to patients that present with a high mental deterioration and/or debility. Cognitive remediation training is applicable to subjects with both cognitive and social dysfunction, but that do not possess signs of an organic cerebral illness or of substance abuse. Social skills training can be the third step to resocialization, training verbal and nonverbal communication competencies.

  3. 75 FR 34611 - Medicare Program; Supplemental Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... CONTACT: Tzvi Hefter, (410) 786-4487. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2010-12567 of... Errors In FR Doc. 2010-12567 of June 2, 2010, make the following corrections: A. Corrections to the...; Supplemental Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care...

  4. Aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Yves; Beaulieu, Lucie; Paradis, Michel; Labonté, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Studies of aggressive behaviors in a nonforensic mental health setting have focused primarily on the inpatient ward and, on event prediction, using behavior-based clinical rating scales. Few studies have specifically targeted aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service or determined whether assessing the demographic and clinical characteristics of such patients might prove useful for their more rapid identification. Methods: We used a prospectively acquired database of over 20,900 visits to four services in the province of Quebec, Canada, over a two-year period from September 2002 onwards. A maximum of 72 variables could be acquired per visit. Visits with aggression (any verbally or physically intimidating behavior), both present and past, were tagged. Binary logistic regressions and cross-tabulations were used to determine whether the profile of a variable differed in visits with aggression from those without aggression. Results: About 7% of visits were marked by current aggression (verbal 49%, physical 12%, verbal and physical 39%). Including visits with a “past only” history of aggression increased this number to 20%. Variables associated with aggression were gender (male), marital status (single/separated), education (high school or less), employment (none), judicial history (any type), substance abuse (prior or active), medication compliance (poor), type of arrival to psychiatric emergency services (involuntary, police, judiciary, landlord), reason for referral (behavioral dyscontrol), diagnosis (less frequent in anxiety disorders), and outcome (more frequently placed under observation or admitted). Conclusion: Our results suggest that many state-independent variables are associated with aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service. Although their sum may not add up to a specific patient profile, they can nevertheless be useful in service planning, being easily integrated alongside state-dependent rating scales in a

  5. What's New in Treating Inpatients With Personality Disorders?: Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Old-Fashioned, Good Communication.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Sarah; Platt, Lois M

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric unit inpatients often have serious mental illnesses with comorbid personality disorders. Mental illnesses usually respond favorably to medication and psychotherapy, but personality disorders do not. Two personality disorders are commonly seen on inpatient units: borderline and antisocial. These personality disorders may destabilize the milieu with disruptive behaviors and present a challenge to nurses. Difficult patient behaviors and therapeutic responses by nurses are examined. Dialectical behavior therapy techniques and good communication skills may be used by nurses to (a) interact therapeutically with patients with personality disorders and (b) protect other patients and the milieu.

  6. [History of psychiatric care].

    PubMed

    Häfner, H

    2006-01-01

    The lecture incorporates stages of the Ettelbruck jubilee-hospital into european psychiatric history of the two last centuries. Beginning with social exclusion in the sense of a Michel Foucauld ("Central Hospice"), then turning into a typical large psychiatric hospital the CHNP is nowadays a specialized clinic with national tasks within the network of mental health community care. Milestones of this evolution are: the isolation theory of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries; eugenics and euthanasia on patients in Nazi-Germany; the second psychiatric revolution after World War 2 and it's impact in Luxembourg.

  7. [Anticonvulsants treatment of psychiatric disorder in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Bidzan, Leszek

    2006-01-01

    Agents introduced for the treatment of epilepsy have also been usedsimultaneously for psychiatric indications. The therapeutic effects of anticonvulsants are recognized in many psychiatric disorders. Growing literature suggests that anticonvulsant medication have efficacy in treating acute mania, bipolar disorder, psychotic disorders, behavioral disturbances especially agitation and impulsive aggression and anxiety, alcohol withdrawal and dependence. However, study of anticonvulsants among elderly patients has been limited. Further research in the field of psychogeriatry is needed to clarify the efficacy and tolerance of anticonvulsants. PMID:17203814

  8. Profiling psychotropic discharge medication from a children's psychiatric ward.

    PubMed

    Akram, Gazala

    2015-10-01

    Background Community prescribing of medication to treat psychiatric illness in children is increasing. However, details about medication prescribed at discharge from psychiatric inpatient services for children are scarce. Objectives Characterise the nature of psychotropic medication prescribed on discharge from a children's psychiatric ward over a 15-year period. Method Retrospective analysis of discharge summary letters of all discharges occurring between Jan 1997 to Dec 2012. Results 234 children (152 males and 82 females) were discharged with 117 (50%) prescribed psychotropic medication at discharge. 133 medicines were prescribed (stimulants n = 49, antipsychotics n = 31, antidepressants n = 22, mood stabilisers n = 1, other ADHD medication n = 11, melatonin n = 10, benzodiazepines n = 7, other n = 2). Risperidone was the most popular antipsychotic at a mean daily dose of 1 mg (range 0.25-4 mg). Fifty per cent were given an unlicensed medicine or a licensed drug was used in an unlicensed manner, of which risperidone was the most common (n = 14). Sleep disturbance and tics were most often treated using unlicensed/off label medication (n = 10). Conclusion Psychotropic medication is routinely used in inpatient children's services, with the majority of use confined to stimulants and atypical antipsychotics. Much of the antipsychotic use is for unlicensed indications or at unlicensed doses. PMID:25893488

  9. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Psychiatric Nursing in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, Naoki; Nosaki, Akiko; Hayashi, Yuta; Tanoue, Hiroki; Shimizu, Eiji; Kunikata, Hiroko; Okada, Yoshie; Shiraishi, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses have played a significant role in disseminating cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in Western countries; however, in Japan, the application, practice, efficiency, and quality control of CBT in the psychiatric nursing field are unclear. This study conducted a literature review to assess the current status of CBT practice and research in psychiatric nursing in Japan. Three English databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO) and two Japanese databases (Ichushi-Web and CiNii) were searched with predetermined keywords. Fifty-five articles met eligibility criteria: 46 case studies and 9 comparative studies. It was found that CBT took place primarily in inpatient settings and targeted schizophrenia and mood disorders. Although there were only a few comparative studies, each concluded that CBT was effective. However, CBT recipients and outcome measures were diverse, and nurses were not the only CBT practitioners in most reports. Only a few articles included the description of CBT training and supervision. This literature review clarified the current status of CBT in psychiatric nursing in Japan and identified important implications for future practice and research: performing CBT in a variety of settings and for a wide range of psychiatric disorders, conducting randomized controlled trials, and establishing pre- and postqualification training system. PMID:26798512

  10. Psychiatric hospitalization in Poland.

    PubMed

    Frydman, L

    1983-01-01

    An overview of psychiatric hospitalization in Poland is presented in the context of Polish political and socio-cultural developments. The areas addressed include: the characteristics of the patient population; the organization of Polish mental health service; the nature of psychiatric treatment; psychiatric legislation; patients' rights; and the training and social status of the various mental health professionals. In spite of the meager resources allocated to mental health services, and the consequent staff shortages and overcrowded, drab living conditions in psychiatric facilities, the care afforded patients is generally humane and nonoppressive. Polish psychiatry has succeeded in maintaining its professional autonomy and has assumed a leadership role in the modernization of its service delivery system.

  11. Neuroinflammation and psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in psychiatric illness. While systemic autoimmune diseases are well-documented causes of neuropsychiatric disorders, synaptic autoimmune encephalitides with psychotic symptoms often go under-recognized. Parallel to the link between psychiatric symptoms and autoimmunity in autoimmune diseases, neuroimmunological abnormalities occur in classical psychiatric disorders (for example, major depressive, bipolar, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorders). Investigations into the pathophysiology of these conditions traditionally stressed dysregulation of the glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems, but the mechanisms causing these neurotransmitter abnormalities remained elusive. We review the link between autoimmunity and neuropsychiatric disorders, and the human and experimental evidence supporting the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in selected classical psychiatric disorders. Understanding how psychosocial, genetic, immunological and neurotransmitter systems interact can reveal pathogenic clues and help target new preventive and symptomatic therapies. PMID:23547920

  12. Psychiatric testimony in Britain.

    PubMed

    Chiswick, D

    1989-01-01

    In the criminal-justice system psychiatric evidence may be relevant both before and after conviction. The scope of psychiatric testimony in the criminal courts has been more restricted in Britain than it has been elsewhere. It is generally confined to questions of fitness to plead, responsibility and disposal after conviction. A distinction must be made between matters of clinical psychiatry and those of moral culpability or legal competence. When psychiatric evidence strays from purely clinical questions there is an increased likelihood of misuse and abuse. Even when considering clinical issues there are factors of a non-clinical nature which may distort the type of evidence given. The implications of these matters for psychiatric witnesses are discussed. It is suggested that forensic psychiatrists are refining their role as expert witnesses.

  13. Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Families Guide Skip breadcrumb navigation Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Quick Links Facts For Families Guide Facts For ... Families Guide - Search No. 52; Updated November 2012 Evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist is appropriate ...

  14. Psychiatric disorders and sleep issues.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Eliza L

    2014-09-01

    Sleep issues are common in people with psychiatric disorders, and the interaction is complex. Sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, can precede and predispose to psychiatric disorders, can be comorbid with and exacerbate psychiatric disorders, and can occur as part of psychiatric disorders. Sleep disorders can mimic psychiatric disorders or result from medication given for psychiatric disorders. Impairment of sleep and of mental health may be different manifestations of the same underlying neurobiological processes. For the primary care physician, key tools include recognition of potential sleep effects of psychiatric medications and familiarity with treatment approaches for insomnia in depression and anxiety.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection. PMID:8067276

  17. Following the Francis report: investigating patient experience of mental health in-patient care

    PubMed Central

    Csipke, E.; Williams, P.; Rose, D.; Koeser, L.; McCrone, P.; Wykes, T.; Craig, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Francis report highlights perceptions of care that are affected by different factors including ward structures. Aims To assess patient and staff perceptions of psychiatric in-patient wards over time. Method Patient and staff perceptions of in-patient psychiatric wards were assessed over 18 months. We also investigated whether the type of ward or service structure affected these perceptions. We included triage and routine care. The goal was to include at least 50% of eligible patients and staff. Results The most dramatic change was a significant deterioration in all experiences over the courseof the study. Systems of care or specific wards did not affect patient experience but staff were more dissatisfied in the triage system. Conclusions This is the first report of deterioration in perceptions of the therapeutic in-patient environment that has been captured in a rigorous way. It may reflect contemporaneous experiences across the National Health Service of budget reductions and increased throughput. The ward systems we investigated did not improve patient experience and triage may have been detrimental to staff. PMID:26989098

  18. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility,......

  19. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility,......

  20. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility,......

  1. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility,......

  2. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility,......

  3. An Inpatient Child Passenger Safety program.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Lindsey Nichole; DiGirolamo, Barbara; McMahon, Maria; Damian, Frances; Brostoff, Marcie; Shermont, Herminia; Mooney, David Patrick; Lee, Lois Kaye

    2013-11-01

    Background. Our institution implemented an Inpatient Child Passenger Safety (CPS) program for hospitalized children to improve knowledge and compliance with the Massachusetts CPS law, requiring children less than 8 years old or 57 inches tall to be secured in a car seat when in a motor vehicle. Methods. After the Inpatient CPS Program was piloted on 3 units in 2009, the program was expanded to all inpatient units in 2010. A computerized nursing assessment tool identifies children in need of a CPS consult for education and/or car seat. Results. With the expanded Inpatient CPS Program, 3650 children have been assessed, 598 consults initiated, and 325 families have received CPS education. Car seats were distributed to 419 children; specialty car seats were loaned to 134 families. Conclusions. With a multidisciplinary approach, we implemented an Inpatient CPS Program for hospitalized children providing CPS education and car seats to families in need. PMID:24137036

  4. The importance of relationships in mental health care: A qualitative study of service users' experiences of psychiatric hospital admission in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Gilburt, Helen; Rose, Diana; Slade, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Background While a number of studies have looked at life on service users' experiences of life on psychiatric wards, no research exists that have approached these experiences from the user perspective since the introduction of community care. Methods This user-led study uses a participatory approach to develop an understanding of the processes and themes which define the user experience of hospitalisation. Nineteen service users who had all had inpatient stays in psychiatric hospitals in London were interviewed in the community. Results Relationships formed the core of service users' experiences. Three further codes, treatment, freedom and environment defined the role of hospital and its physical aspects. Themes of communication, safety, trust, coercion, and cultural competency contributed to the concept of relationships. Conclusion Relationships with an individual which comprised effective communication, cultural sensitivity, and the absence of coercion resulted in that person being attributed with a sense of trust. This resulted in the patient experiencing the hospital as a place of safety in terms of risk from other patients and staff. Barriers to positive relationships included ineffective and negative communication, a lack of trust, a lack of safety in terms of staff as ineffective in preventing violence, and as perpetrators themselves, and the use of coercion by staff. This unique perspective both acts as a source of triangulation with previous studies and highlights the importance of the therapeutic relationship in providing a safe and therapeutic milieu for the treatment of people with acute mental health problems. PMID:18439254

  5. The prevalence and psychosocial correlates of suicide attempts among inpatient adolescent offspring of Croatian PTSD male war veterans.

    PubMed

    Boričević Maršanić, Vlatka; Margetić, Branka Aukst; Zečević, Iva; Herceg, Miroslav

    2014-10-01

    Despite evidence that children of male war veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at particularly high risk for behavior problems, very little is currently known about suicidal behaviors in this population of youth. This study aimed to examine the prevalence and psychosocial correlates of suicide attempts among psychiatrically hospitalized adolescent offspring of Croatian male PTSD veterans. Participants were psychiatric inpatients, ages 12-18 years. Self-report questionnaires assessed demographics, suicide attempts, psychopathology, parenting style, and family functioning. The prevalence of suicide attempts was 61.5% (65.2% for girls and 58.0% for boys). Internalizing symptoms, family dysfunction, lower levels of maternal and paternal care, and paternal overcontrol were significantly associated with suicide attempts. Our findings suggest that suicide attempts are common among inpatient adolescent offspring of male PTSD veterans and that interventions targeting both adolescent psychopathology and family relationships are needed for adolescents who have attempted suicide.

  6. 42 CFR 412.424 - Methodology for calculating the Federal per diem payment amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....65 of this chapter. (B) Where the inpatient psychiatric facility is part of an acute care hospital... an individual patient is discharged to the inpatient psychiatric facility from that acute care... specified by CMS to account for the cost of each day of inpatient psychiatric care relative to the cost...

  7. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition Short Form for Index and IQ Scores in a Psychiatric Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Bruce K.; Girard, Todd A.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2007-01-01

    An eight-subtest short form (SF8) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition (WAIS-III), maintaining equal representation of each index factor, was developed for use with psychiatric populations. Data were collected from a mixed inpatient/outpatient sample (99 men and 101 women) referred for neuropsychological assessment. Psychometric…

  8. Behaviour Management Problems as Predictors of Psychotropic Medication and Use of Psychiatric Services in Adults with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsakanikos, Elias; Costello, Helen; Holt, Geraldine; Sturmey, Peter; Bouras, Nick

    2007-01-01

    We examined behaviour management problems as predictors of psychotropic medication, use of psychiatric consultation and in-patient admission in a group of 66 adults with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) and intellectual disability (ID) and 99 controls matched in age, gender and level of ID. Overall, people with PDD had higher rates of most…

  9. Reasons for premature termination of dialectical behavior therapy for inpatients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Christoph; Roepke, Stefan; Röepke, Stefan; Kliem, Sören

    2014-09-01

    Although one of the main aims of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is to increase the retention rates, premature termination rates for DBT inpatient programs were found to be over 30%. The aim of the study was to identify the reasons for, and to analyze, patient characteristics that are associated with premature termination. We studied 541 inpatients with BPD, who were consecutively admitted for an open-door 3-month DBT inpatient treatment in Berlin, Germany. All participants completed several self-rating measures and participated in clinical interviews. Fourteen percent, who did not complete the full 84 days of assigned treatment, were expelled, mainly due to treatment-disturbing behaviors, or substance abuse or possession. Nearly 19% dropped out of treatment, mostly due to lack of motivation, arguments with others, and poor tolerance of emotional distress. Using non-parametric conditional inference trees, expulsion was associated with anorexia nervosa and alcohol abuse, whereas more than 9 suicide attempts, antisocial personality disorders, and more than 86 weeks in a psychiatric hospital were risk factors for dropout. We discussed measures and interventions that might lead to an adaptation of DBT inpatient programs. Future research should examine the symptom course and utilization of health-care services of non-completers. PMID:25058040

  10. Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality in an Inpatient Setting: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Thomas E.; Green, Kelly L.; Allen, Jon G.; Jobes, David A.; Nadorff, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Patients hospitalized for psychiatric reasons exhibit significantly elevated risk of suicide, yet the research literature contains very few outcome studies of interventions designed for suicidal inpatients. This pilot study examined the inpatient feasibility and effectiveness of The Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS), a structured evidence-based method for risk assessment and treatment planning (Jobes, 2006). The study used an open-trial, case-focused design to assess an inpatient adaptation of CAMS, spread over a period averaging 51 days. The intervention was provided via individual therapy to a convenience sample of 20 patients (16 females and four males, average age 36.9) who were hospitalized with recent histories of suicidal ideation and behavior. Results showed statistically and clinically significant reductions in depression, hopelessness, suicide cognitions, and suicidal ideation, as well as improvement on factors considered “drivers” of suicidality. Treatment effect sizes were in the large range (Cohen’s d > .80) across several outcome measures, including suicidal ideation. Although these findings must be considered preliminary due to the lack of a randomized control group, they merit attention from clinicians working with patients at risk for suicide. This study also supports the feasibility of implementing a structured, suicide-specific intervention for at-risk patients in inpatient settings. PMID:22369081

  11. Physician Prescribing Practices of Vitamin D in a Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Trigoboff, Eileen; Opler, Lewis; Demler, Tammie Lee

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D supplementation has become an increasingly popular prescribing practice, despite our limited knowledge of both the definition and degree of deficiency as well as the expected benefits or risks of exogenous administration. Many of the hypothesized benefits of vitamin D supplementation include a variety of improvements in mental health; however, these claims are not consistently or robustly supported by current research. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of what is currently known about vitamin D deficiency and about outcomes of supplementation as well as a summary of the data relative to prescribing practices for inpatients in an urban psychiatric hospital. PMID:27803841

  12. [Dichotomy of psychiatric and somatic emergency care; fundamental flaw should be addressed].

    PubMed

    Tuerlings, Joep H A M; Pelger, E C M Noor; de Pont, Boudewijn J H B; van Waarde, Jeroen A

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands, acute psychiatric care is characterised by mind-body dualism. For acute psychiatric patients, the first port of call is the general practitioner (GP); after-hour care is provided by the out-of-hours GP service. In contrast to patients with other medical illnesses, the out-of-hours GP service does not usually refer patients with acute psychiatric issues to the accident and emergency (A&E) department of the general hospital, but to the local ambulant psychiatric 'crisis' service. However, some of these patients still end up at the A&E department, as our three cases demonstrate. Integration of the out-of-hours GP service, A&E and acute psychiatric care, therefore, would enable elimination of the current partitioning of somatic and psychiatric medicine in acute emergency care. This solution would not only improve acute emergency care, but would also ensure a targeted and efficient implementation of services and might even lead to a decreased stigmatisation of psychiatric patients in general. PMID:26230348

  13. Travel distance and the use of inpatient care among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuan-Chiao; Hemenway, David; Kawachi, Ichiro; Subramanian, S V; Chen, Wei J

    2008-09-01

    This study examines the variations in the use of inpatient care that can be explained by travel distance among patients with schizophrenia living in Taiwan. Data were drawn from the Psychiatric Inpatient Medical Claims Database. We used mediation analysis and multilevel analysis to identify associations. Travel distance did not significantly account for lower readmission rates after an index admission, but significantly explained the longer length of stay of an index admission by 9.3 days (P<0.001, 85% of variation) between remote and non-remote regions. Policies are discussed aimed at reducing the impact of travel distance on rural mental health care through inter-disciplinary collaboration and telepsychiatry. PMID:18512144

  14. [Treatment satisfaction of patients with borderline personality disorder in inpatient schema therapy].

    PubMed

    Reiss, Neele; Vogel, Friederike; Nill, Marco; Graf-Morgenstern, Mechthild; Finkelmeier, Britta; Lieb, Klaus

    2013-02-01

    Patients with severe and chronic psychiatric disorders, such as Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), are hospitalized frequently, but we often find a high ambivalence regarding treatment in this group of patients. 31 patients with severe BPD participated in an inpatient Schema Therapy (ST) treatment program and evaluated both the intensive ST treatment program and group therapy elements regarding their treatment -satisfaction. A high global treatment satisfaction with the ST treatment program was demonstrated and we found a higher treatment satisfaction in patients with than without BPD specific symptom reductions. Remarkable differences in treatment satisfaction showed when looking at the evaluation of group therapies. The results of the present study demonstrate treatment satisfaction of BPD patients in inpatient ST and give directions for the future development of these programs.

  15. Substance use disorders and comorbid Axis I and II psychiatric disorders among young psychiatric patients: findings from a large electronic health records database.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Gersing, Ken; Burchett, Bruce; Woody, George E; Blazer, Dan G

    2011-11-01

    This study examined the prevalence of substance use disorders (SUDs) among psychiatric patients aged 2-17 years in an electronic health records database (N=11,457) and determined patterns of comorbid diagnoses among patients with a SUD to inform emerging comparative effectiveness research (CER) efforts. DSM-IV diagnoses of all inpatients and outpatients at a large university-based hospital and its associated psychiatric clinics were systematically captured between 2000 and 2010: SUD, anxiety (AD), mood (MD), conduct (CD), attention deficit/hyperactivity (ADHD), personality (PD), adjustment, eating, impulse-control, psychotic, learning, mental retardation, and relational disorders. The prevalence of SUD in the 2-12-year age group (n=6210) was 1.6% and increased to 25% in the 13-17-year age group (n=5247). Cannabis diagnosis was the most prevalent SUD, accounting for more than 80% of all SUD cases. Among patients with a SUD (n=1423), children aged 2-12 years (95%) and females (75-100%) showed high rates of comorbidities; blacks were more likely than whites to be diagnosed with CD, impulse-control, and psychotic diagnoses, while whites had elevated odds of having AD, ADHD, MD, PD, relational, and eating diagnoses. Patients with a SUD used more inpatient treatment than patients without a SUD (43% vs. 21%); children, females, and blacks had elevated odds of inpatient psychiatric treatment. Collectively, results add clinical evidence on treatment needs and diagnostic patterns for understudied diagnoses.

  16. Predicting Institutionalization after Traumatic Brain Injury Inpatient Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Seel, Ronald T.; Goldstein, Richard; Brown, Allen W.; Watanabe, Thomas K.; Zasler, Nathan D.; Roth, Elliot J.; Zafonte, Ross D.; Glenn, Mel B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Risk factors contributing to institutionalization after inpatient rehabilitation for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not been well studied and need to be better understood to guide clinicians during rehabilitation. We aimed to develop a prognostic model that could be used at admission to inpatient rehabilitation facilities to predict discharge disposition. The model could be used to provide the interdisciplinary team with information regarding aspects of patients' functioning and/or their living situation that need particular attention during inpatient rehabilitation if institutionalization is to be avoided. The study population included 7219 patients with moderate-severe TBI in the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) National Database enrolled from 2002–2012 who had not been institutionalized prior to injury. Based on institutionalization predictors in other populations, we hypothesized that among people who had lived at a private residence prior to injury, greater dependence in locomotion, bed-chair-wheelchair transfers, bladder and bowel continence, feeding, and comprehension at admission to inpatient rehabilitation programs would predict institutionalization at discharge. Logistic regression was used, with adjustment for demographic factors, proxy measures for TBI severity, and acute-care length-of-stay. C-statistic and predictiveness curves validated a five-variable model. Higher levels of independence in bladder management (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.88; 95% CI 0.83, 0.93), bed-chair-wheelchair transfers (OR, 0.81 [95% CI, 0.83–0.93]), and comprehension (OR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.68, 0.89]) at admission were associated with lower risks of institutionalization on discharge. For every 10-year increment in age was associated with a 1.38 times higher risk for institutionalization (95% CI, 1.29, 1.48) and living alone was associated with a 2.34 times higher risk (95% CI, 1.86, 2.94). The c-statistic was 0.780. We conclude that this

  17. Predicting institutionalization after traumatic brain injury inpatient rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Eum, Regina S; Seel, Ronald T; Goldstein, Richard; Brown, Allen W; Watanabe, Thomas K; Zasler, Nathan D; Roth, Elliot J; Zafonte, Ross D; Glenn, Mel B

    2015-02-15

    Risk factors contributing to institutionalization after inpatient rehabilitation for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not been well studied and need to be better understood to guide clinicians during rehabilitation. We aimed to develop a prognostic model that could be used at admission to inpatient rehabilitation facilities to predict discharge disposition. The model could be used to provide the interdisciplinary team with information regarding aspects of patients' functioning and/or their living situation that need particular attention during inpatient rehabilitation if institutionalization is to be avoided. The study population included 7219 patients with moderate-severe TBI in the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) National Database enrolled from 2002-2012 who had not been institutionalized prior to injury. Based on institutionalization predictors in other populations, we hypothesized that among people who had lived at a private residence prior to injury, greater dependence in locomotion, bed-chair-wheelchair transfers, bladder and bowel continence, feeding, and comprehension at admission to inpatient rehabilitation programs would predict institutionalization at discharge. Logistic regression was used, with adjustment for demographic factors, proxy measures for TBI severity, and acute-care length-of-stay. C-statistic and predictiveness curves validated a five-variable model. Higher levels of independence in bladder management (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.88; 95% CI 0.83, 0.93), bed-chair-wheelchair transfers (OR, 0.81 [95% CI, 0.83-0.93]), and comprehension (OR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.68, 0.89]) at admission were associated with lower risks of institutionalization on discharge. For every 10-year increment in age was associated with a 1.38 times higher risk for institutionalization (95% CI, 1.29, 1.48) and living alone was associated with a 2.34 times higher risk (95% CI, 1.86, 2.94). The c-statistic was 0.780. We conclude that this simple model

  18. Patient-centered, recovery-oriented psychiatric care and treatment are not always voluntary.

    PubMed

    Geller, Jeffrey L

    2012-01-01

    Explicitly coercive measures are sometimes necessary in the care and treatment of psychiatric patients. The author describes how use of such measures is not antithetical to patient-centered, recovery-oriented practice either in inpatient or outpatient settings. Citing a definition widely used by advocates to describe the overarching goal of recovery--"a full, meaningful, and self-determined life in the community … regardless of psychiatric status"--the author draws parallels between coercive measures taken by society to prevent and treat citizens' dangerous behaviors, such as speeding and public inebriation, and coercive interventions to address dangerous behaviors of psychiatric patients, such as harm to self or others. Society applies coercive interventions to address dangerous behaviors, not psychiatric status.

  19. [Collaboration of the general practitioner and the psychiatrist with the psychiatric hospital. A literature review].

    PubMed

    Spiessl, H; Cording, C

    2000-05-01

    Co-operation of physicians in private practice with psychiatric hospitals was investigated in Germany scarcely until now, although evaluation of consumer satisfaction is of great importance to quality assurance in psychiatry. In this paper, findings from previous studies are presented together with data from interviews with general practitioners and psychiatrists, evaluating their expectations regarding psychiatric hospitals. Substantial problem area in collaboration is referral to the psychiatric hospital. Apart from sociodemographic and disease-related variables, referral practice depends on referring physician's attitudes and competence in psychiatry, and provider influences like delay of admission, communication with referring physician, and competence of the hospital. As conclusion, constructive collaboration must be developed at the interface of outpatient and inpatient care. On account of increasing diversification of psychiatric services, functional network should be an ongoing goal to improve treatment continuity of patients with mental disorders. PMID:10858945

  20. Psychiatric Boarding in Washington State and the Inadequacy of Mental Health Resources.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Joseph D

    2015-06-01

    Psychiatric boarding is a term derived from emergency medicine that describes the holding of patients deemed in need of hospitalization in emergency departments for extended periods because psychiatric beds are not available. Such boarding has occurred for many years in the shadows of mental health care as both inpatient beds and community services have decreased. This article focuses on a 2014 Washington State Supreme Court decision that examined the interpretation of certain sections of the Washington state civil commitment statute that had been used to justify the extended boarding of detained psychiatric patients in general hospital emergency departments. The impact of this decision on the state of Washington should be significant and could spark a national debate about the negative impacts of psychiatric boarding on patients and on the nation's general hospital emergency services.

  1. Antipsychotic Medications and Risk of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Schizophrenia: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Yang, Shu-Yu; Liao, Ya-Tang; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the risk of developing acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization in association with the use of certain antipsychotic medications in schizophrenia patients. Methods A nationwide cohort of 31,177 inpatients with schizophrenia between the ages of 18 and 65 years whose records were enrolled in the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan from 2000 to 2008 and were studied after encrypting the identifications. Cases (n = 147) were patients with subsequent acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization after their first psychiatric admission. Based on a nested case-control design, each case was matched with 20 controls for age, sex and the year of first psychiatric admission using risk-set sampling. The effects of antipsychotic agents on the development of acute coronary syndrome were assessed using multiple conditional logistic regression and sensitivity analyses to confirm any association. Results We found that current use of aripiprazole (adjusted risk ratio [RR] = 3.68, 95% CI: 1.27–10.64, p<0.05) and chlorpromazine (adjusted RR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.40–6.24, p<0.001) were associated with a dose-dependent increase in the risk of developing acute coronary syndrome. Although haloperidol was associated with an increased risk (adjusted RR = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.20–3.44, p<0.01), there was no clear dose-dependent relationship. These three antipsychotic agents were also associated with an increased risk in the first 30 days of use, and the risk decreased as the duration of therapy increased. Sensitivity analyses using propensity score-adjusted modeling showed that the results were similar to those of multiple regression analysis. Conclusions Patients with schizophrenia who received aripiprazole, chlorpromazine, or haloperidol could have a potentially elevated risk of developing acute coronary syndrome, particularly at the start of therapy. PMID:27657540

  2. A Novel Mental Health Crisis Service – Outcomes of Inpatient Data

    PubMed Central

    McGlennon, D; McDonnell, C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Northern Ireland has high mental health needs and a rising suicide rate. Our area has suffered a 32% reduction of inpatient beds consistent with the national drive towards community based treatment. Taking these factors into account, a new Mental Health Crisis Service was developed incorporating a high fidelity Crisis Response Home Treatment Team (CRHTT), Acute Day Care facility and two inpatient wards. The aim was to provide alternatives to inpatient admission. The new service would facilitate transition between inpatient and community care while decreasing bed occupancy and increasing treatment in the community. Methods All services and processes were reviewed to assess deficiencies in current care. There was extensive consultation with internal and external stakeholders and process mapping using the COBRAs framework as a basis for the service improvement model. The project team set the service criteria and reviewed progress. Results In the original service model, the average inpatient occupancy rate was 106.6%, admission rate was 48 patients per month and total length of stay was 23.4 days. After introducing the inpatient consultant hospital model, the average occupancy rate decreased to 90%, admissions to 43 per month and total length of stay to 22 days. The results further decreased to 83% occupancy, 32 admissions per month and total length of stay 12 days after CRHTT initiation. Discussion The Crisis Service is still being evaluated but currently the model has provided safe alternatives to inpatient care. Involvement with patients, carers and all multidisciplinary teams is maximised to improve the quality and safety of care. Innovative ideas including structured weekly timetable and regular interface meetings have improved communication and allowed additional time for patient care. PMID:27158159

  3. Effective inpatient medication reconciliation: The 10 commandments.

    PubMed

    Siu, Henry K

    2015-01-01

    Medication Reconciliation (MedRec) is the comprehensive process of medication verification, clarification and documentation in an effort to avoid medication errors. There are many reasons that contribute to the inadequacies of current day inpatient MedRec. Among these include the limited medical literacy of patients, communication between providers and teams of providers, and the intrinsic difficulties of medical charting. Although the best approach to inpatient MedRec is not known, the following outlines the 10 most important aspects, or "Commandments", for effective inpatient MedRec. The tenets are not listed in any particular order of importance. PMID:25758318

  4. Pharmacogenomics in Psychiatric Practice.

    PubMed

    El-Mallakh, Rif S; Roberts, R Jeannie; El-Mallakh, Peggy L; Findlay, Lillian Jan; Reynolds, Kristen K

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacogenomic testing in psychiatry is becoming an established clinical procedure. Several vendors provide clinical interpretation of combinatorial pharmacogenomic testing of gene variants that have documented predictive implications regarding either pharmacologic response or adverse effects in depression and other psychiatric conditions. Such gene profiles have demonstrated improvements in outcome in depression, and reduction of cost of care of patients with inadequate clinical response. Additionally, several new gene variants are being studied to predict specific response in individuals. Many of these genes have demonstrated a role in the pathophysiology of depression or specific depressive symptoms. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art application of psychiatric pharmacogenomics. PMID:27514465

  5. Postoperative hospital course of patients with history of severe psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; McCartney, J R; Saravay, S M; Katz, E

    1987-09-01

    The postoperative hospital course of 54 patients with a past history of psychiatric illness was studied through chart review. Both chronic schizophrenics and chronic depressives tolerated surgical procedures well, without any unusual difficulties or exacerbation of psychiatric illness. They represented no management problems. Patients with acute, severe upset in the preoperative period (regardless of diagnosis) presented most of the management problems postoperatively. PMID:3678811

  6. Measuring quality of care in psychiatric emergencies: construction and evaluation of a Bayesian index.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D H; Sainfort, F; Johnson, S W; Sateia, M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study was conducted to determine whether an index for measuring quality of care for psychiatric emergencies is reliable and valid. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. The study used primary data collected over a 12-month period from two urban hospitals in the Northeast. One had 700 inpatient beds, an inpatient psychiatric unit, and community mental health personnel located in the emergency department. The other had 300 beds but none of the other hospital's features. STUDY DESIGN. The index was developed by a panel of experts in emergency psychiatry using a subjective Bayesian statistical methodology and was evaluated in terms of its ability to: (1) predict a second panel's judgments of quality; (2) predict a specific quality-related patient outcome, i.e., compliance with follow-up recommendations; (3) provide a reliable measurement procedure; and (4) detect variations in patterns of emergency department practices. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Data were collected on 2,231 randomly selected emergency psychiatric patients (psychiatric diagnosis, alcohol abuse, nonverbal patients experiencing a psychiatric emergency, and patients with somatic complaints such as life crisis) treated in the emergency departments of the two hospitals. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The index predicted physician judgments of quality, was reliable, exhibited sufficient variation in scores, and was strongly associated with patient compliance. CONCLUSIONS. The study demonstrated that a subjective Bayesian model can be used to develop a reliable and valid index for measuring quality of care, with potential for practical application in management of health services. PMID:8514497

  7. Psychiatric comorbidity and mortality among veterans hospitalized for congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Banta, Jim E; Andersen, Ronald M; Young, Alexander S; Kominski, Gerald; Cunningham, William E

    2010-10-01

    A Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization approach was used to examine the impact of comorbid mental illness on mortality of veterans admitted to Veterans Affairs medical centers in fiscal year 2001 with a primary diagnosis of congestive heart failure (n = 15,497). Thirty percent had a psychiatric diagnosis, 4.7% died during the index hospitalization, and 11.5% died during the year following discharge. Among those with mental illness, 23.6% had multiple psychiatric disorders. Multivariable logistic regression models found dementia to be positively associated with inpatient mortality. Depression alone (excluding other psychiatric disorders) was positively associated with one-year mortality. Primary care visits were associated with a reduced likelihood of both inpatient and one-year mortality. Excepting dementia, VA patients with a mental illness had comparable or higher levels of primary care visits than those having no mental illness. Patients with multiple psychiatric disorders had more outpatient care than those with one psychiatric disorder. PMID:20968262

  8. Psychiatric assessment of aggressive patients: a violent attack on a resident.

    PubMed

    Antonius, Daniel; Fuchs, Lara; Herbert, Farah; Kwon, Joe; Fried, Joanna L; Burton, Paul R S; Straka, Tara; Levin, Ze'ev; Caligor, Eve; Malaspina, Dolores

    2010-03-01

    Aggressive patients often target psychiatrists and psychiatric residents, yet most clinicians are insufficiently trained in violence risk assessment and management. Consequently, many clinicians are reluctant to diagnose and treat aggressive and assaultive features in psychiatric patients and instead focus attention on other axis I mental disorders with proven pharmacological treatment in the hope that this approach will reduce the aggressive behavior. Unclear or nonexistent reporting policies or feelings of self-blame may impede clinicians from reporting assaults, thus limiting our knowledge of the impact of, and best response to, aggression in psychiatric patients. The authors pre-sent the case of a young adult inpatient with a long history of antisocial and assaultive behavior who struck and injured a psychiatric resident. With this case in mind, the authors discuss the diagnostic complexities related to violent patients, the importance of assessing violence risk when initially evaluating a patient, and the relevance of risk assessment for treatment considerations and future management. This report illustrates common deficiencies in the prevention of violence on inpatient psychiatric units and in the reporting and response to an assault, and has implications for residency and clinician training.

  9. Predictors of perceived need for medical care in an inpatient rehabilitation unit: an update.

    PubMed

    Drag, Lauren L; Chen, Elvina W; Bieliauskas, Linas A

    2011-03-01

    Limited awareness of illness, or poor insight, has been associated with poor treatment outcomes and prognoses in both psychiatric and medical populations. We examined predictors of insight in a sample of 403 patients in an inpatient rehabilitation unit at a Midwest Veterans Affairs Medical Center. A multiple regression analysis revealed that age, depression, IQ, and a measure of judgment were significant predictors of acknowledgement of illness. Younger age, higher IQ, better judgment, and depression were associated with better insight. By identifying risk factors for poor insight, these findings have significant clinical implications for healthcare providers.

  10. Dexamethasone Suppression Test as a Predictor of Response to Electroconvulsive Therapy. I. Inpatient Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Ronald S.; Backup, Clifford; Bobrin, Yale; Delaplane, James M.; Doeff, Jan; Gittleman, Stanton; Joseph, Robert; Kanefield, Marvin

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-eight psychiatric inpatients who fulfilled DSM-III criteria for major depressive disorder with melancholia received weekly dexamethasone suppression tests (DSTs) while undergoing a clinical course of ECT. Blind ratings of clinical improvement were obtained weekly from patients on the Beck Depression Inventory and from physicians and nurses on the Hamilton Depression Scale. The 26 patients with abnormal DSTs and the 12 patients with normal DSTs demonstrated an equivalent rate of clinical remission (75 vs. 77%) as defined by a composite rating of the nurse, physician, and patient. Other individual rater analyses also confirmed the finding that initial DST status is not predictive of response to a course of ECT.

  11. Does Childbirth Cause Psychiatric Disorders? A Population-Based Study Paralleling a Natural Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Munk-Olsen, Trine; Agerbo, Esben

    2014-01-01

    Background: Childbirth is associated with increased risk of first-time psychiatric episodes, and an unwanted pregnancy has been suggested as a possible etiologic contributor. To what extent childbirth causes psychiatric episodes and whether a planned pregnancy reduces the risk of postpartum psychiatric episodes has not been established. Methods: We conducted a cohort study using data derived from Danish population registers, including all women having in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment and their partners with recorded information in the IVF register covering fertility treatments in Denmark at all public and private treatment sites from January 1994 to December 2005. We compared parents and childless persons to examine whether childbirth is directly associated with onset of first-time psychiatric episodes, with incidence rate ratios (risk of first psychiatric inpatient or outpatient treatment) as the main outcome measures. Results: The incidence rate for any type of psychiatric disorder 0-90 days postpartum was 11.3 per 1000 person-years (95% confidence interval = 8.2-15.0), and 3.8 (3.4-4.3) among women not giving birth. IVF-treated mothers had an increased risk of a psychiatric episode postpartum, incidence rate ratio = 2.9 (2.0-4.2) compared with the risk of psychiatric episodes in childless women. Risk of psychiatric episodes from 90 days postpartum and onwards was decreased (incidence rate ratio = 0.9 [0.7-1.0]). Conclusions: Using a study design paralleling a natural experiment, our results showed that childbirth is associated with first-time psychiatric disorders in new mothers, indicating that a planned pregnancy does not reduce risks of or prevent postpartum psychiatric episodes. PMID:25322321

  12. [The rights of psychiatric patients].

    PubMed

    Baudis, P

    1995-05-01

    The author gives a historical account of patient's rights and in particular the development of codes of rights of psychiatric patients during the past twenty years. He describes differences in attitudes to rights of psychiatric patients in different societies and the different emphasis on patient's rights, as compared with rights of society. Briefly the so far most elaborated account of rights of psychiatric patients submitted by the American Psychiatric Association is described.

  13. Pathological Gambling: Psychiatric Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Three psychiatric conceptual models: addictive, obsessive-compulsive spectrum and mood spectrum disorder have been proposed for pathological gambling. The objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate the evidence base from the most recent reviews of each model, (2) update the evidence through 2007 and (3) summarize the status of the evidence for…

  14. Teaching psychiatric ethics.

    PubMed

    Bloch, S

    1988-11-01

    In the last decade, we have witnessed a burgeoning of interest in ethical issues amongst psychiatrists. Teaching of the subject, however, remains at a rudimentary stage. Various approaches to such instruction are available, particularly modelling (students observe their experienced counterpart), the case method (examining specific clinical situations which involve a need for ethical decision-making), and the seminar approach (trainees are exposed to a core body of knowledge, mainly theoretical in nature). Faced with these different teaching models, the University of Oxford Department of Psychiatry has opted for a blend of all three approaches, which incorporates two goals: an increase in the trainees' sensitivity to the many intricate moral dilemmas facing the psychiatric profession; and their familiarity with salient concepts in moral philosophy which constitute a basis for ethical reasoning and which have a bearing on clinical practice. The teaching programme comprises the following: a pair of trainees prepares a presentation on an aspect of psychiatric ethics under the supervision of a senior psychiatrist. A moral philosopher assumes the role of discussant of the ethical problems raised by the trainees; this is followed by a general discussion. Topics have included involuntary hospitalization, dual loyalty, suicide, psychiatric diagnosis, and ethical issues in various spheres of psychiatric practice such as sex therapy, psychotherapy and child psychiatry. The approach has worked effectively and proved rewarding to all participants involved. PMID:3226351

  15. Psychiatric Morbidity Following Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, B.N.; Swain, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    A Case of cerebral neurocysticercosis reported with manic episode on first presentation which was confirmed after CT scan of Brain. Psychiatric manifestation showed a gradual decline following treatment with medication. Normal social and occupational functioning was ensured by prolonged treatment with Mood Stabilizer. PMID:21224909

  16. Can mental healthcare nurses improve sleep quality for inpatients?

    PubMed

    de Niet, Gerrit; Tiemens, Bea; Hutschemaekers, Giel

    This article describes a pilot study that was carried out to in order to gain an indication as to whether mental healthcare nurses can apply evidence-based interventions for sleep problems effectively in inpatient mental health care. The study had a pre-test/post-test design and a comparison group was used. The study was performed on three psychiatric admission wards, located in three different towns in one province of The Netherlands. The participants were inpatients (18-60 years old) admitted owing to severe mental health problems like psychotic, mood or anxiety disorders. Of the newly admitted patients, 62.8% perceived having a sleep problem. Two brief, evidence-based interventions were introduced on two of the wards: the first with stimulus control (SC) as active component; the second with music-assisted relaxation (MAR). A third ward, with no interventions other than usual care, served as a point of comparison. Sleep quality was monitored using the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ). The change score means of the treatment groups were compared with the mean score of the comparison group by means of a t-test. Estimates of effect were calculated. The results of this study showed that MAR produced a statistically significant improvement of sleep quality and showed a large effect size. The total RCSQ score did not improve significantly. SC failed to produce statistically significant improvement of sleep quality, nor of the RCSQ total score. This pilot study provided a strong indication that mental health nurses can apply MAR effectively. No such indication was found for stimulus control. PMID:20871513

  17. Ethical issues in psychiatric research.

    PubMed

    Barry, Liliana Kalogjera

    2009-06-01

    The field of psychiatric research ethics has evolved in recent years. This evolution seems to stem from the efforts of various groups (eg, medical ethicists, regulatory bodies, and the profession's own association, the APA) and from increased understanding of the endeavor of psychiatric empirical research. Current data regarding mental illness highlight the need for the continued expansion of psychiatric research to help relieve the suffering of the many individuals whom mental illness affects. The ethics for psychiatric research should parallel this expansion of psychiatric research to ensure that studies sufficiently address ethical considerations and thus foster the proper, delicate balance between progress and protection (see Table 1).

  18. Dysphagia outcomes in patients with brain tumors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Wesling, Michele; Brady, Susan; Jensen, Mary; Nickell, Melissa; Statkus, Donna; Escobar, Nelson

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare functional dysphagia outcomes following inpatient rehabilitation for patients with brain tumors with that of patients following a stroke. Group 1 (n = 24) consisted of consecutive admissions to the brain injury program with the diagnosis of brain tumor and dysphagia. Group 2 (n = 24) consisted of matched, consecutive admissions, with the diagnosis of acute stroke and dysphagia. Group 2 was matched for age, site of lesion, and initial composite cognitive FIM score. The main outcome measures for this study included the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Outcome Measurement System (NOMS) swallowing scale, length of stay, hospital charges, and medical complications. Results showed that swallowing gains made by both groups as evaluated by the admission and discharge ASHA NOMS levels were considered to be statistically significant. The differences for length of stay, total hospital charges, and speech charges between the two groups were not considered to be statistically significant. Three patients in the brain tumor group (12.5%) demonstrated dysphagia complications of either dehydration or pneumonia during their treatment course as compared to 0% in the stroke group. This study confirms that functional dysphagia gains can be achieved for patients with brain tumors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation and that they should be afforded the same type and intensity of rehabilitation for their swallowing that is provided to patients following a stroke.

  19. The association between psychopathology and substance use: adolescent and young adult substance users in inpatient treatment in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Saban, Amina; Flisher, Alan; Laubscher, Ria; London, Leslie; Morojele, Neo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Evidence suggests that comorbid psychopathology can negatively affect treatment outcomes in substance users. In South Africa, limited information exists regarding the prevalence, nature and role of psychiatric comorbidity in substance users. This study examined psychiatric comorbidity and its association with specific substance use, and young adult substance users in treatment for substance use. Methods Male and female inpatient substance users (n=95; ages 17-30 years) were sampled consecutively in order of admission from three clinics in Cape Town. An interview schedule was administered to elicit patients’ sociodemographic and substance use history details. The computer-assisted Diagnostic Interview Schedule DSM IV (C-DIS IV) was administered to screen patients for current psychiatric disorders. Resuls The sample was largely male, Coloured, Muslim and single. Cannabis (51.6%) and crystal methamphetamine (17.9%) were the most common first substances of use. Heroin (53.7%) and crystal methamphetamine (33.7%) were the most common substances for which treatment was sought (primary substances). The most common comorbid psychopathologies were anti-social personality disorder (ASPD 87.4%) and conduct disorder (CD 67.4%). Regression analyses showed a marginally significant association between specific phobia and first use of cannabis, but indicated no statistically significant associations between psychopathology and substance use. Conclusion The results demonstrated a high proportion of previously unidentified comorbid psychopathology in inpatient substance users. Further research is needed to investigate psychiatric comorbidity in inpatient substance users. PMID:24643118

  20. Psychiatric adverse effects of pediatric corticosteroid use.

    PubMed

    Drozdowicz, Linda B; Bostwick, J Michael

    2014-06-01

    Corticosteroids, highly effective drugs for myriad disease states, have considerable neuropsychiatric adverse effects that can manifest in cognitive disorders, behavioral changes, and frank psychiatric disease. Recent reviews have summarized these effects in adults, but a comprehensive review on corticosteroid effects in children has not been published since 2005. Here, we systematically review articles published since then that, we find, naturally divide into 3 main areas: (1) chronic effects of acute prenatal and neonatal exposure associated with prematurity and congenital conditions; (2) immediate behavioral effects of acute exposure via oncological protocols; and (3) acute behavioral effects of sporadic use in children and adolescents with other conditions. PsycInfo, MEDLINE, Embase, and Scopus were queried to identify articles reporting psychiatric adverse effects of corticosteroids in pediatric patients. Search terms included corticosteroids, adrenal cortex hormones, steroid psychosis, substance-induced psychoses, glucocorticoids, dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, prednisone, adverse effects, mood disorders, mental disorders, psychosis, psychotic, psychoses, side effect, chemically induced, emotions, affective symptoms, toxicity, behavior, behavioral symptoms, infant, child, adolescent, pediatric, paediatric, neonatal, children, teen, and teenager. Following guidelines for systematic reviews from the Potsdam Consultation on Meta-Analysis, we have found it difficult to draw specific conclusions that are more than general impressions owing to the quality of the available studies. We find a mixed picture with neonates exposed to dexamethasone, with some articles reporting eventual deficits in neuropsychiatric functioning and others reporting no effect. In pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, corticosteroid use appears to correlate with negative psychiatric and behavioral effects. In children treated with corticosteroids for noncancer conditions