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Sample records for acute inpatient psychiatric

  1. Dissociative disorders in acute psychiatric inpatients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chui-De; Meg Tseng, Mei-Chih; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Ross, Colin A

    2017-04-01

    Dissociative disorders have been documented to be common psychiatric disorders which can be detected reliably with standardized diagnostic instruments in North American and European psychiatric inpatients and outpatients (20.6% and 18.4%, respectively). However, there are concerns about their cross-cultural manifestations as an apparently low prevalence rate has been reported in East Asian inpatients and outpatients (1.7% and 4.9%, respectively). It is unknown whether the clinical profile of dissociative disorders in terms of their core symptomatic clusters, associated comorbid disorders, and environmental risk factors that has emerged in western clinical populations can also be found in non-western clinical populations. A standardized structured interview for DSM-IV dissociative disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, and a history of interpersonal victimization was administered in a sample of Taiwanese acute psychiatric inpatients. Our results showed that 19.5% of our participants met criteria for a DSM-IV dissociative disorder, mostly dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. More importantly, the western clinical profile of dissociative disorders also characterized our patients, including a poly-symptomatic presentation and a history of interpersonal trauma in both childhood and adulthood. Our results lend support to the conclusion that cross-cultural manifestations of dissociative pathology in East Asia are similar to those in North America and Europe.

  2. Switch Function and Pathological Dissociation in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chui-De; Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    Swift switching, along with atypical ability on updating and inhibition, has been found in non-clinical dissociators. However, whether swift switching is a cognitive endophenotype that intertwines with traumatisation and pathological dissociation remains unknown. Unspecified acute psychiatric patients were recruited to verify a hypothesis that pathological dissociation is associated with swift switching and traumatisation may explain this relationship. Behavioural measures of intellectual function and three executive functions including updating, switching and inhibition were administered, together with standardised scales to evaluate pathological dissociation and traumatisation. Our results showed superior control ability on switching and updating in inpatients who displayed more symptoms of pathological dissociation. When all three executive functions were entered as predictors, in addition to intellectual quotient and demographic variables to regress upon pathological dissociation, switching rather than updating remained the significant predictor. Importantly, the relationship between pathological dissociation and switching became non-significant when the effect of childhood trauma were controlled. The results support a trauma-related switching hypothesis which postulates swift switching as a cognitive endophenotype of pathological dissociation; traumatisation in childhood may explain the importance of swift switching. PMID:27123578

  3. A Systematic Review of Music Therapy Practice and Outcomes with Acute Adult Psychiatric In-Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. Review Methods A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. Results 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. Conclusions No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to

  4. Multimodal examination of distress tolerance and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in acute-care psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Vujanovic, Anka A; Dutcher, Christina D; Berenz, Erin C

    2016-09-01

    Distress tolerance (DT), the actual or perceived capacity to withstand negative internal states, has received increasing scholarly attention due to its theoretical and clinical relevance to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Past studies have indicated that lower self-reported - but not behaviorally observed - DT is associated with greater PTSD symptoms; however, studies in racially and socioeconomically diverse clinical samples are lacking. The current study evaluated associations between multiple measures of DT (self-report and behavioral) and PTSD symptoms in an urban, racially and socioeconomically diverse, acute-care psychiatric inpatient sample. It was hypothesized that lower self-reported DT (Distress Tolerance Scale [DTS]), but not behavioral DT (breath-holding task [BH]; mirror-tracing persistence task [MT]), would be associated with greater PTSD symptoms, above and beyond the variance contributed by trauma load, substance use, gender, race/ethnicity, and subjective social status. Participants were 103 (41.7% women, Mage=33.5) acute-care psychiatric inpatients who endorsed exposure to potentially traumatic events consistent with DSM-5 PTSD Criterion A. Results of hierarchical regression analyses indicated that DTS was negatively associated with PTSD symptom severity (PCL-5 Total) as well as with each of the four DSM-5 PTSD symptom clusters (p's<0.001), contributing between 5.0%-11.1% of unique variance in PTSD symptoms across models. BH duration was positively associated with PTSD arousal symptom severity (p<0.05). Covariates contributed between 21.3%-40.0% of significant variance to the models. Associations between DT and PTSD in this sample of acute-care psychiatric inpatients are largely consistent with those observed in community samples.

  5. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Violence by Psychiatric Acute Inpatients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iozzino, Laura; Ferrari, Clarissa; Large, Matthew; Nielssen, Olav; de Girolamo, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background Violence in acute psychiatric wards affects the safety of other patients and the effectiveness of treatment. However, there is a wide variation in reported rates of violence in acute psychiatric wards. Objectives To use meta-analysis to estimate the pooled rate of violence in published studies, and examine the characteristics of the participants, and aspects of the studies themselves that might explain the variation in the reported rates of violence (moderators). Method Systematic meta-analysis of studies published between January 1995 and December 2014, which reported rates of violence in acute psychiatric wards of general or psychiatric hospitals in high-income countries. Results Of the 23,972 inpatients described in 35 studies, the pooled proportion of patients who committed at least one act of violence was 17% (95% confidence interval (CI) 14–20%). Studies with higher proportions of male patients, involuntary patients, patients with schizophrenia and patients with alcohol use disorder reported higher rates of inpatient violence. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that almost 1 in 5 patients admitted to acute psychiatric units may commit an act of violence. Factors associated with levels of violence in psychiatric units are similar to factors that are associated with violence among individual patients (male gender, diagnosis of schizophrenia, substance use and lifetime history of violence). PMID:26061796

  6. Inpatient Suicide in a Chinese Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jie; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Hao, Yuantao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Guo, Yangbo; Su, Jinghua; Lu, Huixian

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the risk factors for suicide among psychiatric inpatients in China. In this study we identified the risk factors of suicide among psychiatric inpatients at Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital. All psychiatric inpatients who died by suicide during the 1956-2005 period were included in this study. Using a case-control design, 64…

  7. Regional Correlates of Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ala-Nikkola, Taina; Pirkola, Sami; Kaila, Minna; Saarni, Samuli I.; Joffe, Grigori; Kontio, Raija; Oranta, Olli; Sadeniemi, Minna; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Current reforms of mental health and substance abuse services (MHS) emphasize community-based care and the downsizing of psychiatric hospitals. Reductions in acute and semi-acute hospital beds are achieved through shortened stays or by avoiding hospitalization. Understanding the factors that drive the current inpatient treatment provision is essential. We investigated how the MHS service structure (diversity of services and balance of personnel resources) and indicators of service need (mental health index, education, single household, and alcohol sales) correlated with acute and semi-acute inpatient treatment provision. The European Service Mapping Schedule-Revised (ESMS-R) tool was used to classify the adult MHS structure in southern Finland (population 1.8 million, 18+ years). The diversity of MHS in terms of range of outpatient and day care services or the overall personnel resourcing in inpatient or outpatient services was not associated with the inpatient treatment provision. In the univariate analyses, sold alcohol was associated with the inpatient treatment provision, while in the multivariate modeling, only a general index for mental health needs was associated with greater hospitalization. In the dehospitalization process, direct resource re-allocation and substituting of inpatient treatment with outpatient care per se is likely insufficient, since inpatient treatment is linked to contextual factors in the population and the health care system. Mental health services reforms require both strategic planning of service system as a whole and detailed understanding of effects of societal components. PMID:27929403

  8. 'Shared-rhythm cooperation' in cooperative team meetings in acute psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Vuokila-Oikkonen, P; Janhonen, S; Vaisanen, L

    2004-04-01

    The cooperative team meeting is one of the most important interventions in psychiatric care. The purpose of this study was to describe the participation of patients and significant others in cooperative team meetings in terms of unspoken stories. The narrative approach focused on storytelling. The data consisted of videotaped cooperative team meetings (n = 11) in two acute closed psychiatric wards. The QRS NVivo computer program and the Holistic Content Reading method were used. During the process of analysis, the spoken and unspoken stories were analysed at the same time. According to the results, while there was some evident shared-rhythm cooperation (the topics of discussion were shared and the participants had eye contact), there were many instances where the interaction was controlled and defined by health care professionals. This lack of shared rhythm in cooperation, as defined in terms of storytelling, was manifested as monologue and the following practices: the health care professionals controlled the storytelling by sticking to their opinions, by giving the floor or by pointing with a finger and visually scanning the participants, by interrupting the speaker or by allowing the other experts to sit passively. Implications for mental health nursing practice are discussed.

  9. Shrinking inpatient psychiatric capacity: cause for celebration or concern?

    PubMed

    Salinsky, Eileen; Loftis, Christopher

    2007-08-01

    This issue brief examines reported capacity constraints in inpatient psychiatric services and describes how these services fit within the continuum of care for mental health treatment. The paper summarizes the type and range of acute care services used to intervene in mental health crises, including both traditional hospital-based services and alternative crisis interventions, such as mobile response teams. It reviews historical trends in the supply of inpatient psychiatric beds and explores the anticipated influence of prospective payment for inpatient psychiatric services under Medicare. The paper also considers other forces that may affect the need for and supply of acute mental health services, including key factors that could improve the quality and efficiency of inpatient psychiatric care.

  10. Prosecuting Assaultive Forensic and Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Kerri C.; Reddon, John R.; Chudleigh, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Inpatient assault of forensic and psychiatric staff is a complex and multifaceted issue. Hence, the consequences reported in the literature regarding prosecuting assaultive inpatients are quite variable. In this article, issues pertaining to the prosecution of violent inpatients are reviewed. Illustrative cases, challenges of prosecution,…

  11. Clinical Application of the "Scribble Technique" with Adults in an Acute Inpatient Psychiatric Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanes, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    The "scribble technique," described by Florence Cane's book, "The Artist in Each of Us" (1983), has historically been employed by art therapists as a technique to reduce inhibitions and liberate spontaneous imagery from the unconscious. Reviews the technique and presents examples produced by adult patients in an acute inpatient…

  12. A CBT Approach to Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Kim J.

    2005-01-01

    During a psychiatric hospitalization of 5 to 10 days, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) strategies can be used for the management of inpatients and to support the transition to outpatient treatment. This format was chosen after several years of frustration dealing with crisis inpatient care. The use of CBT is well known, and it seemed that an…

  13. Five-year review of absconding in three acute psychiatric inpatient wards in Australia.

    PubMed

    Gerace, Adam; Oster, Candice; Mosel, Krista; O'Kane, Deb; Ash, David; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2015-02-01

    Absconding, where patients under an involuntary mental health order leave hospital without permission, can result in patient harm and emotional and professional implications for nursing staff. However, Australian data to drive nursing interventions remain sparse. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate absconding in three acute care wards from January 2006 to June 2010, in order to determine absconding rates, compare patients who did and did not abscond, and to examine incidents. The absconding rate was 17.22 incidents per 100 involuntary admissions (12.09% of patients), with no significant change over time. Being male, young, diagnosed with a schizophrenia or substance-use disorder, and having a longer hospital stay were predictive of absconding. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients had higher odds of absconding than Caucasian Australians. Over 25% of absconding patients did so multiple times. Patients absconded early in admission. More incidents occurred earlier in the year, during summer and autumn, and later in the week, and few incidents occurred early in the morning. Almost 60% of incidents lasted ≤24 hours. Formulation of prospective interventions considering population demographic factors and person-specific concerns are required for evidence-based nursing management of the risks of absconding and effective incident handling when they do occur.

  14. Proactive and Reactive Aggression in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fite, Paula J.; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani

    2009-01-01

    This study examined relations between proactive and reactive aggression and indicators of antisocial behavior (callous/unemotional traits and behavioral consequences) and negative affect (depression and suicidal behavior) in a sample of 105 children admitted to an acute child psychiatric inpatient unit. The majority of the children were male (69%)…

  15. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  16. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  17. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  18. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  19. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  20. Observed-predicted length of stay for an acute psychiatric department, as an indicator of inpatient care inefficiencies. Retrospective case-series study.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Rosa E; Lam, Rosa M; Marot, Milagros; Delgado, Ariel

    2004-01-01

    Background Length of stay (LOS) is an important indicator of efficiency for inpatient care but it does not achieve an adequate performance if it is not adjusted for the case mix of the patients hospitalized during the period considered. After two similar studies for Internal Medicine and Surgery respectively, the aims of the present study were to search for Length of Stay (LOS) predictors in an acute psychiatric department and to assess the performance of the difference: observed-predicted length of stay, as an indicator of inpatient care inefficiencies. Methods Retrospective case-series of patients discharged during 1999 from the Psychiatric Department from General Hospital "Hermanos Ameijeiras" in Havana, Cuba. The 374 eligible medical records were randomly split into two groups of 187 each. We derived the function for estimating the predicted LOS within the first group. Possible predictors were: age; sex; place of residence; diagnosis, use of electroconvulsive therapy; co morbidities; symptoms at admission, medications, marital status, and response to treatment. LOS was the dependent variable. A thorough exam of the patients' records was the basis to assess the capacity of the function for detecting inefficiency problems, within the second group. Results The function explained 37% of LOS variation. The strongest influence on LOS came from: age (p = 0.002), response to treatment (p < 0.0001), the dummy for personality disorders (p = 0.01), ECT therapy (p = 0.003), factor for sexual and/or eating symptoms (p = 0.003) and factor for psychotic symptoms (p = 0.025). Mean observed LOS is 2 days higher than predicted for the group of records with inefficient care, whereas for the group with acceptable efficiency, observed mean LOS was 4 days lower than predicted. The area under the ROC curve for detecting inefficiencies was 69% Conclusions This study demonstrates the importance of possible predictors of LOS, in an acute care Psychiatric department. The proposed

  1. Ethnic and clinical characteristics of a Portuguese psychiatric inpatient population.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Joana; Ribeiro, Raquel; Cardoso, Graça

    2010-04-01

    The present study examined the association between ethnicity and clinical characteristics of patients admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit in Portugal. The only ethnicity-related terms routinely recorded in the medical records were "Black" (mainly from the African Portuguese-speaking countries of Cape Verde, Angola, Guinea, Sao Tome and Mozambique) and "White." Black immigrants appeared to be over-represented, comprising 19.6% of inpatients; and were younger and more frequently male when compared with White inpatients. They were more frequently diagnosed with schizophrenia and acute or transient psychosis, and less frequently diagnosed with delusional and personality disorders than White inpatients. These results are consistent with previous studies in the US and UK, and highlight the need for more culturally sensitive care in mental health services.

  2. 'She's manipulative and he's right off': a critical analysis of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language in the acute inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bridget; Manias, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Remarks such as 'she's manipulative' and 'he's right off' are familiar to psychiatric nurses. This paper critiques the language nurses use in acute inpatient psychiatry services, highlighting the diverse discourses implicated in nurses' writing and speaking about patients. Based on a review of the literature, this paper examines ethnographic studies and discourse analyses of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language. A prominent debate in the literature surrounds nurses' use of standardized language, which is the use of set terms for symptoms and nursing activities. This review of spoken descriptions of patients highlights nurses' use of informal and local descriptions, incorporating elements of moral judgement, common sense language and empathy. Research into written accounts in patient files and records show nurses' use of objectifying language, the dominance of medicine and the emergence of the language of bureaucracy in health services. Challenges to the language of psychiatry and psychiatric nursing arise from fields as diverse as bioscience, humanism and social theory. Authors who focus on the relationship between language, power and the discipline of nursing disagree in regard to their analysis of particular language as a constructive exercise of power by nurses. Thus, particular language is in some instances endorsed and in other instances censured, by nurses in research and practice. In this paper, a Foucauldian analysis provides further critique of taken-for-granted practices of speech and writing. Rather than censoring language, we recommend that nurses, researchers and educators attend to nurses' everyday language and explore what it produces for nurses, patients and society.

  3. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Requirements for certification and recertification: General considerations... other hospitals because the care furnished in inpatient psychiatric facilities is often purely...

  4. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Requirements for certification and recertification: General considerations... other hospitals because the care furnished in inpatient psychiatric facilities is often purely...

  5. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.14 Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric... requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  6. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.14 Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric... requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  7. Spectrum of autoantibodies in Tunisian psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Sidhom, Oussama; Laadhar, Lilia; Zitouni, Mondher; Ben Alaya, Nissaf; Rafrafi, Rym; Kallel-Sellami, Marayam; Lahmar, Houria; El Hechmi, Zouhair; Makni, Sondes

    2012-01-01

    One hundred and three psychiatric inpatients (74 men) were assessed for a wide spectrum of autoantibodies including antinuclear, antismooth muscle, antimitochondrial, antiDNA, anti-phospholipid, anti-cardiolipin IgG and IgM, antikeratin, rheumatoid factor, antithyroperoxydase, antigliadin IgA and IgG, antitransgutaminase, and antiendomysium antibodies. Four groups of patients were considered separately, including 47 with schizophrenia, 23 with schizoaffective disorder, 16 with bipolar disorder and 17 patients with other different psychiatric diagnosis. Forty one healthy, age- and sex-matched blood donors were used as a control group. There were no significant difference in the prevalence of the different autoantibodies between patients (N = 103) and controls except for antigliadin IgG (30.1 vs 9.8 respectively, p = 0.01). Presence of autoantibodies was influenced by age but not by sex or treatment. As for diagnosis categories, patients with bipolar disorder presented significantly more autoantibodies than the three other categories and controls. These results point out a possible autoimmune activation in at least a subgroup of psychiatric patients especially amongst those suffering from bipolar disorder.

  8. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.432 Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility receives payment under this subpart for inpatient operating cost and...

  9. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.432 Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility receives payment under this subpart for inpatient operating cost and...

  10. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.432 Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility receives payment under this subpart for inpatient operating cost and...

  11. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.432 Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility receives payment under this subpart for inpatient operating cost and...

  12. Reducing Psychiatric Inpatient Violence through Solution-Focused Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Elaine B.; Chambliss, Catherine

    Violent behaviors increasingly provide the basis for psychiatric hospitalization. This study targeted a group of high-risk psychiatric inpatients with a recent history of violence. A solution-focused treatment approach was used in conducting two ongoing weekly therapy groups. Patients were encouraged to reflect upon occasions where they…

  13. Controlling Costs for Inpatient CHAMPUS Psychiatric Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    average length of stay , primiry diagnoses, cost of admission, reimbursement rates, beneficiary category, and occupancy rates. Compare...Inpatient Psych 26 provided, total mental health care costs, average length of stay , average cost per admission, and average cost per day were calculated. A...depressions account for fully 46% of the total government inpatient bill. The average length of stay (LOS) for inpatient mental health for the

  14. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. 412.434 Section 412.434 Public Health... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.434 Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. (a) An inpatient psychiatric facility...

  15. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.428 Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. This information includes: (a) A description...

  16. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.428 Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. This information includes: (a) A description...

  17. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. 412.434 Section 412.434 Public Health... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.434 Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. (a) An inpatient psychiatric facility...

  18. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.428 Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. This information includes: (a) A description...

  19. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. 412.434 Section 412.434 Public Health... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.434 Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. (a) An inpatient psychiatric facility...

  20. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.428 Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. This information includes: (a) A description...

  1. Medicare Program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system changes and FY2011 rates; provider agreements and supplier approvals; and hospital conditions of participation for rehabilitation and respiratory care services; Medicaid program: accreditation for providers of inpatient psychiatric services. Final rules and interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2010-08-16

    : We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute care hospital inpatient services for operating costs and capital-related costs. We also are setting forth the update to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. We are updating the payment policy and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and setting forth the changes to the payment rates, factors, and other payment rate policies under the LTCH PPS. In addition, we are finalizing the provisions of the August 27, 2009 interim final rule that implemented statutory provisions relating to payments to LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities and increases in beds in existing LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities under the LTCH PPS. We are making changes affecting the: Medicare conditions of participation for hospitals relating to the types of practitioners who may provide rehabilitation services and respiratory care services; and determination of the effective date of provider agreements and supplier approvals under Medicare. We are also setting forth provisions that offer psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs increased flexibility in obtaining accreditation to participate in the Medicaid program. Psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs will have the choice of undergoing a State survey or of obtaining accreditation from a national accrediting organization whose hospital accreditation

  2. The inpatient psychiatric unit as both a safe and unsafe place: implications for absconding.

    PubMed

    Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; Oster, Candice; Grotto, Jessica; Gerace, Adam; Jones, Julia

    2013-08-01

    Absconding from acute psychiatric inpatient units is a significant issue with serious social, economic, and emotional costs. A qualitative study was undertaken to explore the experiences of people (n = 12) who had been held involuntarily under the local mental health act in an Australian inpatient psychiatric unit, and who had absconded (or attempted to abscond) during this time. The aim of the study was to explore why people abscond from psychiatric inpatient units, drawing on published work from health geography on the significance of the person-place encounter, and in particular the concept of 'therapeutic landscapes'. The findings show that the inpatient unit is perceived as a safe or unsafe place, dependent on the dialectical relationship between the physical, individual, social, and symbolic aspects of the unit. Consumers absconded when the unit was perceived as unsafe. Forming a therapeutic relationship with staff, familiarity with the unit, a comfortable environment, and positive experiences with other consumers all supported perceptions that the unit was safe, decreasing the likelihood of absconding. Findings extend existing work on the person-place encounter within psychiatric inpatient units, and bring new knowledge about the reasons why consumers abscond. Implications for practice are discussed.

  3. Acute inpatient presentation of scurvy.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Allison M; Hughey, Lauren C

    2010-10-01

    Scurvy is a well-known disease of vitamin C deficiency that still occurs in industrialized countries. The clinical manifestations of follicular hyperkeratosis, perifollicular petechiae, corkscrew hairs, and easy bruising are due to defective collagen synthesis and can be mistaken for small vessel vasculitis. Populations at risk for development of scurvy include elderly patients, alcohol and drug users, individuals who follow restrictive diets or have eating disorders, patients with malabsorption, and individuals with mental illness. We report an acute case of scurvy presenting in the inpatient/hospital setting with clinical findings initially thought to represent vasculitis. A high index of suspicion for scurvy must be kept in the appropriate clinical context, and a thorough medical history and physical examination are vital to make the diagnosis.

  4. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.160 Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. “Inpatient psychiatric... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. 440.160 Section 440.160 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES,...

  5. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... facility prospective payment system. 412.432 Section 412.432 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.432 Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility receives payment under this subpart for inpatient operating cost and...

  6. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  7. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  8. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  9. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  10. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  11. Managing Bipolar Youths in a Psychiatric Inpatient Emergency Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Gabriele; Mucci, Maria; Pias, Paola; Muratori, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Among the youths referred to our Psychiatric Inpatient Emergency Service, we focused on bipolar disorder (BD), to explore predictive elements for the outcome. Fifty-one patients (30 males, 21 females, age range 8-18 years, mean age 14.2 plus or minus 3.1 years) received a diagnosis of BD, according to historical information, prolonged…

  12. Psychiatric Inpatient Admissions of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Predictive Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Amy; Newton, Jonathan; Sturmey, Peter; Bouras, Nick; Holt, Geraldine

    2005-01-01

    Information on admission to psychiatric inpatient units is lacking from the literature on contemporary services for people with intellectual disability and mental health needs. Here we report on predictors of admission for a cohort of 752 adults from this population living in community settings; 83 were admitted. We also report on two subsamples…

  13. Sampling the Experience of Chronically Aggressive Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Bradley M.

    1994-01-01

    Studies the application of the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) to chronically aggressive psychiatric inpatients. ESM allows for the sampling of behavior, thoughts, and feelings of persons across time and situations by signalling subjects to record these aspects using a questionnaire at random times. (JPS)

  14. Locked doors in acute inpatient psychiatry: a literature review.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, M; Bowers, L; Jones, J; Simpson, A; Haglund, K

    2009-04-01

    Many acute inpatient psychiatric wards in the UK are permanently locked, although this is contrary to the current Mental Health Act Code of Practice. To conduct a literature review of empirical articles concerning locked doors in acute psychiatric inpatient wards, an extensive literature search was performed in SAGE Journals Online, EBM Reviews, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE Psychiatry, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google, using the search terms 'open$', 'close$', '$lock$', 'door', 'ward', 'hospital', 'psychiatr', 'mental health', 'inpatient' and 'asylum'. A total of 11 empirical papers were included in the review. Both staff and patients reported advantages (e.g. preventing illegal substances from entering the ward and preventing patients from absconding and harming themselves or others) and disadvantages (e.g. making patients feel depressed, confined and creating extra work for staff) regarding locked doors. Locked wards were associated with increased patient aggression, poorer satisfaction with treatment and more severe symptoms. The limited literature available showed the urgent need for research to determine the real effects of locked doors in inpatient psychiatry.

  15. Cost effectiveness of day and inpatient psychiatric treatment: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Creed, F.; Mbaya, P.; Lancashire, S.; Tomenson, B.; Williams, B.; Holme, S.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare direct and indirect costs of day and inpatient treatment of acute psychiatric illness. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with outcome and costs assessed over 12 months after the date of admission. SETTING: Teaching hospital in an inner city area. SUBJECTS: 179 patients with acute psychiatric illness referred for admission who were suitable for random allocation to day hospital or inpatient treatment. 77 (43%) patients had schizophrenia. INTERVENTIONS: Routine inpatient or day hospital treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Direct and indirect costs over 12 months, clinical symptoms, social functioning, and burden on relatives over the follow up period. RESULTS: Clinical and social outcomes were similar at 12 months, except that inpatients improved significantly faster than day patients and burden on relatives was significantly less in the day hospital group at one year. Median direct costs to the hospital were 1923 pounds (95% confidence interval 750 pounds to 3174 pounds) per patient less for day hospital treatment than inpatient treatment. Indirect costs were greater for day patients; when these were included, overall day hospital treatment was 2165 pounds cheaper than inpatient treatment (95% confidence interval of median difference 737 pounds to 3593 pounds). Including costs to informants when appropriate meant that day hospital treatment was 1994 pounds per patient cheaper (95% confidence interval 600 pounds to 3543 pounds). CONCLUSIONS: Day patient treatment is cheaper for the 30-40% of potential admissions that can be treated in this way. Carers of day hospital patients may bear additional costs. Carers of all patients with acute psychiatric illness are often themselves severely distressed at the time of admission, but day hospital treatment leads to less burden on carers in the long term. PMID:9161310

  16. Self-harm in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhand, Naista; Matheson, Katherine; Courtney, Darren

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study presents a comprehensive report of children and adolescents who engaged in self-harm during their admission to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Method A chart review was conducted on all admissions to an acute care psychiatric inpatient unit in a Canadian children’s hospital over a one-year period. Details on patients with self-harm behaviour during the admission were recorded, including: demographics, presentation to hospital, self-harm behaviour and outcome. Baseline variables for patients with and without self-harm behaviour during admission were compared. Results Self-harm incidents were reported in 60 of 501 (12%) admissions during the one-year period of the study. Fourteen percent of patients (50 of 351) accounted for total number of 136 self-harm incidents. Half of these incidents (49%) occurred outside of the hospital setting, when patients were on passes. Using the Beck Lethality Scale (0–10), mean severity of the self-injury attempts was 0.33, and there were no serious negative outcomes. Conclusion Self-harm behaviour during inpatient psychiatric admission is a common issue among youth, despite safety strategies in place. While self-harm behaviour is one of the most common reasons for admission to psychiatric inpatient unit, our understanding of nature of these acts during the admission and contributing factors are limited. Further research is required to better understand these factors, and to develop strategies to better support these patients. PMID:27924147

  17. Suicidal patients as experienced by psychiatric nurses in inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Carlén, Pontus; Bengtsson, Anita

    2007-08-01

    Psychiatric nurses have a major influence on the lives of patients with suicidal behaviour in inpatient care. Despite this, there is a lack of knowledge about how nurses experience patients with suicidal behaviour in a deeper sense. The aim of this study was to investigate how psychiatric nurses experience patients with suicidal behaviour within an inpatient psychiatric context. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 11 psychiatric nurses, each of whom had more than 5 years of experience caring for patients with suicidal behaviour. Data were analysed using qualitative latent content analysis. Two main themes emerged from the data analysis. These are 'labelled' and 'suffering'. In the nurses' natural attitude, they saw patients as being labelled with different conditions and/or behaviours based on objective signs. These were categorized into different groups or identities such as psychiatric diagnosis, mask wearer, screened-off, or the social, relapsing or determined patient. On reflection, however, the nurses described the patients' suffering in terms related to feelings of hopelessness, meaninglessness, and being out of control. The nurses' experiences of the patients as suffering were based on their subjective reflective experience of the patients. The study gives support to the conclusion that two main logic systems are represented in the care of patients with suicidal behaviour: technical practical and nursing perspectives. In order to ensure that these two logic systems combine, it is necessary for the psychiatric care organization to intervene to support the nurses in reflecting on their everyday work.

  18. An acute in-patient psychiatric service for 16- to 17-year-old adolescents in the UK: a descriptive evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Duddu, Venu; Rhouma, Abdulhakim; Qureshi, Masood; Chaudhry, Imran Bashir; Drake, Terry; Sumra, Altaf; Husain, Nusrat

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method The need for an age-appropriate in-patient service for 16- to 17-year-olds led to the development of a 6-bed acute admissions unit in a non-metropolitan county in the UK. We provide a descriptive evaluation of the first 2 years of its operation. All admissions from April 2010 to March 2012 were reviewed, clinical details systematically recorded and descriptively analysed. Results Ninety-seven young people were admitted during this period (a third were compulsorily detained under the Mental Health Act 1983). The average length of stay was 3–4 weeks. The most common presenting complaints were self-harm and low mood, usually in the context of life events and childhood adversity. Nearly half had substance misuse and other risk-taking behaviours. A third presented with psychotic symptoms. Adjustment and anxiety disorders were most common, followed by alcohol/substance use disorders, depressive illnesses and psychotic illnesses. Comorbidity was the rule rather than the exception. Most patients improved by the time of discharge. Clinical implications The unit provides an accessible and effective age-appropriate service and is likely to constitute an important component of the comprehensive child and adolescent mental health service strategy in the county. PMID:27752345

  19. [Dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients: prevalence and general characteristics].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Roberto; Aragüés, María; Jiménez-Arriero, Miguel Angel; Ponce, Guillermo; Muñoz, Antonio; Bagney, Alexandra; Hoenicka, Janet; Palomo, Tomás

    2008-06-01

    Comorbidity between a substance use disorder (SUD) and another psychiatric disorder is known as dual diagnosis. It is of great relevance due to its important clinical consequences and costs of care. There are practically no published studies on dual diagnosis prevalence in patients admitted to psychiatric hospitalization units in general hospitals (PHUGH) in our country. The objectives were to estimate the prevalence of dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients admitted consecutively to a Psychiatric Hospitalization Unit (Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain) in one year, to compare clinical and sociodemographic variables between the dual diagnosis group (DD group) and the group with a psychiatric disorder but no SUD (PD group), and to study the types of substances used. This is a retrospective study, based on the review of the clinical charts of the 257 patients admitted to this PHUGH in one year. The results showed that, excluding nicotine dependence, 24.9% of our inpatients had a SUD as well as another psychiatric disorder. A statistically significant predominance of men was found in the DD group, as well as a younger age at the time of the study, at the beginning of their psychiatric attention and on their first psychiatric admission, and they had received diagnoses of schizophrenia or related psychoses more often than the PD group, who had mostly affective disorders. The substances most frequently used in the DD group were alcohol (78.1%), cannabis (62.5%), and cocaine (51.6%). Due to the high prevalence and repercussions of dual diagnosis, it would be advisable to have specialized therapeutic programs for its treatment.

  20. Effects of music on major depression in psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Chi; Lai, Hui-Ling

    2004-10-01

    The study was to assess the effectiveness of soft music for treatment of major depressive disorder inpatients in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. A pretest-posttest with a two-group repeated measures design was used. Patients with major depressive disorder were recruited through referred by the psychiatric physicians. Subjects listened to their choice of music for 2 weeks. Depression was measured with the Zung's Depression Scale before the study and at two weekly posttests. Using repeated measures ANCOVA, music resulted in significantly better depressive scores, as well as significantly better subscores of depression compared with controls. Depression improved weekly, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The findings provide evidence for psychiatric nurses to use soft music as an empirically based intervention for depressed inpatients.

  1. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on Medicare reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Daly, J; Golinger, R C

    1994-01-01

    Funding for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C-L) services has been a difficult problem. It has been suggested that the identification of psychiatric co-morbidities in Medicare patients on medical services could generate incremental hospital revenue by moving patients from a lower to a higher paying Diagnostic Related Group (DRG). This increased revenue could be used as a means of supporting the psychiatric C-L service. This study documents the financial impact of screening for and documenting psychiatric co-morbidities on a general acute medical service. We clinically assessed 100 consecutive Medicare admissions and found 25 psychiatric co-morbidities in 20 patients. In only one case did the psychiatric diagnosis result in moving the case to a higher DRG. However, the need for psychiatric consultation remains evident as there was significant lack of recognition and documentation of the psychiatric diagnoses by the medical team. The authors discuss both the financial and clinical implications of screening medical inpatients for psychiatric co-morbidities and propose directions for further studies in this area.

  2. The temporal fluctuations and characteristics of psychiatric inpatient admissions in Ireland: data from the HRB's National Psychiatric In-Patient Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Walsh, D; Daly, A

    2016-11-01

    This paper examines trends in psychiatric inpatient admissions from the 1960s to 2014 and uses data from the National Psychiatric Inpatient Reporting System (NPIRS) to review these trends. In the 1960s the Department of Health began an annual system of reporting on the activities in Irish psychiatric units and hospitals on foot of the recommendations of the Commission of Inquiry on Mental Illness. The National Psychiatric Inpatient Reporting System (NPIRS) was established shortly thereafter and this paper discusses the data from this database contained in these annual activity reports over the last 50 years.

  3. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... facility prospective payment system. 412.428 Section 412.428 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.428 Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. This information includes: (a) A description...

  4. Non-Psychiatric Health Problems among Psychiatric Inpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlot, L.; Abend, S.; Ravin, P.; Mastis, K.; Hunt, A.; Deutsch, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Physical distress resulting from medical problems has been found to cause increased behaviour problems in patients with intellectual disabilities (ID). Despite this fact, little has been documented on the medical problems of individuals with ID admitted for inpatient psychiatric care. We conducted an exploratory investigation based on…

  5. 78 FR 46733 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ...This notice updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs). These changes are applicable to IPF discharges occurring during the fiscal year (FY) beginning October 1, 2013 through September 30,...

  6. 77 FR 47223 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ...This notice updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs). These changes are applicable to IPF discharges occurring during the fiscal year (FY) beginning October 1, 2012 through September 30,...

  7. Non-psychiatric health problems among psychiatric inpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Charlot, L.; Abend, S.; Ravin, P.; Mastis, K.; Hunt, A.; Deutsch, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical distress resulting from medical problems has been found to cause increased behavior problems in with Intellectual Disabilities (ID). Despite this fact, little has been documented on the medical problems of individuals with ID admitted for inpatient psychiatric care. We conducted an exploratory investigation based on a retrospective chart review of the medical problems and medications for 198 people with ID who had been admitted to a specialized inpatient psychiatric unit. Most patients were referred for admission because of aggressive, disruptive and self-injurious behaviors. The average length of stay was 17.6 days. Method We tallied the total number of medical problems and medications listed in the patients’ discharge summaries. Because longer stays are disruptive, costly and associated with greater overall impairment, we examined the relationship between length of stay and frequency of discharge medical diagnoses. We also assessed whether or not the number of psychoactive medications correlated with the number of medical diagnoses. The effects of other demographic and diagnostic variables on rates of medical diagnoses and medications were also evaluated, including gender, age group (16–25, 26–45, 46–60, > 60), level of ID (Mild, moderate or severe ID), and diagnosis of an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or Down syndrome (DS). Results Inpatients with a higher number of medical diagnoses had longer lengths of stay (Spearman r = +.32, p < 0.0001). There was a significant correlation between number of psychoactive medications and number of medical problems (Spearman r = + .32, p < 0.0001). The most frequent medical comorbidity was constipation, reported in 60% of the inpatients (n = 118), while Gastro- Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) was identified in 38% (n = 75). Older inpatients had an increased number of medical problems, as might be expected, but a diagnosis of an ASD, gender, and level of ID had no detectible effect on rates of

  8. High prevalence of antineuronal antibodies in Tunisian psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Laadhar, Lilia; Sidhom, Oussama; Zitouni, Mondher; Sassi, Nadia; Abdelghaffar, Wafa; Lahmar, Houria; Kallel-Sellami, Maryam; El Hechmi, Zouhaier; Makni, Sondes

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to determine the prevalence of antineuronal antibodies in 103 psychiatric inpatients and 41 control subjects with no history of malignancies or neurological disorders. All sera were tested by indirect immunofluorescence and positive sera by immunoblot. Using immunofluorescence, antineuronal nuclear autoantibodies were detected in 20 patients and none of the control subjects, and antibodies reacted with the cytoplasm of Purkinje cells in six patients and two control subjects. The immunoblot confirmed well-characterized antineuronal antibodies only in five patients: two had anti-Ri and three had anti-Yo antibodies. After a follow-up of 5 years, none of these patients developed neurological disorder or malignancy.

  9. When should psychiatrists seek criminal prosecution of assaultive psychiatric inpatients?

    PubMed

    Ho, Justin; Ralston, D Christopher; McCullough, Laurence B; Coverdale, John H

    2009-08-01

    This Open Forum commentary reviews the ethical considerations relevant to the question of prosecuting assaultive psychiatric patients, with particular attention to the significance that should be attached to the arguments generated by those considerations. A comprehensive literature search was conducted incorporating the terms "assaultive patients," "ethics," "psychiatric inpatients," and "law." The literature of professional medical ethics was applied to identify relevant domains of ethical argument. Five domains were identified: fiduciary obligations of physicians to assaultive and other patients; obligations to staff members; professional virtues of compassion, self-sacrifice, and self-effacement; retributive justice; and the patient's right to confidentiality. The content of each domain is explained, and guidance is provided on how to assess the relative strengths of ethical argument within each domain. All five domains must be explicitly addressed in order to make ethically disciplined judgments about whether to seek prosecution. A distinctive feature of this ethical analysis is the central importance of the professional virtues.

  10. Alternative comorbidity adjustors for the Medicare inpatient psychiatric facility PPS.

    PubMed

    Drozd, Edward M; Maier, Jan; Hales, Jan F; Thomas, Frederick G

    2008-01-01

    The inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system (IPF-PPS), provides per diem payments for psychiatric hospitals and units, including 17 comorbid condition payment adjustors that cover 11 percent of patients. This study identifies an alternative set of 16 adjustors identifying three times as many high-cost patients and evaluates the improved predictive power in log per diem cost regression models. A model using the IPF-PPS adjustors achieved 8.8 percent of the feasible improvement from a no-adjustor baseline, while the alternative adjustors achieved 22.1 percent of the feasible improvement. The current adjustors may therefore be too restrictive, resulting in systematic over- or underpayment for many patients.

  11. A review of token economy treatment programs for psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Milby, J B

    1975-10-01

    The author has reviewed outcome studies of token economy programs for psychiatric inpatients. Only studies that employed some control procedures in their evaluation were included. Token economies were most effective in modifying inhospital work, personal care, and some psychotic behaviors. Studies that assessed token programs to prepare patients for community living and reduce recidivism generally affirmed the effectiveness of token procedures, but the studies were poorly designed, and they lacked systematic follow-up data. Almost all studies failed to examine possible interactions between chemotherapy and the token economies. The author suggests the need for studies using token economies with psychiatric patients other than chronic schizophrenics, who have been studied almost exclusively to date.

  12. Examining Outcomes of Acute Psychiatric Hospitalization among Children

    PubMed Central

    Tharayil, Priya R.; Sigrid, James; Morgan, Ronald; Freeman, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Within the past two decades, few studies have examined outcomes of acute psychiatric hospitalization among children, demonstrating change in emotional and behavioral functioning. A secondary analysis of pre-test/post-test data collected on 36 children was conducted, using the Target Symptom Rating (TSR). The TSR is a 13-item measure with two subscales – Emotional Problems and Behavioral Problems and was designed for evaluation of outcome among children and adolescents in acute inpatient psychiatric settings. Results of this study, its limitations, and the barriers encountered in the implementation of the TSR scale as part of routine clinical practice are discussed. PMID:23946699

  13. Feasibility Analysis of Adopting Medicare’s Mental Health Prospective Payment System for Tricare Beneficiaries Treated in Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    restricting the sample of this criterion is that the military inpatient psychiatric population tends to be concentrated in military catchment areas...determined by CMS using regression. For purposes of this analysis, the teaching adjustment was not 29 applied due to restrictions in the data, but is...584.5 (acute renal failure with lesion of tabular necrosis), 391.0 (acute rheumatic pericarditis ), and 041.1 (staphylococcus). The patient did not

  14. Reliability and Validity of the Beck Depression Inventory--II with Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, Augustine; Kopper, Beverly A; Barrios, Frank; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Bagge, Courtney L.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to validate the Beck Depression Inventory--II (BDI-II; A. T. Beck, R. A. Steer, & G. K. Brown, 1996) in samples of adolescent psychiatric inpatients. The sample in each substudy was primarily Caucasian. In Study 1, expert raters (N=7) and adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N=13) evaluated the BDI-II items to assess…

  15. 75 FR 23105 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System Payment-Update for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...This notice updates the payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient psychiatric hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs). These changes are applicable to IPF discharges occurring during the rate year beginning July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011. We are also responding to comments on the IPF PPS teaching adjustment and the market......

  16. The Prevalence of a History of Childhood Sexual Abuse in an Acute Adult Inpatient Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurr, Catherine J.; Partridge, Ian M.

    1996-01-01

    In a survey of 120 inpatients admitted to a United Kingdom acute psychiatric ward, 46% reported a history of childhood sexual abuse. Only 14%, however, had disclosed the abuse previously to psychiatrists. The patterns of abuse were found to correspond with those causing problems with adjustment in adult life. (CR)

  17. Psychiatric Correlates of Nonsuicidal Cutting Behaviors in an Adolescent Inpatient Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Lance P.; Spirito, Anthony; Dyl, Jennifer; Kittler, Jennifer; Hunt, Jeffrey I.

    2008-01-01

    This archival study of 288 adolescent psychiatric inpatients examined the psychiatric correlates of cutting behavior. Participants were categorized into Threshold cutters (n = 61), Subthreshold cutters (n = 43), and Noncutters (n = 184). Groups were compared on psychiatric diagnoses, suicidality, and self-reported impairment. Results demonstrated…

  18. The Relationship between Adjustment and Perceived Locus of Control for Female Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youkilis, Hildreth D.; Bootzin, Richard R.

    1979-01-01

    Examines the longitudinal relationship between internal-external locus of control and adjustment using independent measures within two dissimilar treatment environments: a traditional ward and a token economy ward. Subjects were 65 female psychiatric inpatients. (CM)

  19. The Relationship between Seclusion and Restraint Use and Childhood Abuse among Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Joseph H.; Springer, Justin; Beck, Niels C.; Menditto, Anthony; Coleman, James

    2011-01-01

    Seclusion and restraint (S/R) is a controversial topic in the field of psychiatry, due in part to the high rates of childhood physical and sexual abuse found among psychiatric inpatients. The trauma-informed care perspective suggests that the use of S/R with previously abused inpatients may result in retraumatization due to mental associations…

  20. 76 FR 26431 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Rate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...This final rule updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs) for discharges occurring during the rate year (RY) beginning July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012. The final rule also changes the IPF prospective payment system (PPS) payment rate update period to a RY that coincides with a fiscal year (FY). In......

  1. 76 FR 4997 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Rate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ...This proposed rule would update the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs) for discharges occurring during the rate year beginning July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012. The proposed rule would also change the IPF prospective payment system (PPS) payment rate update period to a rate year (RY) that coincides with......

  2. Anhedonia predicts suicidal ideation in a large psychiatric inpatient sample.

    PubMed

    Winer, E Samuel; Nadorff, Michael R; Ellis, Thomas E; Allen, Jon G; Herrera, Steve; Salem, Taban

    2014-08-15

    This study examined the relationship among symptoms of anhedonia and suicidal ideation at baseline, at termination, and over time in 1529 adult psychiatric inpatients. Anhedonia was associated with suicidality cross-sectionally at baseline and at termination. In addition, change in anhedonia from baseline to termination predicted change in suicidality from baseline to termination, as well as level of suicidality at termination; moreover, anhedonia remained a robust predictor of suicidal ideation independent of cognitive/affective symptoms of depression. Symptom-level analyses also revealed that, even after accounting for the physical aspect of anhedonia (e.g., loss of energy), loss of interest and loss of pleasure were independently associated with higher levels of suicidal ideation at baseline, over time, and at discharge. Loss of interest was most highly predictive of suicidal ideation, providing support for recent differential conceptualizations of anhedonia. Taken together, these findings indicate that the manner in which anhedonia is conceptualized is important in predicting suicidal ideation, and that anhedonia symptoms warrant particular clinical attention in the treatment of suicidal patients.

  3. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  4. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  5. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  6. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  7. Comprehensive evidence-based program teaching self-management of auditory hallucinations on inpatient psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Robin Kay; Trygstad, Louise Nigh; Buffum, Martha D; Lyttle, Kathleen; Dowling, Glenna

    2010-03-01

    Patients hearing command hallucinations to harm whose only self-management strategies are to obey these commands, can represent serious safety concerns on inpatient psychiatric units. A comprehensive evidence-based program teaching self-management of auditory hallucinations on inpatient psychiatric units is described that includes five components: suggestions for staff education; patient self-assessment tools; an interview guide and safety protocol; a course to teach strategies for managing distressing voices and commands to harm; suggestions to improve staff communication; and a plan to extend the program from inpatient care settings into the community by sharing materials with community case managers and caregivers when patients are discharged.

  8. Characteristics of Dieting and Nondieting Adolescents in a Psychiatric Inpatient Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrantes, Ana M.; Strong, David R.; Ramsey, Susan E.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.; Brown, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    The clinical and psychosocial characteristics of 239 dieting and nondieting adolescents (61% female; mean age=15.3) recruited from an inpatient psychiatric setting were examined. Dieting adolescents were compared to nondieting adolescents on exercise frequency, weight control behaviors, risky behaviors, psychiatric comorbidity and distress, eating…

  9. Gender Differences in Psychiatric Diagnoses among Inpatients with and without Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Yona; Bradley, Elspeth A.; Gracey, Carolyn D.; Durbin, Janet; Koegl, Chris

    2009-01-01

    There are few published studies on the relationship between gender and psychiatric disorders in individuals with intellectual disabilities. Adults (N = 1,971) with and without intellectual disabilities who received inpatient services for psychiatric diagnosis and clinical issues were examined. Among individuals with intellectual disabilities,…

  10. Predictors of aggression on the psychiatric inpatient service: self-esteem, narcissism, and theory of mind deficits.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Brett R; Serper, Mark R; Sheets, Michelle; Beech, Danielle; Dill, Charles; Duffy, Kristine G

    2007-05-01

    Aggressive behavior committed by inpatients has significant negative effects on patients, clinical staff, the therapeutic milieu, and inpatient community as whole. Past research examining nonpsychiatric patient groups has suggested that elevated self-esteem and narcissism levels as well as self-serving theory of mind (ToM) biases may be robust predictors of aggressive behavior. In the present study, we examined whether these constructs were useful in predicting aggressive acts committed by psychiatric inpatients. Severity of psychiatric symptoms, demographic variables and patients' anger, and hostility severity were also examined. We found patients who committed acts of aggression were differentiated from their nonaggressive counterparts by exhibiting significantly higher levels of self-esteem and narcissistic superiority. In addition, aggressors demonstrated self-serving ToM biases, attributing more positive attributes to themselves, relative to their perceptions of how others viewed them. Aggressors also showed increased psychosis, fewer depressive symptoms, and had significantly fewer years of formal education than their nonaggressive peers. These results support and extend the view that in addition to clinical variables, specific personality traits and self-serving attributions are linked to aggressive behavior in acutely ill psychiatric patients.

  11. Psychiatric illness in inpatients with neurological disorders: patients' views on discussion of emotional problems with neurologists.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, K W; Goldberg, D P

    1984-01-01

    The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in inpatients with neurological disorders and the extent to which it is detected by neurologists were measured by using a two stage model of psychiatric assessment and from information recorded in the patients' medical notes. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was estimated as 39%, of which 72% was unrecognised by the neurologists. Only a minority of patients with an uncertain physical diagnosis had a psychiatric illness, showing the error in assuming that a patient's physical symptoms arise from a psychological disturbance if an organic aetiology cannot be determined. When the patients were interviewed on their discharge from hospital they were divided on whether they had wished to discuss their mood with neurologists while they were in hospital. The reasons that they gave suggested that interactions between patients and doctors and the lack of ward facilities for private consultations with doctors are important determinants of hidden psychiatric morbidity in medical inpatients. PMID:6434026

  12. Reducing six-month inpatient psychiatric recidivism and costs through case management.

    PubMed

    Kolbasovsky, Andrew; Reich, Leonard; Meyerkopf, Neil

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the reduction in inpatient psychiatric recidivism and costs associated with an intensive case management (ICM) program among high-risk adults with chronic mental health conditions. An intent-to-treat, historical control design was used to examine utilization differences between 306 intervention group (IG) members eligible to receive ICM services and a cohort of 290 baseline group (BG) members over a six-month outcome period. Members were identified retrospectively using identical criteria during one year prior to implementation of the program. The six-month recidivism rate for BG members was 49.67% compared to 22.07% among IG members. Forward stepwise regression results indicated a significant main effect for the ICM intervention on inpatient psychiatric costs. Inpatient psychiatric costs for the six-month outcome period were $4,982.90 lower per member in the IG group. Additional models demonstrated that the ICM intervention was associated with significantly lower inpatient substance abuse costs and psychiatric emergency department costs. There were no statistically significant increases in utilization associated with the ICM intervention. After factoring in program costs, it is estimated that the ICM services contributed to almost $1,500,000 in cost savings over the six-month outcome period. The ICM intervention was associated with significant reductions in inpatient, psychiatric six-month readmission rates and associated costs among adult members who are at elevated risk of inpatient, psychiatric recidivism. The intervention, enrollment process, and measurement strategies can be adapted for use by health plans looking to reduce psychiatric costs.

  13. Serious untoward incidents and their aftermath in acute inpatient psychiatry: the Tompkins Acute Ward study.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Len; Simpson, Alan; Eyres, Sophie; Nijman, Henk; Hall, Cerdic; Grange, Angela; Phillips, Louise

    2006-12-01

    Serious untoward incidents, or sentinel events (suicide, homicide, suicide attempt, serious assault, and absconding of high-risk patients) occur from time to time in association with acute psychiatric inpatient wards. The aim of this study was to discover the impact of serious untoward incidents on inpatient wards. Doctors, nurses, and occupational therapists at three hospitals were interviewed about these events and their impact on their wards. Staff reported feelings of shock, depression, demoralization, upset, loss, and grief, followed by ruminations, guilt, and anxiety. Levels of containment increased, as did the focus on risk assessment. Processing of the emotional impact was hindered by the pace of ward life, a lack of external support, and management investigations. Patient responses were largely ignored. A few staff responded negatively, hindering service improvements. Much more attention needs to be given to the needs of the patient group following incidents. Substantial planning, organization, and investment are required to properly prepare for such events and manage their outcome. Without this planning and action, acute inpatient work has the capacity to be damaging to staff.

  14. Combined medical-psychiatric inpatient units: evaluation of the Centre for the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Maier, A B; Wächtler, C; Hofmann, W

    2007-08-01

    Considering the large number of elderly patients in acute hospitals who receive medical as well as psychiatric treatment because of relevant comorbidity, adequate interdisciplinary treatment models have to be developed and applied. The Centre for Elderly, a cooperation project between the departments of geriatric and psychogeriatric medicine in a community hospital in Germany, was founded in 2000. In addition to traditionally structured units, the centre consists of interdisciplinary units. Patient-, staff- and hospital-related characteristics influenced by the reformation of both departments were evaluated by comparing hospital-based registry data records containing age, gender, main and minor diagnoses, length of stay and patient transferrals within the centre. Experts working at the centre were asked to take a stand on the development of the treatment quality, allocation of patients, diagnostic procedures, consultation services and information transmission. The number of admissions to the Centre for the Elderly increased within one year. The distribution of the main diagnose groups remained unchanged, with an overlap between the geriatric and psychogeriatric department consisting of the main diagnoses dementia and depression. The length of stay and the number of transferrals decreased significantly in both departments. The majority of the interviewed employees stated that the treatment quality and the allocation of patients were improved. We conclude that interdisciplinary treatment between the departments of psychiatry and geriatric medicine may contribute to the medical needs of subgroups of elderly inpatients suffering from medical-psychiatric comorbidity.

  15. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) The reasons for either— (i) Hospitalization of the patient for inpatient medical treatment or medically required inpatient diagnostic study; or (ii) Special or unusual services for cost outlier cases... treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for...

  16. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) The reasons for either— (i) Hospitalization of the patient for inpatient medical treatment or medically required inpatient diagnostic study; or (ii) Special or unusual services for cost outlier cases... treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for...

  17. Quality of interactions influences everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care—patients’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Molin, Jenny; Graneheim, Ulla H.; Lindgren, Britt-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Everyday life consists of daily activities that are taken for granted. It forms the foundation for human efforts and contains elements of both comfort and boredom. Because everyday life escapes no one, life in a psychiatric ward will become ordinary while staying there. This study aims to explore everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care based on patients’ experiences. We individually interviewed 16 participants with experiences of psychiatric inpatient care and analysed the data in accordance with the methods of grounded theory. Data collection and analysis continued in parallel in accordance with the method. Our results showed that everyday life is linked to the core category quality of interactions influences everyday life, and three constructed categories—staff makes the difference, looking for shelter in a stigmatizing environment, and facing a confusing care content—were related to the core category. Our results highlight the importance of ordinary relationships between staff and patients in psychiatric inpatient care. These results can be used to develop nursing interventions to improve psychiatric inpatient care and might also be used as a basis for reflective dialogues among staff. PMID:26806313

  18. Self-reported peer victimization and suicidal ideation in adolescent psychiatric inpatients: the mediating role of negative self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Jones, Heather A; Bilge-Johnson, Sumru; Rabinovitch, Annie E; Fishel, Hazel

    2014-10-01

    The current study investigated relationships among self-reported peer victimization, suicidality, and depression in adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Sixty-seven adolescent psychiatric inpatients at a Midwestern children's hospital completed measures of bullying and peer victimization, suicidal ideation, and depression during their inpatient stay. Analyses indicated significant moderate correlations among victimization, suicidal ideation, and depression in adolescents. Results from mediational analyses found that negative self-esteem mediated the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation. To date, this study is the first to directly examine the mechanisms underlying the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation in adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

  19. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Content of certification and recertification: General considerations. The content requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  20. Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in psychiatric inpatients in a northern Mexican city

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Alanis-Quiñones, Olga-Patricia; Arreola-Valenzuela, Miguel-Ángel; Rodríguez-Briones, Alfredo; Piedra-Nevarez, Luis-Jorge; Duran-Morales, Ehecatl; Estrada-Martínez, Sergio; Martínez-García, Sergio-Arturo; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Background Patients with psychiatric disorders were found to show a high seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection. There is scarce information about the epidemiology of T. gondii infection in psychiatric patients in Mexico. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalence of T. gondii infection and associated socio-demographic, clinical and behavioural characteristics in a population of psychiatric patients in Durango City, Mexico. Seroprevalence in patients was compared with that obtained in a control population. Methods One hundred and thirty seven inpatients of a public psychiatric hospital and 180 controls were examined for the presence of IgG and IgM antibodies against T. gondii by enzyme-linked immunoassay (Diagnostic Automation Inc., Calabasas, CA, USA). The control population consisted of blood donors of a public blood bank and elderly persons attending a senior center in the same city. Age in controls (42 years +/- 20.2) was comparable with that of the psychiatric patients (43.7 years +/-13.8) (p = 0.42). Socio-demographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics from the patients were also obtained. Results Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies indicating latent infection with T. gondii was found in 25 (18.2%) of 137 psychiatric inpatients and 16 (8.9%) of 180 controls (p = 0.02). Ten (26.3%) of 38 schizophrenic patients had latent infection and this prevalence was also significantly higher than that observed in controls (p = 0.005). Prevalence of anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies was comparable among patients and controls (4.4% vs 2.2%, respectively, p = 0.22). Multivariate analysis showed that T. gondii infection in inpatients was positively associated with sexual promiscuity (adjusted OR = 15.8; 95% CI: 3.8–64.8), unwashed raw fruit consumption (adjusted OR = 5.19; 95% CI: 2.3–11.3), and a history of surgery (adjusted OR = 6.5; 95% CI: 2.6–16), and negatively associated with lamb meat consumption (adjusted OR = 0.26; 95% CI: 0.10–0.63). Conclusion In

  1. Psychosocial Correlates of Suicidal Ideation in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Geetha; Steer, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSI) was administered to 121 adolescent inpatients. Twelve characteristics found to be associated with adolescent suicide ideation were entered into multiple regression to estimate BSI scores, along with Beck inventories for anxiety, depression (BDI), and hopelessness (BHS), and Youth Self Report. BHS and BDI were…

  2. Tracing patients from acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed Central

    Double, D; MacPherson, R; Wong, T

    1993-01-01

    A random sample of those admitted to acute psychiatric wards in Sheffield in 1985 was traced to establish whether or not the patients were homeless 5 years later. Contrary to expectations none were found to be homeless. Although the proportion of mentally ill amongst the homeless may be significantly high, the number discharged from psychiatric hospital, at least in Sheffield, living consistently 'on the streets' or staying regularly in night shelters seems small as a proportion of all discharges. PMID:8410893

  3. Overweight in adolescent, psychiatric inpatients: A problem of general or food-specific impulsivity?

    PubMed

    Deux, Natalie; Schlarb, Angelika A; Martin, Franziska; Holtmann, Martin; Hebebrand, Johannes; Legenbauer, Tanja

    2017-05-01

    Adolescent psychiatric patients are vulnerable to weight problems and show an overrepresentation of overweight compared to the healthy population. One potential factor that can contribute to the etiology of overweight is higher impulsivity. As of yet, it is unclear whether it is a general impulse control deficit or weight-related aspects such as lower impulse control in response to food that have an impact on body weight. As this may have therapeutic implications, the current study investigated differences between overweight and non-overweight adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N = 98; aged 12-20) in relation to trait impulsivity and behavioral inhibition performance. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and two go/no-go paradigms with neutral and food-related stimulus materials were applied. Results indicated no significant differences concerning trait impulsivity, but revealed that overweight inpatients had significantly more difficulties in inhibition performance (i.e. they reacted more impulsively) in response to both food and neutral stimuli compared to non-overweight inpatients. Furthermore, no specific inhibition deficit for high-caloric vs. low-caloric food cues emerged in overweight inpatients, whereas non-overweight participants showed significantly lower inhibition skills in response to high-caloric than low-caloric food stimuli. The results highlight a rather general, non-food-specific reduced inhibition performance in an overweight adolescent psychiatric population. Further research is necessary to enhance the understanding of the role of impulsivity in terms of body weight status in this high-risk group of adolescent inpatients.

  4. The Validation of the Factor Structure of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale-Expanded Version (BPRS-E) with Geriatric and Nongeriatric Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panos, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale-Expanded (BPRS-E) is a widely used outcome measure that assesses change in psychiatric symptoms. The focus of the present study was to clarify and determine the factor structure of the BPRS-E with geriatric and nongeriatric psychiatric inpatients. Two previous studies found different factor structures for the…

  5. Differing Levels of Superstitious Beliefs among Three Groups: Psychiatric Inpatients, Churchgoers, and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Sheryl L.

    This study investigated the level of superstitious belief among 175 persons in three categories: persons undergoing inpatient psychiatric treatment, churchgoers, and college students. A 50-item inventory consisting of positive and negative common superstitions, including a 5-item invalidity subscale, was administered. Using a 2 (male, female) x 3…

  6. Associations between Relational Aggression, Depression, and Suicidal Ideation in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fite, Paula J.; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani; Preddy, Teresa M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined relations between relational aggression, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation in a child clinical population. Participants included 276 children (M age = 9.55 years; 69% Male) who were admitted to a child psychiatric inpatient facility. Findings suggested that relational aggression was associated with depressive…

  7. Utility of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Personality Disorder Scales with Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freiheit, Stacy R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The utility of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory personality disorder scales was studied with 217 male adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Analyses of variance found patterns consistent with research on adult samples in spite of differences in factor structure. These similarities suggest that adolescent assessment may provide information…

  8. Exploring the Sociotropy-Autonomy Dimensions in a Sample of Turkish Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Nesrin; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Explored sociotropy and autonomy among 70 Turkish psychiatric inpatients and 189 university students, who were administered Beck Depression Inventory, Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale, Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire, and Sociotropy-Autonomy Scale. Results seem to support relationship of sociotropy with other depression measures in both samples.…

  9. Concurrent Validity of Three WAIS-R Short Forms in Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedict, Ralph H. B.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The concurrent validities of 3 short forms of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) were compared for their prediction of full-scale IQ for 145 male and 159 female psychiatric inpatients. Results support previous research showing better predictive accuracy for L. C. Ward's (1990) seven-subtest short form than the others. (SLD)

  10. On the Distinction of Suicide Ideation versus Attempt in Elderly Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, Hermann; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Study of selected elderly psychiatric inpatients (n=152) suggests that suicidal ideation may initiate process of smoldering when patient, family, and professionals interact in such a way as to dampen apparent distress. Suicidal thoughts/mood may be masked by affective or cognitive constriction, camouflaged by anxiety and external agitation, and…

  11. The Multi-Attitude Suicide Tendency Scale: Further Validation with Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, Augustine; Gilpin, Andrew R.; Panak, William F.; Kopper, Beverly A.; Barrios, Francisco X.; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Chiros, Christine E.

    2000-01-01

    Examines construct validity and psychometric properties of the Multi-Attitude Suicide Tendency Scale in adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Confirmatory factor analysis provides support for the fit of the 28-item, four-factor model. Results of regression analyses reveal that high scores on the repulsion by life and the attraction to death subscales…

  12. Behavioral Management Leads to Reduction in Aggression in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Angela J.; Duke, Suzanne G.; George, Michelle; Scott, James

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Aggression is common in children and adolescents admitted to psychiatric inpatient units. Few interventions for reducing aggressive behaviors have been identified. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a milieu-based behavioral management program on the frequency of aggressive behaviors in a child and adolescent mental health…

  13. Acceptance of Computerized Compared to Paper-and-Pencil Assessment in Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Bernhard; Schneider, Barbara; Fritze, Jurgen; Gille, Boris; Hornung, Stefan; Kuhner, Thorsten; Maurer, Konrad

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the acceptance of computerized assessment, particularly compared to conventional paper-and-pencil techniques, in seriously impaired psychiatric inpatients. Describes the development of a self-rating questionnaire (OPQ, Operation and Preference Questionnaire) and reports results that showed computerized assessment was convincingly…

  14. Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Admission Rates and Subsequent One-Year Mortality in England: 1998-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Anthony; Clacey, Joe; Seagroatt, Valerie; Goldacre, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a time of very rapid change not only in physical but also psychological development. During the teenage years there is a reported rise in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate age- and sex-specific National Health Service (NHS) hospital inpatient admission rates for psychiatric…

  15. Gender and Disorder Specific Criminal Career Profiles in Former Adolescent Psychiatric In-Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjelsberg, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    A Norwegian nation-wide sample of 1087 former adolescent psychiatric in-patients, 584 males and 503 females, were followed up 15-33 years after first hospitalization. On the basis of detailed hospital records from index hospitalization all were rediagnosed according to DSM-IV. The patient list was linked to the national criminal register and the…

  16. A guest in the house: nursing instructors' experiences of the moral distress felt by students during inpatient psychiatric clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Wojtowicz, Bernadine; Hagen, Brad

    2014-07-23

    Significant research has been done on the impact of moral distress among nurses, particularly in acute and intensive care settings. However, little research to date has investigated the experiences that nursing students have with moral distress. Additionally, there is a dearth of research on the role of nursing instructors' perceptions of their responsibilities to their students when encountering morally distressing situations. This manuscript describes a qualitative study conducted with eight mental health nursing instructors who acknowledged a responsibility for helping students deal with moral distress and ethical issues, but who also struggled with ways to do so. Additionally, instructors expressed frustration with their "guest" status on inpatient psychiatric units and their powerlessness to effect moral change in a medical model of psychiatric care.

  17. The psychiatric inpatient physical health assessment sheet (PIPHAS): a useful tool to improve the speed, efficiency, and documentation of physical examination in new psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Pettipher, Alexander; Ovens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    There is increased morbidity and mortality among patients suffering from mental illness. This is believed to be multi-factorial. Poor access to healthcare, the stigma of mental illness, reduced clinic attendance, lifestyle factors, and side effects of medications are cited as possible contributing factors. It is therefore vital to perform a physical examination to identify previously undiagnosed conditions during the admission of a psychiatric inpatient. The Royal College of Psychiatrists recommends that all patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital should receive a full physical examination on admission, or within twenty-four hours of admission. A snapshot audit was carried out at Prospect Park Hospital in Reading, which highlighted that The Royal College of Psychiatrist's recommendation, along with Trust guidelines regarding physical examination were not being met, with only 78 out of 111 patients (70.3%) undergoing an examination during their admission. In addition to this, examinations were often poorly documented and not covering all examination domains. A psychiatric inpatient physical health assessment sheet (PIPHAS) was designed and introduced, providing a quick and standardised approach to the documentation of a physical examination. After the intervention was put into practice, its impact was assessed by performing a retrospective review of the admission clerking notes of the next 100 admissions to Prospect Park Hospital. Following the introduction of the PIPHAS form there was an increase in the number of patients undergoing physical examination on admission to hospital (75 out of 100 patients, 75%). There was also an increase in the thorough documentation of all examination domains (e.g. respiratory examination) for patients that had a completed PIPHAS form scanned within their medical records. This quality improvement project demonstrates that the PIPHAS form is a useful tool to improve the speed, efficiency, and documentation of a thorough physical

  18. Sociodemographic and Clinical Characteristics of Psychiatric Inpatients Hospitalized Involuntarily and Voluntarily in a Mental Health Hospital

    PubMed Central

    GÜLTEKİN, Bülent Kadri; ÇELİK, Seda; TİHAN, Aysu; BEŞKARDEŞ, Ali Fuat; SEZER, Umut

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we aimed to investigate and compare the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of psychiatric inpatients hospitalized involuntarily and voluntarily. To our knowledge, there is no study analyzing involuntary psychiatric hospitalization in our country. Method In this retrospective study, we included a total of 504 patients who were involuntarily or voluntarily hospitalized in Bolu Izzet Baysal Mental Health Hospital between 1st of May and 31st October 2010. The data were obtained from the hospital records. Result In the 6-month period, 13.1% of 504 inpatients were hospitalized involuntarily. The number of male patients who were involuntarily hospitalized was higher than the number of female patients. Most of the patients in the involuntary hospitalized group were graduates of primary school, were not married and were not working at the time of hospitalization. Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis in the involuntarily hospitalized psychiatric patients and these patients needed longer stay in the hospital. The next hospitalization of the involuntarily hospitalized patients was mostly involuntary. Conclusion Most of the involuntarily hospitalized psychiatric inpatients were male, were not working and had the diagnosis of schizophrenia. These general psychiatric risk factors were more important in involuntary hospitalization compared to voluntary hospitalization. We concluded that the high prevalence of involuntary hospitalizations deserved further studies.

  19. Resigned Professionalism? Non-Acute Inpatients and Resident Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanstone, Meredith; Watling, Christopher; Goldszmidt, Mark; Weijer, Charles; Lingard, Lorelei

    2014-01-01

    A growing group of inpatients on acute clinical teaching units have non-acute needs, yet require attention by the team. While anecdotally, these patients have inspired frustration and resource pressures in clinical settings, little is known about the ways in which they influence physician perceptions of the learning environment. This qualitative…

  20. Interpersonal trauma, attachment insecurity and anxiety in an inpatient psychiatric population.

    PubMed

    Wiltgen, Anika; Arbona, Consuelo; Frankel, Leslie; Frueh, B Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Current research suggests that interpersonal trauma has an impact on insecure attachment and anxiety. Some research further suggests that attachment may play a mediating role between traumatic events and psychopathology. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the experience of interpersonal trauma, attachment anxiety, attachment avoidance and clinical anxiety severity among adult psychiatric inpatients who reported having experienced interpersonal trauma after the age of 16. It was hypothesized that attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance would mediate the relationship between interpersonal trauma and clinical anxiety level. This study used archival data on 414 adult psychiatric inpatients in a large city in the Southwest U.S. Results suggest that interpersonal trauma was correlated to attachment avoidance but not to attachment anxiety and that attachment avoidance partially mediated the relation of interpersonal trauma to anxiety. The attachment framework appositely explains how a negative model of other contributes to the relation between experiences of interpersonal trauma and anxiety in adulthood.

  1. Gender differences in psychiatric diagnoses among inpatients with and without intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lunsky, Yona; Bradley, Elspeth A; Gracey, Carolyn D; Durbin, Janet; Koegl, Chris

    2009-01-01

    There are few published studies on the relationship between gender and psychiatric disorders in individuals with intellectual disabilities. Adults (N = 1,971) with and without intellectual disabilities who received inpatient services for psychiatric diagnosis and clinical issues were examined. Among individuals with intellectual disabilities, women were more likely to have a diagnosis of mood disorder and sexual abuse history; men were more likely to have a substance abuse diagnosis, legal issues, and past destructive behavior. Gender difference patterns found for individuals with intellectual disabilities were similar to those of persons without intellectual disabilities, with the exception of eating disorder and psychotic disorder diagnoses. Gender issues should receive greater attention in intellectual disabilities inpatient care.

  2. Self-harm and attempted suicide within inpatient psychiatric services: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    James, Karen; Stewart, Duncan; Bowers, Len

    2012-08-01

    Self harm is a major public health concern, yet there are considerable challenges in providing support for those who self harm within psychiatric inpatient services. This paper presents the first review of research into self harm within inpatient settings. Searches of the main electronic databases were conducted using key words for self harm and inpatient care. There was substantial variation in the rates of self-harm and attempted suicide between studies, but rates were highest on forensic wards. There was no evidence of differences in prevalence of self-harm between men and women; women, however, were at increased risk of attempting suicide. People were more likely to self-harm in private areas of the ward and in the evening hours, and often self-harmed in response to psychological distress, or elements of nursing care that restricted their freedom. Wards used a variety of strategies to prevent self-harm; however, there is little research into their effectiveness.

  3. From ideals to resignation - interprofessional teams perspectives on everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Molin, Jenny; Graneheim, Ulla Hällgren; Ringnér, Anders; Lindgren, Britt-Marie

    2016-11-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Psychiatric inpatient care has been described by both ward staff and patients as being demanding and disorganized, lacking opportunities for quality interactions in everyday life through joint activities. Qualitative research on interprofessional teams' perspectives on everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care is lacking. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Staff have ideals about care and collaboration, but the obstacles they face in everyday life, such as a poor environment, power asymmetry, lacking structure and the demands of managing chaos, mean that they appear to resign and shift focus from the patients' best interests to self-survival. Different professions in general describe the same obstacles in everyday life on the wards but there are also profession-specific perspectives on distancing and feelings of abandonment. To our knowledge, these findings have not been reported in the international evidence. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Given these findings we suggest interventions such as Protected Engagement Time as well as reflective dialogues within interprofessional teams. This would help staff to resume their caring role in everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care and put their ideals into practice.

  4. Mental health recovery for psychiatric inpatient services: perceived importance of the elements of recovery.

    PubMed

    Siu, B W M; Ng, B F L; Li, V C K; Yeung, Y M; Lee, M K L; Leung, A Y H

    2012-06-01

    OBJECTIVES. To develop a questionnaire for measuring the perceived importance of the elements of mental health recovery in psychiatric inpatients in Hong Kong and to test the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. METHODS. Thematic content analysis of identified literature on mental health recovery was performed to identify the elements related to mental health recovery. A questionnaire was developed to assess the perceived importance of the identified elements. An expert panel was set up to evaluate the content validity and patient focus group's face validity of the questionnaire. Participants were recruited from medium-stay and rehabilitation wards of Castle Peak Hospital. RESULTS. A total of 101 psychiatric inpatients completed the questionnaire, the majority of whom suffered from schizophrenia (75%). Having meaning in life was rated by 91% of the participants as an important element of recovery, followed by hope (86%) and general health and wellness (85%). Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency was 0.91. Explorative factor analysis yielded 7 factors and intraclass correlation coefficients revealed a fair-to-good test-retest reliability. CONCLUSIONS. The results supported the psychometric properties of the questionnaire for measurement of mental health recovery and serve as a basis for the future development of recovery-oriented services in the psychiatric inpatient settings in this locality.

  5. Demographics, psychiatric diagnoses, and other characteristics of North American Deaf and hard-of-hearing inpatients.

    PubMed

    Black, Patricia A; Glickman, Neil S

    2006-01-01

    This study examined demographic and clinical data from a specialty deaf inpatient unit so as to better understand characteristics of severely and chronically mentally ill deaf people. The study compares deaf and hearing psychiatric inpatients on demographic variables, psychiatric discharge diagnoses, a language assessment measure, a cognitive ability measure, and a measure of psychosocial functioning and risk of harm to self and others. Overall, findings indicate a broader range of diagnoses than in past studies with posttraumatic stress disorder being the most common diagnosis. Compared with hearing patients in the same hospital, deaf patients were less likely to be diagnosed with a psychotic or substance abuse disorder and more likely to be diagnosed with a mood, anxiety, personality, or developmental disorder. Psychosocial functioning of the deaf patients was generally similar to hearing psychiatric patients. Deaf patients presented significantly higher risks than hearing patients in areas of self-harm and risk of sexual offending. Cognitive scores show that both the deaf and hearing inpatient population is skewed toward persons who are lower functioning. An additional surprising finding was that 75% of deaf individuals fell into the nonfluent range of communication in American Sign Language.

  6. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide—An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Trine; Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-01-01

    People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during admission. Most studies are based on low power, thus compromising quality and generalisability. The few studies with sufficient statistical power mainly identified non-modifiable risk predictors such as male gender, diagnosis, or recent deliberate self-harm. Also, the predictive value of these predictors is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment tools. PMID:28257103

  7. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide-An Overview.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Trine; Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-03-02

    People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during admission. Most studies are based on low power, thus compromising quality and generalisability. The few studies with sufficient statistical power mainly identified non-modifiable risk predictors such as male gender, diagnosis, or recent deliberate self-harm. Also, the predictive value of these predictors is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment tools.

  8. Patterns of psychotropic medication use in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alosaimi, Fahad D; Alhabbad, Abdulhadi; Abalhassan, Mohammed F; Fallata, Ebtihaj O; Alzain, Nasser M; Alassiry, Mohammad Zayed; Haddad, Bander Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the pattern of psychotropic medication use and compare this pattern between inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia. Method This cross-sectional observational study was conducted between July 2012 and June 2014 on patients seeking psychiatric advice at major hospitals in five main regions of Saudi Arabia. Male (n=651) and female (n=594) patients who signed the informed consent form and were currently or had been previously using psychotropic medications, irrespective of the patient’s type of psychiatric diagnosis and duration of the disease, were included. A total of 1,246 patients were found to be suitable in the inclusion criteria of whom 464 were inpatients while 782 were outpatients. Results Several studied demographic factors have shown that compared with outpatients, inpatients were more likely to be male (P=0.004), unmarried (P<0.001), have less number of children (1–3; P=0.002), unemployed (P=0.001), have a lower family income (<3,000 SR; P<0.001), live in rural communities (P<0.001), have a lower body mass index (P=0.001), and are smokers (P<0.001); however, there were no differences with regard to age or educational levels. The current frequency of use of psychotropic medications in overall patients was antipsychotics (76.6%), antidepressants (41.4%), mood stabilizers (27.9%), and antianxiety (6.2%). However, compared to outpatients, the current use of medications for inpatients was more frequent (93.8% vs 89.9%, P=0.019) with inpatients more likely to be treated with multiple medications (2.1 vs 1.8 medications). A similar trend was observed in the case of antipsychotics, high potency first-generation antipsychotics, second-generation antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and antianxiety medicines where inpatients were more frequently treated with these medications for all psychiatric diagnoses when compared with outpatients. On the contrary, in the case of antidepressant treatment, an opposite trend was observed

  9. Use of Inpatient Psychiatric Services by Children and Youth under Age 18, United States, 1980. Mental Health Statistical Note No. 175.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milazzo-Sayre, Laura J.; And Others

    The report examines data from three sample surveys of admissions during 1980 to the inpatient psychiatric services of state and mental hospitals and private psychiatric hospitals and the separate inpatient psychiatric services of non-federal general hospitals. Findings revealed that an estimated 81,532 persons under 18 years were admitted to…

  10. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of the 90 days spent in the general hospital. (3) An individual was admitted to a general hospital... initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a psychiatric... participating in Medicare as a psychiatric hospital on the individual's first day of entitlement. (3)...

  11. Is Exposure to Domestic Violence and Violent Crime Associated with Bullying Behaviour among Underage Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustanoja, Susanna; Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Hakko, Helina; Rasanen, Pirkko; Saavala, Hannu; Riala, Kaisa

    2011-01-01

    We examined the relationship of exposure to domestic violence and violence occurring outside home to bullying behaviour in a sample (508; 40.9% males, 59.1% females) of underage psychiatric inpatient adolescents. Participants were interviewed using K-SADS-PL to assess DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses and to gather information about domestic and other…

  12. Reducing Length of Acute Inpatient Hospitalization Using a Residential Step Down Model for Patients with Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Zarzar, Theodore; Sheitman, Brian; Cook, Alan; Robbins, Brian

    2017-02-23

    Psychiatric inpatient bed numbers have been markedly reduced in recent decades often resulting in long emergency department wait times for acutely ill psychiatric patients. The authors describe a model utilizing short-term residential treatment to substitute for acute inpatient care when the barrier to discharge for patients with serious mental illness (SMI) is finding appropriate community placement. Thirty-eight patients (community hospital (n = 30) and a state hospital (n = 8)) were included. Clinical variables, pre-/post-step down length of stay, and adverse outcomes are reported. Thirty of the 38 patients completed treatment on the residential unit and were discharged to the community. Five of the patients required readmission to an inpatient unit and the other three had pre-planned state hospital discharges. The majority of patients with SMI awaiting placement can be stepped down to residential treatment, potentially freeing up an inpatient bed for an acutely ill patient. Reforms in healthcare funding are necessary to incentivize such an approach on a larger scale, despite likely cost savings.

  13. Inpatient Suicide in a Psychiatric Hospital: A Nested Case–control Study

    PubMed Central

    Khanra, Sourav; Mahintamani, Tathagata; Bose, Swarnali; Khess, Christoday Raja Jayant; Umesh, Shreekantiah; Ram, Daya

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Risk factors for inpatient suicide are different from those in the general population. We examined sociodemographic and clinical variables of patients who committed suicide as an inpatient in a psychiatric hospital in India. Methods: Matched retrospective nested case–control design was adopted. Ten patients who died by suicide as inpatients between 2000 and 2013 were included, along with fifty controls, matched with respect to age, sex, diagnosis, and period of admission. Results: Suicide completers were mostly unskilled in occupation (P = 0.03), had a history of past suicide attempts (P < 0.001), shorter duration of hospital stay (P = 0.001), poorer improvement on psychopathology (P = 0.02), and were having more suicidal ideation (P = 0.02). Significantly more completers were receiving antidepressants (P = 0.04). Conclusion: This study adds to the existing sparse literature on inpatient suicides from Asia. Strength of the study was close matching between case and controls and blindedness. Limitations were retrospective design, and variations in prescription behavior and treatment decisions. PMID:28031595

  14. Effects of a single-session assertiveness music therapy role playing protocol for psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement and measure the effectiveness of a single-session assertiveness music therapy role playing protocol for psychiatric inpatients. Participants (N=133) were randomly assigned by group to one of three conditions: (a) Assertiveness Music Therapy, (b) No Music Assertiveness, or (c) Music No Assertiveness. Participants in both assertiveness conditions role played a number of different commonly occurring scenarios at an inpatient psychiatric facility and in the community. There were no significant between-group differences in posttest quality of life, locus of control, or other subscales. However, participants in both assertiveness conditions tended to have slightly higher internal locus of control and overall quality of life scores than participants in the music no assertiveness condition. Additionally, the assertiveness music therapy condition had higher attendance rates than the other conditions. A higher percentage of participants from both the assertiveness music therapy and music no assertiveness conditions indicated they thought their session was the most helpful/therapeutic group therapy session in which they had participated; this was not the case for the assertiveness no music condition. Future research is warranted to measure the effects of protocols that can help psychiatric patients generalize skills learned in treatment.

  15. Rehabilitation Needs of Chronic Female Inpatients Attending Day-care in a Tertiary Care Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Avinash; Sherine, Linda; Sivakumar, Thanapal; Kumar, C. Naveen; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Female patients hospitalized for a long duration in psychiatric hospitals are a special population with unique needs. Aims and Objectives: To assess rehabilitation needs of chronic female inpatients attending psychiatric rehabilitation services in a tertiary care psychiatric hospital. Materials and Methods: Rehabilitation needs of nine chronic female inpatients were assessed with an interview schedule developed by expert consensus. The needs were elicited from the patients. Perspectives of nursing staff, vocational instructors, and treating psychiatrists were also sought. Results and Conclusion: Most patients expressed the need for more incentives for working in day-care, variety in food and grooming items. The nursing staff felt many patients could be placed outside, and the family members should come more frequently to meet them. Vocational instructors felt that patients need more incentives, variety in food and work. Treating psychiatrists said that major barriers in discharging and placing them were nonavailability or poor involvement of family members. Services like supported housing, supported education and supported employment are necessary to cater to their complex needs. PMID:27011400

  16. The discriminating characteristics of for-profit versus not-for-profit freestanding psychiatric inpatient facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Culhane, D P; Hadley, T R

    1992-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics that discriminate between ownership types among private, freestanding psychiatric inpatient facilities in the United States. Use of data from the Inventory of Mental Health Organizations (National Institute of Mental Health 1983, 1986), revealed that not-for-profits provide more services and serve more of the underinsured, while for-profits serve the better insured, concentrate primarily on inpatient services, and serve more children, adolescents, and substance abusers. A surplus bed capacity among for-profit psychiatric hospitals is presumed to contribute to lower occupancy rates and less turnover in the for-profit sector. Not-for-profit psychiatric facilities are also found to be more involved in professional training and to be more accessible through emergency services. However, the misclassification test in the discriminant procedure reveals that a significant group of not-for-profit facilities looks more like its for-profit counterpart group than like other not-for-profits. Study findings are interpreted both in terms of debates over the tax-exempt status of not-for-profit hospitals and the potential negative service effects of proprietization. PMID:1592604

  17. Prevalence of periodontal disease among inpatients in a psychiatric hospital in India.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Ajithkrishnan Champettil; Iyer, Ramya Radhakrishnan; Kalantharakath, Thanveer

    2012-01-01

    This paper assessed the periodontal status of inpatients at Government Mental Hospital, Vadodara, India, and studied the possible relationship between periodontal status and age, length of hospitalization, type of mental illness, and medication and tobacco use. Information about psychiatric diagnosis, length of hospitalization, and prescribed medication was obtained from hospital records. We interviewed 165 inpatients and recorded their chief dental complaints (if any) and relevant histories. Periodontal status was assessed using the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Descriptive statistics, nonparametric tests, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. The most prevalent periodontal condition was shallow pockets (47.27%). Some subjects (10.3%) had loss of attachment (LOA) of 9-11 mm. Age and length of hospitalization were significantly associated with periodontal status. Multiple logistic regression revealed that only age was significantly associated with periodontal pockets. Male gender, age, and tobacco-related habits were significantly associated with LOA of more than 0-3 mm.

  18. Hospice referral after inpatient psychiatric treatment of individuals with advanced dementia from a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Fulton, Ana Tuya; Marino, Louis J; Teno, Joan

    2015-06-01

    This report addresses the discharge disposition following inpatient psychiatric treatment for advanced dementia. The total population included 685 305 Medicare fee-for-service decedents with advanced cognitive and functional impairment, with a mean age of 85.9 years who had resided in a nursing home. In the last 90 days of life, 1027 (0.15%) persons received inpatient psychiatry treatment just prior to the place of care where the individual died. Discharge dispositions included 132 (12.9%) persons to a medical hospital, 728 (70.9%) to nursing home without hospice services, 73 (7.1%) to hospice services in a nursing home, 32 (3.1%) to home without hospice services, and 16 (1.6%) to hospice services at home. Overall, the rate of referral to hospice services for advanced dementia was relatively low.

  19. The shift of psychiatric inpatient care from hospitals to jails and prisons.

    PubMed

    Lamb, H Richard; Weinberger, Linda E

    2005-01-01

    Far-reaching structural changes have been made in the mental health system. Many severely mentally ill persons who come to the attention of law enforcement now receive their inpatient treatment in jails and prisons, at least in part, because of a dramatic reduction of psychiatric inpatient beds. While more high-quality community treatment, such as intensive case management and assertive community treatment, is needed, the authors believe that for many, 24-hour structured care is needed in the mental health system for various lengths of time to decrease criminalization. Another central theme of this article is that when a mentally ill individual is arrested, that person now has a computerized criminal record, which is easily accessed by the police and the courts in subsequent encounters. This may influence their decisions and reinforce the tendency to choose the criminal justice system over the mental health system.

  20. Use of novel psychoactive substances by inpatients on general adult psychiatric wards

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jack L; Mogford, Daniel V; Lawrence, Rebecca J; Lawrie, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Non-illicit alternatives to controlled drugs, known as novel psychoactive substances (NPS), have recently risen to prominence. They are readily available, with uncertain pharmacology and no widely available assay. Given that psychiatric patients are at risk of comorbid substance abuse, we hypothesised that NPS use would be present in the psychiatric population, and sought to determine its prevalence and investigate the characteristics of those who use these drugs with a retrospective review of discharge letters. Setting General adult inpatient wards of a psychiatric hospital in a Scottish city. Participants All adult inpatients (18–65) discharged from general psychiatric wards between 1 July 2014 and 31 December 2014. Of the 483 admissions identified, 46 were admissions for maintenance electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and were excluded. Of the remaining 437 admissions, 49 discharge letters were unobtainable, leaving 388 admissions to analyse. Primary outcome measure The mention, or lack thereof, of NPS use in discharge letters was our planned primary outcome measure and was also the primary outcome measure we used in our analysis. Results NPS use was identified in 22.2% of admissions, contributing to psychiatric symptoms in 59.3%. In comparison to non-users, NPS users were younger (p<0.01), male and more likely to have a forensic history ((p<0.001) for both). The diagnosis of drug-induced psychosis was significantly more likely in NPS users (p<0.001, OR 18.7, 95% CI 8.1 to 43.0) and the diagnosis of depression was significantly less likely (p<0.005, OR 0.133, CI 0.031 to 0.558). Use of cannabis was significantly more likely in NPS users (p<0.001, OR 4.2, CI 2.5 to 7.1), as was substitute opiate prescribing (p<0.001, OR 3.7, CI 1.8 to 7.4). Conclusions NPS use was prevalent among young, male psychiatric inpatients, in particular those with drug-induced psychosis and often occurred alongside illicit drug use. PMID:27165643

  1. Relational stressors as predictors for repeat aggressive and self-harming incidents in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Ulke, Christine; Klein, Annette M; von Klitzing, Kai

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether relational stressors such as psychosocial stressors, the therapist's absence and a change of therapist are associated with repeat aggressive or self-harming incidents in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient care. The study data were derived from critical incident reports and chart reviews of 107 inpatients. In multinomial regression analysis, patients with repeat aggressive or self-harming incidents were compared with patients with single incidents. Results suggested that a higher number of psychosocial stressors and a change of therapist, but not the therapist's absence are predictors for repeat aggressive and self-harming incidents. There was a high prevalence of therapist's absence during both, single and repeat, incidents. Repeat aggressive incidents were common in male children and adolescents with disruptive behavior disorders. Repeat self-harming incidents were common in adolescent females with trauma-related disorders. Patients with repeat aggressive or self-harming incidents had a higher number of abnormal intrafamilial relationships and acute life events than patients with single incidents. Interventions to reduce a change of therapist should in particular target children and adolescents with a higher number of psychosocial stressors and/or a known history of traumatic relational experiences. After a first incident, patients should have a psychosocial assessment to evaluate whether additional relational support is needed.

  2. Tripartite structure of positive and negative affect, depression, and anxiety in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Joiner, T E; Catanzaro, S J; Laurent, J

    1996-08-01

    The tripartite model of depression and anxiety suggests that depression and anxiety have shared (generalized negative affect) and specific (anhedonia and physiological hyperarousal) components. In one of the 1st studies to examine the structure of mood-related symptoms in youngsters, this model was tested among 116 child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients, ages 8-16 (M = 12.46; SD = 2.33). Consistent with the tripartite model, a 3-factor (Depression, Anxiety, and Negative Affect) model represented the observed data well. Follow-up analyses suggested that a nonhierarchical arrangement of the 3 factors may be preferable to a hierarchical one.

  3. Psychiatric nursing as 'different' care: experience of Iranian mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Zarea, K; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, A; Abbaszadeh, A; Mohammadpour, A

    2013-03-01

    Patients with mental illness require unique and specific care. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses, who provide such care for mentally ill people, within the context of Iranian culture. This hermeneutic phenomenological study was carried out in a university-affiliated hospital in an urban area of Iran. We interviewed 10 mental health nurses to capture in detail their experiences in psychiatric units, and the approach developed by Diekelmann et al. was employed to analyse the data. Four themes and five sub-themes were identified: 'being engaged with patients' (sub-themes: 'struggle for monitor/control', 'safety/security concerns', 'supporting physiological and emotional needs'), 'being competent', 'altruistic care' and 'facing difficulties and challenges' (sub-themes: 'socio-cultural' and 'organizational challenges'). The results provide valuable insights and greater understanding of the professional experiences of psychiatric nurses in Iran, and indicate the need for a stable and responsible organizational structure for those nurses who are expected to manage patient care in psychiatric wards.

  4. Prevalence and denial of sexual abuse in a male psychiatric inpatient population.

    PubMed

    Lab, Damon D; Moore, Estelle

    2005-08-01

    While the link between sexual abuse and psychiatric morbidity is well established, there are only a few studies that have investigated the prevalence of sexual abuse in male psychiatric populations and these studies have typically employed designs that ignore methodological issues specific to male sexual abuse. The present study aims to contribute to this research using as methodologically sound approach as possible. Seventy-four male inpatients were interviewed using a questionnaire (J. N. Briere, 1992) about childhood sexual experiences. Approximately one third reported incidents that met this study's criteria for sexual abuse. Many of these men did not label such experiences as "sexual abuse." The results suggest that mental health professionals need to be aware that many of their male patients may have a history of sexual abuse and that potential minimization or denial of it is a barrier to disclosure.

  5. Profiles of psychiatric symptoms among Amphetamine Type Stimulant and Ketamine using inpatients in Wuhan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yao; Xu, Zaifeng; Zhang, Sheng; Desrosiers, Alethea; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Chawarski, Marek C.

    2014-01-01

    Amphetamine type stimulants (ATS) and ketamine have emerged as major drug problems in China, and chronic extensive exposure to these substances frequently co-occurs with psychiatric symptoms. This study compares the psychiatric symptoms of patients reporting ATS use only, ATS and ketamine use, or ketamine use only who were admitted to an inpatient psychiatry ward in Wuhan, China between 2010 and 2011. Data on 375 study participants collected during their ward admission and extracted from their clinical records included their socio-demographics, scores on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), and urine toxicology screens. Results The ketamine-only group had significantly lower total BPRS scores and significantly lower scores on Thinking Disorder, Activity, and Hostility-Suspicion BPRS subscales than the ATS-only and ATS+ketamine groups (p<0.001 for all comparisons). The ketamine-only group also had significantly higher scores on the subscales of Anxiety-Depression and Anergia. The ATS-only group had significantly higher scores on subscales of Thinking Disorder, Activity, and Hostility-Suspicion and significantly lower scores on Anxiety-Depression and Anergia subscales than the ketamine-only and ATS+ketamine groups (p<0.001 for all comparisons). A K-means cluster method identified three distinct clusters of patients based on the similarities of their BPRS subscale profiles, and the identified clusters differed markedly on the proportions of participants reporting different primary drugs of abuse. The study findings suggest that ketamine and ATS users present with different profiles of psychiatric symptoms at admission to inpatient treatment. PMID:24613031

  6. Utilization of psychiatric inpatient care in Greece: a nationwide study (1984-1996).

    PubMed

    Madianos, M G; Zacharakis, C; Tsitsa, C

    2000-01-01

    This report examines the trends in the utilization of psychiatric inpatient care for the period 1984-1996, when the implementation of the psychiatric reform programme was initiated in Greece. Admissions in public mental hospitals declined by 7.2%. However discharges have been increased by 30.6% with a parallel decrease of the length of stay by 53.7% followed by an increase in discharges of patients diagnosed as suffering from schizophrenia and affective psychoses by 61.1% and 123.8% respectively. In the private sector a remarkable reduction in both admissions and discharges was noticed. Admissions in psychiatric departments of general hospitals for the same years have been increased by 1054.1%. It seems that the recent deinstitutionalization process resulted in increasing trends in the discharges of patients suffering from psychoses. Additionally, a substantial increase in the number of extramural psychiatric services and rehabilitation places between 1994-1996 was observed. The demand for the mental health care services expressed as the urbanization index was found to be related with mental health professionals and the extramural units ratios. The higher degree of urbanism is, the greater the number of extramural services exist. The models explained variance reached 50.6%.

  7. Patterns of antipsychotics' prescription in Portuguese acute psychiatric wards: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Campos Mendes, João; Azeredo-Lopes, Sofia; Cardoso, Graça

    2016-12-30

    This study aimed to establish the prescribing patterns of antipsychotics in acute psychiatric wards across Portugal, to determine the prevalence of polypharmacy and "high-doses" treatment, and to identify possible predictors. Twelve acute psychiatric inpatient units and 272 patients were included. The majority (87.5%) was treated with antipsychotics regardless of diagnosis, and 41.6% had at least two antipsychotics prescribed in combination. Age, use of depot antipsychotics, and antipsychotic "high-doses" were significant predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Excluding 'as required' prescriptions, 13.8% of the patients were prescribed "high-doses" of antipsychotics. When antipsychotics 'as required' prescriptions were considered, 49.2% of the patients were on antipsychotic "high-doses". Age, use of depot antipsychotics, previous psychiatric hospitalization and involuntary admission were significant predictors of antipsychotic "high-doses". These results show that in Portugal the antipsychotics prescribing practices in psychiatric inpatient units diverge from those that are universally recommended, entailing important clinical and economic implications. It seems advisable to optimize the prescription of these drugs, in order to prevent adverse effects and improve the quality of the services provided.

  8. Associations between sleep disturbance and suicidal ideation in adolescents admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sebastian G; Ali, Shahzad K; Simpson, Brittany; Britt, Victoria; McCall, W Vaughn

    2014-01-01

    The goals of our study were to: 1) describe the incidence of disturbances in sleep quality, sleep hygiene, sleep-related cognitions and nightmares; and 2) investigate the association between these sleep-related disturbances and suicidal ideation (SI), in adolescents admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Our sample consisted of 50 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 years (32 females and 18 males; 41 Caucasian and nine African American). Our cross-sectional design involved the administration of the Adolescent Sleep Wake Scale (ASWS), the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHS), the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep-Short version for use with children (DBAS-C10), the Disturbing Dreams and Nightmare Scale (DDNSI), and the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire Jr (SIQ-JR). Analyses were conducted using Pearson correlations, as well as univariate and multivariate regression. Results indicated that our sample experienced sleep disturbances and SI to a greater degree than non-clinical samples. Sleep quality was correlated with nightmares, while sleep quality and nightmares were each correlated with SI. Sleep quality, dysfunctional beliefs, and nightmares each independently predicted SI. Our study was the first to use the four sleep measures with an adolescent psychiatric inpatient sample. It is important to develop sleep-related assessment tools in high-risk populations given the link between sleep disturbances and suicidality. Furthermore, a better understanding of the relationships between SI and sleep quality, sleep-related cognitions, and nightmares is needed to develop potential prevention and treatment options for suicidality in adolescents.

  9. Psychopathic traits and change on indicators of dynamic risk factors during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Martin; de Ruiter, Corine

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of treatment on forensic psychiatric inpatients, examining changes on 22 indicators of five dynamic risk factors for violence (i.e., egocentrism, hostility, impulsivity, lack of insight, and negative distrustful attitudes), and to relate these potential changes to level of psychopathy assessed with the Hare Psychopathy Checklist - Revised (PCL-R). Also, we studied the relationship between psychopathy and treatment compliance, as indicated by the attendance rate of therapeutic activities. Eighty-seven male patients (due to missing data on at least one measure, sample size varies from 58 to 87; 42 patients have complete datasets) were administered a standardized psychological assessment battery (self-report inventories, performance-based personality test, observer ratings) upon admission (T1) and after on average 20 months of treatment (T2). Upon admission, psychopathy (median split, PCL-R score≥22) was significantly related to a higher score on five of the 22 indicators of dynamic risk. The analyses showed no significant differences between psychopathic and non-psychopathic patients on the indicators of dynamic risk factors during 20 months of inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment. However, psychopaths showed the expected pattern of treatment noncompliance, compared to non-psychopaths. The clinical and research implications of these findings are discussed.

  10. Teaching literacy and mathematics skills to adult psychiatric inpatients: an evaluation of the adult literacy program at Hawaii State Hospital.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Todd N; Meyer, Kim A; Samarasinghe, Roshani

    2005-01-01

    The Adult Literacy Program at Hawaii State Hospital utilized techniques drawn from the Morningside Model of Generative Instruction. In a study involving psychiatric inpatients, participants were taught reading, mathematics, or both over a 6- to 8-month time span. Using the Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery-Revised, it was determined that nearly half of the participants demonstrated academic gains during the study period. Further, a behavioral observation system indicated that participants were on-task 80% of the observation time and staff engaged in positive interactions nearly 20% of the observation time. This study is the first of its kind to document any efficacy for academic instruction with a psychiatric inpatient population.

  11. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates) has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients’ perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be compared with standard care

  12. Seroprevalence of selected viral, bacterial and parasitic infections among inpatients of a public psychiatric hospital of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Arreola-Valenzuela, Miguel Angel; Rodríguez-Briones, Alfredo; Alanís-Quiñones, Olga Patricia; Estrada-Martínez, Sergio; Luevanos-Becerra, Carlos; Martínez-Saenz, Luis Felipe; Martínez-García, Sergio Arturo; Ramírez-Valles, Eda Guadalupe; Ibarra-Torres, Isaac; González-Verdín, Cesar Arnulfo

    2008-01-01

    We sought to determine the frequency of serological markers of selected infections in a population of psychiatric patients in Durango City, Mexico, and to determine whether there are any epidemiological characteristics of the subjects associated with the infections. One hundred and five inpatients of a public psychiatric hospital of Durango were examined for HBsAg, anti-HCV antibodies, anti-HIV antibodies, anti-Brucella antibodies, rapid plasma reagin and anti-Cysticercus antibodies by commercially available assays. Anti-Cysticercus antibodies were confirmed by Western blot and HBsAg by neutralization assay. Epidemiological data from each participant were also obtained. Seroprevalences of HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV, anti-Brucella, rapid plasma reagin and anti-Cysticercus antibodies found were 0.0%, 4.8%, 0.9%, 0.0%, 1.9%, and 0.9%, respectively. Overall, 9 (8.6%) inpatients showed seropositivity to any infection marker. We concluded that our psychiatric inpatients have serological evidence of a number of infections. HCV is an important pathogen among our psychiatric inpatients. Health care strategies for prevention and control of infections in Mexican psychiatric patients should be considered.

  13. Association of Family Structure to Later Criminality: A Population-Based Follow-Up Study of Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients in Northern Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikaheimo, Olli; Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helina; Rasanen, Pirkko

    2013-01-01

    The influence of family structure on criminality in adolescents is well acknowledged in population based studies of delinquents, but not regarding adolescent psychiatric inpatients. The association of family structure to criminality was examined among 508 adolescents receiving psychiatric inpatient treatment between 2001 and 2006. Family structure…

  14. The relationship between executive functions and capacity to consent to treatment in acute psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Mandarelli, Gabriele; Parmigiani, Giovanna; Tarsitani, Lorenzo; Frati, Paola; Biondi, Massimo; Ferracuti, Stefano

    2012-12-01

    Despite the acknowledged influence of cognition on patients' capacity to consent to treatment, the specific neuropsychological domains involved remain elusive, as does the role of executive functions. We investigated possible associations between executive functions and decisional capacity in a sample of acute psychiatric inpatients. Patients were recruited and evaluated through the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment (MacCAT-T), the 24-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Patients with poor executive functioning performed worse in MacCAT understanding, appreciation, and expression of a choice, compared with good performers. These findings point to the importance of cognition in decisional capacity processes. In addition, the strong association found between learning abilities and informed consent decision-making provide empirical evidence indicating possible cognitive enhancement strategies that may improve psychiatric patients' competency.

  15. [Foreign patients in inpatient treatment in a psychiatric university clinic with community service].

    PubMed

    Holzmann, T H; Volk, S; Georgi, K; Pflug, B

    1994-05-01

    About one third (29.5%) of the population living within the area of Frankfurt, for which the psychiatric university clinic provides psychiatric service, are foreigners. For the better understanding of our foreign psychiatric inpatients treated in our clinic in in 1992, the diagnostic spectrum and the nationalities of these patients were analysed. More than half of them (58%) were raised up in former Yugoslavia, Turkey, Italy, Poland and Marocco. The other foreign patients came from 36 different countries. The diagnostic spectrum comparing german and foreign patients showed marked differences. Paranoid schizophrenia was more common in foreigners (31.5%) compared with german patients (16.8%), as well as female foreigners were admitted to the clinic because of psychoreactive disorders (65.2% of all turkish females) more often. The language barrier limited the treatment in many patients. In addition treatment was also hampered by family induced pressure on our patients. This was mainly due to differences and misunderstanding concerning the nature and treatment strategies. In spite of these difficulties, engagement of the therapeutic teams and treatment outcome did not differ between german and foreign patients. In order to improve treatment modalities, we quote for an increasing number of psychiatrists, who are capable of serbocroatic, turkish, italian, polish or arab language and culture, to work in clinical psychiatry.

  16. Psychiatric and Cognitive Functioning in Adolescent Inpatients with Histories of Dating Violence Victimization

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Christie J.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Spirito, Anthony; Thompson, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    The presence of dating violence victimization as well as its relation to psychiatric diagnosis and cognitive processes was examined in a sample of 155 adolescents hospitalized in a psychiatric facility. Participants and their parents completed semi-structured diagnostic interviews. Participants also completed self-report measures of dating violence victimization and cognitive functioning. Seventy-seven percent of adolescents who had initiated dating reported psychological, physical, and/or sexual abuse by a dating partner over the past year. Victims of psychological abuse alone as well as physical and/or sexual violence endorsed higher rates of major depressive disorder compared to non-victims. Physical/sexual dating violence victims also endorsed significantly higher rates of PTSD and alcohol use disorders, more frequent co-occurrence of externalizing and internalizing disorders, and more frequent negative cognitive biases, relative to non-victimized adolescents. Findings suggest that psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents with dating violence histories represent a subgroup of adolescent inpatients with a particularly serious clinical picture. PMID:20824193

  17. Substance Use Disorders in Elderly Admissions to an Academic Psychiatric Inpatient Service over a 10-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowski, Dennis; Norrell, Nelly

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is a paucity of research on substance use disorders (SUDs) in the elderly psychiatric population. This study examines SUDs in a geriatric psychiatry inpatient service over a 10-year period. Methods. Data from 1788 elderly psychiatric inpatients from a ten-year period was collected. Variables collected included psychiatric diagnoses, SUD, number of psychiatric admissions, and length of stay. Those with and without a SUD were compared using Chi-Square or Student's t-test as appropriate using SPSS. Results. 11.7% (N = 210) of patients had a SUD, and the most common substance was alcohol at 73.3% (N = 154) or 8.6% of all admissions. Other SUDs were sedative-hypnotics (11%), opiate (2.9%), cannabis (1%), tobacco (1.4%), and unspecified SUD (38.6%). SUD patients were significantly younger, divorced, male, and less frequently readmitted and had shorter lengths of stay. The most common comorbid diagnoses were major depression (26.1%), bipolar disorder (10.5%), and dementia (17.1%). Conclusions. Over 10% of psychogeriatric admissions were associated with a SUD, with alcohol being the most common. Considering the difficulties in diagnosing SUD in this population and the retrospective study design, the true prevalence in elderly psychiatric inpatients is likely higher. This study adds to sparse literature on SUD in elderly psychiatric patients. PMID:27840765

  18. Investigation into the acceptability of door locking to staff, patients, and visitors on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; van der Merwe, Marie; Nijman, Henk; Haglund, Kristina; Simpson, Alan; Bowers, Len

    2012-02-01

    There is disagreement among psychiatric professionals about whether the doors of acute psychiatric wards should be kept locked to prevent patients from leaving and harming themselves or others. This study explored patient, staff, and visitor perceptions about the acceptability of locking the ward door on acute psychiatric inpatient wards. Interviews were conducted with 14 registered nurses, 15 patients, and six visitors from three different acute wards. Findings revealed commonalities across all groups, with general agreement that locking the door reduced absconding. Staff expressed feelings of guilt, embarrassment, and fear of being blamed when a patient absconded. Staff also reported that open wards created anxious vigilance to prevent an abscond and increased workload in allocating staff to watch the door, whereas staff on partially-locked doors also perceived an increased workload in letting people in and out of the ward. Patients had mixed feelings about the status of the door, expressing depression, a sense of stigma, and low self-esteem when the door was locked. The issue of balancing safety and security on acute psychiatric wards against the autonomy of patients is not easily resolved, and requires focused research to develop innovative nursing practices.

  19. State of Acute Agitation at Psychiatric Emergencies in Europe: The STAGE Study

    PubMed Central

    San, Luis; Marksteiner, Josef; Zwanzger, Peter; Figuero, María Aragüés; Romero, Francisco Toledo; Kyropoulos, Grigorios; Peixoto, Alberto Bessa; Chirita, Roxana; Boldeanu, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Background: Agitation is an array of syndromes and types of behaviors that are common in patients with psychiatric disorders. In Europe, the estimation of prevalence of agitation has been difficult due to the lack of standard studies or systematic data collection done on this syndrome. Objective: An observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study aimed to assess the prevalence of agitation episodes in psychiatric emergencies in different European countries. Method: For 1 week, all episodes of acute agitation that were attended to at the psychiatric emergency room (ER) or Acute Inpatient Unit (AIU) in the 27 participating centers were registered. The clinical characteristics and management of the agitation episode were also described. A descriptive analysis was performed. Results: A total of 334 agitation episodes out of 7295 psychiatric emergencies were recorded, giving a prevalence rate of 4.6% (95% CI: 4.12-5.08). Of them, 172 [9.4% (95% CI: 8.2-10.9)] were attended at the ER and 162 [2.8% (95% CI: 2.4-3.3)] at AIU. Only data from 165 episodes of agitation (those with a signed informed consent form) was registered and described in this report. The most common psychiatric conditions associated with agitation were schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and personality disorder. The management of agitation included from non-invasive to more coercive measures (mechanical, physical restraint or seclusion) that were unavoidable in more than half of the agitation episodes (59.5%). Conclusion: The results show that agitation is a common symptom in the clinical practice, both in emergency and inpatient psychiatric departments. Further studies are warranted to better recognize (using a standardized definition) and characterize agitation episodes. PMID:27857778

  20. Behavioural antecedents to pro re nata psychotropic medication administration on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Duncan; Robson, Deborah; Chaplin, Robert; Quirk, Alan; Bowers, Len

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the antecedents to administration of pro re nata (PRN) psychotropic medication on acute psychiatric wards, with a particular focus on its use in response to patient aggression and other conflict behaviours. A sample of 522 adult in-patients was recruited from 84 acute psychiatric wards in England. Data were collected from nursing and medical records for the first 2  weeks of admission. Two-thirds of patients received PRN medication during this period, but only 30% of administrations were preceded by patient conflict (usually aggression). Instead, it was typically administered to prevent escalation of patient behaviour and to help patients sleep. Overall, no conflict behaviours or further staff intervention occurred after 61% of PRN administrations. However, a successful outcome was less likely when medication was administered in response to patient aggression. The study concludes that improved monitoring, review procedures, training for nursing staff, and guidelines for the administration of PRN medications are needed.

  1. Psychiatric In-Patients Away from Home: Accounts by People with Intellectual Disabilities in Specialist Hospitals outside Their Home Localities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Deborah; Hall, Ian; Ali, Afia; Hassell, Holly; Patkas, Iannis

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study reflects a growing concern with the placement of people with intellectual disabilities and complex mental health problems in out of area placements at a distance from their families and communities. Materials and methods: We interviewed service users (n = 17) living in out of area in-patient psychiatric units using a…

  2. Problems in Differentiating Sexually from Nonsexually Abused Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients by Self-Reported Anxiety, Depression, Internalization, and Externalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Geetha; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Several measures of psychopathology were administered to 111 psychiatric inpatients (ages 13 to 17) including 46 patients who reported sexually abusive experiences. None of the scales was correlated with sexual abuse in either sex, and a history of physical abuse was the only characteristic that significantly correlated with sexual abuse for both…

  3. Sensory Modulation Treatment on a Psychiatric Inpatient Unit: Results of a Pilot Program.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the current pilot program was to measure efficacy of sensory modulation treatment for adults (N = 20) admitted to an inpatient, involuntary psychiatric unit. Efficacy of 1-hour group (n = 10) and 1-hour individual (n = 9) sensory modulation treatment was measured via pre- and postintervention self-rating scales (visual analog scale from 0 to 10, with 0 = low arousal and 10 = high arousal) and post-survey. Results indicated treatment elicited an average self-perceived change in arousal of 1.93. Group treatment elicited an average self-rating change of 1.79, whereas individual treatment elicited an average change of 2.67. For participants who initially rated their arousal level ≥6, group treatment elicited a change of 4.5, whereas individual treatment elicited a change of 7.5. Participants sought materials and activities that were primarily categorized into the olfactory, gustatory, and auditory sensory systems.

  4. Multiple-baseline analysis of a token economy for psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, G L; Cone, J D

    1979-01-01

    Twelve behaviors selected for reinforcement among 16 chronic psychiatric inpatients were divided into four classes: (a) personal hygiene, (b) personal management, (c) ward work, and (d) social skills. A token economy program was introduced for each class in a sequential, cumulative, multiple-baseline format. Corrections were included for methodological deficiencies frequently enountered in past studies. Treatment variables were systematically monitored, and target behavior rates, levels of global individual functioning, general ward behavior, and off-ward behavior were assessed during baseline, implementation, and probe periods. Results indicated abrupt and substantial increases in performance of most target behaviors, significant improvements in global individual functioning (p less than .025), positive changes in general ward behavior, and increases in social interaction during off-ward activities. The findings provide strong evidence for the efficacy of a token economy and indicate that the multiple-baseline design can be a useful method for evaluating token economy programs. PMID:489481

  5. Ringleader bullying: association with psychopathic narcissism and theory of mind among child psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Stellwagen, Kurt K; Kerig, Patricia K

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the association of ringleader bullying with psychopathic traits and theory of mind among 100 youth aged 10-15 (62 boys and 38 girls) receiving inpatient psychiatric services at a state facility. Results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated a positive association between ringleader bullying and psychopathic narcissism, and a significant interaction effect between narcissism and theory of mind. More specifically, narcissism moderated the relationship between theory of mind and ringleader bullying such that theory of mind was positively associated with ringleader bullying when levels of narcissism were high, and theory of mind was negatively associated ringleader bullying when levels of narcissism were low. The discussion of these results focuses on the importance of developing effective treatment techniques for youth whose bullying behavior is associated with narcissistic features and social acuity.

  6. Multiple-baseline analysis of a token economy for psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G L; Cone, J D

    1979-01-01

    Twelve behaviors selected for reinforcement among 16 chronic psychiatric inpatients were divided into four classes: (a) personal hygiene, (b) personal management, (c) ward work, and (d) social skills. A token economy program was introduced for each class in a sequential, cumulative, multiple-baseline format. Corrections were included for methodological deficiencies frequently enountered in past studies. Treatment variables were systematically monitored, and target behavior rates, levels of global individual functioning, general ward behavior, and off-ward behavior were assessed during baseline, implementation, and probe periods. Results indicated abrupt and substantial increases in performance of most target behaviors, significant improvements in global individual functioning (p less than .025), positive changes in general ward behavior, and increases in social interaction during off-ward activities. The findings provide strong evidence for the efficacy of a token economy and indicate that the multiple-baseline design can be a useful method for evaluating token economy programs.

  7. Universal parent training as a supplement to inpatient psychiatric treatment for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schwenck, Christina; Schneider, Wolfgang; Reichert, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Parent trainings constitute an effective method to target aspects of parenting in child and adolescent psychiatric and psychotherapeutic care. Past research has mainly been conducted in outpatient contexts, with parents of children with externalizing disorders and often included only small sample sizes. The aim of the current study was first to assess the effectiveness of a novel parent training which is characterized by a universal approach, an open group concept, and short duration, and second to identify variables that have an influence on the effectiveness. A sample of n = 151 parent-child dyads treated in an inpatient clinic was included in the study and randomly assigned to a treatment group and a waiting-list control group. As dependent measures served child behavior problems, dysfunctional parenting, parental mental health, and parental self-efficacy measured with parent-rated questionnaires prior to the training, post training and 3 months after discharge of the clinic. Additionally, a parent-child-interaction observation was conducted and rated by blind raters. Results indicated a general inpatient treatment effect on all dependent measures assessed with questionnaires. An additional effect of the parent training was only shown for parenting and parental mental health with the treatment group revealing better outcomes post training and at follow-up. No effects were found for the measures assessed by interaction observation. Out of a number of variables, only a low monthly income was associated with a higher reduction of dysfunctional parenting. Results indicate that parent training does not contribute additionally to standard inpatient care with respect to child behavior, but does have an influence on parental well-being, which might have a positive effect on the long run.

  8. Reduced amygdala volume in newly admitted psychiatric in-patients with unipolar major depression.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Golo; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Regen, Francesca; Deuschle, Michael; Heuser, Isabella; Colla, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Structural neuroimaging studies investigating amygdala volumes in patients suffering from major depression have yielded variable results. Discrepant findings across studies may be attributable in part to heterogeneity with respect to antidepressant medication and to lack of adequate control for the effects of total brain volume and age. Here, 24 unipolar depressed in-patients newly admitted to a psychiatric unit and 14 healthy control participants matched for age, gender, and years of education underwent quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) toward the end of a one-week washout period. Saliva cortisol was measured at 08.00 and at 16.00h in patients during washout. Absolute amygdala volumes were significantly reduced in the patient group (by 13% in left amygdala and 12% in right amygdala). The effect of reduced amygdala volumes in patients remained significant after correction for brain volume (BV) and age. Furthermore, amygdala volume measurements in the patient sample showed a significant inverse relationship to the number of preceding depressive episodes. In patients, severity of disease (baseline HAMD scores) and baseline cortisol levels were not related to amygdala volume. This study of a sample of unmedicated depressed in-patients adds to the small, yet growing, body of evidence linking untreated major depression to reduced amygdala volume.

  9. The Effect of Violence on the Diagnoses and the Course of Illness Among Female Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    TEMİZ, Meltem; BEŞTEPE, Emrem; YILDIZ, Özlem; KÜÇÜKGÖNCÜ, Suat; YAZICI, Ayla; ÇALIKUŞU, Celal; ERKOÇ, Şahap

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to determine the rate of exposure to domestic violence among female inpatients at any period of their lives; to investigate the effect of different forms of violence on the diagnoses and the course of the illness. Method The study was conducted on 102 female inpatients treated at Bakirkoy Research and Training Hospital for Psychiatry, Neurology and Neurosurgery. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) was administered and socio-demographic and clinical data was collected. A form designed for the assessment of violence was used to evaluate domestic violence. Results Ninety patients reported that they had been subjected to some kind of violence at some period of their lives. The parents or husbands were the most frequently reported persecutors. Seventy-three patients reported that they had been subjected to violence before the onset of their illness. Seventy-one had been subjected to physical, 79 to verbal, 42 to sexual, 52 to economic violence, and 49 to constraints on social relationship formation. Comorbid diagnosis of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was related to all types of violence. The rate of suicide attempt was found to be significantly related to verbal-emotional violence. Only 12 patients had previously reported being subjected to domestic violence to their psychiatrist. Conclusion Domestic violence, an often overlooked phenomenon, is prevalent among women with psychiatric disorders. Subjection to domestic violence is found to be correlated with PTSD and suicidal attempt.

  10. [Nonfatal suicidal acts in a group of psychiatric inpatients. Situation of Mediterranean immigrants].

    PubMed

    Grube, M

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the correlation of belonging to an ethnic cultural minority and nonfatal suicidal acts (suicide attempts), suicidal ideation, and self-injurious behavior in a group of 494 psychiatric inpatients at the time of admission. The frequency of nonfatal suicidal acts was 15.3% in the group of immigrants ( n=111) and 8.9% in the group of German patients. This difference is significant, but the impact of belonging to the immigration group covaries with the impact of female gender and young age (below 45 years). If all three factors come together the risk of suicide attempts increases threefold. In the immigrant group alone, nonfatal suicidal acts were correlated with "transcultural conflicts". In the group of suicide attempters, we tried to assess the risk of suicide with the help of the "suicide risk list" (Pöldinger) and the suicidal intention with the help of the "suicide intention scale" (Pierce). Additionally, we investigated the method of suicide attempts and categorized them into two groups: "hard" and "weak" methods. We did not find any significant difference between immigrants and German patients concerning suicide risk, suicide intention, and choice of the method. Although there are some methodological shortcomings, we interpret our findings as an indication that immigrant inpatients are more involved in managing the additional stress which results from their immigration. Perhaps nonfatal suicidal behavior represents a risky, but insufficient attempt at "solving" transcultural problems in the immigrant group.

  11. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... 0938-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident... Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term...

  12. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY... Rehabilitation and Respiratory Care Services; Medicaid Program: Accreditation for Providers of Inpatient... ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

  13. Comorbid internet addiction in male clients of inpatient addiction rehabilitation centers: psychiatric symptoms and mental comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Wölfling, Klaus; Beutel, Manfred E; Koch, Andreas; Dickenhorst, Ulrike; Müller, Kai W

    2013-11-01

    Addictive Internet use has recently been proposed to be included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Still, little is known about its nosological features, including comorbidity with other mental disorders and disorder-specific psychopathological symptoms. To investigate whether Internet addiction (IA) is an issue in patients in addiction treatment, 1826 clients were surveyed in 15 inpatient rehabilitation centers. Male patients meeting criteria for comorbid IA (n = 71) were compared with a matched control group of male patients treated for alcohol addiction without addictive Internet use (n = 58). The SCL-90-R, the Patient Health Questionnaire, and the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder were used to assess associated psychiatric symptoms and further comorbid disorders. Comorbid IA was associated with higher levels of psychosocial symptoms, especially depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and interpersonal sensitivity. Moreover, the patients with IA more frequently met criteria for additional mental disorders. They display higher rates of psychiatric symptoms, especially depression, and might be in need of additional therapeutic treatment. In rehabilitation centers, a regular screening for IA is recommended to identify patients with this (non-substance-related) addiction and supply them with additional disorder-specific treatment.

  14. Network coordination following discharge from psychiatric inpatient treatment: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inadequate discharge planning following inpatient stays is a major issue in the provision of a high standard of care for patients who receive psychiatric treatment. Studies have shown that half of patients who had no pre-discharge contact with outpatient services do not keep their first outpatient appointment. Additionally, discharged patients who are not well linked to their outpatient care networks are at twice the risk of re-hospitalization. The aim of this study is to investigate if the Post-Discharge Network Coordination Program at ipw has a demonstrably significant impact on the frequency and duration of patient re-hospitalization. Subjects are randomly assigned to either the treatment group or to the control group. The treatment group participates in the Post-Discharge Network Coordination Program. The control group receives treatment as usual with no additional social support. Further outcome variables include: social support, change in psychiatric symptoms, quality of life, and independence in daily functioning. Methods/design The study is conducted as a randomized controlled trial. Subjects are randomly assigned to either the control group or to the treatment group. Computer generated block randomization is used to assure both groups have the same number of subjects. Stratified block randomization is used for the psychiatric diagnosis of ICD-10, F1. Approximately 160 patients are recruited in two care units at Psychiatrie-Zentrum Hard Embrach and two care units at Klinik Schlosstal Winterthur. Discussion The proposed post-discharge network coordination program intervenes during the critical post-discharge period. It focuses primarily on promoting the integration of the patients into their social networks, and additionally to coordinating outpatient care and addressing concerns of daily life. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN58280620 PMID:24007198

  15. The Role of Family Variables in the Length of Stay of Psychiatric In-patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoneyama, Satoko; Makita, Yudo; Miyazu, Keiko; Katsukawa, Kazuhiko; Yoneyama, Eiichi; Masuda, Shinji; Nakajima, Yukiko; Kawasaki, Yasuhiro; Miyazu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Japan, the number of beds and average length of stay in a psychiatric ward are greater than in other developed countries. Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the association between family variables and the length of stay of patients with mental and behavioural disorders in a private psychiatric hospital in Japan. Methods: The medical records of patients discharged during a one-year period (n=56: men 50.0% excepting 27 patients discharged due to death were re-examined regarding age, laundry type (self-washing of clothes, family washing or supplier washing), number of family visits per one month while hospitalised, and family structure prior to hospitalisation. A length of stay greater than six months was considered the cut-off point for a long hospital stay. Bivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors independently associated with the length of stay, adjusted for sex, age, and mental and/or behavioural disorders according to the criteria of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. Results: The bivariate-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) for in-patients hospitalised for more than six months was 0.08 (0.01, 0.48) for those who used family washing (p = 0.006) compared with those who used supplier washing. The number of visits per month and family structures before hospitalisation were not significantly associated. Conclusion: These results suggest that within a private psychiatric hospital in Japan, family washing is associated with shortened stays and frequency of family visits, while family structure is not associated with these factors. PMID:27867414

  16. Feasibility and acceptability of brief cognitive remediation targeting metacognition in acute inpatients with psychosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Tsapekos, Dimosthenis; Taylor, Rumina; Cella, Matteo

    2017-03-20

    Cognitive remediation (CR) is an intensive intervention targeting cognitive impairment with the aim of improving functioning in people with psychotic disorders. Shorter forms of CR based on metacognition and targeting awareness of cognitive problems may be more appropriate for acute inpatient settings where time is limited. The objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a new brief course of CR targeting cognitive and metacognitive difficulties within an acute inpatient psychiatric setting. Thirteen male service users with psychosis received a three-week course of CR. Participants were assessed at baseline and post-treatment on cognitive measures, subjective cognitive complaints, functional impairment, and symptom severity. Feasibility was assessed based on engagement, attendance, and attrition. Acceptability was evaluated through treatment satisfaction. Eight participants completed therapy, with 81% session attendance. Therapy was considered acceptable, with the majority of participants considering it satisfactory. Potential benefit analysis showed a significant post-treatment improvement in global cognition and memory. Subjective cognitive complaints did not change over time. It was concluded that it is feasible to deliver brief CR in an acute inpatient setting. Context of delivery and engagement are challenges for optimal therapy implementation. CR protocol adaptations made to promote metacognitive competencies may compensate for lack of intensive practice.

  17. Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System--Update for Fiscal Year Beginning October 1, 2015 (FY 2016). Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-08-05

    This final rule updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs) (which are freestanding IPFs and psychiatric units of an acute care hospital or critical access hospital). These changes are applicable to IPF discharges occurring during fiscal year (FY) 2016 (October 1, 2015 through September 30, 2016). This final rule also implements: a new 2012-based IPF market basket; an updated IPF labor-related share; a transition to new Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA) designations in the FY 2016 IPF Prospective Payment System (PPS) wage index; a phase-out of the rural adjustment for IPF providers whose status changes from rural to urban as a result of the wage index CBSA changes; and new quality measures and reporting requirements under the IPF quality reporting program. This final rule also reminds IPFs of the October 1, 2015 implementation of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM), and updates providers on the status of IPF PPS refinements.

  18. Information on antidepressants for psychiatric inpatients: the divide between patient needs and professional practice

    PubMed Central

    Desplenter, Franciska A.; Laekeman, Gert J.; De Coster, Sandra; Reyntens, Johan; De Baere, Sheila; De Boever, Willy; De Vos, Marc; Vrijders, Danny; De Fré, Claudine; De Keyster, Cécile; De Meulemeester, Katharina; Heremans, Marise; Rutgeerts, Cathérine; Simoens, Steven R.

    Background Medicine information is an integral part of patient care and a patient right. In particular, patients with a mental health diagnosis have a need for information on medicines. Objective This study aims to describe the current practice on information provision on antidepressants to inpatients in psychiatric hospitals. Methods A qualitative study was conducted consisting of semi-structured interviews with health care professionals (n=46) and patients (n=17) in 11 Flemish psychiatric hospitals. Two topic guides were designed for conducting the interviews with these respective stakeholders. The issues addressed in the topic guides related to: organization of information provision in the hospital, information on demand of the patient, information provision by health care professionals, information for relatives, evaluation of provided information, interdisciplinary contacts on information provision and satisfaction on current practice of information provision. The interviews were analysed according to the five stages of the framework analysis. Results Psychiatrists and nurses are the key players to provide information on antidepressants. Their approach depends on patient characteristics and mental state. Information is provided mainly orally. Health care professionals consider non-verbal cues of patients to verify if information has been understood. Health care professionals reported lack of time and lack of interdisciplinary contacts as negative aspects. Patients indicated that health care professionals take too little initiative to provide medicine information. Conclusions Patients are informed about their antidepressants through various pathways. Although the awareness is present of the importance of the individual approach and efforts are done to tailor information to the individual patient, improvement is still possible. Tailoring communication; assessing patient needs and preferences; matching of health care professional style and patient needs; and

  19. Evaluation of Trazodone and Quetiapine for Insomnia: An Observational Study in Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Tony I-Fan; Yu, Junhua; Trinh, Karen; Pal, Jai; Perry, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Insomnia is symptomatic of most psychiatric disorders. Non–habit-forming agents such as trazodone and quetiapine are commonly used off-label to treat patients with insomnia. The safety and efficacy of trazodone and quetiapine as medications for treatment of insomnia have never been directly contrasted. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of trazodone to quetiapine among inpatient psychiatric patients by measuring the traditional sleep parameters of total sleep time, number of nighttime awakenings, sleep efficiency, sleep latency, length of hospitalization, and patient-reported side effects. Method: Participants were recruited from St Helena Hospital Center for Behavioral Health, Vallejo, California. Patient inclusion criteria were age 18 to 65 years, admitted between September 2011 and February 2012, and a physician order for trazodone or quetiapine for insomnia. Exclusion criteria included primary insomnia, pregnancy, concomitant order of trazodone and quetiapine, receiving trazodone or quetiapine up to 2 weeks prior to the study, and inability to coherently communicate. Subjective patient interviews and objective nursing sleep log reviews composed the data set. Results: On average, mean total sleep time hours were longer among patients receiving trazodone versus those receiving quetiapine according to patients’ subjective reports (7.80 vs 6.75, respectively, P < .01) and the nursing sleep logs (9.13 vs 8.68, respectively, P = .04). Patients receiving trazodone experienced fewer mean nighttime awakenings versus those receiving quetiapine (0.52 vs 0.75, respectively, P = .04) according to the nursing sleep log report. Patients receiving trazodone reported more side effects of constipation, nausea, and diarrhea than patients receiving quetiapine. Conclusions: With respect to total sleep time and nighttime awakenings, trazodone was a more effective alternative than quetiapine. However, patients receiving trazodone experienced

  20. Security rules and banned items in psychiatric acute admission wards in Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Koukia, Evmorfia; Giannouli, Eleni; Gonis, Nikolaos; Douzenis, Athanassios

    2010-12-01

    Mental health nurses play a key role in maintaining the safety of patients, themselves, and others during hospitalization. The aim of the research was to evaluate the safety measures that are taken by mental health nurses to identify the security policies that exist in acute mental health wards. The Ward Safety and Security Rules Survey was used as a method of data collection. Descriptive analysis and content analysis were carried out in order to identify nurses' practices. The total sample consisted of 172 mental health nurses and nurses' assistants who worked in 14 acute inpatient psychiatric wards in three psychiatric hospitals in the greater area of Athens, Greece. The results show a minimum number of security features existing in the wards. Only one of the 14 wards had an intercom system. In only nine wards, there was a panic alarm in the office, and in eight, an emergency response telephone extension. A wide range of practices were noted concerning banned items and patient searches upon admission and return from leave. The results indicate the significant lack of protocols and specific safety rules to guide nurses' actions across psychiatric acute admission wards in Athens.

  1. How Patients and Nurses Experience an Open Versus an Enclosed Nursing Station on an Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    PubMed

    Shattell, Mona; Bartlett, Robin; Beres, Kyle; Southard, Kelly; Bell, Claire; Judge, Christine A; Duke, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The inpatient environment is a critical space for nurses and patients in psychiatric settings. In this article, we describe nurses' and patients' perceptions of the inpatient environment both before the removal of a Plexiglas enclosure around a nurses' station and after its removal. Nurses had mixed feelings about the enclosure, reporting that it provided for confidentiality and a concentrated work space but also acknowledged the challenge of the barrier for communication with their patients. Patients unanimously preferred the nurses' station without the barrier, reporting increased feelings of freedom, safety, and connection with the nurses after its removal. It is important to consider the implications of environmental decisions in inpatient settings in order to promote a healthy workplace and healing environment for all community members.

  2. Interviews of psychiatric inpatients about their family situation and young children.

    PubMed

    Wang, A R; Goldschmidt, V V

    1994-12-01

    In this study, the perception by mentally ill parents of their family situation and young children was explored with the purpose of improving the basis for cooperation between families and professionals, when intervention is needed. Fifty consecutively admitted psychiatric inpatients with children 0-10 years old were interviewed by child psychiatrists, and their information constitutes the study material. It was generally easy to approach the patients as parents. Most of them were already preoccupied with their children's situation and seemed relieved to talk about it when guaranteed anonymity. Half of the patients experienced and described having emotional difficulties in relation to their children. Half of the 64 children were reported to suffer from physical or mental health problems, and an unexpected accumulation of children with serious and relatively rare medical conditions was registered. Most of the children had parents who had been mentally ill all their life, and many had 2 parents with mental disorders. Family discord was frequent. Many women related the debut of mental symptoms to childbirth. Attention is drawn to special patterns concerning suicidal and addicted patients.

  3. Catatonia in inpatients with psychiatric disorders: A comparison of schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sandeep; Chakrabarti, Subho; Ghormode, Deepak; Agarwal, Munish; Sharma, Akhilesh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-10-30

    This study aimed to evaluate the symptom threshold for making the diagnosis of catatonia. Further the objectives were to (1) to study the factor solution of Bush Francis Catatonia Rating Scale (BFCRS); (2) To compare the prevalence and symptom profile of catatonia in patients with psychotic and mood disorders among patients admitted to the psychiatry inpatient of a general hospital psychiatric unit. 201 patients were screened for presence of catatonia by using BFCRS. By using cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, ROC curve, sensitivity and specificity analysis, data suggested that a threshold of 3 symptoms was able to correctly categorize 89.4% of patients with catatonia and 100% of patients without catatonia. Prevalence of catatonia was 9.45%. There was no difference in the prevalence rate and symptom profile of catatonia between those with schizophrenia and mood disorders (i.e., unipolar depression and bipolar affective disorder). Factor analysis of the data yielded 2 factor solutions, i.e., retarded and excited catatonia. To conclude this study suggests that presence of 3 symptoms for making the diagnosis of catatonia can correctly distinguish patients with and without catatonia. This is compatible with the recommendations of DSM-5. Prevalence of catatonia is almost equal in patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders.

  4. Validation of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory among psychiatric inpatients: sociodemographic, cognitive and personality correlates.

    PubMed

    Claes, Laurence; Vertommen, Stefaan; Soenens, Bart; Eyskens, Ann; Rens, Els; Vertommen, Hans

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the internal structure and validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI) in a sample of 399 psychiatric inpatients. The construct validity of the PPI was examined by means of Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). The divergent and convergent validity of the PPI were examined by correlating the PPI with demographic variables, intelligence, DSM-IV Axis I and Axis II disorders, and measures of impulsiveness, aggression, narcissism, and psychopathy. CFA supports the presumed 8-factor structure of the PPI and shows that the first-order PPI scales can be represented by two higher-order factors, that is, PPI-I (fearless dominance) and PPI-II (impulsive-aggressiveness). Males scored significantly higher on all PPI scales than females. PPI-I correlated positively with functional impulsiveness, amorality, social imperturbability, and self-centered narcissism. PPI-II was negatively related to age and educational level, and positively to physical and verbal aggression, dysfunctional impulsivity, and other-centered narcissism. Implications for clinical practice are outlined.

  5. Cost accounting methodologies in price setting of acute inpatient services in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Gaal, Peter; Stefka, Nóra; Nagy, Júlia

    2006-08-01

    On the basis of documentary analysis and interviews with decision makers, this paper discusses the cost accounting methodologies used for price setting of inpatient services in the Hungarian health care system focusing on sector of acute inpatient care, which is financed through the Hungarian adaptation of Diagnosis Related Groups since 1993. Hungary has a quite sophisticated DRG system, which had a deep impact on the efficiency of the acute inpatient care sector. Nevertheless, the system requires continuous maintenance, where the cooperation of hospitals, as well as the minimisation of political influence are critical success factors.

  6. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... CMS Abstraction & Reporting Tool CAUTI Catheter-associated urinary tract infection CBSAs Core-based... Regulations CLABSI Central line-associated bloodstream infection CIPI Capital input price index CMI Case-mix... Healthcare-associated infection HBIPS Hospital-based inpatient psychiatric services HCAHPS Hospital...

  7. Course and predictors of physical aggressive behaviour after discharge from a psychiatric inpatient unit: 1 year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Amore, Mario; Tonti, Cristina; Esposito, William; Baratta, Stefano; Berardi, Domenico; Menchetti, Marco

    2013-08-01

    The present study analyzes course and predictors of physically aggressive behaviour over a 1-year follow up in a sample of patients discharged from a psychiatric inpatient unit. One hundred and eighty-six patients discharged from a locked short-term Psychiatric Inpatient Unit at the Bologna University Hospital. After discharge, two data collection contacts at 1 month and at 1 year were scheduled. In particular, psychiatrists, nurses, and other professionals were interviewed by the research staff using the Overt Aggression Scale. About 20 % of discharged patients showed physical aggressiveness in subsequent follow-up contacts. Risk factors for physical violence in the short-time period were social problems and a longer time from the first psychiatric contact. Living in residential facilities and physical aggressiveness during hospitalization were correlated to violence in the long-time period. Risk factors for physically violent behaviour differed in the short-term and long-term follow-ups; different causes of violent behaviour could be hypothesized.

  8. Neuropsychological and psychiatric profiles in acute encephalitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Pewter, Stephen M; Williams, W Huw; Haslam, Catherine; Kay, Janice M

    2007-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is an inflammation of brain tissue that can result from activity in the central nervous system (CNS) of a number of viruses. Although the neurological and psychiatric effects of encephalitis in the acute phase of the illness are well-known (Caroff, Mann, Gliatto, Sullivan, & Campbell, 2001), larger scale studies of the pattern of neuropsychological and psychiatric impairment following recovery from the acute inflammatory phase are less apparent. This paper reports the results of neuropsychological testing with a range of standardised cognitive measures in a case series of long-term post-acute participants. Psychiatric abnormality is examined using the SCL-90-R self-report scale of distress (Derogatis, 1983). We also examined the role of emerging insight in the aetiology of depression in this population. Two clusters of cognitive dysfunction were observed, one group of primarily herpes simplex cases showing a severe generalised deficit across a number of cognitive domains and a second cluster showing a variety of more isolated disorders of executive function. Abnormally high levels of distress were reported by participants, with depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity and phobic anxiety most significantly increased. Depression was found to be least severe in those with most accurate insight into their problems. Examining the correlations between cognitive and psychiatric test results demonstrates a relationship between depression and interpersonal anxiety and specific cognitive measures. Obsessive-compulsive behaviour and phobic anxiety, however, appear to exist independently of the assessed cognitive deficits.

  9. Risk Factors of Acute Behavioral Regression in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Périsse, Didier; Amiet, Claire; Consoli, Angèle; Thorel, Marie-Vincente; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Bodeau, Nicolas; Guinchat, Vincent; Barthélémy, Catherine; Cohen, David

    2010-01-01

    Aim: During adolescence, some individuals with autism engage in severe disruptive behaviors, such as violence, agitation, tantrums, or self-injurious behaviors. We aimed to assess risk factors associated with very acute states and regression in adolescents with autism in an inpatient population. Method: Between 2001 and 2005, we reviewed the charts of all adolescents with autism (N=29, mean age=14.8 years, 79% male) hospitalized for severe disruptive behaviors in a psychiatric intensive care unit. We systematically collected data describing socio-demographic characteristics, clinical variables (severity, presence of language, cognitive level), associated organic conditions, etiologic diagnosis of the episode, and treatments. Results: All patients exhibited severe autistic symptoms and intellectual disability, and two-thirds had no functional verbal language. Fifteen subjects exhibited epilepsy, including three cases in which epilepsy was unknown before the acute episode. For six (21%) of the subjects, uncontrolled seizures were considered the main cause of the disruptive behaviors. Other suspected risk factors associated with disruptive behavior disorders included adjustment disorder (N=7), lack of adequate therapeutic or educational management (N=6), depression (N=2), catatonia (N=2), and painful comorbid organic conditions (N=3). Conclusion: Disruptive behaviors among adolescents with autism may stem from diverse risk factors, including environmental problems, comorbid acute psychiatric conditions, or somatic diseases such as epilepsy. The management of these behavioral changes requires a multidisciplinary functional approach. PMID:20467546

  10. Inpatient Care or Outplacement: Which Is Better for the Psychiatric Medically Infirm Patient?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Charles G.

    1976-01-01

    Geriatric ward patients (N=84) were randomly assigned to groups targeted for outplacement planning or inpatient care. During the following year, the mean Morale Inventory score of the outplacement sample improved while that of the inpatient group remained statis. Results argue for an increased emphasis on outplacement programs among geriatric…

  11. Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy: A Brief Intervention for Psychiatric Inpatients Admitted After a Suicide Attempt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Cox, Daniel W.; Greene, Farrah N.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no empirically based inpatient intervention for individuals who have attempted suicide exists. We present an overview of a novel psychotherapeutic approach, Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), currently under development and empirical testing for inpatients who have been admitted for a recent suicide attempt. PACT is adapted from an…

  12. The Involuntary Treatment of Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients--A Nation-Wide Survey from Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellila, Heikki Toivo; Sourander, Andre; Valimaki, Maritta; Warne, Tony; Kaivosoja, Matti

    2008-01-01

    This national cross-sectional study investigates the prevalence rates, regional differences and factors associated with the involuntary inpatient treatment of adolescents in Finland on a chosen day in 2000. The proportion of inpatients with involuntary legal status was 29.5% (n=82) giving a prevalence rate of 2.5 per 10,000/12-17 years old…

  13. Music listening preferences and preadmission dysfunctional psychosocial behaviors of adolescents hospitalized on an in-patient psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Weidinger, C K; Demi, A S

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between music listening preferences and preadmission, dysfunctional psychosocial behaviors (PDPB) of 60 adolescents who were hospitalized on an in-patient psychiatric unit. Findings were that hospitalized adolescents who primarily listened to music with negative lyrics/themes had a history of more PDPB than hospitalized adolescents who primarily listened to music that did not contain negative lyrics/themes; and hospitalized adolescents who primarily listened to heavy metal music had a history of more PDPB than hospitalized adolescents who primarily listened to other types of music.

  14. Improving capacity and consent to treatment recording in psychiatric inpatient wards: A multi-centre quality improvement project

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ching; Stellman, Judith; Patel, Nitisha; Dalton, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of mental capacity provides an ethical and legal framework for care which values patients' autonomy whilst recognising the instances where it is appropriate to act in patients' best interests. Existing medical literature indicates that mental capacity is poorly documented in psychiatric inpatient settings. The aim of the project was to examine the frequency of capacity and consent to treatment documentation with a view to creating changes in practice by raising awareness about the importance of assessing and documenting mental capacity. A multi-centre quality improvement project was conducted in September 2014 across all general adult psychiatric inpatient wards in the North Central London Training Scheme. The frequency of documentation of capacity and consent to treatment for all adult psychiatric inpatient wards across North Central London was measured. Electronic patient notes were audited retrospectively to ascertain whether capacity and consent to treatment on admission, and within the preceding seven days of data collection, was recorded. Data was collected across three successive time points during a 12 month period following the implementation of changes. A total of 232 patients were included in the baseline measurements. The results highlighted a deficiency in the recording of capacity and consent to treatment for adult psychiatric inpatients. The results showed that, of the patients audited, 49.8% had their capacity and consent to treatment assessed on admission, 61.9% had a capacity assessment in the previous 7 days and 60.5% had consent recorded in the previous 7 days. These findings were presented at local hospital teaching sessions at each of the audited sites. These sessions also gave teaching on mental capacity. Audit cycle 1 was conducted 6 months later, this included 213 patients and showed a 30% improvement in the frequency of documentation across all measures. The results showed that 77% of patients audited had their capacity and

  15. Improving capacity and consent to treatment recording in psychiatric inpatient wards: A multi-centre quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Li, Ching; Stellman, Judith; Patel, Nitisha; Dalton, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of mental capacity provides an ethical and legal framework for care which values patients' autonomy whilst recognising the instances where it is appropriate to act in patients' best interests. Existing medical literature indicates that mental capacity is poorly documented in psychiatric inpatient settings. The aim of the project was to examine the frequency of capacity and consent to treatment documentation with a view to creating changes in practice by raising awareness about the importance of assessing and documenting mental capacity. A multi-centre quality improvement project was conducted in September 2014 across all general adult psychiatric inpatient wards in the North Central London Training Scheme. The frequency of documentation of capacity and consent to treatment for all adult psychiatric inpatient wards across North Central London was measured. Electronic patient notes were audited retrospectively to ascertain whether capacity and consent to treatment on admission, and within the preceding seven days of data collection, was recorded. Data was collected across three successive time points during a 12 month period following the implementation of changes. A total of 232 patients were included in the baseline measurements. The results highlighted a deficiency in the recording of capacity and consent to treatment for adult psychiatric inpatients. The results showed that, of the patients audited, 49.8% had their capacity and consent to treatment assessed on admission, 61.9% had a capacity assessment in the previous 7 days and 60.5% had consent recorded in the previous 7 days. These findings were presented at local hospital teaching sessions at each of the audited sites. These sessions also gave teaching on mental capacity. Audit cycle 1 was conducted 6 months later, this included 213 patients and showed a 30% improvement in the frequency of documentation across all measures. The results showed that 77% of patients audited had their capacity and

  16. Crisis intervention program: an alternative to inpatient psychiatric treatment for children.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Samuel H

    2002-03-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a Crisis Intervention program as an alternative to use of psychiatric treatment beds for young children. A multidisciplinary community-based intervention was utilized, including family therapy, psychiatric intervention, and school consultations. The impact of the service was evaluated in relation to the use of psychiatric treatment beds by the population of children eligible for Medicaid or uninsured. In comparison to an historical control group, the program resulted in a 23% reduction in the use of psychiatric treatment beds. A cost-minimization analysis indicated that in addition to the program reducing the use of psychiatric treatment beds, the cost of treatment was also slightly reduced.

  17. Unlocking an acute psychiatric ward: the impact on unauthorised absences, assaults and seclusions.

    PubMed

    Beaglehole, Ben; Beveridge, John; Campbell-Trotter, Warren; Frampton, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Aims and method The acute psychiatric in-patient service in Christchurch, New Zealand, recently changed from two locked and two unlocked wards to four open wards. This provided the opportunity to evaluate whether shifting to an unlocked environment was associated with higher rates of adverse events, including unauthorised absences, violent incidents and seclusion. We compared long-term adverse event data before and after ward configuration change. Results Rates of unauthorised absences increased by 58% after the change in ward configuration (P = 0.005), but seclusion hours dropped by 53% (P = 0.001). A small increase in violent incidents was recorded but this was not statistically significant. Clinical implications Although unauthorised absences increased, the absence of statistically significant changes for violent incidents and a reduction in seclusion hours suggest that the change to a less restrictive environment may have some positive effects.

  18. Unlocking an acute psychiatric ward: the impact on unauthorised absences, assaults and seclusions

    PubMed Central

    Beaglehole, Ben; Beveridge, John; Campbell-Trotter, Warren; Frampton, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Aims and method The acute psychiatric in-patient service in Christchurch, New Zealand, recently changed from two locked and two unlocked wards to four open wards. This provided the opportunity to evaluate whether shifting to an unlocked environment was associated with higher rates of adverse events, including unauthorised absences, violent incidents and seclusion. We compared long-term adverse event data before and after ward configuration change. Results Rates of unauthorised absences increased by 58% after the change in ward configuration (P = 0.005), but seclusion hours dropped by 53% (P = 0.001). A small increase in violent incidents was recorded but this was not statistically significant. Clinical implications Although unauthorised absences increased, the absence of statistically significant changes for violent incidents and a reduction in seclusion hours suggest that the change to a less restrictive environment may have some positive effects.

  19. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  20. Psychosocial work environment, stress factors and individual characteristics among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Tuvesson; Mona, Eklund

    2014-01-20

    The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics--Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience--are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff's perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  1. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... psychiatric facility which is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the Council on Accreditation of Services for Families and Children, the Commission on Accreditation...

  2. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... psychiatric facility which is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the Council on Accreditation of Services for Families and Children, the Commission on Accreditation...

  3. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... psychiatric facility which is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the Council on Accreditation of Services for Families and Children, the Commission on Accreditation...

  4. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... psychiatric facility which is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the Council on Accreditation of Services for Families and Children, the Commission on Accreditation...

  5. Stability of Diagnosis: A 20-Year Retrospective Cohort Study of Israeli Psychiatric Adolescent Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valevski, Avi; Ratzoni, Gideon; Sever, Jonathan; Apter, Alan; Zalsman, Gil; Shiloh, Roni; Weizman, Abraham; Tyano, Sam

    2001-01-01

    Outcome according to diagnosis and stability of diagnosis were investigated in a follow-back study, with a duration of 15-19 years, of 351 adolescents with various psychiatric disorders hospitalized in a closed psychiatric ward. Findings indicated that transient adolescent psychosis is associated with a relatively good prognosis and should…

  6. Calorie and Protein Intake in Acute Rehabilitation Inpatients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Versus Other Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity and its consequences affect patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of data with regard to the dietary intake patterns of patients with SCI in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Our hypothesis is that acute rehabilitation inpatients with SCI consume significantly more calories and protein than other inpatient rehabilitation diagnoses. Objective: To compare calorie and protein intake in patients with new SCI versus other diagnoses (new traumatic brain injury [TBI], new stroke, and Parkinson’s disease [PD]) in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Methods: The intake of 78 acute rehabilitation inpatients was recorded by registered dieticians utilizing once-weekly calorie and protein intake calculations. Results: Mean ± SD calorie intake (kcal) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 1,967.9 ± 611.6, 1,546.8 ± 352.3, 1,459.7 ± 443.2, and 1,459.4 ± 434.6, respectively. ANOVA revealed a significant overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 4.74, P = .004. Mean ± SD protein intake (g) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 71.5 ± 25.0, 61.1 ± 12.8, 57.6 ± 16.6, and 55.1 ± 19.1, respectively. ANOVA did not reveal an overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 2.50, P = .066. Conclusions: Given the diet-related comorbidities and energy balance abnormalities associated with SCI, combined with the intake levels demonstrated in this study, education with regard to appropriate calorie intake in patients with SCI should be given in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. PMID:23960707

  7. Integrating real-time feedback of outcome assessment for individual patients in an inpatient psychiatric setting: a case study of personalized psychiatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Confer, Jacob R; White, Melissa; Groat, Michael M; Madan, Alok; Allen, Jon G; Fowler, J Christopher; Kahn, David A

    2015-01-01

    Routine assessment of psychiatric patient outcomes is rare, despite growing evidence that feedback to clinicians and patients concerning patient progress improves treatment outcomes. The authors present a case in which real-time feedback proved beneficial in the treatment of a woman with a personality disorder admitted for inpatient treatment due to worsening depression, anxiety, severe suicide risk, and decline in functioning. During the course of her 10-week hospitalization, she completed standardized assessments of symptoms/functioning at admission, at 2 week intervals, and at discharge. The distinctive feature of this case is the way in which real-time feedback to the treatment team, psychiatrist, and patient exposed hidden treatment barriers. In the midst of an improving profile with decreasing symptom severity, the patient experienced a spike in distress and symptoms, prompting her treatment team to examine the treatment plan and to engage the patient around understanding the decline in functioning. This intervention revealed a replay of a familiar pattern in the patient's life that led to the identification and repair of a rupture in the therapeutic alliance and to an improvement in the patient's functioning. This case expands on previous research concerning the integration of individualized assessments into outpatient treatment and it illustrates the need to extend outpatient research to inpatient settings.

  8. The association of non-suicidal self-injury and suicidal behavior according to DSM-5 in adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Groschwitz, Rebecca C; Kaess, Michael; Fischer, Gloria; Ameis, Nina; Schulze, Ulrike M E; Brunner, Romuald; Koelch, Michael; Plener, Paul L

    2015-08-30

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal behaviors frequently occur among adolescent psychiatric patients. Although those behaviors are distinct with regards to intent, NSSI has been shown to be an important risk-factor for suicide attempts. However, the association of NSSI and Suicidal Behavior Disorder (SBD) according to DSM-5 criteria has not yet been investigated. For investigating distinctive features and mutual risk-factors of NSSI-disorder and SBD, adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N=111, aged 12-19 years; 65.8% females) were interviewed using the Self-Injurious-Thoughts-And-Behaviors-Interview-German (SITBI-G). NSSI started significantly earlier in life (M=12.5 years, SD=2.2) than first suicide attempts (M=14.1 years, SD=2.0). Patients meeting NSSI-disorder and/or SBD were significantly more likely to be female and to be diagnosed with an affective disorder. NSSI-disorder and SBD seem to have several distinctive features (i.e. age of onset or frequency), but also seem to share certain mutual risk-factors (i.e. affective disorders, female gender). While both NSSI and SBD seem to be maintained by mainly automatic negative reinforcement, positive automatic and social functions were rated significantly higher for NSSI. Most importantly, NSSI seems to be a strong risk factor for the occurrence of SBD (even when controlling for suicidal ideation) and should therefore always be assessed when dealing with psychiatric adolescent patients.

  9. Borderline personality disorder associates with violent criminality in women: A population based follow-up study of adolescent psychiatric inpatients in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Arola, Riikka; Antila, Henna; Riipinen, Pirkko; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa; Kantojärvi, Liisa

    2016-09-01

    Various psychiatric problems in adolescence and early adulthood have been shown to associate with criminal behaviour. In this study the association of personality disorders (PDs) with criminal behaviour was examined in adolescents treated in psychiatric hospitals. The study sample consisted of 508 adolescents (age 13-17) admitted to acute psychiatric impatient care between April 2001 and March 2006. Crime data was obtained from the Finnish Legal Register Centre on September 2013. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) was used to assess psychiatric diagnoses in adolescence. The information on PDs in early adulthood was based on follow-up information on psychiatric treatments in either out- or inpatient settings until the end of 2012, and was extracted from the National Care Register for Health Care provided by the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare. A total of 22 (39%) of the 57 subjects with PD had committed a crime. In women, the likelihood for violent criminality was significantly increased in those with Borderline PD (OR 6.09, CI 1.24-29.84, p=0.009) and was also associated with conduct disorder (OR 4.26, CI 1.38-13.19, p=0.012), child welfare placement (OR 11.82, CI 3.61-38.76, p<0.001) and parent's substance use disorder (OR 7.74, CI 2.30-26.10, p=0.001). In men, no association was observed between PD and any kind of criminal behaviour. Significant predictors for violent criminality in males were conduct disorder (OR 4.05, CI 1.75-9.38, p=0.001), substance use disorder (OR 2.51, CI 1.22-5.17, p=0.012) and special services at school (OR 2.58, CI 1.16-5.76, p=0.021). Females with Borderline PD showed an increased risk for violent offending. This suggests Borderline PD as a potential explanatory factor for violent assaults by females and highlights the importance of recognizing the risk for violence in young women with a Borderline PD.

  10. Attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In psychiatry, most of the focus on patient aggression has been in adolescent and adult inpatient settings. This behaviour is also common in elderly people with mental illness, but little research has been conducted into this problem in old age psychiatry settings. The attitudes of clinical staff toward aggression may affect the way they manage this behaviour. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient settings. Methods A convenience sample of clinical staff were recruited from three locked acute old age psychiatry inpatient units in Melbourne, Australia. They completed the Management of Aggression and Violence Scale, which assessed the causes and managment of aggression in psychiatric settings. Results Eighty-five staff completed the questionnaire, comprising registered nurses (61.1%, n = 52), enrolled nurses (27.1%, n = 23) and medical and allied health staff (11.8%, n = 10). A range of causative factors contributed to aggression. The respondents had a tendency to disagree that factors directly related to the patient contributed to this behaviour. They agreed patients were aggressive because of the environment they were in, other people contributed to them becoming aggressive, and patients from certain cultural groups were prone to these behaviours. However, there were mixed views about whether patient aggression could be prevented, and this type of behaviour took place because staff did not listen to patients. There was agreement medication was a valuable approach for the management of aggression, negotiation could be used more effectively in such challenging behaviour, and seclusion and physical restraint were sometimes used more than necessary. However, there was disagreement about whether the practice of secluding patients should be discontinued. Conclusions Aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units occurs

  11. "Helicobacter Pylori" Infection in Five Inpatient Units for People with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, David; Vemuri, Murali; Gunatilake, Deepthi; Tewari, Sidhartha

    2008-01-01

    Background: A high prevalence of "Helicobacter pylori" infection has been reported among people with intellectual disability, especially those residing in hospital and similar settings. Surveys of inpatients have found unusually high rates of gastrointestinal malignancy, to which "H. pylori" infection predisposes. Methods: "Helicobacter pylori"…

  12. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... patient for medical treatment or medically required inpatient diagnostic study; or (ii) Special or unusual services for cost outlier cases (under the prospective payment system set forth in subpart F of part 412 of... physician finds that the patient could receive proper treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in...

  13. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of the patient for medical treatment or medically required inpatient diagnostic study; or (ii) Special or unusual services for cost outlier cases (under the prospective payment system set forth in... hospitalization if the physician finds that the patient could receive proper treatment in a SNF but no bed...

  14. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... patient for medical treatment or medically required inpatient diagnostic study; or (ii) Special or unusual services for cost outlier cases (under the prospective payment system set forth in subpart F of part 412 of... physician finds that the patient could receive proper treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in...

  15. Mood and Anxiety Symptoms in Psychiatric Inpatients with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlot, Lauren; Deutsch, Curtis K.; Albert, Aranya; Hunt, Anne; Connor, Daniel F.; McIlvane, William J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may experience depression at a high frequency, yet few published studies address this issue, especially among adults. In the current investigation, we reviewed features of depression and comorbid traits among depressed inpatients with intellectual disabilities (ID) as a…

  16. Domestic Violence in Methamphetamine Psychotic Users, Psychiatric Inpatients, and Healthy People: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Khalkhali, Seyed Mohammad Rasoul; Najafi, Kiomars; Ahmadi, Reza; Yousefnezhad, Azadeh; Hamidi, Azam; Ellahi, Masoumeh; Amiri, Ali; Montakhabi, Afsar; Zavarmousavi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Domestic violence is a serious threat to the physical and mental health of women. The aim of the present study was to find and compare the frequency of domestic violence between methamphetamine users, patients with psychiatric disorders, and healthy people. Methods: In this analytical cross-sectional study, methamphetamine users (n=30) and patients with psychiatric disorders (n=30) were women whose husbands were hospitalized during 2014 in Shafa Psychiatric Hospital in Guilan. Diagnosis was done with DSMIV-TR. Healthy people (n=60) were women whose husbands had no primary or drug induced psychiatric disorder or addiction. CTS-2 test was used to evaluate violence. Results: The frequency of psychological, physical and sexual violence in the groups suffering from psychiatric disease and methamphetamine users was higher than the healthy group (P=0.001). We observed a direct correlation between the mean of psychological and physical violence in the three groups (r=0.9, P=0.001), (r=0.7, P=0.0001) and (r=0.53, P=0.005), respectively. Direct correlation between the psychological and physical violence was only observed in the healthy group (r=0.8, P=0.007). Conclusion: The results showed that methamphetamine users such as psychiatric patients are at increased risk of violence. Domestic violence screening of these patients is necessary. It seems that this substance is a new source of increasing domestic violence with more undesirable outcomes in Iran. PMID:27853328

  17. 76 FR 51475 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ...We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010......

  18. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ...We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine......

  19. 76 FR 19365 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and Fiscal Year 2011 Final Wage Indices...), HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice contains the final fiscal year (FY) 2011 wage indices and... the expiration date for certain geographic reclassifications and special exception wage...

  20. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific...

  1. 78 FR 15882 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific...

  2. 77 FR 63751 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ...; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers and for Ambulatory...

  3. Door locking and exit security measures on acute psychiatric admission wards.

    PubMed

    Nijman, H; Bowers, L; Haglund, K; Muir-Cochrane, E; Simpson, A; Van Der Merwe, M

    2011-09-01

    Locking the exit doors of psychiatric wards is believed to reduce the risk of patients absconding. The aims of the study were to investigate both the prevalence of door locking and other exit security measures on UK admission wards, as well as whether door locking appears to be effective in keeping inpatients in. A cross-sectional survey on 136 acute psychiatric wards in the UK was conducted, in which a range of data on patients, staff, and conflict and containment events, including door locking and absconding, were collected from shift to shift during a period of 6 months. About one-third of the participating wards (30%) operated with their ward exit door permanently locked, whereas another third (34%) never locked the ward door. Univariate analyses suggested little association between exit security measures and absconding. A more robust multilevel statistical analysis, however, did indicate a reduction of about 30% of absconding rates when the ward door was locked the entire shift. Although locking the ward door does seem to reduce absconding to a certain extent, it far from completely prevents it. As it may be unrealistic to strive for a 100% absconding-proof ward, alternative measures for door locking to prevent absconding are discussed.

  4. Tripartite model of depression and anxiety in youth psychiatric inpatients: relations with diagnostic status and future symptoms.

    PubMed

    Joiner, T E; Lonigan, C J

    2000-09-01

    Examined the relation of the depression aspect of the tripartite model of depression and anxiety to the diagnostic status and future symptoms of two samples that included 74 child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients, ages 7 to 17 years (M = 13.57, SD = 2.39), some with either internalizing or externalizing diagnoses. The tripartite model suggests that anhedonia (low positive affect, or PA) differentiates depression from other conditions, whereas generalized negative affect (NA) also characterizes depression but is not specific to it. In this study, differences among children in PA and NA were associated with depressive versus externalizing diagnostic status and with future symptoms of depression. Depressive disorder diagnoses were associated with the combination of low levels of PA and high levels of NA. Changes over time in depression, but not in anxiety, also were associated with the combination of low PA and high NA. Results provide support for the applicability, clinical utility, and extension of the tripartite model with children.

  5. Stigma, Social Structure, and the Biomedical Framework: Exploring the Stigma Experiences of Inpatient Service Users in Two Belgian Psychiatric Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sercu, Charlotte; Bracke, Piet

    2016-05-31

    The study discusses the stigma experiences of service users in mental health care, within the debate on the role of the biomedical framework for mental health care and power relations in society. Interview data of inpatient users (n = 42) and care providers (n = 43) from two Belgian psychiatric hospitals were analyzed using a constructivist grounded theory approach: Findings offer insight into how stigma experiences are affected by social structure. Stigma seemed to be related to the relation between care providers and service users their social position. The concept "mental health literacy" is used to frame this finding. In paying attention to the specific cultural and normative context, which influences the relationship between mental health literacy and stigma, it is further possible to cast some light on the meaning of the biomedical model for the construction and maintenance of power relations in mental health care and broader society.

  6. Development of the Observation Scale for Aggressive Behavior (OSAB) for Dutch forensic psychiatric inpatients with an antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Hornsveld, Ruud H J; Nijman, Henk L I; Hollin, Clive R; Kraaimaat, Floor W

    2007-01-01

    The Observation Scale for Aggressive Behavior (OSAB) has been developed to evaluate inpatient treatment programs designed to reduce aggressive behavior in Dutch forensic psychiatric patients with an antisocial personality disorder, who are "placed at the disposal of the government". The scale should have the sensitivity to measure changes in the possible determinants of aggressive behavior, such as limited control of displayed negative emotions (irritation, anger or rage) and a general deficiency of social skills. In developing the OSAB 40 items were selected from a pool of 82 and distributed among the following a priori scales: Irritation/anger, Anxiety/gloominess, Aggressive behavior, Antecedent (to aggressive behavior), Sanction (for aggressive behavior) and Social behavior. The internal consistency of these subscales was good, the inter-rater reliability was moderate to good, and the test-retest reliability over a two to three week period was moderate to good. The correlation between the subscales Irritation/anger, Anxiety/gloominess, Aggressive behavior, Antecedent, Sanction was substantial and significant, but the anticipated negative correlation between these subscales and the Social behavior subscale could not be shown. Relationships between the corresponding subscales of the OSAB and the FIOS, used to calculate concurrent validity, yielded relatively high correlations. The validity of the various OSAB subscales could be further supported by significant correlations with the PCL-R and by significant but weak correlations with corresponding subscales of the self-report questionnaires. The Observation Scale for Aggressive Behavior (OSAB) seems to measure aggressive behavior in Dutch forensic psychiatric inpatients with an antisocial personality disorder reliably and validly. Contrary to expectations, a negative relationship was not found between aggressive and social behavior in either the OSAB or FIOS, which were used for calculating concurrent validity.

  7. More Daytime Sleeping Predicts Less Functional Recovery Among Older People Undergoing Inpatient Post-Acute Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Cathy A.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Webber, Adam P.; Alam, Tarannum; Littner, Michael R.; Harker, Judith O.; Josephson, Karen R.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To study the association between sleep/wake patterns among older adults during inpatient post-acute rehabilitation and their immediate and long-term functional recovery Design: Prospective, observational cohort study Setting: Two inpatient post-acute rehabilitation sites (one community and one Veterans Administration) Participants: Older patients (aged ≥ 65 years, N = 245) admitted for inpatient post-acute rehabilitation Interventions: None Measurements and Results: Based on 7-day wrist actigraphy during the rehabilitation stay, mean nighttime percent sleep was only 52.2% and mean daytime percent sleep was 15.8% (16.3% based on structured behavioral observations). Using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), participants reported their sleep was worse during rehabilitation compared to their premorbid sleep. Functional recovery between admission and discharge from rehabilitation (measured by the motor component of the Functional Independence Measure) was not significantly associated with reported sleep quality (PSQI scores) or actigraphically measured nighttime sleep. However, more daytime percent sleep (estimated by actigraphy and observations) during the rehabilitation stay was associated with less functional recovery from admission to discharge, even after adjusting for other significant predictors of functional recovery (mental status, hours of rehabilitation therapy received, rehospitalization, and reason for admission; adjusted R2 = 0.267, P < 0.0001). More daytime sleeping during rehabilitation remained a significant predictor of less functional recovery in adjusted analyses at 3-month follow-up. Conclusions: Sleep disturbance is common among older people undergoing inpatient post-acute rehabilitation. These data suggest that more daytime sleeping during the rehabilitation stay is associated with less functional recovery for up to three months after admission for rehabilitation. Citation: Alessi CA; Martin JL; Webber AP; Alam T

  8. Medicare program; inpatient rehabilitation facility prospective payment system for federal fiscal year 2012; changes in size and square footage of inpatient rehabilitation units and inpatient psychiatric units. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2011-08-05

    This final rule will implement section 3004 of the Affordable Care Act, which establishes a new quality reporting program that provides for a 2 percent reduction in the annual increase factor beginning in 2014 for failure to report quality data to the Secretary of Health and Human Services. This final rule will also update the prospective payment rates for inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) for Federal fiscal year (FY) 2012 (for discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2011 and on or before September 30, 2012) as required under section 1886(j)(3)(C) of the Social Security Act (the Act). Section 1886(j)(5) of the Act requires the Secretary to publish in the Federal Register on or before the August 1 that precedes the start of each FY the classification and weighting factors for the IRF prospective payment system (PPS) case-mix groups and a description of the methodology and data used in computing the prospective payment rates for that fiscal year. We are also consolidating, clarifying, and revising existing policies regarding IRF hospitals and IRF units of hospitals to eliminate unnecessary confusion and enhance consistency. Furthermore, in accordance with the general principles of the President's January 18, 2011 Executive Order entitled "Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review," we are amending existing regulatory provisions regarding ''new'' facilities and changes in the bed size and square footage of IRFs and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs) to improve clarity and remove obsolete material.

  9. Use of movies for group therapy of psychiatric inpatients: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Esra; Ulus, Fuat; Selvitop, Rabia; Yazici, Ahmet Bülent; Aydin, Nazan

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports on the use of cinema therapy at a psychiatry clinic for inpatients. The program, "Watching Cinema Group Therapy," was used with over 500 inpatients over the course of one year. We found that using movies for group psychotherapy sessions encouraged the patients to talk about their beliefs, thoughts, and feelings while discussing the characters and stories. We also used the movies as a reward for patients who had developed a therapeutic alliance. It motivated the patients to be active instead of simply remaining in their rooms. As a follow-up to full-length films, it was more useful to show short scenes to patients who had been administered high doses of drugs. Movies can be an important, positive, and productive means of treatment and teaching.

  10. [Acute psychiatric symptoms during methylphenidate intravenous injections: A case report].

    PubMed

    Vérité, Fabrice; Micallef, Joëlle

    2016-11-24

    We report the case of a 32-year-old man who developed acute psychiatric disorders after repeated intravenous injections of methylphenidate. The behavioural disorders with extreme psychomotor restlessness and delirious syndrome have resolved within 24hours. The available data highlight the fact that the prescriptions of methylphenidate, an amphetamine-like substance, are constantly increasing in Europe and Northern America. The potential of abuse and addiction to this drug, which is growingly misused, is now clearly established. The medical professionals should be cautious and attentive to the risk of misuse of this drug.

  11. Adolescent Dress, Part I: Dress and Body Markings of Psychiatric Outpatients and Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelman, John D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated dress and body markings of 100 hospitalized and never-hospitalized adolescent psychiatric patients using in-depth interviews. Found that hospitalized patients had higher incidence of self-scarring, but other individual expressions of appearance did not differentiate two groups. Suggests that dress and appearance observations,…

  12. ADHD and Aggression as Correlates of Suicidal Behavior in Assaultive Prepubertal Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Geoff; Gerstadt, Cherie; Pfeffer, Cynthia R.; Stroh, Martha; Valdez, Adina

    2008-01-01

    Forty-three psychiatrically hospitalized prepubertal children were assessed regarding their assaultive and suicidal behaviors. These children were subsequently classified into two groups, assaultive/suicidal (AS) and assaultive-only (AO). AS children had higher aggression and suicidal-scale scores, but not higher depression scores, and were more…

  13. Subgrouping with psychiatric inpatients in group psychotherapy: linking dependency and counterdependency.

    PubMed

    Spivack, Neal

    2008-04-01

    Abstract A model of inpatient group psychotherapy that focuses on two frequently observed patient subgroups reflecting contrasting attitudes toward authority is presented. The counterdependent subgroup overly values autonomy, opposes unit restrictions, and rejects treatment. The dependent subgroup tends to accept the unit's treatment and structure but is overly passive. In this model these attitudes are addressed in order to help patients adapt to the unit and to facilitate discharge. The author describes a three-stage group designed to help patients achieve these goals.

  14. Medicare program; inpatient psychiatric facilities prospective payment system--update for fiscal year beginning October 1, 2014 (FY 2015). Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-06

    This final rule will update the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs). These changes will be applicable to IPF discharges occurring during the fiscal year (FY) beginning October 1, 2014 through September 30, 2015. This final rule will also address implementation of ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS codes; finalize a new methodology for updating the cost of living adjustment (COLA), and finalize new quality measures and reporting requirements under the IPF quality reporting program.

  15. The Effect of Acute Exercise on Affect and Arousal in Inpatient Mental Health Consumers.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Robert; Reaburn, Peter; Happell, Brenda

    2016-09-01

    Acute exercise performed at a self-selected intensity improves affect and may improve long-term adherence. Similarly, in people with severe depression, acute aerobic exercise performed at self-selected intensity improves affect and arousal. However, the relationship between changes in affect and arousal and perceived exercise intensity in people with mental illness has not been evaluated. Affect and arousal were assessed immediately prior to, and immediately following, a group exercise program performed at a self-selected intensity in 40 inpatient mental health consumers who received a diagnosis of anxiety or bipolar or depressive disorders. Exercise intensity was assessed immediately after exercise. Postexercise affect was significantly improved for people with bipolar and depressive disorders but not for people with anxiety disorders. For the group as a whole, results showed a significant curvilinear relationship between ratings of perceived exertion and postexercise affect. These data will inform the development and delivery of future exercise interventions for inpatient mental health consumers.

  16. Characteristics of aggression among psychiatric inpatients by ward type in Japan: Using the Staff Observation Aggression Scale - Revised (SOAS-R).

    PubMed

    Sato, Makiko; Noda, Toshie; Sugiyama, Naoya; Yoshihama, Fumihiro; Miyake, Michi; Ito, Hiroto

    2016-07-22

    Aggressive behaviour by psychiatric patients is a serious issue in clinical practice, and adequate management of such behaviour is required, with careful evaluation of the factors causing the aggression. To examine the characteristics of aggressive incidents by ward type, a cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted for 6 months between April 2012 and June 2013 using the Staff Observation Aggression Scale - Revised, Japanese version (SOAS-R) in 30 wards across 20 Japanese psychiatric hospitals. Participating wards were categorized into three types based on the Japanese medical reimbursement system: emergency psychiatric, acute psychiatric, and standard wards (common in Japan, mostly treating non-acute patients). On analyzing the 443 incidents reported, results showed significant differences in SOAS-R responses by ward type. In acute and emergency psychiatric wards, staff members were the most common target of aggression. In acute psychiatric wards, staff requiring patients to take medication was the most common provocation, and verbal aggression was the most commonly used means. In emergency psychiatric wards, victims felt threatened. In contrast, in standard wards, both the target and provocation of aggression were most commonly other patients, hands were used, victims reported experiencing physical pain, and seclusion was applied to stop their behaviour. These findings suggest that ward environment was an important factor influencing aggressive behaviour. Ensuring the quality and safety of psychiatric care requires understanding the characteristics of incidents that staff are likely to encounter in each ward type, as well as implementing efforts to deal with the incidents adequately and improve the treatment environment.

  17. A Study of the Most Cost Effective Method of Providing Short Term Inpatient Psychiatric Care in the Washington, DC Catchment Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    where care was provided to include the average length of stay for the short term psychiatric patient, total cost per hospital encounter as well as...for short term inpatient psychiatric care. This figure multiplied by the average length of stay and the projected number of CNA renders a range for...in FY 1983 estimates that the average length of stay (ALOS) in days is 54.2.15 This ALOS is elevated to 58 days when the Washington, D.C. catchment

  18. The Role of Parenting Styles in the Relation Between Functions of Aggression and Internalizing Symptoms in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Population.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Casey A; Rathert, Jamie L; Fite, Paula J; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric inpatient hospitalization is a costly intervention for youth. With rates of hospitalization rising, efforts to refine prevention and intervention are necessary. Aggression often precedes severe internalizing behaviors, and proactive and reactive functions of aggression are differentially associated with internalizing symptomatology. Thus, further understanding of the links between functions of aggression and internalizing symptomatology could aid in the improvement of interventions for hospitalized youth. The current study examined parenting styles, gender, and age as potential moderators of the relations between proactive and reactive aggression and internalizing symptoms. Participants included 392 children, 6-12 years of age admitted consecutively to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Reactive aggression was uniquely associated with anxiety symptoms. However, proactive aggression was associated with internalizing problems only when specific parenting styles and demographic factors were present. Although both proactive and reactive subtypes of aggression were associated with internalizing symptoms, differential associations were evident. Implications of findings are discussed.

  19. Associations of the Dopamine D4 Receptor Gene VNTR Polymorphism with Drug Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    McGeary, John E.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Spirito, Anthony; Monti, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Background The VNTR polymorphism in the Dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4) has been associated with differential urge for substances across multiple methodologies ranging from neuroimaging to assessment in the natural environment. It is unclear whether the DRD4 gene is a marker for an underlying propensity for greater urge or whether the DRD4 gene differentially moderates the neuroadaptive effects of extended substance use on urge. Examination of the DRD4 in an adolescent sample may provide evidence of a mechanism of this putative relationship. Method Data from a subset of 77 participants in a larger assessment study characterized adolescents for substance-related behaviors by DRD4 genotype. The psychiatrically admitted adolescents were genotyped for the variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism in the DRD4 gene (L ≥ 7 [n = 25], S = < 7 [n = 52]). Associations of the DRD4 with scores on the SASSI, and ADI were examined as well as selected individual items thought to be most related to the intermediate phenotype of urge. Results The DRD4 gene was not associated with any DSM-IV substance misuse diagnostic classification. Individual items related to urge were also nonsignificantly related to DRD4 status. Carriers of the long variant of the DRD4 polymorphism were more likely to have used hard drugs within the previous 6 months and scored higher on the self-medication subscale of the ADI compared to short variant homozygotes. Discussion Preliminary results provide little evidence for the DRD4 VNTR polymorphism to be related to urge-related phenomena in hospitalized adolescents on a psychiatric inpatient unit. The association of the DRD4 gene with hard drug use may support literature linking this gene to impulsivity. Subscale findings may suggest a role of negative affect in previous DRD4 urge findings. PMID:17175015

  20. Latent Growth Modeling of nursing care dependency of acute neurological inpatients.

    PubMed

    Piredda, M; Ghezzi, V; De Marinis, M G; Palese, A

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal three-time point study, addressing how neurological adult patient care dependency varies from the admission time to the 3rd day of acute hospitalization. Nursing care dependency was measured with the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) and a Latent Growth Modeling approach was used to analyse the CDS trend in 124 neurosurgical and stroke inpatients. Care dependence followed a decreasing linear trend. Results can help nurse-managers planning an appropriate amount of nursing care for acute neurological patients during their initial stage of hospitalization. Further studies are needed aimed at investigating the determinants of nursing care dependence during the entire in-hospital stay.

  1. A prospective examination of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior among psychiatric adolescent inpatients.

    PubMed

    Czyz, Ewa K; Berona, Johnny; King, Cheryl A

    2015-04-01

    The challenge of identifying suicide risk in adolescents, and particularly among high-risk subgroups such as adolescent inpatients, calls for further study of models of suicidal behavior that could meaningfully aid in the prediction of risk. This study examined how well the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behavior (IPTS)--with its constructs of thwarted belongingness (TB), perceived burdensomeness (PB), and an acquired capability (AC) for lethal self-injury--predicts suicide attempts among adolescents (N = 376) 3 and 12 months after hospitalization. The three-way interaction between PB, TB, and AC, defined as a history of multiple suicide attempts, was not significant. However, there were significant 2-way interaction effects, which varied by sex: girls with low AC and increasing TB, and boys with high AC and increasing PB, were more likely to attempt suicide at 3 months. Only high AC predicted 12-month attempts. Results suggest gender-specific associations between theory components and attempts. The time-limited effects of these associations point to TB and PB being dynamic and modifiable in high-risk populations, whereas the effects of AC are more lasting. The study also fills an important gap in existing research by examining IPTS prospectively.

  2. Inpatient forensic-psychiatric care: Legal frameworks and service provision in three European countries.

    PubMed

    Edworthy, Rachel; Sampson, Stephanie; Völlm, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Laws governing the detention and treatment of mentally disordered offenders (MDOs) vary widely across Europe, yet little information is available about the features of these laws and their comparative advantages and disadvantages. The purpose of this article is to compare the legal framework governing detention in forensic psychiatric care in three European countries with long-established services for MDOs, England, Germany and the Netherlands. A literature review was conducted alongside consultation with experts from each country. We found that the three countries differ in several areas, including criteria for admission, review of detention, discharge process, the concept of criminal responsibility, service provision and treatment philosophy. Our findings suggest a profound difference in how each country relates to MDOs, with each approach contributing to different pathways and potentially different outcomes for the individual. Hopefully making these comparisons will stimulate debate and knowledge exchange on an international level to aid future research and the development of best practice in managing this population.

  3. Functional Status Predicts Acute Care Readmissions from Inpatient Rehabilitation in the Stroke Population

    PubMed Central

    Slocum, Chloe; Gerrard, Paul; Black-Schaffer, Randie; Goldstein, Richard; Singhal, Aneesh; DiVita, Margaret A.; Ryan, Colleen M.; Mix, Jacqueline; Purohit, Maulik; Niewczyk, Paulette; Kazis, Lewis; Zafonte, Ross; Schneider, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acute care readmission risk is an increasingly recognized problem that has garnered significant attention, yet the reasons for acute care readmission in the inpatient rehabilitation population are complex and likely multifactorial. Information on both medical comorbidities and functional status is routinely collected for stroke patients participating in inpatient rehabilitation. We sought to determine whether functional status is a more robust predictor of acute care readmissions in the inpatient rehabilitation stroke population compared with medical comorbidities using a large, administrative data set. Methods A retrospective analysis of data from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation from the years 2002 to 2011 was performed examining stroke patients admitted to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. A Basic Model for predicting acute care readmission risk based on age and functional status was compared with models incorporating functional status and medical comorbidities (Basic-Plus) or models including age and medical comorbidities alone (Age-Comorbidity). C-statistics were compared to evaluate model performance. Findings There were a total of 803,124 patients: 88,187 (11%) patients were transferred back to an acute hospital: 22,247 (2.8%) within 3 days, 43,481 (5.4%) within 7 days, and 85,431 (10.6%) within 30 days. The C-statistics for the Basic Model were 0.701, 0.672, and 0.682 at days 3, 7, and 30 respectively. As compared to the Basic Model, the best-performing Basic-Plus model was the Basic+Elixhauser model with C-statistics differences of +0.011, +0.011, and + 0.012, and the best-performing Age-Comorbidity model was the Age+Elixhauser model with C-statistic differences of -0.124, -0.098, and -0.098 at days 3, 7, and 30 respectively. Conclusions Readmission models for the inpatient rehabilitation stroke population based on functional status and age showed better predictive ability than models based on medical comorbidities. PMID

  4. An in-house prevocational training program for newly discharged psychiatric inpatients: exploring its employment outcomes and the predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Fang; Hwang, Eric; Lee, Hui-Ling; Wu, Shang-Liang

    2015-06-01

    Individuals with severe mental disorders continue to experience low employment rates. Occupational therapists play an important role in helping these individuals develop the skills and obtain the supports necessary for productive living. This retrospective cohort study aimed to explore employment outcomes and identify factors predictive of the outcomes of an in-house prevocational training program designed for newly discharged psychiatric inpatients. Data retrieved from the files of 58 participants including demographics, diagnostic history, physical fitness, functional assessment results, the use of vocational counselling service and employment status were analyzed. The overall employment rates among the participants were high (67.2-79.3%) within the 6 months following the prevocational training program. No significant differences were found in the employment rates across the 1, 3 and 6-month time periods post-training. Vocational counselling service post-training and hand function were two factors predictive of participants' employment outcomes. Occupational therapists should attend to the clients' need for continuous vocational support and carefully identify the personal, functional and environmental factors contributing to successful employment. Caution in interpreting the results is warranted because of the lack of control and randomization in this retrospective study. Additional longitudinal cohort or experimental studies would add further certainty to the current findings.

  5. Length of psychiatric hospitalization is correlated with CYP2D6 functional status in inpatients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Szarek, Bonnie L; Villagra, David; Gorowski, Krystyna; Kocherla, Mohan; Seip, Richard L; Goethe, John W; Schwartz, Harold I

    2016-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to determine the effect of the CYP2D6 genotype on the length of hospitalization stay for patients treated for major depressive disorder. Methods A total of 149 inpatients with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder at the Institute of Living, Hartford Hospital (CT, USA), were genotyped to detect altered alleles in the CYP2D6 gene. Prospectively defined drug metabolism indices (metabolic reserve, metabolic alteration and allele alteration) were determined quantitatively and assessed for their relationship to length of hospitalization stay. Results Hospital stay was significantly longer in deficient CYP2D6 metabolizers (metabolic reserve <2) compared with functional or suprafunctional metabolizers (metabolic reserve ≥2; 7.8 vs 5.7 days, respectively; p = 0.002). Conclusion CYP2D6 enzymatic functional status significantly affected length of hospital stay, perhaps due to reduced efficacy or increased side effects of the medications metabolized by the CYP2D6 isoenzyme. Functional scoring of CYP2D6 alleles may have a substantial impact on the quality of care, patient satisfaction and the economics of psychiatric treatment. PMID:23734807

  6. The Psychosocial Characteristics Associated with NSSI and Suicide Attempt of Youth Admitted to an In-patient Psychiatric Unit

    PubMed Central

    Preyde, Michèle; Vanderkooy, John; Chevalier, Pat; Heintzman, John; Warne, Amanda; Barrick, Kendra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of self-harm and the psychosocial factors associated with self-harming behaviours in youth admitted to an in-patient psychiatric unit. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys of standardized measures were administered to youth and a separate survey to their caregivers while the youth were in hospital. Results: The mean age of the 123 youth who participated was 15.74 (SD 1.51) years, and 90 of 121 (74.38%) reported being female. Of the 115 who completed this question, 101 (87.83%) indicated that they thought of injuring themselves and 89 (77.39%) did engage in NSSI within the past month, and 78 of 116 (67%) reported that they had made an attempt to take their life. Youth who reported that they had attempted suicide (lifetime) reported significantly less difficulty with emotion regulation than youth who engaged in NSSI only, or both NSSI and suicide attempts. Conclusions: These youth reported a very high prevalence of self-harm, and in general substantial difficulty with regulating their emotions, and difficulty with their interpersonal relationships. The psychosocial distinctions evident between groups may have practical utility. PMID:24872825

  7. Adverse Childhood Experiences Among Inpatient Youths with Severe and Early-Onset Psychiatric Disorders: Prevalence and Clinical Correlates.

    PubMed

    Benarous, Xavier; Raffin, Marie; Bodeau, Nicolas; Dhossche, Dirk; Cohen, David; Consoli, Angèle

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence and the clinical correlates of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) among 158 inpatient youths with two types of severe psychiatric disorders. ACEs were retrospectively collected with the ACEs scale and the List of Threatening Experiences Questionnaire in 77 patients hospitalized for a catatonic syndrome (average age 15.2 years) and 81 for a manic or mixed episode (average age 15.7 years). ACEs were frequent in youths suffering from bipolar disorder type I (BD-I) (58 %) and from catatonia (57 %), with around one quarter exposed to severe abuse (i.e., physical/sexual/emotional abuse or physical/emotional neglect). Youths with BD-I were more likely to be exposed to family violence compared to those with catatonia. Youths who had been exposed to ACEs did not exhibit a more severe presentation or a poorer response to treatment compared to others, either in the bipolar group or in the catatonic group.

  8. The impact of trauma on the onset of mental health symptoms, aggression, and criminal behavior in an inpatient psychiatric sample.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Jill D; Quinn, Megan A; Levenson, Jill S

    2016-11-01

    Experiences of trauma and maltreatment are frequent predictors of poor physical and mental health outcomes in adulthood. Existing literature also suggests an impact of developmental adversity on criminality and aggressive behavior, though little research exists describing the effects of cumulative adversity in forensic mental health samples. In the current study of 381 forensic mental health inpatients, rates of trauma, neglect, and parental substance abuse are reported in comparison with community norms. Cumulative adversity and the occurrence of foster care placement are examined via linear and logistic regression analyses in relation to age at first arrest, first psychiatric hospitalization, and onset of aggression, as well as history of suicide attempts and non-suicidal self-injury. Results revealed that experiences of developmental adversity were more common among participants than have been reported in community samples using the ACE survey, and that there were differential effects of gender on the prevalence of traumas experienced. Cumulative adversity scores were significantly associated with all outcomes, though the addition of foster care placement to the model significantly contributed to understanding outcomes, and in some cases, removed the effect of cumulative adversity. Implications and direction for future study are discussed.

  9. Bullying behavior in relation to psychiatric disorders and physical health among adolescents: a clinical cohort of 508 underage inpatient adolescents in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Räsänen, Pirkko; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa

    2010-06-30

    The aim was to investigate the association of bullying behavior with psychiatric disorders and physical health in a sample of adolescent psychiatric patients, as there have to our knowledge been no previous studies using actual psychiatric diagnoses examining this relationship in boys and girls. We studied 508 Finnish adolescents (age 12-17) admitted to psychiatric inpatient care between April 2001 and March 2006 from the geographically large area of Northern Finland. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) was used to obtain psychiatric diagnoses of adolescents according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) and information on bullying behavior. Logistic regression analyses showed that having an externalizing disorder increased the likelihood of being a bully or a bully-victim (i.e. a person who is both a bully and a victim of bullying) among both the boys (odds ratio, OR=14.4, P=0.001) and the girls (OR=10.0, P<0.001). In addition, having an internalizing disorder increased the likelihood of being a victim of bullying among the boys (OR=3.4, P=0.008), but not the girls. Chronic somatic diseases were also significantly associated with being bullied among the boys (OR=2.5, P=0.041). Our results suggest that adolescents who are involved in bullying behavior should be evaluated psychiatrically, as this might be an early marker of psychiatric disorders.

  10. Inpatient Opioid Withdrawal Management of Street Children and Adolescents Admitted to Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Ward: A Preliminary Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Firouzkouhi Moghadam, Mahboubeh; Hashemian, Seyed-Sepehr; Pishjoo, Masoud; Ghasemi, Sanaz; Hajebi, Ahmad; Noroozi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background About 10 million children worldwide live or work on the street. International reports estimate the prevalence of substance use among street children to be between 25% - 90%, which is who were referredntal disorders and high-risk behaviors. Objectives The objective of this study was to report the outcomes of assisted withdrawal of opioid-dependent vulnerable children and adolescents who were referred to child and adolescent psychiatric ward of Ali Ebne Abitaleb hospital, an academic hospital in Zahedan city. Methods Clinical chart abstractions were performed on a convenience sample of 40 serial opioid-dependent street children and adolescents (mean age: 11.14 ± 3.6 years) who were referred to child and adolescent psychiatric ward of Ali Ebne Abitaleb treatment and research center from November 2014 to May 2015. The demographic data, drug use history, comorbid physical and psychiatric conditions, symptomatology of opioid withdrawal syndrome, pharmacotherapies and psychosocial services, length of hospital stay, and any adverse events were extracted from the patients’ files using a checklist developed by the authors. Results Twenty-four (60%) patients were male, and 16 (40%) were female. The main drug used by all patients was opioids. Heroin Kerack (which has a street name of crystal in southeast Iran) was the most common (75%) drug of use, followed by opium (10%) and opium residue (7.5%). None of the participants self-reported using injected drugs. The high rate of a lack of eligibility for guardianship was documented among parents (87.5%) mainly due to their use of illegal drugs. Musculoskeletal pain and diarrhea were the most common withdrawal symptoms of the patients upon admission. The mean length of stay was 10.8 (± 7.30) days, and no significant adverse events were reported during the symptomatic treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to report on the safety and feasibility of inpatient

  11. Correlation between levels of conflict and containment on acute psychiatric wards: the city-128 study.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Len; Stewart, Duncan; Papadopoulos, Chris; Iennaco, Joanne DeSanto

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Attainment of safe, calm inpatient psychiatric wards that are conducive to positive therapeutic care is crucial. On such wards, rates of coerced medication, seclusion, manual restraint and other types of containment are comparatively low, and, usually, rates of conflict-for example, aggression, substance use, and absconding-are also low. Sometimes, however, wards maintain low rates of containment even when conflict rates are high. This study investigated wards with the counterintuitive combination of low containment and high conflict or high containment and low conflict. METHODS The authors conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected from 136 acute psychiatric wards across England in 2004-2005. The wards were categorized into four groups on the basis of median splits of containment and conflict rates: high conflict and high containment, high conflict and low containment, low conflict and low containment, and low conflict and high containment. Features significantly associated with these ward types were identified. RESULTS Among the variables significantly associated with the various typologies, some-for example, environmental quality-were changeable, and others-such as social deprivation of the area served-were fixed. High-conflict, low-containment wards had higher rates of male staff and lower-quality environments than other wards. Low-conflict, high-containment wards had higher numbers of beds. High-conflict, high-containment wards utilized more temporary staff as well as more unqualified staff. No overall differences were associated with low-conflict, low-containment wards. CONCLUSIONS Wards can make positive changes to achieve a low-containment, nonpunitive culture, even when rates of patient conflict are high.

  12. Risk of acute gout among active smokers: data from nationwide inpatient sample.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Dilli Ram; Karmacharya, Paras; Donato, Anthony

    2016-12-01

    Smoking has been found to be negatively correlated with serum uric acid levels by virtue of reduced production and increased consumption of endogenous antioxidant uric acid among smokers and has been reported to decrease incidence of gout. To shed further light on the question of association between active smoking and acute gout by examining this association using a large inpatient US database, using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample data from 2009 to 2011, we identified current smokers based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) code 305.1 and were assumed to have ceased smoking during hospital stay. Patients who developed acute gout inhospital were identified based on ICD-9 code 274.01 at secondary diagnosis position. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to derive odds ratio for measures of association. Statistical analysis was done using STATA version 13.0 (College Station, TX). A total of 17,847,045 discharge records were used which included 13,932 (0.08 %) inhospital acute gouty arthritis and 2,615,944 (14.66 %) active smokers. Both univariate (OR 0.59, CI 0.54-0.63, p < 0.0001) and multivariate (OR 0.64, CI 0.59-0.68, p < 0.0001) regressions showed statistically significant reduction of acute gout among hospitalized patients who were current smokers but were assumed to have ceased smoking during hospital stay. Active tobacco use was associated with a lower risk of acute inpatient gouty arthritis, even when controlling for conventional risk factors. More study is needed to correlate this finding with uric acid levels, and a better understanding of the mechanisms that explain this finding are necessary.

  13. Reduction of Seclusion and Restraint in an Inpatient Psychiatric Setting: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Blair, Ellen W; Woolley, Stephen; Szarek, Bonnie L; Mucha, Theodore F; Dutka, Olga; Schwartz, Harold I; Wisniowski, Jeff; Goethe, John W

    2017-03-01

    The authors describe a quality and safety initiative designed to decrease seclusion/restraint (S/R) and present the results of a pilot study that evaluated the effectiveness of this program. The study sample consisted of consecutive admissions to a 120-bed psychiatric service after the intervention was implemented (October 2010-September 2012, n = 8029). Analyses compared S/R incidence and duration in the study sample to baseline (consecutive admissions during the year prior to introduction of the intervention, October 2008-September 2009, n = 3884). The study intervention, which used evidence-based therapeutic practices for reducing violence/aggression, included routine use of the Brøset Violence Checklist, mandated staff education in crisis intervention and trauma informed care, increased frequency of physician reassessment of need for S/R, formal administrative review of S/R events and environmental enhancements (e.g., comfort rooms to support sensory modulation). Statistically significant associations were found between the intervention and a decrease in both the number of seclusions (p < 0.01) and the duration of seclusion per admission (p < 0.001). These preliminary results support the conclusion that this intervention was effective in reducing use of seclusion. Further study is needed to determine if these prevention strategies are generalizable, the degree to which each component of the intervention contributes to improve outcome, and if continuation of the intervention will further reduce restraint use.

  14. Which values are important for patients during involuntary treatment? A qualitative study with psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Emanuele; Giacco, Domenico; Katasakou, Christina; Priebe, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Involuntary hospital treatment is practised throughout the world. Providing appropriate treatment in this context is particularly challenging for mental health professionals, who frequently face ethical issues as they have to administer treatments in the absence of patient consent. We have explored the views of 59 psychiatric patients who had been involuntarily admitted to hospital treatment across England. Moral deliberation theory, developed in the field of clinical bioethics, was used to assess ethical issues. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and analysed through thematic content analysis. We have detected a number of circumstances in the hospital that were perceived as potentially conflictual by patients. We have established which patient values should be considered by staff when deliberating on ethically controversial issues in these circumstances. Patients regarded as important having freedom of choice and the feeling of being safe during their stay in the hospital. Patients also valued non-paternalistic and respectful behaviour from staff. Consideration of patient values in moral deliberation is important to manage ethical conflicts. Even in the ethically challenging context of involuntary treatment, there are possibilities to increase patient freedoms, enhance their sense of safety and convey respect.

  15. Readmission to Acute Care Hospital during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Flora M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Ryser, David K.; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate frequency, reasons, and factors associated with readmission to acute care (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants 2,130 consecutive admissions for TBI rehabilitation. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. Results 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total 210 episodes. 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. Mean days from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22 days (SD 22). Mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7 days (SD 8). 84 participants (46%) had >1 RTAC episode for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had >1 RTAC for surgical reasons, and RTAC reason was unknown for 6 (3%) participants. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were: neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurologic (23%), and cardiac (12%). Older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission predicted patients with RTAC. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission Functional Independence Measure Motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Conclusion(s) Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experience RTAC during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation due to RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. PMID:26212405

  16. Nurses experiences of delivering care in acute inpatient mental health settings: A narrative synthesis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wyder, Marianne; Ehrlich, Carolyn; Crompton, David; McArthur, Leianne; Delaforce, Caroline; Dziopa, Fiona; Ramon, Shulamit; Powell, Elizabeth

    2017-03-14

    Inpatient psychiatric care requires a balance between working with consumers' priorities and goals, managing expectations of the community, legal, professional and service responsibilities. In order to improve service delivery within acute mental health units, it is important to understand the constraints and facilitating factors for good care. We conducted a systematic narrative synthesis, where findings of qualitative studies are synthesised to generate new insights. 21 articles were identified. Our results show that personal qualities, professional skills as well as environmental factors all influence the ability to provide recovery focused care. Three overarching themes which either facilitated or hindered were identified. These included: (i) Complexity of the nursing role (clinical care; practical and emotional support: advocacy and education; enforcing aspects of the Mental Health Act. and, maintaining ward safety); (ii) Constraining factors (operational barriers; change in patient characteristic; and competing understandings of care); and (iii) Facilitating factors (ward factors; nursing tools; nurse characteristics; approach to people; approach to work and ability to self-care). We suggest that the therapeutic use of self is central to the provision of recovery oriented care. However person-centred practice can be fragile and fluid and a compassionate system of support is needed to enable an understanding of context and self. It is critical to have a work environment which fosters hope and optimism and is supportive of autonomy, ensures workload balance, and is safe.

  17. Association of family structure to later criminality: a population-based follow-up study of adolescent psychiatric inpatients in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Ikäheimo, Olli; Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helinä; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2013-04-01

    The influence of family structure on criminality in adolescents is well acknowledged in population based studies of delinquents, but not regarding adolescent psychiatric inpatients. The association of family structure to criminality was examined among 508 adolescents receiving psychiatric inpatient treatment between 2001 and 2006. Family structure and DSM-IV based psychiatric diagnoses were based on the K-SADS-PL-interview and criminality on criminal records provided by the Finnish Legal Register Centre. After adjusting for socio-demographic, clinical and family factors, the adolescents from single parent families, child welfare placements and those not living with their biological parents showed an increased risk of committing crimes at an earlier age than adolescents from two parent families. Lack of a safe and stable family environment has important implications for adolescents with severe mental disorder. When these adolescents are discharged from hospital, special attention should be focused on organizing stable and long term psychosocial support which compensates for the lack of stable family environment and seeks to prevent future adversities.

  18. Ready, aim fire! Mental health nurses under siege in acute inpatient facilities.

    PubMed

    Ward, Louise

    2013-04-01

    It has been clearly acknowledged and well-documented that physical, emotional, and psychological violence is a central theme and an expected workplace hazard for registered nurses working in acute inpatient mental health care facilities. Limited research, however, has focused on how registered nurses have been able to cope within this environment and adequately protect themselves from harm. A critical feminist research project recently explored the lived experience of 13 Australian, female, registered nurses working in a busy metropolitan acute inpatient mental health care facility. "Fear" was exposed as the precursor to violence and aggression, both "fear as experienced by the nurse" and "fear as experienced by the patient." The participants reported experiencing a sense of fear when they could not accurately or confidently anticipate a patient response or reaction. They identified this relationship with fear as being "part of the job" and part of the unpredictable nature of caring for people experiencing complex distortions in thinking and behavior. The participants believed, however, that additional workplace pressures complicated the therapeutic environment, resulting in a distraction from patient care and observation. This distraction could lead to nurse-patient miscommunication and the potential for violence. This article discusses a major theme to emerge from this study, "Better the devil you know!" The theme highlights how mental health nurses cope with violence and why they choose to continue working in this complex care environment.

  19. The training value of working with armed forces inpatients in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    de Burgh, H Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Over the last 10 years, the UK armed forces (UKAF) have been involved in operations worldwide. Mental health in the armed forces (AF) has been the subject of considerable interest in part because of a perceived added risk of psychological distress in this population. Inpatient psychiatric services are provided through partnerships with NHS hospitals. The Cavell Centre, Peterborough's acute inpatient psychiatric unit has up to four beds for service personnel, under the care of a civilian consultant psychiatrist and his AF Foundation Year 2 doctor (F2). This was the only Ministry of Defence (MoD) inpatient unit which had a training post for an AF doctor, but the post ended in August 2014 with the closure of MoD Hospital Unit Peterborough (MDHU(P)). This article outlines the differences in civilian and AF inpatient care and discusses the training value of AF doctors managing service personnel who are psychiatric inpatients.

  20. Poor Self-Reported Sleep Quality Predicts Mortality within One Year of Inpatient Post-Acute Rehabilitation among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer L.; Fiorentino, Lavinia; Jouldjian, Stella; Mitchell, Michael; Josephson, Karen R.; Alessi, Cathy A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the association between self-reported sleep quality among older adults during inpatient post-acute rehabilitation and one-year survival. Design: Prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: Two inpatient post-acute rehabilitation sites (one community and one Veterans Administration). Participants: Older patients (aged ≥ 65 years, n = 245) admitted for inpatient post-acute rehabilitation. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Within one year of post-acute rehabilitation, 57 participants (23%) were deceased. Cox proportional hazards models showed that worse Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) total scores during the post-acute care stay were associated with increased mortality risk when controlling for amount of rehabilitation therapy received, comorbidities, and cognitive functioning (Hazard ratio [95% CI] = 1.11 [1.02-1.20]). Actigraphically estimated sleep was unrelated to mortality risk. Conclusions: Poorer self-reported sleep quality, but not objectively estimated sleep parameters, during post-acute rehabilitation was associated with shorter survival among older adults. This suggests self-reported poor sleep may be an important and potentially modifiable risk factor for negative outcomes in these vulnerable older adults. Studies of interventions to improve sleep quality during inpatient rehabilitation should therefore be undertaken, and the long-term health benefits of improved sleep should be explored. Citation: Martin JL; Fiorentino L; Jouldjian S; Mitchell M; Josephson KR; Alessi CA. Poor self-reported sleep quality predicts mortality within one year of inpatient post-acute rehabilitation among older adults. SLEEP 2011;34(12):1715-1721. PMID:22131610

  1. Inpatient management of children with severe acute malnutrition: a review of WHO guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Tickell, Kirkby D

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand how the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) guidelines on the inpatient care of children with complicated severe acute malnutrition may be strengthened to improve outcomes. Methods In December 2015, we searched Google scholar and WHO’s website for WHO recommendations on severe acute malnutrition management and evaluated the history and cited evidence behind these recommendations. We systematically searched WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, clinicaltrials.gov and the Controlled Trials metaRegister until 10 August 2015 for recently completed, ongoing, or pending trials. Findings WHO’s guidelines provide 33 recommendations on the topic. However, 16 (48.5%) of these recommendations were based solely on expert opinion – unsupported by published evidence. Another 11 (33.3%) of the recommendations were supported by the results of directly relevant research – i.e. either randomized trials (8) or observational studies (3). The other six recommendations (18.2%) were based on studies that were not conducted among children with complicated severe malnutrition or studies of treatment that were not identical to the recommended intervention. Trials registries included 20 studies related to the topic, including nine trials of alternative feeding regimens. Acute medical management and follow-up care studies were minimally represented. Conclusion WHO’s guidelines on the topic have a weak evidence base and have undergone limited substantive adjustments over the past decades. More trials are needed to make that evidence base more robust. If the mortality associated with severe malnutrition is to be reduced, inpatient and post-discharge management trials, supported by studies on the causes of mortality, are needed. PMID:27708469

  2. Symptom, Family, and Service Predictors of Children's Psychiatric Rehospitalization within One Year of Discharge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blader, Joseph C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate predictors of readmission to inpatient psychiatric treatment for children aged 5 to 12 discharged from acute-care hospitalization. Method: One hundred nine children were followed for 1 year after discharge from inpatient care. Time to rehospitalization was the outcome of interest. Predictors of readmission, examined via…

  3. RH-01THE SIGNIFICANCE OF ACUTE INPATIENT REHABILITATION FOR GLIOMA PATIENTS: IMPROVING THE PHYSICAL FUNCTION, QUALITY OF LIFE AND SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Beverly Fu, D.; Bota, Daniela A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of inpatient acute rehabilitation on overall function, quality of life and overall survival for glioma patients. DESIGN: A retrospective study of glioma patients treated at UCI Neuro-Oncology Program. PARTICIPANTS: We have identified 12 patients with glioma diagnosis who underwent inpatient acute rehabilitation program using our IRB approved neuro-oncology database. OUTCOME ASSESSMENT TOOLS: Functional status based upon Karnofsky performance scale (KPS), quality of life as assessed by Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Brain (FACT-Br) and overall survival. RESULTS: We identified on our study 3 patients with glioblastoma, 7 patients with anaplastic gliomas, and 2 patients with low grade gliomas. All of them had radiation and chemotherapy, except 2 patients with low grade gliomas who had radiation treatment only. The age range is from 26 to 77 and the mean age is 49-year-old. All the patients who underwent the acute inpatient rehabilitation program at our institution, not only improved their KPS scale significantly, but also enhanced their social and emotional well-being. The median KPS improvement is 30 points from a 3-6 weeks stay. Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Brain (FACT-Br) is obtained from 4 patients at this time (further information will be presented at SNO conference). The mean FACT-Br TOI is 60.8, and the total FACT0Br Score is 119.6. Survival data are still collected. CONCLUSIONS: The patients who underwent acute inpatient rehabilitation program, showed significant improvements in their functional status and quality of life. The observation from this pilot study warrants further research and demonstrates the acute inpatient rehabilitation may be beneficial to glioma patients with good physical functions and tolerance for 3 hours a day of physical, occupation and speech therapies.

  4. Improving smoking cessation policy by assessing user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service in adult psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kathy; Creamer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Smoking rates are higher among people with mental health conditions compared to the general population. Smoking reduces physical, mental and financial well-being, and interacts with psychotropic drugs. An inpatient admission provides an opportunity to engage and support smokers in smoking cessation. Compliance with Trust/NICE smoking cessation guidelines was assessed in two inpatient wards, and a questionnaire evaluated user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service. A need for improved documentation of smoking status to identify and treat smokers routinely was revealed. A new electronic health form was designed and introduced, and a clear pathway for onward referrals was developed. This intervention preceded the introduction of the Trust-wide smoke free policy from October 2014. The intervention doubled rates of documentation of smoking status, cessation advice and offer of NRT/referral. There were large differences between the two wards, highlighting the need for a tailored approach.

  5. Effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in patients on an acute care psychiatric unit: a randomized three group effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Stigma is a major social barrier that can restrict access to and willingness to seek psychiatric care. Psychiatric consumers may use secrecy and withdrawal in an attempt to cope with stigma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in acute care psychiatric inpatients using a randomized design with wait-list control. Participants (N=83) were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three single-session group-based conditions: music therapy, education, or wait-list control. Participants in the music therapy and education conditions completed only posttests while participants in the wait-list control condition completed only pretests. The music therapy condition was a group songwriting intervention wherein participants composed lyrics for "the stigma blues." Results indicated significant differences in measures of discrimination (experienced stigma), disclosure (self-stigma), and total stigma between participants in the music therapy condition and participants in the wait-list control condition. From the results of this randomized controlled investigation, music therapy may be an engaging and effective psychosocial technique to treat stigma. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for clinical practice and psychiatric music therapy research are provided.

  6. Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Other Clinically Significant Body Image Concerns in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyl, Jennifer; Kittler, Jennifer; Phillips, Katharine A.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study assessed prevalence and clinical correlates of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), eating disorders (ED), and other clinically significant body image concerns in 208 consecutively admitted adolescent inpatients. It was hypothesized that adolescents with BDD would have higher levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidality.…

  7. The Feasibility of Inpatient Geriatric Assessment for Older Adults Receiving Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Geiger, Ann M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Levitan, Denise; Pardee, Timothy S.; Isom, Scott; Powell, Bayard L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To test the feasibility and utility of a bedside geriatric assessment (GA) to detect impairment in multiple geriatric domains in older adults initiating chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). DESIGN Prospective observational cohort study. SETTING Single academic institution. PARTICIPANTS Individuals aged 60 and older with newly diagnosed AML and planned chemotherapy. MEASUREMENTS Bedside GA was performed during inpatient exmination for AML. GA measures included the modified Mini-Mental State Examination; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; Distress Thermometer, Pepper Assessment Tool for Disability (includes self- reported activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental ADLs, and mobility questions); Short Physical Performance Battery (includes timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance); grip strength, and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Comorbidity Index. RESULTS Of 54 participants (mean age 70.8 ± 6.4) eligible for this analysis, 92.6% completed the entire GA battery (mean time 44.0 ± 14 minutes). The following impairments were detected: cognitive impairment, 31.5%; depression, 38.9%; distress, 53.7%; impairment in ADLs, 48.2%; impaired physical performance, 53.7%; and comorbidity, 46.3%. Most were impaired in one (92.6%) or more (63%) functional domains. For the 38 participants rated as having good performance status according to standard oncologic assessment (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Performance Scale score ≤1), impairments in individual GA measures ranged from 23.7% to 50%. Significant variability in cognitive, emotional, and physical status was detected even after stratification according to tumor biology (cytogenetic risk group classification). CONCLUSION Inpatient GA was feasible and added new information to standard oncology assessment, which may be important for stratifying therapeutic risk in older adults with AML. PMID:22091497

  8. Nurse-police coalition: improves safety in acute psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Diane E; Harris, Frank N; de Nesnera, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Although police officers protect and secure the safety of citizens everywhere, nurses are the primary guardians of patient safety within the treatment milieu. At New Hampshire Hospital, both nurses and police officers share ownership of this responsibility, depending on the needs that arise specific to each profession. Psychiatric nurses take pride in their ability to de-escalate agitated and potentially aggressive patients; however, times arise when the best efforts of nurses fail, or when a situation requires intervention from police officers. Nurses and police officers at New Hampshire Hospital have worked together for many years to develop a trusting, respectful alliance. This coalition has resulted in a safe, clear, orderly process for transfer of authority from nurses to police during violent, clinically unmanageable psychiatric emergencies. Nurses and police officers work collaboratively toward the common goal of ensuring safety for patients and staff, while also acknowledging the unique strengths of each profession.

  9. Nurse-patient interaction in acute adult inpatient mental health units: a review and synthesis of qualitative studies.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Hunt, Glenn E; Horsfall, Jan; Deacon, Maureen

    2012-02-01

    Mental health nurses work with acutely unwell patients, and the busy setting is characterised by unpredictable events. This paper is a report of a review conducted to identify, analyse and synthesize research in adult acute inpatient mental health units, which focused on nurse-patient interaction. Several electronic databases were searched using relevant keywords to identify studies published from 1999-present. Qualitative studies published in English were included if they specifically investigated nurse-patient interaction in acute inpatient care in adult settings. Eighteen studies were included (23 papers). Findings were grouped into the following six categories: 1) sophisticated communication; 2) subtle discriminations; 3) managing security parameters; 4) ordinary communication; 5) reliance on colleagues; and 6) personal characteristics. These studies of acute inpatient mental health units reveal that nurse communication involves interpersonal approaches and modalities that exemplify highly developed communication and personal skills designed specifically for this challenging setting. Further quality research should focus on the conditions that enable the development of therapeutic interactional skills and the relationship of these skills to the nuanced context in which they are practiced.

  10. Ecological Assessment of Clinicians’ Antipsychotic Prescription Habits in Psychiatric Inpatients: A Novel Web- and Mobile Phone–Based Prototype for a Dynamic Clinical Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Barrigón, Maria Luisa; Brandt, Sara A; Nitzburg, George C; Ovejero, Santiago; Alvarez-Garcia, Raquel; Carballo, Juan; Walter, Michel; Billot, Romain; Lenca, Philippe; Delgado-Gomez, David; Ropars, Juliette; de la Calle Gonzalez, Ivan; Courtet, Philippe; Baca-García, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Background Electronic prescribing devices with clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) hold the potential to significantly improve pharmacological treatment management. Objective The aim of our study was to develop a novel Web- and mobile phone–based application to provide a dynamic CDSS by monitoring and analyzing practitioners’ antipsychotic prescription habits and simultaneously linking these data to inpatients’ symptom changes. Methods We recruited 353 psychiatric inpatients whose symptom levels and prescribed medications were inputted into the MEmind application. We standardized all medications in the MEmind database using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system and the defined daily dose (DDD). For each patient, MEmind calculated an average for the daily dose prescribed for antipsychotics (using the N05A ATC code), prescribed daily dose (PDD), and the PDD to DDD ratio. Results MEmind results found that antipsychotics were used by 61.5% (217/353) of inpatients, with the largest proportion being patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (33.4%, 118/353). Of the 217 patients, 137 (63.2%, 137/217) were administered pharmacological monotherapy and 80 (36.8%, 80/217) were administered polytherapy. Antipsychotics were used mostly in schizophrenia spectrum and related psychotic disorders, but they were also prescribed in other nonpsychotic diagnoses. Notably, we observed polypharmacy going against current antipsychotics guidelines. Conclusions MEmind data indicated that antipsychotic polypharmacy and off-label use in inpatient units is commonly practiced. MEmind holds the potential to create a dynamic CDSS that provides real-time tracking of prescription practices and symptom change. Such feedback can help practitioners determine a maximally therapeutic drug treatment while avoiding unproductive overprescription and off-label use. PMID:28126703

  11. Acute inpatient palliative medicine in a cancer center: clinical problems and medical interventions--a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth; Rivera, Nilo; Walsh, Declan; LeGrand, Susan; Davis, Mellar P

    2007-01-01

    The clinical characteristics and medical interventions of the 100 consecutive cancer admissions to the acute care inpatient palliative medicine unit at the Cleveland Clinic for 2 months are described. Median age was 62 years (range, 31 to 92 years). The male-female ratio was 1:1. Most admissions were referred by hematology-oncology and had prior antineoplastic therapy. Reasons for admission were symptom control and cancer-related complications. Patients underwent invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, hydration, transfusions, radiation, or chemotherapy, or a combination, during their admission. Most were discharged home with hospice care or had outpatient clinic follow-up. The mortality rate was 20%. Aggressive multidisciplinary management of symptoms, disease complications, comorbid conditions, and psychosocial problems were provided. Palliative medicine physicians provided continuity of care in the outpatient clinic and at home. An acute inpatient palliative medicine unit within a tertiary level medical center has a definable and important role in comprehensive cancer care.

  12. Characteristics of patients frequently subjected to pharmacological and mechanical restraint--a register study in three Norwegian acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Mjøsund, Nina Helen; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2014-01-30

    This retrospective study from three catchment-area-based acute psychiatric wards showed that of all the pharmacologically and mechanically restrained patients (n=373) 34 (9.1%) had been frequently restrained (6 or more times). These patients accounted for 39.2% of all restraint episodes during the two-year study period. Adjusted binary logistic regression analyses showed that the odds for being frequently restrained were 91% lower among patients above 50 years compared to those aged 18-29 years; a threefold increase (OR=3.1) for those admitted 3 times or more compared to patients with only one stay; and, finally, a threefold increase (OR=3.1) if the length of stay was 16 days or more compared to those admitted for 0-4 days. Among frequently restrained patients, males (n=15) had significantly longer stays than women (n=19), and 8 of the females had a diagnosis of personality disorder, compared to none among males. Our study showed that being frequently restrained was associated with long inpatient stay, many admissions and young age. Teasing out patient characteristics associated with the risk of being frequently restraint may contribute to reduce use of restraint by developing alternative interventions for these patients.

  13. Safety Planning for Military (SAFE MIL): rationale, design, and safety considerations of a randomized controlled trial to reduce suicide risk among psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Brown, Gregory K; Currier, Glenn W; Brenner, Lisa; Knox, Kerry L; Grammer, Geoffrey; Carreno-Ponce, Jaime T; Stanley, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Mental health related hospitalizations and suicide are both significant public health problems within the United States Department of Defense (DoD). To date, few evidence-based suicide prevention programs have been developed for delivery to military personnel and family members admitted for psychiatric inpatient care due to suicidal self-directed violence. This paper describes the rationale and detailed methodology for a study called Safety Planning for Military (SAFE MIL) which involves a randomized controlled trial (RCT) at the largest military treatment facility in the United States. The purpose of this study is to test the efficacy of a brief, readily accessible, and personalized treatment called the Safety Planning Intervention (Stanley and Brown, 2012). Primary outcomes, measured by blinded assessors at one and six months following psychiatric discharge, include suicide ideation, suicide-related coping, and attitudes toward help seeking. Additionally, given the study's focus on a highly vulnerable patient population, a description of safety considerations for human subjects' participation is provided. Based on this research team's experience, the implementation of an infrastructure in support of RCT research within DoD settings and the processing of regulatory approvals for a clinical trial with high risk suicidal patients are expected to take up to 18-24 months. Recommendations for expediting the advancement of clinical trials research within the DoD are provided in order to maximize cost efficacy and minimize the research to practice gap.

  14. A critical narrative analysis of shared decision-making in acute inpatient mental health care.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Gemma; Felton, Anne; Morgan, Alastair; Stickley, Theo; Willis, Martin; Diamond, Bob; Houghton, Philip; Johnson, Beverley; Dumenya, John

    2016-01-01

    Shared decision-making (SDM) is a high priority in healthcare policy and is complementary to the recovery philosophy in mental health care. This agenda has been operationalised within the Values-Based Practice (VBP) framework, which offers a theoretical and practical model to promote democratic interprofessional approaches to decision-making. However, these are limited by a lack of recognition of the implications of power implicit within the mental health system. This study considers issues of power within the context of decision-making and examines to what extent decisions about patients' care on acute in-patient wards are perceived to be shared. Focus groups were conducted with 46 mental health professionals, service users, and carers. The data were analysed using the framework of critical narrative analysis (CNA). The findings of the study suggested each group constructed different identity positions, which placed them as inside or outside of the decision-making process. This reflected their view of themselves as best placed to influence a decision on behalf of the service user. In conclusion, the discourse of VBP and SDM needs to take account of how differentials of power and the positioning of speakers affect the context in which decisions take place.

  15. Substance Abusers in an Acute Psychiatric Facility: A Diagnostic and Logistic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Berg, John E.; Restan, Asbjørn

    2013-01-01

    Acute resident psychiatric facilities in Norway usually get their patients after referral from a medical doctor. Acute psychiatric wards are the only places accepting persons in need of emergency hospitalisation when emergency units in somatic hospitals do not accept the patient. Resident patients at one random chosen day were scrutinized in an acute psychiatric facility with 36 beds serving a catchment area of 165 000. Twenty-five patients were resident in the facility at that particular day. Eight of 25 resident patients (32.0%) in the acute wards were referred for a substance-induced psychosis (SIP). Another patient may also have had a SIP, but the differential diagnostic work was not finished. A main primary diagnosis of substance use was given in the medical reports in only 12.9% of patients during the last year. Given that the chosen day was representative of the year, a majority of patients with substance abuse problems were given other diagnoses. There seems to be a reluctance to declare the primary reason for an acute stay in a third of resident stays. Lack of specialized emergency detoxification facilities may have contributed to the results. PMID:23738222

  16. The Contribution of Children's Temperamental Fear and Effortful Control to Restraint and Seclusion during Inpatient Treatment in a Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgett, David J.; Valentino, Kristin; Hayden, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined temperament characteristics as risk factors for restraint and seclusion (R/S) events in psychiatrically hospitalized youth, extending work that has sought to identify R/S risk factors and research examining temperament-behavior problem associations that has largely relied upon community samples. It was anticipated that…

  17. A Comparative Study of Pituitary Volume Variations in MRI in Acute Onset of Psychiatric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Joish, Upendra Kumar; Sahni, Hirdesh; George, Raju A; Sivasankar, Rajeev; Aggarwal, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The growing belief that endocrine abnormalities may underlie many mental conditions has led to increased use of imaging and hormonal assays in patients attending to psychiatric OPDs. People who are in an acute phase of a psychiatric disorder show Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity, but the precise underlying central mechanisms are unclear. Aim To assess the pituitary gland volume variations in patients presenting with new onset acute psychiatric illness in comparison with age and gender matched controls by using MRI. Materials and Methods The study included 50 patients, with symptoms of acute psychiatric illness presenting within one month of onset of illness and 50 age and gender matched healthy controls. Both patients and controls were made to undergo MRI of the Brain. A 0.9 mm slices of entire brain were obtained by 3 dimensional T1 weighted sequence. Pituitary gland was traced in all sagittal slices. Anterior pituitary and posterior pituitary bright spot were measured separately in each slice. Volume of the pituitary (in cubic centimetre- cm3) was calculated by summing areas. Significance of variations in pituitary gland volumes was compared between the cases and controls using Analysis of Covariance (ANOVA). Results There were significantly larger pituitary gland volumes in the cases than the controls, irrespective of psychiatric diagnosis (ANOVA, f=15.56; p=0.0002). Pituitary volumes in cases were 15.36% (0.73 cm3) higher than in controls. Conclusion There is a strong likelihood of HPA axis overactivity during initial phase of all mental disorders along with increased pituitary gland volumes. Further studies including hormonal assays and correlation with imaging are likely to provide further insight into neuroanatomical and pathological basis of psychiatric disorders. PMID:28384955

  18. Causes of Death in an Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Unit of a Portuguese General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Sofia; Sequeira, Márcia; Castro, Sara; Manso, Rita; Klut Câmara, Catarina; Trancas, Bruno; Borja-Santos, Nuno; Maia, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Introdução: Os doentes afectos de patologia psiquiátrica apresentam maior risco de morte, tanto por causas naturais como não naturais. Este estudo avalia as causas de morte de todos os doentes de uma unidade de internamento de agudos de Psiquiatria num hospital geral em Portugal, ao longo de dezasseis anos (de 1998 a 2013). Material e Métodos: Vinte e um doentes morreram na unidade de internamento de doentes agudos entre 1998 e 2013 (média 1,3 por ano). As características demográficas, os diagnósticos médicos e psiquiátricos foram recolhidos através de um estudo retrospectivo que consistiu na análise dos processos clínicos da amostra selecionada. Os doentes transferidos para outras enfermarias durante o internamento não foram incluídos no estudo. Resultados: As doenças do sistema circulatório foram as causas de morte mais prevalentes, ocorrendo em 2/3 dos doentes, incluindo embolismo pulmonar (n = 6), acidente vascular cerebral (n = 3), arritmia cardíaca (n = 2), enfarte agudo do miocárdio (n = 1), rutura de aneurisma da aorta abdominal (n = 1) e insuficiência cardíaca (n = 1). Dois doentes morreram de pneumonia e em quatro casos a causa de morte foi indeterminada. Apenas um caso de suicídio foi registado. Discussão: As doenças do aparelho circulatório foram as causas de morte mais frequentes nesta unidade de agudos. O suicídio em doentes internados, apesar de constituir um evento raro, é uma realidade que comporta consequências complexas para os profissionais de saúde, familiares e restantes doentes, devendo permanecer como foco de prevenção continuada. Conclusão: Os estudos de mortalidade são importantes para determinar a qualidade dos cuidados de saúde e criar recomendações para medidas preventivas.

  19. [Factors influencing the course and duration of inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric treatment: between empiricism and clinical reality].

    PubMed

    Branik, Emil

    2003-09-01

    In the last two decades considerable changes influenced the scope of inpatient treatment in child and adolescent psychiatry. Proceeding from a literature review dilemmas between available research data and clinical practice will be pointed out. Proposals will be made to take into account the complex developmental processes, the individuality and the social context by psychic impaired children and adolescents requiring hospitalisation. This could improve the transfer of research findings into the clinical practice. It will be argued against a confusion of economical interests with research findings.

  20. Inpatient deaths from acute myocardial infarction, 1982-92: analysis of data in the Nottingham heart attack register.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, N.; Young, T.; Gray, D.; Skene, A. M.; Hampton, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess longitudinal trends in admissions, management, and inpatient mortality from acute myocardial infarction over 10 years. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis based on the Nottingham heart attack register. SETTING: Two district general hospitals serving a defined urban and rural population. SUBJECTS: All patients admitted with a confirmed acute myocardial infarction during 1982-4 and 1989-92 (excluding 1991, when data were not collected). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Numbers of patients, background characteristics, time from onset of symptoms to admission, ward of admission, treatment, and inpatient mortality. RESULTS: Admissions with acute myocardial infarction increased from 719 cases in 1982 to 960 in 1992. The mean age increased from 62.1 years to 66.6 years (P < 0.001), the duration of stay fell from 8.7 days to 7.2 days (P < 0.001), and the proportion of patients aged 75 years and over admitted to a coronary care unit increased significantly from 29.1% to 61.2%. A higher proportion of patients were admitted to hospital within 6 hours of onset of their symptoms in 1989-92 than in 1982-4, but 15% were still admitted after the time window for thrombolysis. Use of beta blockers increased threefold between 1982 and 1992, aspirin was used in over 70% of patients after 1989, and thrombolytic use increased 1.3-fold between 1989 and 1992. Age and sex adjusted odds ratios for inpatient mortality remained unchanged over the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Despite an increasing uptake of the "proved" treatments, inpatient mortality from myocardial infarction did not change between 1982 and 1992. PMID:9251546

  1. Predictors of suicide in the patient population admitted to a locked-door psychiatric acute ward

    PubMed Central

    Fosse, Roar; Ryberg, Wenche; Carlsson, Merete Kvalsvik; Hammer, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objective No prior study appears to have focused on predictors of suicide in the general patient population admitted to psychiatric acute wards. We used a case-control design to investigate the association between suicide risk factors assessed systematically at admission to a locked-door psychiatric acute ward in Norway and subsequent death by suicide. Method From 2008 to 2013, patients were routinely assessed for suicide risk upon admission to the acute ward with a 17-item check list based on recommendations from the Norwegian Directorate of Health and Social Affairs. Among 1976 patients admitted to the ward, 40 patients, 22 men and 18 women, completed suicide within December 2014. Results Compared to a matched control group (n = 120), after correction for multiple tests, suicide completers scored significantly higher on two items on the check list: presence of suicidal thoughts and wishing to be dead. An additional four items were significant in non-corrected tests: previous suicide attempts, continuity of suicidal thoughts, having a suicide plan, and feelings of hopelessness, indifference, and/or aggression. A brief scale based on these six items was the only variable associated with suicide in multivariate regression analysis, but its predictive value was poor. Conclusion Suicide specific ideations may be the most central risk markers for suicide in the general patient population admitted to psychiatric acute wards. However, a low predictive value may question the utility of assessing suicide risk. PMID:28301590

  2. Women in acute psychiatric units, their characteristics and needs: a review

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Michaela; Lau, Yasmine; Sethi, Faisil

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method Recent policy guidelines published by the Department of Health highlight the need to develop gender-sensitive psychiatric services. However, very little is currently known about the specific characteristics and needs of female patients entering acute psychiatric wards, particularly psychiatric intensive care units. This article aims to review the current literature on what is known about this group of patients. PubMed, Embase and PsycINFO were systematically searched using a number of key terms. Results A total of 27 articles were obtained. The findings were divided into four categories: admission characteristics, treatment needs, risk management and outcomes after discharge. Gender differences were found in diagnosis and presentation. Clinical implications The differences observed in the reviewed studies suggest that women may have different assessment and treatment needs, and ultimately, different philosophies of care. A dearth of studies in this area indicates that if services are to develop in line with government policies, more research is needed. PMID:27752346

  3. Reflective Prompts to Guide Termination of the Psychiatric Clinical Student Nursing Experience.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Grace B

    2016-04-01

    The average length of stay on psychiatric inpatient units has decreased in the past 40 years from 24.9 to 7.2 days. Inpatient psychiatric nurses are challenged to meet the standards and scope of practice despite the changing circumstances of their work environment. The amount of time student nurses spend with a given patient has been affected by changes in acute psychiatric inpatient care and decreased length of stay; however, opportunities exist for effective termination of the nurse-client relationship. Facilitation of students' awareness and understanding of the dynamics inherent in the termination process is an important teaching task for psychiatric nursing clinical instructors. In the current article, a clinically focused learning activity using structured prompts to guide and promote psychiatric nursing students' experiences with the process of termination is described and teaching strategies are discussed.

  4. Reduced acute inpatient care was largest savings component of Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Daniel D; Khan, Nazmul; Tomcavage, Janet; Graf, Thomas R; Davis, Duane E; Steele, Glenn D

    2015-04-01

    Early evidence suggests that the patient-centered medical home has the potential to improve patient outcomes while reducing the cost of care. However, it is unclear how this care model achieves such desirable results, particularly its impact on cost. We estimated cost savings associated with Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home clinics by examining longitudinal clinic-level claims data from elderly Medicare patients attending the clinics over a ninety-month period (2006 through the first half of 2013). We also used these data to deconstruct savings into its main components (inpatient, outpatient, professional, and prescription drugs). During this period, total costs associated with patient-centered medical home exposure declined by approximately 7.9 percent; the largest source of this savings was acute inpatient care ($34, or 19 percent savings per member per month), which accounts for about 64 percent of the total estimated savings. This finding is further supported by the fact that longer exposure was also associated with lower acute inpatient admission rates. The results of this study suggest that patient-centered medical homes can lead to sustainable, long-term improvements in patient health outcomes and the cost of care.

  5. The contribution of children's temperamental fear and effortful control to restraint and seclusion during inpatient treatment in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Bridgett, David J; Valentino, Kristin; Hayden, Lisa C

    2012-12-01

    The current study examined temperament characteristics as risk factors for restraint and seclusion (R/S) events in psychiatrically hospitalized youth, extending work that has sought to identify R/S risk factors and research examining temperament-behavior problem associations that has largely relied upon community samples. It was anticipated that children with poor effortful control (EC) and greater frustration would have more instances of R/S during psychiatric hospitalization. The contribution of children's fearfulness to R/S was also examined. A measure of temperament was completed by youths' clinicians and youths (n = 52) completed objective measures of EC. The frequency of R/S events for each participant was obtained from hospital records. After controlling for R/S risk factors, lower EC and higher fearfulness predicted increased R/S occurrences during the first 2 weeks of hospitalization and over the course of children's entire hospitalization. These findings indicate that temperament should potentially be considered in individualized treatment plans targeting the prevention and/or reduction of R/S. Additional implications of the findings are also discussed.

  6. Likelihood of obtaining Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS) and SIRS-2 elevations among forensic psychiatric inpatients with screening elevations on the Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test.

    PubMed

    Glassmire, David M; Tarescavage, Anthony M; Gottfried, Emily D

    2016-12-01

    The Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST) was designed as a screening measure for feigned psychiatric symptoms. When M-FAST Total Scores are elevated (raw score ≥6), the test manual recommends follow-up with a more comprehensive measure of feigning, such as the widely used and researched Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS) or the revised version of the test (SIRS-2). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate how often M-FAST screening elevations are associated with subsequent elevations on the SIRS or SIRS-2. The sample included archival data from 100 forensic psychiatric inpatients who obtained M-FAST Total Score elevations ≥6 during screening and were subsequently administered the SIRS (that was also rescored using SIRS-2 criteria). Among examinees who elevated the M-FAST over the recommended cutoff, 66.0% met standard SIRS feigning criteria, 42% met SIRS-2 criteria for feigning, and 81.0% obtained at least 1 SIRS/SIRS-2 elevation in the Probable Feigning range or higher. These results are consistent with the M-FAST manual guidelines, which support the use of the ≥6 M-FAST cutoff score to screen for potential feigning (but not as an independent marker of feigning). A higher M-FAST cutoff score of ≥16 was associated with subsequently meeting full SIRS criteria for feigning in 100.0% of protocols. Because the SIRS criteria were designed to have very low false positive rates, these findings indicate that more confident assertions about feigning can be made when elevations reach this level on the MFAST. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Is locating acute wards in the general hospital an essential element in psychiatric reform? The U.K. experience.

    PubMed

    Totman, Jonathan; Mann, Farhana; Johnson, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Locating psychiatric wards in general hospitals has long been seen in many countries as a key element in the reform of services to promote community integration of the mentally ill. In the U.K., however, this is no longer a policy priority, and the recent trend has been towards small freestanding inpatient units, located either within the communities they serve, or on general hospital sites, but separate from the main building. Whether locating the psychiatric wards in the general hospital is essential to psychiatric reform has been little discussed, and we can find no relevant evidence. Perceived strengths of general hospital psychiatric wards are in normalisation of mental health problems, accessibility to local communities, better availability of physical health care resources, and integration of psychiatry with the rest of the medical profession, which may faclilitate recruitment. However, difficulties seem to have been encountered in establishing well-designed psychiatric wards with access to open space in general hospitals. Also, physical proximity may not be enough to achieve the desired reduction in stigma, and complaints from the general hospital may sometimes result in undue restrictions on psychiatric ward patients. There are strong arguments both for and against locating psychiatric wards in general hospitals: an empirical evidence base would be helpful to inform important decisions about the best setting for wards.

  8. Traumatic Life Events Prior to Alcohol-Related Admission of Injured Acute Care Inpatients: A Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Roselyn; Russo, Joan; Darnell, Doyanne; Wang, Jin; Ingraham, Leah; Zatzick, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Approximately 30 million Americans present to acute care medical settings annually after incurring traumatic injuries. Posttraumatic stress disorder and depressive symptoms are endemic among injury survivors. Our paper is a replication and extension of a previous report documenting a pattern of multiple traumatic life events across patients admitted to Level I trauma centers for an alcohol-related injury. Method This study is a secondary analysis of a nationwide 20-site randomized trial of an alcohol brief intervention with 660 traumatically injured inpatients. Pre-injury trauma history was assessed using the National Comorbidity Survey trauma history screen at the 6 month time point. Results Most common traumatic events experienced by our population of alcohol positive trauma survivors were having had someone close unexpectedly die, followed by having seen someone badly beaten or injured. Of particular note, there is high reported prevalence of rape/sexual assault, and childhood abuse and neglect among physically injured trauma survivors. Additional trauma histories are increasingly common among alcohol-positive patients admitted for a traumatic injury. Conclusions Due to the high rate of experienced multiple traumatic events among acutely injured inpatients, the trauma history screen could be productively integrated into screening and brief intervention procedures developed for acute care settings. PMID:26745689

  9. Less Is More: Inpatient Management of a Child with Complex Pharmacotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Varley, Christopher; Cummins, Thomas K.; Martin, Andres

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a case of an 11-year-old boy who was admitted to an acute inpatient psychiatric setting because of a recent exacerbation of physical aggression, accompanied by long-standing problems with verbal aggression, irritability, dysphoria, and sleep disturbance. His family history was notable for domestic violence, substance abuse by…

  10. A comparison of pattern of psychiatric symptoms in inpatients with bipolar disorder type one with & without methamphetamine use

    PubMed Central

    Gouran Ourimi, Elham; Shabani, Amir; Alavi, Kaveh; Najarzadegan, Mohammad Reza; Mirfazeli, Fatemehsadat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Iran is facing an outbreak of methamphetamine-induced disorders and frequent use of these substances in patients with bipolar disorder. Using or intoxication of methamphetamine in patients with bipolar I disorder may alter the patient's clinical profile; however there is limited studies about impact of methamphetamine on clinical manifestation of bipolar disorders. This study aimed to compare psychiatric symptoms in patients with bipolar I disorder with and without concomitant use of methamphetamine. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, psychiatric symptoms of bipolar I disorder in patients with (Meth+) and without (Meth-) methamphetamine use was evaluated. A number of 57 participants with Meth + and 50 subjects with Meth- were recruited. The clinical picture of bipolar disorder was investigated by Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), 17-item Hamilton Depressive Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and the Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS). Statistical comparisons were performed using the T-test for independent samples and Mann- Whitney test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between two groups regarding age, duration of illness and hospitalizations. However, male participants were significantly higher in Meth+ group than in Meth- one (p<0.001). The mean (± SD) scores in the two groups of Meth+ and Meth- for YMRS, HDRS, and SAPS were 31.3 (±1.3) and 34.0 (±1.2), 13.7 (±0.7) and 13.5±(0.5), and 50.0 (±1.9) and 48.0 (±2.1), respectively, which were not statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion: There was no significant difference in the overall clinical manifestation of bipolar I disorder in patients with and without methamphetamine use. However, in some symptomatology domains, there were some differences between the two groups. PMID:28210586

  11. A comparison of pattern of psychiatric symptoms in inpatients with bipolar disorder type one with & without methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Gouran Ourimi, Elham; Shabani, Amir; Alavi, Kaveh; Najarzadegan, Mohammad Reza; Mirfazeli, Fatemehsadat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Iran is facing an outbreak of methamphetamine-induced disorders and frequent use of these substances in patients with bipolar disorder. Using or intoxication of methamphetamine in patients with bipolar I disorder may alter the patient's clinical profile; however there is limited studies about impact of methamphetamine on clinical manifestation of bipolar disorders. This study aimed to compare psychiatric symptoms in patients with bipolar I disorder with and without concomitant use of methamphetamine. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, psychiatric symptoms of bipolar I disorder in patients with (Meth+) and without (Meth-) methamphetamine use was evaluated. A number of 57 participants with Meth + and 50 subjects with Meth- were recruited. The clinical picture of bipolar disorder was investigated by Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), 17-item Hamilton Depressive Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and the Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS). Statistical comparisons were performed using the T-test for independent samples and Mann- Whitney test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between two groups regarding age, duration of illness and hospitalizations. However, male participants were significantly higher in Meth+ group than in Meth- one (p<0.001). The mean (± SD) scores in the two groups of Meth+ and Meth- for YMRS, HDRS, and SAPS were 31.3 (±1.3) and 34.0 (±1.2), 13.7 (±0.7) and 13.5±(0.5), and 50.0 (±1.9) and 48.0 (±2.1), respectively, which were not statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion: There was no significant difference in the overall clinical manifestation of bipolar I disorder in patients with and without methamphetamine use. However, in some symptomatology domains, there were some differences between the two groups.

  12. Assessing the contribution of borderline personality disorder and features to suicide risk in psychiatric inpatients with bipolar disorder, major depression and schizoaffective disorder.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ruifan; Cohen, Lisa J; Tanis, Thachell; Qizilbash, Azra; Lopatyuk, Yana; Yaseen, Zimri S; Galynker, Igor

    2015-03-30

    Suicidal behavior often accompanies both borderline personality disorder (BPD) and severe mood disorders, and comorbidity between the two appears to further increase suicide risk. The current study aims to quantify the risk of suicidality conferred by comorbid BPD diagnosis or features in three affective disorders: major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder (BP) and schizoaffective disorder. One hundred forty-nine (149) psychiatric inpatients were assessed by SCID I and II, and the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Logistic regression analyses investigated the associations between previous suicide attempt and BPD diagnosis or features in patients with MDD, BP, and schizoaffective disorder, as well as a history of manic or major depressive episodes, and psychotic symptoms. Comorbid BPD diagnosis significantly increased suicide risk in the whole sample, and in those with MDD, BP, and history of depressive episode or psychotic symptoms. Each additional borderline feature also increased risk of past suicide attempt in these same groups (excepting BP) and in those with a previous manic episode. Of the BPD criteria, only unstable relationships and impulsivity independently predicted past suicide attempt. Overall, among patients with severe mood disorders, the presence of comorbid BPD features or disorder appears to substantially increase the risk of suicide attempts.

  13. [Consistency analysis on acute hepatitis B inpatients reported by hepatitis B surveillance pilot spots in six provinces of China].

    PubMed

    Miao, N; Zhang, G M; Wang, F Z; Zheng, H; Sun, X J; Ma, X J; Cui, F Q

    2017-02-10

    Objective: To understand the characteristics of acute hepatitis B inpatients reported by the hepatitis B surveillance pilot points and to estimate the consistency between the diagnosed and reported types of hepatitis B by the clinicians involved. Methods: Data related to acute hepatitis B was from the NNDRS and the characteristics of acute hepatitis B were classified by querying Hospital Information System. We recorded the results based on clinical diagnosis and analyzed the consistency between the reported and diagnosed types that the clinicians made, on hepatitis B. Results: A total of 179 patients were included in this study with all of them as acute hepatitis B reported through NNDRS in 2015-2016. In terms of the durations of disease, among the 179 cases who were HBsAg positive, 32.40% (58/179) of them exceeding 6 months, 2.79% (5/179) within 6 months and 64.80% (116/179) tested the first time or never. Among the 179 cases who claimed having the history of hepatitis, 33.52% (60/179) of them identified as having hepatitis B, 1.12% (2/179) were hepatitis A, C or E, 41.34% (74/179) did not have the signs on hepatitis, while the rest 24.02% (43/179) did not know the situation. Only 79.89% (143/179) of the patients showed the symptoms or signs of hepatitis, but the rest 20.11% (36/179) did not. Among the 179 reported acute hepatitis patients, 67 of them were diagnosed as acute hepatitis B while 112 cases were as non-acute hepatitis B. The consistent rate of acute hepatitis B was 37.43% (67/179). Among the 112 cases that were diagnosed as non-acute hepatitis B, proportions of chronic hepatitis B and cirrhosis were 49.11%(55/112) and 16.07%(18/112) respectively. Conclusion: Consistency between the reported type of acute hepatitis B inpatients and the types diagnosed by clinicians was poor. Our results suggested that clinicians should make the accurate diagnosis at first place and then report to the Network in accordance with the clinical diagnosis classification

  14. Who experiences seclusion? An examination of demographics and duration in a public acute inpatient mental health service.

    PubMed

    Chavulak, Jacinta; Petrakis, Melissa

    2017-03-21

    Restrictive interventions such as seclusion may occur during an acute mental health crisis. Such interventions are experienced by people as traumatic and counter to recovery. The current study aimed to investigate the use of seclusion and who was secluded amongst patients presenting with psychotic symptomology. All acute inpatient admissions were examined across a 12-month period January-December 2013. Electronic and paper records were accessed and audited for all 655 admissions. There were 91 admissions that included a seclusion and 200 seclusion events. There were 79 unique patients who experienced seclusion. For those experiencing seclusion: two-thirds were male, 49% were either homeless or had no fixed abode, 32% received case management in the community prior to their inpatient stay, and 56% were unemployed or not in the workforce. The median and mode duration of seclusion was 4 h. By understanding seclusion interventions better, changes can be made to enhance practice. This descriptive research into seclusion has clarified the demographics of who is most likely to experience seclusion, for how long, and the implications for reducing restrictive interventions. How the social work role could contribute to reforms to protect and enhance the rights and well-being of marginalized members of our communities, at their most vulnerable, is considered.

  15. Secondary analysis of data can inform care delivery for Indigenous women in an acute mental health inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Pat; Cunningham, Teresa; Lowell, Anne; Nagel, Tricia; Dunn, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    There is a paucity of research exploring Indigenous women's experiences in acute mental health inpatient services in Australia. Even less is known of Indigenous women's experience of seclusion events, as published data are rarely disaggregated by both indigeneity and gender. This research used secondary analysis of pre-existing datasets to identify any quantifiable difference in recorded experience between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, and between Indigenous women and Indigenous men in an acute mental health inpatient unit. Standard separation data of age, length of stay, legal status, and discharge diagnosis were analysed, as were seclusion register data of age, seclusion grounds, and number of seclusion events. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data, and where warranted, inferential statistical methods used SPSS software to apply analysis of variance/multivariate analysis of variance testing. The results showed evidence that secondary analysis of existing datasets can provide a rich source of information to describe the experience of target groups, and to guide service planning and delivery of individualized, culturally-secure mental health care at a local level. The results are discussed, service and policy development implications are explored, and suggestions for further research are offered.

  16. Doing their best: strategies used by South African clinicians in working with psychiatric inpatients across a language barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kilian, Sanja; Swartz, Leslie; Chiliza, Bonginkosi

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives South Africa has 11 official languages, but most psychiatrists can speak only English and Afrikaans and there are no formal interpreter posts in the mental healthcare system. As a result clinicians communicate with patients who have limited English language proficiency (LEP) without the use of interpreters. We present case material, constituting recordings of interactions between clinicians and LEP patients in a public psychiatric institution. The aim is to have a better understanding of how these clinical encounters operated and what communicative strategies clinicians used. Design We used the Roter interaction analysis system (RIAS) to evaluate clinicians’ conversational strategies and to analyze interactions between clinicians and patients. Results Clinicians showed a high degree of tenacity in trying to engage patients in the clinical conversation, build rapport, and gather crucial diagnostic information. However, patients often responded briefly and monosyllabically, or kept quiet. In psychiatry where commonality of language cannot be assumed, it is not possible to determine the clinical significance of these responses. Discussion Clinicians went to great lengths to understand LEP patients. It is also clear that patients were often not optimally understood. Clinicians would try to gain valid information in a polite manner, but would abandon these attempts repeatedly as it became clear that proper communication was not possible. Conclusions Our findings suggest that in the absence of interpreter services, the communication between clinicians and LEP patients is sparse and yields limited clinical information. The lack of proper language services stands in the way of optimal clinical care and requires urgent attention. PMID:26507606

  17. 75 FR 31118 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ...This notice contains the final wage indices, hospital reclassifications, payment rates, impacts, and other related tables effective for the fiscal year (FY) 2010 hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) and rate year 2010 long-term care hospital (LTCH) prospective payment system (PPS). The rates, tables, and impacts included in this notice reflect changes required by or resulting......

  18. Psychiatric nursing case management: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Herrick, Charlotte A; Bartlett, Robin

    2004-09-01

    This literature review examines the evolution of psychiatric nursing case management in the United States. Various models, both inpatient and outpatient, are described, along with the roles of the case manager in each setting. The development of clinical pathways to monitor and document outcomes in acute settings is examined, along with the difficulties in adapting them specifically to psychiatric nursing case management. The types of data collected and the use of outcomes to support programs for the mentally ill are reviewed. Finally, recommendations for psychiatric nursing case management are made to provide guidelines for the future.

  19. A retrospective population-based data analyses of inpatient care use and medical expenditure in people with intellectual disability co-occurring schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chia-Im; Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Chien, Wu-Chien; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    The paper aims to analyze the hospital inpatient care use and medical fee of people with ID co-occurring with schizophrenia in Taiwan. A nationwide data were collected concerning hospital admission and medical expenditure of people with ID (n = 2565) among national health insurance beneficiaries in Taiwan. Multiple regression analyses were undertaken to determine the role of the explanatory variables to hospital psychiatric inpatient care and medical expenditure. We found that there were 2565 individuals with ID used hospital psychiatric inpatient care among people with ID in 2005, and 686 cases (26.7%) co-occurring with schizophrenia according to hospital discharge claims. Those ID patients co-occurring with schizophrenia consumed more annual inpatient fee than those without schizophrenia (251,346 vs. 126,666 NTD) (p < 0.001). We found factors of female cases, longer hospital stay in chronic ward and general ward users among ID patients co-occurring with schizophrenia used more hospital inpatient care (R(2) = 0.417). Annual hospital inpatient days were significantly affected by factors of severe illness card holder, annual inpatient care fee, longer hospital stay in acute or chronic ward (R(2) = 0.746). Those factors of female cases, high inpatient care users, longer hospital stay in acute ward and general ward were consuming more medical care fee than their counterparts (R(2) = 0.620). The study highlights the future study should examine the efficacy of hospital inpatient care for people with ID and schizophrenia.

  20. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing.

  1. The bulldozer and the ballet dancer: aspects of nurses' caring approaches in acute psychiatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Björkdahl, A; Palmstierna, T; Hansebo, G

    2010-08-01

    Demanding conditions in acute psychiatric wards inhibit provision of safe, therapeutic care and leave nurses torn between humanistic ideals and the harsh reality of their daily work. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' caring approaches within this context. Data were collected from interviews with nurses working in acute psychiatric intensive care. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis, based on interpretive description. Results revealed a caring-approach continuum on which two approaches formed the main themes: the bulldozer and the ballet dancer. The bulldozer approach functioned as a shield of power that protected the ward from chaos. The ballet dancer approach functioned as a means of initiating relationships with patients. When examining the data from a theoretical perspective of caring and uncaring encounters in nursing, the ballet dancer approach was consistent with a caring approach, while the bulldozer approach was more complex and somewhat aligned with uncaring approaches. Conclusions drawn from the study are that although the bulldozer approach involves a risk for uncaring and harming actions, it also brings a potential for caring. This potential needs to be further explored and nurses should be encouraged to reflect on how they integrate paternalistic nursing styles with person-centred care.

  2. 75 FR 71441 - Universal Health Services, Inc. and Psychiatric Solutions, Inc.; Analysis of Agreement Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... contract management business accounted for the remaining 7%. Acute Inpatient Psychiatric Services UHS's... largest hospital management companies, with 2009 revenues totaling approximately $5.2 billion. In 2009... business, and includes all of the assets necessary for a Commission-approved buyer to independently...

  3. The financial benefits of acute inpatient palliative medicine: an inter-institutional comparative analysis by all patient refined-diagnosis related group and case mix index.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Walsh, Declan; LeGrand, Susan B; Lagman, Ruth L; Harrison, Betty; Rybicki, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Financial comparisons of acute care hospital services are possible using the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services case mix index (CMI) and All Patient Refined-Diagnosis Related Group (APR-DRG) data. We compared The Cleveland Clinic's Inpatient Palliative Medicine (CCIPM) acute care unit's CMI and APR-DRG data with national and peer institution data. Total mean charges per admission to the CCIPM unit were 7,800 dollars lower than at other peer institutions despite an equivalent severity of illness and longer length of stay and higher mortality in the CCIPM unit. The lower charges were due primarily to lower laboratory and pharmaceutical charges. We conclude that an acute inpatient palliative medicine unit operating within a comprehensive integrated palliative medicine program is cost-effective in providing specialized care for people with advanced disease.

  4. 75 FR 34614 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ..., 2010 unless otherwise footnoted).'' c. Third column, the title, ``Table 4J.--Out-Migration Adjustment...) Out-Migration Adjustment for Acute Care Hospitals--FY 2010 (April 1, 2010 through September 30, 2010...: Table 4J--(Abbreviated) Out-Migration Adjustment for Acute Care Hospitals--FY 2010 (April 1,...

  5. An evaluation of the use of interactive television in an acute psychiatric service.

    PubMed

    McLaren, P; Ball, C J; Summerfield, A B; Watson, J P; Lipsedge, M

    1995-01-01

    This study reports the results of the use of a low-cost videoconferencing system (LCVC) for communication in an acute psychiatric service. Qualitative research methodology was used to examine the use of the LCVC in interactions between psychiatrists, patients and nursing staff, including information on refusals. One hundred and five clinical interactions were studied over four months. The LCVC proved technically reliable and compatible with the performance of a wide range of clinical tasks. However, the results suggest the need for better understanding of the nature and origins of the attitudes that users bring to the use of such communications technology. A framework is presented for the classification of user responses in terms of preexisting attitudes of the users, technological limitations of the system and the mental state of the users. The study demonstrated the potential for interactive television to support many of the communication tasks necessary in a dispersed psychiatric service and for telepsychiatry to become a major method of service provision.

  6. The implementation of community-based crisis services for people with acute psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Finch, S J; Burgess, P M; Herrman, H E

    1991-06-01

    This article describes three recently established community-based crisis services for people with acute psychiatric illness. Data were obtained from local information systems developed in the early phase of service operation. Patterns of service were found to vary among the teams in terms of the frequency of contact with the client, the period of contact with the client and the overall numbers of contacts. Such diversification of services reflects, at least in part, the differences in the service networks within which the new services were Such diversification of services is inevitable and creative, and the evaluation of these services must consider not only the short-term impact of crisis services, but also the impact of the network of care services on longer term outcomes for the client.

  7. Changing model of nursing care from individual patient allocation to team nursing in the acute inpatient environment.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Greg; Jones, Aaron; Rivas, Ketty

    2010-06-01

    Agreement was reached with 12 acute medical and surgical wards/units at Sydney's Prince of Wales Hospital to participate in a trial of team nursing (TN). Six units employed action research principles to undertake a change to a team nursing model and six remained with the pre-existing individual patient allocation (IPA) model. Task-based teaming was widely discarded by the team nursing units in favour of allocating patients within the team and introducing more supportive and communicative processes aimed at fostering responsibility sharing. Localised team-based models of care arose in the change wards and were outlined, implemented and refined using social action research principles. A 12-month prospective experimental comparison of job satisfaction and staff retention between the TN and IPA groups indicated statistically significant job satisfaction benefits and practically important staff retention benefits associated with moving away from an IPA model of nursing care delivery towards a team-based model of care delivery. Perhaps not surprisingly, job satisfaction gains were most marked among new graduate nurses, who reported real benefits from a teaming inspired shift in model of care in the acute inpatient environment.

  8. Mechanical and pharmacological restraints in acute psychiatric wards--why and how are they used?

    PubMed

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Helen Mjøsund, Nina; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2013-08-30

    Restraint use has been reported to be common in acute psychiatry, but empirical research is scarce concerning why and how restraints are used. This study analysed data from patients' first episodes of restraint in three acute psychiatric wards during a 2-year study period. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors for type and duration of restraint. The distribution of restraint categories for the 371 restrained patients was as follows: mechanical restraint, 47.2%; mechanical and pharmacological restraint together, 35.3%; and pharmacological restraint, 17.5%. The most commonly reported reason for restraint was assault (occurred or imminent). It increased the likelihood of resulting in concomitant pharmacological restraint. Female patients had shorter duration of mechanical restraint than men. Age above 49 and female gender increased the likelihood of pharmacological versus mechanical restraint, whereas being restrained due to assault weakened this association. Episodes with mechanical restraint and coinciding pharmacological restraint lasted longer than mechanical restraint used separately, and were less common among patients with a personality disorder. Diagnoses, age and reason for restraint independently increased the likelihood for being subjected to specific types of restraint. Female gender predicted type of restraint and duration of episodes.

  9. Orthopaedic inpatient rehabilitation conducted by nursing staff in acute orthopaedic wards in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pi-Chu; Wang, Ching-Hui; Liu, Yo-Yi; Chen, Chyang-Shiong

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the postoperative rehabilitation patterns of orthopaedic patients and to explore factors which affected the patients' functional recovery. A descriptive study with convenience sampling was performed. Study participants included orthopaedic inpatients from two hospitals in Taipei. In total, 100 patients were selected with an average age of 60.88 ± 17.61 years, of which the most common type of surgery was a total knee replacement (49.0%). Among these participants, 79.0% received rehabilitation guided by nursing staff, while only 6.0% were instructed by a physical therapist. The predictive factor for the time to first ambulation was the intensity of pain experienced on the second day after the operation, which accounted for 4.5% of the total variance. As for the functional status prior to discharge, predictive factors included the time to first ambulation and whether nursing staff provided instructions on rehabilitation, which accounted for 11.2% of the total variance. We recommend that professional staff should promote patient guidance toward postoperative rehabilitation, assistance in achieving the first ambulation and a resolution of obstacles to rehabilitation.

  10. A computerized standard protocol order entry for pediatric inpatient acute seizure emergencies reduces time to treatment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Morgan, Robin; Schiff, Linda; Hannah, Debbie; Wheless, James

    2014-02-01

    Time to treatment of seizures is critical to efficacy. We performed a quality initiative and evaluated time to treatment of inpatient seizure emergencies with first- and second-line medicines before and after implementation of a computerized, standard treatment protocol. Data from 125 patients revealed that 179 seizure episodes required first-line antiepileptic drugs, and the mean time to treatment was 7.72 minutes. In 87 episodes, patients (49%) received the drugs within 5 minutes. Forty-six episodes required second-line drugs. In 17 (37%), patients received them within 30 minutes (mean 49.48 minutes). After implementation of the protocol, the mean time to treatment with first-line drugs was 3.74 minutes, a reduction of >50% (P < .0001). The mean time to treatment with second-line drugs was 25.05 minutes, a reduction of ∼50% (P < .0001). This effective model for reducing the time to treatment of seizure emergencies may be useful to similar institutions.

  11. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Inpatient Psychiatric..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a...

  12. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Inpatient Psychiatric..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a...

  13. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Inpatient Psychiatric..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a...

  14. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Inpatient Psychiatric..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a...

  15. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Inpatient Psychiatric..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a...

  16. Norms, Reliability, and Item Analysis of the Hopelessness Scale in General Psychiatric, Forensic Psychiatric, and College Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Thomas W.

    1982-01-01

    Administered the Hopelessness Scale to criminal psychiatric inpatients, general psychiatric inpatients, and college students. Both psychiatric groups endorsed significantly more items in the hopeless direction. Found the scale more reliable with the psychiatric patients. Item analysis of the Hopelessness Scale suggests that three items were not…

  17. Psychiatric nurse practitioners' experiences of working with mental health care users presenting with acute symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ngako, Kgalabi J; Van Rensburg, Elsie S J; Mataboge, Sanah M L

    2012-05-30

    Psychiatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) working with mental health care users presenting with acute symptoms work in a complex environment. This environment is characterised by mental health care users who may present with a history of violence, sexual assault and substance misuse. The objectives of this study were twofold: firstly, to explore and describe the experiences of PNPs working with mental health care users (MHCUs) presenting with acute symptoms; and secondly, to make recommendations for the advanced PNPs to facilitate promotion of the mental health of PNPs with reference to nursing practice, research and education. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. The target population was PNPs working with MHCUs presenting with acute symptoms in a public mental health care institution in Gauteng. Data were collected by means of four focus group interviews involving 21 PNPs. The researcher made use of drawings, naïve sketches and field notes for the purpose of data triangulation. Data were analysed in accordance with Tesch's method of open coding. The three themes that emerged were: PNPs experienced working with these MHCUs as entering an unsafe world where care became a burden; they experienced negative emotional reactions and attitudes towards these MHCUs that compromised quality nursing care; and they made a plea for a nurturing environment that would enhance quality nursing care. The PNPs suggest skills and competency development, organisational support, and a need for external resources. Creation of a positive environment and mobilisation of resources as well as the identification and bridging of obstacles are essential in the promotion of the overall wellbeing and mental health of PNPs.

  18. What happens when 55% of acute psychiatric beds are closed in six days: an unexpected naturalistic observational study

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Matt; Mitchell, Anji; Parkin, Lindsay; Confue, Phil; Shankar, Rohit; Wilson-James, Diane; Marshall, Mike; Edgecombe, Maria; Keaney, Bernie; Gill, Kiran; Harrison, Juliet

    2016-01-01

    Objective The sudden closure of 30 out of 54 acute psychiatric beds in Cornwall presented a stressful challenge to staff but also a natural experiment on how a service dealt with this situation. We aimed to evaluate the outcomes of patients needing to leave the closed ward, how bed occupancy rates were affected and the impact on admission rates. Design A service evaluation of the impact of the ward closure. Setting A comprehensive secondary NHS mental health service in Cornwall serving 550,000 population. Main outcome measures The destination of the patients needing to leave the acute unit, the effect of the closure on bed occupancy, admission rates and serious untoward incidents. Results Of 26 patients needing to be moved from the acute ward, only 10 needed an acute psychiatric bed. None of the seven patients who had been on the ward longer than nine weeks needed an acute unit. Admission rates fell over the subsequent three months. There was no increase in serious incidents due to the closure. Conclusions This naturalistic event suggests that many patients on acute units could be cared for elsewhere, especially recovery/rehabilitation care environments, if political and financial urgency is present. Admission rates are responsive to the pressure on beds. PMID:27757241

  19. The Evolving Role of the Acute Assessment Unit - from inpatient to outpatient care.

    PubMed

    Connolly, V; Hamad, M; Scott, Y; Bramble, M

    2005-01-01

    Acute Assessment Units (AAUs) have been developed to meet the demand for emergency care. Traditionally, AAUs have been an admission route to secondary care but the role is now evolving to assessment. AAUs are complex and have many interactions both in hospitals and the community. The effective functioning of an AAU requires excellent clinical leadership, appropriate facilities, timely access to diagnostics and input from the multi-disciplinary team. Increasingly, AAUs will have to develop services which are not dependent on using hospital beds. A variety of emergency medical presentations can, with the appropriate resources, be delivered in an out-patient setting.

  20. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  1. Acute effects of electroconvulsive therapy on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in psychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Prohovnik, I.; Alderson, P.O.; Sackheim, H.A.; Decina, P.; Kahn, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is frequently used in the treatment of major depression and other psychiatric disorders; its mechanism of action is not established, but previous evidence suggests that it is associated with postictal metabolic suppression. The authors have used measurements of rCBF as an index of cortical metabolic activity to study the acute effects of ECT. Measurements of rCBF were made in 32 cortical regions in 10 patients (pts) following one minute breathing of Xe-133 (5mCi/L); the measurements were performed 30min before and 50min after ECT. Bilateral ECT was administered to six pts (five diagnosed as major depressives and one schizophrenic) and unilateral ECT to four (all diagnosed as unipolar or bipolar affective disorder). The total rCBF material consists of 52 measurements in these pts, made before and after 16 bilateral and 10 unilateral treatments. ECT was found to cause significant reduction of rCBF. Mean hemispheric flows (using the Initial Slope Index to measure grey-matter flow) were reduced by about 5% in both hemispheres following bilateral treatment. Unilateral treatment caused a 9% reduction of flow in the treated hemisphere, but only 2% contralaterally. Regional patterns of flow decreases also differed between the two treatment modes: bilateral frontal reductions were found after bilateral treatment, whereas unilateral ECT caused a widespread flow reduction in the treated hemisphere, and almost no effect contralaterally. These results suggest that rCBF studies are useful for assessing ECT, and indicate that the acute cerebral effects of ECT vary with the mode of treatment.

  2. Behavior Therapy for Tics in Children: Acute and Long-Term Effects on Psychiatric and Psychosocial Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Douglas W.; Piacentini, John C.; Scahill, Lawrence; Peterson, Alan L.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Chang, Susanna; Deckersbach, Thilo; McGuire, Joseph; Specht, Matt; Conelea, Christine A.; Rozenman, Michelle; Dzuria, James; Liu, Haibei; Levi-Pearl, Sue; Walkup, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Children (n = 126) ages 9 to 17 years with chronic tic or Tourette disorder were randomly assigned to receive either behavior therapy or a control treatment over 10 weeks. This study examined acute effects of behavior therapy on secondary psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial functioning and long-term effects on these measures for behavior therapy responders only. Baseline and end point assessments conducted by a masked independent evaluator assessed several secondary psychiatric symptoms and measures of psychosocial functioning. Responders to behavior therapy at the end of the acute phase were reassessed at 3-month and 6-month follow-up. Children in the behavior therapy and control conditions did not differentially improve on secondary psychiatric or psychosocial outcome measures at the end of the acute phase. At 6-month posttreatment, positive response to behavior therapy was associated with decreased anxiety, disruptive behavior, and family strain and improved social functioning. Behavior therapy is a tic-specific treatment for children with tic disorders. PMID:21555779

  3. Acute exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms during influenza treatment with oseltamivir in chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chen-Chia; Liu, Chia-Chien; Chen, Ying-Sheue

    2015-06-01

    Influenza treatment and prophylaxis with oseltamivir are critically important in reducing the morbidity and mortality of patients in chronic psychiatric facilities. Abnormal behavior, delusions, perceptual disturbances, mania, and depression have all been reported as oseltamivir-related psychiatric side effects. We hereby report two chronic schizophrenia patients in Taiwan manifesting psychiatric instability who were being treated with oseltamivir for suspected influenza infection, and further discuss other potential contributing factors. The possibility that oseltamivir can cause psychotic or affective symptoms suggests that additional caution is necessary for its use in patients with an established psychiatric diagnosis.

  4. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  5. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  6. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  7. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  8. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  9. A LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF POOR SLEEP AFTER INPATIENT POST-ACUTE REHABILITATION: THE ROLE OF DEPRESSION AND PRE-ILLNESS SLEEP QUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer L.; Jouldjian, Stella; Mitchell, Michael N.; Josephson, Karen R.; Alessi, Cathy A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore the unique impact of poor sleep and symptoms of depression on sleep quality for up to one year after inpatient post-acute rehabilitation among older adults. Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Setting Two in-patient post-acute rehabilitation facilities Participants 245 individuals over age 65 years (mean age=80 years, 38% female) Interventions None. Measurements Sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) during the post-acute care stay twice to evaluate pre-illness sleep quality and sleep quality during the post-acute care stay, and again at 3, 6, 9 and 12-months follow-up. Demographics, symptoms of depression, cognitive functioning, and comorbidities were also assessed. Results Across time points, sleep was significantly disturbed for many individuals. Nested regression models predicting PSQI total score at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months showed that variables entered in Block 1 (age, gender, cognitive functioning and comorbidities) were significant predictors of poor sleep at 6-months, but not at 3, 9 or 12 months follow-up. Depression (Block 2) and pre-illness PSQI total score (Block 3) were significant predictors of PSQI total score at all follow-up time points. PSQI total score during post-acute care (Block 4) explained a significant proportion of variance only at the 3-month follow-up. Conclusions This study confirms that chronic poor sleep is common among older adults during post-acute rehabilitation, and resolution of sleep disturbance after acute health events may be a lengthy process. Our findings expand understanding of the role of depressive symptoms and pre-existing sleep complaints in predicting poor sleep over time among these vulnerable older adults. PMID:22617164

  10. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention. Materials and Methods A national retrospective cohort of 1,620,898 patient hospitalizations from 116 Veterans Affairs hospitals was assembled from electronic health record (EHR) data collected from 2003 to 2012. HA-AKI was defined at stage 1+, stage 2+, and dialysis. EHR-based predictors were identified through logistic regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso) regression, and random forests, and pair-wise comparisons between each were made. Calibration and discrimination metrics were calculated using 50 bootstrap iterations. In the final models, we report odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and importance rankings for predictor variables to evaluate their significance. Results The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the different model outcomes ranged from 0.746 to 0.758 in stage 1+, 0.714 to 0.720 in stage 2+, and 0.823 to 0.825 in dialysis. Logistic regression had the best AUC in stage 1+ and dialysis. Random forests had the best AUC in stage 2+ but the least favorable calibration plots. Multiple risk factors were significant in our models, including some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medications, antibiotics, and intravenous fluids given during the first 48 h of admission. Conclusions This study demonstrated that, although all the models tested had good discrimination, performance characteristics varied between methods, and the random forests models did not calibrate as well as the lasso or logistic regression models. In addition, novel modifiable risk factors were explored and found to be significant. PMID:26104740

  11. "We Have to Be Satisfied with the Scraps": South African Nurses' Experiences of Care on Adult Psychiatric Intellectual Disability Inpatient Wards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capri, Charlotte; Buckle, Chanellé

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migrating nursing labour inadvertently reinforces South Africa's care drain, contributes to a global care crisis and forces us to reconsider migration motivation. This paper highlights issues that complicate psychiatric intellectual disability nursing care and identifies loci for change in an attempt to redress this care challenge.…

  12. Multifaceted Inpatient Psychiatry Approach to Reducing Readmissions: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Timothy P.; Rohrer, James E.; Rioux, Pierre A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Access to psychiatric services, particularly inpatient psychiatric care, is limited and lacks comprehensiveness in rural areas. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact on readmission rates of a multifaceted inpatient psychiatry approach (MIPA) offered in a rural hospital. Methods: Readmissions within 30 days of…

  13. Acute Psychiatric Hospital Admissions of Adults and Elderly Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pary, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Examination of the records of 240 inpatients with mental retardation and 7 with autism discharged from a university hospital indicated that elderly adults had more medical problems than did adults, more elderly adults were transferred to a state hospital, and the most common diagnosis in both adults and elderly adults was chronic schizophrenia,…

  14. Short-Term Diagnostic Stability of Acute Psychosis: Data from a Tertiary Care Psychiatric Center in South India

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C.; Shanmugam, Virupaksha Harave; Raveendranathan, Dhanya; Viswanath, Biju; Muralidharan, Kesavan

    2012-01-01

    Context: Studies on acute psychosis in patients from India report good outcome. A small proportion of these patients may suffer relapses or other develop major psychiatric disorders later. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the diagnostic stability of acute psychosis in patients from India. Materials and Methods: The records of patients who presented with the first episode of acute and transient psychotic disorder (n=57) over 1 year (2004) were analyzed, and the follow-up data at the end of 1 and 2 years were recorded. Results: The mean age of the sample was 30.72 years. The mean duration of illness episode was 18.15±17.10 days. The follow-up data were available for 77.2% (n=44) and 75.4% (n=43) of the sample at the end of first and second years. Relapse was recorded in 47.4 and 54.4% at the end of first and second years, respectively. Conclusion: The diagnosis changed into other disorders such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and unspecified psychosis, while a majority retained the initial diagnosis of acute psychosis. The findings suggest that acute psychosis is a relatively stable condition. A small percentage of these patients may go on to develop schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. PMID:23162196

  15. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2013 rates; hospitals' resident caps for graduate medical education payment purposes; quality reporting requirements for specific providers and for ambulatory surgical centers. final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-08-31

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2012. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes made by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are implementing changes relating to determining a hospital's full-time equivalent (FTE) resident cap for the purpose of graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We also are establishing new administrative, data completeness, and extraordinary circumstance waivers or extension requests requirements, as well as a reconsideration process, for quality reporting by ambulatory surgical centers

  16. How does active substance use at psychiatric admission impact suicide risk and hospital length-of-stay?

    PubMed

    Miller, Keith A; Hitschfeld, Mario J; Lineberry, Timothy W; Palmer, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    Despite their high prevalence, little is known about the effects of substance use disorders and active substance use on the suicide risk or length-of-stay of psychiatric inpatients. This study examines the relationship between active substance use at the time of psychiatric hospitalization and changes in suicide risk measures and length-of-stay. Admission and discharge ratings on the Suicide Status Form-II-R, diagnoses, and toxicology data from 2,333 unique psychiatric inpatients were examined. Data for patients using alcohol, tetrahydrocannabinol, methamphetamines, cocaine, benzodiazepines, opiates, barbiturates, phencyclidine, and multiple substances on admission were compared with data from 1,426 admissions without substance use. Patients with substance use by toxicology on admission had a 0.9 day shorter length-of-stay compared to toxicology-negative patients. During initial nurse evaluation on the inpatient unit, these patients reported lower suicide measures (i.e., suicidal ideation frequency, overall suicide risk, and wish-to-die). No significant between-group differences were seen at discharge. Patients admitted with a substance use disorder diagnosis had a 1.0 day shorter length-of-stay than those without, while those with a substance use disorder diagnosis and positive toxicology reported the lowest measures of suicidality on admission. These results remained independent of psychiatric diagnosis. For acute psychiatric inpatients, suicide risk is higher and length-of-stay is longer in patients with substance use disorders who are NOT acutely intoxicated compared with patients without a substance use disorder. Toxicology-positive patients are less suicidal on admission and improve faster than their toxicology-negative counterparts. This study gives support to the clinical observation that acutely intoxicated patients may stabilize quickly with regard to suicidal urges and need for inpatient care.

  17. Personality traits as predictors of inpatient aggression in a high-security forensic psychiatric setting: prospective evaluation of the PCL-R and IPDE dimension ratings.

    PubMed

    Langton, Calvin M; Hogue, Todd E; Daffern, Michael; Mannion, Aisling; Howells, Kevin

    2011-05-01

    The Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder (DSPD) initiative in England and Wales provides specialized care to high-risk offenders with mental disorders. This study investigated the predictive utility of personality traits, assessed using the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) and the International Personality Disorder Examination, with 44 consecutive admissions to the DSPD unit at a high-security forensic psychiatric hospital. Incidents of interpersonal physical aggression (IPA) were observed for 39% of the sample over an average 1.5-year period following admission. Histrionic personality disorder (PD) predicted IPA, and Histrionic, Borderline, and Antisocial PDs all predicted repetitive (2+ incidents of) IPA. PCL-R Factor 1 and Facets 1 and 2 were also significant predictors of IPA. PCL-R Factor 1 and Histrionic PD scores were significantly associated with imminence of IPA. Results were discussed in terms of the utility of personality traits in risk assessment and treatment of specially selected high-risk forensic psychiatric patients in secure settings.

  18. [Inpatient psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Spitzer, C; Rullkötter, N; Dally, A

    2016-01-01

    In German-speaking countries inpatient psychotherapy plays a major role in the mental healthcare system. Due to its characteristic features, i. e. multiprofessionalism, multimodality and method integration, the inpatient approach represents a unique and independent type of psychotherapy. In order to be helpful, the manifold verbal and non-verbal methods need to be embedded into an overall treatment plan. Additionally, the therapeutic milieu of the hospital represents an important effective factor and its organization requires a more active construction. The indications for inpatient psychotherapy are not only based on the mental disorder but also on illness, setting and healthcare system-related criteria. In integrative concepts, the multiprofessional team is a key component with many functions. The effectiveness of psychotherapeutic hospital treatment has been proven by meta-analysis studies; however, 20-30% of patients do not benefit from inpatient psychotherapy and almost 13% drop-out prematurely.

  19. [Comparison of Aggressive Behavior, Compulsory Medication and Absconding Behavior Between Open and Closed door Policy in an Acute Psychiatric Ward].

    PubMed

    Cibis, Mara-Lena; Wackerhagen, Carolin; Müller, Sabine; Lang, Undine E; Schmidt, Yvonne; Heinz, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Objective According to legal requirements coercive treatment must be limited to acts necessary for the protection of patients and cannot be used for institutional interests. Here, we aimed to test the hypothesis that opening psychiatric wards can reduce the number of aggressive assaults and of coercive treatment without increasing absconding rates. Methods Numbers of absconding, coercive medication, fixation and special security actions were collected retrospectively and compared between phases of closed (N total = 409; N legally committed = 64) and 90 % of daytime opened (N total = 571; N legally committed = 99) doors in an acute psychiatric ward. Results During the phase of opened doors we observed significantly reduced aggressive assaults (p < 0,001) and coercive medication (p = 0,006) compared to the closed setting, while the absconding rate did not change (p = 0,20). Limitation Given the retrospective non-experimental design, no causal interpretations can be drawn. Conclusion The results suggest that open door is associated with reduction of aggressive assaults and coercive medication without increasing absconding rates. This speaks for a stronger implementation of open door policies in acute wards in order to preserve human rights in psychiatry. To collect more robust evidence for this thesis, longer phases should be monitored and moderating variables such as atmosphere and social cohesion should be assessed.

  20. Consistency of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) at inpatient-to-community transition

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Richard; Phung, Dinh; Venkatesh, Svetha; Connor, Jason P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) are mandated outcome-measures in many mental-health jurisdictions. When HoNOS are used in different care settings, it is important to assess if setting specific bias exists. This article examines the consistency of HoNOS in a sample of psychiatric patients transitioned from acute inpatient care and community centres. Setting A regional mental health service with both acute and community facilities. Participants 111 psychiatric patients were transferred from inpatient care to community care from 2012 to 2014. Their HoNOS scores were extracted from a clinical database; Each inpatient-discharge assessment was followed by a community-intake assessment, with the median period between assessments being 4 days (range 0–14). Assessor experience and professional background were recorded. Primary and secondary outcome measures The difference of HoNOS at inpatient-discharge and community-intake were assessed with Pearson correlation, Cohen's κ and effect size. Results Inpatient-discharge HoNOS was on average lower than community-intake HoNOS. The average HoNOS was 8.05 at discharge (median 7, range 1–22), and 12.16 at intake (median 12, range 1–25), an average increase of 4.11 (SD 6.97). Pearson correlation between two total scores was 0.073 (95% CI −0.095 to 0.238) and Cohen's κ was 0.02 (95% CI −0.02 to 0.06). Differences did not appear to depend on assessor experience or professional background. Conclusions Systematic change in the HoNOS occurs at inpatient-to-community transition. Some caution should be exercised in making direct comparisons between inpatient HoNOS and community HoNOS scores. PMID:27121703

  1. The business of palliative medicine--part 4: Potential impact of an acute-care palliative medicine inpatient unit in a tertiary care cancer center.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Declan

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a hematology/oncology computerized discharge database was qualitatively and quantitatively reviewed using an empirical methodology. The goal was to identify potential patients for admission to a planned acute-care, palliative medicine inpatient unit. Patients were identified by the International Classifications of Disease (ICD-9) codes. A large heterogenous population, comprising up to 40 percent of annual discharges from the Hematology/Oncology service, was identified. If management decided to add an acute-care, palliative medicine unit to the hospital, these are the patients who would benefit. The study predicted a significant change in patient profile, acuity, complexity, and resource utilization in current palliative care services. This study technique predicted the actual clinical load of the acute-care unit when it opened and was very helpful in program development. Our model predicted that 695 patients would be admitted to the acute-care palliative medicine unit in the first year of operation; 655 patients were actually admitted during this time.

  2. A Case Report Examining the Feasibility of Meta-Cognitive Strategy Training in Acute Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Skidmore, Elizabeth R.; Holm, Margo B.; Whyte, Ellen M.; Dew, Mary Amanda; Dawson, Deirdre; Becker, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Meta-cognitive strategy training may be used to augment inpatient rehabilitation to promote active engagement and subsequent benefit for individuals with cognitive impairments after stroke. We examined the feasibility of administering a form of meta-cognitive strategy training, Cognitive Orientation to daily Occupational Performance, during inpatient rehabilitation. We trained an individual with cognitive impairments after right hemisphere stroke to identify performance problems, set self-selected goals, develop plans to address goals, and evaluate performance improvements. To assess feasibility, we examined the number of meta-cognitive training sessions attended, the number of self-selected goals, and changes in goal-related performance. We also examined changes in rehabilitation engagement and disability. The participant used the meta-cognitive strategy to set 8 goals addressing physically-oriented, instrumental, and work-related activities. Mean improvement in Canadian Occupational Performance Measure Performance Scale scores was 6.1. Pittsburgh Rehabilitation Participation Scale scores (measuring rehabilitation engagement) improved from 3.2 at admission to 4.9 at discharge. Functional Independence Measure scores (measuring disability) improved from 68 at admission, to 97 at discharge. Performance Assessment of Self-care Skills scores improved from 1.1 at admission to 2.9 at discharge. The results indicate that meta-cognitive strategy training was feasible during inpatient rehabilitation and warrants further evaluation to determine its effectiveness. PMID:21391121

  3. A preliminary study of Patient Dignity Inventory validation among patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cabri, Giulio; Carretti, Eleonora; Galli, Giacomo; Giambalvo, Nina; Rioli, Giulia; Saraceni, Serena; Spiga, Giulia; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Ferri, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the perception of dignity among patients hospitalized in a psychiatric setting using the Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI), which had been first validated in oncologic field among terminally ill patients. Patients and methods After having modified two items, we administered the Italian version of PDI to all patients hospitalized in a public psychiatric ward (Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment of a northern Italian town), who provided their consent and completed it at discharge, from October 21, 2015 to May 31, 2016. We excluded minors and patients with moderate/severe dementia, with poor knowledge of Italian language, who completed PDI in previous hospitalizations and/or were hospitalized for <72 hours. We collected the demographic and clinical variables of our sample (n=135). We statistically analyzed PDI scores, performing Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and principal factor analysis, followed by orthogonal and oblique rotation. We concomitantly administered to our sample other scales (Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression and Anxiety, Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales) to analyze the PDI concurrent validity. Results With a response rate of 93%, we obtained a mean PDI score of 48.27 (±19.59 SD) with excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient =0.93). The factorial analysis showed the following three factors with eigenvalue >1 (Kaiser’s criterion), which explained >80% of total variance with good internal consistency: 1) “Loss of self-identity and social role”, 2) “Anxiety and uncertainty for future” and 3) “Loss of personal autonomy”. The PDI and the three-factor scores were statistically significantly positively correlated with the Hamilton Scales for Depression and Anxiety but not with other scale scores. Conclusion Our preliminary research suggests that PDI can be a reliable tool to assess patients’ dignity perception in a psychiatric setting, until now

  4. [An acute psychiatric ward moves into the community. An empirical test of the satellite model].

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, R P; Schmidt-Michel, P O

    2002-11-01

    A satellite ward is a psychiatric ward at a general hospital settled within a catchment area that is administered by a distant psychiatric hospital. The objective of the satellite model is to close the gap between patients and their community on the one hand and between psychiatry and general medicine on the other. The essential size of the satellite ward that enables it to take care for the patients in its catchment area is discussed controversially. This study investigated admission rates and number of beds needed in two catchment areas distant to the psychiatric hospital from 6 months before opening until 12 months after the opening of a satellite ward with 21 beds in one of the two catchment areas. We registered an 81% increase of admission rates in this catchment area (from 130 admissions in the half-year before the opening of the satellite ward to 235 admissions in the 2nd half-year after it) and a 41% increase in beds needed (from 28.8 beds in the half-year before opening to 40.7 beds in the 2nd half-year following). This increase was significant in comparison to the increase in the controlled catchment area. Thus, only 168 (71%) patients of the catchment area (but 82% of the patients with schizophrenia) were treated in the satellite ward. The remaining patients were treated in the parent house. A selective admission of severely ill patients into the parent house was not observed.

  5. Acute Interventions and Referral of Patients With Bipolar Disorder by the Psychiatric Consultation Liaison Service in a General Hospital in Germany: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the population of bipolar patients in a general hospital in Germany who required treatment by a consultant psychiatrist. Method: A retrospective analysis was conducted of the clinical records of 47 patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder (DSM-IV-TR criteria) who were treated by a consultant psychiatrist between 2009 and 2012 in one of the general hospitals of Charité Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany. We investigated the sections of the hospital that requested psychiatric consultations for bipolar patients, the status of these patients, and their primary cause of treatment, as well as the intervention (including pharmacotherapy) recommended by the consultant psychiatrist. Results: For more than half of the patients, their psychiatric illness was either directly or indirectly the reason they presented to the hospital. The remaining bipolar patients were treated for various somatic illnesses unrelated to their bipolar disorder throughout the hospital, with a relative overrepresentation of patients in the neurology department. More than half of the patients were referred to a psychiatric hospital by the consultant psychiatrist. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly administered drugs for acute pharmacologic intervention. Conclusions: Psychiatric consultations are not frequently requested for bipolar patients compared to those with other psychiatric disorders. However, more than half of the bipolar patients needed further psychiatric treatment in a psychiatric hospital. This finding emphasizes the importance of psychiatric consultations in a general hospital for bipolar patients. The administration of benzodiazepines as an acute treatment seems to be the standard pharmacologic procedure, not a specific pharmacotherapy like mood stabilizers. PMID:25133062

  6. Influence of drugs of abuse and alcohol upon patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards: physician's assessment compared to blood drug concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mordal, Jon; Medhus, Sigrid; Holm, Bjørn; Mørland, Jørg; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2013-06-01

    In acute psychiatric services, rapid and accurate detection of psychoactive substance intake may be required for appropriate diagnosis and intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between (a) drug influence as assessed by physicians and (b) blood drug concentrations among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards. We also explored the possible effects of age, sex, and psychotic symptoms on physician's assessment of drug influence. In a cross-sectional study, the sample comprised 271 consecutive admissions from 2 acute psychiatric wards. At admission, the physician on call performed an overall judgment of drug influence. Psychotic symptoms were assessed with the positive subscale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Blood samples were screened for a wide range of psychoactive substances, and quantitative results were used to calculate blood drug concentration scores. Patients were judged as being under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol in 28% of the 271 admissions. Psychoactive substances were detected in 56% of the blood samples. Altogether, 15 different substances were found; up to 8 substances were found in samples from 1 patient. Markedly elevated blood drug concentration scores were estimated for 15% of the patients. Physician's assessment was positively related to the blood drug concentration scores (r = 0.52; P < 0.001), to symptoms of excitement, and to the detection of alcohol, cannabis, and amphetamines. The study demonstrates the major impact of alcohol and drugs in acute psychiatric settings and illustrates the challenging nature of the initial clinical assessment.

  7. Psychiatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, S V

    1986-09-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in medical inpatient and outpatient populations. As a result, internists commonly are the first to see psychiatric emergencies. As with all medical problems, a good history, including a collateral history from relatives and friends, physical and mental status examination, and appropriate laboratory tests help establish a preliminary diagnosis and treatment plan. Patients with suicidal ideation usually have multiple stressors in the environment and/or a psychiatric disorder (i.e., a major affective disorder, dysthymic disorder, anxiety or panic disorder, psychotic disorder, alcohol or drug abuse, a personality disorder, and/or an adjustment disorder). Of all patients who commit suicide, 70% have a major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, psychotic organic mental disorder, alcoholism, drug abuse, and borderline personality disorder. Patients who are at great risk have minimal supports, a history of previous suicide attempts, a plan with high lethality, hopelessness, psychosis, paranoia, and/or command self-destructive hallucinations. Treatment is directed toward placing the patient in a protected environment and providing psychotropic medication and/or psychotherapy for the underlying psychiatric problem. Other psychiatric emergencies include psychotic and violent patients. Psychotic disorders fall into two categories etiologically: those that have an identifiable organic factor causing the psychosis and those that have an underlying psychiatric disorder. Initially, it is essential to rule out organic pathology that is life-threatening or could cause irreversible brain damage. After such organic causes are ruled out, neuroleptic medication is indicated. If the patient is not agitated or combative, he or she may be placed on oral divided doses of neuroleptics in the antipsychotic range. Patients who are agitated or psychotic need rapid tranquilization with an intramuscular neuroleptic every half hour to 1 hour until the agitation and

  8. Recent developments in alcoholism: inpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Nace, E P

    1993-01-01

    The historical role of inpatient treatment for alcoholism is reviewed in terms of its advantages and disadvantages. The factors that have forced a change in the utilization of inpatient treatment include increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of alcoholic patients, negative outcome studies, and cost-containment efforts. The clinical domains that warrant inpatient treatment are outlined, and decisions of treatment placement are necessarily guided by the factors of acuteness, ability, safety, and stabilization.

  9. Psychiatric Patients Experiences with Mechanical Restraints: An Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Lanthén, Klas; Rask, Mikael; Sunnqvist, Charlotta

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine psychiatric patients' experience of mechanical restraints and to describe the care the patients received. Background. All around the world, threats and violence perpetrated by patients in psychiatric emergency inpatient units are quite common and are a prevalent factor concerning the application of mechanical restraints, although psychiatric patients' experiences of mechanical restraints are still moderately unknown. Method. A qualitative design with an inductive approach were used, based on interviews with patients who once been in restraints. Results. This study resulted in an overbridging theme: Physical Presence, Instruction and Composed Behaviour Can Reduce Discontent and Trauma, including five categories. These findings implicated the following: information must be given in a calm and sensitive way, staff must be physically present during the whole procedure, and debriefing after the incident must be conducted. Conclusions. When mechanical restraints were unavoidable, the presence of committed staff during mechanical restraint was important, demonstrating the significance of training acute psychiatric nurses correctly so that their presence is meaningful. Nurses in acute psychiatric settings should be required to be genuinely committed, aware of their actions, and fully present in coercive situations where patients are vulnerable. PMID:26199931

  10. Post Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT) for the Inpatient Treatment of Military Personnel with Suicidal Behaviors: A Multi-Site Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    direct stress of a military career. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Suicide Prevention, Acute Care, Inpatient Treatment, Cognitive Behavior Therapy 16. SECURITY...future suicide behavior, specifically young, psychiatrically hospitalized adults under the direct stress of a military career. The development and...for suicide . In Comprehensive Guide to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders. London: Springer. 7. Tucker, J., Neely, L. L., Colborn, V., Tylor, S., Pak, K

  11. Dietary Issues Inpatients Face With Being Vegetarian

    PubMed Central

    Potter-Dunlop, Julie A.; Tse, Alice M.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the literature from 1985 through 2010 on research related to the dietary issues vegetarian inpatients may encounter in the acute care setting. A thematic portrayal of vegetarianism in the context of the inpatient setting is described. Implications for future research and nursing practice are identified. PMID:22157507

  12. Use of Risk Assessment Tool for Inpatient Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage after Falls in Acute Care Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Toyabe, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Severe injuries such as intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) are the most serious problem after falls in hospital, but they have not been considered in risk assessment scores for falls. We tried to determine the risk factors for ICH after falls in 20,320 inpatients (696,364 patient-days) aged from 40 to 90 years who were admitted to a tertiary-care university hospital. Possible risk factors including STRATIFY risk score for falls and FRAX™ risk score for fractures were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Fallers accounted for 3.2% of the patients, and 5.0% of the fallers suffered major injuries, including peripheral bone fracture (59.6%) and ICH (23.4%). In addition to STRATIFY, FRAX™ was significantly associated not only with bone fractures but also ICH. Concomitant use of risk score for falls and risk score for fractures might be useful for the prediction of major injuries such as ICH after falls. PMID:22980233

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor increase during treatment in severe mental illness inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Nuernberg, G L; Aguiar, B; Bristot, G; Fleck, M P; Rocha, N S

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analytical evidence suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is altered in various psychiatric disorders. However, meta-analyses may be hampered by the heterogeneity of BDNF assays, lack of BDNF standard values and heterogeneity among the populations included in the studies. To address these issues, our study aimed to test, in a ‘true-to-life' setting, the hypothesis that the serum BDNF level is nonspecifically reduced in acute severe mental illness (SMI) patients and increases during inpatient treatment. Consecutive samples of 236 inpatients with SMI and 100 healthy controls were recruited. SMI includes schizophrenia and severe mood disorders, and is characterized in the sample by the presence of at least 2 years of psychiatric treatment and disability. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze BDNF serum levels at admission and upon discharge controlled by confounding factors. BDNF levels increased significantly between admission and discharge in SMI patients. BDNF levels showed significant reductions compared with controls both at admission and upon discharge. In addition, BDNF levels showed no difference among SMI patient diagnostic subgroups (unipolar depression, bipolar depression, schizophrenia and manic episode). The increase but non-restoration of BDNF levels, even with the general acute improvement of clinical scores, may reflect the progression of the disorder characteristically seen in these patients. BDNF levels could be considered as a marker for the presence of a nonspecific psychiatric disorder and possibly a transdiagnostic and nonspecific marker of disease activity. PMID:27959329

  14. Effects of Educational Music Therapy on State Hope for Recovery in Acute Care Mental Health Inpatients: A Cluster-Randomized Effectiveness Study

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been an increasing emphasis on recovery as the expectation for people with mental health disorders. Purpose: The purpose of this effectiveness study is to determine if group-based educational music therapy can immediately impact state hope for recovery in acute care mental health patients. Research questions included: will acute care mental health inpatients who participate in a single music therapy session have higher agency and pathway aspects of state hope for recovery than patients in a control condition? Will there be differences in state hope for recovery as a result of hope-oriented songwriting or lyric analysis interventions? Method: Participants (N = 169) were cluster randomized to one of three single-session conditions: lyric analysis, songwriting, or wait-list control. Results: There was no significant between-group difference. However, both music therapy conditions tended to have slightly higher mean pathway, agency, and total state hope scores than the control condition even within the temporal parameters of a single music therapy session. There was no between-group difference in the songwriting and lyric analysis interventions. Conclusion: Although not significant, results support that educational music therapy may impact state hope for recovery within the temporal parameters of a single session. The specific type of educational music therapy intervention did not affect results. Implications for practice, limitations, and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:27774084

  15. Effects of Educational Music Therapy on State Hope for Recovery in Acute Care Mental Health Inpatients: A Cluster-Randomized Effectiveness Study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been an increasing emphasis on recovery as the expectation for people with mental health disorders. Purpose: The purpose of this effectiveness study is to determine if group-based educational music therapy can immediately impact state hope for recovery in acute care mental health patients. Research questions included: will acute care mental health inpatients who participate in a single music therapy session have higher agency and pathway aspects of state hope for recovery than patients in a control condition? Will there be differences in state hope for recovery as a result of hope-oriented songwriting or lyric analysis interventions? Method: Participants (N = 169) were cluster randomized to one of three single-session conditions: lyric analysis, songwriting, or wait-list control. Results: There was no significant between-group difference. However, both music therapy conditions tended to have slightly higher mean pathway, agency, and total state hope scores than the control condition even within the temporal parameters of a single music therapy session. There was no between-group difference in the songwriting and lyric analysis interventions. Conclusion: Although not significant, results support that educational music therapy may impact state hope for recovery within the temporal parameters of a single session. The specific type of educational music therapy intervention did not affect results. Implications for practice, limitations, and suggestions for future research are provided.

  16. The Role of Inhaled Loxapine in the Treatment of Acute Agitation in Patients with Psychiatric Disorders: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    de Berardis, Domenico; Fornaro, Michele; Orsolini, Laura; Iasevoli, Felice; Tomasetti, Carmine; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Serroni, Nicola; Valchera, Alessandro; Carano, Alessandro; Vellante, Federica; Marini, Stefano; Piersanti, Monica; Perna, Giampaolo; Martinotti, Giovanni; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Loxapine is a first generation antipsychotic, belonging to the dibenzoxazepine class. Recently, loxapine has been reformulated at a lower dose, producing an inhaled powder that can be directly administered to the lungs to treat the agitation associated with psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Thus, the aim of this narrative and clinical mini-review was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of inhaled loxapine in the treatment of acute agitation in patients with psychiatric disorders. The efficacy of inhaled loxapine has been evaluated in one Phase II trial on patients with schizophrenia, and in two Phase III trials in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Moreover, there are two published case series on patients with borderline personality disorder and dual diagnosis patients. Inhaled loxapine has proven to be effective and generally well tolerated when administered to agitated patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Two case series have suggested that inhaled loxapine may also be useful to treat agitation in patients with borderline personality disorder and with dual diagnosis, but further studies are needed to clarify this point. However, the administration of inhaled loxapine requires at least some kind of patient collaboration, and is not recommended in the treatment of severe agitation in totally uncooperative patients. Moreover, the drug-related risk of bronchospasm must always be kept in mind when planning to use inhaled loxapine, leading to a careful patient assessment prior to, and after, administration. Also, the higher costs of inhaled loxapine, when compared to oral and intramuscular medications, should be taken into account when selecting it for the treatment of agitation. PMID:28208695

  17. Homeless and Housed Inpatients with Schizophrenia: Disparities in Service Access upon Discharge from Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burra, Tara A.; Hwang, Stephen W.; Rourke, Sean B.; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in services available at the time of discharge for homeless and housed psychiatric inpatients. Participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from a general hospital psychiatric inpatient unit. Thirty homeless individuals and 21 housed controls (matched for diagnosis, gender,…

  18. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful.

  19. Psychiatric Inpatient Rehabilitation: Is There a Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Peter H.

    1990-01-01

    Review of 105 consecutive admissions of mentally ill patients to a British Hospital Rehabilitation Unit over 2 years showed relatively few were of the "long stay" variety and the overall number under age 65 had fallen. Most patients were admitted for sound clinical reasons after consideration of and sometimes trial of community…

  20. Predictors of Specialized Inpatient Admissions for Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modi, Miti; McMorris, Carly; Palucka, Anna; Raina, Poonam; Lunsky, Yona

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) have complex mental health needs and may seek specialized ID psychiatric services. This study reports on predictors of specialized inpatient admissions for 234 individuals with ID who received outpatient services at a psychiatric hospital. Overall, from 2007-2012, 55 of the 234 outpatients were triaged…

  1. Symptom, Family, and Service Predictors of Children’s Psychiatric Rehospitalization Within One Year of Discharge

    PubMed Central

    BLADER, JOSEPH C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate predictors of readmission to inpatient psychiatric treatment for children aged 5 to 12 discharged from acute-care hospitalization. Method One hundred nine children were followed for 1 year after discharge from inpatient care. Time to rehospitalization was the outcome of interest. Predictors of readmission, examined via the Cox proportional hazards model, were symptom and family factors assessed at admission, aspects of psychiatric treatment, and demographic variables. Results The Kaplan-Meier rehospitalization risk within 1 year of discharge, taking into account known readmissions and censored observations, was 0.37. Most readmissions (81%) occurred within 90 days of discharge. Four variables contributed simultaneously to predicting readmission risk. More severe conduct problems, harsh parental discipline, and disengaged parent–child relations conferred a higher risk for rehospitalization; these risks were attenuated when parents disclosed higher stress in their parenting roles. Conclusions Findings showed that psychiatric rehospitalization of children is common, most likely in the trimester after discharge, and highly related to both child symptoms and family factors measurable at admission. Results suggest that efforts to improve postdischarge outcomes of children should target the initial period following inpatient care, address vigorously the complex treatment needs of those with severe conduct problems, and aim to improve parent–child relations. PMID:15187804

  2. Psychiatric response to the Clapham rail crash.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, T P; Hollins, S C

    1991-01-01

    The psychiatric response to the Clapham rail crash is described. The psychiatric input was short term, dealing with the 38 inpatients and over 200 hospital staff involved in the response. The need to evolve a compact, responsive team structure is noted. The value of a proactive approach and provision of psychological debriefing is defended. Incorporation of components of the psychiatric response into the Hospital's major incident plan is reported. PMID:1994007

  3. Care zoning. A pragmatic approach to enhance the understanding of clinical needs as it relates to clinical risks in acute in-patient unit settings.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kris; Guy, Stuart; Stewart, Linda; Ayling, Mark; Miller, Graham; Anthony, Anne; Bajuk, Anne; Brun, Jo Le; Shearer, Dianne; Gregory, Rebecca; Thomas, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The process of risk assessment which should inform and help identify clinical needs is often seen as a tick box and task-focussed approach. While on the surface this provides a sense of security that forms have been completed, we often fail to communicate in a meaningful manner about the clinical needs identified, which would assist in supporting the care planning delivery processes. A clinical practice improvement (CPI) project implemented a care zoning framework as an evidenced-based process that provides pragmatic support to nurses who are required to continually assess, implement, and evaluate plans to address clinical need across three acute mental health inpatient settings. Risk descriptors informed by the New South Wales (NSW) Mental Health Assessment & Outcome Tools (MHAOT) criteria were developed and described in behavioural contexts in order to improve the project's reliability and translation. A pragmatic traffic light tool was used to share clinical information across three agreed care zones, red (high clinical need), amber (medium clinical need), and green (low clinical need). Additionally nurses were asked to utilise a shift review form in the context of supporting the recording of care zoning and promoting action-orientated note writing. The introduction of care zoning has enthused the nursing teams and the mental health service to adopt care zoning as a supervisory framework that increases their capacity to communicate clinical needs, share information, and gain invaluable support from one another in addressing clinical needs. This includes increased opportunities for staff to feel supported in asking for assistance in understanding and addressing complex clinical presentations.

  4. Aggression on inpatient units: Clinical characteristics and consequences.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Laoise; Stewart, Duncan; Richardson, Michelle; Lavelle, Mary; James, Karen; Hardy, Claire; Price, Owen; Bowers, Len

    2016-08-01

    Aggression and violence are widespread in UK Mental Health Trusts, and are accompanied by negative psychological and physiological consequences for both staff and other patients. Patients who are younger, male, and have a history of substance use and psychosis diagnoses are more likely to display aggression; however, patient factors are not solely responsible for violence, and there are complex circumstances that lead to aggression. Indeed, patient-staff interactions lead to a sizeable portion of aggression and violence on inpatient units, thus they cannot be viewed without considering other forms of conflict and containment that occur before, during, and after the aggressive incident. For this reason, we examined sequences of aggressive incidents in conjunction with other conflict and containment methods used to explore whether there were particular profiles to aggressive incidents. In the present study, 522 adult psychiatric inpatients from 84 acute wards were recruited, and there were 1422 incidents of aggression (verbal, physical against objects, and physical). Cluster analysis revealed that aggressive incident sequences could be classified into four separate groups: solo aggression, aggression-rule breaking, aggression-medication, and aggression-containment. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find physical aggression dominant in the aggression-containment cluster, and while verbal aggression occurred primarily in solo aggression, physical aggression also occurred here. This indicates that the management of aggression is variable, and although some patient factors are linked with different clusters, these do not entirely explain the variation.

  5. The Impact of Psychiatric Patient Boarding in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, B. A.; Manthey, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of emergency department (ED) boarding. This study examines the impact of resource utilization, throughput, and financial impact for psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement. Methods. The authors retrospectively studied all psychiatric and non-psychiatric adult admissions in an Academic Medical Center ED (>68,000 adult visits) from January 2007-2008. The main outcomes were ED length of stay (LOS) and associated reimbursement. Results. 1,438 patients were consulted to psychiatry with 505 (35.1%) requiring inpatient psychiatric care management. The mean psychiatric patient age was 42.5 years (SD 13.1 years), with 2.7 times more women than men. ED LOS was significantly longer for psychiatric admissions (1089 min, CI (1039–1140) versus 340 min, CI (304–375); P < 0.001) when compared to non-psychiatric admissions. The financial impact of psychiatric boarding accounted for a direct loss of ($1,198) compared to non-psychiatric admissions. Factoring the loss of bed turnover for waiting patients and opportunity cost due to loss of those patients, psychiatric patient boarding cost the department $2,264 per patient. Conclusions. Psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement remain in the ED 3.2 times longer than non-psychiatric patients, preventing 2.2 bed turnovers (additional patients) per psychiatric patient, and decreasing financial revenue. PMID:22888437

  6. 42 CFR 483.354 - General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false General requirements for psychiatric residential... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.354 General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. A...

  7. 42 CFR 483.354 - General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General requirements for psychiatric residential... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.354 General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. A...

  8. 42 CFR 483.354 - General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General requirements for psychiatric residential... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.354 General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. A...

  9. 42 CFR 483.354 - General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General requirements for psychiatric residential... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.354 General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. A...

  10. 42 CFR 483.354 - General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false General requirements for psychiatric residential... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.354 General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. A...

  11. Psychiatric home care: a new tool for crisis intervention.

    PubMed

    Spiro, A H

    1994-03-01

    The cost of psychiatric care has been rapidly increasing in recent years. Between 1984 and 1987, there was a 46 percent increase in psychiatric hospitals beds and a 60 percent increase in psychiatric units in general hospitals. This reflected a recognition by many health care systems that psychiatric patients were a good source of revenue. With this push toward more and more inpatient programs, crucial aspects of psychiatric care were left behind. Specifically, the limitations of inpatient therapy have not been recognized. Within the past five years, a new program has been developed and pioneered to use home care to prevent psychiatric hospitalizations and to also prevent the difficult transitions for psychiatric patients. Over a two-year period, this program was studied for its impact on the quality and cost of psychiatric care.

  12. The dynamics of psychiatric bed use in general hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Eric P; Goldman, Howard H

    2014-01-01

    This study examines general hospitals' adjustments in psychiatric bed utilization practices in response to increases in psychiatric inpatient admissions. Using panel data from 439 hospitals, monthly observations (N=7831) between 2007 and 2010 on psychiatric admissions, psychiatric bed occupancy rates, and average length-of-stay were created for psychiatric inpatients. In fixed-effects regressions, an increase in psychiatric admissions was associated with an increase in the probability of psychiatric bed use exceeding 100% occupancy and with a reduction of mean length-of-stay. These results were confirmed in instrumental variables models. General hospitals may dynamically adjust bed utilization practices in response to changing psychiatric bed needs. An implication of this dynamic adjustment model is that bed shortages are likely to be local, transitory events. PMID:24756929

  13. The dynamics of psychiatric bed use in general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Slade, Eric P; Goldman, Howard H

    2015-03-01

    This study examines general hospitals' adjustments in psychiatric bed utilization practices in response to increases in psychiatric inpatient admissions. Using panel data from 439 hospitals, monthly observations (N = 7,831) between 2007 and 2010 on psychiatric admissions, psychiatric bed occupancy rates, and average length-of-stay were created for psychiatric inpatients. In fixed-effects regressions, an increase in psychiatric admissions was associated with an increase in the probability of psychiatric bed use exceeding 100 % occupancy and with a reduction of mean length-of-stay. These results were confirmed in instrumental variables models. General hospitals may dynamically adjust bed utilization practices in response to changing psychiatric bed needs. An implication of this dynamic adjustment model is that bed shortages are likely to be local, transitory events.

  14. Treatment - mother-infant inpatient units.

    PubMed

    Glangeaud-Freudenthal, Nine M C; Howard, Louise M; Sutter-Dallay, Anne-Laure

    2014-01-01

    Infants of parents with psychiatric disorders may be particularly vulnerable and have a higher risk of developing psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Until the second half of the 20th century, women and infants were cared for separately. Today, hospitalisation of women with their babies in psychiatric mother-baby units enables psychiatric care of women and promotion of parent-infant interactions and child development. The distribution of psychiatric mother-baby units around the world, as well as within countries, varies strongly. Reasons for this may be related to the absence of national perinatal mental health policies related to psychiatric mother-baby unit location, differences in sources of referral for admission, and criteria for psychiatric mother-baby unit admission. Two principal national epidemiologic studies, in England and in France and Belgium, have described issues related to discharge from such care, as have smaller local studies, but no epidemiologic studies have yet demonstrated that joint inpatient psychiatric mother-baby unit care is cost-effective compared with separate care.

  15. Cotard syndrome in neurological and psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Bermudez, Jesus; Aguilar-Venegas, Luis C; Crail-Melendez, Daniel; Espinola-Nadurille, Mariana; Nente, Francisco; Mendez, Mario F

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the frequency and characteristics of Cotard syndrome among neurological and psychiatric inpatients at a tertiary referral center. All inpatients from the National Institute of Neurology of Mexico (March 2007-May 2009) requiring neuropsychiatric consultation were reviewed. Among 1,321 inpatient consultations, 63.7% had neurological disease and one (0.11%) had viral encephalitis and Cotard syndrome. Of inpatients, 36.2% had pure psychiatric disorders and three (0.62%) had Cotard syndrome, associated with psychotic depression, depersonalization, and penile retraction (koro syndrome). This review discusses potential mechanisms for Cotard syndrome, including the role of a perceptual-emotional dissociation in self-misattribution in the deliré des negations.

  16. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We

  17. The Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry - II (ASAP-II): a comparative study of psychiatric intensive care units in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Schoevers, Robert; van Wijk, Cecile Gijsbers; Mulder, Wijnand; Hornbach, Annett; Barkhof, Emile; Klaassen, André; van Egmond, Marieke; van Venrooij, Janine; Bijpost, Yan; Nusselder, Hans; van Herrewaarden, Marjan; Maksimovic, Igor; Achilles, Alexander; Dekker, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Background The number of patients in whom mental illness progresses to stages in which acute, and often forced treatment is warranted, is on the increase across Europe. As a consequence, more patients are involuntarily admitted to Psychiatric Intensive Care Units (PICU). From several studies and reports it has become evident that important dissimilarities exist between PICU's. The current study seeks to describe organisational as well as clinical and patient related factors across ten PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region, adjusted for or stratified by level of urbanization. Method/Design This paper describes the design of the Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry II (ASAP-II). This study is a prospective observational cohort study comparing PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region on various patient characteristics, treatment aspects and recovery related variables. Dissimilarities were measured by means of collecting standardized forms which were filled out in the framework of care as usual, by means of questionnaires filled out by mental health care professionals and by means of extracting data from patient files for every consecutive patient admitted at participating PICU's during a specific time period. Urbanization levels for every PICU were calculated conform procedures as proposed by the Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics (CBS). Discussion The current study may provide a deeper understanding of the differences between psychiatric intensive care units that can be used to promote best practice and benchmarking procedures, and thus improve the standard of care. PMID:19725981

  18. Group treatment of adult male inpatients abused as children.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, L Y

    1994-10-01

    Recent research indicates that childhood abuse experiences characterize a large subset of psychiatric inpatients. This paper presents a time-limited pilot group developed for adult male abuse survivors in an inpatient setting using: (1) techniques adapted from the existing literature on treatment of abuse survivors; and (2) approaches deriving from the interface of theory and current manifestations of distress. The eclectic therapeutic approach incorporated psychoeducational, cognitive, behavioral, and art therapy techniques presented below in a session-by-session format.

  19. The periodicities in and biometeorological relationships with bed occupancy of an acute psychiatric ward in Antwerp, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, M.; de Meyer, F.; Peeters, D.; Meltzer, H.; Schotte, C.; Scharpe, S.; Cosyns, P.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, some investigators have established a seasonal pattern in normal human psychology, physiology and behaviour, and in the incidence of psychiatric psychopathology. In an attempt to elucidate the chronopsy and meteotropism in the latter, we have examined the chronograms of, and the biometeorological relationships to bed occupancy of the psychiatric ward of the Antwerp University Hospital during three consecutive calendar years (1987 1989). Weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological station and comprise mean atmospheric pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and minutes of sunlight and precipitation/day. The number of psychiatric beds occupied during the study period exhibited a significant seasonal variation. Peaks in bed occupancy were observed in March and November, with lows in August. An important part of the variability in the number of beds occupied could be explained by the composite effects of weather variables of the preceding weeks. Our results suggest that short-term fluctuations in atmospheric activity may dictate some of the periodicities in psychiatric psychopathology.

  20. Pharmacotherapy and Postdischarge Outcomes of Child Inpatients Admitted for Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Blader, Joseph C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives (1) To ascertain the utilization rates of specific pharmacotherapy strategies for child psychiatric inpatients with aggressive behavior from preadmission care through 12 months after discharge, and (2) To examine the associations between these strategies and postdischarge outcomes. Method Prospective follow-up of eighty-three 5- to 13-year-old children admitted to acute inpatient care for aggressive behavior in the context of a disruptive behavior disorder. Treatment and symptom severity data were obtained at admission, discharge, and 3, 6, and 12 months after discharge between 1998 and 2001. Results Utilization The number of concurrent medications increased over assessment times. Changes in children’s pharmacotherapy occurred most frequently during hospitalization and from discharge to 3 months after discharge. Treatment with antipsychotics and mood stabilizers increased over assessment times, whereas selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment decreased. Outcomes Children treated with stimulants and risperidone 3 months after discharge had significantly improved behavioral ratings, adjusted for admission scores utilization and concurrent medications. Children treated with SSRIs at 6 months after discharge had higher problem severity ratings. Those who maintained lithium and SSRI treatment between 6 and 12 months showed improvements. Conclusions The complexity of pharmacotherapy for child inpatients ratchets upwards from admission through 1 year after discharge. Hospital-initiated treatment is commonly altered soon after discharge. Within the limitations of observational methodology, their postdischarge outcomes seem related to specific pharmacotherapy regimens. PMID:16855463

  1. The importance of the patients deemed not guilty by reason of insanity for the psychiatric reform.

    PubMed

    Douzenis, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    will decide that this certain individual has "ceased to be dangerous". These problems are accentuated by the difficulties that the Greek justice system is facing. On the other side, from the psychiatric point of view, the "NGRI" patient who is an inpatient is not receiving the holistic, (bio psycho social) treatment and assessment of needs he/she requires. The psychiatric team looking after him, once the acute symptomatology is controlled is just getting used to a patient who will not be discharged in the immediate future. These patients form the "new chronic asylum psychiatric inpatients" for whom the treating psychiatrists are not allowed to discharge back into the community whilst it is unclear whether they can be transferred to supported rehabilitation units. It is a medical but also legal paradox to assign to contemporary psychiatric units aiming mainly to treat patients in the community to "keep and guard" inpatients whilst these psychiatric units should focus on care and rehabilitation of the patients (including the "NGRIs").3 Keeping patients like these in psychiatric units creates problems in the functioning of the units. These patients are "kept" in acute beds for long periods of time (5 to 6 years minimum) with patients treated voluntarily or against their will and cannot be discharged without a court's decision. The problems are obvious if one realises that the average time of hospitalisation is not exceeding 2 months for the vast majority of psychiatric patients. With the prolonged stay patients of the "article 69" (NGRIs) they not only burden the already limited resources (there is an established lack of psychiatric beds nationwide) but also this prolonged hospitalisation increases their stigmatisation and marginalisation. Thus the prolonged hospitalisation for "safety" reasons according to the court decision leads to the absence of a therapeutic aim other than maintaining the patient on the ward. Greece has agreed that there is an urgent need in

  2. Psychiatric rehabilitation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rössler, W; Drake, R E

    2017-01-19

    To describe the core elements of modern psychiatric rehabilitation. Based on selected examples we describe the discussion about values in mental health care with focus on Europe. We present outcome data from studies, which have tried to implement care structures based on this value discussion. In the second half of the 20th century, mental health care in all European and other high-income countries changed conceptually and structurally. Deinstitutionalisation reduced the number of psychiatric beds and transferred priority to outpatient care and community-based services, but community mental health programs developed differently across and within these countries. High-income countries in Europe continued to invest in costly traditional services that were neither evidence-based nor person-centered by emphasising inpatient services, sheltered group homes and sheltered workshops. We argue that evidence-based, person-centred, recovery-oriented psychiatric rehabilitation offers a parsimonious solution to developing a consensus plan for community-based care in Europe. The challenges to scaling up effective psychiatric rehabilitation services in high-income countries are not primarily a lack of resources, but rather a lack of political will and inefficient use and dysfunctional allocation of resources.

  3. Reinvigorating Inpatient Group Psychotherapy: Integrating Clients' Off-Unit Experiences in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Elaine B.; Chambliss, Catherine

    Publicly funded psychiatric inpatient institutions focus increasingly on stabilization and relapse prevention, readying patients for rapid community reentry. Growing emphasis on consumer satisfaction and professionals' accountability for efficient outcomes has coincided with increasing cost concerns. Since staffing limitations mandate innovative…

  4. REFINE (REducing Falls in In-patieNt Elderly) using bed and bedside chair pressure sensors linked to radio-pagers in acute hospital care: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sahota, Opinder; Drummond, Avril; Kendrick, Denise; Grainge, Matthew J.; Vass, Catherine; Sach, Tracey; Gladman, John; Avis, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background: falls in hospitals are a major problem and contribute to substantial healthcare burden. Advances in sensor technology afford innovative approaches to reducing falls in acute hospital care. However, whether these are clinically effective and cost effective in the UK setting has not been evaluated. Methods: pragmatic, parallel-arm, individual randomised controlled trial of bed and bedside chair pressure sensors using radio-pagers (intervention group) compared with standard care (control group) in elderly patients admitted to acute, general medical wards, in a large UK teaching hospital. Primary outcome measure number of in-patient bedside falls per 1,000 bed days. Results: 1,839 participants were randomised (918 to the intervention group and 921 to the control group). There were 85 bedside falls (65 fallers) in the intervention group, falls rate 8.71 per 1,000 bed days compared with 83 bedside falls (64 fallers) in the control group, falls rate 9.84 per 1,000 bed days (adjusted incidence rate ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66–1.22; P = 0.51). There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to time to first bedside fall (adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 0.95; 95% CI: 0.67–1.34; P= 0.12). The mean cost per patient in the intervention group was £7199 compared with £6400 in the control group, mean difference in QALYs per patient, 0.0001 (95% CI: −0.0006–0.0004, P= 0.67). Conclusions: bed and bedside chair pressure sensors as a single intervention strategy do not reduce in-patient bedside falls, time to first bedside fall and are not cost-effective in elderly patients in acute, general medical wards in the UK. Trial registration: isrctn.org identifier: ISRCTN44972300. PMID:24141253

  5. Violent psychiatric patients: a study.

    PubMed

    Kermani, E J

    1981-04-01

    In a study of fifty-three violent psychiatric patients in a psychiatric hospital setting, it was found that there are two distinct major groups of violent patients--one of patients with a long history of antisocial behavior who are often chronically homicidal and suicidal, and another of patients who neither have a history of destructive behavior nor exhibit homicidal or suicidal tendencies. The latter become acutely assaultive only during the course of psychiatric illness. The personality traits and background associated with these two groups offer additional contrasts. Each group presents different problems and, of major importance to the psychiatric practioner, each group requires different management.

  6. Predicting Length of Psychiatric Hospital Stay in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Michele; Stephenson, Laura A.

    Length of stay in psychiatric inpatient units has received increasing attention with the external pressures for treatment cost-effectiveness and evidence that longer hospital stays do not appear to have significant advantages over shorter hospital stays. This study examined the relationship between length of psychiatric hospital stay and…

  7. A cross-sectional prospective study of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication in acute psychiatric wards: patient, staff and ward characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research on mental health care has shown considerable differences in use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication among different wards and geographical areas. This study investigates to what extent use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication for involuntary admitted patients in Norwegian acute psychiatric wards is associated with patient, staff and ward characteristics. The study includes data from 32 acute psychiatric wards. Methods Multilevel logistic regression using Stata was applied with data from 1016 involuntary admitted patients that were linked to data about wards. The sample comprised two hierarchical levels (patients and wards) and the dependent variables had two values (0 = no use and 1 = use). Coercive measures were defined as use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary depot medication during hospitalization. Results The total number of involuntary admitted patients was 1214 (35% of total sample). The percentage of patients who were exposed to coercive measures ranged from 0-88% across wards. Of the involuntary admitted patients, 424 (35%) had been secluded, 117 (10%) had been restrained and 113 (9%) had received involuntary depot medication at discharge. Data from 1016 patients could be linked in the multilevel analysis. There was a substantial between-ward variance in the use of coercive measures; however, this was influenced to some extent by compositional differences across wards, especially for the use of restraint. Conclusions The substantial between-ward variance, even when adjusting for patients' individual psychopathology, indicates that ward factors influence the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication and that some wards have the potential for quality improvement. Hence, interventions to reduce the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication should take into account organizational and environmental factors. PMID:20370928

  8. Clinical outcomes and mortality associated with weekend admission to psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Chesney, Edward; Cullen, Alexis E.; Tulloch, Alex D.; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals. Aims To investigate whether weekend admission to a psychiatric hospital is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Method Data were obtained from 45 264 consecutive psychiatric hospital admissions. The association of weekend admission with in-patient mortality, duration of hospital admission and risk of readmission was investigated using multivariable regression analyses. Secondary analyses were performed to investigate the distribution of admissions, discharges, in-patient mortality, episodes of seclusion and violent incidents on different days of the week. Results There were 7303 weekend admissions (16.1%). Patients who were aged between 26 and 35 years, female or from a minority ethnic group were more likely to be admitted at the weekend. Patients admitted at the weekend were more likely to present via acute hospital services, other psychiatric hospitals and the criminal justice system than to be admitted directly from their own home. Weekend admission was associated with a shorter duration of admission (B coefficient −21.1 days, 95% CI −24.6 to −17.6, P<0.001) and an increased risk of readmission in the 12 months following index admission (incidence rate ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.18, P<0.001), but in-patient mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.23, P = 0.30) was not greater than for weekday admission. Fewer episodes of seclusion occurred at the weekend but there was no significant variation in deaths during hospital admission or violent incidents on different days of the week. Conclusions Being admitted at the weekend was not associated with an increased risk of in-patient mortality. However, patients admitted at the weekend had shorter admissions and were more likely to be readmitted, suggesting that they may represent a

  9. Psychiatric diagnosis, psychiatric power and psychiatric abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, T

    1994-01-01

    Psychiatric abuse, such as we usually associate with practices in the former Soviet Union, is related not to the misuse of psychiatric diagnoses, but to the political power intrinsic to the social role of the psychiatrist in totalitarian and democratic societies alike. Some reflections are offered on the modern, therapeutic state's proclivity to treat adults as patients rather than citizens, disjoin rights from responsibilities, and thus corrupt the language of political-philosophical discourse. PMID:7996558

  10. Negotiating Time: The Significance of Timing in Ending Inpatient Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sarah Gustavus

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses work with young people during their stay on an NHS psychiatric inpatient unit, especially focusing on the end of treatment and the appropriate timing of discharge into the community. When approaching the end of an admission, various factors are considered that seem particularly relevant to the decision of when a young person…

  11. Feasibility of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Adolescent Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Laurence Y.; Cox, Brian J.; Gunasekara, Shiny; Miller, Alec L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) implementation in a general child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit and to provide preliminary effectiveness data on DBT versus treatment as usual (TAU). Method: Sixty-two adolescents with suicide attempts or suicidal ideation were admitted to one of two…

  12. Tailoring Inpatient Group Psychotherapy to Patients' Needs: Size Matters!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Elaine B.; Chambliss, Catherine

    Today's publicly funded psychiatric inpatient institutions focus increasingly in stabilization and relapse prevention, readying patients for community reentry. An increasing emphasis on consumer satisfaction and professionals' accountability for efficient outcomes has coincided with growing cost-consciousness. Therapists must strive to tailor…

  13. Group Psychotherapy for a Heterogeneous Short-Term Inpatient Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Janet E.

    1989-01-01

    This article outlines considerations in planning inpatient groups for psychiatric patients and presents a model for group psychotherapy with a heterogeneous admission ward population. The model includes session plans based on objectives graded according to patients' levels of functioning. Also discussed are group rules and the therapist's role.…

  14. Programmed Instruction, Self-Control, and In-Patient Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layng, Terrence; And Others

    The extension of the instructional programming process, as outlined by Markle and Tiemann (1967), to the treatment of psychiatric in-patients is described. Three case studies are presented as examples of the application of the programming procedures as derived from the Constructional Model of Dr. Israel Goldiamond. The emphasis throughout all…

  15. The clinical psychologist and the management of inpatient pain: a small case series

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Susan R; Casely, Emma M; Kuehler, Bianca M; Ward, Stephen; Halmshaw, Charlotte L; Thomas, Sarah E; Goodall, Ian D; Bantel, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has confirmed that between 25% and 33% of all hospitalized patients experience unacceptable levels of pain. Studies further indicate that this reduces patient satisfaction levels, lengthens hospital stays, and increases cost. Hospitals are aiming to discharge patients earlier, and this can interfere with adequate pain management. Therefore, the pain service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has adapted to this changing model of care. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that psychological factors are key components of patients’ pain experiences in both acute and chronic pain. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest a clinical psychologist should be involved in inpatient pain management. This small study discusses three cases that highlight how patient care could be improved by including a clinical psychologist as part of the inpatient pain team. Two cases particularly highlight the active role of the psychologist in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as fear and anxiety, along with other psychiatric comorbidities. The management therefore employed an eclectic approach adapted from chronic pain and comprising of behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavioral therapeutic techniques blended with brief counseling. The third case exemplifies the importance of nurse-patient interactions and the quality of nurse-patient relationships on patient outcomes. Here, the psychologist helped to optimize communication and to resolve a difficult and potentially risk-laden situation. This small case series discusses the benefits derived from the involvement of a clinical psychologist in the management of inpatient pain, and therefore illustrates the need for novel initiatives for inpatient pain services. However, future research is warranted to validate this approach. PMID:25506221

  16. Suicide Behaviors in Adult Inpatients with Mental Disorders in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qi; Fan, Hua; Di, Fei; Xia, Xue; Long, Haiying; Zhu, Huiping

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study examined the tendency and suicidal behavior rates of Chinese adult inpatients with different types of mental disorders from 2010 to 2015. The aim was to provide some interesting clues for further studies. Methods: Adult patients with mental disorders who were hospitalized in Beijing Anding hospital from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2015 were included. Chi-square tests were used to compare the difference among inpatients with mental disorders by gender and year. Frequency, trend and suicidal behavior rates of inpatients with mental disorders were graphed. Results: A total of 17,244 psychiatric adult inpatients were included in our study. About 53.2% of the inpatients had mood disorders, followed by schizophrenia, which accounted for 34.6%. The proportion of female inpatients with mental disorders was larger than that of males (52.6% to 47.4%). Of the total, 3296 psychiatric inpatients were recognized as having suicidal behaviors. The rate of suicidal behavior among all inpatients was 19.1%, and it varied over the years. The suicidal behavior rate of female inpatients with mood disorders was much higher than that of the corresponding male inpatients. Conclusions: The presence of suicidal behavior varied among people with different types of mental disorders. For each type of mental illness, identifying the risk of specific suicide behavior would help tailor-make preventive efforts accordingly. PMID:28273823

  17. 42 CFR 485.647 - Condition of participation: psychiatric and rehabilitation distinct part units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: psychiatric and... Condition of participation: psychiatric and rehabilitation distinct part units. (a) Conditions. (1) If a CAH provides inpatient psychiatric services in a distinct part unit, the services furnished by the...

  18. 42 CFR 485.647 - Condition of participation: psychiatric and rehabilitation distinct part units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: psychiatric and... Condition of participation: psychiatric and rehabilitation distinct part units. (a) Conditions. (1) If a CAH provides inpatient psychiatric services in a distinct part unit, the services furnished by the...

  19. 42 CFR 485.647 - Condition of participation: psychiatric and rehabilitation distinct part units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: psychiatric and... Condition of participation: psychiatric and rehabilitation distinct part units. (a) Conditions. (1) If a CAH provides inpatient psychiatric services in a distinct part unit, the services furnished by the...

  20. 42 CFR 485.647 - Condition of participation: psychiatric and rehabilitation distinct part units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: psychiatric and... Condition of participation: psychiatric and rehabilitation distinct part units. (a) Conditions. (1) If a CAH provides inpatient psychiatric services in a distinct part unit, the services furnished by the...

  1. 42 CFR 485.647 - Condition of participation: psychiatric and rehabilitation distinct part units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: psychiatric and... Condition of participation: psychiatric and rehabilitation distinct part units. (a) Conditions. (1) If a CAH provides inpatient psychiatric services in a distinct part unit, the services furnished by the...

  2. Hispanic Inpatient Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Ambrose, Margaret; Morey, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Hispanic adults experience significant pain, but little is known about their pain during hospitalization. The purpose of this research was to describe Hispanic inpatients' pain intensity and compare their pain intensity with that of non-Hispanic patients. A post hoc descriptive design was used to examine 1,466 Hispanic inpatients' medical records (63.2% English speakers) and 12,977 non-Hispanic inpatients' medical records from one hospital for 2012. Mean documented pain intensity was mild for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatients. Pain intensity was greater for English-speaking Hispanic patients than Spanish speakers. The odds of being documented with moderate or greater pain intensity decreased 30% for Spanish-speaking patients. Greater pain intensity documented for English-speaking Hispanic inpatients suggests underreporting of pain intensity by Spanish-speaking patients. Practitioners should use interpreter services when assessing and treating pain with patients who speak languages different from the practitioners' language(s).

  3. Using trauma informed care as a nursing model of care in an acute inpatient mental health unit: A practice development process.

    PubMed

    Isobel, Sophie; Edwards, Clair

    2017-02-01

    Without agreeing on an explicit approach to care, mental health nurses may resort to problem focused, task oriented practice. Defining a model of care is important but there is also a need to consider the philosophical basis of any model. The use of Trauma Informed Care as a guiding philosophy provides a robust framework from which to review nursing practice. This paper describes a nursing workforce practice development process to implement Trauma Informed Care as an inpatient model of mental health nursing care. Trauma Informed Care is an evidence-based approach to care delivery that is applicable to mental health inpatient units; while there are differing strategies for implementation, there is scope for mental health nurses to take on Trauma Informed Care as a guiding philosophy, a model of care or a practice development project within all of their roles and settings in order to ensure that it has considered, relevant and meaningful implementation. The principles of Trauma Informed Care may also offer guidance for managing workforce stress and distress associated with practice change.

  4. Psychiatric Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Bayrakal, Sadi

    1972-01-01

    Dr. Bayrakal believes that the time has come for the family physician to deal with minor psychiatric disturbances in his office as well as psychiatric emergencies in the emergency department. The newly emerging medico-social philosophy of both the federal and provincial governments, he says, is giving greater responsibility and authority to the family physician in every area of medicine, including psychiatry. The author discusses major psychiatric emergencies (suicide, suicidal attempt, homicide, social scandal, as well as other psychiatric emergencies) on the ward including adolescent psychiatry. (The descriptions and treatment procedures are given on a concrete clinical level without theoretical overload.) In the family physician's work, psychological understanding is of profound importance. Giving him the added scope of psychiatric consideration to see the patient in bio-psycho-social totality will enable him to practice a more humanized form of medicine. PMID:20468779

  5. An Update on Inpatient Hypertension Management.

    PubMed

    Axon, R Neal; Turner, Mason; Buckley, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent affecting nearly one third of the US adult population. Though generally approached as an outpatient disorder, elevated blood pressure is observed in a majority of hospitalized patients. The spectrum of hypertensive disease ranges from patients with hypertensive emergency including markedly elevated blood pressure and associated end-organ damage to asymptomatic patients with minimally elevated pressures of unclear significance. It is important to note that current evidence-based hypertension guidelines do not specifically address inpatient hypertension. This narrative review focuses primarily on best practices for diagnosing and managing nonemergent hypertension in the inpatient setting. We describe examples of common hypertensive syndromes, provide suggestions for optimal post-acute management, and point to evidence-based or consensus guidelines where available. In addition, we describe a practical approach to managing asymptomatic elevated blood pressure observed in the inpatient setting. Finally, arranging effective care transitions to ensure optimal ongoing hypertension management is appropriate in all cases.

  6. Evaluation of the impact of non-inpatient i.v. antibiotic treatment for acute infections on the hospital, primary care services and the patient.

    PubMed

    Parker, S E; Nathwani, D; O'Reilly, D; Parkinson, S; Davey, P G

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of providing i.v. antibiotic therapy outside hospital. The main outcome measures were the direct costs of providing i.v. antibiotic therapy in the community compared with standard hospital treatment and the perceptions of patients and General Practitioners (GPs). A total of 29 patients entered the study, of whom 15 received teicoplanin and 14 ceftriaxone. The costs of drugs exceeded the cost of the estimated alternative treatments (median Pound Sterling 208 and Pound Sterling 126 respectively) and this was only partially compensated for by a small reduction in costs of consumables. The staff time required to train patients was compensated for by savings in drug preparation and administration. Sensitivity analysis showed that these conclusions were sensitive to drug and patient selection, and that treatment of skin and soft tissue infections outside hospital with ceftriaxone was likely to have similar variable costs to treatment in hospital with drugs such as flucloxacillin. Non-inpatient i.v. (NIPIV) therapy was estimated to save a total of 532 bed days in the year of the study. Patients strongly preferred non-inpatient treatment to hospital treatment. GPs identified a number of potential disadvantages, mainly concerning safety and lack of support for patients at home. Following the study a strategy for development of NIPIV services in Tayside has been developed with local GPs and a plan has been agreed for funding a community liaison nurse based on the impact of NIPIV therapy on future bed requirements in Dundee Teaching Hospitals Trust.

  7. Recovery rate and associated factors of children age 6 to 59 months admitted with severe acute malnutrition at inpatient unit of Bahir Dar Felege Hiwot Referral hospital therapeutic feeding unite, northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Desyibelew, Hanna Demelash; Fekadu, Abel; Woldie, Haile

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite numerous advances made in improving child health and the clinical management protocols for treating severe acute malnutrition at treatment centers, evidences concerning the treatment outcomes are scarce. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the recovery rate and associated factors of severely acute malnourished children of age 6 to 59 months admitted to inpatient therapeutic feeding unit at Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital. Methods We conducted a hospital-based cross-sectional study including 401 severely malnourished children who were admitted from September 2012 to January 2016. Bivariable and a Multivariable logistic regression model were fitted to identify factors associated with recovery rate. Adjusted Odds ratio with its 95% CI was reported and P-value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results Fifty eight percent (58.4%) (95%CI: 53.1–64.1) of admitted children were recovered with a mean recovery time of 18 (±6.3) days. Being female, children who were fully and partially vaccinated, who had better MUAC measurement, who stayed longer in the hospital, and children who took routine vitamin-A supplementation had better recovery rate. However, children who had co-morbidity at admission, had human immune virus (HIV) and Tuberculosis (TB) infection, and who had edema were less likely to recover. Interpretation Recovery rate was low as compared to international SPHERE cutoff points (> 75% recovery rate). Interventions that could address the outlined factors would be helpful to improve treatment recovery rate of admitted children. PMID:28166247

  8. Adjustment of inpatient care reimbursement for nursing intensity.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Zone-Smith, Laurie; Fischer, Mary H

    2006-11-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has begun an ambitious recalibration of the inpatient prospective payment system, the first since its introduction in 1983. Unfortunately, inpatient nursing care has been overlooked in the new payment system and continues to be treated as a fixed cost and billed at a set per-diem "room and board" fee despite the known variability of nursing intensity across different care settings and diagnoses. This article outlines the historical influences regarding costing, billing, and reimbursement of inpatient nursing care and provides contemporary evidence about the variability of nursing intensity and costs at acute care hospitals in the United States. A remedy is proposed to overcome the existing limitations of the Inpatient Prospective Payment System by creating a new nursing cost center and nursing intensity adjustment by DRG for each routine-and intensive-care day of stay to allow independent costing, billing, and reimbursement of inpatient nursing care.

  9. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P < 0.000) compared to the fifth post-operative hour. The number of patients with complete analgesia decreased on the third post-operative day (P = 0.001 compared to fifth post-operative day). The Spearman correlation coefficient between pain score on the third post-operative day and level of satisfaction with nurse's response, doctor's response to pain and the overall pain management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management. PMID:27761037

  10. Validation of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) with Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Lance P.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Hollander, Beth L. G.; Dyl, Jennifer; Rizzo, Christie J.; Steinley, Douglas L.; Spirito, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the concurrent validity of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) for adolescent inpatients aged 12 to 18. The results reveal moderate agreement between ChIPS diagnoses and Schedule for Affective Disorder sand Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime version diagnoses.

  11. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2017 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Graduate Medical Education; Hospital Notification Procedures Applicable to Beneficiaries Receiving Observation Services; Technical Changes Relating to Costs to Organizations and Medicare Cost Reports; Finalization of Interim Final Rules With Comment Period on LTCH PPS Payments for Severe Wounds, Modifications of Limitations on Redesignation by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board, and Extensions of Payments to MDHs and Low-Volume Hospitals. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2017. Some of these changes will implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Notice of Observation Treatment and Implications for Care Eligibility Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are providing the estimated market basket update to apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2017. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2017. In addition, we are making changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education payments; establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities), including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program; implementing statutory provisions that require hospitals and CAHs to furnish notification to Medicare beneficiaries, including Medicare Advantage enrollees, when the beneficiaries receive outpatient observation services for more than 24 hours; announcing the implementation of the Frontier Community Health Integration Project Demonstration; and

  12. The effectiveness of inpatient case management. Fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Cook, T H

    1998-04-01

    Production processes and service delivery in acute care hospitals can be fragmented. Inpatient case management has the potential to improve both processes and outcomes of hospital care. The author reports on 18 research studies that used inpatient case management as the treatment variable. These outcome studies, using case management, did not provide the evidence needed to address deficiencies in inpatient settings. However, these studies do provide clear direction for nurse administrators and nurse researchers to take concerning the next steps needed to address this critical issue.

  13. Psychiatric comorbidity in forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Palijan, Tija Zarković; Muzinić, Lana; Radeljak, Sanja

    2009-09-01

    For the past several years a numerous studies in the field of forensic psychiatry confirmed a close relationship between violent offenders and comorbid substance abuse. The comorbid substance abuse in violent offenders was usually unrecognized and misdiagnosed. Furthermore, comorbidity in forensic psychiatry describes the co-occurrence of two or more conditions or psychiatric disorder known in the literature as dual diagnosis and defined by World Health Organization (WHO). In fact, many violent offenders have multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Recent studies have confirmed causal relationship between major psychiatric disorders and concomitant substance abuse (comorbidity) in 50-80% of forensic cases. In general, there is a high level of psychiatric comorbidity in forensic patients with prevalence of personality disorders (50-90%), mood disorders (20-60%) and psychotic disorders (15-20%) coupled with substance abuse disorders. Moreover, the high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities could be found in mentally retarded individuals, as well as, in epileptic patients. Drugs and alcohol abuse can produce serious psychotoxic effects that may lead to extreme violent behavior and consequently to serious criminal offence such as physical assault, rape, armed robbery, attempted murder and homicide, all due to an altered brain function and generating psychotic-like symptoms. Studies have confirmed a significant statistical relevance in causal relationship between substance abuse and violent offences. In terms of forensic psychiatry, the comorbidity strongly contributes in the process of establishing psychiatric diagnosis of diminished mental capacity or insanity at the time of the offence in the course of clinical assessment and evaluation of violent offenders. Today, the primary focus of forensic psychiatry treatment services (in-patient or community) is management of the violent offenders with psychiatric comorbidity which requires a multilevel, evidence based approach to

  14. Prevalence and Predictors of Domestic-Violence towards Wives by their Psychiatric Hospitalized Husbands

    PubMed Central

    Sahraian, Ali; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Hashemi, Seyed Hamzeh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadzadeh, Laaya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Violence imposed on wives by their inpatient psychiatric husbands has not been studied yet. The current study surveyed the rates and predictors of violence committed by inpatient psychiatric husbands towards their wives. Methods: A convenient sample of wives of 209 married male psychiatric inpatients completed a self-reported questionnaire. They were asked about physical, emotional, social and economic abuse. Results: More than 80% of the husbands socially abused their wives; 73.0% of the wives had been regularly beaten by their husbands; the rate for humiliation was 77.2%; and only 14.1% of the wives reported that their sexual relationship with their husbands is with desire. Conclusion There is a dramatic high rate of different types of abuse toward wives by their inpatient psychiatric husbands. They are commonly victimized by their husbands. Moreover, different types of violence always co-occur. Future studies should consider this important issue which is unfortunately an ignored research area. PMID:27006668

  15. [In-patient (early) rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Wallesch, Claus-W; Lautenschläger, Sindy

    2017-04-01

    It is difficult to develop the financing and hospital provision of interventions for early rehabilitation within the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system. In addition to a range of partially rehabilitative complex interventions, the system recognizes three main forms of early rehabilitative interventions: geriatric, neurological/neurosurgical, and interdisciplinary and others. In this article, the appropriate definitions and cost-effectiveness of these procedures are analyzed and compared. The early rehabilitative interventions are characterized by constant cooperation in the therapeutic team, especially neurological early rehabilitation through the incorporation of nursing as a therapeutic profession. Whereas geriatric and neurological early rehabilitation are reflected in the DRG system, the former provided in many general hospitals and the latter mainly in specialized institutions, interdisciplinary early rehabilitation has only occasionally been represented in the DRG system so far. If all acute in-patients who require early rehabilitation should receive such an intervention, an additional fee must be implemented for this this interdisciplinary service.

  16. Psychiatric symptoms, social disablement and illness behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hurry, J; Bebbington, P E; Tennant, C

    1987-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the relationship between social performance and the use of medical services, and to what extent this is independent of clinical disorder. In a sample of adults living in Camberwell, South London, social disability and clinical disorder were both predictive of service use. Those subjects who were admitted to psychiatric day-patient or inpatient facilities were found to show the highest levels of both types of impairment, followed by psychiatric outpatients. People who had seen their general practitioner because of their 'nerves' were less impaired than those in touch with the specialist psychiatric services but had significantly poorer social performance and a higher level of clinical disorder than people not in contact with medical services at all. When the severity of clinical disorder was controlled, however, levels of social performance no longer discriminated between the different groups of service users, except that psychiatric outpatients remained significantly more socially disabled than the general practice group.

  17. PCL-R Psychopathy Predicts Disruptive Behavior Among Male Offenders in a Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Martin; De Ruiter, Corine; Nijman, Henk

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between psychopathy, according to the Dutch language version of Hare's Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), and various types of disruptive behavior during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment is investigated. Ninety-two male participants were administered the PCL-R following admission to an inpatient forensic…

  18. Transitioning Children from Psychiatric Hospitals to Schools: The Role of the Special Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Joan B.; Savina, Elena A.

    2010-01-01

    Over a quarter of a million U.S. students each year reside for a period of time in a psychiatric inpatient hospital setting to receive mental health treatment. Following inpatient treatment, most children are transitioned from the hospital into a regular school setting. Little is known about how these transitions are managed by hospital or school…

  19. [Social psychiatric service as a cornerstone of psychiatric community care].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, P; Tiggemann, H G

    1991-12-01

    Psychiatric care has gradually been shifting in Germany from its original inpatient basis to outpatient and complementary treatment. This shift of emphasis resulted in a transfer of psychiatry-political responsibility to communal bodies and hence also to communal public health services. Sociopsychiatric service ranks high in communal psychiatric care setups, since it promotes cooperation and helps to coordinate efforts in individual cases in respect of focal points on which such care is centered. For the future, an expert commission has suggested that the various institutions actively engaged in community psychiatric care should team up in each region. This applies in particular to mobile services visiting the patients in their homes, and to the offices providing contracts to sociopsychiatric services of public health offices. Despite positive outlooks there are also quite a few negative aspects of present-day practice. One of them is poor definition of tasks and functions of communal sociopsychiatric services, whereas another one are the unsatisfactory quantitative and qualitative means at their disposal. It is also too often overlooked that psychiatric patients and disabled persons are entitled to compensation insurance payments to promote their rehabilitation, as provided for by individual legislation in the various German laender. To tap these sources sufficiently well, sociopsychiatric services must be better equipped in every respect. The professional competence of social workers and physicians, as well as of the relevant staff, must be safeguarded by continuing education and specialist training measures.

  20. Characteristics of the MMPI-2 F(p) Scale as a Function of Diagnosis in an Inpatient Sample of Veterans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbisi, Paul A.; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.

    1997-01-01

    A new infrequent response indicator, frequency psychopathology [F(p)] was developed for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) and tested with 308 male psychiatric inpatients (veterans). Findings support the F(p) as a sensitive index of profile invalidity in psychiatric populations. (SLD)

  1. Clinical Outcomes of a Specialised Inpatient Unit for Adults with Mild to Severe Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Y.; White, S. E.; Palucka, A. M.; Weiss, J.; Bockus, S.; Gofine, T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Limitations of general psychiatric services have led to the development of specialised psychiatric programmes for patients with intellectual disability (ID) and mental health needs. Few studies have examined treatment outcomes of specialised inpatient units, and no studies have explored how the effects of intervention may differ for…

  2. Dissociative disorders among alcohol-dependent inpatients.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Sar, Vedat; Karadag, Figen; Tamar Gurol, Defne; Karagoz, Mustafa

    2007-08-30

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dissociative disorders among inpatients with alcohol dependency. The Dissociative Experiences Scale was used to screen 111 alcohol-dependent patients consecutively admitted to the inpatient unit of a dependency treatment center. Subgroups of 29 patients who scored 30.0 or above and 25 patients who scored below 10.0 were then evaluated with the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule and the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders. The interviewers were blind to the Dissociative Experiences Scale scores. Of the 54 patients evaluated, 10 (9.0% of the original 111) patients had a dissociative disorder. A considerable number of the remaining patients reported a high level of dissociative experiences. Among the dissociative disorder group, nine patients had dissociative disorder not otherwise specified and one patient had depersonalization disorder. Female gender, younger age, history of suicide attempt, childhood emotional and sexual abuse, and neglect were more frequent in the dissociative disorder group than among non-dissociative patients. The dissociative disorder group also had somatization disorder, borderline personality disorder, and lifetime major depression more frequently. For 9 of the 10 dissociative patients, dissociative symptoms started before the onset of alcohol use. Although the probability of having a comorbid dissociative disorder was not higher among alcohol-dependent inpatients than among the general psychiatric inpatients, the dissociative subgroup had distinct features. Many patients without a dissociative disorder diagnosis (predominantly men) provided hints of subtle dissociative psychopathology. Implications of comorbid dissociative disorders and dissociative experiences on prevention and treatment of alcohol dependency and the importance of gender-specific characteristics in this relationship require further study.

  3. Preventing Suicide Among Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Sakinofsky, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inpatient suicide comprises a proportionately small but clinically important fraction of suicide. This study is intended as a qualitative analysis of the comprehensive English literature, highlighting what is known and what can be done to prevent inpatient suicide. Method: A systematic search was conducted on the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and a personal database for articles on cohort series, preferably controlled, of inpatient suicide (not deliberate self-harm or attempted suicide, unless they also dealt specifically with suicide data). Results: A qualitative discussion is presented, based on the findings of the literature searched. Conclusions: The bulk of inpatient suicides actually occur not on the ward but off premises, when the patient was on leave or had absconded. Peaks occur shortly after admission and discharge. It is possible to reduce suicide risk on the ward by having a safe environment, optimizing patient visibility, supervising patients appropriately, careful assessment, awareness of and respect for suicide risk, good teamwork and communication, and adequate clinical treatment. PMID:24881161

  4. Integrating Smartphone Technology at the Time of Discharge from a Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatry Unit

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Jonathan M.; Sukhera, Javeed; Taylor-Gates, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Objective As smartphone technology becomes an increasingly important part of youth mental health, there has been little to no examination of how to effectively integrate smartphone-based safety planning with inpatient care. Our study sought to examine whether or not we could effectively integrate smartphone-based safety planning into the discharge process on a child and adolescent inpatient psychiatry unit. Method Staff members completed a survey to determine the extent of smartphone ownership in a population of admitted child and adolescent inpatients. In addition to quantifying smartphone ownership, the survey also tracked whether youth would integrate their previously-established safety plan with a specific safety planning application on their smartphone (Be Safe) at the time of discharge. Results Sixty-six percent (50/76) of discharged youth owned a smartphone, which is consistent with prior reports of high smartphone ownership in adult psychiatric populations. A minority of youth (18%) downloaded the Be Safe app prior to discharge, with most (68%) suggesting they would download the app after discharge. Notably, all patients who downloaded the app prior to discharge were on their first admission to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Conclusion Child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients have a clear interest in smartphone-based safety planning. Our results suggest that integrating smartphone-related interventions earlier in an admission might improve access before discharge. This highlights the tension between restricting and incorporating smartphone access for child and adolescent inpatients and may inform future study in this area. PMID:28331503

  5. Psychiatric emergencies (part I): psychiatric disorders causing organic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Daini, S

    2013-02-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are conditions that mostly destabilize the already frenetic activity of the Emergency Department. Sometimes the emergency is clearly referable to primitive psychiatric illness. Other times, psychiatric and organic symptoms can independently coexist (comorbidity), or develop together in different conditions of substance abuse, including alcohol and prescription drugs. Differentiating between substance induced and pre-existing psychiatric disorder (dual diagnosis) may be difficult, other than controversial issue. Finally, an organic disease can hide behind a psychiatric disorder (pseudopsychiatric emergency). In this review (part I), psychiatric disorders that occur with organic symptoms are discussed. They include: (1) anxiety, conversion and psychosomatic disorders, and (2) simulated diseases. The physiologic mechanisms of the stress reaction, divided into a dual neuro-hormonal response, are reviewed in this section: (1) activation of the sympathetic nervous system and adrenal medulla with catecholamine production (rapid response), and (2) activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis with cortisol production (slow response). The concept of the fight-or-flight response, its adaptive significance and the potential evolution in paralyzing response, well showing by Yerkes-Dodson curve, is explained. Abnormal short- and long-term reactions to stress evolving toward well codified cluster of trauma and stressor-related disorders, including acute stress disorder, adjustment disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder, are examined. A brief review of major psychiatric disorder and related behaviour abnormalities, vegetative symptoms and cognitive impairment, according to DMS IV-TR classification, are described. Finally, the reactive psychic symptoms and behavioral responses to acute or chronic organic disease, so called "somatopsychic disorders", commonly occurring in elderly and pediatric patients, are presented. The specific conditions of

  6. Applied Behavior Analysis in the Treatment of Severe Psychiatric Disorders: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scotti, Joseph R.; And Others

    Clinical research in the area of severe psychiatric disorders constituted the major focus for the discipline of applied behavior analysis during the early 1960s. Recently, however, there appears to be a notable lack of a behavioral focus within many inpatient psychiatric settings and a relative dearth of published behavioral treatment studies with…

  7. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods

    PubMed Central

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. Method: User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Results: Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Conclusions: Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users. PMID:26886239

  8. Inpatient Consultative Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, Lauren K; Shinohara, Michi M

    2015-11-01

    Dermatology consultation can improve diagnostic accuracy in the hospitalized patient with cutaneous disease. Dermatology consultation can streamline and improve treatment plans, and potentially lead to cost savings. Dermatology consultants can be a valuable resource for education for trainees, patients, and families. Inpatient consultative dermatology spans a breadth of conditions, including inflammatory dermatoses,infectious processes, adverse medication reactions, and neoplastic disorders, many of which can be diagnosed based on dermatologic examination alone, but when necessary, bedside skin biopsies can contribute important diagnostic information.

  9. Frequency, Characteristics and Management of Adolescent Inpatient Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, Immaculada; Saito, Ema; Amanbekova, Dinara; Ramani, Meena; Kapoor, Sandeep; Chekuri, Raja; De Hert, Marc; Carbon, Maren

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Inpatient aggression is a serious challenge in pediatric psychiatry. Methods A chart review study in adolescent psychiatric inpatients consecutively admitted over 24 months was conducted, to describe aggressive events requiring an intervention (AERI) and to characterize their management. AERIs were identified based on specific institutional event forms and/or documentation of as-needed (STAT/PRN) medication administration for aggression, both recorded by nursing staff. Results Among 408 adolescent inpatients (age: 15.2±1.6 years, 43.9% male), 1349 AERIs were recorded, with ≥1 AERI occurring in 28.4% (n=116; AERI+). However, the frequency of AERIs was highly skewed (median 4, range: 1–258). In a logistical regression model, the primary diagnosis at discharge of disruptive behavior disorders and bipolar disorders, history of previous inpatient treatment, length of hospitalization, and absence of a specific precipitant prior to admission were significantly associated with AERIs (R2=0.32; p<0.0001). The first line treatment of patients with AERIs (AERI+) was pharmacological in nature (95.6%). Seclusion or restraint (SRU) was used at least once in 59.4% of the AERI+ subgroup (i.e., in 16.9% of all patients; median within-group SRU frequency: 3). Treatment and discharge characteristics indicated a poorer prognosis in the AERI+ (discharge to residential care AERI+: 22.8%, AERI−: 5.6%, p<0.001) and a greater need for psychotropic polypharmacy (median number of psychotropic medications AERI+: 2; AERI−: 1, p<0.001). Conclusions Despite high rates of pharmacological interventions, SRU continue to be used in adolescent inpatient care. As both of these approaches lack a clear evidence base, and as adolescents with clinically significant inpatient aggression have increased illness acuity/severity and service needs, structured research into the most appropriate inpatient aggression management is sorely needed. PMID:23647136

  10. Closeness, chaos and crisis: the attractions of working in acute mental health care.

    PubMed

    Deacon, M; Warne, T; McAndrew, S

    2006-12-01

    This paper makes a case for the attractiveness of acute mental health inpatient nursing (acute nursing) and argues that an altered perception of this work is essential if we are to provide the most acutely mentally ill and vulnerable people with a stable and expert nursing workforce. The discussion draws on an ethnographic study conducted in an inner-city psychiatric unit in England and the advantages of this method for understanding nursing work are described. Within our findings, we set out two overarching themes: the contextual realities of the contemporary acute ward and features of attraction that encourage nurses to work in the acute care setting. The former includes nurses' responsibility for the total ward environment and the latter the 'comfort of closeness' and 'surviving and thriving in chaos and crisis'. In conclusion, we argue that despite the unpopularity of the acute inpatient mental health environment, the highly sophisticated skills employed by acute nurses actually ensure the promotion of health for the majority of service users.

  11. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various…

  12. Cognitive predictors of violent incidents in forensic psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Brugman, Suzanne; Lobbestael, Jill; von Borries, A Katinka L; Bulten, Berend Erik H; Cima, Maaike; Schuhmann, Teresa; Dambacher, Franziska; Sack, Alexander T; Arntz, Arnoud

    2016-03-30

    This study tested the predictive value of attentional bias, emotion recognition, automatic associations, and response inhibition, in the assessment of in-clinic violent incidents. Sixty-nine male forensic patients participated and completed an Emotional Stroop to measure attentional bias for threat and aggression, a Single Target - Implicit Association Task to assess automatic associations, a Graded Emotional Recognition Task to measure emotion recognition, and an Affective Go/NoGo to measure response inhibition. Violent incidents were derived from patient files and scored on severity level. The predictive value of level of psychopathy was tested with the Psychopathy Checklist - Revised (PCL-R). Generalized linear mixed model analyses showed that increased attention towards threat and aggression, difficulty recognizing sad faces and factor 2 of the PCL-R predicted the sum of violent incidents. Specifically, verbal aggression was predicted by increased attention towards threat and aggression, difficulty to recognize sad and happy faces, and PCL-R factor 2; physical aggression by decreased response inhibition, higher PCL-R factor 2 and lower PCL-R factor 1 scores; and aggression against property by difficulty recognizing angry faces. Findings indicate that cognitive tasks could be valuable in predicting aggression, thereby extending current knowledge on dynamic factors predicting aggressive behavior in forensic patients.

  13. Gender Differences in Military Psychiatric Inpatients Admitted for Suicide Ideation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    such as anxiety, social phobias, or panic disorder ( Corna et al., 2010; Legleye, Beck, Peretti-Watel, Chau, & Firdion, 2010). Moreover, substance...for which there was not a significant relationship, F (1, 392), p = .14 (see Figure 1). Because this relationship was not significant, further...American Family Physician, 59(6), 1500-1506. Goldberg, J. F ., Ernst, C. L., & Bird, S. (2007). Predicting hospitalization versus discharge of

  14. The Spectrum of Psychiatric Pathology in a Patient with Genetically Verified Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alkabie, Samir; Singh, Daljinder; Hernandez, Amy; Dumenigo, Rhaisa

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric and behavioral disturbances are common in Huntington's disease (HD) and contribute significantly to its morbidity and mortality. We herein present the case of a 43-year-old woman with genetically verified HD, whose deteriorating psychiatric condition necessitated multiple inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations and featured a clinical spectrum of neuropsychiatric disturbances classically associated with HD. This paper reviews the literature concerning Huntington's psychopathology and provides an illustrative case example of its clinical nature. PMID:26451266

  15. Development of an adolescent inpatient sexual abuse group: application of Lewin's model of change.

    PubMed

    Riddle, C R

    1994-01-01

    The development and implementation of an adolescent sexual abuse group on an inpatient psychiatric unit is described. Steps of Kurt Lewin's model of change are used as a framework for this planned change. Specific issues concerning group procedure and process are detailed. Recommendations for this group and broader use of the Lewin model are included.

  16. External Correlates of the MMPI-2 Content Component Scales in Mental Health Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Bradley A.; Handel, Richard W.; Archer, Robert P.

    2006-01-01

    External correlates of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) Content Component Scales were identified using an inpatient sample of 544 adults. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R) produced correlates of the Content Component Scales, demonstrating external validity with…

  17. Caregiver Perspectives during the Post Inpatient Hospital Transition: A Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blizzard, Angela M.; Weiss, Catherine L.; Wideman, Rukiya; Stephan, Sharon H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of caregiver perspectives of their psychosocial resources and needs during the post inpatient psychiatric hospitalization is limited. Examining caregivers' perspectives of the transition period may be a critical step in improving the transition success of children with emotional and behavioral disorders. Using quantitative…

  18. Specialized Inpatient Psychiatry for Serious Behavioral Disturbance in Autism and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Matthew; Milligan, Briana; Chemelski, Bruce; Payne, David; Ellsworth, Beth; Harmon, Jamie; Teer, Olivia; Smith, Kahsi A.

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization of children with autism spectrum disorder and/or intellectual disability is common, however, the effectiveness of this intervention is largely unknown. Thirty-eight clinically-referred children 8-19 years old admitted to a specialized inpatient psychiatry unit were assessed by a consistent caregiver on the Aberrant…

  19. Child and Adolescent Inpatient Restraint Reduction: A State Initiative to Promote Strength-Based Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBel, Janice; Stromberg, Nan; Duckworth, Ken; Kerzner, Joan; Goldstein, Robert; Weeks, Michael; Harper, Gordon; LaFlair, Lareina; Sudders, Marylou

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To reduce the use of restraint and seclusion with children and adolescents in psychiatric inpatient units by promoting a preventive, strength-based model of care. Method: The State Mental Health Authority used data analysis, quality improvement strategies, regulatory oversight, and technical assistance to develop and implement system…

  20. Revisiting the Association of Aggression and Suicidal Behavior in Schizophrenic Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuner, Tanja; Hubner-Liebermann, Bettina; Hausner, Helmut; Hajak, Goran; Wolfersdorf, Manfred; Spiessl, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Our study investigated the association of aggression and suicidal behavior in schizophrenic inpatients. Eight thousand nine hundred one admissions for schizophrenia (1998-2007) to a psychiatric university hospital were included. Schizophrenic suicides (n = 7)/suicide attempters (n = 40) were compared to suicides (n = 30)/suicide attempters (n =…

  1. Experiential Therapy with Troubled Youth: The Ropes Course for Adolescent Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Charles W.

    This paper provides information about conducting adventure-based counseling using a ropes course with adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Active learning in the process of therapy is widely accepted, but it is not clear how the complex nature of that relationship works and how programs should be structured to facilitate change. Theoretical…

  2. Implementing a Music Therapy Program at a New 72-Hour Acute Psychiatric Admissions Unit: A Case Study of a Patient Who Was Malingering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the relatively poor treatment available, the high financial costs of hospitalization, multiple and complex issues of persons with severe mental illnesses, and advancements in pharmacotherapy, psychiatric patients are often only hospitalized for a few days before they are discharged. Thus, brief psychosocial interventions for persons who…

  3. Dissociative disorders among Chinese inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A; Keyes, Benjamin B; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study were 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria of Mental Disorders, Version 3. All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation (the Dissociative Experiences Scale), and none had a prior diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. A total of 96 randomly selected participants were interviewed with a structured interview (the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule) and a clinical interview. These 96 patients did not differ significantly from the 473 patients who were not interviewed on any demographic measures or who did not complete the self-report dissociation measure. A total of 28 patients (15.3%, after weighting of the data) received a clinical diagnosis of a dissociative disorder based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.) criteria. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in 2 patients (0.53%, after weighting). Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder, patients with dissociative disorders were significantly more likely to report childhood abuse (57.1% vs. 22.1%), but the 2 groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measures. Dissociative disorders were readily identified in an inpatient psychiatric population in China.

  4. Dissociative Disorders Among Chinese Inpatients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A.; Keyes, Benjamin B.; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study consisted of 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria for Mental Disorders, Version 3 (CCMD-3). All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation, the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and none had a prior diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. Ninety-six randomly selected participants were interviewed with a structured interview, the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS) and a clinical interview. These 96 patients did not differ significantly from the 473 patients who were not interviewed on any demographic measures or on the self-report measure dissociation. A total of 28 (15.3%, after weighting of the data) patients received a clinical diagnosis of a dissociative disorder based on DSM-IV-TR criteria. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in 2 (0.53%, after weighting) patients. Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder, patients with dissociative disorders were significantly more likely to report childhood abuse (57.1% versus 22.1%), but the two groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measures. Dissociative disorders were readily identified in an inpatient psychiatric population in China. PMID:20603768

  5. Effects of psychiatric history on cognitive performance in old-age depression

    PubMed Central

    Pantzar, Alexandra; Atti, Anna Rita; Bäckman, Lars; Laukka, Erika J.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in old-age depression vary as a function of multiple factors; one rarely examined factor is long-term psychiatric history. We investigated effects of psychiatric history on cognitive performance in old-age depression and in remitted persons. In the population-based Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen study, older persons (≥60 years) without dementia were tested with a cognitive battery and matched to the Swedish National Inpatient Register (starting 1969). Participants were grouped according to current depression status and psychiatric history and compared to healthy controls (n = 96). Group differences were observed for processing speed, attention, executive functions, and verbal fluency. Persons with depression and psychiatric inpatient history (n = 20) and late-onset depression (n = 49) performed at the lowest levels, whereas cognitive performance in persons with self-reported recurrent unipolar depression (n = 52) was intermediate. Remitted persons with inpatient history of unipolar depression (n = 38) exhibited no cognitive deficits. Heart disease burden, physical inactivity, and cumulative inpatient days modulated the observed group differences in cognitive performance. Among currently depressed persons, those with inpatient history, and late onset performed at the lowest levels. Importantly, remitted persons showed no cognitive deficits, possibly reflecting the extended time since the last admission (m = 15.6 years). Thus, the present data suggest that cognitive deficits in unipolar depression may be more state- than trait-related. Information on profiles of cognitive performance, psychiatric history, and health behaviors may be useful in tailoring individualized treatment. PMID:26175699

  6. Inpatient management of acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Perry, Elizabeth C

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol withdrawal is a common condition encountered in the hospital setting after abrupt discontinuation of alcohol in an alcohol-dependent individual. Patients may present with mild symptoms of tremulousness and agitation or more severe symptoms including withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens. Management revolves around early identification of at-risk individuals and symptom assessment using a validated tool such as the revised Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol score. Benzodiazepines remain the mainstay of treatment and can be administered using a front-loading, fixed-dose, or symptom-triggered approach. Long-acting benzodiazepines such as chlordiazepoxide or diazepam are commonly used and may provide a smoother withdrawal than shorter-acting benzodiazepines, but there are no data to support superiority of one benzodiazepine over another. Elderly patients or those with significant liver disease may have increased accumulation and decreased clearance of the long-acting benzodiazepines, and lorazepam or oxazepam may be preferred in these patients. Patients with symptoms refractory to high doses of benzodiazepines may require addition of a rescue medication such as phenobarbital, propofol or dexmedetomidine. Anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, valproate, gabapentin) may have a role in the management of mild to moderate withdrawal. Other medications such as β-antagonists or neuroleptics may offer additional benefit in select patients but should not be used a monotherapy.

  7. Examining Factors That Impact Inpatient Management of Diabetes and the Role of Insulin Pen Devices.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Chelsea; Lamarche, Danièle; Chevrier, Annie

    2017-02-01

    Insulin administration in the acute care setting is an integral component of inpatient diabetes management. Although some institutions have moved to insulin pen devices, many acute care settings continue to employ the vial and syringe method of insulin administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of insulin pen implementation in the acute care setting on patients, healthcare workers and health resource utilization. A review of published literature, including guidelines, was conducted to identify how insulin pen devices in the acute care setting may impact inpatient diabetes management. Previously published studies have revealed that insulin pen devices have the potential to improve inpatient management through better glycemic control, increased adherence and improved self-management education. Furthermore, insulin pen devices may result in cost savings and improved safety for healthcare workers. There are benefits to the use of insulin pen devices in acute care and, as such, their implementation should be considered.

  8. The influence of borderline personality features on inpatient adolescent suicide risk.

    PubMed

    Yalch, Matthew M; Hopwood, Christopher J; Fehon, Dwain C; Grilo, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents and suicidal behavior is one of the primary risk factors for youth psychiatric hospitalizations. A number of studies indicate that depression and substance abuse are associated with suicide risk in this population, but less is known about the role of borderline personality features or their incremental influence over other known risk factors in indicating suicidal behavior among adolescents. This study examined whether borderline features were associated with suicide risk when controlling for symptoms of depression and substance abuse in a sample of adolescents hospitalized in an inpatient psychiatric facility. Self-report data from 477 adolescent psychiatric inpatients were used to test hypotheses about the association of borderline features with suicide risk after controlling for other common risk factors. Borderline features were significantly related to suicide risk even after accounting for symptoms of depression and substance abuse. These findings underscore the clinical value of routinely assessing borderline features among adolescents.

  9. [Psychiatric disorders of the contemporary battlefield].

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2008-06-01

    This article presents the factors exerted an influence on psychiatric health status of participants of military missions and psychiatric disorders forming on the contemporary battlefield. The main stressors are threats being a result of duty in warfare, also hard climatic conditions, long-lasting separation from family, foreign language of local population, other customs, religion, caused alienation of mission personnel. Significant factors seem also dependences on duty and unofficial relationships prevailing in military environment. The consequence of survived psychiatric trauma being a result of short-lived incident or prolonged event are often acute stress disorder (ASD) or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  10. The effect of humorous movies on inpatients with chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gelkopf, Marc; Gonen, Bruria; Kurs, Rena; Melamed, Yuval; Bleich, Avi

    2006-11-01

    We assessed the impact of humorous movies on psychopathology, anxiety, depression, anger, social functioning, insight, and therapeutic alliance in schizophrenia inpatients. Twenty-nine psychiatric inpatients in open wards participated in the study. The study group viewed humorous and the control group viewed neutral movies daily for 3 months. Participants were assessed before and after viewing movies with the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale, Calgary Depression Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the Multinomah Community Ability Scale, the Insight and Treatment Attitude Questionnaire, and the Working Alliance Inventory. Reduced levels of psychopathology, anger, anxiety, and depression symptoms and an improvement in social competence were revealed in the study group. No changes were observed in treatment insight or working alliance. Video films are a practical and cost-efficient means of entertainment that seem to have a positive effect on patient morale, mood, and mental status.

  11. The Effects of Sociodemographic Factors on Psychiatric Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal Rye; Eun, Hun-Jeong; Yoo, Tai P.; Yun, Youngmi; Wood, Christopher; Kase, Michael; Park, Jong-Il

    2012-01-01

    Objective Several studies have reported that ethnic differences influence psychiatric diagnoses. Some previous studies reported that African Americans and Hispanics are diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders more frequently than Caucasians, and that Caucasians are more likely to be diagnosed with affective disorders than other ethnic groups. We sought to identify associations between sociodemographic factors and psychiatric diagnosis. Methods We retrospectively examined the medical records of all psychiatric inpatients (ages over 18 years) treated at Kern county mental hospital (n=2,051) between July 2003 and March 2007 for demographic, clinical information, and discharge diagnoses. Results African American and Hispanic males were more frequently diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders than Caucasians, whereas Caucasian females were more frequently diagnosed with affective disorders than females in the other ethnic groups, suggesting that patient ethnicity and gender may influence clinical diagnoses. Demographic variables, that is, a lower education, failure of marriage, homelessness, and low quality insurance, were found to be significantly associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum disorders after adjusting for clinical variables. And, the presence of a family psychiatric history, failure of marriage, not-homelessness, and quality insurance were found to be associated with a diagnosis of affective disorders. Conclusion Our results show that these demographic factors, including ethnicity, have effects on diagnoses in psychiatric inpatients. Furthermore, these variables may help prediction of psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:22993517

  12. Hyponatraemia in cancer patients on an inpatient rehabilitation unit.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M; Palmer, J L; Fu, J; Williams, J L; Yadav, R; Guo, Y

    2014-05-01

    This study identifies the incidence of hyponatraemia in cancer patients on an inpatient rehabilitation unit and examines the association between admission hyponatraemia and rehabilitation length of stay (LOS), functional outcome, and survival. After institutional review committee's approval, we retrospectively reviewed medical records of 295 consecutive patients who were admitted to this inpatient cancer rehabilitation unit between 27 January 2009 through 31 July 2010 in a tertiary cancer centre. The incidence of hyponatraemia in cancer patients admitted to our inpatient rehabilitation unit was 41.4%. Median rehabilitation LOS for patients with mild (Na 130-134 mEq/L) and moderate-severe (Na < 130 mEq/L) hyponatraemia was 11 and 15 days, respectively, which was significantly longer than patients with eunatraemia (10 days; P = 0.03). Functional Independence Measure gain for ambulation and transfers during inpatient rehabilitation stay was not significantly different between three different patient groups. We concluded that large portion of patients who require acute inpatient rehabilitation presented with hyponatraemia, which is associated with prolonged rehabilitation LOS. Whether aggressive management of hyponatraemia will shorten rehabilitation stay needs further study.

  13. Inpatient Rehabilitation Performance of Patients with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jack B.; Raj, Vishwa S.; Asher, Arash; Lee, Jay; Guo, Ying; Konzen, Benedict S.; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional improvement of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Design Retrospective Review Setting Three tertiary referral based hospitals. Interventions Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for demographic, laboratory, medical and functional data. Main Outcome Measure Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Participants Cancer rehabilitation inpatients admitted to three different cancer centers with a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (n=7). Results All 7 patients were white females. Median age was 62. Primary cancers included ovarian carcinoma (2), small cell lung cancer (2), uterine carcinoma (2), and invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Mean admission total FIM score was 61.0 (SD=23.97). Mean discharge total FIM score was 73.6 (SD=29.35). The mean change in total FIM score was 12.6 (p=.0018). The mean length of rehabilitation stay was 17.1 days. The mean total FIM efficiency was 0.73. 5/7 (71%) patients were discharged home. 1/7 (14%) was discharged to a nursing home. 1/7 (14%) transferred to the primary acute care service. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the functional performance of a group of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Despite the poor neurologic prognosis associated with this syndrome, these patients made significant functional improvements on inpatient rehabilitation. When appropriate, inpatient rehabilitation should be considered. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. PMID:25051460

  14. Adoption of an Internet-based patient education programme in psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Anttila, M; Välimäki, M; Koivunen, M; Luukkaala, T; Kaila, M; Pitkänen, A; Kontio, R

    2011-12-01

    Internet-based patient support systems are widely assumed to predict a future trend in patient education. Coherent information is still lacking on how patient education is adopted in psychiatric hospitals and how information technology is used in it. Our aim was to describe nurses' adoption of an Internet-based patient education programme and the variables explaining it. The study was based on Rogers' model of the diffusion of innovation. The Internet-based patient education sessions were carried out by nurses on nine acute psychiatric inpatient wards in two Finnish hospitals. They were evaluated with reports and analysed statistically. Out of 100 nurses, 83 adopted the programme during the study period. The nurses fell into Rogers' groups, late majority (72%), laggards (17%), early majority (7%), early adopters (3%) and innovators (1%). Three groups were formed according to their activity: laggards, late majority, adopters (including early majority, early adopters, innovators). There was a statistical difference between the nurses' programme adoption between the two hospitals (P= 0.045): more laggards (65% vs. 35%) and adopters (73% vs. 27%) in the same hospital. The findings help to provide insight into the contexts and settings when adopting information technology programmes in the area of mental health care.

  15. DISPO Advisor: Expert System for Psychiatric Disposition

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Patrick; Barta, Wendy

    1988-01-01

    An expert system was designed to assist psychiatric residents at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. This microcomputer based decision support system helps residents find the proper disposition for patients who come to the emergency room. The system uses an inexpensive, commercially available expert system shell, VP-EXPERT by Paperback Software, to match patients with inpatient and outpatient resources appropriate to their needs. The inference engine uses both forward and backward chaining, and interfaces with data stored in DBase III files. The system is currently in daily use by residents.

  16. 75 FR 23851 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ...We are proposing to revise the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In addition, in the Addendum to this proposed rule, we describe the proposed changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute......

  17. Elements of Successful School Reentry after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization is an intensive intervention designed to stabilize adolescents who are experiencing an acute mental health crisis. Reintegrating to school after discharge from psychiatric hospitalization can be overwhelming for many adolescents (E. V. Clemens, L. E. Welfare, & A. M. Williams, 2010). The authors used a consensual…

  18. Inpatient diabetology. The new frontier.

    PubMed

    Abourizk, Nicolas N; Vora, Chaula K; Verma, Parveen K

    2004-05-01

    Tight glycemic control is now an imperative of outpatient diabetes care. The inpatient arena remains under the influence of an ineffective paradigm characterized by tolerance for hyperglycemia and a reluctance to use insulin intensively. This article is a call to action against the lip service paid to inpatient diabetes care. The compelling in vitro and in vivo evidence for the benefit of intensive insulin-mediated glycemic control is summarized. The linchpin of current inpatient care is a commonly used insulin sliding scale. This autopilot approach as the sole mode of treatment for inpatient hyperglycemia has been strongly condemned. Nevertheless, it continues to survive. The evidence supports the compelling argument that the adverse effect of hyperglycemia on hospital length of stay, morbidity, and mortality is substantial. Clinicians, nurses, administrators, and insurers ought to look critically at the prevailing paradigm and spearhead the much-needed revolution in inpatient diabetology. The issue of glycemic targets, the need for noninvasive blood glucose monitoring, and the role of nursing staff in this revolution are raised. We call for the banning of the insulin sliding scale use as the sole diabetes order. Also, the use of basal insulin via continuous intravenous insulin infusion or subcutaneous insulin analogs should be embraced. Educating nurses, house staff, and other frontline professionals in the adverse consequences of the current paradigm is essential. Inpatient glycemic control matters; clinical and financial outcomes are at stake. It behooves the health care system and the diabetic public to address the contemporary state of inpatient diabetology as soon as possible.

  19. Alternate ventricular asymmetry could suggest a psychiatric diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Egan, P J; Mitrovics, T C; Tomandl, B F

    2017-01-01

    Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the skull and brain for diagnostic purposes sometimes reveals a wider tip of the frontal ventricular horn on one side and a wider tip of the temporal horn on the other. A search for 'alternate ventricular asymmetry' in Google Scholar, Medline and PubMed Central yielded no results, so the digital archive of the hospital was searched for such cases. A total of 5908 examinations were reviewed and 508 cases were found, comprising 6% of the neurological inpatients and 20% of the psychiatric inpatients (P = 0.001 by χ(2) ). The >3-fold difference in the incidence of this particular ventricular asymmetry implies that it could suggest a psychiatric diagnosis. Clin. Anat. 30:50-52, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Adding Laboratory Data to Hospital Claims Data to Improve Risk Adjustment of Inpatient/30-Day Postdischarge Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pine, Michael; Fry, Donald E; Hannan, Edward L; Naessens, James M; Whitman, Kay; Reband, Agnes; Qian, Feng; Schindler, Joseph; Sonneborn, Mark; Roland, Jaclyn; Hyde, Linda; Dennison, Barbara A

    Numerical laboratory data at admission have been proposed for enhancement of inpatient predictive modeling from administrative claims. In this study, predictive models for inpatient/30-day postdischarge mortality and for risk-adjusted prolonged length of stay, as a surrogate for severe inpatient complications of care, were designed with administrative data only and with administrative data plus numerical laboratory variables. A comparison of resulting inpatient models for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, coronary artery bypass grafting, and percutaneous cardiac interventions demonstrated improved discrimination and calibration with administrative data plus laboratory values compared to administrative data only for both mortality and prolonged length of stay. Improved goodness of fit was most apparent in acute myocardial infarction and percutaneous cardiac intervention. The emergence of electronic medical records should make the addition of laboratory variables to administrative data an efficient and practical method to clinically enhance predictive modeling of inpatient outcomes of care.

  1. The influence of institutional characteristics on length of stay for psychiatric patients: a national database study in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woojin; Cho, Woo Hyun; Yoon, Chung Won

    2009-03-01

    The institutionalization of psychiatric patients has put a tremendous burden on many societies, but few studies have examined the effects of institutional characteristics on patient length of stay (LOS). This paper investigated the association between institutional characteristics and LOS for 160,517 psychiatric patients in South Korea by applying a two-level modeling technique to administrative claims databases covering the entire patient population. Patient LOS, expressed in terms of days, was analyzed by taking account of institutional type, ownership, location, inpatient capacity, staffing, and patient demographics. The characteristics of inpatients were used as control variables and consisted of gender, age, sub-diagnosis, and the type of national health security program. The main findings of this study are: (1) patient LOS was 69% longer at psychiatric hospitals than at tertiary-care hospitals; (2) neither location nor inpatient capacity was associated with LOS; (3) larger staffs reduced LOS; and (4), LOS increased with a higher proportion of male inpatients, inpatients > or =65 years old, or inpatients diagnosed with organic or schizophrenic disorders, possibly through contextual effects. The results of this study suggest that researchers and policy makers could improve their assessment of psychiatric patient LOS and its association with health outcome by taking into account institutional characteristics and using multi-level analyses.

  2. The effect of songwriting on knowledge of coping skills and working alliance in psychiatric patients: a randomized clinical effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a songwriting intervention on psychiatric patients' knowledge of coping skills and working alliance. Participants were randomly assigned to scripted and manualized experimental (n=48) or control (n=41) conditions. The experimental condition was a group psychoeducational music therapy songwriting session concerning coping skills while the control condition was a group psychoeducational session concerning coping skills. Both conditions were single-session therapy with patients on an acute adult psychiatric unit. Results indicated no significant between group differences in measures of knowledge of coping skills, consumer working alliance, or perception of enjoyment (p>.05), although the experimental condition tended to have slightly higher mean scores than the control group for these measures. There was a significant between group difference in measures of therapist working alliance (p<.001), with the therapist scoring the experimental group higher than the control group. Although the music therapy group had a higher mean rate of previous psychiatric hospitalizations, their perception of enjoyment scores were still higher than those of the control condition, a finding incongruent in the literature. Furthermore, despite the increased number of previous hospitalizations, the music therapy condition had higher attendance rates than the control condition, thus possibly providing incentives for funding. It seems that group songwriting about coping skills can be as effective a psychosocial intervention as traditional talk-based psychoeducation to teach psychiatric inpatients how to proactively manage their illness. Additionally, music therapy can be as effective as talk-based psychoeducation in establishing working alliance. Implications for clinical practice, limitations, and suggestions for future research are provided.

  3. Psychiatrists and psychiatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Torrey, William C; Green, Ronald L; Drake, Robert E

    2005-05-01

    Interventions that focus directly on functional impairments related to mental illnesses are termed psychiatric rehabilitation. Research demonstrates that rehabilitation services are increasingly able to help adults with psychiatric disabilities achieve the functional outcomes they desire, particularly in the areas of housing and employment. To support the community lives of adults with severe mental illnesses, psychiatrists must stay current with advances in this field and know how to integrate psychiatric rehabilitation with other interventions. This article reviews the concept of psychiatric rehabilitation, current approaches in the field, the psychiatrist's role in these services, and implications for psychiatric training and continuing education.

  4. Training Health Service Technicians as Teacher Assistants in an Inpatient Residential Emotional/Behavior Disorder Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Walter E.

    2012-01-01

    Schools have identified that the use of Teacher Assistants often provides needed additional support in the school setting. In a Health Care Facility that provides inpatient psychiatric services, children ages 5-14 are required to engage in school activities. Currently there are no Teacher Assistants trained in the facility. This study focuses on…

  5. Adolescent Inpatient Behavioral Health Clients: Risk Factors and Methods of Preventing an Increase in HIV Infection among Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackerman, Ann E.

    2002-01-01

    There has been a surge in the rates of adolescents who are becoming infected with HIV. This study of 214 at risk clients being treated on an inpatient psychiatric hospitalization basis examines why such clients continue to engage in high-risk behaviors. Results and suggestions for a psychoeducational curriculum for professionals are included.…

  6. [Suicide in psychiatric hospitals : Results, risk factors and therapeutic measures].

    PubMed

    Wolfersdorf, M; Vogel, R; Vogl, R; Grebner, M; Keller, F; Purucker, M; Wurst, F M

    2016-05-01

    Suicide prevention is a core responsibility of psychiatry and psychotherapy. Periods of change in psychiatric inpatient treatment concepts are usually also accompanied by an increase in psychopathological behavior and with increased suicide rates in psychiatric hospitals, as seen in the 1970s and 1980s in Germany. That this represented a real increase of inpatient suicides during those years was confirmed and subsequently the number and rate of inpatient suicides has decreased from approximately 280 out of 100,000 admissions of patients in 1980 to approximately 50 in 2014. Death can also occur in psychiatric hospitals and an absolute prevention is not possible even under optimal conditions of therapy and nursing, communication and security. The suicide rate has clearly decreased over the last two decades in relation to admissions. The group of young male schizophrenic patients newly identified as having a high clinical suicide risk has decreased among the suicide victims whereas the percentage of severely depressed patients with delusions has increased. This reduction could be associated with the comprehensive improvements in educational and training programs in the field of suicide and suicide prevention, objectification of coping methods, development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, improvements in therapy and relationship possibilities and a general reduction in the number of suicides in Germany.

  7. Psychosocial functioning of individuals with schizophrenia in community housing facilities and the psychiatric hospital in Zurich.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Matthias; Briner, David; Kawohl, Wolfram; Seifritz, Erich; Baumgartner-Nietlisbach, Gabriela

    2015-12-15

    Individuals with severe mental illness frequently have difficulties in obtaining and maintaining adequate accommodation. If they are not willing or able to adapt to requirements of traditional supported housing institutions they may live in sheltered and emergency accommodation. Adequate mental health services are rarely available in these facilities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mental health, functional and social status of individuals living in community sheltered housing facilities. A cross-sectional survey of n=338 individuals in sheltered housing compared to a sample of patients at intake in acute inpatient psychiatry (n=619) concerning clinical and social variables was carried out in the catchment area of Zurich. Matched subsamples of individuals with schizophrenia (n=168) were compared concerning functioning and impairments on the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Individuals with schizophrenia in sheltered housing (25% of the residents) have significantly more problems concerning substance use, physical illness, psychopathological symptoms other than psychosis and depression, and relationships, daily activities and occupation than patients with schizophrenia at intake on an acute psychiatric ward. Community sheltered accommodation although conceptualized to prevent homelessness in the general population de facto serve as housing facilities for individuals with schizophrenia and other severe mental illness.

  8. [Recurrent psychiatric manifestations during malaria prevention with mefloquine. A case report].

    PubMed

    Rodor, F; Bianchi, G; Grignon, S; Samuelian, J C; Jouglard, J

    1990-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 22 years old woman without psychiatric antecedent who started a prophylaxis with mefloquine for a journey in a chloroquino resistant area. The first tablet induced an acute psychiatric syndrome which lasted five days; the second tablet induced the recidive of the psychiatric data and a suicide attempt by drowning.

  9. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS AND SLEEP

    PubMed Central

    Krystal, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Psychiatric disorders and sleep are related in important ways. In contrast to the longstanding view of this relationship which viewed sleep problems as symptoms of psychiatric disorders, there is growing experimental evidence that the relationship between psychiatric disorders and sleep is complex and includes bi-directional causation. In this article we provide the evidence that supports this point of view, reviewing the data on the sleep disturbances seen in patients with psychiatric disorders but also reviewing the data on the impact of sleep disturbances on psychiatric conditions. Although much has been learned about the psychiatric disorders-sleep relationship, additional research is needed to better understand these relationships. This work promises to improve our ability to understand both of these phenomena and to allow us to better treat the many patients with sleep disorders and with psychiatric disorders. PMID:23099143

  10. Utility of social cognition and insight in the prediction of inpatient violence among individuals with a severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Waldheter, Evan J; Jones, Nicole T; Johnson, Elizabeth R; Penn, David L

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of social cognition and insight in the prediction of violence in a psychiatric inpatient sample. Violence history, demographic information, symptomatology, neuropsychological functioning, social cognition (i.e., attributional style), and insight were assessed in 29 inpatients with severe mental illness. Greater posttest violence was associated with greater pretest violence, less education, greater psychiatric distress, neuropsychological impairment, and hostile attributional and personalizing biases. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that history of violence contributed the most variance to posttest violence. Hostile attributional and personalizing biases were also uniquely associated with posttest violence. Overall, this study supported the modest utility of attributional style measures in the prediction of inpatient violence. The predictive value of insight in this context appears limited.

  11. [The reform of psychiatric care in Poland--2001].

    PubMed

    Puzyński, Stanisław; Langiewicz, Wanda; Pietrzykowska, Bozena

    2002-01-01

    Both positive and negative effects of the reform of the health care financing system are noted. Low prices offered by Sickness Funds for particular services (a bed-day, a visit) should be regarded as a negative effect of the reform. Particularly insufficient were the prices of services in some specialised psychiatric wards and in outpatient clinics. Prices in many community-based psychiatric facilities were also considerably underestimated. Undoubtedly, the reform has led to positive changes in the organization of inpatient care. These changes include: further reduction of beds in large hospitals organisational structure as well as a marked increase in the number of psychiatric wards at general hospitals, which should be the key units of psychiatric inpatient care. Increase in the number of day hospitals is another positive effect of the reform. The programme of psychiatric care transformation is presented mostly in the Mental Health Programme. The main goal of this programme is to ensure appropriate care for the mentally disordered people, namely comprehensive and accessible health care as well as other forms of help and and support necessary for living in family and in society. This goal will be accomplished by health care and other forms of help mentioned in the Mental Health Act and in the Social Help Act. Community-based model of psychiatric care is the key element of this system. Also, the Programme states desired accessibility rates for staff, number of beds and number of particular forms of psychiatric and alcohol treatment care. Separate rates for adult and children/youth population have been elaborated.

  12. Reducing or increasing violence in forensic care: a qualitative study of inpatient experiences.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Helen; Audulv, Åsa; Strand, Susanne; Kristiansen, Lisbeth

    2015-12-01

    Semi-structured interviews with 13 forensic psychiatric inpatients that had decreased their assessed risk of violence were analyzed using interpretive description. The main contribution from this study is a detailed description of patients' own strategies to avoid violence. Participants described having an ongoing inner dialog in which they encouraged themselves, thereby increasing their self-esteem and trying to accept their current situation. An unsafe and overcrowded ward with uninterested and nonchalant staff increased the risk of aggressive behavior. In the process of decreasing violence, the patients and the forensic psychiatric nursing staff interacted to create and maintain a safe environment.

  13. The effect of animal-assisted activity on inpatients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cheng-I; Liu, Chao-Yin; Sun, Chi-Tzu; Lin, Jung

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of animal-assisted activity on self-esteem, control over activities of daily living, and other psycho-physiological aspects among Taiwanese inpatients with schizophrenia. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to either the treatment or control group. A weekly animal-assisted activity program was arranged for patients in the treatment group for 2 months. A questionnaire assessing self-esteem, self-determination, social support, and psychiatric symptoms was completed the week before and the week after the animal-assisted activity. Compared with the control group, the treatment group showed significant improvement on all measures except for social support and negative psychiatric symptoms. The results of this study showed that animal-assisted activity can promote significant improvements in many clinical aspects among inpatients with schizophrenia. Therefore, animal-assisted activity should be integrated into the treatment of institutionalized patients with schizophrenia.

  14. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  15. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  16. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  17. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  18. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  19. Occupational stress in psychiatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, P J

    1993-04-01

    Psychiatric nursing is invariably assumed to be a stressful area of nursing practice. Empirical evidence to support this proposition is limited, however, due to the lack of research in this field. The purpose of this project was to examine occupational stress in a specified area of psychiatric nursing. The research was exploratory and therefore the concern was discovery and description rather than the testing of clear hypotheses and the development of causal relationships. The study has four main objectives. First, to describe the various stressors present in the work of the psychiatric nurse in the acute admission wards of two district health authorities. Secondly, to measure the effects of stress using a recognized and well-validated instrument for recording levels of burnout. Thirdly, through the use of a particular theoretical framework to identify the types of coping strategy used by the participants in the study. Fourthly, to note any clear associations between the stressors, the effects of stress and the ways of coping identified in the study. The conceptual basis for the project was Lazarus's cognitive theory of stress and coping and Maslach's model of burnout.

  20. Post Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT) for the Inpatient Treatment of Military Personnel with Suicidal Behaviors: A Multi-Site Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    depression, trauma, sleep , suicide ideation), repeat number of psychiatric hospitalization(s), hope for one’s future, and acceptability of treatment (as...0106 TITLE: Post Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT) for the Inpatient Treatment of Military Personnel with Suicidal Behaviors: A Multi- Site...Inpatient Treatment of Military Personnel with Suicidal Behaviors: A Multi-Site Randomized Controlled Trial Service Members and Veterans 5a

  1. Paraneoplastic stiff person syndrome: Inpatient rehabilitation outcomes of a rare disease from two cancer rehabilitation programmes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sean Robinson; Fu, Jack B

    2016-07-18

    Paraneoplastic stiff person syndrome is a rare, but debilitating, manifestation of cancer, characterized by painful extremities, truncal and facial spasms. The resultant functional impairment may necessitate comprehensive rehabilitation and symptom management. This case series describes the acute inpatient rehabilitation courses of 2 patients at different tertiary care referral cancer rehabilitation programmes, including work-up and diagnosis, medical management of symptoms, and functional outcomes. Both patients had a reduction in symptom burden and an improvement in motor function as a result of multidisciplinary acute inpatient rehabilitation.

  2. Psychiatric morbidity in prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sandeep Kumar; Singh, Paramjit; Gargi, Parshotam D.; Goyal, Samta; Garg, Aseem

    2011-01-01

    Context: The prevalence of psychiatric illness in correctional settings is significantly elevated, with higher than community rates reported for most mental disorders. Aims: (1) To examine the socio-demographic profile of convicted prisoners. (2) To evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in convicted prisoners. Materials and Methods: 500 convicts were assessed for psychiatric morbidity with the help of (a) Socio-demographic proforma, (b) Pareek Udai and Trivedi G's socio-economic status scale (rural) (household schedule), (c) Kuppuswamy's economic status scale (urban) and (d) Present State Examination (PSE). Results: 23.8% of the convicted prisoners were suffering from psychiatric illness excluding substance abuse. 56.4% of the prisoners had history of substance abuse / dependence prior to incarceration. Conclusions: The results suggest that a substantial burden of psychiatric morbidity exists in the prison population of India and the burden of psychiatric illness in this vulnerable and marginalized population poses a serious challenge to psychiatrists. PMID:22135446

  3. Enquiry about the Needs of Children Whose Mothers Are Admitted to Psychiatric Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderson, J.; McCune, N.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess whether children's needs are taken into consideration in female patients who are admitted to an adult psychiatric hospital. A retrospective case note audit of 100 female inpatients aged between 18 and 55 years over a 6-month period were randomly selected. The medical and nursing case notes of patients with…

  4. Family Trauma and Dysfunction in Sexually Abused Female Adolescent Psychiatric Control Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wherry, Jeffrey N.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Differences in family trauma, stressors, and dysfunction among adolescent psychiatric inpatients grouped by sexual abuse self-reports were investigated. Family trauma/dysfunction was determined from a composite score derived from the Traumatic Antecedents Scale. The results indicated that sexually abused adolescents reported more family…

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Aggression Questionnaire in Dutch Violent Forensic Psychiatric Patients and Secondary Vocational Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsveld, Ruud H. J.; Muris, Peter; Kraaimaat, Floris W.; Meesters, Cor

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a Dutch version of Buss and Perry's Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) were examined in a sample of violent forensic psychiatric inpatients and outpatients and a sample of secondary vocational students. The internal consistency, interitem correlations, and item--scale correlations of the subscales Physical Aggression,…

  6. [The matter: No psychiatrization].

    PubMed

    Pisa, Hugo

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety, sadness, worries, fears, irritability, fatigue, tedium, are situations that life confront us with. They don't qualify as psychiatric disorders, but nevertheless they are treated as though. We refer to the psychiatrization of daily life. The aim of this article is to prevent such psychiatrization. To support this assertion, we are going to develop different aspects tending to explain the origins of the patient's demands and the answers given by the psychiatrist. A critical reflection of our practice is proposed.

  7. Pediatric Inpatient Headache Therapy: What is Available.

    PubMed

    Kabbouche, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Status migrainosus is defined by the international classification of headache disorders (ICHD) criteria as a debilitating migraine lasting more then 72 hours. The epidemiology of status migrainosus is still unknown in adult and children, and frequently underdiagnosed. Children and adolescents often end up in the emergency room with an intractable headache that failed outpatient therapy. Six to seven percent of these children do not respond to acute infusion therapy and require hospitalization. It is imperative that more aggressive therapy is considered when patients are affected by a severe intractable headache to prevent further disability and returning the child to baseline activity. Multiple therapies are available for adults and children. Studies for acute therapy in the emergency room are available in adults and pediatric groups. Small studies are available for inpatient therapy in children and, along with available therapies for children and adolescents, are described in this review. A review of the literature shows growing evidence regarding the use of dihydroergotamine intravenously once patients are hospitalized. Effectiveness and safety have been proven in the last decades in adults and small studies in the pediatric populations.

  8. Neuropsychological predictors of adaptive kitchen behavior in geriatric psychiatry inpatients.

    PubMed

    Benedict, R H; Goldstein, M Z; Dobraski, M; Tannenhaus, J

    1997-10-01

    This study examined the degree to which demographic variables, psychiatric diagnosis, depression rating, and neuropsychological test performance predict adaptive kitchen behavior in geriatric psychiatry patients and normal elderly volunteers. Amixed group of 27 participants including 8 normal volunteers and 19 geriatric psychiatry inpatients underwent psychiatric evaluation, neuropsychological testing, and a kitchen skills assessment conducted in a natural setting. Both depression and dementia were prevalent among patients. The kitchen skills assessment was abnormal in 69% of patients, compared to none of the normal volunteers. Estimated premorbid IQs, psychiatric diagnosis, and neuropsychological test scores significantly predicted the pass/fail status on the kitchen skills assessment, but there was no effect for age, education, gender, or depression. The discriminant function analysis classified 92% of cases, and the canonical correlation coefficient was .84. Of the neuropsychological tests employed in the study, two tests involving visuospatial processing and attention were retained in the discriminant function analysis. The results are consistent with previous studies that suggest that visuospatial tasks are more predictive of instrumental activities of daily living than are cognitive tasks emphasizing verbal and memory abilities. In addition, we conclude that neuropsychological test data are useful and valid for the purpose of guiding clinical judgments regarding activities of daily living in geriatric psychiatry patients.

  9. Immigration, moving house and psychiatric admissions.

    PubMed

    Johansson, L M; Sundquist, J; Johansson, S E; Bergman, B

    1998-08-01

    This study was designed to elucidate psychiatric admission rates for native Swedes and foreign-born individuals during the period 1991-1994, when Sweden had a great influx of refugees. During the same period, and even earlier, psychiatric in-patient care had been reduced. Tests of differences between Swedes and foreign-born individuals in first psychiatric admission rates were performed using Poisson regressions, and the risk of a readmission was assessed using a proportional hazard model. Foreign-born individuals and native Swedes, both males and females, showed a similar admission pattern with regard to the number of admissions. Foreign-born males under 55 years of age and foreign-born females under 35 years of age had significantly higher admission rates than native Swedes. In total, native Swedes, both males and females, were hospitalized for a significantly longer period than the foreign-born subjects. About 43% of the patients were readmitted. The risk of a readmission was significantly increased among those with a high rate of internal migration. The high admission rates for young foreign-born individuals might be explained by a high incidence of mental illness owing to the trauma of being violently forced to migrate, acculturation difficulties, or unsatisfactory social circumstances such as high unemployment. The shorter hospitalization time could be due to undertreatment or less serious mental illness.

  10. Posthospitalization Outcomes for Psychiatric Sex Offenders: Comparing Two Treatment Protocols.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Jill D; McVay, Lee Ann; Becker, Judith V

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of safe offender strategies (SOS) in comparison with relapse prevention (RP) in a sample of 91 inpatient males in a secure psychiatric setting. All men evidenced a history of violent sexual offending and were diagnosed with serious psychiatric disorders and/or intellectual disabilities. Participants who received SOS (n= 58) and RP (n= 33) were followed from 6 to 36 months post release. SOS clients were significantly less likely to be arrested (0%) or rehospitalized (5.2%) than RP clients (9% arrested; 54.5% rehospitalized). In addition, SOS clients were more likely to transition continuously to less restrictive alternatives, with no returns to high security, in comparison with RP clients. The authors discuss implications for use of SOS, a treatment that facilitates skills development and affects global self-regulatory functioning, particularly in sex offenders with serious mental illness or intellectual impairment, in promoting community reintegration and limiting returns to psychiatric settings.

  11. Peritraumatic reactions and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms after psychiatric admission.

    PubMed

    Ladois-Do Pilar Rei, Agnès; Bui, Eric; Bousquet, Benjamin; Simon, Naomi M; Rieu, Julie; Schmitt, Laurent; Billard, Julien; Rodgers, Rachel; Birmes, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore exposure to stressful events during a psychiatric admission and the predictive power of peritraumatic distress and dissociation in the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms after exposure to such events. Psychiatric inpatients (N = 239) were asked to report exposure to stressful events during their admission within 48 hours of being admitted. Individuals reporting at least one stressful event during admission (n = 70, 29%) were assessed for peritraumatic dissociation and distress in relation to this event and, 5 weeks later, were reassessed for PTSD symptoms. Eight participants (12.3%) scored above the cutoff for probable PTSD. Multiple regression analyses revealed that peritraumatic distress was a significant predictor of 5-week PTSD symptoms. Our findings suggest that individuals experiencing increased peritraumatic distress in relation to a stressful event experienced during a psychiatric admission might be at risk of PTSD symptoms and might benefit from increased attention.

  12. Addressing Inpatient Glycaemic Control with an Inpatient Glucometry Alert System

    PubMed Central

    Seheult, J. N.; Pazderska, A.; Gaffney, P.; Fogarty, J.; Sherlock, M.; Gibney, J.; Boran, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Poor inpatient glycaemic control has a prevalence exceeding 30% and results in increased length of stay and higher rates of hospital complications and inpatient mortality. The aim of this study was to improve inpatient glycaemic control by developing an alert system to process point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) results. Methods. Microsoft Excel Macros were developed for the processing of daily glucometry data downloaded from the Cobas IT database. Alerts were generated according to ward location for any value less than 4 mmol/L (hypoglycaemia) or greater than 15 mmol/L (moderate-severe hyperglycaemia). The Diabetes Team provided a weekday consult service for patients flagged on the daily reports. This system was implemented for a 60-day period. Results. There was a statistically significant 20% reduction in the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted values >15 mmol/L compared to the preimplementation period without a significant change in the percentage of hypoglycaemic values. The time-to-next-reading after a dysglycaemic POC-BG result was reduced by 14% and the time-to-normalization of a dysglycaemic result was reduced from 10.2 hours to 8.4 hours. Conclusion. The alert system reduced the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted glucose values and the time-to-normalization of blood glucose. PMID:26290664

  13. Experiencing Seclusion in a Forensic Psychiatric Setting: A Phenomenological Study.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dave; Murray, Stuart J; Knack, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    In hospital settings, and especially in forensic psychiatric ones, restlessness, aggression, and even violence are familiar issues to healthcare workers. Under these circumstances, the need for restrictive measures (seclusion, mechanical/chemical restraints) is sometimes needed. Although such measures should be considered as exceptional interventions, they continue to be widespread in general, psychiatric, and forensic psychiatric settings. Although there is a great deal of literature on a myriad of issues associated with the use of seclusion, very little research has focused on the lived experience of the seclusion room in forensic psychiatric settings, whether from the patient's perspective or from the perspective of nursing staff responsible for these patients. Such an examination could help ameliorate the experience of secluded forensic psychiatric patients while informing nursing staff about the impacts of seclusion. This article reports the results of a federally funded qualitative, phenomenological research study conducted in a Canadian forensic psychiatric environment. Our results show that the "structure of place" matters for both patients who experience seclusion and nursing staff who work therapeutically in these settings. "Place" is irreducible to the physical "space" in which bodies find themselves; this study of place took into consideration the ways the lived body experiences seclusion and interrelates with others. Although there can be no doubt that many patients who experience seclusion are oftentimes objectively at risk, with a heightened potential to self-harm and to harm other inpatients and nursing staff as well, as our study participants attested, the bodies secluded in this space are not "objects."

  14. Public Commenting on Inpatient Psychiatry Smoking Ban Media Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Johnson, Cati; Sanders-Jackson, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Objective Individuals with mental health concerns are disproportionately affected by, and suffer the negative consequences of, tobacco use disorder, perhaps because smoking has historically been part of psychiatry’s culture. In the early 1990s, psychiatric inpatient facilities were exempted from US hospital smoking bans, in response to public outcries with national media attention. Almost two decades later, the current study characterizes online conversation about psychiatric hospital smoking bans. Previous commenting studies have demonstrated commenting’s negativity, documenting the “nasty effect” wherein negative comments color perceptions of neutral articles. Thus, we focused particular attention on cited barriers to implementing health-positive smokefree policies. Methods We collected online comments (N=261) responding to popular media articles on smoking bans in inpatient psychiatry between 2013 and 2014, and conducted an inductive and exploratory qualitative content analysis. Results Verifying previous studies documenting the prevalence of negative commenting, of the comments explicitly supporting or refuting psychiatry smoking bans, there were over twice as many con comments (44) than pro (18). Many commenters argued for access to outdoor smoking areas and warned of patient agitation and risk posed to care workers. Identified content themes included psychiatric medication and negative side effects, broken mental health systems and institutions, denigration of the health risks of tobacco in the context of mental illness, typical pro-smoking arguments about “smokers’ rights” and alternatives (including e-cigarettes), addiction, and stigma. Conclusions The current findings provide a platform to begin to understand how people talk about mental health issues and smoking. Our analysis also raised complex issues concerning forces that impact US patients with serious mental illness, but over which they have little control, including medication, the US

  15. Risk of violence of inpatients with severe mental illness--do patients with schizophrenia pose harm to others?

    PubMed

    Edlinger, Monika; Rauch, Anna-Sophia; Kemmler, Georg; Yalcin-Siedentopf, Nursen; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Hofer, Alex

    2014-11-30

    Individuals suffering from schizophrenia are frequently considered to be dangerous. The current longitudinal chart review was carried out to investigate the diagnostic mix of patients who were admitted to the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy at the Medical University Innsbruck due to risk of harm to others. The sample consisted of all adult inpatients admitted to psychiatric acute care units in the years 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2007. Data collection included diagnoses, criteria for risk of harm to others, and the use of mechanical restraint. Altogether, 7222 admissions were reviewed. Of these, 529 patients had to be admitted to a locked unit because of risk of harm to others. Among those mechanical restraint was more often used in patients with organic mental disorders, Cluster B personality disorders, and mania than in patients with schizophrenia. Patients suffering from schizophrenia with comorbid psychoactive substance use constitute a potentially harmful population and are therefore frequently admitted to locked units due to risk of harm to others. However, in the current study additional coercive measures were more commonly applied in patients suffering from personality disorders and organic mental disorders.

  16. HIV RELATED ADMISSIONS IN A PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL A FIVE YEAR PROFILE

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, P.S.; Krishna, V.A.S.; Ravi, V.; Desai, A.; Puttaram, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recent reports have indicated an increasing prevalence of HIV infection in the mentally ill. Reports have also emphasised the etiological role of HIV infection in psychiatric illness. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and risk profile of psychiatric inpatients found seropositive for HIV infection. All psychiatric inpatients from a psychiatric hospital who tested positive for HI V infection over a five year period were assessed. The assessments included a detailed clinical history, psychiatric assessment and risk behaviour evaluation. Of the 2283 psychiatric patients tested, 51 were found to be seropositive. 43 patients were included in the study. 30 (69.7%) had a diagnosis of alcohol dependence, of which, 11 patients had comorbid psychiatnc diagnosis in the form of affective disorders (23%) and psychosis (14%). Personality disorders were seen in 9 patients. In 19% the clinical manifestation was considered to be etiologically related to HIV infection. The predominant risk behaviour was in the form of multiple partner heterosexual contacts. In several patients the risk behaviour had occurred during an episode of mental illness or under the influence of alcohol. The study demonstrates the importance of detecting and describing HIV infection and its manifestation among psychiatric patients. PMID:21430804

  17. When the safe place does not protect: reports of victimisation and adverse experiences in psychiatric institutions.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Mesquita, Cristina; da Costa Maia, Ângela

    2016-12-01

    Psychiatric patients report higher levels of victimisation and are at risk for further victimisation in different contexts, such as psychiatric institutions. Studies in this field tend to focus on hospital staff as victims, experiencing classic forms of victimisation (e.g. physical assault, threats, verbal abuse), through qualitative studies. This is a quantitative retrospective study that aims to know the occurrence of psychiatric victimisation and other adverse experiences in Portuguese psychiatric patients. Ninety-five psychiatric patients, between 20 and 79 years old (M - 45.18, SD - 13.06), with a history of psychiatric hospitalisation answered the Experiences in Psychiatric Institution Inventory. Participants were recruited in four psychiatric hospitals. Inpatients were approached during their hospitalisation; outpatients were approached in scheduled appointment days. Only 23 (24.2%) participants reported no victimisation. Total Experiences of Self varied from 0 to 7 (M - 1.75, SD - 1.72), Total Witnessed Experiences varied from 0 to 7 (M - 1.17, SD - 1.64), and Total Global Experiences varied from 0 to 14 (M - 2.92, SD - 3.01). These results show that victimisation and adverse experiences in psychiatric contexts are frequent and go beyond classic forms of victimisation. A deeper knowledge of these experiences and their impact in the mental health of psychiatric patients may promote quality of care provided and lead to more effective treatments, thus reducing the number and length of hospitalisations, and the financial burden for public health services.

  18. Suicide mortality of suicide attempt patients discharged from emergency room, nonsuicidal psychiatric patients discharged from emergency room, admitted suicide attempt patients, and admitted nonsuicidal psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae W; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K; Hong, Jin P

    2012-06-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients admitted for suicide attempt, and psychiatric inpatients admitted for other reasons were examined. The records of 3,897 patients who were treated at a general hospital in Seoul, Korea, from July 2003 to December 2006 were reviewed. Forty-three of the 3,897 subjects died by suicide during the 2.5-year observation period. Compared to the general Korean population, the suicide mortality rate was 82-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, admitted; 54-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, discharged; 21-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, admitted; and 11-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, discharged. In all four groups, diagnosis of a depressive disorder and suicide attempt at presentation were each significant independent risk factors for suicide completion. These results highlight the need for suicide prevention strategies for depressed patients who present to the ER or are admitted to a psychiatric ward after a suicide attempt.

  19. Prevalence and related factors of psychological distress among cancer inpatients using routine Distress Thermometer and Chinese Health Questionnaire screening

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Yu-Jie; Chiu, Nien-Mu; Wang, Liang-Jen; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Lee, Chun-Yi; Wu, Ming-Kung; Chen, Chien-Chih; Wu, Yi-Shan; Lee, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines suggest routine screening for distress among cancer patients for immediate early psychiatric care. However, previous studies focusing on routine screening for psychological distress among cancer inpatients in Taiwan are scant. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and related factors of psychological distress and mental illness among cancer inpatients in Taiwan. Patients and methods This study was conducted as a retrospective chart review in a general hospital in southern Taiwan. Cancer inpatients were regularly screened by nursing staff using the Distress Thermometer and the 12-item Chinese Health Questionnaire. Positive screening results on either instrument were followed by a non-commanded referral to psychiatrists for clinical psychiatric diagnosis and treatment. Results Of the 810 participants in this study, 179 (22.1%) were recognized as having psychological distress. Younger age (odds ratio [OR] =1.82), having head and neck cancer (OR =2.43), and having not received chemotherapy (OR =1.58) were significantly related to psychological distress. Among the 56 patients (31.3%) with psychological distress who were referred to psychiatrists, the most common mental illness was adjustment disorder (n=22, 39.2%), followed by major depressive disorder (n=13, 23.2%), depressive disorder not otherwise specified (n=6, 10.7%), and anxiety disorder not otherwise specified (n=4, 7.1%). Conclusion Our study indicated that cancer inpatients with psychological distress were more likely to be younger in age, have head and neck cancer, and have not received chemotherapy. The most common psychiatric disorder was adjustment disorder. Early detection of psychological distress and prompt psychiatric consultation and management are very important for cancer inpatients. PMID:27822049

  20. Psychiatric Advance Directives: Getting Started

    MedlinePlus

    ... More... Home Getting Started National Resource Center on Psychiatric Advance Directives - Getting Started Getting Started Psychiatric advance directives (PADs) are relatively new legal instruments ...