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Sample records for acute intestinal infection

  1. [THE MODES OF EVALUATION OF TYPE OF DEHYDRATION IN CHILDREN HOSPITALIZED BECAUSE OF ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Krieger, E A; Samodova, O V; Gulakova, N N; Aruiev, A B; Krylova, L A; Titova, L V

    2015-11-01

    Every year about 800,000 cases of intestinal infections end in lethal outcome due to dehydration. The different types of dehydration acquire differential approach to correction. Everywhere there is no application of routine detection of osmolarity of blood plasma under exicosis in children in view of absence of possibility of instrumental measurement. The search of techniques is needed to make it possible to indirectly detect types of dehydration in children hospitalized because of acute intestinal infection with purpose to apply rationale therapy of water-electrolyte disorders. The sampling of 32 patients with intestinal infections accompanied with signs of exicosis degree I-III was examined. The detection of osmolarity of blood was implemented by instrumental technique using gas analyzer ABL 800 Flex (Radiometer; Denmark) and five estimate techniques according to results of biochemical analysis of blood. The differences in precision of measurement of osmolarity of blood plasma by instrumental and estimate techniques were compared using Bland-Altman graphic technique. It is established that formula: 2x[Na+kp] + [glucosekp] (mmol/l) is the most recise. Its application provided results comparable with values detected by instrumental mode. PMID:26999860

  2. Default in plasma and intestinal IgA responses during acute infection by simian immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Conflicting results regarding changes in mucosal IgA production or in the proportions of IgA plasma cells in the small and large intestines during HIV-infection have been previously reported. Except in individuals repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 but yet remaining uninfected, HIV-specific IgAs are frequently absent in mucosal secretions from HIV-infected patients. However, little is known about the organization and functionality of mucosal B-cell follicles in acute HIV/SIV infection during which a T-dependent IgA response should have been initiated. In the present study, we evaluated changes in B-cell and T-cell subsets as well as the extent of apoptosis and class-specific plasma cells in Peyer’s Patches, isolated lymphoid follicles, and lamina propria. Plasma levels of IgA, BAFF and APRIL were also determined. Results Plasma IgA level was reduced by 46% by 28 days post infection (dpi), and no IgA plasma cells were found within germinal centers of Peyer’s Patches and isolated lymphoid follicles. This lack of a T-dependent IgA response occurs although germinal centers remained functional with no sign of follicular damage, while a prolonged survival of follicular CD4+ T-cells and normal generation of IgG plasma cells is observed. Whereas the average plasma BAFF level was increased by 4.5-fold and total plasma cells were 1.7 to 1.9-fold more numerous in the lamina propria, the relative proportion of IgA plasma cells in this effector site was reduced by 19% (duodemun) to 35% (ileum) at 28 dpi. Conclusion Our data provide evidence that SIV is unable to initiate a T-dependent IgA response during the acute phase of infection and favors the production of IgG (ileum) or IgM (duodenum) plasma cells at the expense of IgA plasma cells. Therefore, an early and generalized default in IgA production takes place during the acute of phase of HIV/SIV infection, which might impair not only the virus-specific antibody response but also IgA responses to other pathogens and

  3. Acute intestinal anisakiasis: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, H N; Avcu, S; Pauwels, W; Mortelé, K J; De Backer, A I

    2012-09-01

    Small bowel anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease that results from consumption of raw or insufficiently pickled, salted, smoked, or cooked wild marine fish infected with Anisakis larvae. We report a case of intestinal anisakiasis in a 63-year-old woman presenting with acute onset of abdominal complaints one day after ingestion of raw wild-caught herring from the Northsea. Computed tomography (CT) scanning demonstrated thickening of the distal small bowel wall, mucosa with hyperenhancement, mural stratification, fluid accumulation within dilated small-bowel loops and hyperemia of mesenteric vessels. In patients with a recent history of eating raw marine fish presenting with acute onset of abdominal complaints and CT features of acute small bowel inflammation the possibility of anisakiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal syndromes.

  4. Upregulation of ICOS on CD43+ CD4+ murine small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes during acute reovirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Montufar-Solis, Dina; Garza, Tomas; Teng, B.-B.; Klein, John R. . E-mail: john.r.klein@uth.tmc.edu

    2006-04-14

    Murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) can be classified according to expression of a CD43 glycoform recognized by the S7 monoclonal antibody. In this study, we examined the response of S7+ and S7- IELs in mice during acute reovirus serotype 3 (Dearing strain) infection, which was confirmed by virus-specific real-time PCR. In vivo proliferation increased significantly for both S7- and S7+ IELs on day 4 post-infection as determined by BrdU incorporation; however, expression of the inducible costimulatory (ICOS) molecule, which peaked on day 7 post-infection, was upregulated on S7+ CD4+ T cells, most of which were CD4+8- IELs. In vitro ICOS stimulation by syngeneic peritoneal macrophages induced IFN-{gamma} secretion from IELs from day 7 infected mice, and was suppressed by treatment with anti-ICOS mAb. Additionally, IFN-{gamma} mRNA increased in CD4+ IELs on day 6 post-infection. These findings indicate that S7- and S7+ IELs are differentially mobilized during the immune response to reovirus infection; that the regulated expression of ICOS is associated with S7+ IELs; and that stimulation of IELs through ICOS enhances IFN-{gamma} synthesis during infection.

  5. Small Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections. PMID:27168147

  6. Oral infection with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli triggers immune response and intestinal histological alterations in mice selected for their minimal acute inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, Amanda Bardella; Tino-De-Franco, Milene; Amaral, José Araujo; Ribeiro, Orlando Garcia; Cabrera, Wafa Hanna Koury; Bordenalli, Marcela Aparecida; Carbonare, Cristiane Barros; Álvares, Eliana Parisi; Carbonare, Solange Barros

    2014-06-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), a leading cause of infant diarrhea, is an important public health problem in Brazil and other developing countries. In vitro assays of bacterial adhesion to cultured cells are important tools for studying bacterial pathogenicity but do not reproduce all the events that occur in natural infections. In this study, the effects of oral infection with EPEC on mice selected for their minimal acute inflammatory response (AIR min) were evaluated. Mice were orally infected with EPEC and variations in body weight, bacterial shedding and antibody production observed. The infected animals developed seric and secretory anti-EPEC antibodies; however, neither mortality nor diarrhea was observed. Light microscopy of their intestines demonstrated histological modifications that were not present in controls. However, electron microscopy did not show bacteria attached to the intestinal epithelia to form attaching and effacing lesions, characteristic of EPEC in humans. The bacteria were detected in Peyer's patches and intestinal contents up to 5 hr post-infection. When human anti-EPEC secretory immunoglobulin A or avian immunoglobulin Y antibodies were administered to infected animals, they developed minor histological alterations compared with non-treated animals. In summary, it was found that EPEC triggers immune responses and intestinal histological alterations but does not produce evidence of diarrheal disease in mice infected by the oral route. This study of EPEC experimental infection provides a better understanding of the effects of antibodies on bacterial infections and may provide a suitable model for the design and testing of immunobiological products for active or passive immunization. PMID:24750489

  7. [INCIDENCE, PREDISPOSING RISK FACTORS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND SPREADING OF ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS IN THE NORTH-EASTERN REGION OF UKRAINE].

    PubMed

    Malysh, N G; Chemych, N D; Zaritsky, A M

    2016-01-01

    Using data of the branch statistical reporting of the State Sanitary and Epidemiological Service in Sumy region and Sumy Regional State Laboratory of Veterinary Medicine, the incidence rate, modern risk factors for the development and spreading of acute infectious diarrheas were determined in the North-Eastern region of Ukraine. Under the current conditions incidence rate indices of acute intestinal infections and food toxicoinfections are within the range of 159.8-193.6 per 100 thousands. pop. Seasonal and epidemical rises are associated with a species of the agent. In the etiological structure of acute diarrheal infections there are dominated viruses, of food toxicoinfections--Klebsiellae pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter cloacae (p < 0.05). Predictors of the complication of epidemiological situation of Shigella infections are the gain in the detection of bacterially contaminated samples of milk and dairy products (r = 0.75), for food toxicoinfections caused by Klebsiellae pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae--pastry with cream and cooking meat products (r = 0.64; r = 0.75). Epizootic situation in the region affects on the salmonellosis incidence rate of the population (r = 0.89). There were revealed correlations between the selection of E. coli bacteria from swabs taken from the enterprises of catering, in child care centers and the levels of incidence rates of salmonellosis, acute intestinal infections of unknown etiology (r = 0.59; r = 0.60). Timely detection and sanitation of Shigella carriers are a powerful instrument to reduce the incidence rate of shigellosis (r = 0.83). PMID:27266031

  8. [INCIDENCE, PREDISPOSING RISK FACTORS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND SPREADING OF ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS IN THE NORTH-EASTERN REGION OF UKRAINE].

    PubMed

    Malysh, N G; Chemych, N D; Zaritsky, A M

    2016-01-01

    Using data of the branch statistical reporting of the State Sanitary and Epidemiological Service in Sumy region and Sumy Regional State Laboratory of Veterinary Medicine, the incidence rate, modern risk factors for the development and spreading of acute infectious diarrheas were determined in the North-Eastern region of Ukraine. Under the current conditions incidence rate indices of acute intestinal infections and food toxicoinfections are within the range of 159.8-193.6 per 100 thousands. pop. Seasonal and epidemical rises are associated with a species of the agent. In the etiological structure of acute diarrheal infections there are dominated viruses, of food toxicoinfections--Klebsiellae pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter cloacae (p < 0.05). Predictors of the complication of epidemiological situation of Shigella infections are the gain in the detection of bacterially contaminated samples of milk and dairy products (r = 0.75), for food toxicoinfections caused by Klebsiellae pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae--pastry with cream and cooking meat products (r = 0.64; r = 0.75). Epizootic situation in the region affects on the salmonellosis incidence rate of the population (r = 0.89). There were revealed correlations between the selection of E. coli bacteria from swabs taken from the enterprises of catering, in child care centers and the levels of incidence rates of salmonellosis, acute intestinal infections of unknown etiology (r = 0.59; r = 0.60). Timely detection and sanitation of Shigella carriers are a powerful instrument to reduce the incidence rate of shigellosis (r = 0.83).

  9. Intestinal obstruction caused by Taenia taeniaeformis infection in a cat.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Rebbecca S; Bowman, Dwight D; Barr, Stephen C; Euclid, James M

    2009-01-01

    An adult domestic shorthair (DSH) cat was presented with acute vomiting, anorexia, lethargy, and dyspnea. The cat's clinical status worsened over 24 hours with conservative medical management. An exploratory celiotomy was performed. Acute intestinal obstruction resulting from infection with Taenia (T.) taeniaeformis was diagnosed. Surgical removal of the cestodes via multiple enterotomies resolved the obstruction. This paper reports, for the first time, small intestinal obstruction caused by T. taeniaeformis infection in a cat.

  10. [DISTRIBUTION OF BACTERIA OF THE KLEBSIELLA STRAIN IN WATER OBJECTS AND THEIR VALUE IN DEVELOPING OF THE WATER CAUSED ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Yu A; Ivanova, L V; Artyomova, T Z; Gipp, E K; Zagaynova, A V; Maksimkina, T N; Krasnyak, A V; Zhuravlev, P V; Aleshnya, V V; Panasovets, O P

    2016-01-01

    The wide circulation of Klebsiella bacteria in water ofwater objects of different climatic zones of Russia and various function is established. So bacteria of the Klebsiella strain are in superficial sources of the centralized water supply depending on extent of their biological and chemical pollution; underground waters at the unprotected water-bearing horizons; in drinking water at insufficiently effective system of its cleaning and disinfecting. Klebsiella circulating in water was shown to keep properties of pathogenicity and a virulence, possess resistance both to modern preparations and disinfecting agents (chlorine, an ultraviolet to radiation). Bacteria of the Klebsiella strain have high penetration in the water-bearing horizons. At strains of Klebsiella there is allocated considerable pathogenic potential (adhesive, invasive, phosphatase, lecithinase, DNA-ase, hemolytic activity) and genetic markers of pathogenicity of cnf-1. The etiologic role of bacteria of Klebsiella and an infecting (100, COE/dm3) dose emergence of acute intestinal infections (AII) is established. Detection of Klebsiella in water objects and especially in water of drinking appointment, in the absence of total coliform bacteria (TCB) contributes to the epidemic danger of water use. PMID:27430075

  11. [DISTRIBUTION OF BACTERIA OF THE KLEBSIELLA STRAIN IN WATER OBJECTS AND THEIR VALUE IN DEVELOPING OF THE WATER CAUSED ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Yu A; Ivanova, L V; Artyomova, T Z; Gipp, E K; Zagaynova, A V; Maksimkina, T N; Krasnyak, A V; Zhuravlev, P V; Aleshnya, V V; Panasovets, O P

    2016-01-01

    The wide circulation of Klebsiella bacteria in water ofwater objects of different climatic zones of Russia and various function is established. So bacteria of the Klebsiella strain are in superficial sources of the centralized water supply depending on extent of their biological and chemical pollution; underground waters at the unprotected water-bearing horizons; in drinking water at insufficiently effective system of its cleaning and disinfecting. Klebsiella circulating in water was shown to keep properties of pathogenicity and a virulence, possess resistance both to modern preparations and disinfecting agents (chlorine, an ultraviolet to radiation). Bacteria of the Klebsiella strain have high penetration in the water-bearing horizons. At strains of Klebsiella there is allocated considerable pathogenic potential (adhesive, invasive, phosphatase, lecithinase, DNA-ase, hemolytic activity) and genetic markers of pathogenicity of cnf-1. The etiologic role of bacteria of Klebsiella and an infecting (100, COE/dm3) dose emergence of acute intestinal infections (AII) is established. Detection of Klebsiella in water objects and especially in water of drinking appointment, in the absence of total coliform bacteria (TCB) contributes to the epidemic danger of water use.

  12. [Intestinal parasitic infections in Serbia].

    PubMed

    Nikolić, A; Djurković-Djaković, O; Bobić, B

    1998-01-01

    To determine the public health significance of intestinal parasitism in Serbia today, systematic parasitologic examination of 16 regions (Kragujevac, Luchani, Zhagubica, Bor, Sjenica, Novi Pazar, Valjevo, Aleksandrovac, Pirot, Bosilegrad, Ivanjica, Golubac, Uzhice, Kladovo, Negotin, Beograd) in central Serbia were carried out over the period 1984-1993. The study involved a total of 5981 schoolchildren (2887 F, 3094 M), 7-11 years old representing 10% of the total age-matched population (N = 58,228) of the examined regions, residing in 91 settlements. Field parasitological examinations included the examination of perianal swabs for E. vermicularis and Taenia sp., and examination of a single feces sample by direct saline smear and Lugol stained smear for intestinal protozoa, and the Kato and Lörincz methods for intestinal helminths. Nine species of intestinal parasites were detected, of which five protozoan: Entamoeba histolytica (0.02%), Entamoeba hartmanni (0.02%), Entamoeba coli (1.3%), Iodamoeba bütschlii (0.02%), Giardia lamblia (6.8%), and four helminthic: Hymenolepis nana (0.06%), Enterobius vermicularis (14.7%), Ascaris lumbricoides (3.3%), Trichuris trichiura (1.8%). The overall prevalence of intestinal parasite infections amounted to 24.6% (1207/4913), with a highly significant difference (p < 0.001) between particular sites (range 14.4%-43.8%) (Figure 1). Helminthic infections (810) were significantly more frequent (p < 0.001) as compared to both protozoan (296) and combined helminthic-protozoan infections (101). Of these, two species (G. lamblia, E. vermicularis) were found in all examined regions, three (E. coli, A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura) were detected in two or more, while four species (E. histolytica, E. hartmanni, I. bütschlii, H. nana) were each found in a single region (Figure 2). The predominant species (E. coli, G. lamblia, E. vermicularis, A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura) were distributed at considerably different prevalence rates, with a

  13. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially centers with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  14. The role of serine protease HtrA in acute ulcerative enterocolitis and extra-intestinal immune responses during Campylobacter jejuni infection of gnotobiotic IL-10 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Heimesaat, Markus M.; Alutis, Marie; Grundmann, Ursula; Fischer, André; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Böhm, Manja; Kühl, Anja A.; Göbel, Ulf B.; Backert, Steffen; Bereswill, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni infections have a high prevalence worldwide and represent a significant socioeconomic burden. C. jejuni can cross the intestinal epithelial barrier as visualized in biopsies derived from human patients and animal models, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms and associated immunopathology are still not well understood. We have recently shown that the secreted serine protease HtrA (high temperature requirement A) plays a key role in C. jejuni cellular invasion and transmigration across polarized epithelial cells in vitro. In the present in vivo study we investigated the role of HtrA during C. jejuni infection of mice. We used the gnotobiotic IL-10−/− mouse model to study campylobacteriosis following peroral infection with the C. jejuni wild-type (WT) strain NCTC11168 and the isogenic, non-polar NCTC11168ΔhtrA deletion mutant. Six days post infection (p.i.) with either strain mice harbored comparable intestinal C. jejuni loads, whereas ulcerative enterocolitis was less pronounced in mice infected with the ΔhtrA mutant strain. Moreover, ΔhtrA mutant infected mice displayed lower apoptotic cell numbers in the large intestinal mucosa, less colonic accumulation of neutrophils, macrophages and monocytes, lower large intestinal nitric oxide, IFN-γ, and IL-6 as well as lower TNF-α and IL-6 serum concentrations as compared to WT strain infected mice at day 6 p.i. Notably, immunopathological responses were not restricted to the intestinal tract given that liver and kidneys exhibited mild histopathological changes 6 days p.i. with either C. jejuni strain. We also found that hepatic and renal nitric oxide levels or renal TNF-α concentrations were lower in the ΔhtrA mutant as compared to WT strain infected mice. In conclusion, we show here that the C. jejuni HtrA protein plays a pivotal role in inducing host cell apoptosis and immunopathology during murine campylobacteriosis in the gut in vivo. PMID:24959425

  15. Intestinal aGVHD and infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Cai-yan; Xu, Li-li; Chen, Hu; Liu, Na; Jiang, Ming; Wang, Guo-quan; Zhang, Linlin; Wang, Xiao-hong; Zeng, Yan-jun

    2013-01-01

    Background We aimed to guide clinical nursing by studying the relationship between intestinal acute graft-versus-host disease and intestinal infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Material/Methods We present an effective nursing method by comparing and analyzing the degree, duration time, and volume of diarrhea, and the distribution of pathogens in 44 patients who developed intestinal aGVHD after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (24 patients with no intestinal infection). Results 21.4% of patients with grade I–II intestinal aGVHD developed into intestinal infection and 87.5% of patients with grade III–IV intestinal aGVHD developed into intestinal infection (P<0.05). Higher mortality was found in the grade III–IV intestinal aGVHD patients with intestinal infection. Patient age had no effect on the incidence of GVHD according to our data (P<0.05). We found remarkable differences in the amount and duration of diarrhea between patients with and without intestinal infection (P<0.05). The most common pathogens cultivated were Candida glabrata (24%) and Candida albicans (22.67%). Conclusions The incidence of intestinal infection increased remarkably after intestinal aGVHD occurred. Severe aGVHD can easily lead to fungus infection. Nursing care can decrease the incidence of intestinal infection in aGVHD. PMID:24077343

  16. Chronic Administration of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Intestinal Anti-Inflammatory MicroRNA Expression during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Lawrance C.; Kumar, Vinay; Torben, Workineh; Stouwe, Curtis Vande; Winsauer, Peter; Amedee, Angela; Molina, Patricia E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recreational and medical use of cannabis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals has increased in recent years. In simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques, chronic administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) inhibited viral replication and intestinal inflammation and slowed disease progression. Persistent gastrointestinal disease/inflammation has been proposed to facilitate microbial translocation and systemic immune activation and promote disease progression. Cannabinoids including Δ9-THC attenuated intestinal inflammation in mouse colitis models and SIV-infected rhesus macaques. To determine if the anti-inflammatory effects of Δ9-THC involved differential microRNA (miRNA) modulation, we profiled miRNA expression at 14, 30, and 60 days postinfection (days p.i.) in the intestine of uninfected macaques receiving Δ9-THC (n = 3) and SIV-infected macaques administered either vehicle (VEH/SIV; n = 4) or THC (THC/SIV; n = 4). Chronic Δ9-THC administration to uninfected macaques significantly and positively modulated intestinal miRNA expression by increasing the total number of differentially expressed miRNAs from 14 to 60 days p.i. At 60 days p.i., ∼28% of miRNAs showed decreased expression in the VEH/SIV group compared to none showing decrease in the THC/SIV group. Furthermore, compared to the VEH/SIV group, THC selectively upregulated the expression of miR-10a, miR-24, miR-99b, miR-145, miR-149, and miR-187, previously been shown to target proinflammatory molecules. NOX4, a potent reactive oxygen species generator, was confirmed as a direct miR-99b target. A significant increase in NOX4+ crypt epithelial cells was detected in VEH/SIV macaques compared to the THC/SIV group. We speculate that miR-99b-mediated NOX4 downregulation may protect the intestinal epithelium from oxidative stress-induced damage. These results support a role for differential miRNA induction in THC-mediated suppression of intestinal

  17. Dengue Virus Infection with Highly Neutralizing Levels of Cross-Reactive Antibodies Causes Acute Lethal Small Intestinal Pathology without a High Level of Viremia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Satoru; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Wang, Jiaqi; Rivino, Laura; Lok, Shee-Mei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe dengue virus (DENV)-associated diseases can occur in patients who have preexisting DENV antibodies (Abs) through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection. It is well established that during ADE, DENV-antibody immune complexes (ICs) infect Fcγ receptor-bearing cells and increase the systemic viral burden that can be measured in the blood. For protection against infection with DENV serotypes 1 to 4, strongly neutralizing Abs must be elicited to overcome the effect of ADE. Clinical observations in infants who have maternal DENV Abs or recent phase II/III clinical trials with a leading tetravalent dengue vaccine suggested a lack of correlation between Ab neutralization and in vivo disease prevention. In addressing this gap in knowledge, we found that inoculation of ICs formed with serotype cross-reactive Abs that are more than 98% neutralized in vitro promotes high mortality in AG129 mice even though peak viremia was lower than that in direct virus infection. This suggests that the serum viremia level is not always correlated with disease severity. We further demonstrated that infection with the ICs resulted in increased vascular permeability, specifically in the small intestine, accompanied with increased tissue viral load and cytokine production, which can be suppressed by anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) Abs. Flow cytometric analysis identified increased infection in CD11bint CD11cint/hi CD103− antigen-presenting cells by IC inoculation, suggesting that these infected cells may be responsible for the increase in TNF-α production and vascular permeability in the small intestine that lead to mortality in mice. Our findings may have important implications for the development of dengue therapeutics. IMPORTANCE We examined the relationship between the neutralizing level of Abs at the time of infection and subsequent disease progression in a mouse model in order to understand why patients who are shown to have a neutralizing

  18. Mucin Dynamics in Intestinal Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Sara K.; Florin, Timothy H. J.; McGuckin, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Bacterial gastroenteritis causes morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Murine Citrobacter rodentium infection is a model for gastroenteritis caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli. Mucin glycoproteins are the main component of the first barrier that bacteria encounter in the intestinal tract. Methodology/Principal Findings Using Immunohistochemistry, we investigated intestinal expression of mucins (Alcian blue/PAS, Muc1, Muc2, Muc4, Muc5AC, Muc13 and Muc3/17) in healthy and C. rodentium infected mice. The majority of the C. rodentium infected mice developed systemic infection and colitis in the mid and distal colon by day 12. C. rodentium bound to the major secreted mucin, Muc2, in vitro, and high numbers of bacteria were found in secreted MUC2 in infected animals in vivo, indicating that mucins may limit bacterial access to the epithelial surface. In the small intestine, caecum and proximal colon, the mucin expression was similar in infected and non-infected animals. In the distal colonic epithelium, all secreted and cell surface mucins decreased with the exception of the Muc1 cell surface mucin which increased after infection (p<0.05). Similarly, during human infection Salmonella St Paul, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium difficile induced MUC1 in the colon. Conclusion Major changes in both the cell-surface and secreted mucins occur in response to intestinal infection. PMID:19088856

  19. Intestinal protozoan infections in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lai, K P

    1992-12-01

    Intestinal protozoa are found in all communities in Malaysia and among all ethnic groups. Prevalence of intestinal protozoa is not affected by ethnicity but by living conditions. Communities with both basic amenities of safe water supply and proper toilets have lower prevalence than those with one or none of the amenity. Cryptosporidium is an important intestinal protozoon in Malaysia and should be included in future field and laboratory studies and also in laboratory diagnosis for pathogens. Much interest will be centered on Blastocystis hominis in future studies in view that it may be a cause of diarrhea. PMID:1298065

  20. Intestinal protozoan infections in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lai, K P

    1992-12-01

    Intestinal protozoa are found in all communities in Malaysia and among all ethnic groups. Prevalence of intestinal protozoa is not affected by ethnicity but by living conditions. Communities with both basic amenities of safe water supply and proper toilets have lower prevalence than those with one or none of the amenity. Cryptosporidium is an important intestinal protozoon in Malaysia and should be included in future field and laboratory studies and also in laboratory diagnosis for pathogens. Much interest will be centered on Blastocystis hominis in future studies in view that it may be a cause of diarrhea.

  1. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:25999427

  2. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela; Said, Hamid M

    2015-07-15

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines.

  3. Acute upper airway infections.

    PubMed

    West, J V

    2002-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections are common and important. Although rarely fatal, they are a source of significant morbidity and carry a considerable economic burden. Numerous therapies for the common cold have no effect on symptoms or outcome. Complications such as cough are not improved by over-the-counter preparations, while labelling cough alone as a symptom of asthma may result in unnecessary use of inhaled steroid treatment. Clinical presentation of sore throat does not accurately predict whether the infection is viral or bacterial, while throat culture and rapid antigen tests do not significantly change prescribing practice. Antibiotics have only a limited place in the management of recurrent sore throat due to group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal infection. Routine use of antibiotics in upper respiratory infection enhances parent belief in their effectiveness and increases the likelihood of future consultation in primary care for minor self-limiting illness. Respiratory viruses play a major role in the aetiology of acute otitis media (AOM); prevention includes the use of influenza or RSV vaccination, in addition to reducing other risk factors such as early exposure to respiratory viruses in day-care settings and to environmental tobacco smoke. The use of ventilation tubes (grommets) in secretory otitis media (SOM) remains controversial with conflicting data on developmental outcome and quality of life in young children. New conjugate pneumococcal vaccines appear safe in young children and prevent 6-7% of clinically diagnosed AOM.

  4. Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection

    MedlinePlus

    CMV mononucleosis; Cytomegalovirus (CMV) ... Infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) is very common. The infection is spread by: Blood transfusions Organ transplants Respiratory droplets Saliva Sexual contact ...

  5. Intestinal parasitic infections and urbanization.

    PubMed

    Crompton, D W; Savioli, L

    1993-01-01

    About a third of the population in the cities of developing countries live in slums and shanty towns. By the year 2000 it is estimated that this number will grow to 2200 million, and by 2025 about 57% of the population in developing countries will be in urban areas. The prevalence of infections caused by Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia intestinalis and the prevalence and intensity of Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura infections may increase among the rural populations who are migrating to these urban and suburban settings owing to the favourable conditions for transmission. Urgent consideration should therefore be given to improving sanitation in deprived urban areas and to treating periodically these populations to reduce the worm burden, especially in school-age children.

  6. Murine norovirus infection does not cause major disruptions in the murine intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Murine norovirus (MNV) is the most common gastrointestinal pathogen of research mice and can alter research outcomes in biomedical mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Despite indications that an altered microbiota is a risk factor for IBD, the response of the murine intestinal microbiota to MNV infection has not been examined. Microbiota disruption caused by MNV infection could introduce the confounding effects observed in research experiments. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of MNV infection on the intestinal microbiota of wild-type mice. Results The composition of the intestinal microbiota was assessed over time in both outbred Swiss Webster and inbred C57BL/6 mice following MNV infection. Mice were infected with both persistent and non-persistent MNV strains and tissue-associated or fecal-associated microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA-encoding gene pyrosequencing. Analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in infected mice at the phylum and family level showed no major differences to uninfected controls, both in tissue-associated samples and feces, and also over time following infection, demonstrating that the intestinal microbiota of wild-type mice is highly resistant to disruption following MNV infection. Conclusions This is the first study to describe the intestinal microbiota following MNV infection and demonstrates that acute or persistent MNV infection is not associated with major disruptions of microbial communities in Swiss Webster and C57BL/6 mice. PMID:24451302

  7. Acute intestinal obstruction due to a non-involuted uterus after cesarean section: case report.

    PubMed

    Karaman, K; Ercan, M; Demir, H; Yener Uzunoglu, M; Bostanci, S

    2016-01-01

    The involution of the uterus is influenced by a number of factors such as advanced childbearing age, electrolyte disturbances, multiparity, repeated cesarean sections, and vaginal infections. The authors report the management of a clinical case of a 41-year-old female who presented with acute intestinal obstruction due to a non-involuted uterus after cesarean section.

  8. Control strategies for human intestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Albonico, M; Crompton, D W; Savioli, L

    1999-01-01

    In recent years significant progress has been made in understanding the ecology, epidemiology and related morbidity and development of new tools for the control of soil-transmitted helminths. Such knowledge has recognized the impact of helminth infections on the health of infected groups and has created a rational basis for their control. Schoolchildren harbour some of the most intense helminthic infections, which produce adverse effects on health, growth and scholastic performance. However, although great effort has been put into targeting school-age children, women of child-bearing age and pre-school children are two other groups at high risk of morbidity due to intestinal nematode infections. Highly effective and safety-tested, single-dose anthelminthic drugs are now available, permitting periodical deworming of schoolchildren and other high-risk groups at affordable prices. Four anthelminthics against all intestinal nematodes are included in the WHO Essential Drug List (albendazole, levamisole, mebendazole and pyrantel). Recently ivermectin has also been registered for use against Strongyloides stercoralis in humans. Several well-monitored country experiences have shown that chemotherapy-based control of morbidity due to soil-transmitted helminths is possible and highly cost-effective.

  9. Intestinal permeability in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sundström, G M; Wahlin, A; Nordin-Andersson, I; Suhr, O B

    1998-10-01

    Intestinal permeability was studied in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) before, during and after chemotherapy. Intestinal permeability was determined by the lactulose (La)/mannitol (Ma) absorption test in 16 adult patients with de novo AML. The hydrogen breath test was used to disclose bacterial fermentation of the test substances in the small intestine. The permeability was found significantly increased (p<0.02) in the patients before induction chemotherapy treatment. During induction treatment and throughout the cytopenic period the intestinal permeability was constantly and significantly increased, compared with controls. In patients with abnormally increased permeability, no increase in hydrogen breath test result was noted. From our results it can be concluded that increased intestinal permeability is present in AML patients before commencing chemotherapy. Factors other than chemotherapy would seem to be more important regarding the occurrence of intestinal disturbances in these patients.

  10. Intestinal helminthic infections in schoolchildren in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Sinuon, Muth; Anantaphruti, Malinee T; Socheat, Doung

    2003-06-01

    During the period January to December 1998, the National Malaria Center (CNM) carried out a parasitological survey of schoolchildren in rural and semi-urban areas, to assess intestinal helminthic infections in schoolchildren in the central parts of Cambodia. In the rural areas, there were four schools in Stung Treng Province (all situated along the Mekong River), five schools in Kratie Province (around rubber plantations), six schools in Kampong Chhnang Province (along Tonle Sap Lake); and in the semi-urban areas, three schools in Beng Tumpon Commune and five schools in Chbar Ampeou Commune (Mean Chey District) were selected for study. By Kato-Katz technique, the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminthic infections in schoolchildren in both the rural and urban areas was high. The infection rate was between 10-40% for Ascaris, 2-17% for Trichuris and 5-65% for hookworm. Schistosomiasis and opisthorchiasis were found in the schoolchildren living along the Mekong River (Stung Treng Province); the infection rate of S. mekongi ranged from 12 to 43%. These infections in children were with hepatomegalies. An intervention in an urban area (Chraing Chamres) showed that after repeated treatment with mebendazole 500 mg single dose every 6 months, the prevalence of all parasites had dropped to about one third of the initial level.

  11. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  12. Persistence of intestinal antibody response to heterologous rotavirus infection in a murine model beyond 1 year.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, R D; Merchant, A A; Groene, W S; Cheng, E H

    1993-01-01

    We used an ELISPOT (enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot) assay to quantitate the long-term rotavirus-specific intestinal antibody response in a murine model. The frequency of murine intestinal antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) was followed for a period of 1 year after a single dose of rhesus rotavirus (10(6) PFU) was administered at 10 days of age. Some animals were boosted at that time with a second dose. One year after infection, virus-specific ASCs declined from acute-phase levels, but they were still present at significant levels (1.32 x 10(4) virus-specific ASCs per 10(6) intestinal mononuclear cells; approximately 17% of the previously reported response at 1 month after infection). A booster dose 1 year after the primary infection produced a 100% increase in virus-specific ASCs but did not restore the response to that of the primary infection. PMID:8381806

  13. Dietary cholesterol directly induces acute inflammasome-dependent intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Progatzky, Fränze; Sangha, Navjyot J.; Yoshida, Nagisa; McBrien, Marie; Cheung, Jackie; Shia, Alice; Scott, James; Marchesi, Julian R.; Lamb, Jonathan R.; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol- or saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induces chronic, often systemic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems worldwide. In vivo information regarding the local and direct inflammatory effect of these dietary components in the intestine and, in particular, on the intestinal epithelium is lacking. Here we report that both mice and zebrafish exposed to high-fat (HFDs) or high-cholesterol (HCDs) diets develop acute innate inflammatory responses within hours, reflected in the localized interleukin-1β-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the intestine. Acute HCD-induced intestinal inflammation is dependent on cholesterol uptake via Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and inflammasome activation involving apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, which leads to Caspase-1 activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Extended exposure to HCD results in localized, inflammation-dependent, functional dysregulation as well as systemic pathologies. Our model suggests that dietary cholesterol initiates intestinal inflammation in epithelial cells. PMID:25536194

  14. Dietary cholesterol directly induces acute inflammasome-dependent intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Progatzky, Fränze; Sangha, Navjyot J; Yoshida, Nagisa; McBrien, Marie; Cheung, Jackie; Shia, Alice; Scott, James; Marchesi, Julian R; Lamb, Jonathan R; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol- or saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induces chronic, often systemic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems worldwide. In vivo information regarding the local and direct inflammatory effect of these dietary components in the intestine and, in particular, on the intestinal epithelium is lacking. Here we report that both mice and zebrafish exposed to high-fat (HFDs) or high-cholesterol (HCDs) diets develop acute innate inflammatory responses within hours, reflected in the localized interleukin-1β-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the intestine. Acute HCD-induced intestinal inflammation is dependent on cholesterol uptake via Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and inflammasome activation involving apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, which leads to Caspase-1 activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Extended exposure to HCD results in localized, inflammation-dependent, functional dysregulation as well as systemic pathologies. Our model suggests that dietary cholesterol initiates intestinal inflammation in epithelial cells. PMID:25536194

  15. A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Intestinal Dilation in Trypanosoma cruzi–infected Mice Deficient in Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ny, Lars; Li, Hua; Mukherjee, Shankar; Persson, Katarina; Holmqvist, Bo; Zhao, Dazhi; Shtutin, Vitaliy; Huang, Huan; Weiss, Louis M.; Machado, Fabiana S.; Factor, Stephen M.; Chan, John; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Jelicks, Linda A.

    2009-01-01

    Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi causes megasyndromes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor alterations in the GI tract of T. cruzi–infected mice, and to assess the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the development of intestinal dilation. Brazil strain–infected C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice exhibited dilatation of the intestines by 30 days post-infection. Average intestine lumen diameter increased by 72%. Levels of intestinal NO synthase (NOS) isoforms, NOS2 and NOS3, were elevated in infected WT mice. Inflammation and ganglionitis were observed in all infected mice. Intestinal dilation was observed in infected WT, NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 null mice. This study demonstrates that MRI is a useful tool to monitor intestinal dilation in living mice and that these alterations may begin during acute infection. Furthermore, our data strongly suggests that NO may not be the sole contributor to intestinal dysfunction resulting from this infection. PMID:18981519

  16. [Food contamination by pathogens of acute intestinal infections and survival of microorganisms in them under some variants of thermal processing and storage].

    PubMed

    Sergevnin, V I

    2013-01-01

    The contamination of the surface of vegetables and fruits with conditionally pathogenic enterobacteria, intestinal protozoa and enteric viruses has been revealed. The experiment showed an opportunity of penetration of enteric viruses inside of vegetables and fruits with intact (without visible damages) surface. S. enteritidis survive on the shells of the eggs 4 months in the refrigerator, in the albumen and yolk--more than 5 months and in the long storage (more than one month) of chicken eggs in the refrigerator S. enteritidis could penetrate into the egg through the intact shell and multiply in the yolk. It was shown in the experiment on the condition laying of chicken eggs of room temperature in cold water and their subsequent cooking S. enteritidis full destruction of pathogens comes on the 5 minute of heat processing, when the temperature inside the eggs reaches more than 80 degrees C. In mayonnaise at the temperature of the refrigerator S. enteritidis reproduce, but remain viable for 13 days. In the egg powder at the room temperature noted smooth death of S. enteritidis, term viability of microorganisms is 5 months. Addition 10% acetic acid to egg powder in the ratio 1:2 provides for the death of S. enteritidis for a minute. In experimental conditions was established that the processing of chicken on the grill in the process of cooking "Shaverma" provides exemption meat from Salmonella only in the thickness of a piece of up to 2 centimeters. The deeper layers of meat and meat juice which accumulates on the pallet grill, throughout the duration of thermal processing may remain contaminated Salmonella. PMID:24340937

  17. [Food contamination by pathogens of acute intestinal infections and survival of microorganisms in them under some variants of thermal processing and storage].

    PubMed

    Sergevnin, V I

    2013-01-01

    The contamination of the surface of vegetables and fruits with conditionally pathogenic enterobacteria, intestinal protozoa and enteric viruses has been revealed. The experiment showed an opportunity of penetration of enteric viruses inside of vegetables and fruits with intact (without visible damages) surface. S. enteritidis survive on the shells of the eggs 4 months in the refrigerator, in the albumen and yolk--more than 5 months and in the long storage (more than one month) of chicken eggs in the refrigerator S. enteritidis could penetrate into the egg through the intact shell and multiply in the yolk. It was shown in the experiment on the condition laying of chicken eggs of room temperature in cold water and their subsequent cooking S. enteritidis full destruction of pathogens comes on the 5 minute of heat processing, when the temperature inside the eggs reaches more than 80 degrees C. In mayonnaise at the temperature of the refrigerator S. enteritidis reproduce, but remain viable for 13 days. In the egg powder at the room temperature noted smooth death of S. enteritidis, term viability of microorganisms is 5 months. Addition 10% acetic acid to egg powder in the ratio 1:2 provides for the death of S. enteritidis for a minute. In experimental conditions was established that the processing of chicken on the grill in the process of cooking "Shaverma" provides exemption meat from Salmonella only in the thickness of a piece of up to 2 centimeters. The deeper layers of meat and meat juice which accumulates on the pallet grill, throughout the duration of thermal processing may remain contaminated Salmonella.

  18. Interferon-γ-Induced Nitric Oxide Causes Intrinsic Intestinal Denervation in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, Rosa M.E.; Marche, Homero H.F.; Bahia, Maria T.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Rossi, Marcos A.; Silva, João S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in neuronal destruction during acute-phase Trypanosoma cruzi infection was evaluated in male C57BL/6 (WT, wild-type) mice and knockout mice [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)−/− and interferon (IFN)−/−]. Selected animals were infected by intraperitoneal injection of 100 trypomastigote forms of the Y strain of T. cruzi. Others were injected intraperitoneally with an equal volume of saline solution and served as controls. Our findings support those of previous studies regarding myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection. In addition, we clearly demonstrate that, despite the fact that parasite nests and similar inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall were more pronounced in infected iNOS−/− mice than in infected WT mice, the former presented no reduction in myenteric plexus neuron numbers. Neuronal nerve profile expression, as revealed by the general nerve marker PGP 9.5, was preserved in all knockout animals. Infected IFN−/− mice suffered no significant neuronal loss and there was no inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall. On days 5 and 10 after infection, iNOS activity was greater in infected WT mice than in controls, whereas iNOS activity in infected knockout mice remained unchanged. These findings clearly demonstrate that neuronal damage does not occur in NO-impaired infected knockout mice, regardless of whether inflammatory infiltrate is present (iNOS−/−) or absent (IFN−/−). In conclusion, our observations strongly indicate that myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection is because of IFN-γ-elicited NO production resulting from iNOS activation in the inflammatory foci along the intestinal wall. PMID:15039223

  19. Mast cells drive mesenteric afferent signalling during acute intestinal ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen; Kirkup, Anthony J; Grundy, David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Acute intestinal ischaemia stimulates visceral afferent nerves but the mechanisms responsible for this excitation are not fully understood. Mast cells may participate in this process as they are known to signal to mesenteric afferents during intestinal anaphylaxis and contribute to early inflammation and neuronal damage in response to cerebral ischaemia. We therefore hypothesised that mast cells are early responders to acute intestinal ischaemia and their activation initiates rapid signalling to the CNS via the excitation of mesenteric afferents. Primary afferent firing was recorded from a mesenteric nerve bundle supplying a segment of jejunum in anaesthetized adult rats. Acute focal ischaemia was produced by clamping the mesenteric vessels for 8 min, and reperfusion followed removal of the vessel clip. Two episodes of ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R) separated by a 30 min interval were performed. Drugs or their vehicles were administered 10 min before the 2nd I–R episode. Ischaemia caused a reproducible, intense and biphasic afferent firing that was temporally dissociated from the concomitantly triggered complex pattern of intestinal motor activity. The L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, significantly attenuated this afferent firing by a mechanism independent of its action on intestinal tone. Ischaemia-induced afferent firing was also abrogated by the mast cell stabilizer, doxantrazole, and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist, pyrilamine. In contrast, the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, and the N-type calcium channel toxin, ω-conotoxin GVIA, each reduced the ischaemia-evoked motor inhibition but not the concurrent afferent discharge. Similarly, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, naproxen, had no effect on the ischaemic afferent response but reduced the intestinal tone shortly from the onset of ischaemia to the early period of reperfusion. These data support a critical role for mast cell-derived histamine in the direct chemoexcitation

  20. Acute effects of rotavirus and malnutrition on intestinal barrier function in neonatal piglets

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, Sheila K; Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T; Rhoads, J Marc; Corl, Benjamin A; Harrell, Robert J; Odle, Jack

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of protein-energy malnutrition on intestinal barrier function during rotavirus enteritis in a piglet model. METHODS: Newborn piglets were allotted at day 4 of age to the following treatments: (1) full-strength formula (FSF)/noninfected; (2) FSF/rotavirus infected; (3) half-strength formula (HSF)/noninfected; or (4) HSF/rotavirus infected. After one day of adjustment to the feeding rates, pigs were infected with rotavirus and acute effects on growth and diarrhea were monitored for 3 d and jejunal samples were collected for Ussing-chamber analyses. RESULTS: Piglets that were malnourished or infected had lower body weights on days 2 and 3 post-infection (P < 0.05). Three days post-infection, marked diarrhea and weight loss were accompanied by sharp reductions in villus height (59%) and lactase activity (91%) and increased crypt depth (21%) in infected compared with non-infected pigs (P < 0.05). Malnutrition also increased crypt depth (21%) compared to full-fed piglets. Villus:crypt ratio was reduced (67%) with viral infection. There was a trend for reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance with rotavirus infection and malnutrition (P = 0.1). 3H-mannitol flux was significantly increased (50%; P < 0.001) in rotavirus-infected piglets compared to non-infected piglets, but there was no effect of nutritional status. Furthermore, rotavirus infection reduced localization of the tight junction protein, occludin, in the cell membrane and increased localization in the cytosol. CONCLUSION: Overall, malnutrition had no additive effects to rotavirus infection on intestinal barrier function at day 3 post-infection in a neonatal piglet model. PMID:23964143

  1. Acute abdomen in adult Celiac disease: an intestinal intussusception case.

    PubMed

    Makay, Ozer; Kazimi, Mircelal; Doğanavşargil, Başak; Osmanoğlu, Necla; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2007-06-01

    It is well known that half of the cases admitted to hospital emergency services complain of abdominal pain and that nearly half of these cases are diagnosed with nonspecific abdominal pain. The population of patients with celiac sprue is rarely encountered at the emergency room. Although acute abdominal pain is rarely seen in adult celiac sprue, it should be added to the differential diagnosis. It should also be remembered that acute abdominal pain in these patients could be originating from perforation, intussusceptions and/or intestinal lymphoma. Herein we report a case of adult celiac sprue where successful surgical exploration was carried out because of entero-enteral intussusception. PMID:17602358

  2. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection and intestinal thiamin uptake: studies with intestinal epithelial Caco-2 monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Chatterjee, Nabendu S; Chou, Tristan; Said, Hamid M

    2013-12-01

    Infections with enteric pathogens like enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major health issue worldwide and while diarrhea is the major problem, prolonged, severe, and dual infections with multiple pathogens may also compromise the nutritional status of the infected individuals. There is almost nothing currently known about the effect of ETEC infection on intestinal absorptions of water-soluble vitamins including thiamin. We examined the effect of ETEC infection on intestinal uptake of the thiamin using as a model the human-derived intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The results showed that infecting confluent Caco-2 monolayers with live ETEC (but not with boiled/killed ETEC or nonpathogenic E. coli) or treatment with bacterial culture supernatant led to a significant inhibition in thiamin uptake. This inhibition appears to be caused by a heat-labile and -secreted ETEC component and is mediated via activation of the epithelial adenylate cyclase system. The inhibition in thiamin uptake by ETEC was associated with a significant reduction in expression of human thiamin transporter-1 and -2 (hTHTR1 and hTHTR2) at the protein and mRNA levels as well as in the activity of the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 promoters. Dual infection of Caco-2 cells with ETEC and EPEC (enteropathogenic E. coli) led to compounded inhibition in intestinal thiamin uptake. These results show for the first time that infection of human intestinal epithelial cells with ETEC causes a significant inhibition in intestinal thiamin uptake. This inhibition is mediated by a secreted heat-labile toxin and is associated with a decrease in the expression of intestinal thiamin transporters.

  3. The Role of Vibrio cholerae Haemagglutinin Protease (HAP) in Extra-Intestinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Koley, Hemanta; Pal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Based on the diversity of surface O antigen Vibrio cholerae can be classified into 206 serogroups. Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of cholera and extra intestinal infections like, septicemia, wound infection and haemorrhagic reactions. Pathogenic factors of V. cholerae extra-intestinal infection are yet to be explored. Aim To identify the pathogenic factor associated with V. cholerae extra-intestinal infection. Materials and Methods This study was carried out between April, 2007 to October 2007 in National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases (NICED). Haemagglutinin Protease (HAP), a major secreted proteolytic enzyme, was purified from the culture supernatant of Vibrio cholerae O1 strain C6709 after removal of outer membrane vesicles using a single step ion-exchange chromatography. Function of HAP was characterized by animal model, like, subcutaneous mouse assay, basement membrane component’s degradation assays and tissue culture assays. Result When suckling mouse was subcutaneously injected with culture supernatant of C6709 strain or purified HAP in both cases, distinct in vivo haemorrhagic response along with histopathological changes like necrosis of the capillaries and muscle layer, acute myofibre degeneration as well as moderate number of erythrocyte scattered through the skin, capillary necrosis, acute myofiber degeneration and necrosis of muscle layer were found. When Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB) media was used, the haemorrhagic effects in suckling mouse were not detectable. The major protein components, laminin and collagen, of basement membrane comprising of vascular endothelial cells, were degraded by HAP. Purified HAP showed cell rounding effects on Int 407 cells. Conclusion Result indicates that HAP may be a causative agent of Vibrio cholerae mediated extra-intestinal infection. This study confirms that Vibrio cholera as a sole pathogen can cause the extra-intestinal infection. This information is important for public health

  4. Investigation of intestine function during acute viral hepatitis using combined sugar oral loads.

    PubMed Central

    Parrilli, G; Cuomo, R; Nardone, G; Maio, G; Izzo, C M; Budillon, G

    1987-01-01

    One fifth of all cases of A virus hepatitis (AVH) have symptoms of gastroenteritis at the onset. This study investigated the mediated intestinal absorption of D-xylose (D-xyl) and 3-o-methyl-D-glucose (3-omG) and the non-mediated permeation of lactulose (Lacl, mol wt 342) and L-rhamnose (L-rh, mol wt 164) during acute and remission phases of AVH. Ten patients with AVH were given an oral load containing these sugars (5 g D-xyl: 2.5 g 3-omG, 1 g L-rh, 5 g lacl in 250 ml water) once during the acute phase and again during remission. The same load was given once to a group of 22 healthy controls. The mean concentration of D-xyl in urine and the ratio of D-xyl to 3-omG in plasma and urine were normal in both the AVH phases, ruling out intestinal malabsorption even in the acute phase. This study showed a significant increase in non-mediated permeation to Lacl, but not to L-rh, during the acute phase. These data indicate that the barrier function of the intestine is compromised in AVH infection while the absorptive function is not. An abnormally low concentration of D-xyl and 3-omG in plasma at one hour was found in all patients during the acute phase. This finding cannot be explained by alterations in intestinal absorption, but could be accounted for by increased space distribution of the sugars because of increased diffusion into tissue cells and/or expansion of the extracellular space by fluid retention. PMID:3428669

  5. Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Pregnant Women in Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J.; Barbella, Rosa A.; Case, Cynthia; Arria, Melissa; Ravelo, Marisela; Perez, Henry; Urdaneta, Oscar; Gervasio, Gloria; Rubio, Nestor; Maldonado, Andrea; Aguilera, Ymora; Viloria, Anna; Blanco, Juan J.; Colina, Magdary; Hernández, Elizabeth; Araujo, Elianet; Cabaniel, Gilberto; Benitez, Jesús; Rifakis, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. Intestinal parasitic infections, especially due to helminths, increase anemia in pregnant women. The results of this are low pregnancy weight gain and IUGR, followed by LBW, with its associated greater risks of infection and higher perinatal mortality rates. For these reasons, in the setting of no large previous studies in Venezuela about this problem, a national multicentric study was conducted. Methods. Pregnant women from nine states were studied, a prenatal evaluation with a coproparasitological study. Univariated and multivariated analyses were made to determine risk factors for intestinal parasitosis and related anemia. Results. During 19 months, 1038 pregnant women were included and evaluated. Intestinal parasitosis was evidenced in 73.9%: A lumbricoides 57.0%, T trichiura 36.0%, G lamblia 14.1%, E hystolitica 12.0%, N americanus 8.1%, E vermicularis 6.3%, S stercoralis 3.3%. Relative risk for anemia in those women with intestinal parasitosis was 2.56 (P < .01). Discussion. Intestinal parasitoses could be associated with conditions for development of anemia at pregnancy. These features reflect the need of routine coproparasitological study among pregnant women in rural and endemic zones for intestinal parasites. Further therapeutic and prophylactic protocols are needed. Additional research on pregnant intestinal parasitic infection impact on newborn health is also considered. PMID:17093349

  6. Acute appendicitis mimicking intestinal obstruction in a patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Han; Chang, Cheng-Chih; Yang, Bor-Yau; Lin, Paul Y; Wang, Chia-Siu

    2012-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the secretory glands caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. The clinical manifestations of CF are repetitive lung infections, biliary cirrhosis, pancreatic abnormalities, and gastrointestinal disorders. We report a 21-year-old Taiwanese man with CF who had abdominal pain for 2 days. The diagnosis of CF had been confirmed by peripheral blood analysis of the CFTR gene 5 years before admission. He presented to the emergency department with nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, and crampy abdominal pain, which is atypical for acute appendicitis. The physical examination and a series of studies revealed intestinal obstruction, but acute appendicitis could not be ruled out. After conservative treatment, together with empiric antibiotics, the refractory abdominal pain and leukocytosis with a left-shift warranted surgical intervention. A diagnostic laparoscopy revealed a swollen, hyperemic appendix, a severely distended small intestine, and serous ascites. The laparoscopic procedure was converted to a laparotomy for open disimpaction and appendectomy. He was discharged on the eighth postoperative day. The histologic examination of the appendix was consistent with early appendicitis. In conclusion, acute abdominal pain in adult CF patients is often associated with intestinal obstruction syndrome. The presentation of concurrent appendicitis may be indolent and lead not only to diagnostic difficulties, but also a number of therapeutic choices.

  7. Stress and acute respiratory infection

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, N.M.; Douglas, R.M.; Ryan, P.

    1986-09-01

    To examine the relationship between stress and upper respiratory tract infection, 235 adults aged 14-57 years, from 94 families affiliated with three suburban family physicians in Adelaide, South Australia, participated in a six-month prospective study. High and low stress groups were identified by median splits of data collected from the Life Events Inventory, the Daily Hassles Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire, which were administered both before and during the six months of respiratory diary data collection. Using intra-study stress data, the high stress group experienced significantly more episodes (mean of 2.71 vs. 1.56, p less than 0.0005) and symptom days (mean of 29.43 vs. 15.42, p = 0.005) of respiratory illness. The two groups were almost identical with respect to age, sex, occupational status, smoking, passive smoking, exposure to air pollution, family size, and proneness to acute respiratory infection in childhood. In a multivariate model with total respiratory episodes as the dependent variable, 21% of the variance was explained, and two stress variables accounted for 9% of the explained variance. Significant, but less strong relationships were also identified between intra-study stress variables and clinically definite episodes and symptom days in both clinically definite and total respiratory episodes. Pre-study measures of stress emphasized chronic stresses and were less strongly related to measures of respiratory illness than those collected during the study. However, significantly more episodes (mean of 2.50 vs. 1.75, p less than 0.02) and symptom days (mean of 28.00 vs. 17.06, p less than 0.03) were experienced in the high stress group. In the multivariate analyses, pre-study stress remained significantly associated with total respiratory episodes nd symptom days in total and ''definite'' respiratory episodes.

  8. Current Therapy in Acute Mouth Infections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, George; Burnstein, Irwin L.

    1970-01-01

    Until a dental department is added to a college health service, a physician or nurse can give treatment for acute oral infections. Treatment excludes the use of caustic, escharotic chemicals in favor of more benign agents. (Author)

  9. Intestinal infection with Trichinella spiralis induces distinct, regional immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Blum, L.K.; Mohanan, S.; Fabre, M.V.; Yafawi, R.E.; Appleton, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate differences between the small and large intestines (SI and LI) with regard to colonization and immunity during infection with Trichinella spiralis. In orally infected C57BL/6 mice, the gender ratios of worms differed among the SI, cecum, and LI. Mucosal mastocytosis developed in the SI but not in the LI, consistent with reduced IL-9 and IL-13 production by explants from the LI. Despite these differences, worms were cleared at the same rate from both sites. Furthermore, IL-10 production was reduced in the LI, yet it was instrumental in limiting local inflammation. Finally, passive immunization of rat pups with tyvelose-specific antibodies effectively cleared fist-stage larvae from all intestinal regions. We conclude that despite regional differences in immune responsiveness and colonization, immune mechanisms that clear T. spiralis operate effectively throughout the intestinal tract. PMID:23465441

  10. Intestinal parasitic infections among mentally handicapped individuals in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Amany I; Hassanein, Faika

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was carried to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among mentally handicapped individuals in Alexandria, Egypt, in the period from December 2012 till November 2013. The study was conducted on 200 institutionalized and non-institutionalized mentally handicapped individuals. Fresh stool samples were subjected to different stains including; trichrome for detecting intestinal protozoa, modified acid fast stain for intestinal coccidia and quick hot gram chromotrope stain for Microsporidia. Also they were processed by Kato-Katz and formol ethyl acetate techniques for intestinal helminths. Additionally, blood samples were collected for measuring hemoglobin levels. Out of 200 mentally handicapped individuals, 87 (43.5%) were infected. The infection rates were 44.6% and 42.6% for non-institutionalized and institutionalized people, respectively. Regarding gender, 46.7% and 38.5% were reported for the males and females respectively. The most common parasites detected were: Cryptosporidium sp. (23.5%), microsporidia (15%), Giardia lamblia (8.5%), Dientamoeba fragilis (8%), Cyclospora cyatanensis (7.5%), Blastocystis hominis (6.5%), Entamoeba histolytica (5.5%) and Entamoeba coli (2.5%). Rates for Isospora belli and Enterobius vermicularis were estimated to be 1.5% for each, while lower rate was reported for Iodamoeba butschlii (1.0%). Prevalence of infections among mentally handicapped individuals are indications for several risk factors, including improper sanitary hygiene and illiteracy about personal hygiene. Therefore, frequent investigations, health care and medical intervention are needed. PMID:26878626

  11. Intestinal parasitic infections among mentally handicapped individuals in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Amany I; Hassanein, Faika

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was carried to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among mentally handicapped individuals in Alexandria, Egypt, in the period from December 2012 till November 2013. The study was conducted on 200 institutionalized and non-institutionalized mentally handicapped individuals. Fresh stool samples were subjected to different stains including; trichrome for detecting intestinal protozoa, modified acid fast stain for intestinal coccidia and quick hot gram chromotrope stain for Microsporidia. Also they were processed by Kato-Katz and formol ethyl acetate techniques for intestinal helminths. Additionally, blood samples were collected for measuring hemoglobin levels. Out of 200 mentally handicapped individuals, 87 (43.5%) were infected. The infection rates were 44.6% and 42.6% for non-institutionalized and institutionalized people, respectively. Regarding gender, 46.7% and 38.5% were reported for the males and females respectively. The most common parasites detected were: Cryptosporidium sp. (23.5%), microsporidia (15%), Giardia lamblia (8.5%), Dientamoeba fragilis (8%), Cyclospora cyatanensis (7.5%), Blastocystis hominis (6.5%), Entamoeba histolytica (5.5%) and Entamoeba coli (2.5%). Rates for Isospora belli and Enterobius vermicularis were estimated to be 1.5% for each, while lower rate was reported for Iodamoeba butschlii (1.0%). Prevalence of infections among mentally handicapped individuals are indications for several risk factors, including improper sanitary hygiene and illiteracy about personal hygiene. Therefore, frequent investigations, health care and medical intervention are needed.

  12. Cytomegalovirus Infection After Intestinal Transplantation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Javier; Green, Michael; Kocoshis, Samuel; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Ahu-Elmagd, Kareem; Yunis, Eduardo; Irish, William; Todo, Satoru; Reyes, Jorge; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen episodes of cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease occurred in 10 of 41 children undergoing intestinal transplantation from 1990 to 1995. Stratification of CMV disease by donor (D)/recipient (R) serological status was as follows: 3 of 8, D+/R−; 3 of 9, D+/R+; 4 of 9, D−/R+; and 0 of 15, D−/R−. Treatment resulted in resolution of CMV disease in 93.3% of episodes. No deaths attributable to CMV disease occurred in this series. CMV in D+/R− children resulted in more extensive and persistent disease. However, patient and graft survival rates were similar in the different D/R subgroups and between children with and without CMV disease. Cumulative dose of steroid boluses (relative risk [RR]. 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]. 1.14–2.21) and history of steroid recycles (RR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.21–6.13) were associated with CMV disease. These results suggest that although CMV-associated morbidity in pediatric intestinal transplant recipients was substantial, it was not associated with an increased rate of mortality or graft loss, even among high-risk D+/R− patients. PMID:9402361

  13. Campylobacter infection in chickens modulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Molnár, Andor; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Ghareeb, Khaled; Khayal, Basel; Hess, Claudia; Liebhart, Dieter; Dublecz, Károly; Hess, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Asymptomatic carriage of Campylobacter jejuni is highly prevalent in chicken flocks. Thus, we investigated whether chronic Campylobacter carriage affects chicken intestinal functions despite the absence of clinical symptoms. An experiment was carried out in which commercial chickens were orally infected with C. jejuni (1 × 10(8) CFU/bird) at 14 days of life. Changes in ion transport and barrier function were assessed by short-circuit current (I(sc)) and transepithelial ion conductance (G(t)) in Ussing chambers. G(t) increased in cecum and colon of Campylobacter-infected chicken 7 d post-infection (DPI), whereas G t initially decreased in the jejunum at 7 DPI and increased thereafter at 14 DPI. The net charge transfer across the epithelium was reduced or tended to be reduced in all segments, as evidenced by a decreased I sc. Furthermore, the infection induced intestinal histomorphological changes, most prominently including a decrease in villus height, crypt depth and villus surface area in the jejunum at 7 DPI. Furthermore, body mass gain was decreased by Campylobacter carriage. This study demonstrates, for the first time, changes in the intestinal barrier function in Campylobacter-infected chickens and these changes were associated with a decrease in growth performance in otherwise healthy-appearing birds.

  14. Risk factors associated with intestinal parasitic infections among children.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbini, Gehad T; Abosdera, Mostafa Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    Intestinal parasites are endemic worldwide and have been described as constituting the greatest single worldwide cause of illness and disease. The effective prevention and control of intestinal parasitic infections requires identification of local risk factors, particularly among high-risk groups. This study retrospectively analyzed demographic factors that may affect the prevalence of intestinal parasites among school children. Interviews, observation, and anthropometric indices assessment were used to identify the risk factors. The findings of the study showed that young age, female gender, and severe malnutrition, Poverty, illiteracy, poor hygiene, lack of access to potable water and hot and humid tropical climate are the factors associated with intestinal parasitic infections all correlated positively with increased rates of infection. Clinical visits were performed on 650 school children aged 5-15 years over a four-year period (2010-2013) in the Nahya Village, Giza Governorate. Stool specimens were examined using the formal ether concentration technique. Data were analysed using the SPSS statistical software. The results suggest that the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites among young children is highly dependent on the specific species of the parasite. PMID:23697034

  15. Survival after intestinal mucormycosis in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Parra, R; Arnau, E; Julia, A; Lopez, A; Nadal, A; Allende, E

    1986-12-15

    A young woman with acute myelocytic leukemia developed acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding immediately after a first remission induction of her leukemia. After the site of bleeding was located in the descending colon, a necrotic bleeding ulcer was resected. Histologic examination of the ulcer established the diagnosis of gastrointestinal mucormycosis. Treatment with amphotericin B was administered because of the high risk of dissemination. The patient has been followed for 9 months with no evidence of relapse of infection. Survival after gastrointestinal mucormycosis in acute leukemia has not previously been reported in the English language literature. Success in managing mucormycosis depends on the adherence to the recommended principles of early aggressive diagnostic measures, excisional surgery, amphotericin B therapy, and control of the underlying predisposing condition.

  16. Intestinal parasitic infection among Egyptian children with chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, Lerine Bahy El-Dine; El-Faramawy, Amel Abdel Magid; El-Sayed, Nagwa Mostafa; Ismail, Khadiga Ahmed; Fouad, Sally Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    Patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD) are often highly susceptible to parasitic infection due to a depressed immune system. The objective of this study was to detect the most commonly intestinal parasites found among Egyptian children with CLD. The present study was conducted on 50 children with CLD of different etiology (25 were having different intestinal symptoms, 25 without intestinal symptoms) and 50 non-CLD children with gastrointestinal complaints served as controls. All cases were subjected to stool examination and investigated by liver function tests. Also, anthropometric measurements were taken for all children including weight and height. It was found that the most commonly intestinal protozoa identified in the patients with CLD in order of frequency were: Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (16 %), Giardia lamblia (14 %), Blastocystis hominis (14 %), Cryptosporidium parvum (10 %), E. histolytica and G. lamblia (2 %), E. histolytica and B. hominis (2 %), G. lamblia and B. hominis (2 %), B. hominis and Entamoeba coli (2 %), Microsporidium (2 %) and no cases were found infected with Strongyloides stercoralis. As compared to the controls, the observed incidence of these organisms in CLD patients was significantly higher (p < 0.045) as regards stool examination by unstained techniques while, there was no significant difference between both groups as regards stool examination by stained techniques (p < 0.478). In addition, this study showed that the weight and height of studied patients were affected by parasitic infection while, there was no significant correlation between parasitic infection and liver function tests. In conclusion, chronic liver diseases affect the immunity of the patients as shown in significant increase in the incidence of intestinal parasites in cases compared to controls.

  17. Tsutsugamushi infection-associated acute rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Young, Park Chi; Hae, Chung Choon; Lee, Kim Hyun; Hoon, Chung Jong

    2003-12-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication that emerges in a variety of infectious diseases, such as tsutsugamushi infection. In this study, we report a 71-year-old female patient with tsutsugamushi infection who exhibiting rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. On admission, an eschar, which is characteristic of tsutsugamushi infection, was found on her right flank area. Moreover, her tsutsugamushi antibody titer was 1:40960. The elevated values of serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), aldolase, creatinine and dark brown urine secondary to myoglobinuria are consistent with indications of rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure due to tsutsugamushi infection. Her health improved without any residual effects after treatment with doxycyclin and hydration with normal saline. PMID:14717236

  18. Acute otitis media and respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Ruuskanen, O; Arola, M; Putto-Laurila, A; Mertsola, J; Meurman, O; Viljanen, M K; Halonen, P

    1989-02-01

    We studied the association of acute otitis media with different respiratory virus infections in a pediatric department on the basis of epidemics between 1980 and 1985. Altogether 4524 cases of acute otitis media were diagnosed. The diagnosis was confirmed by tympanocentesis in 3332 ears. Respiratory virus infection was diagnosed during the same period in 989 patients by detecting viral antigen in nasopharyngeal mucus. There was a significant correlation between acute otitis media and respiratory virus epidemics, especially respiratory syncytial virus epidemics. There was no significant correlation between outbreaks of other respiratory viruses and acute otitis media. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 57% of respiratory syncytial virus, 35% of influenza A virus, 33% of parainfluenza type 3 virus, 30% of adenovirus, 28% of parainfluenza type 1 virus, 18% of influenza B virus and 10% of parainfluenza type 2 virus infections. These observations show a clear association of respiratory virus infections with acute otitis media. In this study on hospitalized children Haemophilus influenzae strains were the most common bacteriologic pathogens in middle ear fluid, occurring in 19% of cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae was present in 16% and Branhamella catarrhalis in 7% of cases. There was no association between specific viruses and bacteria observed in this study.

  19. Extra-intestinal and long term consequences of Giardia duodenalis infections

    PubMed Central

    Halliez, Marie CM; Buret, André G

    2013-01-01

    Giardiasis is the most common waterborne parasitic infection of the human intestine worldwide. The etiological agent, Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia), is a flagellated, binucleated protozoan parasite which infects a wide array of mammalian hosts. Human giardiasis is a true cosmopolitan pathogen, with highest prevalence in developing countries. Giardiasis can present with a broad range of clinical manifestations from asymptomatic, to acute or chronic diarrheal disease associated with abdominal pain and nausea. Most infections are self-limiting, although re-infection and chronic infection can occur. Recent evidence indicating that Giardia may cause chronic post-infectious gastrointestinal complications have made it a topic of intense research. The causes of the post-infectious clinical manifestations due to Giardia, even after complete elimination of the parasite, remain obscure. This review offers a state-of-the-art discussion on the long-term consequences of Giardia infections, from extra-intestinal manifestations, growth and cognitive deficiencies, to post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome. The discussion also sheds light on some of the novel mechanisms recently implicated in the production of these post-infectious manifestations. PMID:24379622

  20. Practical parasitology courses and infection with intestinal parasites in students.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Sh; Rostami, A; Mohammadi, M; Ebrahimzadeh, F; Pournia, Y

    2016-01-01

    Students who are working in research or educational laboratories of parasitology, as well as health care workers providing care for patients, are at the risk of becoming infected with parasites through accidental exposure. The main purpose of this study was to identify potential positive cases of intestinal parasitic infections among students who took practical parasitology courses compared with students who did not take any practical parasitology courses in Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran, in 2013-2014. A total of 310 subjects from various majors were invited to voluntarily participate in the study. Various demographic data were collected using questionnaires. Three stool samples were collected from each individual on alternate days. Saline wet mounts (SWM), formalin-ether sedimentation test (FEST), Sheather floatation test (SHFT) and trichrome and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining methods were used to diagnose the presence of intestinal parasites. The prevalence rate of intestinal parasites (IPs) among the students was 11.93%. There was a significant difference between majors in the infection with IPs (P<0.05). The most frequently observed IPs were Blastocystis hominis (4.51%) and Giardia intestinalis (3.54%). The results of this study showed that the transmission of pathogenic parasites in the educational course of practical parasitology could occur and must be taken into careful consideration. PMID:26796769

  1. Practical parasitology courses and infection with intestinal parasites in students.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Sh; Rostami, A; Mohammadi, M; Ebrahimzadeh, F; Pournia, Y

    2016-01-01

    Students who are working in research or educational laboratories of parasitology, as well as health care workers providing care for patients, are at the risk of becoming infected with parasites through accidental exposure. The main purpose of this study was to identify potential positive cases of intestinal parasitic infections among students who took practical parasitology courses compared with students who did not take any practical parasitology courses in Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran, in 2013-2014. A total of 310 subjects from various majors were invited to voluntarily participate in the study. Various demographic data were collected using questionnaires. Three stool samples were collected from each individual on alternate days. Saline wet mounts (SWM), formalin-ether sedimentation test (FEST), Sheather floatation test (SHFT) and trichrome and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining methods were used to diagnose the presence of intestinal parasites. The prevalence rate of intestinal parasites (IPs) among the students was 11.93%. There was a significant difference between majors in the infection with IPs (P<0.05). The most frequently observed IPs were Blastocystis hominis (4.51%) and Giardia intestinalis (3.54%). The results of this study showed that the transmission of pathogenic parasites in the educational course of practical parasitology could occur and must be taken into careful consideration.

  2. Cryptosporidiosis in rhesus macaques challenged during acute and chronic phases of SIV infection.

    PubMed

    Singh, Inderpal; Carville, Angela; Tzipori, Saul

    2011-09-01

    The intestinal immune dysfunction due to loss of mucosal and peripheral CD4(+) T cells in individuals with HIV/AIDS is presumably responsible for the establishment of persistent cryptosporidiosis. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques were used to investigate the phase/timing in SIV infection, which permits a self-limiting Cryptosporidium parvum infection to become persistent in immunodeficient hosts because of significant mucosal immune defects. Two groups of SIV-infected macaques were challenged with C. parvum; one was challenged during the acute SIV infection phase (2 weeks post-SIV infection) and the second was challenged during the chronic SIV phase (CD4 counts 200-500 cells/μl of blood). Samples (fecal, blood, biopsy, and necropsy) were collected at different time points after infection to correlate the progression of disease with the immune status of the animals. All seven SIV-infected macaques challenged during the acute phase of SIV infection became persistently infected and excreted oocysts for 1-4 months. However, four of the six in the chronic SIV phase became infected with cryptosporidiosis, of which one survived 2 weeks and one became naturally infected. Sequential analysis of CD4(+) in blood and intestines of coinfected macaques exhibited pronounced losses of CD4 T cells during the first 2 weeks after SIV infection, followed by transient rebound of CD4 T cells in the gut after C. parvum infection, and then a gradual loss over subsequent months. Persistent cryptosporidiosis was more consistently induced during the acute SIV phase indicating that profound viral damage to gut lymphoid tissue during the acute phase was more conducive, compared with the chronic phase, to establishing persistent cryptosporidiosis than low circulating CD4 T cells.

  3. When to consider acute HIV infection in the differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Richard M; Hardwicke, Robin L; Grimes, Deanna E; DeGarmo, D Sean

    2016-01-16

    Patients presenting with fever, pharyngitis, and lymphadenopathy are likely to have mononucleosis; however, patients with acute HIV infection may present with similar symptoms. Acute HIV infection should be considered as a differential diagnosis if test results for mononucleosis are negative. This article describes when to order HIV testing and discusses the importance of early intervention for acute HIV infection. PMID:26678418

  4. Intestinal parasitic infections and micronutrient deficiency: a review.

    PubMed

    Hesham, M S; Edariah, A B; Norhayati, M

    2004-06-01

    Malnutrition including vitamin A and iron deficiency and parasitic diseases have a strikingly similar geographical distribution with the same people experiencing both insults together for much of their lives. Parasitic infections are thought to contribute to child malnutrition and micronutrient deficiency through subtle reduction in digestion and absorption, chronic inflammation and loss of nutrients. Parasites may affect the intake of food; it's subsequent digestion and absorption, metabolism and the maintenance of nutrient pools. The most important parasites related to nutritional status are intestinal parasites especially soil transmitted helminthes, Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica, followed by other parasites such as the coccidia, Schistosoma sp. and malarial parasites.

  5. Peritoneal infection in acute intermittent peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raj Kumar; Kumar, Jitendra; Gupta, Amit; Gulati, Sanjeev

    2003-11-01

    A prospective study was done to evaluate the incidence and microbiological trend of peritoneal infection in patients undergoing acute intermittent peritoneal dialysis (PD). Complete sterile procedure was ensured and at the completion of the procedure PD fluid was sent for bacteriological culture, sensitivity, and total and differential cell count. During the period September 2000 to February 2001 a total of 100 patients were evaluated. Male female ratio was 72:28. Mean age was 43.17 +/- 17.2 years. In 26 patients cyclers were used. Bacterial culture was positive in total of 30 cases (30%). Gram positive, Gram negative and mixed infection was found in 10%, 15%, and 5% respectively. Number of exchanges (31.61 +/- 7.7 vs. 31.3 +/- 6, p = 0.8) were similar and number of repositioning was significantly more in the infected group (23.3% vs. 11.4%, p < 0.01). Total cell count was significantly higher in infected group (274.3 +/- 502 vs. 31.25 +/- 79.34, p < 0.01). Among Gram +ve organisms Staphylococcus was found in 7, Enterococcus faecalis in 4 and Coryne bacterium sps. in 2 cases. Among Gram -ve organisms, E. coli was found in 4, Enterobacter in 3, Klebsiella 1, Pseudomonas 1, Acinetobacter arinatus 5, Acinetobacter baumani 3, and Citrobacter freundii 3. Mixed flora comprised of Enterococcus faecalis 3, Enterobacter 1, Staphlococcus 1, E. coli 3, Citrobacter 1, Acinobacter baumani 1. Although with the cyclers using collapsible bags, staphylococcus was not isolated, the total incidence of infection (11/26 cases) was not decreased with the use of cyclers. We conclude that in acute intermittent peritoneal dialysis the incidence of bacterial infection is 30% with preponderance of Gram -ve over Gram +ve organisms and organism of fecal origin being commoner than those of skin origin. Use of cycler-assisted over manual PD do not improve the incidence of infection. Repositioning of the stiff catheter significantly increases the incidence of infection.

  6. Cytokine-mediated regulation of chronic intestinal helminth infection

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Most inbred strains of mouse infected with the intestinal nematode Trichuris muris are resistant to infection expelling the parasite before adult worms establish. However, a few susceptible strains exist that are incapable of worm expulsion and harbor chronic infections of mature adult worms. Analyses of in vitro cytokine production by cells from the draining lymph node (mesenteric lymph node) have indicated that expulsion phenotype is tightly correlated with the selective expansion of helper T cells (Th) of the Th1 or Th2 cell subset within the mesenteric lymph node, resulting in susceptibility and resistance to T. muris, respectively. We have now confirmed and extended our in vitro observations in a series of experiments involving the in vivo manipulation of host cytokine levels. Depletion of interferon (IFN)- gamma in normally susceptible mice resulted in expulsion of the parasite, representing the first evidence for a role for IFN-gamma in the establishment of chronic helminth infection. Blocking interleukin (IL)-4 function in normally resistant animals prevented the generation of a protective immune response allowing adult stages of the parasite to develop. Conversely the administration of IL-4 to a normally susceptible host facilitated expulsion and indeed enabled established adult worms to be expelled when administered late in infection. In all cases assessment of a variety of in vivo parameters indicative of a Th1- or Th2-type response (parasite-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) G2a and the parasite-specific IgG1, total IgE levels and intestinal mastocytosis, respectively) demonstrated that the in vivo modulation of a Th1- or Th2- specific cytokine allowed the reciprocal Th cell subset to expand and become dominant with dramatic consequences for worm expulsion. PMID:8270879

  7. Intestinal helminth infections amongst HIV-infected adults in Mthatha General Hospital, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yogeswaran, Parimalaranie; Wright, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Background In South Africa, studies on the prevalence of intestinal helminth co-infection amongst HIV-infected patients as well as possible interactions between these two infections are limited. Aim To investigate the prevalence of intestinal helminth infestation amongst adults living with HIV or AIDS at Mthatha General Hospital. Setting Study participants were recruited at the outpatient department of Mthatha General Hospital, Mthatha, South Africa. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between October and December 2013 amongst consecutive consenting HIV-positive adult patients. Socio-demographic and clinical information were obtained using data collection forms and structured interviews. Stool samples were collected to investigate the presence of helminths whilst blood samples were obtained for the measurement of CD4+ T-cell count and viral load. Results Data were obtained on 231 participants, with a mean age of 34.9 years, a mean CD4 count of 348 cells/µL and a mean viral load of 4.8 log10 copies/mL. Intestinal helminth prevalence was 24.7%, with Ascaris Lumbricoides (42.1%) the most prevalent identified species. Statistically significant association was found between CD4 count of less than 200 cells/µL and helminth infection (p = 0.05). No statistically significant association was found between intestinal helminth infection and the mean CD4 count (p = 0.79) or the mean viral load (p = 0.98). Conclusion A high prevalence of intestinal helminth infections was observed amongst the study population. Therefore, screening and treatment of helminths should be considered as part of the management of HIV and AIDS in primary health care. PMID:26842519

  8. Intestinal parasitic infections in Campalagian district, south Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mangali, A; Sasabone, P; Syafruddin; Abadi, K; Hasegawa, H; Toma, T; Kamimura, K; Miyagi, I

    1993-06-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections were surveyed in the inhabitants of 3 coastal and 2 inland villages of Campalagian District, South Sulawesi, Indonesia, in July 1992. A total of 398 fecal samples were examined by using Kato-Katz thick smear, Harada-Mori culture and agar-plate culture techniques. Protozoan cysts were examined by formalin ether concentration technique on 380 fecal samples. Soil-transmitted helminth infections were highly prevalent with the overall positive rates as follows: Ascaris lumbricoides 25.3%, Trichuris trichiura 59.3%, hookworm 68.3% and Strongyloides stercoralis 2.3%. Eight species of protozoan were detected with the overall prevalence as follows: Entamoeba histolytica 10.9%, E. hartmanni 16.3%, E. coli 31.9%, Endolimax nana 12.5%, Iodamoeba buetschlii 5.4%, Giardia lamblia 4.6%, Chilomastix mesnili 0.8% and Blastocystis hominis 18.0%. In the inland villages, prevalence of hookworm infection was higher than Ascaris and Trichuris infections, while in the coastal villages Trichuris infection was predominant. Egg count revealed that the infection level was light in most of the hookworm and Trichuris carriers. Prevalence of lavatories among houses appeared to be inversely proportional to the prevalence of hookworm infection. Meanwhile, the incomplete structure of the lavatories might result in contamination of environment with Ascaris and Trichuris eggs. Harada-Mori culture was the most efficient method in the detection of hookworm infection compared to other techniques. Both Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale were found in all villages, but the former was the predominant species. An adult pinworm was detected by agar-plate culture of feces. Two types of pinworm males, corresponding to Enterobius vermicularis and E. gregorii, were observed. PMID:8266235

  9. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Di Genova, Bruno M; Tonelli, Renata R

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite-host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases' pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death. PMID:26973630

  10. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Di Genova, Bruno M.; Tonelli, Renata R.

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite–host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases’ pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death. PMID:26973630

  11. Intestinal fluke infection as a result of eating sushi.

    PubMed

    Adams, K O; Jungkind, D L; Bergquist, E J; Wirts, C W

    1986-11-01

    Severe diarrhea in a female outpatient was caused by an intestinal fluke, identified as Heterophyes heterophyes, a natural parasite of humans and domesticated and wild fish-eating mammals. This parasite is endemic in the Orient and the Middle East. A detailed case history revealed that the woman had never traveled outside the continental United States but became infected while eating raw fresh-water fish (sushi) that had been served at a local Japanese restaurant. The restaurant specialized in serving a great variety of fresh-water and salt-water fish that were flown in from the Orient and other parts of the world. The authors' findings indicate that a person does not have to travel to an endemic area to become infected with this organism.

  12. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Di Genova, Bruno M; Tonelli, Renata R

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite-host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases' pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death.

  13. Epidemiologic features of intestinal parasitic infections in Italian mental institutions.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, A; Cirioni, O; Balducci, M; Drenaggi, D; Quarta, M; De Federicis, M; Ruggeri, P; Colapinto, D; Ripani, G; Scalise, G

    1997-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in the residents of four Italian psychiatric institutions, we examined the stool specimens collected in triplicate from 238 residents, enrolled between May 1995 and May 1996. Besides, physician and staff nurses provided data about each resident by standardized questionnaires. Parasites were detected in the fecal samples from 128 patients (53.8%). However, in the stool specimens from 106 residents only non-pathogenic protozoa were found (82.8%). Trichuris trichiura ova, Giardia lamblia cysts and trophozoites, Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, and Balantidium coli cysts were found in the fecal samples from 22 residents (9.2%). B. hominis was the most prevalent parasite. It was detected in the fecal specimens from 97 residents (40.8%). The so-called nonpathogenic amebae were detected in the fecal specimens from 65 residents, though, at the same time, there was no evidence of Entamoeba histolytica infection. Twelve residents (5.0%) showed intestinal colonization by nonpathogenic flagellates. All the subjects with T. trichiura infection were housed in the facility of Ancona. Parasites were found in fecal samples from all the 11 residents with behavioural aberrations, but only three of those suffering from intestinal pathogen infection associated to diarrhea. Statistical analyses revealed that the presence of pathogenic parasites in fecal specimens was significantly associated with diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fever, behavioural aberrations and nonpathogenic protozoa (p < 0.01), but did not demonstrate any other significant associations between these parasites and the other variables, such as pruritus, mucus or blood in the stools and presence of fecal leukocytes. On the other hand, the presence of nonpathogenic protozoa was significantly related to aberrations such as pica, geophagia, phytophagy, coprophagy, coprophilia and pathogenic parasites (p < 0.01). Data analyses revealed that both

  14. Accuracy of the serum intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein for diagnosis of acute intestinal ischemia: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Da-Li; Cen, Yun-Yun; Li, Shu-Min; Li, Wei-Ming; Lu, Qi-Ping; Xu, Peng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the utility of serum intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (I-FABP) in differentiating acute intestinal ischemia from acute abdomen. However, the results remain controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis is to determine the overall accuracy of serum I-FABP in the diagnosis of acute intestinal ischemia. Publications addressing the accuracy of serum I-FABP in the diagnosis of ischemic bowel diseases were selected from databases. The values of true-positive (TP), true-negative (TN), false-positive (FP), and false-negative (FN) were extracted or calculated for each study. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were calculated. The overall diagnostic performance was assessed using a summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) and area under curve (AUC). Nine studies that collectively included 1246 patients met the eligible criteria. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, DOR, PLR, and NLR were 0.80 (95% CI: 0.72–0.86), 0.85 (95% CI: 0.73–0.93), 24 (95% CI: 9–65), 5.5 (95% CI: 2.8–10.8) and 0.23 (95% CI: 0.15–0.35), respectively. The AUC was 0.86 (95% CI: 0.83–0.89). The meta-analysis carried out in this report suggests that the I-FABP may be a useful diagnostic tool to confirm acute intestinal ischemia in acute abdomen, but better-designed trials are still required to confirm our findings. PMID:27681959

  15. Neutrophils Are Essential for Containment of Vibrio cholerae to the Intestine during the Proinflammatory Phase of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Queen, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Cholera is classically considered a noninflammatory diarrheal disease, in comparison to invasive enteric organisms, although there is a low-level proinflammatory response during early infection with Vibrio cholerae and a strong proinflammatory reaction to live attenuated vaccine strains. Using an adult mouse intestinal infection model, this study examines the contribution of neutrophils to host defense to infection. Nontoxigenic El Tor O1 V. cholerae infection is characterized by the upregulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 alpha in the intestine, indicating an acute innate immune response. Depletion of neutrophils from mice with anti-Ly6G IA8 monoclonal antibody led to decreased survival of mice. The role of neutrophils in protection of the host is to limit the infection to the intestine and control bacterial spread to extraintestinal organs. In the absence of neutrophils, the infection spread to the spleen and led to increased systemic levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor alpha, suggesting the decreased survival in neutropenic mice is due to systemic shock. Neutrophils were found not to contribute to either clearance of colonizing bacteria or to alter the local immune response. However, when genes for secreted accessory toxins were deleted, the colonizing bacteria were cleared from the intestine, and this clearance is dependent upon neutrophils. Thus, the requirement for accessory toxins in virulence is negated in neutropenic mice, which is consistent with a role of accessory toxins in the evasion of innate immune cells in the intestine. Overall, these data support that neutrophils impact disease progression and suggest that neutrophil effectiveness can be manipulated through the deletion of accessory toxins. PMID:22615254

  16. Acute focal infections of dental origin.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ingar; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    2014-06-01

    This article describes the most important pus-producing acute oral infections (dental infections) that can spread extra-orally. Most of these infections are spread by bacteria entering the bloodstream. However, dental infections have a number of other pathways for dissemination. By forming abscesses or phlegmon they can reach facial spaces that communicate with each other and then spread downwards to the mediastinum or upwards to the brain. In such cases dental infections can become, if not properly treated, life-threatening. It seems that early diagnosis and treatment are imperative, and potentially infectious foci should be traced and eliminated. Dental hygiene and prophylaxis to prevent dental biofilm formation are important measures to reduce the risk of these calamities. The more compromised the host defense is, the more importance should be put on these measures. Although commensal bacteria are often involved in these infections, attention should also be paid to specific periodontal pathogens, and a proper microbial diagnosis, obtained using molecular methods plus bacterial sensitivity testing, can provide the patient with optimal care. Drainage of pus must be established where possible so that the optimal effect of antibiotics can be achieved. Penicillin is still the drug of first choice in settings where suspicion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is low.

  17. Acute focal infections of dental origin.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ingar; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    2014-06-01

    This article describes the most important pus-producing acute oral infections (dental infections) that can spread extra-orally. Most of these infections are spread by bacteria entering the bloodstream. However, dental infections have a number of other pathways for dissemination. By forming abscesses or phlegmon they can reach facial spaces that communicate with each other and then spread downwards to the mediastinum or upwards to the brain. In such cases dental infections can become, if not properly treated, life-threatening. It seems that early diagnosis and treatment are imperative, and potentially infectious foci should be traced and eliminated. Dental hygiene and prophylaxis to prevent dental biofilm formation are important measures to reduce the risk of these calamities. The more compromised the host defense is, the more importance should be put on these measures. Although commensal bacteria are often involved in these infections, attention should also be paid to specific periodontal pathogens, and a proper microbial diagnosis, obtained using molecular methods plus bacterial sensitivity testing, can provide the patient with optimal care. Drainage of pus must be established where possible so that the optimal effect of antibiotics can be achieved. Penicillin is still the drug of first choice in settings where suspicion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is low. PMID:24738592

  18. Intestinal parasitic infections in HIV infected and non-infected patients in a low HIV prevalence region, West-Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Nkenfou, Céline Nguefeu; Nana, Christelle Tafou; Payne, Vincent Khan

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients requires careful consideration in the developing world where poor nutrition is associated with poor hygiene and several tropical diseases. However, there have been very few studies addressing this issue in Cameroon. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Dschang -Cameroon. Stool and blood specimens from HIV/AIDS patients and control group were screened respectively for intestinal parasites and for HIV antibodies. Intestinal parasites were identified using direct microscopy, formalin-ether concentration and Ziehl Neelsen methods. Out of 396 participants recruited among patients consulting at hospital, 42 (10.6%) were HIV positive, thirty of them treatment naïve. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 14.64%. Out of 42 HIV/AIDS patients, 59.5% (25/42) were infected with intestinal parasites, while only 9.32% (33/354) of the HIV negative patients were infected with intestinal parasites. The parasites detected in our study population included Crystosporidium parvum (2.53%), Entamoeba histolytica (7.52%), Entamoeba coli (4.04%), Giardia lamblia (0.25%), Trichuris trichura (0.25%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25%) and Taenia spp. (0.25%). In the HIV infected group, Crystosporidium parvum (19.04%), Entamoeba histolytica (19.04%), Entamoeba coli (21.42%), Giardia lamblia (2.38%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25%) and Taenia spp. (0.25%) were found. Crystosporidium parvum was found to be significantly higher in HIV/AIDS patients than in controls (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that the HIV status and the quality of water were the major risk factors for intestinal parasitosis. Routine examinations of stool samples for parasites would significantly benefit the HIV patients by contributing in reducing morbidity and improving the efficiency of antiretroviral treatment. Even after the introduction of

  19. Antibiotic and Antiinflammatory Therapy Transiently Reduces Inflammation and Hypercoagulation in Acutely SIV-Infected Pigtailed Macaques.

    PubMed

    Pandrea, Ivona; Xu, Cuiling; Stock, Jennifer L; Frank, Daniel N; Ma, Dongzhu; Policicchio, Benjamin B; He, Tianyu; Kristoff, Jan; Cornell, Elaine; Haret-Richter, George S; Trichel, Anita; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Tracy, Russell; Wilson, Cara; Landay, Alan L; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Increased chronic immune activation and inflammation are hallmarks of HIV/SIV infection and are highly correlated with progression to AIDS and development of non-AIDS comorbidities, such as hypercoagulability and cardiovascular disease. Intestinal dysfunction resulting in microbial translocation has been proposed as a lead cause of systemic immune activation and hypercoagulability in HIV/SIV infection. Our goal was to assess the biological and clinical impact of a therapeutic strategy designed to reduce microbial translocation through reduction of the microbial content of the intestine (Rifaximin-RFX) and of gut inflammation (Sulfasalazine-SFZ). RFX is an intraluminal antibiotic that was successfully used in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SFZ is an antiinflammatory drug successfully used in patients with mild to moderate inflammatory bowel disease. Both these clinical conditions are associated with increased microbial translocation, similar to HIV-infected patients. Treatment was administered for 90 days to five acutely SIV-infected pigtailed macaques (PTMs) starting at the time of infection; seven untreated SIVsab-infected PTMs were used as controls. RFX+SFZ were also administered for 90 days to three chronically SIVsab-infected PTMs. RFX+SFZ administration during acute SIVsab infection of PTMs resulted in: significantly lower microbial translocation, lower systemic immune activation, lower viral replication, better preservation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and significantly lower levels of hypercoagulation biomarkers. This effect was clear during the first 40 days of treatment and was lost during the last stages of treatment. Administration of RFX+SFZ to chronically SIVsab-infected PTMs had no discernible effect on infection. Our data thus indicate that early RFX+SFZ administration transiently improves the natural history of acute and postacute SIV infection, but has no effect during chronic infection. PMID:26764484

  20. Antibiotic and Antiinflammatory Therapy Transiently Reduces Inflammation and Hypercoagulation in Acutely SIV-Infected Pigtailed Macaques.

    PubMed

    Pandrea, Ivona; Xu, Cuiling; Stock, Jennifer L; Frank, Daniel N; Ma, Dongzhu; Policicchio, Benjamin B; He, Tianyu; Kristoff, Jan; Cornell, Elaine; Haret-Richter, George S; Trichel, Anita; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Tracy, Russell; Wilson, Cara; Landay, Alan L; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Increased chronic immune activation and inflammation are hallmarks of HIV/SIV infection and are highly correlated with progression to AIDS and development of non-AIDS comorbidities, such as hypercoagulability and cardiovascular disease. Intestinal dysfunction resulting in microbial translocation has been proposed as a lead cause of systemic immune activation and hypercoagulability in HIV/SIV infection. Our goal was to assess the biological and clinical impact of a therapeutic strategy designed to reduce microbial translocation through reduction of the microbial content of the intestine (Rifaximin-RFX) and of gut inflammation (Sulfasalazine-SFZ). RFX is an intraluminal antibiotic that was successfully used in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SFZ is an antiinflammatory drug successfully used in patients with mild to moderate inflammatory bowel disease. Both these clinical conditions are associated with increased microbial translocation, similar to HIV-infected patients. Treatment was administered for 90 days to five acutely SIV-infected pigtailed macaques (PTMs) starting at the time of infection; seven untreated SIVsab-infected PTMs were used as controls. RFX+SFZ were also administered for 90 days to three chronically SIVsab-infected PTMs. RFX+SFZ administration during acute SIVsab infection of PTMs resulted in: significantly lower microbial translocation, lower systemic immune activation, lower viral replication, better preservation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and significantly lower levels of hypercoagulation biomarkers. This effect was clear during the first 40 days of treatment and was lost during the last stages of treatment. Administration of RFX+SFZ to chronically SIVsab-infected PTMs had no discernible effect on infection. Our data thus indicate that early RFX+SFZ administration transiently improves the natural history of acute and postacute SIV infection, but has no effect during chronic infection.

  1. Antibiotic and Antiinflammatory Therapy Transiently Reduces Inflammation and Hypercoagulation in Acutely SIV-Infected Pigtailed Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pandrea, Ivona; Xu, Cuiling; Stock, Jennifer L.; Frank, Daniel N.; Ma, Dongzhu; Policicchio, Benjamin B.; He, Tianyu; Kristoff, Jan; Cornell, Elaine; Haret-Richter, George S.; Trichel, Anita; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Tracy, Russell; Wilson, Cara; Landay, Alan L.; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Increased chronic immune activation and inflammation are hallmarks of HIV/SIV infection and are highly correlated with progression to AIDS and development of non-AIDS comorbidities, such as hypercoagulability and cardiovascular disease. Intestinal dysfunction resulting in microbial translocation has been proposed as a lead cause of systemic immune activation and hypercoagulability in HIV/SIV infection. Our goal was to assess the biological and clinical impact of a therapeutic strategy designed to reduce microbial translocation through reduction of the microbial content of the intestine (Rifaximin-RFX) and of gut inflammation (Sulfasalazine-SFZ). RFX is an intraluminal antibiotic that was successfully used in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SFZ is an antiinflammatory drug successfully used in patients with mild to moderate inflammatory bowel disease. Both these clinical conditions are associated with increased microbial translocation, similar to HIV-infected patients. Treatment was administered for 90 days to five acutely SIV-infected pigtailed macaques (PTMs) starting at the time of infection; seven untreated SIVsab-infected PTMs were used as controls. RFX+SFZ were also administered for 90 days to three chronically SIVsab-infected PTMs. RFX+SFZ administration during acute SIVsab infection of PTMs resulted in: significantly lower microbial translocation, lower systemic immune activation, lower viral replication, better preservation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and significantly lower levels of hypercoagulation biomarkers. This effect was clear during the first 40 days of treatment and was lost during the last stages of treatment. Administration of RFX+SFZ to chronically SIVsab–infected PTMs had no discernible effect on infection. Our data thus indicate that early RFX+SFZ administration transiently improves the natural history of acute and postacute SIV infection, but has no effect during chronic infection. PMID:26764484

  2. Selenium (Se) deficiency alters intestinal diaphorase activity in mice infected with the intestinal parasitic worm Heligmosomoides polygyrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mice fed a diet deficient in Se show reduced resistance to a secondary infection with H. polygyrus. IL-4 and IL-13-dependent- increases in intestinal smooth muscle hyper-contractility and decreased glucose absorption correlate with expulsion of the adult worm following a challenge infection. Selen...

  3. ANTIOXIDANT ENZYME ACTIVITY AMONG ORPHANS INFECTED WITH INTESTINAL PARASITES IN PATHUM THANI PROVINCE, THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Mahittikorn, Aongart; Prasertbun, Rapeepan; Mori, Hirotake; Popruk, Supaluk

    2014-11-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections can negatively impact growth and nutrition in children. The infections can induce oxidative stress, resulting in a variety of illnesses. We measured antioxidant enzyme levels in orphan children infected with intestinal parasites to investigate the influence of nutritional status on antioxidant enzymes. This cross sectional study was conducted at an orphanage in Thailand. Stool samples were obtained from each subject and examined for intestinal parasites. Anthropometric measurements, complete blood count and biochemical parameters, including serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels, were obtained from studied subjects. One hundred twenty-eight children were included in the study. Intestinal parasites were found on microscopic examination of the stools in 36.7% (47/128); 18% (23/128) had a mixed parasite infection. Intestinal protozoa were found in 34.4% of subjects and intestinal helminthes were found in 2.3%. The median GPx level in children infected with intestinal parasites (2.3 ng/ml) was significantly lower than in non-infected children (7.7 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in SOD levels between the two groups. When comparing GPx levels in children with 1) pathogenic parasites, 2) non-pathogenic parasites and 3) no intestinal parasite infection, GPx levels differed significantly among three groups (2.2 ng/ml, 2.4 ng/ml and 7.7 ng/ml, respectively) (p < 0.05). When separating children by BMI and type of infection, the median SOD level in underweight children infected with pathogenic parasites (107.2 ng/ml) was significantly higher than in underweight children infected with non-pathogenic parasites (68.6 ng/ml) and without intestinal parasite infections (72.2 ng/ml). The present study identified two key findings: low GPx levels in children with intestinal parasitic infections, and the potential impact of malnutrition on some antioxidants. PMID:26466411

  4. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among public school children in a rural village of Kathmandu Valley.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, P; Bhandary, S; Shakya, P R; Acharya, T; Shrestha, A

    2014-09-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections (IPI) are one of the most prevalent infections in humans residing in developing countries and its burden is high among school aged children. This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection and types of intestinal parasites in rural public school children of Nepal. It included students from Nursery to Class X of a rural public school located in the northeast part of the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. Among the 194 participating children, prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection was found as 23.7%; (28.2% for boys; 20.2% for girls). Amongst the infected children, single and mixed parasitic infection was detected in 43 (93.5%) and 3 (6.5%) children respectively. Among protozoan parasites, Giardia lamblia was the most common (58.6%) whereas Hymenolepis nana was the most common (21.7%) among the helminths. Statistically different prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection was observed among children aged above 10 years and children aged below 6 years as well as 6 to 10 years. Gender-wise, there was no statistical difference in prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection. This study suggests the need of health education program in schools along with regular screening of intestinal parasites and treatment for effective management of the intestinal parasites among school children in Nepal.

  5. Intestinal parasitic infections and anaemia among pregnant women in the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Michael, Audrey; Kirarock, Wendy S; Pomat, William S; van den Biggelaar, Anita H J

    2013-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections and associations with risk factors among pregnant women in their second or third trimester in Goroka, Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. Among the 201 pregnant women enrolled in this study, 163 (81%) were infected with one or more intestinal parasites. Infections with protozoan parasites (65%) were more prevalent than infections with nematodes (31%); protozoan infections included Entamoeba histolytica (43%), Giardia lamblia (39%) and Pentatrichomonas hominis (14%), and nematode infections included hookworm (18%), Ascaris lumbricoides (14%), Strongyloides stercoralis (3%) and Trichuris trichiura (2%). Factors associated with higher risk of intestinal parasitic infections in pregnancy included being a primigravida for protozoan-only infections and education limited to primary school for nematode infections. Altitude-adjusted haemoglobin levels were assessed at the beginning of labour for 110 women, with 69 (63%) found to be anaemic (haemoglobin < 11 g/dl). There were no associations found between being infected in pregnancy and anaemia. PMID:26288929

  6. [Acute intestinal obstruction revealing enteropathy associated t-cell lymphoma, about a case].

    PubMed

    Garba, Abdoul Aziz; Adamou, Harissou; Magagi, Ibrahim Amadou; Brah, Souleymane; Habou, Oumarou

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare complication of celiac disease (CD). We report a case of EATL associated with CD revealed by acute intestinal obstruction. A North African woman of 38 years old with a history of infertility and chronic abdominal pain was admitted in emergency with acute intestinal obstruction. During the surgery, we found a tumor on the small intestine with mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the specimen objectified a digestive T lymphoma CD3+ and immunological assessment of celiac disease was positive. The diagnosis of EATL was thus retained. Chemotherapy (CHOEP protocol) was established as well as gluten-free diet with a complete response to treatment. The EATL is a rare complication of CD that can be revealed by intestinal obstruction. The prognosis can be improved by early treatment involving surgery and chemotherapy. Its prevention requires early diagnosis of celiac and gluten-free diets. PMID:27217874

  7. Intestinal parasitic infections among children in central Albania

    PubMed Central

    Sejdini, A; Mahmud, R; Lim, Y A L; Mahdy, M; Sejdini, F; Gjoni, V; Xhaferraj, K; Kasmi, G

    2011-01-01

    Although intestinal parasitic infections (IPI) among children remain a global issue, the current information on such infections in Albanian children is very limited. A cross-sectional study of the IPI in 321 children living in the Albanian counties of Tirana (152) and Elbasan (169) was therefore conducted in 2008, with a pre-tested standard questionnaire employed to gather the relevant personal and clinical data. Using formalin–ether concentration and permanent stains, stool samples were examined microscopically for the ova, cysts and oocysts of any parasites. The overall prevalence of IPI was 19% (61 of 321), with protozoan infections (11·5%) apparently more common than infections with soil-transmitted helminths (STH; 8·1%). Giardia duodenalis was the parasite most frequently detected (10·9%), followed by hookworm (5·6%), Ascaris lumbricoides (1·9%), Trichuris trichiura (0·6%), Cryptosporidium (0·3%) and Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (0·3%). The results of a univariate analysis indicated that the children from Tirana county were significantly more likely to be found infected with STH compared with the children from Elbasan county (12·5% v. 4·1%; P = 0·006). Children sampled in the community were also more likely to be found STH-positive than the children sampled as they attended hospitals and health clinics (10·5% v. 6·0%) but this difference did not reach statistical significance. The children found STH-positive were five times more likely to be suffering from diarrhoea than the other children checked in clinical settings (P = 0·004) and were also more likely to be suffering from abdominal pain (P = 0·054) and/or diminished appetite (P = 0·016). PMID:21801503

  8. Thrombosis associated with acute cytomegalovirus infection: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Shany; Eytan, Ori

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis associated with acute cytomegalovirus infection has been reported many times in the literature since the mid 1980s – mainly in case reports and in small case series, but also in four controlled studies. Still, many physicians are unaware of this association although acute cytomegalovirus infection diagnosis in a thrombosis patient may warrant antiviral therapy and may affect anticoagulation therapy duration. Accordingly, the clinical characteristics of patients with thrombosis and acute cytomegalovirus infection are reviewed, and the current knowledge concerning this unique association is presented herein. We believe it is time to add acute cytomegalovirus infection to the list of thrombosis triggers. PMID:25624857

  9. Drosophila C Virus Systemic Infection Leads to Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chtarbanova, Stanislava; Lamiable, Olivier; Lee, Kwang-Zin; Galiana, Delphine; Troxler, Laurent; Meignin, Carine; Hetru, Charles; Hoffmann, Jules A.; Daeffler, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Drosophila C virus (DCV) is a positive-sense RNA virus belonging to the Dicistroviridae family. This natural pathogen of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster is commonly used to investigate antiviral host defense in flies, which involves both RNA interference and inducible responses. Although lethality is used routinely as a readout for the efficiency of the antiviral immune response in these studies, virus-induced pathologies in flies still are poorly understood. Here, we characterize the pathogenesis associated with systemic DCV infection. Comparison of the transcriptome of flies infected with DCV or two other positive-sense RNA viruses, Flock House virus and Sindbis virus, reveals that DCV infection, unlike those of the other two viruses, represses the expression of a large number of genes. Several of these genes are expressed specifically in the midgut and also are repressed by starvation. We show that systemic DCV infection triggers a nutritional stress in Drosophila which results from intestinal obstruction with the accumulation of peritrophic matrix at the entry of the midgut and the accumulation of the food ingested in the crop, a blind muscular food storage organ. The related virus cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), which efficiently grows in Drosophila, does not trigger this pathology. We show that DCV, but not CrPV, infects the smooth muscles surrounding the crop, causing extensive cytopathology and strongly reducing the rate of contractions. We conclude that the pathogenesis associated with systemic DCV infection results from the tropism of the virus for an important organ within the foregut of dipteran insects, the crop. IMPORTANCE DCV is one of the few identified natural viral pathogens affecting the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. As such, it is an important virus for the deciphering of host-virus interactions in insects. We characterize here the pathogenesis associated with DCV infection in flies and show that it results from the

  10. Acute neuromuscular weakness associated with dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Hira, Harmanjit Singh; Kaur, Amandeep; Shukla, Anuj

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dengue infections may present with neurological complications. Whether these are due to neuromuscular disease or electrolyte imbalance is unclear. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight patients of dengue fever required hospitalization during epidemic in year 2010. Twelve of them presented with acute neuromuscular weakness. We enrolled them for study. Diagnosis of dengue infection based on clinical profile of patients, positive serum IgM ELISA, NS1 antigen, and sero-typing. Complete hemogram, kidney and liver functions, serum electrolytes, and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) were tested. In addition, two patients underwent nerve conduction velocity (NCV) test and electromyography. Results: Twelve patients were included in the present study. Their age was between 18 and 34 years. Fever, myalgia, and motor weakness of limbs were most common presenting symptoms. Motor weakness developed on 2nd to 4th day of illness in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient, it developed on 10th day of illness. Ten of 12 showed hypokalemia. One was of Guillain-Barré syndrome and other suffered from myositis; they underwent NCV and electromyography. Serum CPK and SGOT raised in 8 out of 12 patients. CPK of patient of myositis was 5098 IU. All of 12 patients had thrombocytopenia. WBC was in normal range. Dengue virus was isolated in three patients, and it was of serotype 1. CSF was normal in all. Within 24 hours, those with hypokalemia recovered by potassium correction. Conclusions: It was concluded that the dengue virus infection led to acute neuromuscular weakness because of hypokalemia, myositis, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. It was suggested to look for presence of hypokalemia in such patients. PMID:22346188

  11. Protective effects of fenofibrate against acute lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qiankun; He, Guizhen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yukang; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate whether pretreatment with fenofibrate could mitigate acute lung injury (ALI) in a mice model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 6): sham, intestinal I/R + vehicle, and intestinal I/R + fenofibrate. Intestinal I/R was achieved by clamping the superior mesenteric artery. Fenofibrate (100 mg/kg) or equal volume of vehicle was injected intraperitoneally 60 minutes before the ischemia. At the end of experiment, measurement of pathohistological score, inflammatory mediators and other markers were performed. In addition, a 24-hour survival experiment was conducted in intestinal I/R mice treated with fenofibrate or vehicle. The chief results were as anticipated. Pathohistological evaluation indicated that fenofibrate ameliorated the local intestine damage and distant lung injury. Pretreatment with fenofibrate significantly decreased inflammatory factors in both the intestine and the lung. Consistently, renal creatine levels and hepatic ALT levels were significantly decreased in the fenofibrate group. Moreover, serum systemic inflammatory response indicators were significantly alleviated in the fenofibrate group. In addition, fenofibrate administration significantly improved the survival rate. Collectively, our data indicated that pretreatment with fenofibrate prior to ischemia attenuated intestinal I/R injury and ALI. PMID:26902261

  12. Programmatic Implications of Acute and Early HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Amitabh B; Granich, Reuben M; Kato, Masaya; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Montaner, Julio S G; Williams, Brian G

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes acute, early, chronic, and late stages. Acute HIV infection lasts approximately 3 weeks and early HIV infection, which includes acute HIV infection, lasts approximately 7 weeks. Many testing and blood screening algorithms detect HIV antibodies about 3 weeks after HIV infection. Incidence estimates are based on results of modeling, cohort studies, surveillance, and/or assays. Viral load is the key modifiable risk factor for HIV transmission and peaks during acute and early HIV infection. Empirical evidence characterizing the impact of acute and early HIV infection on the spread of the HIV epidemic are limited. Time trends of HIV prevalence collected from concentrated and generalized epidemics suggest that acute and early HIV infection may have a limited role in population HIV transmission. Collectively, these data suggest that acute and early HIV infection is relatively short and does not currently require fundamentally different programmatic approaches to manage the HIV/AIDS epidemic in most settings. Research and surveillance will inform which epidemic contexts and phases may require tailored strategies for these stages of HIV infection.

  13. Intra-amniotic Candida albicans infection induces mucosal injury and inflammation in the ovine fetal intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforou, Maria; Jacobs, Esmee M.R.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Hornef, Mathias W.; Payne, Matthew S.; Saito, Masatoshi; Newnham, John P.; Janssen, Leon E.W.; Jobe, Alan H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Kramer, Boris W.; Wolfs, Tim G.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is caused by intrauterine infection with microorganisms including Candida albicans (C.albicans). Chorioamnionitis is associated with postnatal intestinal pathologies including necrotizing enterocolitis. The underlying mechanisms by which intra-amniotic C.albicans infection adversely affects the fetal gut remain unknown. Therefore, we assessed whether intra-amniotic C.albicans infection would cause intestinal inflammation and mucosal injury in an ovine model. Additionally, we tested whether treatment with the fungistatic fluconazole ameliorated the adverse intestinal outcome of intra-amniotic C.albicans infection. Pregnant sheep received intra-amniotic injections with 107 colony-forming units C.albicans or saline at 3 or 5 days before preterm delivery at 122 days of gestation. Fetuses were given intra-amniotic and intra-peritoneal fluconazole treatments 2 days after intra-amniotic administration of C.albicans. Intra-amniotic C.albicans caused intestinal colonization and invasive growth within the fetal gut with mucosal injury and intestinal inflammation, characterized by increased CD3+ lymphocytes, MPO+ cells and elevated TNF-α and IL-17 mRNA levels. Fluconazole treatment in utero decreased intestinal C.albicans colonization, mucosal injury but failed to attenuate intestinal inflammation. Intra-amniotic C.albicans caused intestinal infection, injury and inflammation. Fluconazole treatment decreased mucosal injury but failed to ameliorate C.albicans-mediated mucosal inflammation emphasizing the need to optimize the applied antifungal therapeutic strategy. PMID:27411776

  14. Intestinal parasite co-infection among pulmonary tuberculosis cases without human immunodeficiency virus infection in a rural county in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of co-infection with tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites in humans have not been extensively investigated in China. A cross-section study was conducted in a rural county of Henan Province, China. Pulmonary TB (PTB) case-patients receiving treatment for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and healthy controls matched for geographic area, age, and sex were surveyed by using questionnaires. Fecal and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal parasites, routine blood examination, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus. The chi-square test was used for univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors. A total of 369 persons with PTB and 366 healthy controls were included; all participants were negative for human immunodeficiency virus. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites in persons with PTB was 14.9%, including intestinal protozoa (7.9%) and helminthes (7.6%). The infection spectrum of intestinal parasites was Entamoeba spp. (1.4%), Blastocystis hominis (6.2%), Trichomonas hominis (0.3%), Clonorchis sinensis (0.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.5%), Trichuris trichiura (2.2%), and hookworm (4.6%). The prevalence of intestinal parasites showed no significant difference between persons with PTB and healthy controls after adjusting for potential confounding factors. There was no factor that affected infection rates for intestinal parasites between the two groups. Infection with intestinal parasites of persons with PTB was associated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-4.17), body mass index ≤ 19 (AOR = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.47-6.20), and anemia (AOR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.17-5.03). Infection of healthy controls was only associated with an annual labor time in farmlands > 2 months (AOR = 4.50, 95% CI = 2.03-10.00). In addition, there was no significant trend between rates of infection with

  15. Intestinal Parasite Co-infection among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Cases without Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in a Rural County in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of co-infection with tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites in humans have not been extensively investigated in China. A cross-section study was conducted in a rural county of Henan Province, China. Pulmonary TB (PTB) case-patients receiving treatment for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and healthy controls matched for geographic area, age, and sex were surveyed by using questionnaires. Fecal and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal parasites, routine blood examination, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus. The chi-square test was used for univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors. A total of 369 persons with PTB and 366 healthy controls were included; all participants were negative for human immunodeficiency virus. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites in persons with PTB was 14.9%, including intestinal protozoa (7.9%) and helminthes (7.6%). The infection spectrum of intestinal parasites was Entamoeba spp. (1.4%), Blastocystis hominis (6.2%), Trichomonas hominis (0.3%), Clonorchis sinensis (0.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.5%), Trichuris trichiura (2.2%), and hookworm (4.6%). The prevalence of intestinal parasites showed no significant difference between persons with PTB and healthy controls after adjusting for potential confounding factors. There was no factor that affected infection rates for intestinal parasites between the two groups. Infection with intestinal parasites of persons with PTB was associated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01–4.17), body mass index ≤ 19 (AOR = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.47–6.20), and anemia (AOR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.17–5.03). Infection of healthy controls was only associated with an annual labor time in farmlands > 2 months (AOR = 4.50, 95% CI = 2.03–10.00). In addition, there was no significant trend between rates of infection with

  16. Toxoplasma gondii Oral Infection Induces Intestinal Inflammation and Retinochoroiditis in Mice Genetically Selected for Immune Oral Tolerance Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Raul Ramos Furtado; de Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiroz; Leite, Carla Cristina da Silva; Tedesco, Roberto Carlos; Calabrese, Katia da Silva; Silva, Antonio Carlos; DaMatta, Renato Augusto; de Fatima Sarro-Silva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide disease with most of the infections originating through the oral route and generates various pathological manifestations, ranging from meningoencephalitis to retinochoroiditis and inflammatory bowel disease. Animal models for these pathologies are scarce and have limitations. We evaluated the outcome of Toxoplasma gondii oral infection with 50 or 100 cysts of the ME-49 strain in two lines of mice with extreme phenotypes of susceptibility (TS) or resistance (TR) to immune oral tolerance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of TS and TR mice, orally infected by T. gondii, and determine its value as a model for inflammatory diseases study. Mortality during the acute stage of the infection for TR was 50% for both dosages, while 10 and 40% of the TS died after infection with these respective dosages. In the chronic stage, the remaining TS succumbed while TR survived for 90 days. The TS displayed higher parasite load with lower intestinal inflammation and cellular proliferation, notwithstanding myocarditis, pneumonitis and meningoencephalitis. TR presented massive necrosis of villi and crypt, comparable to inflammatory bowel disease, with infiltration of lymphoid cells in the lamina propria of the intestines. Also, TR mice infected with 100 cysts presented intense cellular infiltrate within the photoreceptor layer of the eyes, changes in disposition and morphology of the retina cell layers and retinochoroiditis. During the infection, high levels of IL-6 were detected in the serum of TS mice and TR mice presented high amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Both mice lineages developed different disease outcomes, but it is emphasized that TR and TS mice presented acute and chronic stages of the infection, demonstrating that the two lineages offer an attractive model for studying toxoplasmosis. PMID:25437299

  17. Dose Determination for Acute Salmonella Infection in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Loynachan, A. T.; Harris, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    Pigs were exposed to various levels of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium by either intranasal inoculation or by subjecting them to a contaminated environment. More than 103 salmonellae were required to induce acute Salmonella infection. These results indicate that intervention against acute Salmonella infection in lairage may be more readily achieved than previously thought. PMID:15870368

  18. Acute uremia and intestinal obstruction due to a retroperitoneal hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Ugraş, Murat; Işik, Burak; Yilmaz, Sezai; Kirimlioğlu, Vedat

    2007-12-01

    Hydatid disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any cystic mass in endemic areas. The symptoms due to bulk effect, usually occurring over a certain period of time, depend on the site and size of the cyst. We report an unusual presentation of retroperitoneal hydatid cyst with rapidly developing uremia and acute intestinal obstruction.

  19. The hydrocortisone protection of glycocalyx on the intestinal capillary endothelium during severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shun-Liang; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Shao-Yang; Liang, Zhong-Yan; Yu, Wen-Qiao; Liang, Ting-Bo

    2015-05-01

    Malfunctioning of the intestinal microcirculation secondary to severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) can cause injuries to the intestinal mucosal barrier, translocation of gut flora, and sepsis. The glycocalyx on the vascular endothelium helps maintain its normal function through multiple mechanisms, including regulation of vascular permeability and inhibition of intercellular adhesion. It is unknown that whether pancreatitis inflicts injuries to the intestinal mucosal barrier through damaging glycocalyx or stabilizing glycocalyx can be a potential therapeutic target in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier during SAP. Injecting sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct of Sprague-Dawley rats induced SAP. Intestinal perfusion, changes in endothelial glycocalyx, and the associated molecular mechanisms were assessed by laser Doppler velocimetry, electron microscopy, and the levels of heparan sulfate, syndacan-1, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the superior mesenteric vein. Protective effects of hydrocortisone treatment in the intestinal microcirculation during SAP were evaluated. Degradation of the glycocalyx in intestinal vascular endothelium developed 3 h after the onset of SAP in rats. By 12 h, significant reduction of intestinal perfusion was observed. The concomitant elevated levels of TNF-α in the superior mesenteric vein suggest that TNF-α is involved in the degradation of the glycocalyx. With the use of hydrocortisone, intestinal perfusion was improved and the degradation of glycocalyx was reduced. The degradation of glycocalyx is involved in the malfunction of the intestinal microcirculation. The massive release of TNF-α participates in this process and leads to glycocalyx degradation. Hydrocortisone may be a good therapy to prevent this process.

  20. Protein deficiency alters impact of intestinal nematode infection on intestinal, visceral and lymphoid organ histopathology in lactating mice.

    PubMed

    Starr, Lisa M; Odiere, Maurice R; Koski, Kristine G; Scott, Marilyn E

    2014-05-01

    Protein deficiency impairs local and systemic immune responses to Heligmosomoides bakeri infection but little is known about their individual and interactive impacts on tissue architecture of maternal lymphoid (thymus, spleen) and visceral (small intestine, kidney, liver, pancreas) organs during the demanding period of lactation. Using a 2 × 2 factorial design, pregnant CD1 mice were fed a 24% protein sufficient (PS) or a 6% protein deficient (PD) isoenergetic diet beginning on day 14 of pregnancy and were infected with 100 H. bakeri larvae four times or exposed to four sham infections. On day 20 of lactation, maternal organs were examined histologically and serum analytes were assayed as indicators of organ function. The absence of villus atrophy in response to infection was associated with increased crypt depth and infiltration of mast cells and eosinophils but only in lactating dams fed adequate protein. Infection-induced lobular liver inflammation was reduced in PD dams, however, abnormalities in the kidney caused by protein deficiency were absent in infected dams. Bilirubin and creatinine were highest in PD infected mice. Infection-induced splenomegaly was not due to an increase in the lymphoid compartment of the spleen. During lactation, infection and protein deficiency have interactive effects on extra-intestinal pathologies.

  1. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  2. INTESTINAL AND PULMONARY INFECTION BY Cryptosporidium parvum IN TWO PATIENTS WITH HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    REINA, Fábio Tadeu Rodrigues; RIBEIRO, Camila Aparecida; de ARAÚJO, Ronalda Silva; MATTÉ, Maria Helena; CASTANHO, Roberto Esteves Pires; TANAKA, Ioshie Ibara; VIGGIANI, Ana Maria Ferreira Sornas; MARTINS, Luciamáre Perinetti Alves

    2016-01-01

    We describe two patients with HIV/AIDS who presented pulmonary and intestinal infection caused by Cryptosporidium parvum, with a fatal outcome. The lack of available description of changes in clinical signs and radiographic characteristics of this disease when it is located in the extra-intestinal region causes low prevalence of early diagnosis and a subsequent lack of treatment. PMID:27007564

  3. INTESTINAL AND PULMONARY INFECTION BY Cryptosporidium parvum IN TWO PATIENTS WITH HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Reina, Fábio Tadeu Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Camila Aparecida; Araújo, Ronalda Silva de; Matté, Maria Helena; Castanho, Roberto Esteves Pires; Tanaka, Ioshie Ibara; Viggiani, Ana Maria Ferreira Sornas; Martins, Luciamáre Perinetti Alves

    2016-01-01

    We describe two patients with HIV/AIDS who presented pulmonary and intestinal infection caused by Cryptosporidium parvum, with a fatal outcome. The lack of available description of changes in clinical signs and radiographic characteristics of this disease when it is located in the extra-intestinal region causes low prevalence of early diagnosis and a subsequent lack of treatment. PMID:27007564

  4. Neutralization of Osteopontin Ameliorates Acute Lung Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yohei; Aziz, Monowar; Yang, Weng-Lang; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Osteopontin (OPN), a glycoprotein secreted from immune-reactive cells, plays a deleterious role in various inflammatory diseases. Considering OPN as a pro-inflammatory molecule, we hypothesize that the treatment with its neutralizing antibody (anti-OPN Ab) protects mice against intestinal I/R-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Intestinal I/R was induced in mice by superior mesenteric artery occlusion with a vascular clip. After 45 min of occlusion, the clip was removed and anti-OPN Ab (25 μg/mouse) or normal IgG isotype control (25 μg/mouse) was immediately administrated intravenously. Blood, small intestine, and lung tissues were collected at 4 h after reperfusion for various analyses. After intestinal I/R, mRNA and protein levels of OPN were significantly induced in the small intestine, lungs, and blood relative to sham-operated animals. Compared with the IgG control group, treatment of anti-OPN Ab significantly reduced plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine (IL-6 and MIP-2) and organ injury markers (AST, ALT, and LDH). The histological architecture of the gut and lung tissues in anti-OPN Ab-treated intestinal I/R-induced mice showed significant improvement versus the IgG control mice. The lung inflammation measured by the levels of IL-6, IL-1β, and MIP-2 was also significantly downregulated in the anti-OPN Ab-treated mice as compared with the IgG control mice. Besides, the lung MPO and neutrophil infiltration in anti-OPN Ab-treated mice showed significant reduction as compared with the IgG control animals. In conclusion, we have demonstrated beneficial outcomes of anti-OPN Ab treatment in protecting against ALI, implicating a novel therapeutic potential in intestinal I/R. PMID:26974422

  5. Neutralization of Osteopontin Ameliorates Acute Lung Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yohei; Aziz, Monowar; Yang, Weng-Lang; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Osteopontin (OPN), a glycoprotein secreted from immune-reactive cells, plays a deleterious role in various inflammatory diseases. Considering OPN as a pro-inflammatory molecule, we hypothesize that the treatment with its neutralizing antibody (anti-OPN Ab) protects mice against intestinal I/R-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Intestinal I/R was induced in mice by superior mesenteric artery occlusion with a vascular clip. After 45 min of occlusion, the clip was removed and anti-OPN Ab (25 μg/mouse) or normal IgG isotype control (25 μg/mouse) was immediately administrated intravenously. Blood, small intestine, and lung tissues were collected at 4 h after reperfusion for various analyses. After intestinal I/R, mRNA and protein levels of OPN were significantly induced in the small intestine, lungs, and blood relative to sham-operated animals. Compared with the IgG control group, treatment of anti-OPN Ab significantly reduced plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine (IL-6 and MIP-2) and organ injury markers (AST, ALT, and LDH). The histological architecture of the gut and lung tissues in anti-OPN Ab-treated intestinal I/R-induced mice showed significant improvement versus the IgG control mice. The lung inflammation measured by the levels of IL-6, IL-1β, and MIP-2 was also significantly downregulated in the anti-OPN Ab-treated mice as compared with the IgG control mice. Besides, the lung MPO and neutrophil infiltration in anti-OPN Ab-treated mice showed significant reduction as compared with the IgG control animals. In conclusion, we have demonstrated beneficial outcomes of anti-OPN Ab treatment in protecting against ALI, implicating a novel therapeutic potential in intestinal I/R.

  6. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Infection Among Inhabitants and Tribes of Chelgerd, Iran, 2008-2009

    PubMed Central

    Pestehchian, Nader; Haghighi, Ali; Salehi, Mansour; Yosefi, Hosein Ali; Khosravi, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although a notable development in treating and controlling of parasitic infections in recent years has occurred but, these infections are still counted as important problems in many countries. Aim The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in the inhabitant and tribe populations who were referred to central health care of Chelgerd, Iran. Materials and Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out from April 2008 to October 2009 in Chelgerd, Iran. A total of 655 samples of feces from inhabitants and tribes were collected and each sample was examined by Direct smear, formol- ethyl acetate concentration and Trichorom staining. Results Out of 655 stool samples, 367(56%) patients revealed at least one intestinal parasite (pathogenic /non-pathogenic protozoa/helminth), 233(67.7%) in tribes and 134(43%) in inhabitants. There was significant difference between infected inhabitants and infected tribes (p=0.001). Although the intestinal parasitic infections were more in female than male it was not statistically significant (p=0.52). There was no significant difference in various age groups. Common intestinal parasitic infections which were detected in both the populations were Giardia intestinalis (28.2%) and Blastocystis hominis (27.5%). Conclusions We found that the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections was higher in the tribe than inhabitant populations. Prevalence of intestinal protozoa infections was much higher than the helminthic infections. These findings reflect poor sanitary conditions in this region. They should be educated and provided better facilities to get rid of intestinal parasitic infections. PMID:26155498

  7. A new in vitro model using small intestinal epithelial cells to enhance infection of Cryptosporidium parvum

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand and study the infection of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, a more sensitive in vitro assay is required. In vivo, this parasite infects the epithelial cells of the microvilli layer in the small intestine. While cell infection models using colon,...

  8. Prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections among Orang Asli schoolchildren in Pos Senderut, Pahang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Harazi, Talal; Ghani, Mohamed Kamel Abd; Othman, Hidayatulfathi

    2013-12-01

    The current study determined the prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections among the Orang Asli schoolchildren in Pos Senderut, Pahang, Malaysia. The overall intestinal protozoan infection rate was 85% (261 out of 307). The highest prevalence rates were due to Entamoeba coli (24.4%), Giardia lamblia (21.8%), Blastocystis hominis (21.2%) and Entamoeba histolytica (15.0%). The prevalence of Iodamoeba butschlii was only 2.9%. Among the positive samples, mixed infection with B. hominis and E. histolytica was 3.3%, B. hominis and G. lamblia was 2.9%, G. lamblia and E. histolytica was 2.0% and triple infections (B. hominis, G. lamblia and E. histolytica) was 1.0 %. The prevalence of the infection was high in all age groups (6-14 years old). Thus, we can conclude that intestinal protozoan infections are still representing a serious public health problem in aboriginal communities, especially among children.

  9. Temporal relationship of serum markers and tissue damage during acute intestinal ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    la Garza, Francisco Javier Guzmán-de; Ibarra-Hernández, Juan Manuel; Cordero-Pérez, Paula; Villegas-Quintero, Pablo; Villarreal-Ovalle, Claudia Ivette; Torres-González, Liliana; Oliva-Sosa, Norma Edith; Alarcón-Galván, Gabriela; Fernández-Garza, Nancy Esthela; Muñoz-Espinosa, Linda Elsa; Cámara-Lemarroy, Carlos Rodrigo; Carrillo-Arriaga, José Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It is essential to identify a serological marker of injury in order to study the pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia reperfusion. In this work, we studied the evolution of several serological markers after intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats. The markers of non-specific cell damage were aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase, the markers of inflammation were tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1 beta, and the markers of intestinal mucosal damage were intestinal fatty acid binding protein and D-lactate. We used Chiús classification to grade the histopathological damage. METHODS: We studied 35 Wistar rats divided into groups according to reperfusion time. The superior mesenteric artery was clamped for 30 minutes, and blood and biopsies were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after reperfusion. We plotted the mean ± standard deviation and compared the baseline and maximum values for each marker using Student's t-test. RESULTS: The maximum values of interleukin-1 beta and lactic dehydrogenase were present before the maximal histopathological damage. The maximum tumor necrosis factor alpha and D-lactate expressions coincided with histopathological damage. Alanine aminotransaminase and aspartate aminotransferase had a maximum expression level that increased following the histopathological damage. The maximum expressions of interluken-6 and intestinal fatty acid binding protein were not significantly different from the Sham treated group. CONCLUSION: For the evaluation of injury secondary to acute intestinal ischemia reperfusion with a 30 minute ischemia period, we recommend performing histopathological grading, quantification of D-lactate, which is synthesized by intestinal bacteria and is considered an indicator of mucosal injury, and quantification of tumor necrosis factor alpha as indicators of acute inflammation three hours after reperfusion. PMID:23917671

  10. Mini-FLOTAC, an Innovative Direct Diagnostic Technique for Intestinal Parasitic Infections: Experience from the Field

    PubMed Central

    Barda, Beatrice Divina; Rinaldi, Laura; Ianniello, Davide; Zepherine, Henry; Salvo, Fulvio; Sadutshang, Tsetan; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Clementi, Massimo; Albonico, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background Soil-transmitted helminths and intestinal protozoa infection are widespread in developing countries, yet an accurate diagnosis is rarely performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the recently developed mini–FLOTAC method and to compare with currently more widely used techniques for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections in different settings. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was carried out in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh, India, and in Bukumbi, Tanzania. A total of 180 pupils from two primary schools had their stool analyzed (n = 80 in Dharamsala and n = 100 in Bukumbi) for intestinal parasitic infections with three diagnostic methods: direct fecal smear, formol-ether concentration method (FECM) and mini-FLOTAC. Overall, 72% of the pupils were positive for any intestinal parasitic infection, 24% carried dual infections and 11% three infections or more. The most frequently encountered intestinal parasites were Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia intestinalis, hookworm, (and Schistosoma mansoni, in Tanzania). Statistically significant differences were found in the detection of parasitic infections among the three methods: mini-FLOTAC was the most sensitive method for helminth infections (90% mini-FLOTAC, 60% FECM, and 30% direct fecal smear), whereas FECM was most sensitive for intestinal protozoa infections (88% FECM, 70% direct fecal smear, and 68% mini-FLOTAC). Conclusion/Significance We present the first experiences with the mini-FLOTAC for the diagnosis of intestinal helminths and protozoa. Our results suggest that it is a valid, sensitive and potentially low-cost alternative technique that could be used in resource-limited settings — particularly for helminth diagnosis. PMID:23936577

  11. Human CD8+ T Cells Clear Cryptosporidium parvum from Infected Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pantenburg, Birte; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Dann, Sara M.; Connelly, Rhykka L.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Ward, Honorine D.; Clinton White, A.

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular protozoans of the genus Cryptosporidium are a major cause of diarrheal illness worldwide, especially in immunocompromised individuals. CD4+ T cells and interferon-gamma are key factors in the control of cryptosporidiosis in human and murine models. Previous studies led us to hypothesize that CD8+ T cells contribute to clearance of intestinal epithelial Cryptosporidium infection in humans. We report here that antigen expanded sensitized CD8+ T cells reduce the parasite load in infected intestinal epithelial cell cultures and lyse infected intestinal epithelial cells. These effects are most likely mediated by the release of cytotoxic granules. Elimination of parasites seems to require antigen presentation through both human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A and HLA-B. These data suggest that cytotoxic CD8+ T cells play a role in clearing Cryptosporidium from the intestine, a previously unrecognized feature of the human immune response against this parasite. PMID:20348507

  12. Intestinal helminth infections and nutritional status of children attending primary schools in Wakiso District, Central Uganda.

    PubMed

    Lwanga, Francis; Francis, Lwanga; Kirunda, Barbara Eva; Orach, Christopher Garimoi

    2012-08-01

    A cross-sectional study to assess the prevalence of intestinal helminth infections and nutritional status of primary school children was conducted in the Wakiso district in Central Uganda. A total of 432 primary school children aged 6-14 years were randomly selected from 23 schools. Anthropometric measurements of weight, height, MUAC were undertaken and analyzed using AnthroPlus software. Stool samples were examined using a Kato-Katz method. The prevalence of stunting, underweight and moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) was 22.5%, 5.3% and 18.5% respectively. Males had a threefold risk of being underweight (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.17-9.4, p = 0.011) and 2 fold risk of suffering from MAM (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.21-3.48, p = 0.004). Children aged 10-14 years had a 2.9 fold risk of stunting (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.37-6.16, p = 0.002) and 1.9 risk of MAM (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.07-3.44, p = 0.019). Attending urban slum schools had 1.7 fold risk of stunting (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.03-2.75, p = 0.027). Rural schools presented a twofold risk of helminth infection (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.12-3.32, p = 0.012). The prevalence of helminth infections was (10.9%), (3.1%), (1.9%), (0.2%) for hookworm, Trichuriatrichiura, Schistosomamansoni and Ascarislumbricoides, respectively. The study revealed that 26.6%, 46% and 10.3% of incidences of stunting, underweight and MAM respectively were attributable to helminth infections.

  13. Intestinal Parasitoses in HIV Infected Children in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Oyedeji, Olusola Adetunji; Adejuyigbe, Ebun; Oninla, Samuel Olorunyomi; Akindele, Abiodum Akeem; Adedokun, Samuel Adeyinka

    2015-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitoses are common amongst people living in developing countries. They may impact negatively on the growth and health of immune competent children. There is paucity of information on the association between HIV and intestinal parasitoses in African children. Objective To identify the intestinal infections responsible for infections in HIV infected children and document characteristics of HIV infected children at a Nigerian teaching hospital. Materials and Methods Consecutive children attending a Paediatric anti-retroviral clinic were studied. Information such as socio-demographics and clinical characteristics elicited from clinical examination were recorded in the proforma. Stool samples of the children were obtained and examined for intestinal parasites. Data was analysed with the SPSS 18 software. Results A total 52 children were studied and their age ranged between 6 months and 14 years, with a mean of 6.5 years ± 3.93. The 52 were made up of 27 boys and 25 girls, giving a male: female ratio of 1.1:1. 10 (19.2%) of the 52 children were infected with cryptosporidium spp, while 1(1.9%) had Ascaris lumbricoides infestation. Anti-helminthics had previously been administered to 86.5% of children studied. Those who previously received anti-helminthics had lower prevalence estimates of cryptosporidium infections. (p<0.01, RR = 0.42, 95%CI = 0.20 – 0.90). Children on co-trimoxazole prophylaxis had lower prevalence estimates of cryptosporidium infections. (P<0.01, RR = 0.35, 95%CI = 0.14 – 0.91). Use of highly active antiretroviral drugs was also associated with lower prevalence estimates of intestinal cryptosporidium. (p=0.04, RR = 0.58, 95%CI = 0.31 – 1.10). Eight of the 10 children infected with cryptosporidium had recurrent abdominal pain in comparison with the six with recurrent abdominal pain amongst the 42 without cryptosporidial infections. (p<0.01, RR=5.6, 95%CI= 2.51 – 12.1). Conclusion Cryptosporidial infection is the most

  14. [Intestinal tuberculosis--cause of acute surgical abdomen].

    PubMed

    Ciurea, M; Ion, D; Ionescu, S; Tica, M R

    2001-01-01

    Tuberculosis, in its various forms, remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries in immunodeficitary patients. The indicatives of epidemiology of tuberculosis show that Romania presents a fresh outbreak of the disease in the last few years. The purpose of this paper is to present from the various forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the intestinal tipe which have a high incidence. The authors describe theirs preliminary experience of intraoperative small and large bowel emergencies resections in a short period (1 year) of three young patients (between 30 and 40 years old) with history of pulmonary tuberculosis. The pathology was complex (bowel obstructions, peritonitis) and so were the surgical operations (resections, devirations). The patients showed short and long term good results.

  15. MONOCYTE HUMAN LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN–DR EXPRESSION—A TOOL TO DISTINGUISH INTESTINAL BACTERIAL INFECTIONS FROM INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE?

    PubMed Central

    Tillinger, Wolfgang; Jilch, Ruth; Waldhoer, Thomas; Reinisch, Walter; Junger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background We sought to determine the quantitative expression of human leukocyte antigen–DR (HLA-DR) on monocytes in patients with acute intestinal bacterial infections and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods The quantitative expression of HLA-DR on monocytes was determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis in patients with IBD, patients with acute intestinal bacterial infections (bact.), and healthy subjects (contr.). Results The quantitative expression of HLA-DR in patients with bact. (n = 20; 90,000 molecules per monocyte; confidence interval [CI], 79,000–102,000) was significantly higher than that in patients with ulcerative colitis (n = 40, 30,000; CI, 30,000–38,000; P < 0.0001), Crohn disease (n = 80, 31,000; CI, 32,000–39,000; P < 0.0001), or in contr. (n = 28, 39,000; CI, 36,000–46,000; P < 0.0001). In patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease, HLA-DR expression was significantly decreased, as compared with contr. (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). With a cutoff point of 50,000, HLA-DR showed a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 92% in discriminating between bact. and active IBD. Conclusion The quantitative measurement of HLA-DR expression could serve as a valuable tool to discriminate between bact. and active IBD. PMID:23860582

  16. Acute tubular nephropathy in a patient with acute HIV infection: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Datta, Anandita A; Fletcher, James Lk; Townamchai, Natavudh; Chomchey, Nitiya; Kroon, Eugene; Sereti, Irini; Valcour, Victor; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    We report a 57-year old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who presented with acute HIV infection. Routine blood tests showed an elevated blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. Renal biopsy showed acute tubular nephropathy, which has not been reported to occur during acute HIV infection, in the absence of rhabdomyolysis or multiple organ system failure. Antiretroviral therapy was initiated. His renal failure gradually resolved without further intervention. At one year of follow-up his HIV RNA was undetectable, and his renal function was normal. The case illustrates a rare manifestation of acute HIV infection - acute renal failure - in an older man with diabetes and hypertension. In this setting acute kidney injury might mistakenly have been attributed to his chronic comorbidities, and this case supports early HIV-1 testing in the setting of a high index of suspicion.

  17. Intestinal Schistosomiasis as Unusual Aetiology for Acute Appendicitis, Nowadays a Rising Disease in Western Countries

    PubMed Central

    López de Cenarruzabeitia, I.; Landolfi, S.; Armengol Carrasco, M.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal schistosomiasis as unusual aetiology for acute appendicitis, nowadays a rising disease in western countries. Recent changes in global migration has led to an immigration growth in our scenario, upsurging people coming from endemic areas of schistosomiasis. Schistosomal appendicitis, seldom reported in developed countries, is now an expected incrising entity in our hospitals during the near future. Due to this circumstances, we believe that schistosomiasis should be consider as a rising source for acute appendicitis in western countries. In order to illustrate this point, we present a case of a 45-years-old black man, from Africa, was admitted via A&E because of acute abdominal pain, located in right lower quadrant. Acute appendicitis was suspected, and he underwent laparotomy and appendectomy. Pathological study by microscope revealed a gangrenous appendix with abscesses and parasitic ova into the submucosal layer of the appendix, suggesting Schistosomiasis. PMID:22792502

  18. Idiopathic myenteric ganglionitis underlying acute 'dramatic' intestinal pseudoobstruction: report of an exceptional case.

    PubMed

    Racalbuto, A; Magro, G; Lanteri, R; Aliotta, I; Santangelo, M; Di Cataldo, A

    2008-09-01

    Inflammation of the myenteric plexus of the gastrointestinal tract is a very rare pathological condition, with few reports in the medical literature. This pathological condition causes atonic gut motor dysfunction and is principally secondary to other diseases, being reported nearly solely as a paraneoplastic phenomenon in neuroendocrine lung tumors, including small cell carcinomas or neuroblastomas. In addition it can also be associated with disorders of the central nervous system, although it has rarely been described in Chagas disease. It has been named 'idiopathic myenteric ganglionitis' because no apparent causes can be demonstrated. We report the clinicopathologic findings of an exceptional case of a young woman affected by severe chronic constipation suddenly changing into acute intestinal pseudoobstruction with dramatic evolution. Relationships between ganglionitis, idiopathic constipation and acute intestinal pseudoobstruction as well as therapeutic implications are discussed.

  19. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasite Infections among Individuals with Mental Retardation in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schupf, Nicole; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Prevalence of intestinal parasite infection among program participants of the New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities for 1986-87 was estimated at 7.3%, suggesting that management of parasitic infection is improving. Males and individuals with severe/profound mental retardation were twice as likely to have…

  20. Models of intestinal infection by Salmonella enterica: introduction of a new neonate mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Marc; Hensel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen causing inflammatory disease in the intestine following diarrhea and is responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Many in vitro investigations using cell culture models are available, but these do not represent the real natural environment present in the intestine of infected hosts. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study the host-pathogen interaction and to unravel the immune responses and cellular processes occurring during infection. An animal model for Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation relies on the pretreatment of mice with streptomycin. This model is of great importance but still shows limitations to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in the small intestine in vivo. Here, we review the use of mouse models for Salmonella infections and focus on a new small animal model using 1-day-old neonate mice. The neonate model enables researchers to observe infection of both the small and large intestine, thereby offering perspectives for new experimental approaches, as well as to analyze the Salmonella-enterocyte interaction in the small intestine in vivo. PMID:27408697

  1. Wastewater quality and the risk of intestinal nematode infection in sewage farming families in Hyderabad, India

    PubMed Central

    Ensink, Jeroen H.J.; Blumenthal, Ursula J.; Brooker, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The use of sewage or wastewater in agriculture is becoming increasingly common as a result of global water scarcity. Intestinal nematode infections have been identified as the main health risk associated with this practise. To protect consumer and farmer health the WHO has set an intestinal nematode water quality standard. However because of a lack of well designed studies the validity of this guideline is questioned. This paper presents the findings of a study on the risk of intestinal nematode infections in farming families occupationally exposed to untreated and partially treated wastewater in Hyderabad, India. The study found an increased risk of hookworm (OR: 3.5, 95% CI 2.2-5.5), Ascaris lumbricoides (OR: 5.3, 95% CI: 2.0-14) and Trichuris trichiura (OR: 5.6, 95% CI: 1.8-18) infection when untreated wastewater (150 intestinal nematode ova/L) was used for crop production. The use of partially treated wastewater (28 intestinal nematode ova/L) was only associated with an increased risk (OR: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.2-8.6) of Ascaris lumbricoides infection. The findings of the study suggest that the current WHO intestinal nematode guideline of 1 ova/L is sufficient to protect farmer health. PMID:18840745

  2. Models of intestinal infection by Salmonella enterica: introduction of a new neonate mouse model.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Marc; Hensel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen causing inflammatory disease in the intestine following diarrhea and is responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Many in vitro investigations using cell culture models are available, but these do not represent the real natural environment present in the intestine of infected hosts. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study the host-pathogen interaction and to unravel the immune responses and cellular processes occurring during infection. An animal model for Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation relies on the pretreatment of mice with streptomycin. This model is of great importance but still shows limitations to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in the small intestine in vivo. Here, we review the use of mouse models for Salmonella infections and focus on a new small animal model using 1-day-old neonate mice. The neonate model enables researchers to observe infection of both the small and large intestine, thereby offering perspectives for new experimental approaches, as well as to analyze the Salmonella-enterocyte interaction in the small intestine in vivo. PMID:27408697

  3. Global analysis of the eukaryotic pathways and networks regulated by Salmonella typhimurium in mouse intestinal infection in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute enteritis caused by Salmonella is a public health concern. Salmonella infection is also known to increase the risk of inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand how Salmonella works in targeting eukaryotic pathways in intestinal infection. However, the global physiological function of Salmonella typhimurium in intestinal mucosa in vivo is unclear. In this study, a whole genome approach combined with bioinformatics assays was used to investigate the in vivo genetic responses of the mouse colon to Salmonella. We focused on the intestinal responses in the early stage (8 hours) and late stage (4 days) after Salmonella infection. Results Of the 28,000 genes represented on the array, our analysis of mRNA expression in mouse colon mucosa showed that a total of 856 genes were expressed differentially at 8 hours post-infection. At 4 days post-infection, a total of 7558 genes were expressed differentially. 23 differentially expressed genes from the microarray data was further examined by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis identified that the most significant pathway associated with the differentially expressed genes in 8 hours post-infection is oxidative phosphorylation, which targets the mitochondria. At the late stage of infection, a series of pathways associated with immune and inflammatory response, proliferation, and apoptosis were identified, whereas the oxidative phosphorylation was shut off. Histology analysis confirmed the biological role of Salmonella, which induced a physiological state of inflammation and proliferation in the colon mucosa through the regulation of multiple signaling pathways. Most of the metabolism-related pathways were targeted by down-regulated genes, and a general repression process of metabolic pathways was observed. Network analysis supported IFN-γ and TNF-α function as mediators of the immune/inflammatory response for host defense against pathogen. Conclusion Our study

  4. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure in Plasmodium vivax malaria infection, a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Sangappa, Jainapur Ravi; Choudhary, Prakash Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male presented with 6 days history of intermittent fever with chills, 2 days history of upper abdomen pain, distension of abdomen, and decreased urine output. He was diagnosed to have Plasmodium vivax malaria, acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure. These constellations of complications in P. vivax infection have never been reported in the past. The patient responded to intravenous chloroquine and supportive treatment. For renal failure, he required hemodialysis. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure form an unusual combination in P. vivax infection. PMID:26629455

  5. Intestinal helminths regulate lethal acute graft-versus-host disease and preserve the graft-versus-tumor effect in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Chen, Hung-Lin; Bannick, Nadine; Henry, Michael; Holm, Adrian N; Metwali, Ahmed; Urban, Joseph F; Rothman, Paul B; Weiner, George J; Blazar, Bruce R; Elliott, David E; Ince, M Nedim

    2015-02-01

    Donor T lymphocyte transfer with hematopoietic stem cells suppresses residual tumor growth (graft-versus-tumor [GVT]) in cancer patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, donor T cell reactivity to host organs causes severe and potentially lethal inflammation called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). High-dose steroids or other immunosuppressive drugs are used to treat GVHD that have limited ability to control the inflammation while incurring long-term toxicity. Novel strategies are needed to modulate GVHD, preserve GVT, and improve the outcome of BMT. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control alloantigen-sensitized inflammation of GVHD, sustain GVT, and prevent mortality in BMT. Helminths colonizing the alimentary tract dramatically increase the Treg activity, thereby modulating intestinal or systemic inflammatory responses. These observations led us to hypothesize that helminths can regulate GVHD and maintain GVT in mice. Acute GVHD was induced in helminth (Heligmosomoides polygyrus)-infected or uninfected BALB/c recipients of C57BL/6 donor grafts. Helminth infection suppressed donor T cell inflammatory cytokine generation and reduced GVHD-related mortality, but maintained GVT. H. polygyrus colonization promoted the survival of TGF-β-generating recipient Tregs after a conditioning regimen with total body irradiation and led to a TGF-β-dependent in vivo expansion/maturation of donor Tregs after BMT. Helminths did not control GVHD when T cells unresponsive to TGF-β-mediated immune regulation were used as donor T lymphocytes. These results suggest that helminths suppress acute GVHD using Tregs and TGF-β-dependent pathways in mice. Helminthic regulation of GVHD and GVT through intestinal immune conditioning may improve the outcome of BMT.

  6. Undernutrition, the Acute Phase Response to Infection, and Its Effects on Micronutrient Status Indicators12

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Kara A.; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A.

    2014-01-01

    Infection and undernutrition are prevalent in developing countries and demonstrate a synergistic relation. Undernutrition increases infection-related morbidity and mortality. The acute phase response (APR) is an innate, systemic inflammatory reaction to a wide array of disruptions in a host’s homeostasis, including infection. Released from immune cells in response to deleterious stimuli, proinflammatory cytokines act on distant tissues to induce behavioral (e.g., anorexia, weakness, and fatigue) and systemic effects of the APR. Cytokines act to increase energy and protein requirements to manifest fever and support hepatic acute phase protein (APP) production. Blood concentrations of glucose and lipid are augmented to provide energy to immune cells in response to cytokines. Additionally, infection decreases intestinal absorption of nutrients and can cause direct loss of micronutrients. Traditional indicators of iron, zinc, and vitamin A status are altered during the APR, leading to inaccurate estimations of deficiency in populations with a high or unknown prevalence of infection. Blood concentrations of APPs can be measured in nutrition interventions to assess the time stage and severity of infection and correct for the APR; however, standardized cutoffs for nutrition applications are needed. Protein-energy malnutrition leads to increased gut permeability to pathogens, abnormal immune cell populations, and impaired APP response. Micronutrient deficiencies cause specific immune impairments that affect both innate and adaptive responses. This review describes the antagonistic interaction between the APR and nutritional status and emphasizes the need for integrated interventions to address undernutrition and to reduce disease burden in developing countries. PMID:25398733

  7. Intestinal mucosal mast cells in normal and nematode-infected rat intestines are in intimate contact with peptidergic nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Stead, R H; Tomioka, M; Quinonez, G; Simon, G T; Felten, S Y; Bienenstock, J

    1987-01-01

    Inflammatory or allergic conditions, as well as situations where healing and repair processes occur, are characterized by the presence of increased numbers of mast cells. Previous work on the effect of neuropeptides on mast cell mediator release showed that only substance P caused such release from intestinal mucosal mast cells [Shanahan, F., Denburg, J. A., Fox, J., Bienenstock, J. & Befus, A. D. (1985) J. Immunol. 135, 1331-1337]. Accordingly, we investigated the microanatomical relationship between mast cells and enteric nerves in normal rat intestine and parasite-infected rat intestine, in which mucosal mast cell hyperplasia occurs. Combined immunohistochemistry for neuron-specific enolase and staining with alcian blue at pH 0.5 was employed on paraffin-embedded sections of normal and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rat jejunum. Sixty-seven percent of intestinal mucosal mast cells were touching subepithelial nerves, and an additional 20% were within 2 micron of nerves. Assessment of the proportion of the lamina propria occupied by mast cells (12.5%), the average mast cell area (121 +/- 28 microns 2), and the density of enteric nerves (one per 788 +/- 151 microns 2) suggested that the association was 5 times greater than would be expected by chance alone (P less than 0.0001). In consecutive sections, the nerves in contact with mast cells were also shown to contain substance P and/or calcitonin-gene-related peptide. Electron microscopy confirmed this association: 8% of the mast cells in infected rats exhibited membrane-membrane contact with unmyelinated axons containing 70- to 170-nm dense-core vesicles, and an additional 31% were situated less than 250 nm from nerves. Other mast cells appeared to embrace nerve bundles through the projection of lamellopodia. These data provide systematic quantitative evidence that a structural foundation for communication between the immune and nervous systems exists in the rat gastrointestinal tract. Images PMID:2437589

  8. Intestinal parasitic infections amongst Orang Asli (indigenous) in Malaysia: has socioeconomic development alleviated the problem?

    PubMed

    Lim, Y A L; Romano, N; Colin, N; Chow, S C; Smith, H V

    2009-08-01

    Orang Asli are the indigenous minority peoples of peninsular Malaysia. Despite proactive socioeconomic development initiated by the Malaysian Government in upgrading the quality of life of the Orang Asli communities since 1978, they still remained poor with a current poverty rate of 76.9%. Poverty exacerbates the health problems faced by these communities which include malnourishment, high incidences of infectious diseases (eg. tuberculosis, leprosy, malaria) and the perpetual problem with intestinal parasitic infections. Studies reported that the mean infection rate of intestinal parasitic infections in Orang Asli communities has reduced from 91.1% in 1978, to 64.1% in the subsequent years. Although the results was encouraging, it has to be interpreted with caution because nearly 80% of studies carried out after 1978 still reported high prevalence (i.e. >50%) of soil-transmitted helminthiases (STH) among Orang Asli communities. Prior to 1978, hookworm infection is the most predominant STH but today, trichuriasis is the most common STH infections. The risk factors for intestinal parasitic infections remained unchanged and studies conducted in recent years suggested that severe STH infections contributed to malnutrition, iron deficiency anaemia and low serum retinol in Orang Asli communities. In addition, STH may also contribute to poor cognitive functions and learning ability. Improvements in socioeconomic status in Malaysia have shown positive impact on the reduction of intestinal parasitic infections in other communities however, this positive impact is less significant in the Orang Asli communities. In view of this, a national parasitic infections baseline data on morbidity and mortality in the 18 subgroups of Orang Asli, will assist in identifying intervention programmes required by these communities. It is hope that the adoption of strategies highlighted in the World Health Organisation- Healthy Village Initiatives (WHO-HVI) into Orang Asli communities will

  9. Intestinal parasitic infections amongst Orang Asli (indigenous) in Malaysia: has socioeconomic development alleviated the problem?

    PubMed

    Lim, Y A L; Romano, N; Colin, N; Chow, S C; Smith, H V

    2009-08-01

    Orang Asli are the indigenous minority peoples of peninsular Malaysia. Despite proactive socioeconomic development initiated by the Malaysian Government in upgrading the quality of life of the Orang Asli communities since 1978, they still remained poor with a current poverty rate of 76.9%. Poverty exacerbates the health problems faced by these communities which include malnourishment, high incidences of infectious diseases (eg. tuberculosis, leprosy, malaria) and the perpetual problem with intestinal parasitic infections. Studies reported that the mean infection rate of intestinal parasitic infections in Orang Asli communities has reduced from 91.1% in 1978, to 64.1% in the subsequent years. Although the results was encouraging, it has to be interpreted with caution because nearly 80% of studies carried out after 1978 still reported high prevalence (i.e. >50%) of soil-transmitted helminthiases (STH) among Orang Asli communities. Prior to 1978, hookworm infection is the most predominant STH but today, trichuriasis is the most common STH infections. The risk factors for intestinal parasitic infections remained unchanged and studies conducted in recent years suggested that severe STH infections contributed to malnutrition, iron deficiency anaemia and low serum retinol in Orang Asli communities. In addition, STH may also contribute to poor cognitive functions and learning ability. Improvements in socioeconomic status in Malaysia have shown positive impact on the reduction of intestinal parasitic infections in other communities however, this positive impact is less significant in the Orang Asli communities. In view of this, a national parasitic infections baseline data on morbidity and mortality in the 18 subgroups of Orang Asli, will assist in identifying intervention programmes required by these communities. It is hope that the adoption of strategies highlighted in the World Health Organisation- Healthy Village Initiatives (WHO-HVI) into Orang Asli communities will

  10. Viral immunity. Transkingdom control of viral infection and immunity in the mammalian intestine.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Julie K; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-01-15

    Viruses that infect the intestine include major human pathogens (retroviruses, noroviruses, rotaviruses, astroviruses, picornaviruses, adenoviruses, herpesviruses) that constitute a serious public health problem worldwide. These viral pathogens are members of a large, complex viral community inhabiting the intestine termed "the enteric virome." Enteric viruses have intimate functional and genetic relationships with both the host and other microbial constituents that inhabit the intestine, such as the bacterial microbiota, their associated phages, helminthes, and fungi, which together constitute the microbiome. Emerging data indicate that enteric viruses regulate, and are in turn regulated by, these other microbes through a series of processes termed "transkingdom interactions." This represents a changing paradigm in intestinal immunity to viral infection. Here we review recent advances in the field and propose new ways in which to conceptualize this important area.

  11. Bacteriotherapy for the treatment of intestinal dysbiosis caused by Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Blessing O; Lawley, Trevor D

    2013-10-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been used for more than five decades to treat a variety of intestinal diseases associated with pathological imbalances within the resident microbiota, termed dysbiosis. FMT has been particularly effective for treating patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection who are left with few clinical options other than continued antibiotic therapy. Our increasing knowledge of the structure and function of the human intestinal microbiota and C. difficile pathogenesis has led to the understanding that FMT promotes intestinal ecological restoration and highlights the microbiota as a viable therapeutic target. However, the use of undefined faecal samples creates a barrier for widespread clinical use because of safety and aesthetic issues. An emerging concept of bacteriotherapy, the therapeutic use of a defined mixture of harmless, health-associated bacteria, holds promise for the treatment of patients with severe C. difficile infection, and possibly represents a paradigm shift for the treatment of diseases linked to intestinal dysbiosis. PMID:23866975

  12. Acute hemiplegia with lacunar infarct after varicella infection in childhood.

    PubMed

    Eda, I; Takashima, S; Takeshita, K

    1983-01-01

    We report 4 cases of acute hemiplegia and a small low-density lesion on computerized tomography (CT) after varicella infection. In 3 of them, CT in the acute hemiplegic stage, and later, reveals the development of lacunar infarct around the internal capsule. Focal low density may be caused by occlusive vascular lesions of the penetrating arteries. Varicella infection may play an important role as one of the causes of acute hemiplegia in childhood producing lacunar infarct, as well as delayed hemiplegia, reported previously in herpes zoster ophthalmicus. PMID:6660422

  13. First report of birds infection by intestinal parasites in Khorramabad, west Iran.

    PubMed

    Badparva, Ebrahim; Ezatpour, Behrouz; Azami, Mehdi; Badparva, Masoud

    2015-12-01

    Parasitic infections in birds are omnipresent, even when they occur in low amounts, may result in subclinical diseases. There aren't any studies, based on Iranian data, investigating the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in some birds' species. We conducted a cross-sectional study between December 2011 and December 2012. The fecal samples were taken from 451 birds including hen, turkey, sparrow, pigeon and decorative birds. The samples screened for intestinal parasitic infections using direct smear, formalin-ether concentration technique, modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining, Culture in RPMI 1640 medium, sporulation with potassium dichromate and Trichrome and Giemsa staining. Out of 451 birds' species, 157 (34.8 %), were infected with one or more type of intestinal parasites. We identified two nematode, two cestoda species and five protozoan parasites species. No trematodes were found in the samples studied. The parasites identified among birds involved Raillietina spp. (4.2 %) and Eimeria spp. (7.1 %) were the most common helminthes and protozoa respectively. From total of birds study, 12 (2.7 %) and 6 (1.3 %) have two and three mixed infections respectively. Intestinal parasitic infections are common in birds in west Iran. The future studies are needed in order to determine to which extent the infections influence mortality and performance of the birds. PMID:26688641

  14. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  15. Nosema ceranae Infection Promotes Proliferation of Yeasts in Honey Bee Intestines

    PubMed Central

    Paleolog, Jerzy; Borsuk, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Background Nosema ceranae infection not only damages honey bee (Apis melifera) intestines, but we believe it may also affect intestinal yeast development and its seasonal pattern. In order to check our hypothesis, infection intensity versus intestinal yeast colony forming units (CFU) both in field and cage experiments were studied. Methods/Findings Field tests were carried out from March to October in 2014 and 2015. N. ceranae infection intensity decreased more than 100 times from 7.6 x 108 in March to 5.8 x 106 in October 2014. A similar tendency was observed in 2015. Therefore, in the European eastern limit of its range, N. ceranae infection intensity showed seasonality (spring peak and subsequent decline in the summer and fall), however, with an additional mid-summer peak that had not been recorded in other studies. Due to seasonal changes in the N. ceranae infection intensity observed in honey bee colonies, we recommend performing studies on new therapeutics during two consecutive years, including colony overwintering. A natural decrease in N. ceranae spore numbers observed from March to October might be misinterpreted as an effect of Nosema spp. treatment with new compounds. A similar seasonal pattern was observed for intestinal yeast population size in field experiments. Furthermore, cage experiments confirmed the size of intestinal yeast population to increase markedly together with the increase in the N. ceranae infection intensity. Yeast CFUs amounted to respectively 2,025 (CV = 13.04) and 11,150 (CV = 14.06) in uninfected and N. ceranae-infected workers at the end of cage experiments. Therefore, honey bee infection with N. ceranae supported additional opportunistic yeast infections, which may have resulted in faster colony depopulations. PMID:27736915

  16. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland

    PubMed Central

    Kantele, Anu; Levanov, Lev; Kivistö, Ilkka; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Markus; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-01-01

    Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001–2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (<16 years of age) with INKV infection were hospitalized; adults were outpatients with mild disease, except for 1 who was hospitalized with CHATV infection. Symptoms included fever, influenza-like illness, nausea or vomiting, disorientation, nuchal rigidity, headache, drowsiness, and seizures. Although many INKV and CHATV infections appear to be subclinical, these viruses can cause more severe disease, especially in children. PMID:27088268

  17. Intestinal Helminth Infections in Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinic at Kitale District Hospital, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Wekesa, A. W.; Mulambalah, C. S.; Muleke, C. I.; Odhiambo, R.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal helminth infections during pregnancy are associated with adverse outcomes including low birth weight and prenatal mortality. The infections are a major public health problem in developing countries. A hospital based survey was undertaken for six months to determine the infection prevalence, intensity, and risk factors. The study involved expectant women attending antenatal clinic. Stool samples were screened microscopically for helminth ova using Kato Katz technique. Information on risk factors was collected using semistructured questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS. Epidemiological data was analysed using descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis. The overall prevalence of infection was 21 (13.8%). Ascariasis was the most prevalent 10 (6.5%), hookworm infection was 6 (3.9%), and trichuriasis was 2 (1.3%). Pregnant women aged below 29 years (OR = 3.63, CI = 0.87–11.75) and those with primary level of education (OR = 3.21, CI = 0.88–11.75) were at a higher risk of infection compared to those aged ≥ 29 years with secondary level of education. Hand washing was significantly associated with reduced likelihood of infection (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.06–0.57). It was concluded that intestinal helminth infections were prevalent among pregnant women. We recommended that all expectant women visiting antenatal clinics be screened for intestinal helminth infections and positive cases be advised to seek treatment. PMID:24971167

  18. Perturbation of the intestinal microbiota of mice infected with Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Ras, Refaat; Huynh, Kevin; Desoky, Enas; Badawy, Ahmed; Widmer, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the interaction between the intestinal microbiota (microbiome) and enteric pathogens is of interest in the development of alternative treatments that do not rely on chemotherapy and do not lead to drug resistance. We undertook research in a rodent model of cryptosporidiosis to assess whether the bacterial gut microbiota is impacted by infection with the protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum. The profile of the faecal bacterial microbiota in infected and uninfected animals was compared using 16S amplicon sequencing. In four independent experiments, the intestinal microbiota of infected mice differed from that of uninfected animals, regardless of the C. parvum isolate used to infect mice. The use of replicated treatment groups demonstrated that microbiota divergence between treatments was driven by the infection and did not result from spontaneous changes in the intestinal ecosystem unrelated to the infection. Microbiota perturbation induced by C. parvum appeared to be reversible, as we observed a tendency for the phylogenetic distance between infected and uninfected mice to diminish after mice cleared the infection. As mice infected with C. parvum do not develop diarrhoea, these observations indicate that microbiota perturbation results from other mechanisms than an accelerated movement of gut content. PMID:25913477

  19. Salmonella typhimurium infection increases p53 acetylation in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaoping; Ye, Zhongde; Liu, Xingyin; Zhao, Yun; Xia, Yinglin; Steiner, Andrew; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C; Sun, Jun

    2010-05-01

    The ability of Salmonella typhimurium to enter intestinal epithelial cells constitutes a crucial step in pathogenesis. Salmonella invasion of the intestinal epithelium requires bacterial type three secretion system. Type three secretion system is a transport device that injects virulence proteins, called effectors, to paralyze or reprogram the eukaryotic cells. Avirulence factor for Salmonella (AvrA) is a Salmonella effector that inhibits the host's inflammatory responses. The mechanism by which AvrA modulates host cell signaling is not entirely clear. p53 is situated at the crossroads of a network of signaling pathways that are essential for genotoxic and nongenotoxic stress responses. We hypothesized that Salmonella infection activates the p53 pathway. We demonstrated that Salmonella infection increased p53 acetylation. Cells infected with AvrA-sufficient Salmonella have increased p53 acetylation, whereas cells infected with AvrA-deficient Salmonella have less p53 acetylation. In a cell-free system, AvrA possessed acetyltransferase activity and used p53 as a substrate. AvrA expression increased p53 transcriptional activity and induced cell cycle arrest. HCT116 p53-/- cells had less inflammatory responses. In a mouse model of Salmonella infection, intestinal epithelial p53 acetylation was increased by AvrA expression. Our studies provide novel mechanistic evidence that Salmonella modulates the p53 pathway during intestinal inflammation and infection.

  20. Distribution of intestinal parasitic infections amongst aborigine children at Post Sungai Rual, Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hartini, Y; Geishamimi, G; Mariam, A Z; Mohamed-Kamel, A G; Hidayatul, F O; Ismarul, Y I

    2013-12-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are important public health problems among underprivileged communities. This study was carried out to evaluate the infection rate of intestinal parasites among aborigine children at Pos Sungai Rual, Kelantan, Malaysia. A total of 111 faecal samples from aborigine children aged 4-12 years were screened for intestinal parasites by direct smear technique. Harada-Mori culture was also performed to identify hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis larvae. The results showed that 87.4% of the children examined were positive for one or more parasites. Intestinal parasites were significantly lower in boys (78.7%) as compared to girls (93.8%). The infection occurred in very young children aged 4-6 years (80.0%) and the percentage of parasite-positive cases appeared to be significantly higher (92.9%) among the children aged 7-9 years. Trichuris trichiura was the most common parasite found in aborigine children (65.8%). Low socioeconomic status, poor environmental sanitation and poor personal hygiene are possible contributing factors that increase the rate of intestinal parasitic infections among the children. Thus, the parasitic diseases will continue to threaten the people's health especially among communities from rural areas if no appropriate actions are taken to diminish the transmission of the parasites.

  1. VP4-specific intestinal antibody response to rotavirus in a murine model of heterotypic infection.

    PubMed

    Shaw, R D; Groene, W S; Mackow, E R; Merchant, A A; Cheng, E H

    1991-06-01

    We have adapted a murine model of heterotypic rotavirus infection for the purpose of evaluating the intestinal antibody response to an infection that mimics human vaccination. Neonatal mice were infected with the rhesus rotavirus (RRV). The enzyme-linked immunospot assay was used in order to avoid common artifacts in the quantitation of intestinal immune responses inherent in measurements of luminal or serum immunoglobulins and to obtain easily quantifiable data in a flexible and convenient format. Functionally active lymphocytes were harvested from the spleen, small intestinal lamina propria, Peyer's patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes and processed into single-cell suspensions. Antibody-secreting cells (ASC) were quantitated from 5 to 50 days after infection for total, RRV-specific, baculovirus-expressed VP4-specific, and single-shell RRV-specific ASC secreting either immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, or IgA. The response to VP4 constituted less than 1.5% of the total virus-specific response, which was located almost exclusively in the gut and was 90% IgA. Intestinal ASC were directed overwhelmingly toward proteins incorporated in the single-shell particle, predominantly VP2 and VP6. We conclude that the antibody response to VP4, thought to be the site of the important neutralization sites conserved among several rotavirus serotypes, is an extremely small portion of the overall antibody response in the intestinal tract.

  2. Clinical role of respiratory virus infection in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Arola, M; Ruuskanen, O; Ziegler, T; Mertsola, J; Näntö-Salonen, K; Putto-Laurila, A; Viljanen, M K; Halonen, P

    1990-12-01

    The clinical characteristics of acute otitis media in relation to coexisting respiratory virus infection were studied in a 1-year prospective study of 363 children with acute otitis media. Respiratory viruses were detected using virus isolation and virus antigen detection in nasopharyngeal specimens of 42% of the patients at the time of diagnosis. Rhinovirus (24%) and respiratory syncytial virus (13%) were the two most common viruses detected. Adenovirus, parainfluenza viruses, and coronavirus OC43 were found less frequently. The mean duration of preceding symptoms was 5.9 days before the diagnosis of acute otitis media. Ninety-four percent of the children had symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection. Fever was reported in 55% and earache in 47% of cases. Patients with respiratory syncytial virus infection had fever, cough, and vomiting significantly more often than patients with rhinovirus infection or virus-negative patients. No significant differences were found in the appearance of the tympanic membrane and outcome of illness between virus-negative and virus-positive patients with acute otitis. Most patients respond well to antimicrobial therapy despite the coexisting viral infection. If the symptoms of infection persist, they can be due to the underlying viral infection, and viral diagnostics preferably with rapid methods may be clinically useful in these patients.

  3. Acute Intestinal Obstruction Complicating Abdominal Pregnancy: Conservative Management and Successful Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Udigwe, Gerald Okanandu; Ihekwoaba, Eric Chukwudi; Udegbunam, Onyebuchi Izuchukwu; Egeonu, Richard Obinwanne; Okwuosa, Ayodele Obianuju

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute intestinal obstruction during pregnancy is a very challenging and unusual nonobstetric surgical entity often linked with considerable fetomaternal morbidity and mortality. When it is synchronous with abdominal pregnancy, it is even rarer. Case Presentation. A 28-year-old lady in her second pregnancy was referred to Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria, at 27 weeks of gestation due to vomiting, constipation, and abdominal pain. Examination and ultrasound scan revealed a single live intra-abdominal extrauterine fetus. Plain abdominal X-ray was diagnostic of intestinal obstruction. Conservative treatment was successful till the 34-week gestational age when she had exploratory laparotomy. At surgery, the amniotic sac was intact and the placenta was found to be adherent to the gut. There was also a live female baby with birth weight of 2.3 kg and Apgar scores of 9 and 10 in the 1st and 5th minutes, respectively, with the baby having right clubbed foot. Adhesiolysis and right adnexectomy were done. The mother and her baby were well and were discharged home nine days postoperatively. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of abdominal pregnancy as the cause of acute intestinal obstruction in the published literature. Management approach is multidisciplinary. PMID:27313923

  4. Human Intestinal Enteroids: a New Model To Study Human Rotavirus Infection, Host Restriction, and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Kapil; Blutt, Sarah E.; Ettayebi, Khalil; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Broughman, James R.; Crawford, Sue E.; Karandikar, Umesh C.; Sastri, Narayan P.; Conner, Margaret E.; Opekun, Antone R.; Graham, David Y.; Qureshi, Waqar; Sherman, Vadim; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human gastrointestinal tract research is limited by the paucity of in vitro intestinal cell models that recapitulate the cellular diversity and complex functions of human physiology and disease pathology. Human intestinal enteroid (HIE) cultures contain multiple intestinal epithelial cell types that comprise the intestinal epithelium (enterocytes and goblet, enteroendocrine, and Paneth cells) and are physiologically active based on responses to agonists. We evaluated these nontransformed, three-dimensional HIE cultures as models for pathogenic infections in the small intestine by examining whether HIEs from different regions of the small intestine from different patients are susceptible to human rotavirus (HRV) infection. Little is known about HRVs, as they generally replicate poorly in transformed cell lines, and host range restriction prevents their replication in many animal models, whereas many animal rotaviruses (ARVs) exhibit a broader host range and replicate in mice. Using HRVs, including the Rotarix RV1 vaccine strain, and ARVs, we evaluated host susceptibility, virus production, and cellular responses of HIEs. HRVs infect at higher rates and grow to higher titers than do ARVs. HRVs infect differentiated enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells, and viroplasms and lipid droplets are induced. Heterogeneity in replication was seen in HIEs from different patients. HRV infection and RV enterotoxin treatment of HIEs caused physiological lumenal expansion detected by time-lapse microscopy, recapitulating one of the hallmarks of rotavirus-induced diarrhea. These results demonstrate that HIEs are a novel pathophysiological model that will allow the study of HRV biology, including host restriction, cell type restriction, and virus-induced fluid secretion. IMPORTANCE Our research establishes HIEs as nontransformed cell culture models to understand human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology and the epithelial response, including host restriction of

  5. Changes in intestinal microflora of Caenorhabditis elegans following Bacillus nematocida B16 infection.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qiuhong; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Keqin; Huang, Xiaowei; Hui, Fengli; Kan, Yunchao; Yao, Lunguang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of pathogenic bacteria on a host and its symbiotic microbiota is vital and widespread in the biotic world. The soil-dwelling opportunistic bacterium Bacillus nematocida B16 uses a "Trojan horse" mechanism to kill Caenorhabditis elegans. The alterations in the intestinal microflora that occur after B16 infection remain unknown. Here, we analyzed the intestinal bacteria presented in normal and infected worms. The gut microbial community experienced a complex change after B16 inoculation, as determined through marked differences in species diversity, structure, distribution and composition between uninfected and infected worms. Regardless of the worm's origin (i.e., from soil or rotten fruits), the diversity of the intestinal microbiome decreased after infection. Firmicutes increased sharply, whereas Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Acidobacteria decreased to different degrees. Fusobacteria was only present 12 h post-infection. After 24 h of infection, 1228 and 1109 bacterial species were identified in the uninfected and infected groups, respectively. The shared species reached 21.97%. The infected group had a greater number of Bacillus species but a smaller number of Pediococcus, Halomonas, Escherichia and Shewanella species (P < 0.01). Therefore, this study provides the first evaluation of the alterations caused by pathogenic bacteria on symbiotic microbiota using C. elegans as the model species. PMID:26830015

  6. Changes in intestinal microflora of Caenorhabditis elegans following Bacillus nematocida B16 infection

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qiuhong; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Keqin; Huang, Xiaowei; Hui, Fengli; Kan, Yunchao; Yao, Lunguang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of pathogenic bacteria on a host and its symbiotic microbiota is vital and widespread in the biotic world. The soil-dwelling opportunistic bacterium Bacillus nematocida B16 uses a “Trojan horse” mechanism to kill Caenorhabditis elegans. The alterations in the intestinal microflora that occur after B16 infection remain unknown. Here, we analyzed the intestinal bacteria presented in normal and infected worms. The gut microbial community experienced a complex change after B16 inoculation, as determined through marked differences in species diversity, structure, distribution and composition between uninfected and infected worms. Regardless of the worm’s origin (i.e., from soil or rotten fruits), the diversity of the intestinal microbiome decreased after infection. Firmicutes increased sharply, whereas Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Acidobacteria decreased to different degrees. Fusobacteria was only present 12 h post-infection. After 24 h of infection, 1228 and 1109 bacterial species were identified in the uninfected and infected groups, respectively. The shared species reached 21.97%. The infected group had a greater number of Bacillus species but a smaller number of Pediococcus, Halomonas, Escherichia and Shewanella species (P < 0.01). Therefore, this study provides the first evaluation of the alterations caused by pathogenic bacteria on symbiotic microbiota using C. elegans as the model species. PMID:26830015

  7. Viral antibodies in the CSF after acute CNS infections.

    PubMed

    Cappel, R; Thiry, L; Clinet, G

    1975-09-01

    Viral antibodies were measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from 25 patients having acute viral central nervous system (CNS) infections, and from 39 control patients. The results, collected two weeks after the clinical onset, revealed the presence of antibodies in nine of 13 (69%) CSF specimens from patients suffering from encephalitis of myelitis, and in only one of nine (11%) of the CSF samples of those presenting a viral meningitis infection. This difference was statistically significant and suggests that the titration of viral antibodies in the CSF can be helpful in establishing the diagnosis of viral CNS infection. Our data also suggest that localized production of antibodies occurs during the course of acute CNS infections, and that the respiratory syncytial virus can be associated with CNS infections in man.

  8. Acute Myopericarditis Likely Secondary to Disseminated Gonococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, Daniel; Kerr, Leslie Dubin

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) is a rare complication of primary infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Cardiac involvement in this condition is rare, and is usually limited to endocarditis. However, there are a number of older reports suggestive of direct myocardial involvement. We report a case of a 38-year-old male with HIV who presented with chest pain, pharyngitis, tenosynovitis, and purpuric skin lesions. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed acute biventricular dysfunction. Skin biopsy showed diplococci consistent with disseminated gonococcal infection, and treatment with ceftriaxone improved his symptoms and ejection fraction. Though gonococcal infection was never proven with culture or nucleic acid amplification testing, the clinical picture and histologic findings were highly suggestive of DGI. Clinicians should consider disseminated gonococcal infection when a patient presents with acute myocarditis, especially if there are concurrent skin and joint lesions. PMID:26246922

  9. Acute Myopericarditis Likely Secondary to Disseminated Gonococcal Infection.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Daniel; Kerr, Leslie Dubin

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) is a rare complication of primary infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Cardiac involvement in this condition is rare, and is usually limited to endocarditis. However, there are a number of older reports suggestive of direct myocardial involvement. We report a case of a 38-year-old male with HIV who presented with chest pain, pharyngitis, tenosynovitis, and purpuric skin lesions. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed acute biventricular dysfunction. Skin biopsy showed diplococci consistent with disseminated gonococcal infection, and treatment with ceftriaxone improved his symptoms and ejection fraction. Though gonococcal infection was never proven with culture or nucleic acid amplification testing, the clinical picture and histologic findings were highly suggestive of DGI. Clinicians should consider disseminated gonococcal infection when a patient presents with acute myocarditis, especially if there are concurrent skin and joint lesions. PMID:26246922

  10. Role of dystrophin in acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Malvestio, Lygia M; Celes, Mara R N; Milanezi, Cristiane; Silva, João S; Jelicks, Linda A; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Rossi, Marcos A; Prado, Cibele M

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated loss/reduction of dystrophin in cardiomyocytes in both acute and chronic stages of experimental Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection in mice. The mechanisms responsible for dystrophin disruption in the hearts of mice acutely infected with T. cruzi are not completely understood. The present in vivo and in vitro studies were undertaken to evaluate the role of inflammation in dystrophin disruption and its correlation with the high mortality rate during acute infection. C57BL/6 mice were infected with T. cruzi and killed 14, 20 and 26 days post infection (dpi). The intensity of inflammation, cardiac expression of dystrophin, calpain-1, NF-κB, TNF-α, and sarcolemmal permeability were evaluated. Cultured neonatal murine cardiomyocytes were incubated with serum, collected at the peak of cytokine production and free of parasites, from T. cruzi-infected mice and dystrophin, calpain-1, and NF-κB expression analyzed. Dystrophin disruption occurs at the peak of mortality and inflammation and is associated with increased expression of calpain-1, TNF-α, NF-κB, and increased sarcolemmal permeability in the heart of T. cruzi-infected mice at 20 dpi confirmed by in vitro studies. The peak of mortality occurred only when significant loss of dystrophin in the hearts of infected animals occurred, highlighting the correlation between inflammation, dystrophin loss and mortality.

  11. Pediatric Infection and Intestinal Carriage Due to Extended-Spectrum-Cephalosporin-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xuan; Oron, Assaf P.; Adler, Amanda L.; Wolter, Daniel J.; Berry, Jessica E.; Hoffman, Lucas; Weissman, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the epidemiology of intestinal carriage with extended-spectrum-cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in children with index infections with these organisms. Patients with resistant Escherichia coli or Klebsiella bacteria isolated from the urine or a normally sterile site between January 2006 and December 2010 were included in this study. Available infection and stool isolates underwent phenotypic and molecular characterization. Clinical data relevant to the infections were collected and analyzed. Overall, 105 patients were identified with 106 extended-spectrum-cephalosporin-resistant E. coli (n = 92) or Klebsiella (n = 14) strains isolated from urine or a sterile site. Among the 27 patients who also had stool screening for resistant Enterobacteriaceae, 17 (63%) had intestinal carriage lasting a median of 199 days (range, 62 to 1,576). There were no significant differences in demographic, clinical, and microbiological variables between those with and those without intestinal carriage. Eighteen (17%) patients had 37 subsequent resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections identified: 31 urine and 6 blood. In a multivariable analysis, antibiotic intake in the 91 days prior to subsequent urine culture was significantly associated with subsequent urinary tract infection with a resistant organism (hazard ratio, 14.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6 to 130.6). Intestinal carriage and reinfection were most commonly due to bacterial strains of the same sequence type and with the same resistance determinants as the index extended-spectrum-cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, but carriage and reinfection with different resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains also occurred. PMID:24798269

  12. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection alters intestinal immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiangwu; Xiao, Zhiming; Liu, Fen; Chen, Shuai; Tang, Wuliang; Zhang, Decai; Liu, Shaojun

    2016-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrhea in humans and piglets. However, research regarding alterations of intestinal immunity following ETEC infection remains limited and the results controversial. The present study investigated the effects of ETEC on the expression levels of pro‑inflammatory cytokines and innate immune regulators from plasma cells, goblet cells and Paneth cells, and the activation of toll‑like receptor 4-nuclear factor (NF)‑κB and mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, in a mouse model infected with a porcine isolated ETEC strain. ETEC infection significantly reduced the expression of pro‑inflammatory cytokines in the mouse jejunum (P<0.05). Additionally, ETEC infection significantly affected the expression of immune regulators of plasma cells, goblet cells and Paneth cells in the mouse intestine (P<0.05). ETEC influenced the intestinal immunity via the NF‑κB and MAPK signaling pathways. In conclusion, ETEC colonization affects intestinal immunity as observed in a mouse model. This study provides a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of ETEC infection in animals and humans. PMID:27221777

  13. RESISTANCE OF THE MOUSE'S INTESTINAL TRACT TO EXPERIMENTAL SALMONELLA INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Bohnhoff, Marjorie; Miller, C. Phillip; Martin, William R.

    1964-01-01

    Multiplication of Salmonella enteritidis was inhibited in vitro by buffered suspensions of fecal material freshly removed from the large intestine of normal mice. Most effective was material obtained from cecum and transverse colon. Inhibitory activity was not impaired by sterilization by heat or filtration. From such materials were isolated acetic and butyric acids in concentrations which inhibited Salmonella in vitro. The degree of inhibitory activity of suspensions of colon content and of mixtures of the two fatty acids was conditioned by pH and favored by anaerobiosis. Effective inhibition occurred at or slightly below the pH of colon content of most normal mice as determined in situ by direct measurement. Acetic and butyric acids were isolated from anaerobic cultures of several strains of Bacteroides previously demonstrated to be one of the most numerous inhabitants of the large intestine of the normal mouse. PMID:14247721

  14. [Estimation of efficiency of complex-method intestinal therapy using Nitella flexilis test-object for acute intestinal obstruction of various etiology].

    PubMed

    Berishvili, K L; Rummo, O O; Kirkovskiĭ, V V; Tret'iak, S I; Korotkov, S V

    2005-12-01

    The aim of our investigation was to define the presence of correlation between toxicity of intestinal contents and clinical and laboratory indices in the cases of ileus and peritonitis with the use of complex method of enteral therapy. Experiments have been carried out on internodal cells of Nitella Flexilis water plant. Efficiency of the given method (investigation of toxicity of the intestinal content with the use of test-object Nitella Flexilis) has been studied in 25 patients, who underwent correction of morpho-functional status of small intestine. Results of investigation have shown that changes in toxicity of intestinal content reliably reflect the nature and dynamics of the pathobiologic processes proceeding in GIS in treated patients suffering from acute intestinal impassability. Using the method of correction of morpho-functional status of small intestine decreases the role of "Intestinal factor" in formation of endogenous intoxication, which in turn results in early normalization of clinical and laboratory indices, favored process of early post-operational period, decreased rate of lethality and shortened rehabilitation period.

  15. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Coyne G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and

  16. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Coyne G; Nickerson, Cheryl A; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and encounters the

  17. Observations on the intestinal protozoa infecting man in Rhodesia.

    PubMed

    Goldsmid, J M; Rogers, S; Mahomed, K

    1976-09-18

    Humans in Rhodesia harbour a wide range of intestinal protozoa. Of the species included, Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba coli and Giardia lamblia have previously been recorded. Other species which are either rarely reported or which have previously never been reported from this country, include Trichomonas hominis, Chilomastix mesnili, Enteromonas hominis, Retortamonas intestinalis, Balantidum coli,Entamoeba hartmanni,Entamoeba histolytica Laredo. Endolimax nana, Dientamoeba fragilis and Isospora belli. The importance in Rhodesia of these species, and especially of E. histolytica, is discussed. PMID:988643

  18. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment Proposal for Acute Endodontic Infection.

    PubMed

    Keine, Kátia Cristina; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Kamila Figueiredo; Diniz, Ana Carolina Soares; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Galoza, Marina Oliveira Gonçalves; Magro, Miriam Graziele; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the main lesions that simulate clinically and propose a treatment protocol for acute endodontic infection. Signs and clinical symptoms of periodontal abscess, gingival abscess, odontoma, herpes simplex, pericoronitis, acute pulpitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis/periodontitis (NUG/NUP) were described and compared with acute endodontic infections. A treatment protocol was described by optimizing the procedures in access cavity, microbial decontamination and detoxification of the root canal, apical debridement, intracanal and systemic medication and surgical drainage procedures. The convenience of the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, root canal instrumentation using a crown-down technique, intracanal medication with 2% chlorhexidine or triple antibiotic paste and the convenience of the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and surgical drainage to solve cases of acute dentoalveolar abscess was discussed.

  19. Screening for acute HIV infection in South Africa: finding acute and chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Ingrid V.; Chetty, Senica; Giddy, Janet; Reddy, Shabashini; Bishop, Karen; Lu, Zhigang; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The yield of screening for acute HIV infection among general medical patients in resource-scarce settings remains unclear. Our objective was to evaluate a strategy of pooled HIV plasma RNA to diagnose acute HIV infection in patients with negative or discordant rapid HIV antibody tests in Durban, South Africa. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients with negative or discordant rapid HIV antibody tests from a routine HIV screening program in an outpatient department in Durban with an HIV prevalence of 48%. Study participants underwent venipuncture for pooled qualitative HIV RNA, and if positive, quantitative RNA, enzyme immunoassay and Western Blot (WB). Patients with negative or indeterminate WB and positive quantitative HIV RNA were considered acutely infected. Those with chronic infection (positive RNA and WB) despite negative or discordant rapid HIV tests were considered false negative rapid antibody tests. Results Nine hundred ninety-four participants were enrolled with either negative (N=976) or discordant (N=18) rapid test results. Eleven (1.1%, 95% CI: 0.6–2.0%) had acute HIV infection. Of the 994 patients, an additional 20 (2.0%, 95% CI: 1.3–.3.1%) had chronic HIV infection (false negative rapid test). Conclusions One percent of outpatients with negative or discordant rapid HIV tests in Durban, South Africa had acute HIV infection readily detectable through pooled serum HIV RNA screening. Pooled RNA testing also identified an additional 2% of patients with chronic HIV infection. HIV RNA screening has the potential to identify both acute and chronic HIV infections that are otherwise missed by standard HIV testing algorithms. PMID:20553336

  20. Studies with inulin-type fructans on intestinal infections, permeability, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Francisco

    2007-11-01

    Symbiosis between host and gut bacteria can be optimized by prebiotics. Inulin-type fructans have been shown to improve the microbial balance of the intestinal ecosystem by stimulating the growth of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. These changes have been associated with several health benefits, including the prevention of gastrointestinal and systemic infections in animal models and human studies. Inulin-type fructans induce changes of the intestinal mucosa characterized by higher villi, deeper crypts, increased number of goblet cells, and a thicker mucus layer on the colonic epithelium. Bacterial antagonism and competition of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli with pathogens, as well as the trophic effects on the intestinal epithelium, may explain the protective role of inulin against enteric infections. In contrast, studies with rats fed a low-calcium diet suggested a negative effect of prebiotics on intestinal barrier function. However, the adverse effect was clearly ascribed to the strong reduction of dietary calcium, as it could be reversed by oral administration of calcium. The adverse effect of a low-calcium diet on intestinal permeability has not been observed in humans. Inulin and oligofructose are now being tested in human studies aimed at prevention of bacterial translocation in critical health conditions. Mixtures of probiotics and prebiotics including inulin or oligofructose significantly reduced the rate of postoperative infections in liver transplant patients. Finally, inulin and oligofructose have proven useful to prevent mucosal inflammatory disorders in animal models and in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  1. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Infection among Food Handlers in Northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Balarak, Davoud; Modrek, Mohammad Jafari; Bazrafshan, Edris; Ansari, Hossein; Kord Mostafapour, Ferdos

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases are among the most important infectious diseases and pose health problems in many countries, most especially in developing countries. Workers at food centers could transmit parasitic infections in the absence of sanitation. This is a descriptive study conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in food clerks in the city of Tabriz in 2014. Data was recorded in the offices of the health center for all food handlers who were referred to the laboratory for demographic and stool tests to receive the health card. Parasitic infection was observed in 172 cases (3.73%) of 4612 samples. A total of 156 positive samples (90.69%) were related to protozoa and 16 (9.3%) were related to helminthes. Most of the parasitic infections were related to Giardia and Entamoeba coli and the lowest infection was related to H. nana. Also, there was a significant relationship between level of education and parasitic infection rate (P = 0.0044). But there was no significant difference between the type of infection and amount of intestinal parasites. The results show that the prevalence of intestinal parasites, especially pathogenic protozoa, is common in some food handlers. Therefore, more sanitary controls are required and increasing of education will play a crucial role in improving the health of these people.

  2. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Infection among Food Handlers in Northwest Iran

    PubMed Central

    Balarak, Davoud; Modrek, Mohammad Jafari; Bazrafshan, Edris; Ansari, Hossein; Kord Mostafapour, Ferdos

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases are among the most important infectious diseases and pose health problems in many countries, most especially in developing countries. Workers at food centers could transmit parasitic infections in the absence of sanitation. This is a descriptive study conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in food clerks in the city of Tabriz in 2014. Data was recorded in the offices of the health center for all food handlers who were referred to the laboratory for demographic and stool tests to receive the health card. Parasitic infection was observed in 172 cases (3.73%) of 4612 samples. A total of 156 positive samples (90.69%) were related to protozoa and 16 (9.3%) were related to helminthes. Most of the parasitic infections were related to Giardia and Entamoeba coli and the lowest infection was related to H. nana. Also, there was a significant relationship between level of education and parasitic infection rate (P = 0.0044). But there was no significant difference between the type of infection and amount of intestinal parasites. The results show that the prevalence of intestinal parasites, especially pathogenic protozoa, is common in some food handlers. Therefore, more sanitary controls are required and increasing of education will play a crucial role in improving the health of these people. PMID:27127643

  3. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Infection among Food Handlers in Northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Balarak, Davoud; Modrek, Mohammad Jafari; Bazrafshan, Edris; Ansari, Hossein; Kord Mostafapour, Ferdos

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases are among the most important infectious diseases and pose health problems in many countries, most especially in developing countries. Workers at food centers could transmit parasitic infections in the absence of sanitation. This is a descriptive study conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in food clerks in the city of Tabriz in 2014. Data was recorded in the offices of the health center for all food handlers who were referred to the laboratory for demographic and stool tests to receive the health card. Parasitic infection was observed in 172 cases (3.73%) of 4612 samples. A total of 156 positive samples (90.69%) were related to protozoa and 16 (9.3%) were related to helminthes. Most of the parasitic infections were related to Giardia and Entamoeba coli and the lowest infection was related to H. nana. Also, there was a significant relationship between level of education and parasitic infection rate (P = 0.0044). But there was no significant difference between the type of infection and amount of intestinal parasites. The results show that the prevalence of intestinal parasites, especially pathogenic protozoa, is common in some food handlers. Therefore, more sanitary controls are required and increasing of education will play a crucial role in improving the health of these people. PMID:27127643

  4. Imaging in acute renal infection in children

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Starshak, R.J.; Schroeder, B.A.

    1987-03-01

    Infection is the most common disease of the urinary tract in children, and various imaging techniques have been used to verify its presence and location. On retrospective analysis, 50 consecutive children with documented upper urinary tract infection had abnormal findings on renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate. The infection involved the renal poles only in 38 and the poles plus other renal cortical areas in eight. Four had abnormalities that spared the poles. Renal sonograms were abnormal in 32 of 50 children. Excretory urograms were abnormal in six of 23 children in whom they were obtained. Vesicoureteral reflux was found in 34 of 40 children in whom voiding cystourethrography was performed. These data show the high sensitivity of renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate in documenting upper urinary tract infection. The location of the abnormalities detected suggests that renal infections spread via an ascending mode and implies that intrarenal reflux is a major contributing factor.

  5. Pathophysiology of Clinical Symptoms in Acute Viral Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Kuchar, E; Miśkiewicz, K; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Szenborn, L

    2015-01-01

    In this article we discuss the pathophysiology of common symptoms of acute viral respiratory infections (e.g., sneezing, nasal discharge, sore throat, cough, muscle pains, malaise, and mood changes). Since clinical symptoms are not sufficient to determine the etiology of viral respiratory tract infections, we believe that the host defense mechanisms are critical for the symptomatology. Consequently, this review of literature is focused on the pathophysiology of respiratory symptoms regardless of their etiology. We assume that despite a high prevalence of symptoms of respiratory infection, their pathogenesis is not widely known. A better understanding of the symptoms' pathogenesis could improve the quality of care for patients with respiratory tract infections.

  6. Sex influence on chronic intestinal inflammation in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Robert S; Myles, Mathew H; Livingston, Beth A; Criley, Jennifer M; Franklin, Craig L

    2004-06-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus is a bacterial pathogen of mice that has been reported to cause chronic intestinal inflammation in A/JCr, germfree Swiss Webster, and immunodeficient mice. To the authors' knowledge, the influence of sex on development of chronic intestinal inflammation in H. hepaticus-infected mice has not been investigated. The purposes of the study reported here were to determine whether severity of intestinal inflammation differs between male and female A/JCr mice chronically infected with H. hepaticus and to characterize the mucosal immune response in these mice. The cecum of male and female A/JCr mice infected with H. hepaticus for 1 month and 3 months was objectively evaluated histologically for intestinal disease. Also, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was done to measure interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha), interferon-inducible protein of 10 kDa (IP-10), and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) mRNA values in the cecal tissue of these mice. Significant differences in cecal lesion scores were not present at 1 month after infection. However, infected female mice had significantly up-regulated expression of cecal IL-10, MIP-1alpha, IP-10, and MIG mRNA compared with that in uninfected females, and expression of IL-10 and MIP-1alpha was significantly greater than that detected in infected male mice (P < or = 0.05). At 3 months after infection, cecal lesion scores were significantly (P < or = 0.05) increased in female and male mice compared with uninfected controls, and infected female mice had significantly (P < or = 0.05) higher cecal lesion scores than did infected male mice. In addition, infected females had significant (P < or = 0.05) increases in cecal IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-10, MIP-1alpha, IP-10, and MIG mRNA values compared with values in uninfected females and infected males

  7. Intestinal parasitic infection among children and neonatus admitted to Ibn-Sina Hospital, Sirt, Libya.

    PubMed

    Kasssem, Hamed H; Zaed, Hana Abdalsalam; Sadaga, Gazala A

    2007-08-01

    A total of 350 stool samples from 196 males and 154 female children and neonatus admitted in Ibn-Sina hospital, Sirt, were examined from June 2001 to May 2002, to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites. Intestinal parasitic infections were identified in 196 (56%) of children and neonates. No intestinal helminthic parasites were detected but 13 intestinal protozoan parasites were detected. The most prevalent protozoan was Entamoeba histolytica /E. dispar (36.57%); Blastocystis hominis (12.57%), Giardia lamblia (10.29%), Isospora belli (3.14%) and Balantidium coli (0.86%), the latter was detected in non-Libyan children. The non-pathogenic ones were Entamoeba coli (15.14%), Endolimax nana (13.71%), Entamoeba hartmanni (4.29%), Chilomastix mesnilli (4.29%), Retortamonas intestinalis (3.43%), Dientamoeba fragilis (2%), Iodamoeba butschlii (0.86%) and Trichomonas hominis (0.86%). The result showed a significant difference exists between the prevalence of pathogenic and non-pathogenic protozoan parasites (P < 0.05). High prevalence of E. histolytica/ E. dispar followed by E. coli, E. nana, B. hominis and G. lamblia in both sexes of children, while the prevalence of other intestinal parasites were low in both sexes, significantly different existed in the prevalence of intestinal parasites between males and females children (t = 24.68; P < 0.05). Age groups had no effect on the prevalence of intestinal parasites (F = 0.66; P < 0.05). Significant differences existed in the prevalence between single and multiple infections with pathogenic protozoa. The socio-economic status of children parents revealed that high prevalence in children from medium socio-economic status. The family size had no significant effect on the prevalence of the intestinal parasites. PMID:17985574

  8. Bacteriocin from epidemic Listeria strains alters the host intestinal microbiota to favor infection

    PubMed Central

    Quereda, Juan J.; Dussurget, Olivier; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Ghozlane, Amine; Volant, Stevenn; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Regnault, Béatrice; Kennedy, Sean; Mondot, Stanislas; Villoing, Barbara; Cossart, Pascale; Pizarro-Cerda, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is responsible for gastroenteritis in healthy individuals and for a severe invasive disease in immunocompromised patients. Among the three identified L. monocytogenes evolutionary lineages, lineage I strains are overrepresented in epidemic listeriosis outbreaks, but the mechanisms underlying the higher virulence potential of strains of this lineage remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that Listeriolysin S (LLS), a virulence factor only present in a subset of lineage I strains, is a bacteriocin highly expressed in the intestine of orally infected mice that alters the host intestinal microbiota and promotes intestinal colonization by L. monocytogenes, as well as deeper organ infection. To our knowledge, these results therefore identify LLS as the first bacteriocin described in L. monocytogenes and associate modulation of host microbiota by L. monocytogenes epidemic strains to increased virulence. PMID:27140611

  9. Giardia duodenalis Infection Reduces Granulocyte Infiltration in an In Vivo Model of Bacterial Toxin-Induced Colitis and Attenuates Inflammation in Human Intestinal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, James A.; Motta, Jean-Paul; Schenck, L. Patrick; Hirota, Simon A.; Beck, Paul L.; Buret, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the development of diarrheal disease and fever. Conversely, separate observations have indicated Giardia infections may enhance the severity of diarrheal disease from a co-infecting pathogen. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils (PMNs) are granulocytic, innate immune cells characteristic of acute intestinal inflammatory responses against bacterial pathogens that contribute to the development of diarrheal disease following recruitment into intestinal tissues. Giardia cathepsin B cysteine proteases have been shown to attenuate PMN chemotaxis towards IL-8/CXCL8, suggesting Giardia targets PMN accumulation. However, the ability of Giardia infections to attenuate PMN accumulation in vivo and how in turn this effect may alter the host inflammatory response in the intestine has yet to be demonstrated. Herein, we report that Giardia infection attenuates granulocyte tissue infiltration induced by intra-rectal instillation of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in an isolate-dependent manner. This attenuation of granulocyte infiltration into colonic tissues paralled decreased expression of several cytokines associated with the recruitment of PMNs. Giardia trophozoite isolates that attenuated granulocyte infiltration in vivo also decreased protein expression of cytokines released from inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues collected from patients with active Crohn’s disease, including several cytokines associated with PMN recruitment. These results demonstrate for the first time that certain

  10. Antagonism between two intestinal parasites in humans: the importance of co-infection for infection risk and recovery dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Aaron D.; Martin, Melanie; Kaplan, Hillard; Gurven, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Co-infection may affect transmission and recovery from infection, but remains an understudied element of disease ecology, particularly with regard to antagonism between parasites sharing a host. Helminth and giardia infections are often endemic in the same populations and both occupy the small intestine; yet few studies have examined interactions between these parasites. We report on helminth–giardia co-infections in a panel study of forager–horticulturalists in the Bolivian lowlands. Parasites were identified in faecal samples from 3275 participants, collected during 5235 medical exams over 6 years. Longitudinal co-infection patterns were examined using logistic mixed and multi-state Markov models. The most prevalent infections were hookworm (56%), Giardia lamblia (30%) and Ascaris lumbricoides (15%). Cross-sectionally, hookworm and A. lumbricoides were negatively associated with G. lamblia (OR = 0.60; OR = 0.65, respectively). Longitudinally, giardia infection was less likely in helminth-infected individuals (HR: 0.46). Infection with helminths was also less likely for individuals infected with giardia (HR: 0.71). Finally, treatment with mebendazole reduced subsequent hookworm infections, but resulted in a marginal increase in the odds of G. lamblia infection. Our results provide evidence for an antagonistic relationship between helminths and giardia, and suggest that co-infection should be considered in disease transmission models and treatment decisions. PMID:23986108

  11. Pericardial Tamponade in an Adult Suffering from Acute Mumps Infection

    PubMed Central

    Flieger, Robert Rainer; Mankertz, Annette; Yilmaz, Kadir; Roepke, Torsten Kai

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a case of a 51-year-old man with acute pericardial tamponade requiring emergency pericardiocentesis after he suffered from sore throat, headache, malaise, and sweats for two weeks. Serological analyses revealed increased mumps IgM and IgG indicating an acute mumps infection whereas other bacterial and viral infections were excluded. In addition, MRI revealed atypical swelling of the left submandibular gland. Whereas mumps has become a rare entity in children due to comprehensive vaccination regimens in western civilizations, our case highlights mumps as an important differential diagnosis also in adults, where the virus can induce life-threatening complications such as pericardial tamponade.

  12. Precision-cut intestinal slices as a culture system to analyze the infection of differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Winter, Christine; Mork, Ann-Kathrin; Amiri, Mahdi; Naim, Hassan Y; Rautenschlein, Silke; Herrler, Georg

    2015-02-01

    Many viruses infect and replicate in their host via the intestinal tract, e.g. many picornaviruses, several coronaviruses and avian influenza viruses of waterfowl. To analyze infection of enterocytes is a challenging task as culture systems for differentiated intestinal epithelial cells are not readily available and often have a life span that is too short for infection studies. Precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) from chicken embryos were prepared and shown that the epithelial cells lining the lumen of the intestine are viable for up to 4 days. Using lectin staining, it was demonstrated that α2,3-linked sialic acids, the preferred receptor determinants of avian influenza viruses, are present on the apical side of the epithelial cells. Furthermore, the epithelial cells (at the tips) of the villi were shown to be susceptible to infection by an avian influenza virus of the H9N2 subtype. This culture system will be useful to analyze virus infection of intestinal epithelial cells and it should be applicable also to the intestine of other species.

  13. Intestinal Infections Among Febrile Hospitalized Patients in the Republic of Armenia: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    PubMed

    Zardaryan, Eduard; Paronyan, Lusine; Bakunts, Vahe; Gevorgyan, Zaruhi; Asoyan, Vigen; Apresyan, Hripsime; Hovhannisyan, Alvard; Palayan, Karo; Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Rivard, Robert G; Bautista, Christian T

    2016-10-01

    In the past, several enteric outbreaks in 1996, 1998, 1999, and 2003 caused by Salmonella typhi, a Gram-negative bacterium, have occurred in Armenia. This study describes the demographic, epidemiological, and clinical characteristics of febrile hospitalized patients with intestinal infections in Armenia. Using a chart review study design, medical data from adult patients who were hospitalized at the Nork hospital during 2010-2012 were reviewed. A total of 600 medical charts were reviewed. Of these, 51 % were diagnosed with intestinal infections. Among these patients, 59 % had an intestinal infection of known etiology, with three main pathogens identified: Salmonella sp. (32 %), Shigella sp. (32 %), and Staphylococcus aureus (18 %). After controlling for the calendar year, age in years, and gender, patients detected with Salmonella sp. were more likely to reported the presence of a family member with similar signs or symptoms [odds ratio (OR) 9.0; 95 % CI 2.4-33.7] and the lack of a water tap at home (OR 3.9; 95 % CI 1.7-9.5). Evidence indicates that Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., and S. aureus as the most common etiologies reported among febrile hospitalized patients. A high percentage of patients had intestinal infections of unknown etiology; thus, improvement in laboratory capacity (enabling more advanced tests, such as polymerase chain reaction) would increase the identification of the enteropathogens causing disease in Armenia. PMID:26992893

  14. Acute mucosal pathogenesis of feline immunodeficiency virus is independent of viral dose in vaginally infected cats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The mucosal pathogenesis of HIV has been shown to be an important feature of infection and disease progression. HIV-1 infection causes depletion of intestinal lamina propria CD4+ T cells (LPL), therefore, intestinal CD4+ T cell preservation may be a useful correlate of protection in evaluating vaccine candidates. Vaccine studies employing the cat/FIV and macaque/SIV models frequently use high doses of parenterally administered challenge virus to ensure high plasma viremia in control animals. However, it is unclear if loss of mucosal T cells would occur regardless of initial viral inoculum dose. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effect of viral dose on mucosal leukocytes and associated innate and adaptive immune responses. Results Cats were vaginally inoculated with a high, middle or low dose of cell-associated and cell-free FIV. PBMC, serum and plasma were assessed every two weeks with tissues assessed eight weeks following infection. We found that irrespective of mucosally administered viral dose, FIV infection was induced in all cats. However, viremia was present in only half of the cats, and viral dose was unrelated to the development of viremia. Importantly, regardless of viral dose, all cats experienced significant losses of intestinal CD4+ LPL and CD8+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). Innate immune responses by CD56+CD3- NK cells correlated with aviremia and apparent occult infection but did not protect mucosal T cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in viremic cats were more likely to produce cytokines in response to Gag stimulation, whereas aviremic cats T cells tended to produce cytokines in response to Env stimulation. However, while cell-mediated immune responses in aviremic cats may have helped reduce viral replication, they could not be correlated to the levels of viremia. Robust production of anti-FIV antibodies was positively correlated with the magnitude of viremia. Conclusions Our results indicate that mucosal immune

  15. Acute Small Bowel Obstruction and Small Bowel Perforation as a Clinical Debut of Intestinal Endometriosis: A Report of Four Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Torralba-Morón, Angel; Urbanowicz, Maria; Ibarrola-De Andres, Carolina; Lopez-Alonso, Guadalupe; Colina-Ruizdelgado, Francisco; Guerra-Vales, Juan-Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a quite common pathology, however, intestinal endometriosis is a rare condition, which typically occurs with chronic symptoms. Its acute presentation is very infrequent. We herein report four cases of intestinal endometriosis, in which the clinical debut occurred acutely: two as an acute small bowel obstruction and two as a small bowel perforation. None of the cases had a preoperative diagnosis of endometriosis. The interest of these cases lies in this exceptional form of presentation, such as a surgical acute abdomen. Therefore, intestinal endometriosis should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of an acute obstructive or perforative process of the small or large bowel. PMID:27629952

  16. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Intestinal Parasitic Infection among Children in an Urban Slum of Karachi

    PubMed Central

    Mehraj, Vikram; Hatcher, Juanita; Akhtar, Saeed; Rafique, Ghazala; Beg, Mohammad Asim

    2008-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitic infections are endemic worldwide and have been described as constituting the greatest single worldwide cause of illness and disease. Poverty, illiteracy, poor hygiene, lack of access to potable water and hot and humid tropical climate are the factors associated with intestinal parasitic infections. The study aimed to estimate prevalence and identify factors associated with intestinal parasitic infections among 1 to 5 years old children residing in an urban slum of Karachi Pakistan. Methods and Principal Findings A cross sectional survey was conducted from February to June 2006 in Ghosia Colony Gulshan Town Karachi, Pakistan. A simple random sample of 350 children aged 1–5 years was collected. The study used structured pre-tested questionnaire, anthropometric tools and stool tests to obtain epidemiological and disease data. Data were analyzed using appropriate descriptive, univariate and multivariable logistic regression methods. The mean age of participants was 2.8 years and 53% were male. The proportions of wasted, stunted and underweight children were 10.4%, 58.9% and 32.7% respectively. The prevalence of Intestinal parasitic infections was estimated to be 52.8% (95% CI: 46.1; 59.4). Giardia lamblia was the most common parasite followed by Ascaris lumbricoides, Blastocystis hominis and Hymenolepis nana. About 43% children were infected with single parasite and 10% with multiple parasites. Age {Adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1; 1.9}, living in rented households (aOR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.0; 3.9) and history of excessive crying (aOR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0; 3.4) were significantly associated with intestinal parasitic infections. Conclusions Intestinal parasites are highly prevalent in this setting and poverty was implicated as an important risk factor for infection. Effective poverty reduction programmes and promotion of deworming could reduce intestinal parasite carriage. There is a need for mass scale campaigns to

  17. Intestinal parasites and HIV infection in Tanzanian children with chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Cegielski, J P; Msengi, A E; Dukes, C S; Mbise, R; Redding-Lallinger, R; Minjas, J N; Wilson, M L; Shao, J; Durack, D T

    1993-02-01

    The authors attempted to determine whether specific intestinal parasites are associated with HIV infection in Tanzanian children with chronic diarrhea. This prospective, cross-sectional study included all children aged 15 months to 5 years admitted with chronic diarrhea and a group of age-matched controls and took place at Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Standardized history, physical examination, HIV serology, and stool parasitology were evaluated for all subjects. The authors compared 3 groups - HIV infected and non-HIV-infected children with chronic diarrhea and controls without diarrhea--and they measured fecal parasites and nutritional status. Chronic diarrhea accounted for one-fourth of all cases of diarrheal disease in the defined age range, and children with chronic diarrhea were severely malnourished. 40% of all subjects with chronic diarrhea were HIV-seropositive. Although intestinal parasites were detected in approximately 50% of all 3 groups, diarrheagenic parasites were detected in up to 40% of children with chronic diarrhea. Blastocystis hominis was detected only in HIV-infected patients. HIV infection was common in children with chronic diarrhea, and parasitic agents of diarrhea may be important in children with chronic diarrhea both with and without HIV infection in this setting. B. hominis was more frequent in HIV-infected children. The immunocompromising effects of severe malnutrition may have diminished the differences between HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected children. PMID:8466683

  18. A matter of timing: early, not chronic phase intestinal nematode infection restrains control of a concurrent enteric protozoan infection.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Sebastian; Held, Josephin; Stange, Joerg; Lendner, Matthias; Hepworth, Matthew R; Klotz, Christian; Lucius, Richard; Pogonka, Thomas; Hartmann, Susanne

    2010-10-01

    Infections with parasitic worms are often long lasting and associated with modulated immune responses. We analyzed the influence of the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri dwelling in the small intestine on concurrent protozoan infection with Eimeria falciformis residing in the cecum. To dissect the effects of a nematode infection in the early versus chronic phase, we infected animals with E. falciformis 6 or 28 days post H. p. bakeri infection. Only a concurrent early nematode infection led to an increased replication of the protozoan parasite, whereas a chronic worm infection had no influence on the control of E. falciformis. Increased protozoan replication correlated with the reduced production of IFN-γ, IL-12/23, CCL4, CXCL9 and CXCL10, reduced migration of T cells and increased expression of Foxp3 at the site of protozoan infection. This was accompanied by a stronger nematode-specific Th2 response in gut-draining LN. Protection of mice against challenge infections with the protozoan parasite was not altered. Hence, the detrimental effect of a nematode infection on the control of a concurrent protozoan infection is transient and occurs only in the narrow time window of the early phase of infection.

  19. Characterization of acute rat parvovirus infection by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gaertner, D J; Jacoby, R O; Johnson, E A; Paturzo, F X; Smith, A L; Brandsma, J L

    1993-04-01

    In situ hybridization and virus titration were used to characterize early stages of rat virus (RV) infection of rat pups after oronasal inoculation. Results suggest that virus enters through the lung and that early viremia leads rapidly to pantropic infection. Cells derived from all three germ layers were infected with RV, but those of endodermal and mesodermal origin were the predominant targets. Infection of vascular endothelium was widespread and was associated with hemorrhage and infarction in the brain. Convalescence from acute infection was accompanied by mononuclear cell infiltrates at sites containing RV DNA. Viral DNA was also detected in endothelium, fibroblasts and smooth muscle myofibers four weeks after inoculation. Further examination of these cells as potential sites of persistent infection is warranted.

  20. [Acute intestinal occlusion caused by phytobezoar in Israel. Role of oranges and persimmons].

    PubMed

    Serour, F; Dona, G; Kaufman, M; Weisberg, D; Krispin, M

    1985-05-01

    Forty-one patients were operated upon for acute intestinal obstruction secondary to the presence of phytobezoars, 34 of these patients (83%) having a history of previous gastric surgery for ulcer. The etiologic factor in 44% of cases was oranges and in 56% persimmons (Kakis). Treatment was by enterotomy in 27 patients (65,85%) and by "milking" in 14 (34,15%). Postoperative mortality was 2,44% (1 case). Recurrence was noted in three cases (7,3%) including one with an ileocutaneous fistula, treatment being by enterotomy in 2 cases and "milking" in the third patient. First intention intestinal resection was never required. Five patients required several admissions for subacute obstruction treated conservatively. These findings suggest that gastric surgery predisposes to intestinal obstruction by phytobezoar. Careful exploration of the digestive tube and particularly the stomach should avoid postoperative relapse, while prevention depends on a dietary regimen avoiding excessive intake of foods rich in cellulose, particularly oranges and persimmon fruit. PMID:4044688

  1. Emergency Department Management Of Acute Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Steven G; Pfaff, James A; Cuenca, Peter John

    2014-11-01

    Infective endocarditis has a high rate of mortality, and most patients suspected of having the disease will require hospital admission. This review examines the literature as it pertains specifically to emergency clinicians who must maintain vigilance for risk factors and obtain a thorough history, including use of intravenous drugs, in order to guide the workup and treatment. Properly obtained cultures are critical during the evaluation, as they direct the course of antibiotic therapy. Although transthoracic echocardiography is widely available in United States emergency departments, it is not sensitive or specific enough to rule out a diagnosis of infective endocarditis. In high-risk patients, transesophageal echocardiography should be considered.

  2. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  3. Administration of Reconstituted Polyphenol Oil Bodies Efficiently Suppresses Dendritic Cell Inflammatory Pathways and Acute Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Elisabetta; Vadrucci, Elisa; Delvecchio, Francesca Romana; Addabbo, Francesco; Bettini, Simona; Liou, Rachel; Monsurrò, Vladia; Huang, Alex Yee-Chen; Pizarro, Theresa Torres

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols are natural compounds capable of interfering with the inflammatory pathways of several in vitro model systems. In this study, we developed a stable and effective strategy to administer polyphenols to treat in vivo models of acute intestinal inflammation. The in vitro suppressive properties of several polyphenols were first tested and compared for dendritic cells (DCs) production of inflammatory cytokines. A combination of the polyphenols, quercetin and piperine, were then encapsulated into reconstituted oil bodies (OBs) in order to increase their stability. Our results showed that administration of low dose reconstituted polyphenol OBs inhibited LPS-mediated inflammatory cytokine secretion, including IL-6, IL-23, and IL-12, while increasing IL-10 and IL-1Rα production. Mice treated with the polyphenol-containing reconstituted OBs (ROBs) were partially protected from dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis and associated weight loss, while mortality and inflammatory scores revealed an overall anti-inflammatory effect that was likely mediated by impaired DC immune responses. Our study indicates that the administration of reconstituted quercetin and piperine-containing OBs may represent an effective and potent anti-inflammatory strategy to treat acute intestinal inflammation. PMID:24558444

  4. Predicting development of infected necrosis in acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dambrauskas, Zilvinas; Pundzius, Juozas; Barauskas, Giedrius

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of severe acute pancreatitis is about 30 cases per 100,000 inhabitants, and it carries an overall mortality rate of 10-15%. Infection of pancreatic necrosis occurs in 20-30% of patients with severe acute pancreatitis and triples the mortality rate. Therefore, early prediction and diagnosis of infection in necrotizing pancreatitis are extremely important. The aim of the studies included in this review was to investigate the potential of specific prognostic factors to predict the development of secondary pancreatic infection in severe acute pancreatitis. This is seen as an important tool allowing to perform a computed tomography- or ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for bacteriological sampling at the right moment, to confirm the diagnosis, and, finally, to select the subgroup of patients who would benefit from the antibiotic prophylaxis. Precise patients' selection could possibly result in more rational use of antibiotics in patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis and reduction of multi-resistant bacteria. Recent studies show that C-reactive protein is an important prognostic marker of pancreatic necrosis with the highest sensitivity and negative prognostic value in this respect. Procalcitonin alone or in combination with interleukin-6 best identifies patients not at risk for infection. However, a review of the clinical studies suggests that we still do not have an optimal model, thus there is a need for new more reliable biochemical and/or clinical predictive systems.

  5. Acute Borrelia infection inducing an APMPPE-like picture.

    PubMed

    Al Mousa, Munjid; Koch, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) is an uncommon disorder of unknown etiology affecting the retina, the retinal pigment epithelium, and the choroid. Although several etiological factors have been suggested, none has been confirmed. We report a case of APMPPE associated with acute infection of Borreliosis. A 30-year-old man presented with a decrease in vision in the right eye of about 1-week duration. His visual acuity in the right eye was 6/36. Fundus exam revealed the presence of multiple placoid creamy retinal/subretinal lesions in the right eye. Fundus fluorescein angiography supported the diagnosis of APMPPE. Blood tests revealed the presence of concomitant acute Borreliosis infection, as confirmed by IgM. The patient received oral prednisone therapy and amoxicillin. Six weeks later, the visual acuity returned to 6/6, and the patient was symptom free. Borreliosis can have several manifestations in the eye. One of the less common presentations is an APMPPE-like picture. The clinician should suspect acute Borreliosis infection in patients presenting with APMPPE, especially when there is a history of a tick bite, when the patient has systemic symptoms, or when living in/visiting endemic areas. This may help in the prompt management of APMPPE, avoiding complications due to the condition itself, or systemic involvement secondary to the Borreliosis infection. PMID:27294731

  6. Immunochromatography-based Diagnosis of Rotavirus Infection in Acute Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, Vipin M; Thacker, Sandeep; Namjoshi, Gajanan Sudhir

    2016-07-01

    Documentation of rotavirus diarrhea in a rural, resource-poor setting is a difficult task. We analyzed stool samples of 103 children admitted for acute diarrhea in a pediatric hospital in Bijnor, UP, India, using a simple bedside immunochromatography kit. Rotavirus infection was detected in 47 out of total of 103 children (45.6%). PMID:27508549

  7. Selective intestinal decontamination for the prevention of early bacterial infections after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Resino, Elena; San-Juan, Rafael; Aguado, Jose Maria

    2016-07-14

    Bacterial infection in the first month after liver transplantation is a frequent complication that poses a serious risk for liver transplant recipients as contributes substantially to increased length of hospitalization and hospital costs being a leading cause of death in this period. Most of these infections are caused by gram-negative bacilli, although gram-positive infections, especially Enterococcus sp. constitute an emerging infectious problem. This high rate of early postoperative infections after liver transplant has generated interest in exploring various prophylactic approaches to surmount this problem. One of these approaches is selective intestinal decontamination (SID). SID is a prophylactic strategy that consists of the administration of antimicrobials with limited anaerobicidal activity in order to reduce the burden of aerobic gram-negative bacteria and/or yeast in the intestinal tract and so prevent infections caused by these organisms. The majority of studies carried out to date have found SID to be effective in the reduction of gram-negative infection, but the effect on overall infection is limited due to a higher number of infection episodes by pathogenic enterococci and coagulase-negative staphylococci. However, difficulties in general extrapolation of the favorable results obtained in specific studies together with the potential risk of selection of multirresistant microorganisms has conditioned controversy about the routinely application of these strategies in liver transplant recipients. PMID:27468189

  8. Selective intestinal decontamination for the prevention of early bacterial infections after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Resino, Elena; San-Juan, Rafael; Aguado, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection in the first month after liver transplantation is a frequent complication that poses a serious risk for liver transplant recipients as contributes substantially to increased length of hospitalization and hospital costs being a leading cause of death in this period. Most of these infections are caused by gram-negative bacilli, although gram-positive infections, especially Enterococcus sp. constitute an emerging infectious problem. This high rate of early postoperative infections after liver transplant has generated interest in exploring various prophylactic approaches to surmount this problem. One of these approaches is selective intestinal decontamination (SID). SID is a prophylactic strategy that consists of the administration of antimicrobials with limited anaerobicidal activity in order to reduce the burden of aerobic gram-negative bacteria and/or yeast in the intestinal tract and so prevent infections caused by these organisms. The majority of studies carried out to date have found SID to be effective in the reduction of gram-negative infection, but the effect on overall infection is limited due to a higher number of infection episodes by pathogenic enterococci and coagulase-negative staphylococci. However, difficulties in general extrapolation of the favorable results obtained in specific studies together with the potential risk of selection of multirresistant microorganisms has conditioned controversy about the routinely application of these strategies in liver transplant recipients. PMID:27468189

  9. Treatment of radiation-induced acute intestinal injury with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, KAI; WU, WEIZHEN; YANG, SHUNLIANG; HUANG, LIANGHU; CHEN, JIN; GONG, CHUNGUI; FU, ZHICHAO; LIN, RUOFEI; TAN, JIANMING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to repair radiation-induced acute intestinal injury, and to elucidate the underlying repair mechanism. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to whole abdominal irradiation using a single medical linear accelerator (12 Gy) and randomly assigned to two groups. Rats in the BMSC-treated group were injected with 1 ml BMSC suspension (2×106 cells/ml) via the tail vein, while the control group rats were injected with normal saline. BMSCs were identified by detecting the expression of CD29, CD90, CD34 and CD45 using flow cytometry. The expression of the cytokines stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and interleukin (IL)-2 was detected using immunohistochemical techniques. Plasma citrulline concentrations were evaluated using an ELISA kit. Rat general conditions, including body weight, and changes in cellular morphology were also recorded. The results suggested that BMSCs exerted a protective effect on radiation-induced acute intestinal injury in rats. The histological damage was rapidly repaired in the BMSC-treated group. In addition, the BMSC-treated group showed significantly reduced radiation injury scores (P<0.01), mildly reduced body weight and plasma citrulline levels, significantly more rapid recovery (P<0.01), significantly reduced expression of the cytokines PGE2 and IL-2 (P<0.05) and significantly increased SDF-1 expression (P<0.01) compared with the control group. In summary, the present results indicate that BMSCs are able to effectively reduce inflammation and promote repair of the structure and function of intestinal tissues damaged by radiation exposure, suggesting that they may provide a promising therapeutic agent. PMID:27284330

  10. Immune Response and Intestinal Permeability in Children With Acute Gastroenteritis Treated With Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sindhu, Kulandaipalayam N. C.; Sowmyanarayanan, Thuppal V.; Paul, Anu; Babji, Sudhir; Ajjampur, Sitara S. R.; Priyadarshini, Sophia; Sarkar, Rajiv; Balasubramanian, K. A.; Wanke, Christine A.; Ward, Honorine D.; Kang, Gagandeep

    2014-01-01

    Background. Probiotics have a possible role in the treatment of pediatric acute gastroenteritis. We report the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on intestinal function, immune response, and clinical outcomes in Indian children with cryptosporidial or rotavirus diarrhea. Methods. Children with gastroenteritis aged 6 months to 5 years, testing positive for either rotavirus or Cryptosporidium species in stool (coinfections were excluded), were randomized to LGG (ATCC 53103) or placebo, once daily for 4 weeks. Baseline demographic and clinical details were obtained. Sera were tested for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies to Cryptosporidium and rotavirus, and the lactulose to mannitol ratio for intestinal permeability was determined at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Results. Of the 124 children enrolled, 82 and 42 had rotavirus and cryptosporidial diarrhea, respectively. Median diarrheal duration was 4 days; one-third of the children had severe diarrhea. Baseline and clinical parameters were comparable between children receiving LGG and placebo. At the end of follow-up, fewer children with rotavirus diarrhea on LGG had repeated diarrheal episodes (25% vs 46%; P = .048) and impaired intestinal function (48% vs 72%; P = .027). Significant increase in IgG levels postintervention (456 vs 2215 EU; P = .003) was observed in children with rotavirus diarrhea receiving LGG. Among children with cryptosporidial diarrhea, those receiving LGG showed significant improvement in intestinal permeability. Conclusions. LGG has a positive immunomodulatory effect and may be useful in decreasing repeated episodes of rotavirus diarrhea. Improvement in intestinal function in children with rotavirus and cryptosporidial gastroenteritis emphasizes the role of probiotics in treating intestinal impairment after infection. Clinical Trials Registration. CTRI/2010/091/000339. PMID:24501384

  11. Oral administration of lactulose: a novel therapy for acute carbon monoxide poisoning via increasing intestinal hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dan-Feng; Hu, Hui-Jun; Sun, Xue-Jun; Meng, Xiang-En; Zhang, Yu; Pan, Shu-Yi

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that the pathophysiology of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is related to hypoxia, the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Studies have shown that the novel, safe and effective free radical scavenger, hydrogen, has neuroprotective effects in both acute CO poisoning and delayed neuropsychological sequelae in CO poisoning. Orally administered lactulose, which may be used by some intestinal bacteria as a food source to produce endogenous hydrogen, can ameliorate oxidative stress. Based on the available findings, we hypothesize that oral administration of lactulose may be a novel therapy for acute CO poisoning via increasing intestinal hydrogen production.

  12. A cross-sectional study on intestinal parasitic infections in rural communities, northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Boonmars, Thidarut; Kaewsamut, Butsara; Ekobol, Nuttapon; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Wonkchalee, Nadchanan; Juasook, Amornrat; Sriraj, Pranee

    2013-12-01

    Despite the existence of effective anthelmintics, parasitic infections remain a major public health problem in Southeast Asia, including Thailand. In rural communities, continuing infection is often reinforced by dietary habits that have a strong cultural basis and by poor personal hygiene and sanitation. This study presents a survey of the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among the people in rural Thailand. The community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in villages in Khon Kaen Province, northeastern Thailand, from March to August 2013. A total of 253 stool samples from 102 males and 140 females, aged 2-80 years, were prepared using formalin-ethyl acetate concentration methods and examined using light microscopy. Ninety-four individuals (37.2%) were infected with 1 or more parasite species. Presence of parasitic infection was significantly correlated with gender (P=0.001); nearly half of males in this survey (49.0%) were infected. Older people had a higher prevalence than younger members of the population. The most common parasite found was Opisthorchis viverrini (26.9%), followed by Strongyloides stercoralis (9.5%), Taenia spp. (1.6%), echinostomes (0.4%), and hookworms (0.4%). The prevalence of intestinal protozoa was Blastocystis hominis 1.6%, Entamoeba histolytica 0.8%, Entamoeba coli 0.8%, Balantidium coli 0.4%, Iodamoeba bütschlii 0.4%, and Sarcocystis hominis 0.4%. Co-infections of various helminths and protozoa were present in 15.9% of the people. The present results show that the prevalence of parasitic infections in this region is still high. Proactive education about dietary habits, personal hygiene, and sanitation should be provided to the people in this community to reduce the prevalence of intestinal parasite infections. Moreover, development of policies and programs to control parasites is needed.

  13. A cross-sectional study on intestinal parasitic infections in rural communities, northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Boonmars, Thidarut; Kaewsamut, Butsara; Ekobol, Nuttapon; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Wonkchalee, Nadchanan; Juasook, Amornrat; Sriraj, Pranee

    2013-12-01

    Despite the existence of effective anthelmintics, parasitic infections remain a major public health problem in Southeast Asia, including Thailand. In rural communities, continuing infection is often reinforced by dietary habits that have a strong cultural basis and by poor personal hygiene and sanitation. This study presents a survey of the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among the people in rural Thailand. The community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in villages in Khon Kaen Province, northeastern Thailand, from March to August 2013. A total of 253 stool samples from 102 males and 140 females, aged 2-80 years, were prepared using formalin-ethyl acetate concentration methods and examined using light microscopy. Ninety-four individuals (37.2%) were infected with 1 or more parasite species. Presence of parasitic infection was significantly correlated with gender (P=0.001); nearly half of males in this survey (49.0%) were infected. Older people had a higher prevalence than younger members of the population. The most common parasite found was Opisthorchis viverrini (26.9%), followed by Strongyloides stercoralis (9.5%), Taenia spp. (1.6%), echinostomes (0.4%), and hookworms (0.4%). The prevalence of intestinal protozoa was Blastocystis hominis 1.6%, Entamoeba histolytica 0.8%, Entamoeba coli 0.8%, Balantidium coli 0.4%, Iodamoeba bütschlii 0.4%, and Sarcocystis hominis 0.4%. Co-infections of various helminths and protozoa were present in 15.9% of the people. The present results show that the prevalence of parasitic infections in this region is still high. Proactive education about dietary habits, personal hygiene, and sanitation should be provided to the people in this community to reduce the prevalence of intestinal parasite infections. Moreover, development of policies and programs to control parasites is needed. PMID:24516280

  14. A Cross-Sectional Study on Intestinal Parasitic Infections in Rural Communities, Northeast Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Kaewsamut, Butsara; Ekobol, Nuttapon; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Wonkchalee, Nadchanan; Juasook, Amornrat; Sriraj, Pranee

    2013-01-01

    Despite the existence of effective anthelmintics, parasitic infections remain a major public health problem in Southeast Asia, including Thailand. In rural communities, continuing infection is often reinforced by dietary habits that have a strong cultural basis and by poor personal hygiene and sanitation. This study presents a survey of the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among the people in rural Thailand. The community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in villages in Khon Kaen Province, northeastern Thailand, from March to August 2013. A total of 253 stool samples from 102 males and 140 females, aged 2-80 years, were prepared using formalin-ethyl acetate concentration methods and examined using light microscopy. Ninety-four individuals (37.2%) were infected with 1 or more parasite species. Presence of parasitic infection was significantly correlated with gender (P=0.001); nearly half of males in this survey (49.0%) were infected. Older people had a higher prevalence than younger members of the population. The most common parasite found was Opisthorchis viverrini (26.9%), followed by Strongyloides stercoralis (9.5%), Taenia spp. (1.6%), echinostomes (0.4%), and hookworms (0.4%). The prevalence of intestinal protozoa was Blastocystis hominis 1.6%, Entamoeba histolytica 0.8%, Entamoeba coli 0.8%, Balantidium coli 0.4%, Iodamoeba bütschlii 0.4%, and Sarcocystis hominis 0.4%. Co-infections of various helminths and protozoa were present in 15.9% of the people. The present results show that the prevalence of parasitic infections in this region is still high. Proactive education about dietary habits, personal hygiene, and sanitation should be provided to the people in this community to reduce the prevalence of intestinal parasite infections. Moreover, development of policies and programs to control parasites is needed. PMID:24516280

  15. Synergy Between Intraepithelial Lymphocytes and Lamina Propria T Cells Drives Intestinal Inflammation During Infection

    PubMed Central

    Egan, C. E.; Maurer, K. J.; Cohen, S. B.; Mack, M.; Simpson, K. W.; Denkers, E. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Oral infection of C57BL/6 mice with Toxoplasma gondii triggers severe necrosis in the ileum within 7–10 days of infection. Lesion development is mediated by Th-1 cytokines, CD4+ T cells, and sub-epithelial bacterial translocation. As such, these features share similarity to Crohn’s disease. Recently, we uncovered a role for intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) in mediating pathology after Toxoplasma infection. We show here that αβ and not γδ T cell IELs mediate intestinal damage. By adoptive transfer of mucosal T cells into naive Rag1−/− mice, we demonstrate that IEL do not function alone to cause inflammatory lesions, but act with CD4+ T lymphocytes from the lamina propria. Furthermore, recipient mice pretreated with broad-spectrum antibiotics to eliminate intestinal flora resisted intestinal disease after transfer of IEL and lamina propria lymphocytes. Our data provide valuable new insight into mechanisms of intestinal inflammation, findings that have important implications for understanding human inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:21796113

  16. Intestinal immune response of Silurus glanis and Barbus barbus naturally infected with Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala).

    PubMed

    Dezfuli, B S; Castaldelli, G; Bo, T; Lorenzoni, M; Giari, L

    2011-02-01

    Immunopathological and ultrastructural studies were conducted on the intestine of barbel Barbus barbus and sheatfish Silurus glanis that were naturally infected with the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus laevis. Enteric helminths often cause inflammation of the digestive tract, inducing the recruitment of different types of immune cells at the site of infection. The results of our study clearly demonstrated that mast cells (MC) were the dominant immune cells which occur at the site of inflammation in both hosts. MC were associated with fibroblasts and were found in close proximity to, and inside, the capillaries of the intestine, thus, migration of mast cells via the bloodstream was suggested. Significant degranulation of MC was present. Immunohistochemical staining revealed met-enkephalin and serotonin (5-HT) in intestinal MC of both uninfected and infected barbel and the absence of the antimicrobial peptides piscidin 3 and piscidin 4 in both species. Data are discussed with respect to host immune response to an intestinal helminth and compared with other host-parasite systems.

  17. An In Vitro Model of the Human Colon: Studies of Intestinal Biofilms and Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Grace S; Wilcox, Mark H; Chilton, Caroline H

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro gut model is an invaluable research tool to study indigenous gut microbiota communities, the behavior of pathogenic organisms, and the therapeutic and adverse effect of antimicrobial administration on these communities. The model has been validated against the intestinal contents of sudden death victims to reflect the physicochemical and microbiological conditions of the proximal to distal colon, and has been extensively used to investigate the interplay between gut microbiota populations, antibiotic exposure, and Clostridium difficile infection. More recently the gut model has been adapted to additionally model intestinal biofilm. Here we describe the structure, assembly, and application of the biofilm gut model. PMID:27507345

  18. Experimental Intestinal Reovirus Infection of Mice: What We Know, What We Need to Know

    PubMed Central

    Montufar-Solis, Dina; Klein, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Reovirus, a member of the Reoviridae family, is a ubiquitous virus in vertebrate hosts. Although disease caused by reovirus infection is for the most part mild, studies of reovirus have been particularly valuable as a model for understanding the local host response to replicating foreign antigen in intestinal and respiratory sites. In this article, a brief overview is presented of the basic features of reovirus infection, as will the host’s humoral and cellular immune response to during the infectious cycle. New information regarding the interactions and involvement of immune response molecules during reovirus infection will be presented based on multiple analyte array studies from our laboratory. PMID:16462002

  19. Polyphasic innate immune responses to acute and chronic LCMV infection

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Brian A.; Uebelhoer, Luke S.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Price, Aryn A.; Grakoui, Arash; Pulendran, Bali

    2013-01-01

    Summary Resolution of acute and chronic viral infections requires activation of innate cells to initiate and maintain adaptive immune responses. Here we report that infection with acute Armstrong (ARM) or chronic Clone 13 (C13) strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) led to two distinct phases of innate immune response. During the first 72hr of infection, dendritic cells upregulated activation markers, and stimulated anti-viral CD8+ T cells, independent of viral strain. Seven days after infection, there was an increase in Ly6Chi monocytic and Gr-1hi neutrophilic cells in lymphoid organs and blood. This expansion in cell numbers was enhanced and sustained in C13 infection, whereas it occurred only transiently with ARM infection. These cells resembled myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and potently suppressed T cell proliferation. The reduction of monocytic cells in Ccr2−/− mice or after Gr-1 antibody depletion enhanced anti-viral T cell function. Thus, innate cells have an important immunomodulatory role throughout chronic infection. PMID:23438822

  20. Chronic Trichuris muris Infection Decreases Diversity of the Intestinal Microbiota and Concomitantly Increases the Abundance of Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jacob Bak; Sorobetea, Daniel; Kiilerich, Pia; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Estellé, Jordi; Ma, Tao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Svensson-Frej, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance of the immune system. In line with this, the prevalence of persistent worm infections is inversely correlated with the incidence of immune-associated diseases, prompting the use of controlled parasite infections for therapeutic purposes. Despite this, the impact of parasite infection on the intestinal microbiota, as well as potential downstream effects on the immune system, remain largely unknown. We have assessed the influence of chronic infection with the large-intestinal nematode Trichuris muris, a close relative of the human pathogen Trichuris trichiura, on the composition of the murine intestinal microbiota by 16S ribosomal-RNA gene-based sequencing. Our results demonstrate that persistent T. muris infection dramatically affects the large-intestinal microbiota, most notably with a drop in the diversity of bacterial communities, as well as a marked increase in the relative abundance of the Lactobacillus genus. In parallel, chronic T. muris infection resulted in a significant shift in the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cells in the intestinal adaptive immune system, in favour of inflammatory cells. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic parasite infection strongly influences the intestinal microbiota and the adaptive immune system. Our results illustrate the complex interactions between these factors in the intestinal tract, and contribute to furthering the understanding of this interplay, which is of crucial importance considering that 500 million people globally are suffering from these infections and their potential use for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25942314

  1. Chronic Trichuris muris Infection Decreases Diversity of the Intestinal Microbiota and Concomitantly Increases the Abundance of Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jacob Bak; Sorobetea, Daniel; Kiilerich, Pia; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Estellé, Jordi; Ma, Tao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Svensson-Frej, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance of the immune system. In line with this, the prevalence of persistent worm infections is inversely correlated with the incidence of immune-associated diseases, prompting the use of controlled parasite infections for therapeutic purposes. Despite this, the impact of parasite infection on the intestinal microbiota, as well as potential downstream effects on the immune system, remain largely unknown. We have assessed the influence of chronic infection with the large-intestinal nematode Trichuris muris, a close relative of the human pathogen Trichuris trichiura, on the composition of the murine intestinal microbiota by 16S ribosomal-RNA gene-based sequencing. Our results demonstrate that persistent T. muris infection dramatically affects the large-intestinal microbiota, most notably with a drop in the diversity of bacterial communities, as well as a marked increase in the relative abundance of the Lactobacillus genus. In parallel, chronic T. muris infection resulted in a significant shift in the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cells in the intestinal adaptive immune system, in favour of inflammatory cells. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic parasite infection strongly influences the intestinal microbiota and the adaptive immune system. Our results illustrate the complex interactions between these factors in the intestinal tract, and contribute to furthering the understanding of this interplay, which is of crucial importance considering that 500 million people globally are suffering from these infections and their potential use for therapeutic purposes.

  2. Sentinel Surveillance of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance, Acute Infection and Recent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Hong-Ha M.; Kellogg, Timothy A.; McFarland, Willi; Louie, Brian; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Philip, Susan S.; Grant, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV-1 acute infection, recent infection and transmitted drug resistance screening was integrated into voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) services to enhance the existing surveillance program in San Francisco. This study describes newly-diagnosed HIV cases and characterizes correlates associated with infection. Methodology/Principal Findings A consecutive sample of persons presenting for HIV VCT at the municipal sexually transmitted infections (STI) clinic from 2004 to 2006 (N = 9,868) were evaluated by standard enzyme-linked immunoassays (EIA). HIV antibody-positive specimens were characterized as recent infections using a less-sensitive EIA. HIV-RNA pooled testing was performed on HIV antibody-negative specimens to identify acute infections. HIV antibody-positive and acute infection specimens were evaluated for drug resistance by sequence analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate associations. The 380 newly-diagnosed HIV cases included 29 acute infections, 128 recent infections, and 47 drug-resistant cases, with no significant increases or decreases in prevalence over the three years studied. HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance prevalence was 11.0% in 2004, 13.4% in 2005 and 14.9% in 2006 (p = 0.36). Resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) was the most common pattern detected, present in 28 cases of resistance (59.6%). Among MSM, recent infection was associated with amphetamine use (AOR = 2.67; p<0.001), unprotected anal intercourse (AOR = 2.27; p<0.001), sex with a known HIV-infected partner (AOR = 1.64; p = 0.02), and history of gonorrhea (AOR = 1.62; p = 0.03). Conclusions New HIV diagnoses, recent infections, acute infections and transmitted drug resistance prevalence remained stable between 2004 and 2006. Resistance to NNRTI comprised more than half of the drug-resistant cases, a worrisome finding given its role as the backbone of first

  3. Human bocavirus infection in young children with acute respiratory tract infection in Lanzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-shu; Yuan, Xin-hui; Xie, Zhi-ping; Jin, Yu; Gao, Han-chun; Song, Jing-rong; Zhang, Rong-fang; Xu, Zi-qian; Hou, Yun-de; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2010-02-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a recognized human parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract infection. However, HBoV has yet to be established as a causative agent of respiratory disease. In this study, the epidemiological and virological characteristics of HBoV infection were studied in children with acute respiratory tract infection in China. In total, 406 children younger than 14 years of age with acute respiratory tract infection were included in this prospective 1-year study. HBoV was detected in 29 (7.1%) of the 406 children. No clear seasonal fluctuation was observed in infection rates of HBoV. Of the 29 children infected with HBoV, 16 (55.2%) were coinfected with other respiratory viruses, most commonly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Viral coinfection with HBoV did not affect the severity of the respiratory disease (P = 0.291). The number of HBoV genome copies ranged from 5.80 x 10(2) to 9.72 x 10(8) copies/ml in nasopharyngeal aspirates among HBoV-positive specimens by real-time PCR, and neither coinfection nor the severity of disease correlated with the viral load (P = 0.148, P = 0.354, respectively). The most common clinical features were cough and acute upper respiratory infection, and acute bronchopneumonia. Additionally, the NP-1 gene of HBoV showed minimal sequence variation. These data suggest that HBoV is frequent in young children with acute respiratory tract infection in Lanzhou, China, and RSV is the most common coinfecting virus. There was no apparent association between the viral load of HBoV and coinfection or disease severity. The NP-1 gene was highly conserved in HBoV. PMID:20029808

  4. Intestinal parasite infections in pigs and beef cattle in rural areas of Chungcheongnam-do, Korea.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Hassan Ahmed Hassan Ahmed; Jeon, Hyung-Kyu; Yu, Yong-Man; Do, Changhee; Lee, Young-Ha

    2010-12-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the infection status of intestinal parasites in pigs and beef cattle in rural areas of Chungcheongnam-do, Korea. From November 2009 to April 2010, a total of 241 fecal samples of pigs and beef cattle (136 and 105, respectively) were examined by direct smear and centrifugal sedimentation methods. The overall positive rates of intestinal parasites among pigs and beef cattle were 73.5% and 4.8%, respectively, and the double-infection rate was 10.3% in pigs. Of 136 specimens from pigs, Balantidium coli, Ascaris suum, and Entamoeba spp. infections were found in 88 (64.7%), 24 (17.6%), and 5 cases (3.7%), respectively. Of 105 beef cattle, Entamoeba spp. infections were detected in 5 cases (4.8%). From these results, it is shown that pigs raised on rural farms in Chungcheongnam-do had a high B. coli infection rate and a moderate A. suum infection rate. These results demonstrate that environmentally resistant cysts or eggs could be widespread on the farms examined, and thus an effective hygienic management system is needed to prevent them from serving as the source of infection for human beings. PMID:21234241

  5. Intestinal Parasite Infections in Pigs and Beef Cattle in Rural Areas of Chungcheongnam-do, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Hassan Ahmed Hassan Ahmed; Jeon, Hyung-Kyu; Yu, Yong-Man; Do, Changhee

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the infection status of intestinal parasites in pigs and beef cattle in rural areas of Chungcheongnam-do, Korea. From November 2009 to April 2010, a total of 241 fecal samples of pigs and beef cattle (136 and 105, respectively) were examined by direct smear and centrifugal sedimentation methods. The overall positive rates of intestinal parasites among pigs and beef cattle were 73.5% and 4.8%, respectively, and the double-infection rate was 10.3% in pigs. Of 136 specimens from pigs, Balantidium coli, Ascaris suum, and Entamoeba spp. infections were found in 88 (64.7%), 24 (17.6%), and 5 cases (3.7%), respectively. Of 105 beef cattle, Entamoeba spp. infections were detected in 5 cases (4.8%). From these results, it is shown that pigs raised on rural farms in Chungcheongnam-do had a high B. coli infection rate and a moderate A. suum infection rate. These results demonstrate that environmentally resistant cysts or eggs could be widespread on the farms examined, and thus an effective hygienic management system is needed to prevent them from serving as the source of infection for human beings. PMID:21234241

  6. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among children from a shanty town in Tucuman, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Dib, J R; Fernández-Zenoff, M V; Oquilla, J; Lazarte, S; González, S N

    2015-06-01

    A parasitological survey was conducted in children living in a poor area next to a drainage channel, in Tucumán province, Argentina. Stool specimens from 115 children were collected and samples were analyzed by direct microscopy examination and concentration techniques. The prevalence rate of intestinal parasites infection was high (78.3%) and Blastocystis hominis was the most frequent protozoan parasite found (68.9%) followed by Giardia intestinalis (33.3%), Entamoeba coli (24.4%), Endolimax nana (12.2%), Chilomastix mesnili (5.6%) and Iodamoeba bütschlii (2.2%). Ascaris lumbricoides was the most prevalent intestinal helminth, with an infection frequency of 38.9%, followed by Trichuris trichiura (13.3%), Strongyloides stercoralis (13.3%), Hymenolepis nana (7.8%) and Enterobius vermicularis (3.3%). Multiple parasitic infections were also high, affecting 71.1% of infected population. These results indicate that sanitary policies, including health care and sanitary education have been inadequate for the control of intestinal parasitism in this high-risk population. Implementation of sanitation programs is a basic need and a joint collaboration between public servant and health professionals should be a priority. PMID:26691248

  7. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among children from a shanty town in Tucuman, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Dib, J R; Fernández-Zenoff, M V; Oquilla, J; Lazarte, S; González, S N

    2015-06-01

    A parasitological survey was conducted in children living in a poor area next to a drainage channel, in Tucumán province, Argentina. Stool specimens from 115 children were collected and samples were analyzed by direct microscopy examination and concentration techniques. The prevalence rate of intestinal parasites infection was high (78.3%) and Blastocystis hominis was the most frequent protozoan parasite found (68.9%) followed by Giardia intestinalis (33.3%), Entamoeba coli (24.4%), Endolimax nana (12.2%), Chilomastix mesnili (5.6%) and Iodamoeba bütschlii (2.2%). Ascaris lumbricoides was the most prevalent intestinal helminth, with an infection frequency of 38.9%, followed by Trichuris trichiura (13.3%), Strongyloides stercoralis (13.3%), Hymenolepis nana (7.8%) and Enterobius vermicularis (3.3%). Multiple parasitic infections were also high, affecting 71.1% of infected population. These results indicate that sanitary policies, including health care and sanitary education have been inadequate for the control of intestinal parasitism in this high-risk population. Implementation of sanitation programs is a basic need and a joint collaboration between public servant and health professionals should be a priority.

  8. Influenza Virus Affects Intestinal Microbiota and Secondary Salmonella Infection in the Gut through Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Deriu, Elisa; Boxx, Gayle M; He, Xuesong; Pan, Calvin; Benavidez, Sammy David; Cen, Lujia; Rozengurt, Nora; Shi, Wenyuan; Cheng, Genhong

    2016-05-01

    Human influenza viruses replicate almost exclusively in the respiratory tract, yet infected individuals may also develop gastrointestinal symptoms, such as vomiting and diarrhea. However, the molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Using an influenza mouse model, we found that influenza pulmonary infection can significantly alter the intestinal microbiota profile through a mechanism dependent on type I interferons (IFN-Is). Notably, influenza-induced IFN-Is produced in the lungs promote the depletion of obligate anaerobic bacteria and the enrichment of Proteobacteria in the gut, leading to a "dysbiotic" microenvironment. Additionally, we provide evidence that IFN-Is induced in the lungs during influenza pulmonary infection inhibit the antimicrobial and inflammatory responses in the gut during Salmonella-induced colitis, further enhancing Salmonella intestinal colonization and systemic dissemination. Thus, our studies demonstrate a systemic role for IFN-Is in regulating the host immune response in the gut during Salmonella-induced colitis and in altering the intestinal microbial balance after influenza infection. PMID:27149619

  9. Toll-Like Receptor-4 Dependent Small Intestinal Immune Responses Following Murine Arcobacter Butzleri Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heimesaat, Markus M.; Karadas, Gül; Fischer, André; Göbel, Ulf B.; Alter, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Gölz, Greta

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic cases of gastroenteritis have been attributed to Arcobacter butzleri infection, but information about the underlying immunopathological mechanisms is scarce. We have recently shown that experimental A. butzleri infection induces intestinal, extraintestinal and systemic immune responses in gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the immunopathological role of Toll-like Receptor-4, the receptor for lipopolysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide of Gram-negative bacteria, during murine A. butzleri infection. To address this, gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice lacking TLR-4 were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and perorally infected with two different A. butzleri strains isolated from a patient (CCUG 30485) or fresh chicken meat (C1), respectively. Bacteria of either strain stably colonized the ilea of mice irrespective of their genotype at days 6 and 16 postinfection. As compared to IL-10–/– control animals, TLR-4–/– IL-10–/– mice were protected from A. butzleri-induced ileal apoptosis, from ileal influx of adaptive immune cells including T lymphocytes, regulatory T-cells and B lymphocytes, and from increased ileal IFN-γ secretion. Given that TLR-4-signaling is essential for A. butzleri-induced intestinal inflammation, we conclude that bacterial lipooligosaccharide or lipopolysaccharide compounds aggravate intestinal inflammation and may thus represent major virulence factors of Arcobacter. Future studies need to further unravel the molecular mechanisms of TLR-4-mediated A. butzleri-host interactions. PMID:26716022

  10. Control of intestinal parasitic infections in Seychelles: a comprehensive and sustainable approach.

    PubMed Central

    Albonico, M.; Shamlaye, N.; Shamlaye, C.; Savioli, L.

    1996-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections have been perceived as a public health problem in Seychelles for decades. A comprehensive strategy to reduce morbidity and, in the long term, transmission of intestinal parasites has been implemented successfully since 1993. Management of the programme is integrated into the well established primary health care system, with control activities being undertaken through existing health facilities. The strategy is based on periodic chemotherapy of schoolchildren, intense health education and improvement of sanitation and safe water supply. The initial objectives of the control programme were met after 2 years of activities, with an overall reduction in prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections of 44%. The intensity of infection with Trichuris trichiura, the commonest parasite, was halved (from 780 to 370 eggs per g of faeces). The programme's integrated approach, in concert with political commitment and limited operational costs, is a warranty for the future sustainability of control activities. The programme can be seen as a model for other developing countries, even where health and socioeconomic conditions are different and the control of parasitic infections will need a much longer-term commitment. PMID:9060217

  11. Influenza Virus Affects Intestinal Microbiota and Secondary Salmonella Infection in the Gut through Type I Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Deriu, Elisa; Boxx, Gayle M.; He, Xuesong; Pan, Calvin; Benavidez, Sammy David; Cen, Lujia; Rozengurt, Nora; Shi, Wenyuan; Cheng, Genhong

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza viruses replicate almost exclusively in the respiratory tract, yet infected individuals may also develop gastrointestinal symptoms, such as vomiting and diarrhea. However, the molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Using an influenza mouse model, we found that influenza pulmonary infection can significantly alter the intestinal microbiota profile through a mechanism dependent on type I interferons (IFN-Is). Notably, influenza-induced IFN-Is produced in the lungs promote the depletion of obligate anaerobic bacteria and the enrichment of Proteobacteria in the gut, leading to a “dysbiotic” microenvironment. Additionally, we provide evidence that IFN-Is induced in the lungs during influenza pulmonary infection inhibit the antimicrobial and inflammatory responses in the gut during Salmonella-induced colitis, further enhancing Salmonella intestinal colonization and systemic dissemination. Thus, our studies demonstrate a systemic role for IFN-Is in regulating the host immune response in the gut during Salmonella-induced colitis and in altering the intestinal microbial balance after influenza infection. PMID:27149619

  12. Prevalence and pathological study of Paramphistomum infection in the small intestine of slaughtered ovine.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Aliasghar; Javanbakht, Javad; Khani, Farzaneh; Hassan, Mehdi Aghamohammad; Khadivar, Farshid; Dadashi, Fereshteh; Alimohammadi, Samad; Amani, Amir

    2015-03-01

    Paramphistomiasis, a trematode infectious disease in ruminants, has been neglected but has recently emerged as an important cause of productivity loss. The small intestine of slaughtered sheep was collected weekly from abattoirs (Kermanshah, Sanandaj, Tabriz and Urmia Slaughterhouses) to monitoring the seasonal occurrence of Paramphistomosis, 2,421 sheep carcasses (743 male (30.69 %) and 1,678 female (69.31 %)) were examined, out of which 0.041 % were positive for Paramphistomum infestation. Furthermore, upon evaluation Paramphistomum termatodes, Gastrothylax crumenifer and Cotylophoron detected as well. Overall, the small intestinal infestation by such parasite was 0.041 % which contained hyperemia, severe congestion and haemorrhage. The highest infection in the sheep infected with Paramphistomum spp. was found during the summer (July to August) (6.7, 2 %) and followed by the autumn seasons (November to October) (3.8, 2.3 %). Microscopic study of the small intestine revealed dilatation of intestinal glands, destruction of superficial glands, replacement of fibrin, diffuse infiltration of inflammatory cells and fibrinonecrotic enteritis. Other changes as congestion hemorrhage and nodules of Ostertagia were observed in total examination of small intestines. According to statistical analysis by SPSS software and Chi square test revealed that there is significant difference between pathologic changes, seasons and ecological situations of the region (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between age, gender and sample pH of examined sheep (p > 0.05).According to the results of pathologic changes of sheep small intestines, preventive measurements in the area should be taken to decrease the damages, so applying a parasitic control program is recommended.

  13. Intestinal Parasite Infections in Symptomatic Children Attending Hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Catrin E.; Nget, Phot; Saroeun, Mao; Kuong, Suy; Chanthou, Seng; Kumar, Varun; Bousfield, Rachel; Nader, Johanna; Bailey, J. Wendi; Beeching, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections with helminths and other intestinal parasites are an important but neglected problem in children in developing countries. Accurate surveys of intestinal parasites in children inform empirical treatment regimens and can assess the impact of school based drug treatment programmes. There is limited information on this topic in Cambodia. Methods In a prospective study of intestinal parasites in symptomatic children attending Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia, April-June 2012, samples were examined by microscopy of a direct and concentrated fecal sample. Two culture methods for hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were employed when sufficient sample was received. Demographic, clinical and epidemiological data were collected. Principal Findings We studied 970 samples from 865 children. The median (inter-quartile range) age of the children was 5.4 (1.9-9.2) years, 54% were male. The proportion of children with abdominal pain was 66.8%, diarrhea 34.9%, anemia 12.7% and malnutrition 7.4%. 458 parasitic infections were detected in 340 (39.3%) children. The most common parasites using all methods of detection were hookworm (14.3%), Strongyloides stercoralis (11.6%) and Giardia lamblia (11.2%). Giardia lamblia was most common in children aged 1-5 years, hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were more common with increasing age. Hookworm, Strongloides stercoralis and Giardia lamblia were more common in children living outside of Siem Reap town. In a multivariate logistic regression increasing age was associated with all three infections, defecating in the forest for hookworm infection, the presence of cattle for S. stercoralis and not using soap for handwashing for G. lamblia. Conclusions/Significance This study confirms the importance of intestinal parasitic infections in symptomatic Cambodian children and the need for adequate facilities for laboratory diagnosis together with education to improve personal hygiene and sanitation. PMID

  14. Intestinal Salmonella typhimurium Infection Leads to miR-29a Induced Caveolin 2 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hoeke, Lena; Sharbati, Jutta; Pawar, Kamlesh; Keller, Andreas; Einspanier, Ralf; Sharbati, Soroush

    2013-01-01

    Background Salmonella are able to modulate host cell functions facilitating both uptake and resistance to cellular host defence mechanisms. While interactions between bacterial modulators and cellular proteins have been the main focus of Salmonella research, relatively little is known about mammalian gene regulation in response to Salmonella infection. A major class of mammalian gene modulators consists of microRNAs. For our study we examined interactions of microRNAs and regulated mRNAs in mammalian intestinal Salmonella infections using a piglet model. Methodology/Principal Findings After performing microRNA as well as mRNA specific microarray analysis of ileal samples from Salmonella infected as well as control piglets, we integrated expression analysis with target prediction identifying microRNAs that mainly regulate focal adhesion as well as actin cytoskeleton pathways. Particular attention was given to miR-29a, which was involved in most interactions including Caveolin 2. RT-qPCR experiments verified up-regulation of miR-29a after infection while its predicted target Caveolin 2 was significantly down-regulated as examined by transcript and protein detection. Reporter gene assays as well as RNAi experiments confirmed Caveolin 2 to be a miR-29a target. Knock-down of Caveolin 2 in intestinal epithelial cells resulted in retarded proliferation as well as increased bacterial uptake. In addition, our experiments showed that Caveolin 2 regulates the activation of the small Rho GTPase CDC42 but apparently not RAC1 in human intestinal cells. Conclusions/Significance Our study outlines for the first time important regulation pathways in intestinal Salmonella infection pointing out that focal adhesion and organisation of actin cytoskeleton are regulated by microRNAs. Functional relevance is shown by miR-29a mediated Caveolin 2 regulation, modulating the activation state of CDC42. Further analysis of examined interactions may support the discovery of novel strategies

  15. Nematode infection: A rare mimic of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Hotchen, Andrew; Chin, Kian; Raja, Mahzar

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis is a common condition seen in all surgical units. One rare condition that can mimic acute appendicitis is a nematode infection of the bowel. There have been few reported cases of nematode infection within the appendix and none that have been accompanied by intra-operative pictures. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 16-year-old female presented with a 12 h history of right iliac fossa pain and mild pyrexia. Bloods showed a neutrophilia and normal C-reactive protein. Laparoscopy was performed which revealed a non-inflamed appendix. The appendix was dissected and a live nematode was visualised exiting the base of the appendix. Anti-helminthics were given and the infection resolved. DISCUSSION Nematode infection is most commonly seen in Africa, Asia and South America. When seen within the United Kingdom (UK), it is seen most commonly within high-risk populations. Testing for these infections is not routine within the UK and when they are performed, the results take a considerable amount of time to return. These tests should be considered within high-risk populations so that unnecessary surgery can be avoided. CONCLUSION This case highlights the importance of considering rare causes of right iliac fossa pain including nematode infection in a young patient. The case highlights this by giving intra-operative pictures of live nematodes upon dissection of the appendix. PMID:25024022

  16. Intestinal fungal and parasitic infections in kidney transplant recipients: a multi-center study.

    PubMed

    Naeini, Afsoon Emami; Sharifi, Mehran; Shahidi, Shahrzad; Taheri, Shahram; Seirafian, Shiva; Taheri, Dyana; Tazhibi, Mahdi; Hejazi, Sayyed Hosein; Naini, Pardis Emami; Harandi, Asghar Amini

    2012-07-01

    Kidney transplant recipients are susceptible to various infections due to the use of immunosuppressive drugs. The present study was performed as studies on the prevalence of intestinal fungal and parasitic infections in kidney transplant recipients are limited. A total of 150 kidney transplant recipients and 225 matched immunocompetent outpatients, who were referred to the laboratory of Noor Hospital, Isfahan, were studied. After recording demographic characteristics, direct test and specific laboratory cultures were carried out on the stool specimens. Patients were instructed on sanitary rules and, during each medical visit, they were reminded of the same. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasitic and fungal infections was 33.3% and 58.7%, respectively, in transplant recipients and 20% and 51%, respectively, in the control group; the difference was not statistically significant. The most prevalent intestinal parasite was Entameba coli, which was seen in 9.3% of the study patients and 6.7% of the controls. The most prevalent fungus was Candida sp., which was seen in 22% of the study patients and 24.4% of the control group. Co-existing infection with two or more fungi was seen in 14.8% and 3.4% in the case and control groups, respectively; P <0.001. Interestingly, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of infection by a single organism between the two groups. However, co-existing infection with two or more species was more prevalent in transplant recipients. We conclude that further investigations are needed to evaluate the pathogenesis of infection with these microorganisms. PMID:22805377

  17. Mucosal and systemic immunity to intestinal reovirus infection in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Jonathan R; Cuff, Christopher F

    2004-09-01

    Systemic immunity is progressively impaired in aging, predisposing to morbidity and mortality from neoplasia and infectious disease. However, the effect of aging on mucosal immunity is controversial. To assess intestinal immunity in aging, young and aged mice were orally exposed to reovirus or cholera toxin (CT) and specific antibody and reovirus-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses were assessed. As previously reported, aged mice immunized orally with CT mounted diminished intestinal IgA responses to CT compared to young mice. In contrast, aged mice yielded two to three-fold more reovirus-specific IgA-producing cells in the Peyers's patches (PP) compared to young mice, and higher titers of reovirus-specific IgA in fragment culture supernatants. Cytotoxicity and CTL frequencies from aged mice were not different from those of young mice. Together, these results suggest a diminished potential for systemic and intestinal immunity to orally applied protein antigens in aging, but an intact ability to respond to intestinal virus infection. Infection with a replicating virus may induce inflammatory mediators and innate immune factors that potentiate the priming of mucosal immunity; overcoming aging related deficits otherwise observed following oral immunization with non-replicating antigens, and suggests the importance of antigen replication to antigen-specific immunotherapy strategies in the elderly. PMID:15489051

  18. PPARγ Agonists as an Anti-Inflammatory Treatment Inhibiting Rotavirus Infection of Small Intestinal Villi

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Dory; Muñoz, Natalia; Guerrero, Rafael; Acosta, Orlando; Guerrero, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus infection has been reported to induce an inflammatory response in the host cell accompanied by the increased expression or activation of some cellular molecules including ROS, NF-κB, and COX-2. PPARγ stimulation and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment have been found to interfere with viral infections including rotavirus infection. Small intestinal villi isolated from in vivo infected mice with rotavirus ECwt were analyzed for the percentage of ECwt-infected cells, the presence of rotavirus antigens, and infectious virion yield following treatment with pioglitazone. Isolated villi were also infected in vitro and treated with PPARγ agonists (PGZ, TZD, RGZ, DHA, and ALA), all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), and NAC. After treatments, the expression of cellular proteins including PPARγ, NF-κB, PDI, Hsc70, and COX-2 was analyzed using immunochemistry, ELISA, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting. The results showed that rotavirus infection led to an increased accumulation of the cellular proteins studied and ROS. The virus infection-induced accumulation of the cellular proteins studied and ROS was reduced upon pioglitazone treatment, causing also a concomitant reduction of the infectious virion yield. We hypothesized that rotavirus infection is benefiting from the induction of a host cell proinflammatory response and that the interference of the inflammatory pathways involved leads to decreased infection. PMID:27382365

  19. PPARγ Agonists as an Anti-Inflammatory Treatment Inhibiting Rotavirus Infection of Small Intestinal Villi.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Dory; Muñoz, Natalia; Guerrero, Rafael; Acosta, Orlando; Guerrero, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus infection has been reported to induce an inflammatory response in the host cell accompanied by the increased expression or activation of some cellular molecules including ROS, NF-κB, and COX-2. PPARγ stimulation and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment have been found to interfere with viral infections including rotavirus infection. Small intestinal villi isolated from in vivo infected mice with rotavirus ECwt were analyzed for the percentage of ECwt-infected cells, the presence of rotavirus antigens, and infectious virion yield following treatment with pioglitazone. Isolated villi were also infected in vitro and treated with PPARγ agonists (PGZ, TZD, RGZ, DHA, and ALA), all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), and NAC. After treatments, the expression of cellular proteins including PPARγ, NF-κB, PDI, Hsc70, and COX-2 was analyzed using immunochemistry, ELISA, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting. The results showed that rotavirus infection led to an increased accumulation of the cellular proteins studied and ROS. The virus infection-induced accumulation of the cellular proteins studied and ROS was reduced upon pioglitazone treatment, causing also a concomitant reduction of the infectious virion yield. We hypothesized that rotavirus infection is benefiting from the induction of a host cell proinflammatory response and that the interference of the inflammatory pathways involved leads to decreased infection. PMID:27382365

  20. Intestinal Tritrichomonas suis (=T. foetus) infection in Japanese cats.

    PubMed

    Doi, Junko; Hirota, Junichi; Morita, Akihiko; Fukushima, Kanae; Kamijyo, Hiromi; Ohta, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Takahashi, Toru; Katakura, Ken; Oku, Yuzaburo

    2012-04-01

    Tritrichomonas suis (=T. foetus) has recently been reported to be a causative agent of chronic large-bowel diarrhea in cats. While the disease was previously attributed to Pentatrichomonas hominis, the etiologic agent for feline trichomonal diarrhea was identified as T. suis. Although feline trichomonosis due to T. suis has been reported at prevalences ranging from 14 to 31% in Europe and the U.S., no reports of the pathogen have been published to date in Japan. In 2008, however, we encountered a case of feline trichomonosis at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of Hokkaido University. The parasite was identified as T. suis by nested PCR amplification of partial internal transcribed spacer region 1 and 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene sequences with T. suis-specific primers and DNA sequencing of the amplified products. We then conducted surveys for feline trichomonosis in three different animal hospitals using either cultivation and/or PCR-based assays. The results revealed that 13 of 147 samples (8.8%) were positive for T. suis, and that 5 of the 13 infected cats, which ranged between 1 month and 7.5 years-old, showed chronic diarrhea. Seven of the infected cats were purebred and 6 were mixed breed. These findings suggested that feline trichomonosis is prevalent in Japan, and that T. suis may play a role as a causative agent of feline chronic diarrhea.

  1. The role of selenium in intestinal motility and morphology in a murine model of Typanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Andréa Pereira; Sieberg, Ryan; Li, Hua; Cahill, Hannah R.; Zhao, Dazhi; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2010-01-01

    Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi causes mega-syndromes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in humans and animals. In the present study, we employed magnetic resonance imaging to non-invasively monitor the effect of selenium supplementation on alterations in the GI tract of T. cruzi-infected mice. CD1 mice infected with T. cruzi (Brazil strain) exhibited dilatation of the intestines similar to that we recently reported in infected C57Bl/6 mice. The average intestine lumen diameter increased by 65% and the increase was reduced to 29% in mice supplemented with 2 ppm selenium in the drinking water. When supplemented with 3 ppm selenium in chow the lumen diameter was also significantly reduced although the difference between the infected and infected supplemented mice was smaller. Intestinal motility in infected mice fed with selenium-enriched chow was increased compared with infected mice fed with normal unsupplemented chow and was not significantly different from intestinal motility in uninfected mice. We suggest that Se may be used to modulate the inflammatory, immunological, and/or antioxidant responses involved in intestinal disturbances caused by T. cruzi infection. PMID:20195635

  2. Absence of Intestinal PPARγ Aggravates Acute Infectious Colitis in Mice through a Lipocalin-2–Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Parag; Ling, Teo Wei; Korecka, Agata; Li, Yinghui; D'Arienzo, Rossana; Bunte, Ralph M.; Berger, Thorsten; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Chambon, Pierre; Mak, Tak Wah; Wahli, Walter; Pettersson, Sven

    2014-01-01

    To be able to colonize its host, invading Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium must disrupt and severely affect host-microbiome homeostasis. Here we report that S. Typhimurium induces acute infectious colitis by inhibiting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) expression in intestinal epithelial cells. Interestingly, this PPARγ down-regulation by S. Typhimurium is independent of TLR-4 signaling but triggers a marked elevation of host innate immune response genes, including that encoding the antimicrobial peptide lipocalin-2 (Lcn2). Accumulation of Lcn2 stabilizes the metalloproteinase MMP-9 via extracellular binding, which further aggravates the colitis. Remarkably, when exposed to S. Typhimurium, Lcn2-null mice exhibited a drastic reduction of the colitis and remained protected even at later stages of infection. Our data suggest a mechanism in which S. Typhimurium hijacks the control of host immune response genes such as those encoding PPARγ and Lcn2 to acquire residence in a host, which by evolution has established a symbiotic relation with its microbiome community to prevent pathogen invasion. PMID:24465207

  3. [Prevalence of microsporidia and other intestinal parasites in patients with HIV infection, Bogota, 2001].

    PubMed

    Flórez, Astrid Carolina; García, Dabeiba Adriana; Moncada, Ligia; Beltrán, Mauricio

    2003-09-01

    Opportunistic intestinal parasites are a common cause of diarrhea in HIV-infected patients. To determine the prevalence of microsporidia and other opportunistic parasites infecting HIV patients in Bogotá, Colombia, 115 patients were examined for these infections during the year 2001. The institution and the sample percent from each are as follows: Santa Clara Hospital, 33.0%; San Pedro Claver, 20.0%; Simón Bolívar Hospital, 14.8%; San José Hospital, 13.9%; Central de la Policía Hospital, 6.1%; Compensar, 5.2%; Colombian League against AIDS, 2.6%; San Ignacio Hospital, 2.6%, and the Military Hospital, 1.7%. The average patient age was 36 years, with a range from 18 to 71 years. Patients with complaint of gastrointestinal symptoms were asked to provide two consecutive stool samples. The samples were concentrated in formalin-ether and examined microscopically for intestinal coccidian parasites by direct wet slide mounts. The prevalence of intestinal opportunistic parasites was 10.4% for Cryptosporidium sp. Initially, 29% of the samples were found to be positive for microsporidian spores using a modified Ziehl Neelsen chromotrope stain, but only 3.5% of them were confirmed as positive when a calcofluor/Gram chromotrope stain was used. The general prevalence of intestinal parasites was 59.1%. The most frequently found pathogens were Blastocystis hominis, 25.2%, and Entamoeba histolytica, 13%. In other studies with HIV patients in Colombia, lower prevalences of Cryptosporidium sp. infection were observed.

  4. Experimental infection with the small intestinal trematode, Haplorchis pumilio, in young dogs.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Sofie; Nguyen, Lan Anh Thi; Dalsgaard, Anders; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Johansen, Maria Vang

    2013-01-16

    Fishborne zoonotic trematodes (FZT) are highly prevalent in Southeast Asia. Recent studies on the role of domestic animals in the transmission of FZT in Northern Vietnam found that dogs, mainly infected with Haplorchis pumilio, contributed widely to the transmission of FZT. On this background, we conducted an experimental infection with H. pumilio to elucidate population dynamics and host reactions in dogs. Eight household-reared dogs (3-6 months old), were each orally infected with 500 H. pumilio metacercariae obtained by artificial digestion of naturally infected fish. Another eight dogs were included as uninfected controls. Faecal examination for eggs was performed twice weekly using a sieving and sedimentation technique. Body temperature and weight of the dogs were measured as was total white blood cells, blood eosinophils and packed cell volume. Subsets of dogs were examined post-mortem for presence of adult FZT at three different time points post infection by sectioning of the small intestine and caecum into four parts. Patent infections established in all eight infected dogs. The worm establishment ranged from 15 to 121 flukes (3-24%, mean 12%). Faecal egg excretion was measured in all eight infected dogs but no more than two eggs per g faeces (epg) were found at any time. Infections lasted for at least two months as documented by the presence of adult flukes in all three dogs necropsied on day 58 post infection. The predilection site of the flukes was identified as the lower part of jejunum (93% of total worm burden). The results of the haematological tests did not differ between the infected and uninfected group. Further, no clinical symptoms were observed in the infected group and no macroscopic pathological changes could be assigned to the trematode infections, neither did histopathological examination of the intestine reveal any differences between the infected and the control dogs. This study provides the first basic knowledge on the establishment

  5. Intestinal protozoa in HIV-infected patients in Apulia, South Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Brandonisio, O.; Maggi, P.; Panaro, M. A.; Lisi, S.; Andriola, A.; Acquafredda, A.; Angarano, G.

    1999-01-01

    Protozoa are important enteric pathogens in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In this study the prevalence of intestinal protozoa in 154 HIV-infected patients, with or without diarrhoea, in our region (Apulia, South Italy) was evaluated between December 1993 and February 1998. In the majority of patients CD4+ T cell count was below 200/microl. The overall prevalence of intestinal protozoa was 43/154 (27.92%). Twenty-eight (43.08%) out of 65 patients with diarrhoea and 15 (16-85%) out of 89 non-diarrhoeic patients were parasitized. In particular, in the group of 65 patients with diarrhoea the following protozoa were identified: Cryptosporidium parvum in 14 (21.54%), Blastocystis hominis in 7 (10.77%), microsporidia in 6 (9.23%), Giardia lamblia in 4 (6.15%) and Isospora belli in 1 (1.54%). Three patients were Cryptosporidium parvum-microsporidia co-infected. In patients without intestinal symptoms, prevalence was 3/89 (3.37%) for Cryptosporidium parvum, 9/89 (10.11%) for Blastocystis hominis, 1/89 (1.12%) for microsporidia and 2/89 (2.25%) for Giardia lamblia. A significant (P<0.001) correlation was observed between protozoan infection and the presence of diarrhoea. In particular, Cryptosporidium parvum and microsporidia infections were significantly (P<0.001) and P = 0.046, respectively) associated with diarrhoeal illness. Moreover, the majority of cases of cryptosporidiosis were first diagnosed in the periods of heaviest rainfall. Therefore, drinking water contamination may be a possible source of human infection in our area. PMID:10694157

  6. Acute lupus pneumonitis followed by intestinal pseudo-obstruction in systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report

    PubMed Central

    JI, CAIHONG; YU, XING; WANG, YONG; SHI, LUFENG

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IpsO) and acute lupus pneumonitis (ALP) are uncommon severe complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study reports the case of a 26-year-old female who presented with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting as initial symptoms. Computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed the jejunal wall was thickened and streaky, mimicking the presentation of intestinal obstruction. Following emergency surgery, the patient's general condition was aggravated, with evident limb erythematous rashes. A series of laboratory examinations revealed SLE, and combined with patient's medical history IpsO was diagnosed, with a disease Activity Index score of 10. During the therapeutic period, high fever, dyspnea and oxygen saturation (SaO2) reductions were detected, and CT scans indicated lung infiltration, excluding other causes through a comprehensive infectious work-up and a bronchoalveolar lavage examination. ALP was confirmed and treated with high-dose methylprednisolone and gamma globulin supplement. The patient responded well and was discharged in 2 weeks. In the one-year tapering period and after stopping corticosteroids, the patient recovered well with no relapse detected. In conclusion, the manifestation of IpsO in SLE is rare and represents a challenge for the surgeon to establish the correct diagnosis and avoid inappropriate surgical intervention. ALP may be the consequence of emergency surgery, and immediate high-dose glucocorticoid therapy is recommended. PMID:27347044

  7. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Tyrosine Kinase 2 Transduces IL-22 Signals To Protect from Acute Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hainzl, Eva; Rauch, Isabella; Heider, Susanne; Berry, David; Lassnig, Caroline; Schwab, Clarissa; Rosebrock, Felix; Milinovich, Gabriel; Schlederer, Michaela; Wagner, Michael; Schleper, Christa; Loy, Alexander; Urich, Tim; Kenner, Lukas; Han, Xiaonan; Decker, Thomas; Strobl, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    In the intestinal tract, IL-22 activates STAT3 to promote intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) homeostasis and tissue healing. The mechanism has remained obscure, but we demonstrate that IL-22 acts via tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2), a member of the Jak family. Using a mouse model for colitis, we show that Tyk2 deficiency is associated with an altered composition of the gut microbiota and exacerbates inflammatory bowel disease. Colitic Tyk2−/− mice have less p-STAT3 in colon tissue and their IECs proliferate less efficiently. Tyk2-deficient primary IECs show reduced p-STAT3 in response to IL-22 stimulation, and expression of IL-22–STAT3 target genes is reduced in IECs from healthy and colitic Tyk2−/− mice. Experiments with conditional Tyk2−/− mice reveal that IEC-specific depletion of Tyk2 aggravates colitis. Disease symptoms can be alleviated by administering high doses of rIL-22–Fc, indicating that Tyk2 deficiency can be rescued via the IL-22 receptor complex. The pivotal function of Tyk2 in IL-22–dependent colitis was confirmed in Citrobacter rodentium–induced disease. Thus, Tyk2 protects against acute colitis in part by amplifying inflammation-induced epithelial IL-22 signaling to STAT3. PMID:26432894

  8. Status of Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Primary School Children in Rivers State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abah, A E; Arene, F O I

    2015-01-01

    Status of intestinal parasitic infections among primary school children in Rivers State, Nigeria, was investigated between January and December 2011. A total of 3,826 stool samples were collected from school children (1,828 males and 1998 females) in 36 primary schools from 13 local government areas of Rivers State. The samples were analyzed using wet saline/iodine and formol ether concentration methods. Of the 3,826 stool samples examined, 1059 (27.66%) were positive for different intestinal parasites, namely, Ascaris lumbricoides (51.78%), hookworm sp. (25.0%), Trichuris trichiura (15.18%), Strongyloides stercoralis (7.14%), Taenia sp. (0.89%), and Enterobius vermicularis (0.01%). The prevalence of the infection was generally higher in males (57.60%) than females (42.40%). The differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Among these intestinal parasites, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm sp., and Trichuris trichiura were found in all the 13 local government areas studied while Strongyloides stercoralis was found in 12, Taenia sp. in five, and Enterobius vermicularis in only one community in Ahoada Local Government Area. The overall infection rate remains high and would require coordinated deworming of the school children within the state. PMID:26600945

  9. Status of Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Primary School Children in Rivers State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Abah, A. E.; Arene, F. O. I.

    2015-01-01

    Status of intestinal parasitic infections among primary school children in Rivers State, Nigeria, was investigated between January and December 2011. A total of 3,826 stool samples were collected from school children (1,828 males and 1998 females) in 36 primary schools from 13 local government areas of Rivers State. The samples were analyzed using wet saline/iodine and formol ether concentration methods. Of the 3,826 stool samples examined, 1059 (27.66%) were positive for different intestinal parasites, namely, Ascaris lumbricoides (51.78%), hookworm sp. (25.0%), Trichuris trichiura (15.18%), Strongyloides stercoralis (7.14%), Taenia sp. (0.89%), and Enterobius vermicularis (0.01%). The prevalence of the infection was generally higher in males (57.60%) than females (42.40%). The differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Among these intestinal parasites, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm sp., and Trichuris trichiura were found in all the 13 local government areas studied while Strongyloides stercoralis was found in 12, Taenia sp. in five, and Enterobius vermicularis in only one community in Ahoada Local Government Area. The overall infection rate remains high and would require coordinated deworming of the school children within the state. PMID:26600945

  10. Modeling inoculum dose dependent patterns of acute virus infections.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Handel, Andreas

    2014-04-21

    Inoculum dose, i.e. the number of pathogens at the beginning of an infection, often affects key aspects of pathogen and immune response dynamics. These in turn determine clinically relevant outcomes, such as morbidity and mortality. Despite the general recognition that inoculum dose is an important component of infection outcomes, we currently do not understand its impact in much detail. This study is intended to start filling this knowledge gap by analyzing inoculum dependent patterns of viral load dynamics in acute infections. Using experimental data for adenovirus and infectious bronchitis virus infections as examples, we demonstrate inoculum dose dependent patterns of virus dynamics. We analyze the data with the help of mathematical models to investigate what mechanisms can reproduce the patterns observed in experimental data. We find that models including components of both the innate and adaptive immune response are needed to reproduce the patterns found in the data. We further analyze which types of innate or adaptive immune response models agree with observed data. One interesting finding is that only models for the adaptive immune response that contain growth terms partially independent of viral load can properly reproduce observed patterns. This agrees with the idea that an antigen-independent, programmed response is part of the adaptive response. Our analysis provides useful insights into the types of model structures that are required to properly reproduce observed virus dynamics for varying inoculum doses. We suggest that such models should be taken as basis for future models of acute viral infections.

  11. Surgical indicators for the operative treatment of acute mechanical intestinal obstruction due to adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Boluk, Salih; Bayraktar, Baris; Ozemir, Ibrahim Ali; Yildirim Boluk, Sumeyra; Tombalak, Ercument; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to investigate the predictive factors indicating strangulation, and the requirement for surgery in patients with acute mechanical intestinal obstruction due to adhesions. Methods This study retrospectively evaluated the records of patients with adhesive acute mechanical intestinal obstruction. The surgical treatment (group S), conservative treatment (group C), intraoperative bowel ischemia (group I), and intraoperative adhesion only (group A) groups were statistically evaluated according to the diagnostic and surgical parameters. Results The study group of 252 patients consisted of 113 women (44.8%), and 139 men (55.2%). The mean age was 62.79 ± 18.08 years (range, 20-98 years). Group S consisted of 50 patients (19.8%), and 202 (80.2%) were in group C. Group I consisted of 19 patients (38%), where as 31 (62%) were in group A. In group S, the prehospital symptomatic period was longer, incidence of fever was increased, and elevated CRP levels were significant (P < 0.05). Plain abdominal radiography, and abdominal computerized tomography were significantly sensitive for strangulation (P < 0.05). The elderly were more prone to strangulation (P < 0.05). Fever, rebound tendernes, and urea & creatinine levels were significantly higher in the presence of strangulation (P < 0.05, P < 0.05, and P < 0.05, consecutively). Conclusion Fever, rebound tenderness, urea & creatinine levels, plain abdominal radiography, and abdominal computerized tomography images were important indicators of bowel ischemia. Longer prehospital symptomatic period was related with a tendency for surgical treatment, and the elderly were more prone to strangulation. CRP detection was considered to be useful for the decision of surgery, but not significantly predictive for strangulation. PMID:26029678

  12. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth mimicking acute flare as a pitfall in patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is characterized by excessive proliferation of colonic bacterial species in the small bowel. Potential causes of SIBO include fistulae, strictures or motility disturbances. Hence, patients with Crohn's Disease (CD) are especially predisposed to develop SIBO. As result, CD patients may experience malabsorption and report symptoms such as weight loss, watery diarrhea, meteorism, flatulence and abdominal pain, mimicking acute flare in these patients. Methods One-hundred-fifty patients with CD reporting increased stool frequency, meteorism and/or abdominal pain were prospectively evaluated for SIBO with the Hydrogen Glucose Breath Test (HGBT). Results Thirty-eight patients (25.3%) were diagnosed with SIBO based on positive findings at HGBT. SIBO patients reported a higher rate of abdominal complaints and exhibited increased stool frequency (5.9 vs. 3.7 bowel movements/day, p = 0.003) and lower body weight (63.6 vs 70.4 kg, p = 0.014). There was no correlation with the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. SIBO was significantly more frequent in patients with partial resection of the colon or multiple intestinal surgeries; there was also a clear trend in patients with ileocecal resection that did not reach statistical significance. SIBO rate was also higher in patients with affection of both the colon and small bowel, while inflammation of the (neo)terminal ileum again showed only tendential association with the development of SIBO. Conclusion SIBO represents a frequently ignored yet clinically relevant complication in CD, often mimicking acute flare. Because symptoms of SIBO are often difficult to differentiate from those caused by the underlying disease, targeted work-up is recommended in patients with corresponding clinical signs and predisposing factors. PMID:19643023

  13. Multiphasic acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with atypical rubella virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Koji; Asahara, Hideaki; Uehara, Taira; Miyoshi, Katsue; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Iwaki, Toru; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2015-02-01

    We report the first case of an occurrence of multiphasic acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) associated with atypical rubella virus infection with no rash and long-term increased titers of serum anti-rubella IgM in a 17-year-old male who had no history of rubella vaccination. He suffered from at least six clinical exacerbations with disseminated hyperintense lesions on FLAIR MR images during the course of 18 months. Repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy resolved the exacerbations. In patients with multiphasic ADEM of unknown etiology, clinicians should also consider the possibility of preceding infection with rubella virus.

  14. Detection of Acute HIV-1 Infection by RT-LAMP.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Donna L; Sullivan, Vickie; Owen, S Michele; Curtis, Kelly A

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, cost-effective diagnostic test for the detection of acute HIV-1 infection is highly desired. Isothermal amplification techniques, such as reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), exhibit characteristics that are ideal for the development of a rapid nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) because they are quick, easy to perform and do not require complex, dedicated equipment and laboratory space. In this study, we assessed the ability of the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay to detect acute HIV infection as compared to a representative rapid antibody test and several FDA-approved laboratory-based assays. The HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay detected seroconverting individuals one to three weeks earlier than a rapid HIV antibody test and up to two weeks earlier than a lab-based antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combo enzyme immunoassay (EIA). RT-LAMP was not as sensitive as a lab-based qualitative RNA assay, which could be attributed to the significantly smaller nucleic acid input volume. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of detecting acute HIV infection using the RT-LAMP assay. The availability of a rapid NAAT, such as the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay, at the point of care (POC) or in laboratories that do not have access to large platform NAAT could increase the percentage of individuals who receive an acute HIV infection status or confirmation of their HIV status, while immediately linking them to counseling and medical care. In addition, early knowledge of HIV status could lead to reduced high-risk behavior at a time when individuals are at a higher risk for transmitting the virus. PMID:25993381

  15. Pteropine orthoreovirus infection among out-patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Voon, Kenny; Tan, Yeh Fong; Leong, Pooi Pooi; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Gunnasekaran, Rajasekaran; Ujang, Kamsiah; Chua, Kaw Bing; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the incidence rate of Pteropine orthreovirus (PRV) infection in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a suburban setting in Malaysia, where bats are known to be present in the neighborhood. Using molecular detection of PRVs directly from oropharyngeal swabs, our study demonstrates that PRV is among one of the common causative agents of acute URTI with cough and sore throat as the commonest presenting clinical features. Phylogenetic analysis on partial major outer and inner capsid proteins shows that these PRV strains are closely related to Melaka and Kampar viruses previously isolated in Malaysia. Further study is required to determine the public health significance of PRV infection in Southeast Asia, especially in cases where co-infection with other pathogens may potentially lead to different clinical outcomes.

  16. Infection in acute leukemia patients receiving oral nonabsorable antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Hahn, D M; Schimpff, S C; Fortner, C L; Smyth, A C; Young, V M; Wiernik, P H

    1978-06-01

    During a 20-month period all acute nonlymphocytic patients (87 patient trials) receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy were placed on an oral nonabsorbable antibiotic regimen consisting of gentamicin, vancomycin, and nystatin in addition to an intensive program of infection prevention aimed at reducing exogenously acquired and body-surface potential pathogens. Although side effects of anorexia, diarrhea, and nausea were common, gentamicin-vancomycin-nystatin was ingested 80% of the study time. Microbial growth in gingival and rectal cultures was substantially reduced. The incidence of bacteremias and other serious infections was low. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, other gram-negative bacilli, and Candida species caused few infections along the alimentary canal, whereas infections of the skin (especially Staphylococcus aureus) were not reduced compared with those occurring in former years. A total of the 104 acquired gram-negative bacilli were gentamicin resistant; 5 subsequently caused infection. Thus, despite certain definite drawbacks, the use of oral nonabsorbable antibiotics to suppress alimentary tract microbial flora in combination with other infection prevention techniques in granulocytopenic cancer patients has proven feasible and tolerable and has been associated with a low order of life-threatening infections. PMID:98107

  17. A Golden Hamster Model for Human Acute Nipah Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wong, K. Thong; Grosjean, Isabelle; Brisson, Christine; Blanquier, Barissa; Fevre-Montange, Michelle; Bernard, Arlette; Loth, Philippe; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Chevallier, Michelle; Akaoka, Hideo; Marianneau, Philippe; Lam, Sai Kit; Wild, T. Fabian; Deubel, Vincent

    2003-01-01

    A predominantly pig-to-human zoonotic infection caused by the novel Nipah virus emerged recently to cause severe morbidity and mortality in both animals and man. Human autopsy studies showed the pathogenesis to be related to systemic vasculitis that led to widespread thrombotic occlusion and microinfarction in most major organs especially in the central nervous system. There was also evidence of extravascular parenchymal infection, particularly near damaged vessels (Wong KT, Shieh WJ, Kumar S, Norain K, Abdullah W, Guarner J, Goldsmith CS, Chua KB, Lam SK, Tan CT, Goh KJ, Chong HT, Jusoh R, Rollin PE, Ksiazek TG, Zaki SR, Nipah Virus Pathology Working Group: Nipah virus infection: Pathology and pathogenesis of an emerging paramyxoviral zoonosis. Am J Pathol 2002, 161:2153–2167). We describe here a golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) model that appears to reproduce the pathology and pathogenesis of acute human Nipah infection. Hamsters infected by intranasal or intraperitoneal routes died within 9 to 29 days or 5 to 9 days, respectively. Pathological lesions were most severe and extensive in the hamster brain. Vasculitis, thrombosis, and more rarely, multinucleated endothelial syncytia, were found in blood vessels of multiple organs. Viral antigen and RNA were localized in both vascular and extravascular tissues including neurons, lung, kidney, and spleen, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, respectively. Paramyxoviral-type nucleocapsids were identified in neurons and in vessel walls. At the terminal stage of infection, virus and/or viral RNA could be recovered from most solid organs and urine, but not from serum. The golden hamster is proposed as a suitable model for further studies including pathogenesis studies, anti-viral drug testing, and vaccine development against acute Nipah infection. PMID:14578210

  18. Tuberculin Skin-Test Reactions Are Unaffected by the Severity of Hyperendemic Intestinal Helminth Infections and Co-Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zevallos, Karine; Vergara, Katherine C.; Vergara, Antonio; Vidal, Carlos; Garcia, Hector H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2010-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) quantifies cell-mediated immunity to tuberculosis antigens. Helminths suppress cell-mediated immunity, so we studied the effect of helminth infection and deworming on the TST in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in an indigenous Amazon community (N = 195). Stool microscopy diagnosed helminths in 98% and co-infection with multiple species in 24% of study subjects. The TST was positive (≥ 10 mm) for 49%, and responses increased with age (P < 0.001), Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccination (P = 0.01), and tuberculosis contact (P = 0.05). TST results had no association with helminth-egg concentrations, species, or co-infections (all P > 0.1). One month after deworming with albendazole (three daily 400-mg doses), helminths were reduced, but 63% remained infected with helminths. Albendazole did not cause a change in TST size (P = 0.8) or positivity (P = 0.9) relative to placebo. Thus, TST reactions were unaffected by albendazole therapy that partially cured intestinal helminth infections, and TST interpretation was unaffected by high-burden helminth infections and co-infection with multiple helminth species. PMID:20682875

  19. Changing trends in intestinal parasitic infections among long-term-residents and settled immigrants in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The rapid socio-economic development in Qatar in the last two decades has encouraged a mass influx of immigrant workers, the majority of whom originate from countries with low socio-economic levels, inadequate medical care and many are known to carry patent intestinal helminth and protozoan infections on arrival in Qatar. Some eventually acquire residency status but little is known about whether they continue to harbour infections. Methods We examined 9208 hospital records of stool samples that had been analysed for the presence of intestinal helminth and protozoan ova/cysts, over the period 2005-2008, of subjects from 28 nationalities, but resident in Qatar and therefore not recent arrivals in the country. Results Overall 10.2% of subjects were infected with at least one species, 2.6% with helminths and 8.0% with protozoan species. Although hookworms, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and Hymenolepis nana were observed, the majority of helminth infections (69%) were caused by hookworms, and these were largely aggregated among 20.0-39.9 year-old male subjects from Nepal. The remaining cases of helminth infection were mostly among Asian immigrants. Protozoan infections were more uniformly spread across immigrants from different regions when prevalence was calculated on combined data, but this disguised three quite contrasting underlying patterns for 3 taxa of intestinal protozoa. Blastocystis hominis, Giardia duodenalis and non-pathogenic amoebae were all acquired in childhood, but whereas prevalence of B. hominis rose to a plateau and then even further among the elderly, prevalence of G. duodenalis fell markedly in children aged 10 and older, and stayed low (< 2%) gradually falling even further in the elderly. In contrast the prevalence of non-pathogenic amoebae (Entamoeba coli, E. hartmanni, Endolimax nana and Iodamoeba buetschlii) peaked in the 30.0-39.9 age group and only then dropped to very low values among the oldest subjects examined. A

  20. Homeostasis alteration within small intestinal mucosa after acute enteral refeeding in total parenteral nutrition mouse model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yongjia; Barrett, Meredith; Hou, Yue; Yoon, Hong Keun; Ochi, Takanori; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2016-02-15

    Feeding strategies to care for patients who transition from enteral nutrient deprivation while on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) to enteral feedings generally proceed to full enteral nutrition once the gastrointestinal tract recovers; however, an increasing body of literature suggests that a subgroup of patients may actually develop an increased incidence of adverse events, including death. To examine this further, we studied the effects of acute refeeding in a mouse model of TPN. Interestingly, refeeding led to some beneficial effects, including prevention in the decline in intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation. However, refeeding led to a significant increase in mucosal expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as an upregulation in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4). Refeeding also failed to prevent TPN-associated increases in IEC apoptosis, loss of epithelial barrier function, and failure of the leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5-positive stem cell expression. Transitioning from TPN to enteral feedings led to a partial restoration of the small bowel microbial population. In conclusion, while acute refeeding led to some restoration of normal gastrointestinal physiology, enteral refeeding led to a significant increase in mucosal inflammatory markers and may suggest alternative strategies to enteral refeeding should be considered.

  1. Intestinal manifestations of experimental SIV-infection in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): a histological and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, E M; Mätz-Rensing, K; Stahl-Hennig, C; Makoschey, B; Hunsmann, G; Kaup, F J

    1997-10-01

    Intestinal lesions were studied in 32 rhesus monkeys experimentally infected with different strains of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac (251/32H, 251/32H-SPL and 251/MPBL) by light microscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. A spectrum of primary and secondary manifestations of SIV-infection were detected. Primary changes included 'SIV-enteropathy' in 12 monkeys and virus-induced syncytial giant cell formation (GCF) of the intestine in two animals. A primary virus-induced enteropathy occurred both as only histologically visible 'SIV-enteropathy' and as 'AIDS-enteropathy' accompanied by clinical signs of enteritis. Secondary opportunistic infections (Balantidium coli, Cryptosporidium, Trichuris, Trichomonas, Spironucleus, Mycobacteria and Cytomegalovirus) were identified in 27 animals and three monkeys developed malignant lymphomas involving the intestinal tract. Compared to intestinal lesions in HIV-infected patients, differences were found concerning the incidence of GCF and the range of opportunistic infections, with cryptosporidium, cytomegalovirus and mycobacteria occurring in both SIV-infected macaques and AIDS patients. The present observations revealed that SIV-infected rhesus monkeys provide an excellent model both for studies on the pathogenesis of HIV-enteropathy and opportunistic infections and for the development of therapies against cryptosporidial, cytomegalovirus and mycobacteria infection. Comparison of three SIV-strains revealed differences in primary and secondary lesions observed: SIVmac251/MPBL was correlated with severe primary SIV-induced pathologic changes and SIVmac251-SPL-infected animals showed a higher incidence of malignant lymphomas. PMID:9394615

  2. A prospective comparison of acute intestinal toxicity following whole pelvic versus small field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Park, Jin-hong; Yun, In-Ha; Kim, Young Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the acute intestinal toxicity of whole pelvic (WP) and small field (SF) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer using dosimetric and metabolic parameters as well as clinical findings. Methods Patients who received IMRT in either a definitive or postoperative setting were prospectively enrolled. Target volume and organs at risk including intestinal cavity (IC) were delineated in every patient by a single physician. The IC volume that received a 10–50 Gy dose at 5-Gy intervals (V10–V50) and the percentage of irradiated volume as a fraction of total IC volume were calculated. Plasma citrulline levels, as an objective biological marker, were checked at three time points: baseline and after exposure to 30 Gy and 60 Gy. Results Of the 41 patients, only six experienced grade 1 acute intestinal toxicity. Although all dose–volume parameters were significantly worse following WP than SF IMRT, there was no statistically significant relationship between these dosimetric parameters and clinical symptoms. Plasma citrulline levels did not show a serial decrease by radiotherapy volume difference (WP versus SF) and were not relevant to the irradiated doses. Conclusion Given that WP had comparable acute intestinal toxicities to those associated with SF, WP IMRT appears to be a feasible approach for the treatment of prostate cancer despite dosimetric disadvantages. PMID:27022287

  3. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein and serum amyloid A secretion by human intestinal epithelial cells during the acute phase response.

    PubMed

    Vreugdenhil, A C; Dentener, M A; Snoek, A M; Greve, J W; Buurman, W A

    1999-09-01

    The acute phase proteins LPS binding protein (LBP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) are produced by the liver and are present in the circulation. Both proteins have been shown to participate in the immune response to endotoxins. The intestinal mucosa forms a large surface that is continuously exposed to these microbial products. By secretion of antimicrobial and immunomodulating agents, the intestinal epithelium contributes to the defense against bacteria and their products. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of the inflammatory mediators TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-1beta on the release of LBP and SAA by intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). In addition, the induction of LBP and SAA release by cell lines of intestinal epithelial cells and hepatic cells was compared. The data obtained show that in addition to liver cells, IEC also expressed LBP mRNA and released bioactive LBP and SAA upon stimulation. Regulation of LBP and SAA release by IEC and hepatocytes was typical for class 1 acute phase proteins, although differences in regulation between the cell types were observed. Endotoxin did not induce LBP and SAA release. Glucocorticoids were demonstrated to strongly enhance the cytokine-induced release of LBP and SAA by IEC, corresponding to hepatocytes. The data from this study, which imply that human IEC can produce LBP and SAA, suggest a role for these proteins in the local defense mechanism of the gut to endotoxin. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that tissues other than the liver are involved in the acute phase response.

  4. Intestinal epithelial cell secretion of RELM-beta protects against gastrointestinal worm infection.

    PubMed

    Herbert, De'Broski R; Yang, Jun-Qi; Hogan, Simon P; Groschwitz, Kathryn; Khodoun, Marat; Munitz, Ariel; Orekov, Tatyana; Perkins, Charles; Wang, Quan; Brombacher, Frank; Urban, Joseph F; Rothenberg, Marc E; Finkelman, Fred D

    2009-12-21

    Th2 cells drive protective immunity against most parasitic helminths, but few mechanisms have been demonstrated that facilitate pathogen clearance. We show that IL-4 and IL-13 protect against intestinal lumen-dwelling worms primarily by inducing intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to differentiate into goblet cells that secrete resistin-like molecule (RELM) beta. RELM-beta is essential for normal spontaneous expulsion and IL-4-induced expulsion of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus, which both live in the intestinal lumen, but it does not contribute to immunity against Trichinella spiralis, which lives within IEC. RELM-beta is nontoxic for H. polygyrus in vitro but directly inhibits the ability of worms to feed on host tissues during infection. This decreases H. polygyrus adenosine triphosphate content and fecundity. Importantly, RELM-beta-driven immunity does not require T or B cells, alternative macrophage activation, or increased gut permeability. Thus, we demonstrate a novel mechanism for host protection at the mucosal interface that explains how stimulation of epithelial cells by IL-4 and IL-13 contributes to protection against parasitic helminthes that dwell in the intestinal lumen.

  5. Intestinal parasitic infections among inhabitants of Karaj City, Tehran province, Iran in 2006-2008.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Vahid; Esmailnia, Kasra; Karim, Gholamreza; Nasir, Mehdi; Akhavan, Omid

    2009-09-01

    Karaj is an area with large influx of refugee people in Iran. To increase knowledge about parasitic infections, we carried out this research during 2006-2008. We recorded the stool examination results and some of their personal characteristics. A total of 13,915 human stools were examined, and 649 (4.7%) were positive for intestinal parasites. Among them, 13 (0.09%) had worm and 636 (4.6%) had protozoan infections. Maximum infections belonged to Giardia intestinalis, and 534 (3.8%) samples had this infection. Other parasitic infections included Entamoeba coli (0.39%), Entamoeba histolytica (0.021%), Blastocystis hominis (0.08%), Trichomonas hominis (0.1%), Iodamoeba butschlii (0.06%), Chilomastix mesnili (0.007%), Endolimax nana (0.05%), Enterobius spp. eggs (0.028%), Taenia proglottids (0.028%), and Strongyloides stercoralis larvae (0.03%). The maximum numbers of referred people to laboratories were in July and the maximum percentage of infections was in August. There is a point that all 5 Strongyloides stercoralis infections were pertained to 2008. With attention to the rate of parasitic infections (4.7%), it seems that we should take additional educational information to wide spectrum of people living in this city. PMID:19724700

  6. Acute haematogenous infection of a closed vertebral fracture.

    PubMed

    Marshman, Laurence A G; Allison, Dale; Molloy, Cynthia J

    2009-12-01

    Acute haematogenous infection of a closed fractures is rare. A 68-year-old diabetic male sustained a burst fracture of a lumbar vertebra (L2) after a fall onto his back. After 5 days of conservative management, he developed a chest infection and amoxicillin was commenced empirically. However, after 6 days his previously moderate focal L2 back pain had become more severe. Pyrexia and systemic inflammatory markers continued to rise despite administration of antibiotics. Blood cultures and a CT-guided biopsy of L2 both revealed Staphylococcus aureus which was sensitive to flucloxacillin. The patient's symptoms and signs gradually normalised following administration of flucloxacillin for 6 weeks, and the use of a cast brace. We conclude that haematogenous infection can be successfully managed non-operatively.

  7. [Primary volvulus of the small intestine: vascular-like acute abdomen].

    PubMed

    Damiani, S; Ruscazio, M; Ciulla, A; Miceli, G; Tomasello, G

    1998-01-01

    The Authors discuss etiology, clinical picture, diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of intestinal volvulus, an uncommon disease in Europe, thinking of a case of primitive small intestine volvulus, recently observed, and considering the literature. The Authors have come to the conclusion that in all the cases of intestinal occlusion, in emergency hospitalization, it is important to suspect the intestinal volvulus and to operate on the patient urgently to avoid the raise of postoperative mortality in all the cases complicated with intestinal gangrene.

  8. Telaprevir in the Treatment of Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV-Infected Men

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Daniel S.; Dieterich, Douglas T.; Mullen, Michael P.; Branch, Andrea D.; Uriel, Alison J.; Carriero, Damaris C.; van Seggelen, Wouter O.; Hijdra, Rosanne M.; Cassagnol, David G.; Akil, Bisher; Bailey, Juan; Bellman, Paul; Bowers, Daniel; Bungay, Krisczar; Burger, Susanne; Carpenter, Ward; Chavez, Robert; Chow, Rita; Cohen, Robert; Dalton, Patrick; Dellosso, John; Demidont, Adrian; Dillon, Stephen; Donlon, Eileen; Farrow, Terry; Gardenier, Donald; Guadron, Rodolfo; Haber, Stuart; Higgins, Lawrence; Hitzeman, Lawrence; Hsu, Ricky; Huprikar, Shirish; Inada, Victor; Jacob, Sneha; Johnson, Livette; Johnston, Barbara; Kaminsky, Donald; Klein, Oscar; Kwong, Jeffrey; Lares-Guia, Jose; Leach, Eric; Levine, Randy; Linetskaya, Irina; Litvinova, Larisa; Malhotra, Amisha; Mandell, William; Markowitz, Martin; Mayer, Gal; Meraz, Eddie; Mortensen, Erik; Ng, Michel; Olivieri, Joseph; Paolino, Charles; Photangtham, Punyadech; Psevdos, George; Radix, Anita; Rapaport, Steven; Rodriguez-Caprio, Gabriela; Shay, William; Somasundaram, Nirupama; Sorra, Lembitu; Stivala, Alicia; Tran, Richie; Urbina, Antonio; Vail, Rona; Wallach, Francis; Wang, Wen; Weiss, Susan; Wiener, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Background. There is an international epidemic of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected men who have sex with men. Sustained virologic response (SVR) rates with pegylated interferon and ribavirin treatment are higher in these men during acute HCV than during chronic HCV, but treatment is still lengthy and SVR rates are suboptimal. Methods. We performed a pilot study of combination therapy with telaprevir, pegylated interferon, and ribavirin in acute genotype 1 HCV infection in HIV-infected men. Men who were treated prior to the availability of, or ineligible for, telaprevir were the comparator group. The primary endpoint was SVR12, defined as an HCV viral load <5 IU/mL at least 12 weeks after completing treatment. Results. In the telaprevir group, 84% (16/19) of men achieved SVR12 vs 63% (30/48) in the comparator group. Among men with SVR, median time to undetectable viral load was week 2 in the telaprevir group vs week 4 in the comparator group, and 94% vs 53% had undetectable viral loads at week 4. Most patients (81%) who achieved SVR in the telaprevir group received ≤12 weeks of treatment and there were no relapses after treatment. The overall safety profile was similar to that known for telaprevir-based regimens. Conclusions. Incorporating telaprevir into treatment of acute genotype 1 HCV in HIV-infected men halved the treatment duration and increased the SVR rate. Larger studies should be done to confirm these findings. Clinicians should be alert to detect acute HCV infection of HIV-infected men to take advantage of this effective therapy and decrease further transmission in this epidemic. PMID:24336914

  9. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Mediates Intestinal Immunopathogenesis in Campylobacter Jejuni-Infected Infant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alutis, Marie E.; Grundmann, Ursula; Hagen, Ulrike; Fischer, André; Kühl, Anja A.; Göbel, Ulf B.; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9 (also referred to gelatinase-A and -B, respectively) can be detected in the inflamed gut. We have recently shown that synthetic gelatinase blockage reduces colonic apoptosis and pro-inflammatory immune responses following murine Campylobacter (C.) jejuni infection. In order to dissect whether MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 is involved in mediating C. jejuni-induced immune responses, infant MMP-2–/–, MMP-9–/–, and wildtype (WT) mice were perorally infected with the C. jejuni strain B2 immediately after weaning. Whereas, at day 2 postinfection (p.i.), fecal C. jejuni B2 loads were comparable in mice of either genotype, mice expelled the pathogen from the intestinal tract until day 4 p.i. Six days p.i., colonic MMP-2 but not MMP-9 mRNA was upregulated in WT mice. Remarkably, infected MMP-2–/– mice exhibited less frequent abundance of blood in feces, less distinct colonic histopathology and apoptosis, lower numbers of effector as well as innate and adaptive immune cells within the colonic mucosa, and higher colonic IL-22 mRNA levels as compared to infected WT mice. In conclusion, these results point towards an important role of MMP-2 in mediating C. jejuni-induced intestinal immunopathogenesis. PMID:26495129

  10. Epidemiology of intestinal parasitic infections in school children in Ghazni Province, eastern Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Augustynowicz, Alina; Smoleń, Agata; Lass, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of intestinal parasites and their species in Afghan school children and to establish appropriate treatment methods for detected pathogens. Methods: Parasitological examination of stool samples collected from 1369 children aged 8-18, students of the Jahan Malika High School in Ghazni Province in eastern Afghanistan, was conducted in the period November 2013-April 2014. Three stool samples were collected from each patient every second day; the samples were fixed in 10% formalin and tested by light microscopy using the methods of direct smear in Lugol’s solution, decantation in distilled water, and Fülleborn’s flotation. Results: Of 535 examined children (39.1% of the study group) were infected with nematodes (n=324), cestodes (n=118), trematodes (n=12), and protozoa (n=228), 132 were diagnosed with co-infections (mainly ascariasis+giardiasis, ascariasis+hymenolepiasis) and received single or combined therapy. Conclusions: The Afghan community is an example of population characterized by a high rate of parasitic infections. Owing to high prevalence of multiple infections among inhabitants of Afghanistan, it seems that a mass deworming campaign with a single-dose chemotherapy may prove ineffective in eradicating intestinal parasites in the local population. PMID:26870108

  11. Granulomatous encephalomyelitis and intestinal ganglionitis in a spectacled Amazon parrot (Amazona albifrons) infected with Mycobacterium genavense.

    PubMed

    Gomez, G; Saggese, M D; Weeks, B R; Hoppes, S M; Porter, B F

    2011-01-01

    An approximately 30-year-old male spectacled Amazon parrot (Amazona albifrons) was presented with a 2-week history of ataxia, head shaking, weight loss and seizures. Gross findings on necropsy examination included atrophy of the musculature, ruffled feathers and minimal epicardial and abdominal fat. Microscopically, there were perivascular cuffs of macrophages with fewer lymphocytes in the grey and white matter of the brain and spinal cord. These lesions were accompanied by gliosis and mild vacuolation of the white matter. In the small intestine, up to 70% of the intestinal ganglia were effaced by infiltrates of macrophages and fewer lymphocytes. The intestinal lamina propria contained multiple inflammatory aggregates of a similar nature. Ziehl-Neelsen staining revealed the presence of numerous bacilli within the cytoplasm of macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS) and enteric ganglia. Amplification of the DNAJ gene confirmed a mycobacterial infection and subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a species-specific primer confirmed the aetiology as Mycobacterium genavense. Infection of the CNS with Mycobacterium spp. is uncommon and has not been previously reported in a parrot. This case is unusual in that the organism exhibited tropism for neural tissue.

  12. Intermittent fasting promotes bacterial clearance and intestinal IgA production in Salmonella typhimurium-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Godínez-Victoria, M; Campos-Rodriguez, R; Rivera-Aguilar, V; Lara-Padilla, E; Pacheco-Yepez, J; Jarillo-Luna, R A; Drago-Serrano, M E

    2014-05-01

    The impact of intermittent fasting versus ad libitum feeding during Salmonella typhimurium infection was evaluated in terms of duodenum IgA levels, bacterial clearance and intestinal and extra-intestinal infection susceptibility. Mice that were intermittently fasted for 12 weeks or fed ad libitum were infected with S. typhimurium and assessed at 7 and 14 days post-infection. Next, we evaluated bacterial load in the faeces, Peyer's patches, spleen and liver by plate counting, as well as total and specific intestinal IgA and plasmatic corticosterone levels (by immunoenzymatic assay) and lamina propria IgA levels in plasma cells (by cytofluorometry). Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, α- and J-chains, Pax-5 factor, pro-inflammatory cytokine (tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (transforming growth factor-β) mRNA levels were assessed in mucosal and liver samples (by real-time PCR). Compared with the infected ad libitum mice, the intermittently fasted infected animals had (1) lower intestinal and systemic bacterial loads; (2) higher SIgA and IgA plasma cell levels; (3) higher mRNA expression of most intestinal parameters; and (4) increased or decreased corticosterone levels on day 7 and 14 post-infection, respectively. No contribution of liver IgA was observed at the intestinal level. Apparently, the changes following metabolic stress induced by intermittent fasting during food deprivation days increased the resistance to S. typhimurium infection by triggering intestinal IgA production and presumably, pathogen elimination by phagocytic inflammatory cells. PMID:24612255

  13. Effects of BmCPV Infection on Silkworm Bombyx mori Intestinal Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenli; Lu, Yahong; Zhang, Hao; Kumar, Dhiraj; Liu, Bo; Gong, Yongchang; Zhu, Min; Zhu, Liyuan; Liang, Zi; Kuang, Sulan; Chen, Fei; Hu, Xiaolong; Cao, Guangli; Xue, Renyu; Gong, Chengliang

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has a crucial role in the growth, development and environmental adaptation in the host insect. The objective of our work was to investigate the microbiota of the healthy silkworm Bombyx mori gut and changes after the infection of B. mori cypovirus (BmCPV). Intestinal contents of the infected and healthy larvae of B. mori of fifth instar were collected at 24, 72 and 144 h post infection with BmCPV. The gut bacteria were analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. 147(135) and 113(103) genera were found in the gut content of the healthy control female (male) larvae and BmCPV-infected female (male) larvae, respectively. In general, the microbial communities in the gut content of healthy larvae were dominated by Enterococcus, Delftia, Pelomonas, Ralstonia and Staphylococcus, however the abundance change of each genus was depended on the developmental stage and gender. Microbial diversity reached minimum at 144 h of fifth instar larvae. The abundance of Enterococcus in the females was substantially lower and the abundance of Delftia, Aurantimonas and Staphylococcus was substantially higher compared to the males. Bacterial diversity in the intestinal contents decreased after post infection with BmCPV, whereas the abundance of both Enterococcus and Staphylococcus which belongs to Gram-positive were increased. Therefore, our findings suggested that observed changes in relative abundance was related to the immune response of silkworm to BmCPV infection. Relevance analysis of plenty of the predominant genera showed the abundance of the Enterococcus genus was in negative correlation with the abundance of the most predominant genera. These results provided insight into the relationship between the gut microbiota and development of the BmCPV-infected silkworm.

  14. Effects of BmCPV Infection on Silkworm Bombyx mori Intestinal Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Kumar, Dhiraj; Liu, Bo; Gong, Yongchang; Zhu, Min; Zhu, Liyuan; Liang, Zi; Kuang, Sulan; Chen, Fei; Hu, Xiaolong; Cao, Guangli; Xue, Renyu; Gong, Chengliang

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has a crucial role in the growth, development and environmental adaptation in the host insect. The objective of our work was to investigate the microbiota of the healthy silkworm Bombyx mori gut and changes after the infection of B. mori cypovirus (BmCPV). Intestinal contents of the infected and healthy larvae of B. mori of fifth instar were collected at 24, 72 and 144 h post infection with BmCPV. The gut bacteria were analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. 147(135) and 113(103) genera were found in the gut content of the healthy control female (male) larvae and BmCPV-infected female (male) larvae, respectively. In general, the microbial communities in the gut content of healthy larvae were dominated by Enterococcus, Delftia, Pelomonas, Ralstonia and Staphylococcus, however the abundance change of each genus was depended on the developmental stage and gender. Microbial diversity reached minimum at 144 h of fifth instar larvae. The abundance of Enterococcus in the females was substantially lower and the abundance of Delftia, Aurantimonas and Staphylococcus was substantially higher compared to the males. Bacterial diversity in the intestinal contents decreased after post infection with BmCPV, whereas the abundance of both Enterococcus and Staphylococcus which belongs to Gram-positive were increased. Therefore, our findings suggested that observed changes in relative abundance was related to the immune response of silkworm to BmCPV infection. Relevance analysis of plenty of the predominant genera showed the abundance of the Enterococcus genus was in negative correlation with the abundance of the most predominant genera. These results provided insight into the relationship between the gut microbiota and development of the BmCPV-infected silkworm. PMID:26745627

  15. SHP-2 Mediates Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varughese, Eunice A.; Kasper, Susan; Anneken, Emily M.; Yadav, Jagjit S.

    2015-01-01

    The parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, induces human gastroenteritis through infection of host epithelial cells in the small intestine. During the initial stage of infection, C. parvum is reported to engage host mechanisms at the host cell-parasite interface to form a parasitophorous vacuole. We determined that upon infection, the larger molecular weight proteins in human small intestinal epithelial host cells (FHs 74 Int) appeared to globally undergo tyrosine dephosphorylation. In parallel, expression of the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) increased in a time-dependent manner. SHP-2 co-localized with the C. parvum sporozoite and this interaction increased the rate of C. parvum infectivity through SH2-mediated SHP-2 activity. Furthermore, we show that one potential target that SHP-2 acts upon is the focal adhesion protein, paxillin, which undergoes moderate dephosphorylation following infection, with inhibition of SHP-2 rescuing paxillin phosphorylation. Importantly, treatment with an inhibitor to SHP-2 and with an inhibitor to paxillin and Src family kinases, effectively decreased the multiplicity of C. parvum infection in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, our study reveals an important role for SHP-2 in the pathogenesis of C. parvum. Furthermore, while host proteins can be recruited to participate in the development of the electron dense band at the host cell-parasite interface, our study implies for the first time that SHP-2 appears to be recruited by the C. parvum sporozoite to regulate infectivity. Taken together, these findings suggest that SHP-2 and its down-stream target paxillin could serve as targets for intervention. PMID:26556238

  16. Effects of BmCPV Infection on Silkworm Bombyx mori Intestinal Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenli; Lu, Yahong; Zhang, Hao; Kumar, Dhiraj; Liu, Bo; Gong, Yongchang; Zhu, Min; Zhu, Liyuan; Liang, Zi; Kuang, Sulan; Chen, Fei; Hu, Xiaolong; Cao, Guangli; Xue, Renyu; Gong, Chengliang

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has a crucial role in the growth, development and environmental adaptation in the host insect. The objective of our work was to investigate the microbiota of the healthy silkworm Bombyx mori gut and changes after the infection of B. mori cypovirus (BmCPV). Intestinal contents of the infected and healthy larvae of B. mori of fifth instar were collected at 24, 72 and 144 h post infection with BmCPV. The gut bacteria were analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. 147(135) and 113(103) genera were found in the gut content of the healthy control female (male) larvae and BmCPV-infected female (male) larvae, respectively. In general, the microbial communities in the gut content of healthy larvae were dominated by Enterococcus, Delftia, Pelomonas, Ralstonia and Staphylococcus, however the abundance change of each genus was depended on the developmental stage and gender. Microbial diversity reached minimum at 144 h of fifth instar larvae. The abundance of Enterococcus in the females was substantially lower and the abundance of Delftia, Aurantimonas and Staphylococcus was substantially higher compared to the males. Bacterial diversity in the intestinal contents decreased after post infection with BmCPV, whereas the abundance of both Enterococcus and Staphylococcus which belongs to Gram-positive were increased. Therefore, our findings suggested that observed changes in relative abundance was related to the immune response of silkworm to BmCPV infection. Relevance analysis of plenty of the predominant genera showed the abundance of the Enterococcus genus was in negative correlation with the abundance of the most predominant genera. These results provided insight into the relationship between the gut microbiota and development of the BmCPV-infected silkworm. PMID:26745627

  17. SHP-2 Mediates Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Varughese, Eunice A; Kasper, Susan; Anneken, Emily M; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2015-01-01

    The parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, induces human gastroenteritis through infection of host epithelial cells in the small intestine. During the initial stage of infection, C. parvum is reported to engage host mechanisms at the host cell-parasite interface to form a parasitophorous vacuole. We determined that upon infection, the larger molecular weight proteins in human small intestinal epithelial host cells (FHs 74 Int) appeared to globally undergo tyrosine dephosphorylation. In parallel, expression of the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) increased in a time-dependent manner. SHP-2 co-localized with the C. parvum sporozoite and this interaction increased the rate of C. parvum infectivity through SH2-mediated SHP-2 activity. Furthermore, we show that one potential target that SHP-2 acts upon is the focal adhesion protein, paxillin, which undergoes moderate dephosphorylation following infection, with inhibition of SHP-2 rescuing paxillin phosphorylation. Importantly, treatment with an inhibitor to SHP-2 and with an inhibitor to paxillin and Src family kinases, effectively decreased the multiplicity of C. parvum infection in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, our study reveals an important role for SHP-2 in the pathogenesis of C. parvum. Furthermore, while host proteins can be recruited to participate in the development of the electron dense band at the host cell-parasite interface, our study implies for the first time that SHP-2 appears to be recruited by the C. parvum sporozoite to regulate infectivity. Taken together, these findings suggest that SHP-2 and its down-stream target paxillin could serve as targets for intervention. PMID:26556238

  18. ACUTE HEPATIC NECROSIS INDUCED BY BRUCELLA INFECTION IN HYPERTHYROID MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, G. Mary; Spink, Wesley W.

    1959-01-01

    When small numbers of Brucella melitensis were inoculated into ABC mice, occasional hepatic granulomas without necrosis were demonstrated. The greatest multiplication of brucellae was detected in the spleens. Because it had been previously observed that ACTH or cortisone markedly accelerated the multiplication of brucellae in the livers of infected mice with destruction of liver cells, it was considered that triiodothyronine might likewise exaggerate a brucella infection by stimulating endogenous adrenal secretion. Although adrenal hypertrophy was produced, infection of mice treated with triiodothyronine resulted in severe hepatic necrosis or infarcts without the multiplication of brucellae in either the livers or spleens. The lesions were not encountered in untreated infected mice or in control mice treated with triiodothyronine. The necrosis was associated with minimal inflammatory reaction. The necrosis was not induced in mice treated with triiodothyronine and given brucella endotoxin. The precise genesis of the acute hepatic necrosis cited in these experiments remains undefined. Triiodothyronine did not cause deaths in mice infected with Br. melitensis. The infection was neither enhanced nor suppressed. PMID:13803714

  19. Molecular Testing for Clinical Diagnosis and Epidemiological Investigations of Intestinal Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Stensvold, C. Rune

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Over the past few decades, nucleic acid-based methods have been developed for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections. Advantages of nucleic acid-based methods are numerous; typically, these include increased sensitivity and specificity and simpler standardization of diagnostic procedures. DNA samples can also be stored and used for genetic characterization and molecular typing, providing a valuable tool for surveys and surveillance studies. A variety of technologies have been applied, and some specific and general pitfalls and limitations have been identified. This review provides an overview of the multitude of methods that have been reported for the detection of intestinal parasites and offers some guidance in applying these methods in the clinical laboratory and in epidemiological studies. PMID:24696439

  20. Molecular testing for clinical diagnosis and epidemiological investigations of intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Jaco J; Stensvold, C Rune

    2014-04-01

    Over the past few decades, nucleic acid-based methods have been developed for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections. Advantages of nucleic acid-based methods are numerous; typically, these include increased sensitivity and specificity and simpler standardization of diagnostic procedures. DNA samples can also be stored and used for genetic characterization and molecular typing, providing a valuable tool for surveys and surveillance studies. A variety of technologies have been applied, and some specific and general pitfalls and limitations have been identified. This review provides an overview of the multitude of methods that have been reported for the detection of intestinal parasites and offers some guidance in applying these methods in the clinical laboratory and in epidemiological studies.

  1. The role of type I interferons in intestinal infection, homeostasis, and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyeseon; Kelsall, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Type I interferons are a widely expressed family of effector cytokines that promote innate antiviral and antibacterial immunity. Paradoxically, they can also suppress immune responses by driving production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and dysregulation of these cytokines can contribute to host-mediated immunopathology and disease progression. Recent studies describe their anti-inflammatory role in intestinal inflammation and the locus containing IFNAR, a heterodimeric receptor for the type I interferons has been identified as a susceptibility region for human inflammatory bowel disease in a genome-wide association study. This review focuses on the role of type I IFNs in the gut in health and disease and their emerging role as immune modulator. Clear understanding of type I IFN-mediated immune responses may provide revenue for fine-tuning existing IFN treatment for infection and intestinal inflammation. PMID:24942688

  2. Net fluxes of electrolytes in the rat intestine infected with Moniliformis dubius (Acanthocephala).

    PubMed

    Mettrick, D F; Budziakowski, M E; Podesta, R B

    1979-08-01

    The effect of Moniliformis dubius on fluxes of Na+, K+, Cl-, and HCO3-in the rat intestine was determined using a conventional in vivo single-pass perfusion technique. Results for ion and water movements in the uninfected gut were in agreement with previous studies. In the parasitized intestine the jejunal pH was significantly lower than that in control animals, matching the restriction of the parasites to this region of the small intestine. While parasitism did not affect Na+ transport in the distal ileum, Na+ absorption was reduced (pH 7.0), or secretion enhanced (pH 6.0), in the two proximal regions. Cl-absorption was reduced in the distal ileum, but secretion was enhanced in the other two segments. Parasitism also enhanced K+ secretion in all segments. Net H2O absorption was reduced at pH 7.0; at pH 7.0; at pH 6.0 net secretion was also reduced. These changes clearly indicate that a parasite restricted to the jejunum may significantly affect the absorptive and secretory activity of the intestine distal to the site of infection. The results are discussed in the light of current concepts of electrolyte transport. The effect of the parasites on mucosal function distal to their site of attachment is discussed in terms of the release by the parasite of toxin-like substances, changes in the physical-chemical characteristics of the intestinal lumen, and interference with neurohormonal control of gastrointestinal function.

  3. Prevalence and Predictors of Intestinal Helminth Infections Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1–Infected Adults in an Urban African Setting

    PubMed Central

    Modjarrad, Kayvon; Zulu, Isaac; Redden, David T.; Njobvu, Lungowe; Freedman, David O.; Vermund, Sten H.

    2009-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is disproportionately burdened by intestinal helminth and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection. Recent evidence suggests detrimental immunologic effects from concomitant infection with the two pathogens. Few studies, however, have assessed the prevalence of and predictors for intestinal helminth infection among HIV-1–infected adults in urban African settings where HIV infection rates are highest. We collected and analyzed sociodemographic and parasitologic data from 297 HIV-1–infected adults (mean age = 31.1 years, 69% female) living in Lusaka, Zambia to assess the prevalence and associated predictors of helminth infection. We found at least one type of intestinal helminth in 24.9% of HIV-infected adults. Thirty-nine (52.7%) were infected with Ascaris lumbricoides, and 29 (39.2%) were infected with hookworm. More than 80% were light-intensity infections. A recent visit to a rural area, food shortage, and prior history of helminth infection were significant predictors of current helminth status. The high helminth prevalence and potential for adverse interactions between helminths and HIV suggests that helminth diagnosis and treatment should be part of routine HIV care. PMID:16222025

  4. Feconomics®; a new and more convenient method, the routine diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Koltas, Ismail Soner; Akyar, Isın; Elgun, Gullu; Kocagoz, Tanıl

    2014-07-01

    Direct wet mount examination and concentration are the most commonly used methods for detecting intestinal parasites from fecal samples. Concentration methods are used when there are fewer protozoan cyst, coccidian oocyst, microsporidial spore, helminth egg, and larvae in the fecal samples. Early detection of the causative intestinal parasites plays a significant role in implementing timely and correct treatment, which relieves the patients' symptoms and also prevents recurrences. Formalin-ethyl acetate concentration (FEAC) is believed to be a gold standard method to detect most intestinal parasites. Thus, in this study, we evaluated the diagnostic value of Feconomics® [manufactured by Salubris Inc, Boston, USA. Patent application number (TR): 2010/07549] which is a simple, new, and rapid fecal concentration method for the detection of the intestinal parasites in human beings. We also compared the FEAC with Feconomics® and direct wet mount examination. A total of 918 fecal samples were collected from the patients suspected to have intestinal parasitic infection. Samples were examined with the direct wet mount, FEAC, and Feconomics® methods. Different parasite species 15.9% (146/918) with Feconomics®, 13.3% (122/918) with FEAC, and 9.8% (90/918) with direct wet mount examination, Feconomics® > FEAC > direct wet mount examinations were detected. They were statistically compared considering FEAC as the gold standard for parasitological diagnosis; the sensitivity and specificity of Feconomics® were calculated as 96 and 97%, respectively. Blastocystis hominis was found to be the most common parasite, followed by Giardia lamblia with direct wet mount examination, FEAC, and Feconomics® methods. Feconomics® proved to be better than not only FEAC in concentrating parasite egg and cyst forms as well as in maintaining characteristic morphology but it is also better in direct wet mount examination. Feconomics® eliminates the need for centrifugation by using

  5. Human Bocavirus: Passenger or Pathogen in Acute Respiratory Tract Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Schildgen, Oliver; Müller, Andreas; Allander, Tobias; Mackay, Ian M.; Völz, Sebastian; Kupfer, Bernd; Simon, Arne

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly identified virus tentatively assigned to the family Parvoviridae, subfamily Parvovirinae, genus Bocavirus. HBoV was first described in 2005 and has since been detected in respiratory tract secretions worldwide. Herein we review the literature on HBoV and discuss the biology and potential clinical impact of this virus. Most studies have been PCR based and performed on patients with acute respiratory symptoms, from whom HBoV was detected in 2 to 19% of the samples. HBoV-positive samples have been derived mainly from infants and young children. HBoV DNA has also been detected in the blood of patients with respiratory tract infection and in fecal samples of patients with diarrhea with or without concomitant respiratory symptoms. A characteristic feature of HBoV studies is the high frequency of coinciding detections, or codetections, with other viruses. Available data nevertheless indicate a statistical association between HBoV and acute respiratory tract disease. We present a model incorporating these somewhat contradictory findings and suggest that primary HBoV infection causes respiratory tract symptoms which can be followed by prolonged low-level virus shedding in the respiratory tract. Detection of the virus in this phase will be facilitated by other infections, either simply via increased sample cell count or via reactivation of HBoV, leading to an increased detection frequency of HBoV during other virus infections. We conclude that the majority of available HBoV studies are limited by the sole use of PCR diagnostics on respiratory tract secretions, addressing virus prevalence but not disease association. The ability to detect primary infection through the development of improved diagnostic methods will be of great importance for future studies seeking to assign a role for HBoV in causing respiratory illnesses. PMID:18400798

  6. Actinomyces infection causing acute right iliac fossa pain

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajah, Narendranath; Hameed, Waseem; Middleton, Simon; Booth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This is a case of a 75-year-old man being admitted to the on-call surgical department with acute abdominal pain. On arrival he was clinically dehydrated and shocked with localised pain over McBurney's point and examination findings were suggestive of appendiceal or other colonic pathology. Full blood testing revealed a white cell count of 38×109/L and a C reactive protein (CRP) of 278 mg/L. A CT scan revealed a gallbladder empyema that extended into the right iliac fossa. This case highlights the potential for a hyperdistended gallbladder empyema to present as acute right iliac fossa pain with blood tests suggestive of complicated disease. Further analysis confirmed Actinomyces infection as the underlying aetiology prior to a laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy. This case serves to remind clinicians of this as a rare potential cause of atypical gallbladder pathology. PMID:24872493

  7. The Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Schober, Megan; Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by pediatricians. Currently, the diagnosis and management of acute urinary tract infection and recurrent urinary tract infection in children remains controversial. Recently published guidelines and large clinical trials have attempted to clarify UTI diagnostic and management strategies. In this manuscript, we review the diagnosis and management of acute and recurrent urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. PMID:25421102

  8. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  9. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  10. Expression of digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in the small intestine of Eimeria acervulina-infected chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coccidiosis is a major disease of poultry caused by the intestinal protozoa Eimeria. Eimeria acervulina mainly infects the duodenum, causing lesions in epithelial tissue. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of E. acervulina infection on the expression of 18 nutrient transport...

  11. The magnitude and risk factors of intestinal parasitic infection in relation to Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection and immune status, at ALERT Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Taye, Biruhalem; Desta, Kassu; Ejigu, Selamawit; Dori, Geme Urge

    2014-06-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and intestinal parasitic infections are among the main health problems in developing countries like Ethiopia. Particularly, co-infections of these diseases would worsen the progression of HIV to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude and risk factors for intestinal parasites in relation to HIV infection and immune status. The study was conducted in (1) HIV positive on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and (2) ART naïve HIV positive patients, and (3) HIV-negative individuals, at All African Leprosy and Tuberculosis (TB) Eradication and Rehabilitation Training Center (ALERT) hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Study participants were interviewed using structured questionnaires to obtain socio-demographic characteristics and assess risk factors associated with intestinal parasitic infection. Intestinal parasites were identified from fecal samples by direct wet mount, formol ether concentration, and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining techniques. The immune status was assessed by measuring whole blood CD4 T-cell count. The overall magnitude of intestinal parasite was 35.08%. This proportion was different among study groups with 39.2% (69/176), 38.83% (40/103) and 27.14% (38/140) in ART naïve HIV positives patients, in HIV negatives, and in HIV positive on ART patients respectively. HIV positive patients on ART had significantly lower magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection compared to HIV negative individuals. Intestinal helminths were significantly lower in HIV positive on ART and ART naïve patients than HIV negatives. Low monthly income, and being married, divorced or widowed were among the socio-demographic characteristics associated with intestinal parasitic infection. No association was observed between the magnitude of intestinal parasites and CD4 T-cell count. However, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Isospora belli were exclusively identified in individuals with CD4 T

  12. Innate and adaptive type 2 immune cell responses in genetically controlled resistance to intestinal helminth infection.

    PubMed

    Filbey, Kara J; Grainger, John R; Smith, Katherine A; Boon, Louis; van Rooijen, Nico; Harcus, Yvonne; Jenkins, Stephen; Hewitson, James P; Maizels, Rick M

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus is an excellent model for intestinal helminth parasitism. Infection in mice persists for varying lengths of time in different inbred strains, with CBA and C57BL/6 mice being fully susceptible, BALB/c partially so and SJL able to expel worms within 2-3 weeks of infection. We find that resistance correlates not only with the adaptive Th2 response, including IL-10 but with activation of innate lymphoid cell and macrophage populations. In addition, the titer and specificity range of the serum antibody response is maximal in resistant mice. In susceptible strains, Th2 responses were found to be counterbalanced by IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, but these are not solely responsible for susceptibility as mice deficient in either CD8(+) T cells or IFN-γ remain unable to expel the parasites. Foxp3(+) Treg numbers were comparable in all strains, but in the most resistant SJL strain, this population does not upregulate CD103 in infection, and in the lamina propria the frequency of Foxp3(+)CD103(+) T cells is significantly lower than in susceptible mice. The more resistant SJL and BALB/c mice develop macrophage-rich IL-4Rα-dependent Type 2 granulomas around intestinal sites of larval invasion, and expression of alternative activation markers Arginase-1, Ch3L3 (Ym1) and RELM-α within the intestine and the peritoneal lavage was also strongly correlated with helminth elimination in these strains. Clodronate depletion of phagocytic cells compromises resistance of BALB/c mice and slows expulsion in the SJL strain. Thus, Type 2 immunity involves IL-4Rα-dependent innate cells including but not limited to a phagocyte population, the latter likely involving the action of specific antibodies.

  13. Urban/rural differences in prevalence and risk factors for intestinal helminth infection in southern Malawi.

    PubMed

    Phiri, K; Whitty, C J; Graham, S M; Ssembatya-Lule, G

    2000-06-01

    Urbanization may increase the risk of human infection with intestinal helminths. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to investigate the prevalence, intensity and potential risk factors of acquiring such infection, among children aged 3-14 years in similar urban and rural communities in southern Malawi. Stool samples were collected from 553 children (273 urban and 280 rural). The overall prevalence of helminth infection was significantly higher in the urban subjects than in the rural (16.5% v. 3.6%; P < 0.001), mostly because of differences in the prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides infection. Living in an urban community was associated with a significantly higher risk of infection [odds ratio (OR) = 5.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.6-12.1], even after controlling for potential confounding factors. In the urban community, risk factors included having pools of water/sewage around houses (OR = 3.0; CI = 1.4-6.5), not wearing shoes (OR = 7.1; CI = 2.7-19.2), not attending school (OR = 2.8; CI = 1.2-6.5), having mothers with 4-8 years of education (OR = 5.2; CI = 2.0-14.0), and having mothers below 35 years of age (OR = 4.09; CI = 1.39-16.28). In this part of Africa, efforts to reduce helminth infections may best be focused on reducing geohelminth burden in urban areas.

  14. High incidence of extra-intestinal infections in a Salmonella Havana outbreak associated with alfalfa sprouts.

    PubMed Central

    Backer, H D; Mohle-Boetani, J C; Werner, S B; Abbott, S L; Farrar, J; Vugia, D J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine a vehicle and point source for an outbreak of Salmonella Havana. METHODS: The authors conducted a case-control study and traceback investigation of 14 residents of California and four from Arizona with onsets of illness from Apr 15, 1998, to June 15, 1998, and Salmonella Havana infections with identical PFGE patterns. RESULTS: Seventeen of 18 patients were women. Seventeen were adults 20-89 years of age. Nine (50%) had diarrheal illness, 6 (33%) had urinary tract infections, 2 (11%) had sepsis, and one had an infected surgical wound after appendectomy. Four patients were hospitalized, and one died. Eating alfalfa sprouts was associated with S. Havana infection (OR = 10.0; 95% confidence interval 1.2, 83.1; P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: This outbreak resulted in a high incidence of extra-intestinal infections, especially urinary tract infections, and high morbidity. Raw alfalfa sprouts, often considered a safe "heath food," can be a source of serious foodborne disease outbreaks. PMID:11059427

  15. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity.

    PubMed

    van de Heijning, Bert J M; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M

    2015-07-08

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%-75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed.

  16. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity

    PubMed Central

    van de Heijning, Bert J. M.; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%–75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed. PMID:26184291

  17. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed. PMID:26091450

  18. Serum amyloid A protein in acute viral infections.

    PubMed Central

    Miwata, H; Yamada, T; Okada, M; Kudo, T; Kimura, H; Morishima, T

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) were measured in 254 children with viral diseases, including measles, varicella, rubella, mumps, echo-30 meningitis, chronic hepatitis B and C, and in eight with Kawasaki disease. Latex agglutination nephelometric immunoassay was used for assaying SAA. In 191 out of 195 patients (98%), SAA concentrations became markedly raised in the acute phase of the viral disease: measles (97%), varicella (100%), mumps (95%), and echo-30 meningitis (99%) with mean titres of 82.4, 80.5, 60.2, 75.2, and 101.1 micrograms/ml respectively. This increase in SAA was followed by a rapid return to normal concentrations (< 5 micrograms/ml) during convalescence. Remarkably higher concentrations of SAA (mean 1630 micrograms/ml) were detected in the acute phase of patients with Kawasaki disease, but in most of the children with chronic hepatitis B or C, the titres of SAA remained normal. There was no close correlation between SAA and serum concentrations for alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, beta 2-microglobulin, transferrin, and IgG. There was a clear correlation between SAA and C reactive protein concentrations, although SAA showed a greater incremental change than C reactive protein in the acute phase. In the acute phase of these viral diseases, 56% of the patients had raised SAA concentrations (> or = 5 micrograms/ml) with normal C reactive protein concentrations (< 5 micrograms/ml). These results indicate that SAA could be useful as an inflammatory marker in children with acute viral infections. PMID:8481043

  19. Central venous catheter infection in adults in acute hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Jones, Clare A

    As well as the human cost, central venous catheter (CVC)-related bloodstream infections significantly inflate hospital costs, mainly through increased length of stay in hospital, particularly in intensive care. This literature review appraises recent research on measures used to minimize CVC-related infection and compares it with current best practice. Randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews published on the subject between 2000 and 2005 were reviewed, concentrating on non-tunnelled, short-term CVCs in the acute hospital setting. The new evidence mainly backs up current best practice. However, skin disinfection could be improved by using alcoholic chlorhexidine followed by aqueous povidone-iodine before CVC insertion. Also, alcoholic chlorhexidine is the preferred solution for cleaning the hubs/connectors before accessing the CVC. Good hand hygiene and quality control and education programmes are vital to improve patient care. More research is needed to clarify the effectiveness of certain interventions and technologies, such as antimicrobial CVCs.

  20. Antibiotic use in acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Zoorob, Roger; Sidani, Mohamad A; Fremont, Richard D; Kihlberg, Courtney

    2012-11-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections account for millions of visits to family physicians each year in the United States. Although warranted in some cases, antibiotics are greatly overused. This article outlines the guidelines and indications for appropriate antibiotic use for common upper respiratory infections. Early antibiotic treatment may be indicated in patients with acute otitis media, group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis, epiglottitis, or bronchitis caused by pertussis. Persistent cases of rhinosinusitis may necessitate the use of antibiotics if symptoms persist beyond a period of observation. Antibiotics should not be considered in patients with the common cold or laryngitis. Judicious, evidence-based use of antibiotics will help contain costs and prevent adverse effects and drug resistance.

  1. Occurrence of immune cells in the intestinal wall of Squalius cephalus infected with Pomphorhynchus laevis.

    PubMed

    Dezfuli, Bahram S; Manera, Maurizio; Giari, Luisa; DePasquale, Joseph A; Bosi, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    A sub-population of 34 specimens of chub, Squalius cephalus, was sampled from the River Brenta (Northern Italy) and examined for ecto- and endo-parasites. Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala) was the only enteric helminth encountered. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural studies were conducted on the intestines of chub. Near the site of parasite's attachment, mucous cells, mast cells (MCs), neutrophils and rodlet cells (RCs) were found to co-occur within the intestinal epithelium. The numbers of mucous cells, MCs and neutrophils were significantly higher in infected fish (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.05). Dual immunofluorescence staining with the lectin Dolichos Biflorus Agglutinin (DBA) and the macrophage-specific MAC387 monoclonal antibody, with parallel transmission electron microscopy, revealed that epithelial MCs often made intimate contact with the mucous cells. Degranulation of a large number of MCs around the site of the acanthocephalan's attachment and in proximity to mucous cells was also documented. MCs and neutrophils were abundant in the submucosa. Immune cells of the intestinal epithelium have been described at the ultrastructural level and their possible functions and interactions are discussed.

  2. Occurrence of immune cells in the intestinal wall of Squalius cephalus infected with Pomphorhynchus laevis.

    PubMed

    Dezfuli, Bahram S; Manera, Maurizio; Giari, Luisa; DePasquale, Joseph A; Bosi, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    A sub-population of 34 specimens of chub, Squalius cephalus, was sampled from the River Brenta (Northern Italy) and examined for ecto- and endo-parasites. Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala) was the only enteric helminth encountered. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural studies were conducted on the intestines of chub. Near the site of parasite's attachment, mucous cells, mast cells (MCs), neutrophils and rodlet cells (RCs) were found to co-occur within the intestinal epithelium. The numbers of mucous cells, MCs and neutrophils were significantly higher in infected fish (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.05). Dual immunofluorescence staining with the lectin Dolichos Biflorus Agglutinin (DBA) and the macrophage-specific MAC387 monoclonal antibody, with parallel transmission electron microscopy, revealed that epithelial MCs often made intimate contact with the mucous cells. Degranulation of a large number of MCs around the site of the acanthocephalan's attachment and in proximity to mucous cells was also documented. MCs and neutrophils were abundant in the submucosa. Immune cells of the intestinal epithelium have been described at the ultrastructural level and their possible functions and interactions are discussed. PMID:26434712

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of intestinal protozoan and helminth infections among pulmonary tuberculosis patients without HIV infection in a rural county in P. R. China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-09-01

    Although co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites, including protozoa and helminths, in humans has been widely studied globally, very little of this phenomenon is known in China. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a rural county of China to investigate such co-infections. Patients with pulmonary TB (PTB) undergoing anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (anti-MTB) treatment were surveyed by questionnaires, and their feces and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal protozoa and helminths, routine blood examination and HIV detection. The χ(2) test and multivariate logistic regression model were used to identify risk factors. A total of 369 patients with PTB were included and all of them were HIV negative. Overall, only 7.3% of participants were infected with intestinal protozoa, among which prevalence of Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba spp. and Trichomonas hominis were 6.0%, 1.1% and 0.3%, respectively; 7.0% were infected with intestinal helminths, among which prevalence of hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides and Clonorchis sinensis were 4.3%, 1.9%, 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively; and 0.5% were simultaneously infected with intestinal protozoa and helminths. Among patients with PTB, body mass index (BMI)≤18 (OR=3.30, 95% CI=1.44-7.54) and raised poultry or livestock (e.g., chicken, duck, pig) (OR=3.96, 95% CI=1.32-11.89) were significantly associated with harboring intestinal protozoan infection, while BMI≤18 (OR=3.32, 95% CI=1.39-7.91), anemia (OR=3.40, 95% CI=1.44-8.02) and laboring barefoot in farmlands (OR=4.54, 95% CI=1.88-10.92) were significantly associated with having intestinal helminth infection. Additionally, there was no significant relationship between duration of anti-MTB treatment and infection rates of intestinal parasites including protozoa and helminths. Therefore, preventing malnutrition, avoiding unprotected contact with reservoirs of protozoa, and improving health education for good

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of intestinal protozoan and helminth infections among pulmonary tuberculosis patients without HIV infection in a rural county in P. R. China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-09-01

    Although co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites, including protozoa and helminths, in humans has been widely studied globally, very little of this phenomenon is known in China. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a rural county of China to investigate such co-infections. Patients with pulmonary TB (PTB) undergoing anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (anti-MTB) treatment were surveyed by questionnaires, and their feces and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal protozoa and helminths, routine blood examination and HIV detection. The χ(2) test and multivariate logistic regression model were used to identify risk factors. A total of 369 patients with PTB were included and all of them were HIV negative. Overall, only 7.3% of participants were infected with intestinal protozoa, among which prevalence of Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba spp. and Trichomonas hominis were 6.0%, 1.1% and 0.3%, respectively; 7.0% were infected with intestinal helminths, among which prevalence of hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides and Clonorchis sinensis were 4.3%, 1.9%, 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively; and 0.5% were simultaneously infected with intestinal protozoa and helminths. Among patients with PTB, body mass index (BMI)≤18 (OR=3.30, 95% CI=1.44-7.54) and raised poultry or livestock (e.g., chicken, duck, pig) (OR=3.96, 95% CI=1.32-11.89) were significantly associated with harboring intestinal protozoan infection, while BMI≤18 (OR=3.32, 95% CI=1.39-7.91), anemia (OR=3.40, 95% CI=1.44-8.02) and laboring barefoot in farmlands (OR=4.54, 95% CI=1.88-10.92) were significantly associated with having intestinal helminth infection. Additionally, there was no significant relationship between duration of anti-MTB treatment and infection rates of intestinal parasites including protozoa and helminths. Therefore, preventing malnutrition, avoiding unprotected contact with reservoirs of protozoa, and improving health education for good

  5. [Impact of lactic acid fermentation in the large intestine on acute lactic acidosis in cattle].

    PubMed

    Zust, J; Pestevsek, U; Vengust, A

    2000-09-01

    Microbial and fermentation changes in the ingesta of the large intestine and their influence on the pathogenesis of acute lactic acidosis were studied in 4 cows fitted with permanent cannulas in the ileum and cecum. Feed mixture containing 65% of maize was infused into the cecum for several days in amounts of 2 and 4 kg per day. The daily amount was divided in 8 equal portions and given with 3 l of warm physiologic saline solution. During the period of ad libitum feeding of hay, the pH values in cecal digesta were 7.4 to 7.6 and the amount of total volatile fatty acids 40-60 mmol/kg with high molar percentage (87-90 mol%) of acetic acid. As to lactic acid only the L(+) lactic isomer was found in a concentration of about 0.4 mmol/kg. Infusion of low amounts of starch induced mild lactic acid fermentation in the cecum associated with a pronounced increase in the concentration of L(+) and D (-) lactic acid to peak levels of 80 +/- 10 mmol/kg and 7 +/- 1 mmol/kg, respectively. Lactic acid fermentation ceased within 2 to 3 days indicating that the gut microflora had adapted to the starch infusion. Slight decreases of blood pH and bicarbonates in blood as well as a moderate increase of netto acid-base excretion in urine indicated mild changes of acid-base balance, but clinically no pathological symptoms were observed. Higher amounts of infused starch caused pronounced lactic acid production in the large intestine which persisted throughout the experiment. Peak L(+) and D(-) lactic acid concentration in cecal digesta reached on the average 137 +/- 16 mmol/kg and 45 +/- 7 mmol/kg respectively. Significant decreases of blood pH values from 7.41 +/- 0.02 to 7.18 +/- 0.08 (P < 0.001), actual bicarbonate from 28.2 +/- 3.2 to 11.0 +/- 2.6 mmol/l (P < 0.001) and base excess from 3.9 +/- 3.6 to -15.2 +/- 3.8 mmol/l (P < 0.001) were observed. D (-) lactic acid concentration in blood increased to 3.2 +/- 0.4 mmol/l, but L(+) lactic acid values remained unchanged under 1 mmol

  6. A Case Report of Acute Cellular Rejection Following Intestinal Transplantation Managed With Adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Rao, B; Jafri, S-M; Kazimi, M; Mullins, K; Raoufi, M; Segovia, M C

    2016-03-01

    There is a higher incidence of acute cellular rejection (ACR) in small bowel transplantation (SBT) compared with transplantation of other solid organs. Although there are reports on the use of infliximab to successfully treat ACR refractory to other treatments, there are no reports, to our knowledge, regarding the use of adalimumab. We present a case of a female patient with a history of Crohn's disease who underwent an isolated SBT and developed an episode of severe ACR. She was initially treated with methylprednisolone, thymoglobulin, basiliximab, and a dosage adjustment of tacrolimus. Results of repeat endoscopies and biopsies revealed no significant improvement. The patient initiated treatment with adalimumab every 2 weeks for a total of 6 months, in addition to maintenance treatment with prednisone and tacrolimus. Subsequent evaluations showed gradual improvement to normal mucosa and villi without ulceration. A regimen that incorporates adalimumab can thus be used to treat ACR after intestinal transplantation. Larger multicenter studies are needed to show the full efficacy of this therapeutic regimen.

  7. Hydroclimatic variables and acute gastro-intestinal illness in British Columbia, Canada: A time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galway, L. P.; Allen, D. M.; Parkes, M. W.; Li, L.; Takaro, T. K.

    2015-02-01

    Using epidemiologic time series analysis, we examine associations between three hydroclimatic variables (temperature, precipitation, and streamflow) and waterborne acute gastro-intestinal illness (AGI) in two communities in the province of British Columbia (BC), Canada. The communities were selected to represent the major hydroclimatic regimes that characterize BC: rainfall-dominated and snowfall dominated. Our results show that the number of monthly cases of AGI increased with increasing temperature, precipitation, and streamflow in the same month in the context of a rainfall-dominated regime, and with increasing streamflow in the previous month in the context of a snowfall-dominated regime. These results suggest that hydroclimatology plays a role in driving the occurrence and variability of AGI in these settings. Further, this study highlights that the nature and magnitude of the effects of hydroclimatic variability on AGI are different in the context of a snowfall-dominated regime versus a rainfall-dominated regimes. We conclude by proposing that the watershed may be an appropriate context for enhancing our understanding of the complex linkages between hydroclimatic variability and waterborne illness in the context of a changing climate.

  8. Community awareness of intestinal parasites and the prevalence of infection among community members of rural Abaye Deneba area, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Nyantekyi, Liza; Legesse, Mengistu; Medhin, Girmay; Animut, Abebe; Tadesse, Konjit; Macias, Chanda; Degarege, Abraham; Erko, Berhanu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the knowledge of Abaye Deneba community members regarding intestinal parasites and prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections. Methods Knowledge about intestinal parasites was assessed by administering a questionnaire to 345 randomly selected household heads. Parasitological stool examination of 491 randomly selected individuals was done using the formol ether concentration technique. Results Knowledge of the Abaye Deneba community about parasitic diseases such as schistosomiasis, amoebiasis, ascariasis and taeniasis was very low. However, 204 (59.3%) members correctly responded that the cause of giardiasis is related to contaminated water and 176 (51.2%) knew how to prevent it. In some cases, respondents did correctly identify causes, symptoms of intestinal parasite infection and ways to prevent it, but they did not accurately link it to the appropriate disease caused by the different intestinal parasite species. Among the 491 stool samples examined, 50.2% of study participants showed infection with at least one intestinal parasite. Schistosoma mansoni was the most prevalent (41.3%) followed by Trichuris trichiura(9.4%), Ascaris lumbricoides (8.4%), Taenia saginata (2.4%), Enterobius vermicularis (2.0%) and hookworm (0.4%). Prevalence of schistosomiasis was highest in men aged 15-24 years. Conclusions Intestinal parasitic infection is highly prevalent in communities of the Abaye Deneba area. Nevertheless, the knowledge of the community members about the parasite is less. Implementation of preventive chemotherapy, supplemented with health education, provision and use of sanitary facilities would be recommended to reduce morbidity and control transmission of intestinal parasites in this area. PMID:25183071

  9. Berberine ameliorates severe acute pancreatitis‑induced intestinal barrier dysfunction via a myosin light chain phosphorylation‑dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hong-Yin; Chen, Tao; Yan, Hong-Tao; Huang, Zhu; Tang, Li-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Berberine is a traditional drug used to treat gastrointestinal disorders in China and has been demonstrated to attenuate intestinal barrier dysfunction in certain animal models. However, the effects of berberine on pancreatitis-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction are yet to be fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of berberine pretreatment on the attenuation of intestinal barrier dysfunction induced by severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A total of 36 rats were randomly divided into Sham, SAP and SAP plus berberine groups. Pancreatitis was induced using retrograde injection of 3% Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Histological examinations of the pancreas were performed and intestinal barrier dysfunction was characterized by histological measurements and the assessment of serum diamine oxidase activity and endotoxin levels. Zonula occludens-1 and occludin mRNA and protein expression, as well as myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, were assessed. SAP rat models were successfully established. Berberine treatment was found to have no significant effect on the histological changes in the pancreas, but was observed to ameliorate the intestinal mucosal barrier damage and membrane permeability associated with SAP. Although berberine exerted minimal effects on tight junction proteins in the ilea of SAP rats, it was observed to significantly inhibit SAP-induced MLC phosphorylation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that berberine attenuates SAP‑induced intestinal barrier dysfunction in vivo. In addition, this study shows that the effect of berberine on intestinal barrier function may be associated with the inhibition of SAP‑induced upregulation of MLC phosphorylation.

  10. Nutritional Predictors of Acute Respiratory Infections Among Children Born to HIV-Infected Women in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Spiegelman, Donna; Hertzmark, Ellen; Duggan, Christopher; Msamanga, Gernard; Aboud, Said; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2013-01-01

    We prospectively determined the association between undernutrition and incidence of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) among 711 children born to HIV-infected women. Overall, underweight was associated with a 58% increased risk of ARI. Similarly, wasting (54%), very low birth weight (88%) and child HIV infection (62%) were significantly associated with increased risk of ARI during the first 2 years. Breastfeeding was associated with 52% reduction in risk of ARI only during the first 12 months of life. Among HIV-exposed, but uninfected, children, underweight, wasting and stunting were associated with 73%, 61% and 33% increased risk of ARI, respectively. Very low birthweight and advanced maternal disease stage were also associated with increased risk of ARI. Similar results were observed among HIV-infected children, except for stunting and very low birth weight. Prevention of child undernutrition could have major impact in reducing child ARI morbidity in settings of high HIV prevalence. PMID:23400399

  11. The impact of serine protease HtrA in apoptosis, intestinal immune responses and extra-intestinal histopathology during Campylobacter jejuni infection of infant mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni has emerged as a leading cause of bacterial enterocolitis. The serine protease HtrA has been shown to be a pivotal, novel C. jejuni virulence factor involved in cell invasion and transmigration across polarised epithelial cells in vitro. However, the functional relevance of the htrA gene for the interaction of C. jejuni with the host immune system in the infant mouse infection model has not been investigated so far. Results Here we studied the role of C. jejuni htrA during infection of 3-weeks-old infant mice. Immediately after weaning, conventional wild-type mice were perorally infected with the NCTC11168∆htrA mutant (∆htrA) or the parental wild-type strain. Approximately one third of infected infant mice suffered from bloody diarrhea until day 7 post infection (p.i.), whereas colonic histopathological changes were rather moderate but comparable between the two strains. Interestingly, parental, but not ∆htrA mutant infected mice, displayed a multifold increase of apoptotic cells in the colonic mucosa at day 7 p.i., which was paralleled by higher colonic levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IFN-γ and the matrix-degrading enzyme matrixmetalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Furthermore, higher numbers of proliferating cells could be observed in the colon of ∆htrA infected mice as compared to the parental wild-type strain. Remarkably, as early as 7 days p.i. infant mice also exhibited inflammatory changes in extra-intestinal compartments such as liver, kidneys and lungs, which were less distinct in kidneys and lungs following ∆htrA versus parental strain infection. However, live C. jejuni bacteria could not be found in these organs, suggesting the induction of systemic effects during intestinal infection. Conclusion Upon C. jejuni ∆htrA strain infection of infant mice, intestinal and extra-intestinal pro-inflammatory immune responses were ameliorated in the infant mouse model system. Future studies will shed

  12. INTESTINAL PARASITIC INFECTIONS AND ATOPIC DISEASES IN CHILDREN: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY.

    PubMed

    Al Ghwass, Mohamed Me; El Dash, Hanaa H; Amin, Sayed A; Hussin, Shimaa S

    2015-08-01

    Different helminth parasites may have different effects on allergy depending on the timing of the exposure. A meta-analysis of many of studies reported the association between the presence of geohelminth eggs in stool samples and asthma provided some evidence for parasite-specific effects. This study evaluated the occurrence of allergy among different intestinal parasitic infected patients. A cross sectional study was carried out from June, 2013 to October, 2013 in the Pediatric Outpatient Clinic of Al-Fayoum University Hospitals among 55 children aged 2 years to 13 years. The data were collected using ISSAC questionnaire of allergy (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood) also laboratory analysis of complete blood picture, stool analysis and measurement of total serum IgE were performed for the patients. Among the patients 27 suffered from allergy and 28 had no allergic complain. Stool examinations showed Entrobius vernicularis (15), Trichostrongylus species (9), Hymenolepis nana (8), Entameba histolytica (8), Giardia lamblia (6), and mixed infections (9). The allergic group by parasitological examination 7 children (25.9%) had Entrobius vermicularis; 6 children (22.2%) Entameba histolytica; and 2 children (7.4 %) Giardia lamblia, with eosinophilic count was higher in the enterobiasis infected children than in protozoa infected ones. There were significantly high IgE levels in mixed parasitic infection (P= 0.006) and with Entrobius vermicularis infections (P=0.04). Also statistically significant difference between allergic groups by ISAAC score and the non allergic group regarding Ig E levels (P= 0.03). There was no significant difference between numbers of children with allergy and those without allergy among different parasitic infections. However, a marked significant association between the allergy and parasitic infected children was not declaimed. PMID:26485861

  13. INTESTINAL PARASITIC INFECTIONS AND ATOPIC DISEASES IN CHILDREN: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY.

    PubMed

    Al Ghwass, Mohamed Me; El Dash, Hanaa H; Amin, Sayed A; Hussin, Shimaa S

    2015-08-01

    Different helminth parasites may have different effects on allergy depending on the timing of the exposure. A meta-analysis of many of studies reported the association between the presence of geohelminth eggs in stool samples and asthma provided some evidence for parasite-specific effects. This study evaluated the occurrence of allergy among different intestinal parasitic infected patients. A cross sectional study was carried out from June, 2013 to October, 2013 in the Pediatric Outpatient Clinic of Al-Fayoum University Hospitals among 55 children aged 2 years to 13 years. The data were collected using ISSAC questionnaire of allergy (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood) also laboratory analysis of complete blood picture, stool analysis and measurement of total serum IgE were performed for the patients. Among the patients 27 suffered from allergy and 28 had no allergic complain. Stool examinations showed Entrobius vernicularis (15), Trichostrongylus species (9), Hymenolepis nana (8), Entameba histolytica (8), Giardia lamblia (6), and mixed infections (9). The allergic group by parasitological examination 7 children (25.9%) had Entrobius vermicularis; 6 children (22.2%) Entameba histolytica; and 2 children (7.4 %) Giardia lamblia, with eosinophilic count was higher in the enterobiasis infected children than in protozoa infected ones. There were significantly high IgE levels in mixed parasitic infection (P= 0.006) and with Entrobius vermicularis infections (P=0.04). Also statistically significant difference between allergic groups by ISAAC score and the non allergic group regarding Ig E levels (P= 0.03). There was no significant difference between numbers of children with allergy and those without allergy among different parasitic infections. However, a marked significant association between the allergy and parasitic infected children was not declaimed.

  14. Membrane Vesicles Released by Intestinal Epithelial Cells Infected with Rotavirus Inhibit T-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Alfonso; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Rojas, Olga Lucía; Wolf, Marie; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Rotavirus (RV) predominantly replicates in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), and “danger signals” released by these cells may modulate viral immunity. We have recently shown that human model IEC (Caco-2 cells) infected with rhesus-RV release a non-inflammatory group of immunomodulators that includes heat shock proteins (HSPs) and TGF-β1. Here we show that both proteins are released in part in association with membrane vesicles (MV) obtained from filtrated Caco-2 supernatants concentrated by ultracentrifugation. These MV express markers of exosomes (CD63 and others), but not of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or nuclei. Larger quantities of proteins associated with MV were released by RV-infected cells than by non-infected cells. VP6 co-immunoprecipitated with CD63 present in these MV, and VP6 co-localized with CD63 in RV-infected cells, suggesting that this viral protein is associated with the MV, and that this association occurs intracellularly. CD63 present in MV preparations from stool samples from 36 children with gastroenteritis due or not due to RV were analyzed. VP6 co-immunoprecipitated with CD63 in 3/8 stool samples from RV-infected children, suggesting that these MV are released by RV-infected cells in vivo. Moreover, fractions that contained MV from RV-infected cells induced death and inhibited proliferation of CD4+ T cells to a greater extent than fractions from non-infected cells. These effects were in part due to TGF-β, because they were reversed by treatment of the T cells with the TGF-β-receptor inhibitor ALK5i. MV from RV-infected and non-infected cells were heterogeneous, with morphologies and typical flotation densities described for exosomes (between 1.10 and 1.18 g/mL), and denser vesicles (>1.24 g/mL). Both types of MV from RV-infected cells were more efficient at inhibiting T-cell function than were those from non-infected cells. We propose that RV infection of IEC releases MV that modulate viral immunity. PMID:21142445

  15. Impact of drainage and sewerage on intestinal nematode infections in poor urban areas in Salvador, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moraes, L R S; Cancio, Jacira Azevedo; Cairncross, Sandy

    2004-04-01

    This cross-sectional study was conducted in 1989 among children aged between 5 and 14 years old living in nine poor urban areas of the city of Salvador (pop. 2.44 million), capital of Bahia State, in Northeast Brazil. Three of these areas had benefited from both drainage and sewerage, 3 from improved drainage only, and 3 from neither. The children studied thus belonged to 3 exposure groups regarding their level of sanitation infrastructure. An extensive questionnaire was applied to collect information on each child and on the conditions of the household, and stool examinations of the children 5-14 years old were performed to measure nematode infection. Comparison of the sewerage group with the drainage-only group and the latter with the control (no sewerage or drainage) group showed that, when the level of community sanitation was better, the prevalence of infection among children was less, but risk factors identified for infection were more numerous and more significant. Intensity of infection with Trichuris, but not with Ascaris or hookworm, was also less. The results suggest that sewerage and drainage can have a significant effect on intestinal nematode infections, by reducing transmission occurring in the public domain.

  16. The Impact of Intestinal Parasitic Infections on the Nutritional Status of Rural and Urban School-Aged Children in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Opara, Kenneth N.; Udoidung, Nsima I.; Opara, Dominic C.; Okon, Okpok E.; Edosomwan, Evelyn U.; Udoh, Anietie J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Intestinal parasitic infection and undernutrition are still major public health problems in poor and developing countries. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between intestinal parasitic infection and nutritional status in 405 primary school children from rural and urban areas of Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. Methods This cross-sectional survey in 2009 obtained anthropometric data, height-for-age (HA), weight-for-height (WH) and weight-for-age (WA) Z-scores from each child and fecal samples were also collected and screened for intestinal parasites using standard parasitological protocols. Results The prevalence of infection with any intestinal parasite was 67.4%. A total of six intestinal parasites were detected; hookworm (41.7%) had the highest prevalence. The prevalence of intestinal parasites and undernutrition was significantly higher in rural than in urban children (P<0.001). The prevalence of stunting (HAZ < -2), underweight (WAZ < -2) and wasting (WHZ < -2) for rural and urban children were 42.3% vs. 29.7%; underweight 43.2% vs. 29.6% and wasting 10.9% vs. 6.4%, respectively. With respect to nutritional indicators, the infected children had significantly (P<0.05) higher z-scores than the uninfected children. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that only Hookworm and Ascaris lumbricoides were each significantly (P<0.05) associated with stunting, wasting, and underweight. Conclusions and Public Health Implications Since intestinal parasitic infections are associated with malnutrition, controlling these parasites could increase the physical development and well-being of the affected children.

  17. Risk Factors for Opisthorchis viverrini and Minute Intestinal Fluke Infections in Lao PDR, 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hee Jung; Ki, Moran; Eom, Keeseon; Yong, Tai-Soon; Chai, Jong-Yil; Min, Duk-Young; Rim, Han-Jong; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Insisiengmay, Bounnaloth; Phommasack, Bounlay

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare the prevalence of Opisthorchis viverrini/minute intestinal fluke (Ov/MIF) in Lao People's Democratic Republic according to different regions and evaluate the effect of ingestion of raw freshwater fish on the infection. Demographic data, behavioral data, and symptoms were obtained, and the Kato–Katz method was used for the diagnosis of Ov/MIF. In total, 3,046 individuals were enrolled. The risk factors associated with acquisition of Ov/MIF were raw fish consumption and province. Khong Island showed the highest prevalence (odds ratio = 80.1, 95% confidence interval = 47.9–133.9, P < 0.001) compared with other districts, and raw fish consumption was related to Ov/MIF infection. Administration of praziquantel to entire populations, education (avoiding consumption of raw food dishes and improved hygiene), and access to clean water and sanitation should be considered. PMID:24980495

  18. The intestinal microbiota dysbiosis and Clostridium difficile infection: is there a relationship with inflammatory bowel disease?

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Justyna; Palagani, Vindhya

    2013-01-01

    Gut microbiota is a compilation of microorganisms dwelling in the entire mammalian gastrointestinal tract. They display a symbiotic relationship with the host contributing to its intestinal health and disease. Even a slight fluctuation in this equipoise may be deleterious to the host, leading to many pathological conditions like Clostridium difficile infection or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this review, we focus on the role of microbial dysbiosis in initiation of C. difficile infection and IBD, and we also touch upon the role of specific pathogens, particularly C. difficile, as causative agents of IBD. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms activated by C. difficile that contribute to the development and exacerbation of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23320050

  19. Risk factors for Opisthorchis viverrini and minute intestinal fluke infections in Lao PDR, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hee Jung; Ki, Moran; Eom, Keeseon; Yong, Tai-Soon; Chai, Jong-Yil; Min, Duk-Young; Rim, Han-Jong; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Insisiengmay, Bounnaloth; Phommasack, Bounlay

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare the prevalence of Opisthorchis viverrini/minute intestinal fluke (Ov/MIF) in Lao People's Democratic Republic according to different regions and evaluate the effect of ingestion of raw freshwater fish on the infection. Demographic data, behavioral data, and symptoms were obtained, and the Kato-Katz method was used for the diagnosis of Ov/MIF. In total, 3,046 individuals were enrolled. The risk factors associated with acquisition of Ov/MIF were raw fish consumption and province. Khong Island showed the highest prevalence (odds ratio = 80.1, 95% confidence interval = 47.9-133.9, P < 0.001) compared with other districts, and raw fish consumption was related to Ov/MIF infection. Administration of praziquantel to entire populations, education (avoiding consumption of raw food dishes and improved hygiene), and access to clean water and sanitation should be considered.

  20. Intestinal parasite infections in the inhabitants along the Hantan River, Chorwon-gun.

    PubMed

    Park, M S; Kim, S W; Yang, Y S; Park, C H; Lee, W T; Kim, C U; Lee, E M; Lee, S U; Huh, S

    1993-12-01

    The prevalence of intestinal parasite infections in inhabitants at the reaches of the Hantan River, Chorwon-gun, Korea, was observed from August 12 to September 14, 1993. Of 465 people observed by cellophane thick smear and formalin-ether concentration method, 2 Ascaris lumbricoides (unfertilized), 1 Trichuris trichiura, 39 Clonorchis sinensis and 16 Metagonimus egg positive cases were found. After treatment, the Metagonimus egg positive cases passed out flukes of Metagonimus Miyata type. Of 68 fish caught in the Hantan River, 14 (20.6%) were infected with metacercariae of Metagonimus, while no metacercaria of C. sinensis was found. At this area, soil-transmitted nematodes are very low, but clonorchiasis and metagonimiasis are prevalent by modernate endemicity.

  1. Risk factors for Opisthorchis viverrini and minute intestinal fluke infections in Lao PDR, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hee Jung; Ki, Moran; Eom, Keeseon; Yong, Tai-Soon; Chai, Jong-Yil; Min, Duk-Young; Rim, Han-Jong; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Insisiengmay, Bounnaloth; Phommasack, Bounlay

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare the prevalence of Opisthorchis viverrini/minute intestinal fluke (Ov/MIF) in Lao People's Democratic Republic according to different regions and evaluate the effect of ingestion of raw freshwater fish on the infection. Demographic data, behavioral data, and symptoms were obtained, and the Kato-Katz method was used for the diagnosis of Ov/MIF. In total, 3,046 individuals were enrolled. The risk factors associated with acquisition of Ov/MIF were raw fish consumption and province. Khong Island showed the highest prevalence (odds ratio = 80.1, 95% confidence interval = 47.9-133.9, P < 0.001) compared with other districts, and raw fish consumption was related to Ov/MIF infection. Administration of praziquantel to entire populations, education (avoiding consumption of raw food dishes and improved hygiene), and access to clean water and sanitation should be considered. PMID:24980495

  2. Effect of immunologic reactions on rat intestinal epithelium. Correlation of increased permeability to chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and ovalbumin during acute inflammation and anaphylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramage, J.K.; Stanisz, A.; Scicchitano, R.; Hunt, R.H.; Perdue, M.H.

    1988-06-01

    In these studies we compared jejunal permeability to two probes--chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) (mol wt, 360) and ovalbumin (mol wt, 45,000)--under control conditions, during acute intestinal inflammation, and in response to systemic anaphylaxis. Acute inflammation was produced after infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and rats were studied at day 0 (control), day 4 (early), day 10 (acute), and day 35 (postinfection). At the latter stage, immune rats were also studied during anaphylaxis induced by i.v. N. brasiliensis antigen. In each study, blood and urine were sampled over 5 h after the probes were simultaneously injected into ligated loops in anesthetized rats. In controls, small quantities (less than 0.04% and 0.002% of the administered dose for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin, respectively) appeared in the circulation and plateaued at 1 h. During acute inflammation, the appearance of both probes continued to increase with time. Compared with controls, 5-h values for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin were (a) significantly elevated at day 4 (p less than 0.005), (b) increased approximately 20-fold at day 10 (p less than 0.005 and less than 0.01, respectively), and (c) normal at day 35. Urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA followed the same pattern. During anaphylaxis, appearance of the probes in the circulation increased at 1 h to values approximately 10-fold those in controls (p less than 0.001 and less than 0.01, for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin, respectively), and then declined. Urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA over 5 h was also significantly increased. We conclude that epithelial barrier function becomes impaired during both acute inflammation and anaphylaxis. In this rat model, gut permeability changes to 51Cr-EDTA reflect gut permeability changes to macromolecular antigens.

  3. Prevalence and predictors associated with intestinal infections by protozoa and helminths in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Casavechia, Maria Teresinha Gomes; Lonardoni, Maria Valdrinez Campana; Venazzi, Eneide Aparecida Sabaini; Campanerut-Sá, Paula Aline Zanetti; da Costa Benalia, Hugo Rafael; Mattiello, Matheus Felipe; Menechini, Pedro Victor Lazaretti; Dos Santos, Carlos Aparecido; Teixeira, Jorge Juarez Vieira

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 2 billion people are infected with soil-transmitted helminths worldwide, mainly in tropical and subtropical areas. This research aimed to investigate the prevalence and predictors associated with parasitic infections in primary health care. A cross-sectional study was performed with a large random sample to identify the prevalence and predictors associated with parasitic infections in primary health care in Marialva, southern Brazil, from April 2011 to September 2013. Stool samples from 775 individuals were analyzed for the presence of protozoan cysts, helminth eggs, and larvae. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 13.94 %, and the prevalence of protozoa and helminths was 15.1 and 2.9 %, respectively. The predictor variables that were associated with intestinal parasites were male gender odds ratio (OR) 1.60, 95 % confidence interval (CI 1.10-2.40) and the absence of a kitchen garden (OR 2.28, 95 % CI, 1.08-4.85). Positive associations were found between Giardia duodenalis and individuals aged ≤18 with high risk (OR 19.0, 95 % CI 2.16-167.52), between Endolimax nana and the absence of a kitchen garden (p < 0.01), and between Trichuris trichiura and the presence of a kitchen garden (p = 0.014). Polyparasitism was present in 27.27 % of infected individuals. Our findings confirmed a relatively low prevalence in primary care, compared to international standards, despite the rare publications in the area. As variables, male gender and the absence of a kitchen garden stood out as important predictors. It is highly relevant that the health conditions of the population comply with consistent standards.

  4. Resistance to intestinal Entamoeba histolytica infection is conferred by innate immunity and Gr-1+ cells.

    PubMed

    Asgharpour, Amon; Gilchrist, Carol; Baba, Duza; Hamano, Shinjiro; Houpt, Eric

    2005-08-01

    Establishment of intestinal infection with Entamoeba histolytica depends on the mouse strain; C57BL/6 mice are highly resistant, and C3H/HeJ mice are relatively susceptible. We found that resistance to intestinal infection was independent of lymphocyte activity or H-2 haplotype and occurred in the first hours to days postchallenge according to in vivo imaging. At 18 h postchallenge, the ceca of resistant C57BL/6 mice were histologically unremarkable, in contrast to the severe inflammation observed in susceptible C3H/HeJ mice. Comparison of cecal gene expression in C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6 mice demonstrated that there was parasite-induced upregulation of proinflammatory and neutrophil chemotaxis transcripts and there was downregulation of transforming growth factor beta signaling molecules. Pretreatment with dexamethasone abrogated the partial resistance of C3H/HeJ or CBA mice through an innate, lymphocyte-independent mechanism, but it had no effect on the high-level resistance of C57BL/6 mice. Similarly, administration of a neutrophil-depleting anti-Gr-1 monoclonal antibody (RB6-8C5) decreased the partial resistance of CBA mice and led to severe pathology compared to control antibody-treated mice, but it had no effect on C57BL/6 resistance. These data indicate that there are discrete mechanisms of innate resistance to E. histolytica depending on the host background and, in contrast to other reports, imply that neutrophils are protective and not damaging in intestinal amebiasis.

  5. Infection levels of intestinal helminths in two commensal rodent species from rural households in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Panti-May, J A; Hernández-Betancourt, S F; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Robles, M R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to calculate the prevalence and intensity of intestinal helminths in the house mouse (Mus musculus) and the black rat (Rattus rattus) trapped in rural households of Yucatan, Mexico. Sampling was conducted during the rainy season from October to December 2011 and the dry season from January to March 2012. A total of 154 M. musculus and 46 R. rattus were examined, with 84.2% of M. musculus being infected with helminths compared with a significantly lower prevalence of 52.2% in R. rattus (P< 0.01). Adult M. musculus were more likely to be infected with helminths (89%) than subadults (63%) (P< 0.01). Four helminth species were identified: Taenia taeniaeformis larvae, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Syphacia muris and Trichuris muris. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis was present more frequently in M. musculus than in R. rattus (P< 0.01) and in adult mice compared to subadults (P< 0.01). Trichuris muris was present only in adult mice. This is the first report of N. brasiliensis, S. muris and T. muris in Yucatan, Mexico, as well as the first to report the presence of N. brasiliensis in M. musculus from Mexico. The helminth fauna of commensal rodents present in households appears to constitute a low potential health risk to local inhabitants; however, it would be advisable to conduct further studies to better understand the public health risk posed by these rodent intestinal helminths.

  6. Fluid absorption in the small intestine of healthy game birds and those infected with Spironucleus spp.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, S; Irvine, K L; Eves, S M; Gibson, J S

    2005-06-01

    Absorption of fluid by the small intestine of 4-week-old to 12-week-old farmed pheasants and partridges has been studied using an inverted sac technique. The mean rate of absorption was 54 +/- 4 (mean +/- standard error of the mean) microl/g dry tissue/min in pheasants and 49 +/- 3 microl/g dry tissue/min in partridges. Use of inhibitors and ion substitution suggested transepithelial transport driven by baso-lateral Na+/K+ pumps, in combination with mucosal Na+-coupled transporters, including Cl(-)-coupled transporters. Absorption was more than halved to 17 +/- 2 microl/g dry tissue/min (P < 0.001) in birds that were very heavily infected with Spironucleus spp. in their small intestine and showing a syndrome of diarrhoea, depression and loss of weight to severe emaciation. Birds carrying light to moderate levels of infection with Spironucleus had very variable rates of absorption that were statistically similar to the controls. Doubling the glucose concentration in the buffer to 40 mM significantly enhanced absorption.

  7. Intestinal Expression of Genes Encoding Inflammatory Mediators and Gelatinases During Arcobacter Butzleri Infection of Gnotobiotic Il-10 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heimesaat, Markus M.; Alter, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Gölz, Greta

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that Arcobacter butzleri induces intestinal, extra-intestinal, and systemic immune responses in perorally infected gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice in a strain-dependent fashion. Here, we present a comprehensive survey of small and large intestinal expression profiles of inflammatory and regulatory mediators as well as of the matrix-degrading gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 following murine A. butzleri infection. Gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice were infected with A. butzleri strains CCUG 30485 or C1 of human and chicken origin, respectively. At day 6 following A. butzleri infection, mucin-2 mRNA, an integral part of the intestinal mucus layer, was downregulated in the colon, whereas TNF and IL-23p19 mRNA were upregulated in the ileum. Furthermore, IFN-γ, IL-17A, IL-1β, and IL-22 mRNA were upregulated in both colonic and ileal ex vivo biopsies at day 6 post strain CCUG 30485 infection. These changes were accompanied by downregulated colonic MMP-9 levels, whereas both MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA were upregulated in the ileum. In conclusion, these data indicate that A. butzleri infection induces changes in the expression of genes involved in pro-inflammatory and regulatory immune responses as well as in tissue degradation. PMID:27141315

  8. Apical leptin induces chloride secretion by intestinal epithelial cells and in a rat model of acute chemotherapy-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hoda, Raschid M.; Scharl, Michael; Keely, Stephen J.; McCole, Declan F.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether luminal leptin alters ion transport properties of the intestinal epithelium under acute inflammatory conditions. Monolayers of human intestinal T84 epithelial cells and a rat model of chemotherapy-induced enterocolitis were used. Cells were treated with leptin and mounted in Ussing chambers to measure basal and secretagogue-induced changes in transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc). Furthermore, the role of MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathways in mediating responses to leptin was investigated. Acute colitis in Sprague-Dawley rats was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 40 mg/kg methotrexate. Leptin (100 ng/ml) induced a time-dependent increase in basal Isc in T84 intestinal epithelial cells (P < 0.01). Moreover, pretreatment of T84 cells with leptin for up to 1 h significantly potentiated carbachol- and forskolin-induced increases in Isc. Pretreatment with an inhibitor of MAPK abolished the effect of leptin on basal, carbachol- and forskolin-induced chloride secretion (P < 0.05). However, the PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin, only blunted the effect of leptin on forskolin-induced increases in Isc. Furthermore, leptin treatment evoked both ERK1/2 and Akt1 phosphorylation in T84 cells. In the rat model, luminal leptin induced significant increases in Isc across segments of proximal and, to a lesser extent, distal colon (P < 0.05). We conclude that luminal leptin is likely an intestinal chloride secretagogue, particularly when present at elevated concentrations and/or in the setting of inflammation. Our findings may provide a mechanistic explanation, at least in part, for the clinical condition of secretory diarrhea both in hyperleptinemic obese patients and in patients with chemotherapy-induced intestinal inflammation. PMID:20203064

  9. Lactic acid bacteria protect human intestinal epithelial cells from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed

    Affhan, S; Dachang, W; Xin, Y; Shang, D

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens that cause nosocomial and food-borne infections. They promote intestinal diseases. Gastrointestinal colonization by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa has rarely been researched. These organisms spread to extra gastrointestinal niches, resulting in increasingly progressive infections. Lactic acid bacteria are Gram-positive bacteria that produce lactic acid as the major end-product of carbohydrate fermentation. These bacteria inhibit pathogen colonization and modulate the host immune response. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus on enteric infections caused by the paradigmatic human pathogens S. aureus ATCC25923 and P. aeruginosa ATCC27853. The effect of whole cells and neutralized cell-free supernatant (CFS) of the lactobacilli on LoVo human carcinoma enterocyte (ATCC CCL-229) infection was analyzed by co-exposure, pre-exposure, and post-exposure studies. Simultaneous application of whole cells and CFS of the lactobacilli significantly eradicated enterocyte infection (P < 0.05); however, this effect was not seen when the whole cells and CFS were added after or prior to the infection (P > 0.05). This result could be attributed to interference by extracellular polymeric substances and cell surface hydrophobicity, which resulted in the development of a pathogen that did not form colonies. Furthermore, results of the plate count and LIVE/ DEAD BacLight bacterial viability staining attributed this inhibition to a non-bacteriocin-like substance, which acted independently of organic acid and H2O2 production. Based on these results, the cell-free supernatant derived from lactobacilli was concluded to restrain the development of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa enteric infections. PMID:26681052

  10. Acute Arboviral Infections in Guinea, West Africa, 2006

    PubMed Central

    Jentes, Emily S.; Robinson, Jaimie; Johnson, Barbara W.; Conde, Ibrahima; Sakouvougui, Yosse; Iverson, Jennifer; Beecher, Shanna; Bah, M. Alpha; Diakite, Fousseny; Coulibaly, Mamadi; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    Acute febrile illnesses comprise the majority of the human disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa. We hypothesized that arboviruses comprised a considerable proportion of undiagnosed febrile illnesses in Guinea and sought to determine the frequency of arboviral disease in two hospitals there. Using a standard case definition, 47 suspected cases were detected in approximately 4 months. Immunoglobulin M antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and plaque-reduction neutralization assays revealed that 63% (30/47) of patients were infected with arboviruses, including 11 West Nile, 2 yellow fever, 1 dengue, 8 chikungunya, and 5 Tahyna infections. Except for yellow fever, these are the first reported cases of human disease from these viruses in Guinea and the first reported cases of symptomatic Tahyna infection in Africa. These results strongly suggest that arboviruses circulate and are common causes of disease in Guinea. Improving surveillance and laboratory capacity for arbovirus diagnoses will be integral to understanding the burden posed by these agents in the region. PMID:20682888

  11. Acute arboviral infections in Guinea, West Africa, 2006.

    PubMed

    Jentes, Emily S; Robinson, Jaimie; Johnson, Barbara W; Conde, Ibrahima; Sakouvougui, Yosse; Iverson, Jennifer; Beecher, Shanna; Bah, M Alpha; Diakite, Fousseny; Coulibaly, Mamadi; Bausch, Daniel G; Bryan, Juliet

    2010-08-01

    Acute febrile illnesses comprise the majority of the human disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa. We hypothesized that arboviruses comprised a considerable proportion of undiagnosed febrile illnesses in Guinea and sought to determine the frequency of arboviral disease in two hospitals there. Using a standard case definition, 47 suspected cases were detected in approximately 4 months. Immunoglobulin M antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and plaque-reduction neutralization assays revealed that 63% (30/47) of patients were infected with arboviruses, including 11 West Nile, 2 yellow fever, 1 dengue, 8 chikungunya, and 5 Tahyna infections. Except for yellow fever, these are the first reported cases of human disease from these viruses in Guinea and the first reported cases of symptomatic Tahyna infection in Africa. These results strongly suggest that arboviruses circulate and are common causes of disease in Guinea. Improving surveillance and laboratory capacity for arbovirus diagnoses will be integral to understanding the burden posed by these agents in the region.

  12. Risk factors for intestinal parasitic infections in preschoolers in a low socio-economic area, Diamantina, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Luciana N; Silva, Renata V; Macedo, Mariana S; Teixeira, Romero A; Lamounier, Joel A; Franceschini, Sylvia C C

    2013-01-01

    Objective To verify the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among preschoolers and to identify the associated risk factors. Methods The study is a cross-sectional study nested in a cohort of children who were born and resident in Diamantina, Minas Gerais, Brazil. At the time of the study, all children were aged 60 months ± five months. They were recruited after written informed consent was obtained from parents or guardians. The study was carried out between July 2009 and July 2010. In total 214 children provided a stool sample for examination on intestinal parasitic infections. Information on potential risk factors for parasitosis was obtained from parents and guardians of the children by a questionnaire. Logistic regression was used for analysis. Results Intestinal parasitic infections were found in 27.5% (n = 59) of children. The boys' infection prevalence (26.1%, n = 36) was slightly lower than the infection prevalence of the girls (30.3%, n = 23), but not statistically different (p = 0.51). Fourteen children, (23.7%) were infected with two or more parasite species and forty-five (76.3%) with single parasites. A low per capita income of family was strongly associated with an increased risk for an infection (OR = 2.89; P = 0.003). Preschoolers whose mothers did not work outside home had a significantly lower risk for infection (OR = 0.41; p = 0.01). Conclusion Intestinal parasite infection is a health problem among Diamantina preschoolers. Poverty was implicated as an important risk factor for infection, while the presence of the mother at home full-time was a protective factor. PMID:23683337

  13. Viral PCR positivity in stool before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is strongly associated with acute intestinal graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    van Montfrans, Joris; Schulz, Laura; Versluys, Birgitta; de Wildt, Arianne; Wolfs, Tom; Bierings, Marc; Gerhardt, Corinne; Lindemans, Caroline; Wensing, Anne; Boelens, Jaap Jan

    2015-04-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) can be triggered by inflammatory conditions, including infections and mucositis. We investigated the association between PCR positivity for gastrointestinal (GI) viruses in stool before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and intestinal aGVHD using Cox proportional hazard models. We included 48 consecutive HCT patients (28 with malignancies and 20 with nonmalignancies) without GI symptoms before HCT. Fifteen patients were GI virus positive: 9 adenovirus, 3 norovirus, 2 parechovirus, and 1 astrovirus. Overall survival was 58% ± 8%. The cumulative incidence of aGVHD grade 2 to 4 was 43% ± 8% (n = 18) after a median of 47 days (range, 14 to 140). In univariate analysis, GI virus PCR positivity was the only predictor for aGVHD (P = .008): within the group of GI virus PCR-positive patients, the cumulative incidence of aGVHD 2 to 4 was 70% ± 12% versus 29 ± 8% in the PCR-negative group (P = .004). In conclusion, GI virus PCR positivity before HCT predicted development of intestinal aGVHD. These results may ultimately affect monitoring, aGVHD prophylaxis, and treatment, as well as rescheduling of elective HCTs.

  14. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection in five farms in Holambra, São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, J; Hasegawa, H; Forli, A A; Nishimura, N F; Yamanaka, A; Shimabukuro, T; Sato, Y

    1995-01-01

    A parasitological survey was carried out on 222 inhabitants of five farms in Holambra, located 30 km north of Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, on October 1992. Approximately 70% of the inhabitants were found to be infected with at least one species of intestinal parasite. The positive rates of 6 helminths and 7 protozoan species detected are as follows: 5.4% Ascaris lumbricoides; 8.6% Trichuris trichiura; 19.8% Necator americanus; 10.4% Strongyloides stercoralis; 1.4% Enterobius vermicularis; 0.9% Hymenolepis nana; 3.2% Entamoeba histolytica; 2.7% E. hartmanni; 9.9% E. coli; 14.0% Endolimax nana; 2.3% Iodamoeba butschlii; 10.4% Giardia lamblia; 37.8% Blastocystis hominis. The positive rates of helminth infection were generaly higher in the younger-group under 16 years-old than those in the elder group aged 16 or more, whereas the infection rates of protozoan species were higher in the elder group. The infection rate of Strongyloides was found to be 10.4% by a newly developed sensitive method (an agarplate culture methods). PMID:7569635

  15. Levels of infection of intestinal helminth species in the golden jackal Canis aureus from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Ćirović, D; Pavlović, I; Penezić, A; Kulišić, Z; Selaković, S

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, golden jackal populations have substantially increased, yet little is known of their potential for transmitting parasites within animal and human hosts. In the present study, between 2005 and 2010, 447 jackals from six localities in Serbia were examined for intestinal parasites. Two species of trematodes (Alaria alata, Pseudamphistomum truncatum), three nematodes (Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, Gongylonema sp.), and seven cestodes (Taenia pisiformis, Taenia hydatigena, Multiceps multiceps, Multiceps serialis, Mesocestoides lineatus, Mesocestoides litteratus, Dipylidium caninum) were identified. Pseudamphistomum truncatum and M. serialis species were recorded for the first time. The overall prevalence of parasitic infection was 10.3%. No significant differences were found in the prevalence of infection between males and females (P>0.817), between localities (P>0.502), or with regard to annual cycles (P>0.502). In the infected jackal population, 65% harboured multiple infections and one individual was a host to five different types of parasite species, the highest number of parasites we recorded in a single host. These findings indicate that although the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths in the jackal population in Serbia is significantly lower than expected from earlier studies, further monitoring is required given the jackal's rapid population increase. PMID:23941681

  16. Human intestinal alkaline phosphatase-binding IgG in patients with severe bacterial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Mäder, M; Kolbus, N; Meihorst, D; Köhn, A; Beuche, W; Felgenhauer, K

    1994-01-01

    Patterns of alkaline phosphatase (AP)-binding proteins were observed in the alkaline pH range of 6.5-9.5 upon isoelectric focusing and blotting of serum from patients with inflammatory diseases. After isolation using affinity chromatography on protein A or immunoaffinity chromatography on AP coupled to cyanogen bromide (CNBr)-activated Sepharose, the AP-binding protein was identified as IgG on Western blots and in ELISA using human IgG-specific antibodies. It was shown that this IgG binds to AP from both calf (bovine) and human intestine. However, it binds neither to the human liver-bone-kidney (LBK) isoform nor to bacterial AP. Moderate reaction was observed with human placental AP. Comparing patients with various diagnoses (n = 284), AP-binding antibodies were mainly found in severe bacterial infections. They were not detected in serum from healthy blood donors (n = 300). The presence of AP-binding IgG was independent of the infected organ and the bacterial species causing infection. This antibody may be useful for discriminating bacterial from viral infection and for indicating severe bacterial inflammation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8287614

  17. Levels of infection of intestinal helminth species in the golden jackal Canis aureus from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Ćirović, D; Pavlović, I; Penezić, A; Kulišić, Z; Selaković, S

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, golden jackal populations have substantially increased, yet little is known of their potential for transmitting parasites within animal and human hosts. In the present study, between 2005 and 2010, 447 jackals from six localities in Serbia were examined for intestinal parasites. Two species of trematodes (Alaria alata, Pseudamphistomum truncatum), three nematodes (Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, Gongylonema sp.), and seven cestodes (Taenia pisiformis, Taenia hydatigena, Multiceps multiceps, Multiceps serialis, Mesocestoides lineatus, Mesocestoides litteratus, Dipylidium caninum) were identified. Pseudamphistomum truncatum and M. serialis species were recorded for the first time. The overall prevalence of parasitic infection was 10.3%. No significant differences were found in the prevalence of infection between males and females (P>0.817), between localities (P>0.502), or with regard to annual cycles (P>0.502). In the infected jackal population, 65% harboured multiple infections and one individual was a host to five different types of parasite species, the highest number of parasites we recorded in a single host. These findings indicate that although the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths in the jackal population in Serbia is significantly lower than expected from earlier studies, further monitoring is required given the jackal's rapid population increase.

  18. Toxoplasma gondii Rhoptry 16 Kinase Promotes Host Resistance to Oral Infection and Intestinal Inflammation Only in the Context of the Dense Granule Protein GRA15

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kirk D. C.; Hu, Kenneth; Whitmarsh, Ryan J.; Hassan, Musa A.; Julien, Lindsay; Lu, Diana; Chen, Lieping; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii transmission between intermediate hosts is dependent on the ingestion of walled cysts formed during the chronic phase of infection. Immediately following consumption, the parasite must ensure survival of the host by preventing adverse inflammatory responses and/or by limiting its own replication. Since the Toxoplasma secreted effectors rhoptry 16 kinase (ROP16) and dense granule 15 (GRA15) activate the JAK-STAT3/6 and NF-κB signaling pathways, respectively, we explored whether a particular combination of these effectors impacted intestinal inflammation and parasite survival in vivo. Here we report that expression of the STAT-activating version of ROP16 in the type II strain (strain II+ROP16I) promotes host resistance to oral infection only in the context of endogenous GRA15 expression. Protection was characterized by a lower intestinal parasite burden and dampened inflammation. Host resistance to the II+ROP16I strain occurred independently of STAT6 and the T cell coinhibitory receptors B7-DC and B7-H1, two receptors that are upregulated by ROP16. In addition, coexpression of ROP16 and GRA15 enhanced parasite susceptibility within tumor necrosis factor alpha/gamma interferon-stimulated macrophages in a STAT3/6-independent manner. Transcriptional profiling of infected STAT3- and STAT6-deficient macrophages and parasitized Peyer's patches from mice orally challenged with strain II+ROP16I suggested that ROP16 activated STAT5 to modulate host gene expression. Consistent with this supposition, the ROP16 kinase induced the sustained phosphorylation and nuclear localization of STAT5 in Toxoplasma-infected cells. In summary, only the combined expression of both GRA15 and ROP16 promoted host resistance to acute oral infection, and Toxoplasma may possibly target the STAT5 signaling pathway to generate protective immunity in the gut. PMID:23545295

  19. VSL#3 probiotics provide protection against acute intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Salim, S Y; Young, P Y; Lukowski, C M; Madsen, K L; Sis, B; Churchill, T A; Khadaroo, R G

    2013-12-01

    Acute intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion injury (AII/R) is an adaptive physiologic response during critical illness, involving mesenteric vasoconstriction and hypoperfusion. Prevention of AII/R in high risk patient populations would have a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of VSL#3 probiotic treatment in a murine model of AII/R. Adult 129/SvEv mice were subjected to an experimental AII/R model using superior mesenteric artery occlusion. Animals were pre-treated with either three days or two weeks of VSL#3 probiotics. Local tissue injury markers were assessed by levels of myeloperoxidase and activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFкB). Systemic and local cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL- 10, TNFα, and interferon gamma were measured by ELISA and multiplex fluorescent detection. VSL#3 probiotics reduced local tissue inflammation and injury due to AII/R. A two-week course of VSL#3 was more effective than a shorter three-day course. The reduction in local inflammation from the two-week course of VSL#3 is correlated to a significant reduction in levels of active IL-1β, and tissue levels of myeloperoxidase. Levels of active NFкB were significantly elevated in the vehicle-fed AII/R mice, corroborating with tissue inflammation, which were attenuated by VSL#3 administrations. VSL#3 did not cause any systemic inflammation or lung injury. VSL#3 probiotics are effective in reducing local tissue injury from AII/R by down-regulating pro-inflammatory mediators and immune cell recruitment. This study highlights a potential role for VSL#3 in management of patients at high risk for AII/R.

  20. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  1. Airway microbiota and acute respiratory infection in children

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Acute respiratory infection (ARI), such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, is the leading cause of hospitalization for U.S. infants. While the incidence and severity of ARI can vary widely among children, the reasons for these differences are not fully explained by traditional risk factors (e.g., prematurity, viral pathogens). The recent advent of molecular diagnostic techniques has revealed the presence of highly functional communities of microbes inhabiting the human body (i.e., microbiota) that appear to influence development of local and systemic immune response. We propose a “risk and resilience” model in which airway microbiota are associated with an increased (risk microbiota) or decreased (resilience microbiota) incidence and severity of ARI in children. We also propose that modulating airway microbiota (e.g., from risk to resilience microbiota) during early childhood will optimize airway immunity, and thereby decrease ARI incidence and severity in children. PMID:25961472

  2. Commensal-pathogen interactions in the intestinal tract: lactobacilli promote infection with, and are promoted by, helminth parasites.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Lisa A; Smith, Katherine A; Filbey, Kara J; Harcus, Yvonne; Hewitson, James P; Redpath, Stephen A; Valdez, Yanet; Yebra, María J; Finlay, B Brett; Maizels, Rick M

    2014-07-01

    The intestinal microbiota are pivotal in determining the developmental, metabolic and immunological status of the mammalian host. However, the intestinal tract may also accommodate pathogenic organisms, including helminth parasites which are highly prevalent in most tropical countries. Both microbes and helminths must evade or manipulate the host immune system to reside in the intestinal environment, yet whether they influence each other's persistence in the host remains unknown. We now show that abundance of Lactobacillus bacteria correlates positively with infection with the mouse intestinal nematode parasite, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, as well as with heightened regulatory T cell (Treg) and Th17 responses. Moreover, H. polygyrus raises Lactobacillus species abundance in the duodenum of C57BL/6 mice, which are highly susceptible to H. polygyrus infection, but not in BALB/c mice, which are relatively resistant. Sequencing of samples at the bacterial gyrB locus identified the principal Lactobacillus species as L. taiwanensis, a previously characterized rodent commensal. Experimental administration of L. taiwanensis to BALB/c mice elevates regulatory T cell frequencies and results in greater helminth establishment, demonstrating a causal relationship in which commensal bacteria promote infection with an intestinal parasite and implicating a bacterially-induced expansion of Tregs as a mechanism of greater helminth susceptibility. The discovery of this tripartite interaction between host, bacteria and parasite has important implications for both antibiotic and anthelmintic use in endemic human populations.

  3. Commensal-pathogen interactions in the intestinal tract: lactobacilli promote infection with, and are promoted by, helminth parasites.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Lisa A; Smith, Katherine A; Filbey, Kara J; Harcus, Yvonne; Hewitson, James P; Redpath, Stephen A; Valdez, Yanet; Yebra, María J; Finlay, B Brett; Maizels, Rick M

    2014-07-01

    The intestinal microbiota are pivotal in determining the developmental, metabolic and immunological status of the mammalian host. However, the intestinal tract may also accommodate pathogenic organisms, including helminth parasites which are highly prevalent in most tropical countries. Both microbes and helminths must evade or manipulate the host immune system to reside in the intestinal environment, yet whether they influence each other's persistence in the host remains unknown. We now show that abundance of Lactobacillus bacteria correlates positively with infection with the mouse intestinal nematode parasite, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, as well as with heightened regulatory T cell (Treg) and Th17 responses. Moreover, H. polygyrus raises Lactobacillus species abundance in the duodenum of C57BL/6 mice, which are highly susceptible to H. polygyrus infection, but not in BALB/c mice, which are relatively resistant. Sequencing of samples at the bacterial gyrB locus identified the principal Lactobacillus species as L. taiwanensis, a previously characterized rodent commensal. Experimental administration of L. taiwanensis to BALB/c mice elevates regulatory T cell frequencies and results in greater helminth establishment, demonstrating a causal relationship in which commensal bacteria promote infection with an intestinal parasite and implicating a bacterially-induced expansion of Tregs as a mechanism of greater helminth susceptibility. The discovery of this tripartite interaction between host, bacteria and parasite has important implications for both antibiotic and anthelmintic use in endemic human populations. PMID:25144609

  4. Low dietary iron intake restrains the intestinal inflammatory response and pathology of enteric infection by food-borne bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kortman, Guus A M; Mulder, Michelle L M; Richters, Thijs J W; Shanmugam, Nanda K N; Trebicka, Estela; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Roelofs, Rian; Wiegerinck, Erwin T; Laarakkers, Coby M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Bolhuis, Albert; Cherayil, Bobby J; Tjalsma, Harold

    2015-09-01

    Orally administrated iron is suspected to increase susceptibility to enteric infections among children in infection endemic regions. Here we investigated the effect of dietary iron on the pathology and local immune responses in intestinal infection models. Mice were held on iron-deficient, normal iron, or high iron diets and after 2 weeks they were orally challenged with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Microbiome analysis by pyrosequencing revealed profound iron- and infection-induced shifts in microbiota composition. Fecal levels of the innate defensive molecules and markers of inflammation lipocalin-2 and calprotectin were not influenced by dietary iron intervention alone, but were markedly lower in mice on the iron-deficient diet after infection. Next, mice on the iron-deficient diet tended to gain more weight and to have a lower grade of colon pathology. Furthermore, survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was prolonged after iron deprivation. Together, these data show that iron limitation restricts disease pathology upon bacterial infection. However, our data also showed decreased intestinal inflammatory responses of mice fed on high iron diets. Thus additionally, our study indicates that the effects of iron on processes at the intestinal host-pathogen interface may highly depend on host iron status, immune status, and gut microbiota composition.

  5. Low dietary iron intake restrains the intestinal inflammatory response and pathology of enteric infection by food-borne bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kortman, Guus A M; Mulder, Michelle L M; Richters, Thijs J W; Shanmugam, Nanda K N; Trebicka, Estela; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Roelofs, Rian; Wiegerinck, Erwin T; Laarakkers, Coby M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Bolhuis, Albert; Cherayil, Bobby J; Tjalsma, Harold

    2015-09-01

    Orally administrated iron is suspected to increase susceptibility to enteric infections among children in infection endemic regions. Here we investigated the effect of dietary iron on the pathology and local immune responses in intestinal infection models. Mice were held on iron-deficient, normal iron, or high iron diets and after 2 weeks they were orally challenged with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Microbiome analysis by pyrosequencing revealed profound iron- and infection-induced shifts in microbiota composition. Fecal levels of the innate defensive molecules and markers of inflammation lipocalin-2 and calprotectin were not influenced by dietary iron intervention alone, but were markedly lower in mice on the iron-deficient diet after infection. Next, mice on the iron-deficient diet tended to gain more weight and to have a lower grade of colon pathology. Furthermore, survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was prolonged after iron deprivation. Together, these data show that iron limitation restricts disease pathology upon bacterial infection. However, our data also showed decreased intestinal inflammatory responses of mice fed on high iron diets. Thus additionally, our study indicates that the effects of iron on processes at the intestinal host-pathogen interface may highly depend on host iron status, immune status, and gut microbiota composition. PMID:26046550

  6. Exposure to cold and acute upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Eccles, R; Wilkinson, J E

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of acute upper respiratory tract viral infections (URTI) is directly correlated to air temperature with most URTI occurring seasonally in cold weather. This review looks at four types of cold exposure and examines the evidence and possible mechanisms for any relationship to URTI. The effects of cold are discussed as: 1) Chilling of the nose and upper respiratory tract by breathing cold air, 2) Chilling of the mouth and upper digestive tract by ingestion of cold drinks and food, 3) Acute chilling of the body surface, and, 4) Chilling of the body as a whole with a fall in body temperature, hypothermia. Some studies were found to support a relationship between breathing cold air and chilling the body surface with the development of URTI, although this area is controversial. No evidence was found in the literature to support any relationship between ingestion of cold drinks and food and URTI, and similarly no evidence was found to link hypothermia and URTI. PMID:26030031

  7. In silico model as a tool for interpretation of intestinal infection studies.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Peter; Vissers, Marc M M; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg M J

    2007-01-01

    In nutrition research the number of human in vivo experiments is limited because of the many restrictions and the high costs of testing in humans. Up to now predictive computer models aiming to enhance research have been rare or too complex, with many nonmeasurable adjustable parameters. This study aimed to develop a basic physicochemical computer model for a first quantitative interpretation of results obtained from in vivo intestinal experiments with bacteria. This new modeling approach is validated with results obtained from gut infection studies in vivo. The design of the model is described, and its ability to reproduce experimental data is evaluated. The model predictions are compared with new experimental data. The phenomena that take place in the gastrointestinal tract are summarized by model constants for growth, adherence, and release of bacteria. Although the model is far from describing all details and many processes in the intestine are combined, the model calculation results lead to reasonable conclusions and interesting hypotheses. One of these hypotheses concluded from the model outcomes is that Escherichia coli bacteria have a much lower intestinal growth rate in humans than in rats. Extra laboratory validation experiments proved the reliability of this hypothesis predicted by the model. In addition, the known protective effect of dietary calcium and detrimental effect of clindamycin on the growth and adherence of Salmonella bacteria could be quantified. From these results it is clear that the model enhances the interpretation of in vivo gastrointestinal experiments and will facilitate research trajectories towards new functional foods that improve resistance to pathogenic bacteria in humans. PMID:17122404

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi Entrance through Systemic or Mucosal Infection Sites Differentially Modulates Regional Immune Response Following Acute Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Meis, Juliana; Barreto de Albuquerque, Juliana; Silva dos Santos, Danielle; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Savino, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is characterized by a systemic infection that leads to the strong activation of the adaptive immune response. Outbreaks of oral contamination by the infective protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi are frequent in Brazil and other Latin American countries, and an increased severity of clinical manifestations and mortality is observed in infected patients. These findings have elicited questions about the specific responses triggered after T. cruzi entry via mucosal sites, possibly modulating local immune mechanisms, and further impacting regional and systemic immunity. Here, we provide evidence for the existence of differential lymphoid organ responses in experimental models of acute T. cruzi infection. PMID:23898334

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection but not small intestinal bacterial overgrowth may play a pathogenic role in rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Federico, A; Ruocco, E; Lo Schiavo, A; Masarone, M; Tuccillo, C; Peccerillo, F; Miranda, A; Romano, L; de Sio, C; de Sio, I; Persico, M; Ruocco, V; Riegler, G; Loguercio, C; Romano, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Recent studies suggest a potential relationship between rosacea and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), but there is no firm evidence of an association between rosacea and H. pylori infection or SIBO. We performed a prospective study to assess the prevalence of H. pylori infection and/or SIBO in patients with rosacea and evaluated the effect of H. pylori or SIBO eradication on rosacea. Methods We enrolled 90 patients with rosacea from January 2012 to January 2013 and a control group consisting of 90 patients referred to us because of mapping of nevi during the same period. We used the 13C Urea Breath Test and H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA) test to assess H. pylori infection and the glucose breath test to assess SIBO. Patients infected by H. pylori were treated with clarithromycin-containing sequential therapy. Patients positive for SIBO were treated with rifaximin. Results We found that 44/90 (48.9%) patients with rosacea and 24/90 (26.7%) control subjects were infected with H. pylori (p = 0.003). Moreover, 9/90 (10%) patients with rosacea and 7/90 (7.8%) subjects in the control group had SIBO (p = 0.6). Within 10 weeks from the end of antibiotic therapy, the skin lesions of rosacea disappeared or decreased markedly in 35/36 (97.2%) patients after eradication of H. pylori and in 3/8 (37.5%) patients who did not eradicate the infection (p < 0.0001). Rosacea skin lesions decreased markedly in 6/7 (85.7%) after eradication of SIBO whereas of the two patients who did not eradicate SIBO, one (50%) showed an improvement in rosacea (p = 0.284). Conclusions Prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in patients with rosacea than control group, whereas SIBO prevalence was comparable between the two groups. Eradication of H. pylori infection led to a significant improvement of skin symptoms in rosacea patients. PMID:25653855

  10. Incidentally discovered goblet cell carcinoid clinically presenting as acute intestinal obstruction: a case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Nishat; Shamim, Nida; Sofi, Lateef Ahmed; Rizvi, Syed Amjad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) is a rare variant of carcinoid tumor that exclusively involves the appendix. It usually occurs in 5th-6th decade with the most common clinical presentation being acute appendicitis. The natural history of this tumor is intermediate between carcinoids and adenocarcinomas. We here report a case of GCC diagnosed incidentally in a patient presenting with acute intestinal obstruction. Ultrasonographic examination supported the clinical diagnosis of acute intestinal obstruction, following which the patient underwent laparotomy and resection of ileum along with appendix was done. On gross pathological examination, a nodular growth was present on the tip and body of appendix that was yellow in color with a semi-solid to mucoid consistency on cut section. On microscopy, lakes of mucin with few acinar structures floating in them were seen. The submucosa as well as serosa were infiltrated by clusters of goblet cells and well-formed acini, with little atypia. Glands and nests were positive for periodic acid Schiff and immunohistochemistry showed focal chromogranin positivity in glandular structures, thereby confirming the diagnosis of GCC. Although the prognosis of GCC is better than adenocarcinomas, it is one of the carcinoids having a poorer outcome when compared with other variants of carcinoid tumor. Therefore, it is important to rule out other differential diagnoses of goblet cell carcinoid, the most important being mucinous adenocarcinomas. PMID:24739849

  11. The gut flora is required for the control of intestinal infection by poly(I:C) administration in neonates.

    PubMed

    Lacroix-Lamandé, Sonia; Guesdon, William; Drouet, Françoise; Potiron, Laurent; Lantier, Louis; Laurent, Fabrice

    2014-07-01

    We found that immunostimulation of the intestinal immune system of neonatal mice by poly(I:C) injection decreased intestinal infection by the parasite Cryptosporidium parvum. We showed that the presence of dendritic cells and the cooperation of mutually dependent cytokines, such as IL-12p40, and type I and type II IFNs, were involved in the mechanism of protection induced by poly(I:C). This protection is dependent not only on TLR3-TRIF signaling, but also on the activation of the TLR5-MyD88 pathway by gut microbiota. These results raise the possibility that flagellated intestinal commensal bacteria may, in the presence of natural or synthetic agonists of TLR3, provide synergy between the TRIF and MyD88 signaling pathways, thereby favoring the development of mucosal defenses. In this addendum, we summarize these recent findings and discuss their implications for neonatal infections and immunomodulatory strategies.

  12. The gut flora is required for the control of intestinal infection by poly(I:C) administration in neonates.

    PubMed

    Lacroix-Lamandé, Sonia; Guesdon, William; Drouet, Françoise; Potiron, Laurent; Lantier, Louis; Laurent, Fabrice

    2014-07-01

    We found that immunostimulation of the intestinal immune system of neonatal mice by poly(I:C) injection decreased intestinal infection by the parasite Cryptosporidium parvum. We showed that the presence of dendritic cells and the cooperation of mutually dependent cytokines, such as IL-12p40, and type I and type II IFNs, were involved in the mechanism of protection induced by poly(I:C). This protection is dependent not only on TLR3-TRIF signaling, but also on the activation of the TLR5-MyD88 pathway by gut microbiota. These results raise the possibility that flagellated intestinal commensal bacteria may, in the presence of natural or synthetic agonists of TLR3, provide synergy between the TRIF and MyD88 signaling pathways, thereby favoring the development of mucosal defenses. In this addendum, we summarize these recent findings and discuss their implications for neonatal infections and immunomodulatory strategies. PMID:24918602

  13. Humoral and cellular defense against intestinal murine infection with Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed Central

    Hanski, C; Naumann, M; Grützkau, A; Pluschke, G; Friedrich, B; Hahn, H; Riecken, E O

    1991-01-01

    The role of phagocytes and the complement system as potential host defense mechanisms against bacterial infection were studied in mice with two isogenic strains of Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O8 differing in pathogenicity because of differences in plasmid content. Complement depletion in mice by intraperitoneal injection of cobra venom factor did not affect the course of colonization of the intestinal tissue by each strain, indicating that in mice complement is not essential for the elimination of these bacteria. This conclusion is supported by the fact that fresh murine serum had no bactericidal effect in vitro either on the pathogenic or on the nonpathogenic strain. However, in the intestinal tissue as well as in the peritoneal cavity, only the pathogenic, plasmid-bearing Y. enterocolitica strain survived, while the nonpathogenic, plasmidless strain was rapidly eliminated. Since elimination from the peritoneal cavity is due to phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages, resistance to phagocytosis in vivo seems to be the decisive factor determining the virulence of pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains. Images PMID:1997413

  14. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Remolina, Yuly Andrea; Ulloa, María Mercedes; Vargas, Hernán; Díaz, Liliana; Gómez, Sandra Liliana; Saavedra, Alfredo; Sánchez, Edgar; Cortés, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained. Setting Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Participants Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female). Measurements Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality. Results Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%). Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients. Conclusions The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality. PMID:26576054

  15. Bloodstream infections in very low birth weight infants with intestinal failure

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Conrad R.; Hansen, Nellie I.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Bell, Edward F.; Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R.; Walsh, Michele C.; Hale, Ellen C.; Newman, Nancy S.; Das, Abhik; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine pathogens and other characteristics associated with late-onset bloodstream infections (BSI) in infants with intestinal failure (IF) as a consequence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Study design Infants 401–1500 grams at birth who survived >72 hours and received care at NICHD Neonatal Research Network centers were studied. Frequency of culture positive BSI and pathogens were compared for infants with medical NEC, NEC managed surgically without IF, and surgical IF. Among infants with IF, duration of parenteral nutrition (PN) and other outcomes were evaluated. Results 932 infants were studied (IF, n=78; surgical NEC without IF, n=452; medical NEC, n=402). The proportion with BSI after NEC diagnosis was higher in infants with IF than with surgical NEC (p=0.007) or medical NEC (p<0.001). Gram positive pathogens were most frequent. Among infants with IF, increased number of infections was associated with longer hospitalization and duration on PN (0, 1, ≥2 infections; median stay (days): 172, 188, 260, p=0.06; median days on PN: 90, 112, 115, p=0.003), and the proportion who achieved full feeds during hospitalization decreased (87%, 67%, 50%, p=0.03). Conclusion Recurrent BSIs are common in VLBW infants with IF. Gram positive bacteria were most commonly identified in these infants. PMID:21840538

  16. The expression of IGF-1R in Helicobacter pylori-infected intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Noriko; Kozu, Karina; Kobayashi, Shun; Nishiyama, Ryu; Okubo, Rie; Akai, Yuichi; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Kinukawa, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of IGF-1R has been demonstrated in gastrointestinal cancers, and its expression is reported as the result of the loss of tumor suppressors. IL-16 is involved in the pathophysiological process of chronic inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study is to determine the changes in the expression of IGF-1R in intestinal metaplasia (IM) and gastric cancer (GC) as well as the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and IL-16 on cell proliferation and IGF-1R expression in gastric cells. AGS cells were incubated with combinations of IL-16 and H. pylori. Gastric cell proliferation was studied by BrdU uptake. In H. pylori infected mucosa, IGF-1R was significantly higher in IM than chronic gastritis (CG), and also higher in GC than CG and IM. H. pylori significantly decreased BrdU uptake. IL-16 increased BrdU uptake and IGF-1R on AGS cells which had been decreased by H. pylori. Co-incubation with IL-16 increased the expression of IGF-1R mRNA in H. pylori infected cells. We conclude that the expression of IGF-1R in H. pylori infected gastric mucosa may indicate an early stage of carcinogenesis. The IL-16 secretion by H. pylori can be a trigger for the expression of IGF-1R, and it may also be a factor for gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27499580

  17. The expression of IGF-1R in Helicobacter pylori-infected intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Noriko; Kozu, Karina; Kobayashi, Shun; Nishiyama, Ryu; Okubo, Rie; Akai, Yuichi; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Kinukawa, Noriko

    2016-07-01

    Overexpression of IGF-1R has been demonstrated in gastrointestinal cancers, and its expression is reported as the result of the loss of tumor suppressors. IL-16 is involved in the pathophysiological process of chronic inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study is to determine the changes in the expression of IGF-1R in intestinal metaplasia (IM) and gastric cancer (GC) as well as the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and IL-16 on cell proliferation and IGF-1R expression in gastric cells. AGS cells were incubated with combinations of IL-16 and H. pylori. Gastric cell proliferation was studied by BrdU uptake. In H. pylori infected mucosa, IGF-1R was significantly higher in IM than chronic gastritis (CG), and also higher in GC than CG and IM. H. pylori significantly decreased BrdU uptake. IL-16 increased BrdU uptake and IGF-1R on AGS cells which had been decreased by H. pylori. Co-incubation with IL-16 increased the expression of IGF-1R mRNA in H. pylori infected cells. We conclude that the expression of IGF-1R in H. pylori infected gastric mucosa may indicate an early stage of carcinogenesis. The IL-16 secretion by H. pylori can be a trigger for the expression of IGF-1R, and it may also be a factor for gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27499580

  18. DOCK2 confers immunity and intestinal colonization resistance to Citrobacter rodentium infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiping; Man, Si Ming; Zhu, Qifan; Vogel, Peter; Frase, Sharon; Fukui, Yoshinori; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2016-01-01

    Food poisoning is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. Citrobacter rodentium is an enteric pathogen which attaches itself to enterocytes and induces attachment and effacing (A/E) lesions. The ability of the bacterium to cause infection requires subversion of the host actin cytoskeleton. Rac-dependent actin polymerization is activated by a guanine nucleotide exchange factor known as Dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2). However, the role of DOCK2 in infectious disease is largely unexplored. Here, we found that mice lacking DOCK2 were susceptible to C. rodentium infection. These mice harbored increased levels of C. rodentium bacteria, showed more pronounced weight loss and inflammation-associated pathology, and were prone to bacterial dissemination to the systemic organs compared with wild-type mice. We found that mice lacking DOCK2 were more susceptible to C. rodentium attachment to intestinal epithelial cells. Therefore, our results underscored an important role of DOCK2 for gastrointestinal immunity to C. rodentium infection. PMID:27291827

  19. Analysis of antiviral resistance in the intestinal tracts of nude mice infected with a mouse adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Umehara, K; Tazume, S; Hashimoto, K

    1987-05-01

    Upon intestinal infection of heterozygous (nu/+) mice with mouse adenovirus, antiviral resistance can be seen in the form of negative-recovery of virus from feces 2-3 wks post infection. On the other hand, in similar infections in BALB/c nude (nu/nu) mice, the antiviral resistance is manifested as negative-recovery of virus from feces at a later stage, i.e., at around 6 wks post infection. This resistance was not accompanied by rises in interferon titer, rises in natural killer (NK) cell activity, nor was the resistance affected by the introduction of anti-asialo GM1 antibody. No distinct loss of resistance was observed upon administration of carrageenan, but the resistance in the group given carrageenan immediately before and after viral challenge seemed to be slightly reduced. In all infected nu/nu mice, neither neutralizing antibody (NT-Ab) nor complement-dependent NT-Ab could be detected by the usual tube method. On the other hand, a complete abolishment of the antiviral resistance was seen following cyclophosphamide administration. For clarification of the antiviral resistance factor in nu/nu mice, the analysis of antibody other than NT-Ab and complement-dependent NT-Ab, and the problem of resolution of antibody titration remain. Furthermore, it has been noted that the serum IgG titer is high in nu/nu mice and that this level is depressed by cyclophosphamide administration. It is believed that this may be in some way involved with the loss of antiviral resistance observed.

  20. X-ray microanalysis of rotavirus-infected mouse intestine: A new concept of diarrhoeal secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, A.J.; Osborne, M.P.; Haddon, S.J.; Collins, J.; Starkey, W.G.; Candy, D.C.; Stephen, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Neonatal mice were infected at 7 days of age with rotavirus (epizootic diarrhea of infant mice (EDIM) virus) and killed at 24-h intervals postinfection (PI). Cytoplasmic concentrations of Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, and Ca intestinal epithelial cells from infected and age-matched control animals were measured by x-ray microanalysis. In villus tip cells, Ca concentration increased at 24-96 h PI; Na concentration increased at 24-72 h PI; Ca and Na concentrations were near normal by 168 h PI. K concentration decreased 24-72 h PI, and Cl concentration decreased 48-96 h PI. In crypt cells, changes were observed without a discernible pattern: at 96 h PI, Na, Mg, S, and Cl concentrations increased and K concentration decreased; at 120 h PI, the concentrations of all elements except Na and Ca increased. In villus base cells, the mean concentrations of all elements except Ca peaked at 48-72 h PI and at 120 h PI. Na and Cl concentrations increased dramatically in some cells from 48 h PI onward. All the above concentration values were obtained from freeze-dried specimens and expressed in millimoles per kilogram of dry weight. Conversion of a limited number of data, pertaining to villus base cells, from dry weight to wet weight was possible. This conversion revealed that villus base cells in infected animals were more hydrated than corresponding cells from control animals. Also, the Na and Cl concentrations in mmol/kg H2O were significantly higher in villus base cells from infected animals than in those from corresponding controls: 137 +/- 7 versus 38 +/- 4 (Na) and 121 +/- 5 versus 89 +/- 6 (Cl). Wet weight concentrations of other elements were either the same (Mg) or lower (P, S, and K) after infection with virus.

  1. Improved Perceptions and Practices Related to Schistosomiasis and Intestinal Worm Infections Following PHAST Intervention on Kome Island, North-Western Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mwanga, Joseph R; Kaatano, Godfrey M; Siza, Julius E; Chang, Su Young; Ko, Yunsuk; Kullaya, Cyril M; Nsabo, Jackson; Eom, Keeseon S; Yong, Tai-Soon; Chai, Jong-Yil; Min, Duk-Young; Rim, Han-Jong; Changalucha, John M

    2015-10-01

    Schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections are widespread diseases of public health importance in Tanzania. A study on perceptions and practices related to schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections was undertaken among a community population of Kome Island in Sengerema District, north-western Tanzania, where intestinal schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections are endemic. Schistosomiasis and intestinal worm-related perceptions and practices were assessed before and 3 years after implementation of a participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation (PHAST) intervention as a control measure. Data were obtained from baseline and post-intervention knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) questionnaire surveys conducted twice in 2009 and 2012 among 82 individuals aged ≥15 years. We found significant increases in respondents' knowledge of the cause, transmission, symptoms, health consequences, and prevention of schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections after PHAST intervention. The increase in respondents' knowledge on almost all aspects of the said infections was translated into actions to control schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections. This has not been achieved by chance, but due to well-designed and locally-adapted PHAST intervention. We conclude that despite criticisms, PHAST approach is still useful in empowering communities to control water, sanitation, and hygiene related infectious diseases such as schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections. PMID:26537035

  2. Improved Perceptions and Practices Related to Schistosomiasis and Intestinal Worm Infections Following PHAST Intervention on Kome Island, North-Western Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mwanga, Joseph R; Kaatano, Godfrey M; Siza, Julius E; Chang, Su Young; Ko, Yunsuk; Kullaya, Cyril M; Nsabo, Jackson; Eom, Keeseon S; Yong, Tai-Soon; Chai, Jong-Yil; Min, Duk-Young; Rim, Han-Jong; Changalucha, John M

    2015-10-01

    Schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections are widespread diseases of public health importance in Tanzania. A study on perceptions and practices related to schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections was undertaken among a community population of Kome Island in Sengerema District, north-western Tanzania, where intestinal schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections are endemic. Schistosomiasis and intestinal worm-related perceptions and practices were assessed before and 3 years after implementation of a participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation (PHAST) intervention as a control measure. Data were obtained from baseline and post-intervention knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) questionnaire surveys conducted twice in 2009 and 2012 among 82 individuals aged ≥15 years. We found significant increases in respondents' knowledge of the cause, transmission, symptoms, health consequences, and prevention of schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections after PHAST intervention. The increase in respondents' knowledge on almost all aspects of the said infections was translated into actions to control schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections. This has not been achieved by chance, but due to well-designed and locally-adapted PHAST intervention. We conclude that despite criticisms, PHAST approach is still useful in empowering communities to control water, sanitation, and hygiene related infectious diseases such as schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections.

  3. Primary Epstein-Barr-virus infections in acute neurologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Grose, C; Henle, W; Henle, G; Feorino, P M

    1975-02-20

    Infectious mononucleosis has been associated with Guillain--Barré syndrome, Bell's palsy, meningoencephalitis and transverse myelitis. Since it is not known that many children with infectious mononucleosis do not develop heterophil antibodies, we looked for evidence of current or recent Epstein-Barr virus infection in young patients with these neurologic diseases by using serodiagnostic procedures for detection and titration of antibodies to various antigens related to Epstein-Barr virus. Seven of 24 cases with Guillain-Barre syndrome and three of 16 with facial palsy were definitely associated with primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus as were two cases each of the other two neurologic diseases. Only one of these patients had obvious clinical infectious mononucleosis, and only a few demonstrated heterophil agglutinins. It is evident that the virus must be considered in the diagnosis of various acute neurologic diseases affecting children and young adults, even in the absence of heterophil-antibody response or other signs of infectious mononucleosis.

  4. Do intestinal parasites interfere with the seroepidemiologic surveillance of Schistosoma mansoni infection?

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón de Noya, B.; Colmenares, C.; Losada, S.; Fermin, Z.; Masroua, G.; Ruiz, L.; Soto, L.; Noya, O.

    1996-01-01

    In view of the known cross-reactivity of sera from patients with intestinal parasites to some Schistosoma mansoni antigens, field work was conducted in an area of Venezuela non-endemic for schistosomiasis using the routine immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA) with soluble egg antigen (SEA). False positive reactions represented 15.3% of the total population as determined by SEA-ELISA. SEA-immunoblotting of the false positive sera indicated that protein fractions of 91 and 80 kDa appear to be responsible for cross-reactivity. Sera from hookworm infected individuals produced a higher frequency and intensity of cross-reaction than other sera. SEA-fractions of 105, 54, 46, 42, 32, 25 and 15 kDa were the most specific. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8666077

  5. Spatial analysis of the distribution of intestinal nematode infections in Uganda.

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, S.; Kabatereine, N. B.; Tukahebwa, E. M.; Kazibwe, F.

    2004-01-01

    The spatial epidemiology of intestinal nematodes in Uganda was investigated using generalized additive models and geostatistical methods. The prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura was unevenly distributed in the country with prevalence greatest in southwest Uganda whereas hookworm was more homogeneously distributed. A. lumbricoides and T. Trichiura prevalence were nonlinearly related to satellite sensor-based estimates of land surface temperature; hookworm was nonlinearly associated with rainfall. Semivariogram analysis indicated that T. trichiura prevalence exhibited no spatial structure and that A. lumbricoides exhibited some spatial dependency at small spatial distances, once large-scale, mainly environmental, trends had been removed. In contrast, there was much more spatial structure in hookworm prevalence although the underlying factors are at present unclear. The implications of the results are discussed in relation to parasite spatial epidemiology and the prediction of infection distributions. PMID:15635963

  6. Comparative microarray analysis of intestinal lymphocytes following Eimeria acervulina, E. maxima, or E. tenella infection in the chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relative expression levels of immune- and non-immune-related mRNAs in chicken intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes experimentally infected with Eimeria acervulina, E. maxima, or E. tenella were measured using a 10K cDNA microarray. Based on a cutoff of > 2.0-fold differential expression compared ...

  7. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  8. Surveillance for Hospitalized Acute Respiratory Infection in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Verani, Jennifer R.; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lindblade, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  9. Successful Mitigation of Delayed Intestinal Radiation Injury Using Pravastatin is not Associated with Acute Injury Improvement or Tumor Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Haydont, Valerie; Bourhis, Jean; Vozenin-Brotons, Marie-Catherine |. E-mail: vozenin@igr.fr

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether pravastatin mitigates delayed radiation-induced enteropathy in rats, by focusing on the effects of pravastatin on acute cell death and fibrosis according to connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression and collagen inhibition. Methods and Materials: Mitigation of delayed radiation-induced enteropathy was investigated in rats using pravastatin administered in drinking water (30 mg/kg/day) 3 days before and 14 days after irradiation. The ileum was irradiated locally after surgical exteriorization (X-rays, 19 Gy). Acute apoptosis, acute and late histologic alterations, and late CTGF and collagen deposition were monitored by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry and colorimetric staining (6 h, 3 days, 14 days, 15 weeks, and 26 weeks after irradiation). Pravastatin antitumor action was studied in HT-29, HeLa, and PC-3 cells by clonogenic cell survival assays and tumor growth delay experiments. Results: Pravastatin improved delayed radiation enteropathy in rats, whereas its benefit in acute and subacute injury remained limited (6 h, 3 days, and 14 days after irradiation). Delayed structural improvement was associated with decreased CTGF and collagen deposition but seemed unrelated to acute damage. Indeed, the early apoptotic index increased, and severe subacute structural damage occurred. Pravastatin elicited a differential effect, protecting normal intestine but not tumors from radiation injury. Conclusion: Pravastatin provides effective protection against delayed radiation enteropathy without interfering with the primary antitumor action of radiotherapy, suggesting that clinical transfer is feasible.

  10. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Harper, Michael S; Guo, Kejun; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lee, Eric J; Dillon, Stephanie M; Barrett, Bradley S; McCarter, Martin D; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Dittmer, Ulf; Wilson, Cara C; Santiago, Mario L

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs) likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8) and weak (IFNα1) subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies. PMID:26529416

  11. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Michael S.; Guo, Kejun; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lee, Eric J.; Dillon, Stephanie M.; Barrett, Bradley S.; McCarter, Martin D.; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Wilson, Cara C.; Santiago, Mario L.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs) likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8) and weak (IFNα1) subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies. PMID:26529416

  12. An altered intestinal mucosal microbiome in HIV-1 infection is associated with mucosal and systemic immune activation and endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Dong, Z; Hecht, DK; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; Wilson, CC

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection disrupts the intestinal immune system, leading to microbial translocation and systemic immune activation. We investigated the impact of HIV-1 infection on the intestinal microbiome and its association with mucosal T cell and dendritic cell (DC) frequency and activation, as well as with levels of systemic T cell activation, inflammation and microbial translocation. Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies and fecal samples from subjects with chronic, untreated HIV-1 infection and uninfected control subjects. Colon biopsies of HIV-1 infected subjects had increased abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased abundances of Firmicutes compared to uninfected donors. Furthermore at the genus level, a significant increase in Prevotella and decrease in Bacteroides was observed in HIV-1 infected subjects, indicating a disruption in the Bacteroidetes bacterial community structure. This HIV-1-associated increase in Prevotella abundance was associated with increased numbers of activated colonic T cells and myeloid DCs. Principal coordinates analysis demonstrated an HIV-1-related change in the microbiome that was associated with increased mucosal cellular immune activation, microbial translocation and blood T cell activation. These observations suggest that an important relationship exists between altered mucosal bacterial communities and intestinal inflammation during chronic HIV-1 infection. PMID:24399150

  13. Prevention of acute otitis media by prophylaxis and treatment of influenza virus infections.

    PubMed

    Glezen, W P

    2000-12-01

    Human experimental challenge studies with influenza virus infection and controlled intervention trials have demonstrated beyond doubt the role of influenza virus infection in the pathogenesis of acute otitis media. Influenza virus infections not only disrupt eustachian tube function, but also impair recovery from infection and facilitate attachment of bacterial pathogens to respiratory epithelial cells. Immunization of young children with either inactivated or live, attenuated influenza vaccine will significantly reduce the incidence of acute otitis media. Early treatment of influenza with antiviral medication will reduce eustachian tube dysfunction that results from influenza virus infection. Influenza produces high morbidity in children that could be averted by universal immunization with attenuated nasal spray vaccine.

  14. Gut barrier structure, mucosal immunity and intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis and treatment of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Tincati, Camilla; Douek, Daniel C; Marchetti, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, extensive work has been carried out in the field of microbial translocation in HIV infection, ranging from studies on its clinical significance to investigations on its pathogenic features. In the present work, we review the most recent findings on this phenomenon, focusing on the predictive role of microbial translocation in HIV-related morbidity and mortality, the mechanisms by which it arises and potential therapeutic approaches. From a clinical perspective, current work has shown that markers of microbial translocation may be useful in predicting clinical events in untreated HIV infection, while conflicting data exist on their role in cART-experienced subjects, possibly due to the inclusion of extremely varied patient populations in cohort studies. Results from studies addressing the pathogenesis of microbial translocation have improved our knowledge of the damage of the gastrointestinal epithelial barrier occurring in HIV infection. However, the extent to which mucosal impairment translates directly to increased gastrointestinal permeability remains an open issue. In this respect, novel work has established a role for IL-17 and IL-22-secreting T cell populations in limiting microbial translocation and systemic T-cell activation/inflammation, thus representing a possible target of immune-therapeutic interventions shown to be promising in the animal model. Further, recent reports have not only confirmed the presence of a dysbiotic intestinal community in the course of HIV infection but have also shown that it may be linked to mucosal damage, microbial translocation and peripheral immune activation. Importantly, technical advances have also shed light on the metabolic activity of gut microbes, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic approaches to correct the function, as well as the composition, of the gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:27073405

  15. Role of the employment status and education of mothers in the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in Mexican rural schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Quihui, Luis; Valencia, Mauro E; Crompton, David WT; Phillips, Stephen; Hagan, Paul; Morales, Gloria; Díaz-Camacho, Silvia P

    2006-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitic infections are a public health problem in developing countries such as Mexico. As a result, two governmental programmes have been implemented: a) "National Deworming Campaign" and b) "Opportunities" aimed at maternal care. However, both programmes are developed separately and their impact is still unknown. We independently investigated whether a variety of socio-economic factors, including maternal education and employment levels, were associated with intestinal parasite infection in rural school children. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 rural communities in two Mexican states. The study sites and populations were selected on the basis of the following traits: a) presence of activities by the national administration of albendazole, b) high rates of intestinal parasitism, c) little access to medical examination, and d) a population having less than 2,500 inhabitants. A total of 507 schoolchildren (mean age 8.2 years) were recruited and 1,521 stool samples collected (3 per child). Socio-economic information was obtained by an oral questionnaire. Regression modelling was used to determine the association of socio-economic indicators and intestinal parasitism. Results More than half of the schoolchildren showed poliparasitism (52%) and protozoan infections (65%). The prevalence of helminth infections was higher in children from Oaxaca (53%) than in those from Sinaloa (33%) (p < 0.0001). Giardia duodenalis and Hymenolepis nana showed a high prevalence in both states. Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and Entamoeba hystolitica/dispar showed low prevalence. Children from lower-income families and with unemployed and less educated mothers showed higher risk of intestinal parasitism (odds ratio (OR) 6.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6–22.6; OR 4.5, 95% CI 2.5–8.2; OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.5–7.4 respectively). Defecation in open areas was also a high risk factor for infection (OR 2.4, 95% CI 2.0–3

  16. Enterovirus D68 Infection in Children with Acute Flaccid Myelitis, Colorado, USA, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Messacar, Kevin; Pastula, Daniel M.; Robinson, Christine C.; Leshem, Eyal; Sejvar, James J.; Nix, W. Allan; Oberste, M. Steven; Feikin, Daniel R.; Dominguez, Samuel R.

    2016-01-01

    During August 8, 2014–October 14, 2014, a total of 11 children with acute flaccid myelitis and distinctive neuroimaging changes were identified near Denver, Colorado, USA. A respiratory prodrome was experienced by 10, and nasopharyngeal specimens were positive for enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) for 4. To determine whether an association exists between EV-D68 infection and acute flaccid myelitis, we conducted a retrospective case–control study comparing these patients with 2 groups of outpatient control children (1 group tested for acute respiratory illness and 1 for Bordetella pertussis infection). Adjusted analyses indicated that, for children with acute flaccid myelitis, the odds of having EV-D68 infection were 10.3 times greater than for those tested for acute respiratory infection and 4.5 times greater than for those tested for B. pertussis infection. No statistical association was seen between acute flaccid myelitis and non–EV-D68 enterovirus or rhinovirus infection. These findings support an association between EV-D68 infection and acute flaccid myelitis. PMID:27434186

  17. Enterovirus D68 Infection in Children with Acute Flaccid Myelitis, Colorado, USA, 2014.

    PubMed

    Aliabadi, Negar; Messacar, Kevin; Pastula, Daniel M; Robinson, Christine C; Leshem, Eyal; Sejvar, James J; Nix, W Allan; Oberste, M Steven; Feikin, Daniel R; Dominguez, Samuel R

    2016-08-01

    During August 8, 2014-October 14, 2014, a total of 11 children with acute flaccid myelitis and distinctive neuroimaging changes were identified near Denver, Colorado, USA. A respiratory prodrome was experienced by 10, and nasopharyngeal specimens were positive for enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) for 4. To determine whether an association exists between EV-D68 infection and acute flaccid myelitis, we conducted a retrospective case-control study comparing these patients with 2 groups of outpatient control children (1 group tested for acute respiratory illness and 1 for Bordetella pertussis infection). Adjusted analyses indicated that, for children with acute flaccid myelitis, the odds of having EV-D68 infection were 10.3 times greater than for those tested for acute respiratory infection and 4.5 times greater than for those tested for B. pertussis infection. No statistical association was seen between acute flaccid myelitis and non-EV-D68 enterovirus or rhinovirus infection. These findings support an association between EV-D68 infection and acute flaccid myelitis. PMID:27434186

  18. E. coli infection modulates the pharmacokinetics of oral enrofloxacin by targeting P-glycoprotein in small intestine and CYP450 3A in liver and kidney of broilers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengjie; Sun, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Bughio, Shamsuddin; Dai, Xiaohua; Ren, Weilong; Wang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression determines the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of many drugs in the body. Also, up-regulation of P-gp acts as a defense mechanism against acute inflammation. This study examined expression levels of abcb1 mRNA and localization of P-gp protein in the liver, kidney, duodenum, jejunum and ileum in healthy and E. coli infected broilers by real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, pharmacokinetics of orally administered enrofloxacin was also investigated in healthy and infected broilers by HPLC. The results indicated that E. coli infection up-regulated expression of abcb1 mRNA levels significantly in the kidney, jejunum and ileum (P<0.05), but not significantly in the liver and duodenum (P>0.05). However, the expression level of CYP 3A37 mRNA were observed significantly decreased only in liver and kidney of E. coli infected broilers (P<0.05) compared with healthy birds. Furthermore, the infection reduced absorption of orally administered enrofloxacin, significantly decreased Cmax (0.34 vs 0.98 µg mL(-1), P = 0.000) and AUC0-12h (4.37 vs 8.88 µg mL(-1) h, P = 0.042) of enrofloxacin, but increased Tmax (8.32 vs 3.28 h, P = 0.040), T1/2a(2.66 vs 1.64 h(-1), P = 0.050) and V/F (26.7 vs 5.2 L, P = 0.040). Treatment with verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp, significantly improved the absorption of enrofloxacin in both healthy and infected broilers. The results suggest that the E. coli infection induces intestine P-gp expression, altering the absorption of orally administered enrofloxacin in broilers.

  19. Acute middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in livestock Dromedaries, Dubai, 2014.

    PubMed

    Wernery, Ulrich; Corman, Victor M; Wong, Emily Y M; Tsang, Alan K L; Muth, Doreen; Lau, Susanna K P; Khazanehdari, Kamal; Zirkel, Florian; Ali, Mansoor; Nagy, Peter; Juhasz, Jutka; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Sunitha; Syriac, Ginu; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Woo, Patrick C Y; Drosten, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Camels carry Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, but little is known about infection age or prevalence. We studied >800 dromedaries of all ages and 15 mother-calf pairs. This syndrome constitutes an acute, epidemic, and time-limited infection in camels <4 years of age, particularly calves. Delayed social separation of calves might reduce human infection risk.

  20. Should teeth be extracted immediately in the presence of acute infection?

    PubMed

    Johri, Ankur; Piecuch, Joseph F

    2011-11-01

    Immediate extraction of teeth in the setting of an acute infection has shown to be beneficial for many reasons. It results in faster resolution of the infection, decreased pain, and earlier return of function and oral intake. The risk of seeding the infection into deeper spaces by performing immediate extraction is low.

  1. Three atypical lethal cases associated with acute Zika virus infection in Suriname.

    PubMed

    Zonneveld, Rens; Roosblad, Jimmy; Staveren, Jan Willem van; Wilschut, Jan C; Vreden, Stephen G S; Codrington, John

    2016-01-01

    Acute Zika virus infection usually presents with a self-limiting triad of fever, rash and arthritis. There is limited information on severe or lethal cases. We report three cases of lethal acute Zika infection, confirmed with polymerase chain reaction, in adult patients with some co-morbidities. The patients showed rapid clinical deterioration with hemorrhagic and septic shock, and exaggerated acute and innate inflammatory responses with pronounced coagulopathy, and died soon after admission to the hospital. It remains unclear whether the fatal outcomes were due to acute Zika virus infection alone or to the combination with exacerbated underlying prior disease or co-infection. Nonetheless, the severity of these cases implies that increased awareness for atypical presentations of Zika virus infection, and careful clinical assessment of patients with symptoms of Zika, is warranted during current and future outbreaks.

  2. Three atypical lethal cases associated with acute Zika virus infection in Suriname.

    PubMed

    Zonneveld, Rens; Roosblad, Jimmy; Staveren, Jan Willem van; Wilschut, Jan C; Vreden, Stephen G S; Codrington, John

    2016-01-01

    Acute Zika virus infection usually presents with a self-limiting triad of fever, rash and arthritis. There is limited information on severe or lethal cases. We report three cases of lethal acute Zika infection, confirmed with polymerase chain reaction, in adult patients with some co-morbidities. The patients showed rapid clinical deterioration with hemorrhagic and septic shock, and exaggerated acute and innate inflammatory responses with pronounced coagulopathy, and died soon after admission to the hospital. It remains unclear whether the fatal outcomes were due to acute Zika virus infection alone or to the combination with exacerbated underlying prior disease or co-infection. Nonetheless, the severity of these cases implies that increased awareness for atypical presentations of Zika virus infection, and careful clinical assessment of patients with symptoms of Zika, is warranted during current and future outbreaks. PMID:27630820

  3. Toll-Like Receptor-4 Dependent Intestinal Gene Expression During Arcobacter Butzleri Infection of Gnotobiotic Il-10 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gölz1, Greta; Alter, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that Arcobacter butzleri infection induces Toll-like receptor (TLR) -4 dependent immune responses in perorally infected gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice. Here, we analyzed TLR-4-dependent expression of genes encoding inflammatory mediators and matrix-degrading gelatinases MMP-2 and -9 in the small and large intestines of gnotobiotic TLR-4-deficient IL-10–/– mice that were perorally infected with A. butzleri strains CCUG 30485 or C1, of human and chicken origin, respectively. At day 6 following A. butzleri infection, colonic mucin-2 mRNA, as integral part of the intestinal mucus layer, was downregulated in the colon, but not ileum, of IL-10–/– but not TLR-4–/– IL-10–/– mice. CCUG 30485 strain-infected TLR-4-deficient IL-10–/– mice displayed less distinctly upregulated IFN-γ, IL-17A, and IL-1β mRNA levels in ileum and colon, which was also true for colonic IL-22. These changes were accompanied by upregulated colonic MMP-2 and ileal MMP-9 mRNA exclusively in IL-10–/– mice. In conclusion, TLR-4 is essentially involved in A. butzleri mediated modulation of gene expression in the intestines of gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice. PMID:27141316

  4. Drinking Water Quality and the Geospatial Distribution of Notified Gastro-Intestinal Infections

    PubMed Central

    GRILC, Eva; GALE, Ivanka; VERŠIČ, Aleš; ŽAGAR, Tina; SOČAN, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Even brief episodes of fecal contamination of drinking water can lead directly to illness in the consumers. In water-borne outbreaks, the connection between poor microbial water quality and disease can be quickly identified. The impact of non-compliant drinking water samples due to E. coli taken for regular monitoring on the incidence of notified acute gastrointestinal infections has not yet been studied. Methods The objective of this study was to analyse the geographical distribution of notified acute gastrointestinal infections (AGI) in Slovenia in 2010, with hotspot identification. The second aim of the study was to correlate the fecal contamination of water supply system on the settlement level with the distribution of notified AGI cases. Spatial analysis using geo-information technology and other methods were used. Results Hot spots with the highest proportion of notified AGI cases were mainly identified in areas with small supply zones. The risk for getting AGI was drinking water contaminated with E. coli from supply zones with 50–1000 users: RR was 1.25 and significantly greater than one (p-value less than 0.001). Conclusion This study showed the correlation between the frequency of notified AGI cases and non-compliant results in drinking water monitoring. PMID:27646727

  5. Anguilla anguilla intestinal immune response to natural infection with Contracaecum rudolphii A larvae.

    PubMed

    Dezfuli, B S; Manera, M; Bosi, G; DePasquale, J A; D'Amelio, S; Castaldelli, G; Giari, L

    2016-10-01

    The European eel, Anguilla anguilla, is a major warm-water fish species cultured in North and South Europe. Seventy-one A. anguilla collected between 2010 and 2015 from the Comacchio lagoons were examined. Fish were infected and damaged by larvae (L3) of the nematode Contracaecum rudolphii A, which were encapsulated within the thickness of the intestinal wall and within the external visceral peritoneum (serosa). Conspicuous granulomas, visible at sites of infection, were arranged in a trilayer, formed by a series of concentric whorls. The cells involved in the immune response and their distribution in the granuloma layers were assessed by immunohistochemical, immunofluorescence, and ultrastructural techniques. The outer part of the granuloma contained macrophages, macrophage aggregates, and mast cells (MCs) scattered among fibroblasts. This layer was vascularized, with degranulation of MCs occurring in close proximity to the capillaries. The middle layer was rich in MCs and fibroblasts. The inner layer, closest to the parasite larva, consisted mainly of dark epithelioid cells, some of which were necrotic. Non-necrotic epithelioid cells formed desmosomes between themselves or with fibroblasts. Within the granulomas, numerous cells of different types were positive to proliferative cell nuclear antigen antibody, indicating a high degree of cellular proliferation around the larvae. PMID:26814373

  6. A slaughter slab survey for extra-intestinal porcine helminth infections in northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ngowi, H A; Kassuku, A A; Maeda, G E M; Boa, M E; Willingham, A L

    2004-05-01

    A survey on extra-intestinal porcine helminths was conducted at three slaughter slabs that receive pigs from Mbulu, a district endemic for porcine cysticercosis in northern Tanzania. Seventy carcases of pigs between 1 and 2 years old were examined between December 1997 and March 1998. The examination involved ante-mortem lingual examination for Taenia solium cysticercosis followed by post-mortem inspection. In addition, a laboratory procedure was performed to determine whether any of these domestic pigs were infected with Trichinella species. Parasites detected were Ascaris suum (44.3%), Echinococcus granulosus (4.3%) and Taenia hydatigena (1.4%). The lack of cases of porcine cysticercosis in this study compared to previous studies suggests that pig traders are conducting their own ante-mortem lingual examinations before purchasing pigs in the rural communities where the parasite is still highly prevalent. It is concluded that improved meat inspection could prove useful in reducing the local population's risk of infection with these parasites. The results of this study have revealed the parasites of agricultral and public health importance in the targeted communities. Further epidemiological investigations are required to better determine parasite prevalence and impact in order to formulate appropriate and cost-effective strategies for control.

  7. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. Intestinal parasitic infections in children presenting with diarrhoea in outpatient and inpatient settings in an informal settlement of Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The distribution of and factors associated with intestinal parasitic infections are poorly defined in high risk vulnerable populations such as urban slums in tropical sub-Saharan Africa. Methods In a cross sectional study, children aged 5 years and below who presented with diarrhoea were recruited from selected outpatient clinics in Mukuru informal settlement, and from Mbagathi District hospital, Nairobi, over a period of two years (2010–2011). Stool samples were examined for the presence of parasites using direct, formal-ether concentration method and the Modified Ziehl Neelsen staining technique. Results Overall, 541/2112 (25.6%) were positive for at least one intestinal parasite, with the common parasites being; Entamoeba histolytica, 225 (36.7%),Cryptosporidium spp. 187, (30.5%), Giardia lamblia, 98 (16%).The prevalence of intestinal parasites infection was higher among children from outpatient clinics 432/1577(27.4%) than among those admitted in hospital 109/535 (20.1%) p < 0.001. Infections with E. histolytica, and G. lamblia were higher among outpatients than inpatients (13.8% vs 1.3% p < 0.001 and 5.8% vs 1.3% p < 0.049) respectively, while infection with Cryptosporidium spp. was higher among inpatients than outpatients (15.3% vs 6.7%) respectively p < 0.001. Other parasites isolated among outpatients included Isospora belli, 19 (1.2%), Ascaris lumbricoides, 26 (1.6%), and Hymenolepis nana 12 (0.8%), with the remainder detected in less than ten samples each. HIV-infected participants were more likely to be infected with any parasite than uninfected participants, Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR), 2.04, 95% CI, 1.55-2.67, p < 0.001), and with Cryptosporidium spp. (AOR, 2.96, 95% CI 2.07-4.21, p < 0.001).The inpatients were less likely to be infected with E. histolytica than outpatients (AOR, 0.11, 95% CI, 0.51- 0.24, p < 0.001), but more likely for inpatients to be infected with Cryptosporidium spp. than outpatients (AOR, 1

  9. [Clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nguen, V Kh; Stroganov, P V; Geshelin, S A

    2011-09-01

    The results of treatment of 81 patients, suffering tuberculosis and operated in emergency for an acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs, are adduced, in 29 of them--nonspecific diseases of nontuberculosis genesis were diagnosed. In 52 patients the indication for emergency operation performance were complications of abdominal tuberculosis (perforation of the tuberculosis ulcers of small intestine--in 37, the tuberculosis mesadenitis--in 15), of them in 34--pulmonary tuberculosis was in inactive phase, that's why the HIV presence was supposed. In 26 patients the diagnosis was confirmed, basing on serologic analysis data. The presence of intraabdominal catastrophe, caused by abdominal tuberculosis complications on inactive pulmonary tuberculosis background witnesses with 85.3% probability the HIV-infectioning of the patient.

  10. Dietary management of acute diarrhoea in children: effect of fermented and amylase-digested weaning foods on intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Willumsen, J F; Darling, J C; Kitundu, J A; Kingamkono, R R; Msengi, A E; Mduma, B; Sullivan, K R; Tomkins, A M

    1997-03-01

    The effect of three dietary treatments on intestinal permeability during acute diarrhea was compared in 86 Tanzanian children 6-25 months of age admitted to Muhimbili Medical Center's Pediatric Diarrhea Treatment Unit in Dar es Salaam in 1992. 55 children (64%) had received foods other than breast milk during the first week of life. After rehydration, children were randomly assigned to receive a conventional low-energy density porridge (n = 33), a high-energy density amylase digested (AMD) porridge (n = 28), or AMD porridge followed by fermented amylase digested (FAD) porridge (n = 25). Lactulose/mannitol (L/M) permeability tests were performed at admission, after 3 days, and at 2 and 4 weeks after hospital discharge. Children with diarrhea had higher L/M ratios (geometric mean, 0.85; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.68-1.05) at admission than the 30 age-matched healthy controls (mean, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.12-0.17). The L/M ratio of study children fell over time and approached values recorded among healthy controls by the first follow-up visit. The change in L/M ratio between admission and day 3 of hospitalization was significantly greater in the FAD group (89%) than the conventional or AMD groups (44% and 75%, respectively). Dietary treatment and intestinal damage at admission explained 13.5% of the variation in this L/M ratio, while age at admission and age at weaning explained an additional 8.4%. These findings suggest that a porridge that has been both amylase digested and fermented effectively repairs mucosal damage through trophic effects on intestinal epithelium and should be administered to children with acute diarrhea to prevent malnutrition.

  11. Acute respiratory infections in Pakistan: have we made any progress?

    PubMed

    Khan, Tauseef Ahmad; Madni, Syed Ali; Zaidi, Anita K M

    2004-07-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are the leading cause of death in young children in Pakistan, responsible for 20-30% of all child deaths under age 5 years. This paper summarizes the research and technical development efforts over the last 15 years which have contributed to improving the effectiveness of the case management strategy to reduce mortality from pneumonia in children in Pakistan. Community intervention is viable, effective and practical. Rising antimicrobial resistance among commonly used and low-cost oral agents is of significant concern. Appropriate monitoring and evaluation of the impact of the ARI control programme is lacking. Lack of funding for programmatic activities, lack of coordination with other child survival programs, inadequate training for community health workers and general practitioners in the private sector, lack of public awareness about seeking timely and appropriate care, and insufficient planning and support for ARI programmatic activities at provincial and district levels are major hindrances in decreasing the burden of ARI in the country. The recent introduction of the community-based Lady Health Worker (LHW) Programme and WHO and UNICEF-sponsored integrated management of childhood illness initiative present ideal opportunities for re-emphasizing early case detection and appropriate case management of ARI. Ultimately, focusing on preventive strategies such as improving nutrition, reducing indoor pollution, improving mass vaccination, as well as introduction of new vaccines effective against important respiratory pathogens will likely have the most impact on reducing severe ARI and deaths from severe disease. PMID:15279753

  12. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Intestinal Protozoan Infections with Cryptosporidium, Giardia, Blastocystis and Dientamoeba among Schoolchildren in Tripoli, Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Benamrouz, Sadia; Nourrisson, Céline; Poirier, Philippe; Pereira, Bruno; Razakandrainibe, Romy; Pinon, Anthony; Lambert, Céline; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Dabboussi, Fouad; Delbac, Frederic; Favennec, Loïc; Hamze, Monzer; Viscogliosi, Eric; Certad, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Background Intestinal protozoan infections are confirmed as major causes of diarrhea, particularly in children, and represent a significant, but often neglected, threat to public health. No recent data were available in Lebanon concerning the molecular epidemiology of protozoan infections in children, a vulnerable population at high risk of infection. Methodology and Principal Findings In order to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of intestinal pathogenic protozoa, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a general pediatric population including both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. After obtaining informed consent from the parents or legal guardians, stool samples were collected in January 2013 from 249 children in 2 schools in Tripoli, Lebanon. Information obtained from a standard questionnaire included demographic characteristics, current symptoms, socioeconomic status, source of drinking water, and personal hygiene habits. After fecal examination by both microscopy and molecular tools, the overall prevalence of parasitic infections was recorded as 85%. Blastocystis spp. presented the highest infection rate (63%), followed by Dientamoeba fragilis (60.6%), Giardia duodenalis (28.5%) and Cryptosporidium spp. (10.4%). PCR was also performed to identify species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium, subtypes of Blastocystis, and assemblages of Giardia. Statistical analysis using a logistic regression model showed that contact with family members presenting gastrointestinal disorders was the primary risk factor for transmission of these protozoa. Conclusions This is the first study performed in Lebanon reporting the prevalence and the clinical and molecular epidemiological data associated with intestinal protozoan infections among schoolchildren in Tripoli. A high prevalence of protozoan parasites was found, with Blastocystis spp. being the most predominant protozoans. Although only 50% of children reported digestive symptoms, asymptomatic infection was

  13. Vascular stasis, intestinal hemorrhage, and heightened vascular permeability complicate acute portal hypertension in cd39-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Cárdenas, Andrés; Wu, Yan; Enjyoji, Keichi; Robson, Simon C.

    2009-01-01

    Vasoactive factors that regulate splanchnic hemodynamics include nitric oxide, catecholamines, and possibly extracellular nucleosides/nucleotides (adenosine, ATP). CD39/ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1) is the major vascular ectonucleotidase that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleotides. CD39 activity may be modulated by vascular injury, inflammation, and altered oxygen tension. Altered Cd39 expression by the murine hepatosplanchnic vasculature may impact hemodynamics and portal hypertension (PHT) in vivo. We noted that basal portal pressures (PPs) were comparable in wild-type and Cd39-null mice (n = 9). ATP infusions resulted in increments in PP in wild-type mice, but, in contrast, this significantly decreased in Cd39-null mice (n = 9) post-ATP in a nitric oxide-dependent manner. We then studied Cd39/NTPDase1 deletion in the regulation of portal hemodynamics, vascular integrity, and intestinal permeability in a murine model of PHT. Partial portal vein ligation (PPVL) was performed in Cd39-null (n = 44) and wild-type (n = 23) mice. Sequential measurements obtained after PPVL were indicative of comparable levels of PHT (ranges 14–29 mmHg) in both groups. There was one death in the wild-type group and eight in the Cd39-null group from intestinal bleeding (P = 0.024). Circulatory stasis in the absence of overt portal vein thrombosis, portal congestion, intestinal hemorrhage, and increased permeability were evident in all surviving Cd39-null mice. Deletion of Cd39 results in deleterious outcomes post-PPVL that are associated with significant microcirculatory derangements and major intestinal congestion with hemorrhage mimicking acute mesenteric occlusion. Absent Cd39/NTPDase1 and decreased generation of adenosine in the splanchnic circulation cause heightened vascular permeability and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in PPVL. PMID:19520738

  14. Low-Dose Intestinal Trichuris muris Infection Alters the Lung Immune Microenvironment and Can Suppress Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chenery, Alistair L; Antignano, Frann; Burrows, Kyle; Scheer, Sebastian; Perona-Wright, Georgia; Zaph, Colby

    2015-12-07

    Immunological cross talk between mucosal tissues such as the intestine and the lung is poorly defined during homeostasis and disease. Here, we show that a low-dose infection with the intestinally restricted helminth parasite Trichuris muris results in the production of Th1 cell-dependent gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and myeloid cell-derived interleukin-10 (IL-10) in the lung without causing overt airway pathology. This cross-mucosal immune response in the lung inhibits the development of papain-induced allergic airway inflammation, an innate cell-mediated type 2 airway inflammatory disease. Thus, we identify convergent and nonredundant roles of adaptive and innate immunity in mediating cross-mucosal suppression of type 2 airway inflammation during low-dose helminth-induced intestinal inflammation. These results provide further insight in identifying novel intersecting immune pathways elicited by gut-to-lung mucosal cross talk.

  15. Low-Dose Intestinal Trichuris muris Infection Alters the Lung Immune Microenvironment and Can Suppress Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chenery, Alistair L; Antignano, Frann; Burrows, Kyle; Scheer, Sebastian; Perona-Wright, Georgia; Zaph, Colby

    2016-02-01

    Immunological cross talk between mucosal tissues such as the intestine and the lung is poorly defined during homeostasis and disease. Here, we show that a low-dose infection with the intestinally restricted helminth parasite Trichuris muris results in the production of Th1 cell-dependent gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and myeloid cell-derived interleukin-10 (IL-10) in the lung without causing overt airway pathology. This cross-mucosal immune response in the lung inhibits the development of papain-induced allergic airway inflammation, an innate cell-mediated type 2 airway inflammatory disease. Thus, we identify convergent and nonredundant roles of adaptive and innate immunity in mediating cross-mucosal suppression of type 2 airway inflammation during low-dose helminth-induced intestinal inflammation. These results provide further insight in identifying novel intersecting immune pathways elicited by gut-to-lung mucosal cross talk. PMID:26644379

  16. ILC3 GM-CSF production and mobilisation orchestrate acute intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Claire; Thornton, Emily E; McKenzie, Brent; Schaupp, Anna-Lena; Huskens, Nicky; Griseri, Thibault; West, Nathaniel; Tung, Sim; Seddon, Benedict P; Uhlig, Holm H; Powrie, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) contribute to host defence and tissue repair but can induce immunopathology. Recent work has revealed tissue-specific roles for ILCs; however, the question of how a small population has large effects on immune homeostasis remains unclear. We identify two mechanisms that ILC3s utilise to exert their effects within intestinal tissue. ILC-driven colitis depends on production of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which recruits and maintains intestinal inflammatory monocytes. ILCs present in the intestine also enter and exit cryptopatches in a highly dynamic process. During colitis, ILC3s mobilize from cryptopatches, a process that can be inhibited by blocking GM-CSF, and mobilization precedes inflammatory foci elsewhere in the tissue. Together these data identify the IL-23R/GM-CSF axis within ILC3 as a key control point in the accumulation of innate effector cells in the intestine and in the spatio-temporal dynamics of ILCs in the intestinal inflammatory response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10066.001 PMID:26780670

  17. ILC3 GM-CSF production and mobilisation orchestrate acute intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Claire; Thornton, Emily E; McKenzie, Brent; Schaupp, Anna-Lena; Huskens, Nicky; Griseri, Thibault; West, Nathaniel; Tung, Sim; Seddon, Benedict P; Uhlig, Holm H; Powrie, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) contribute to host defence and tissue repair but can induce immunopathology. Recent work has revealed tissue-specific roles for ILCs; however, the question of how a small population has large effects on immune homeostasis remains unclear. We identify two mechanisms that ILC3s utilise to exert their effects within intestinal tissue. ILC-driven colitis depends on production of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which recruits and maintains intestinal inflammatory monocytes. ILCs present in the intestine also enter and exit cryptopatches in a highly dynamic process. During colitis, ILC3s mobilize from cryptopatches, a process that can be inhibited by blocking GM-CSF, and mobilization precedes inflammatory foci elsewhere in the tissue. Together these data identify the IL-23R/GM-CSF axis within ILC3 as a key control point in the accumulation of innate effector cells in the intestine and in the spatio-temporal dynamics of ILCs in the intestinal inflammatory response. PMID:26780670

  18. Changes in the inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation of intestinal smooth muscle from Trichinella spiralis infected rats.

    PubMed

    Tanovic, Adnan; Jiménez, Marcel; Fernández, Ester

    2002-11-15

    Functional motor changes and morphological alterations have been associated with intestinal inflammation. The aim of this work was to study functional motor changes in inflamed and non-inflamed intestinal segments of Trichinella spiralis infected rats. Thickness of muscle layers and cell infiltration during infection were also evaluated. Segments of rat jejunum and ileum were placed in organ bath and relaxations of the longitudinal muscle in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were recorded. During the post-infection (PI) period EFS-induced relaxations in ileum were decreased. Maximal decreases in relaxation were found on day 14-23 PI for ileum, whereas non significant changes were observed in jejunal samples throughout the experimental period. The sensitivity of the EFS-induced relaxations to the NO synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) and to the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor oxadiazolo-quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) was decreased on day 14 PI for jejunum, whereas in the ileum it lasted from day 14-23 PI. The sensitivity of EFS-induced relaxations to apamin (a small conductance calcium activated potassium channel blocker) disappeared between day 6-23 PI for both jejunum and ileum. In contrast, the sensitivity of the EFS-induced relaxations to the K(+) channel blockers tetraethylamonium (TEA) and tetrapenthylammonium (TPEA) chloride was similar for healthy tissue and for tissue obtained form infected animals. Distribution and density of NADPH-diaphorase positive neurons was similar in tissue obtained form healthy and infected animals. In conclusion, intestinal inflammation induces functional and structural changes in both worm-free and worm-positive intestinal segments. Increased muscle thickness was similar for both inflamed and noninflamed segments but the most prominent functional changes i.e. a long-lasting decrease of EFS-induced relaxation was found in non-inflamed ileal segments. PMID:12408878

  19. Comparative analysis of intestinal parasitic infections of outpatients in Guangxi medical university affiliated hospital in 2005 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Deng-Yu; Lu, Zuo-Chao; Liu, Xiao-Quan; Zhan, Ting-Zheng; Tang, Li-Li; Liao, De-Jun; Shen, Ji-Qing; He, Shan-Shan; Shi, Huan-Huan; Li, Yan-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To understand the hospital’s status and trends of intestinal parasitic infections and to provide a reference for prevention. Methods: Stool samples were treated by acid-ether centrifugation; iodine staining and direct-smearing were performed; intestinal parasites were examined under a microscope; characteristics of parasitic infections in population were analyzed using the descriptive epidemiological method. Results: 10 kinds of parasites were detected; the infection rate of clonorchissinensis was the highest, followed by B. hominis, hookworm, whipworm and roundworm in order (x2 = 131.188, 1261.928, 129.386, P < 0.01); The overall infection rates in 2013 and 2005 were 37.08% and 41.07% respectively, and the infection rate in 2013 was lower than that in 2005 (x2 = 20.5003, P < 0.01); All the infection rates of clonorchissinensis, hookworm, whipworm and roundworm in 2013 were lower than those in 2005 (x2 = 18.275, 45.449, 34.855, 12.435, P < 0.01); Both in 2005 and 2013, the male infection rate was higher than that in female (x2 = 12.859, 24.924, P < 0.01); For male, the infection rate of clonorchissinensis was the highest, followed by B. hominis (x2 = 313.621, 104.409, P < 0.01); for female, the infection rate of B. hominis was the highest, followed by clonorchissinensis (x2 = 95.293, 43.357, P < 0.01). For male, the age group of 41~ had the highest infection rate of clonorchissinensis in 2005 (x2 = 5.734, P < 0.05), and the age groups of 31~ and 41~ had the highest infection rate of clonorchissinensis in 2013 (x2 = 8.908, P < 0.01); for female, both in 2005 and 2013, the age group of 21~, 31~, 41~ and 51~ had the highest infection rate of clonorchissinensis (x2 = 6.508, 5.145, P < 0.05). There was no difference in male infection rate of B. hominis in 2005 (x2 = 10.134, P > 0.05); in 2013, the age group of 0~ had the highest infection rate (x2 = 3.825, P < 0.05); for women, it was the highest in the age groups of 11~, 21~ and 31~ in 2005 (x2 = 10.459, P

  20. Behçet's disease diagnosed after acute HIV infection: viral replication activating underlying autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Clay; Kinney, Rebecca; Gilles, Ryan; Blue, Sky

    2015-05-01

    Behçet's disease is an autoimmune systemic vasculitis that can occur after exposure to infectious agents. Behçet's disease also has been associated with HIV infection, including de novo development of this condition during chronic HIV infection and resolution of Behçet's disease symptoms following initiation of antiretroviral therapy. We describe a patient who presented with systemic vasculitis with skin and mucous membrane ulcerations in the setting of acute HIV infection, who was eventually diagnosed with Behçet's disease, demonstrating a possible link between acute HIV infection, immune activation and development of autoimmunity.

  1. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aram; Kang, Ben; Choi, So Yoon; Cho, Joong Bum; Kim, Yae-Jean; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Choe, Yon Ho

    2015-09-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is responsible for approximately 20% to 30% of community-acquired pneumonia, and is well known for its diverse extrapulmonary manifestations. However, acute necrotizing pancreatits is an extremely rare extrapulmonary manifestation of M. pneumoniae infection. A 6-year-old girl was admitted due to abdominal pain, vomiting, fever, and confused mentality. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis was diagnosed according to symptoms, laboratory test results, and abdominal computed tomography scans. M. pneumoniae infection was diagnosed by a 4-fold increase in antibodies to M. pneumoniae between acute and convalescent sera by particle agglutination antibody assay. No other etiologic factors or pathogens were detected. Despite the occurrence of a large infected pseudocyst during the course, the patient was able to discharge without morbidity by early aggressive supportive care. This is the first case in Korea of a child with acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with M. pneumoniae infection. PMID:26473143

  2. Enhancing the detection and management of acute hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Martinello, Marianne; Matthews, Gail V

    2015-10-01

    Acute HCV infection refers to the 6-month period following infection acquisition, although this definition is somewhat arbitrary. While spontaneous clearance occurs in approximately 25%, the majority will develop chronic HCV infection with the potential for development of cirrhosis, end stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Detection of acute HCV infection has been hampered by its asymptomatic or non-specific presentation, lack of specific diagnostic tests and the inherent difficulties in identifying and following individuals at highest risk of transmitting and acquiring HCV infection, such as people who inject drugs (PWID). However, recognition of those with acute infection may have individual and population level benefits and could represent an ideal opportunity for intervention. Despite demonstration that HCV treatment is feasible and successful in PWID, treatment uptake remains low with multiple barriers to care at an individual and systems level. Given the burden of HCV-related disease among PWID, strategies to enhance HCV assessment, treatment and prevention in this group are urgently needed. As the therapeutic landscape of chronic HCV management is revolutionised by the advent of simple, highly effective directly-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy, similar opportunities may exist in acute infection. This review will discuss issues surrounding improving the detection and management of acute HCV infection, particularly in PWID. PMID:26254495

  3. Acute respiratory infections: the forgotten pandemic. Communiqué from the International Conference on Acute Respiratory Infections, held in Canberra, Australia, 7-10 July 1997.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections kill 4 million children every year in developing countries, and most of these deaths are caused by pneumonia. This huge loss of life goes virtually unnoticed, despite the fact that we have two very effective ways of preventing many of the deaths from pneumonia: Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine, and standardised antibiotic treatment regimens. Although H. influenzae type b vaccine has virtually eliminated diseases caused by this organism in children in developed countries, failure to appreciate the importance of this organism and the high cost of the vaccine has meant that it has not been used in developing countries; urgent steps need to be taken to ensure that children in developing countries receive H. influenzae vaccine. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of fatal pneumonia in developing countries. Controlled trials are needed to define the role of unconjugated 23-valent S. pneumoniae vaccine, and the new conjugate vaccine must be made available to children in developing countries soon after it is licensed. The World Health Organization has developed simple and effective guidelines for the treatment of pneumonia which have been incorporated into its Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy, and this programme should be strongly supported. In developed countries, acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity. The cost of these infections is enormous, because of lost earnings and the cost of treatment. There is an urgent need for systematic evaluation of existing knowledge about acute respiratory infections in developed countries, so that this knowledge can be applied to prevention and treatment. Approximately 75% of antibiotics are prescribed for acute respiratory infections, and many of these prescriptions are unnecessary. Unnecessary use of antibiotics is very expensive, and it has contributed to the rapid increase in resistance which has already made some bacteria resistant to all antibiotics

  4. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  5. The intestinal immunoendocrine axis: novel cross-talk between enteroendocrine cells and the immune system during infection and inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Worthington, John J

    2015-08-01

    The intestinal epithelium represents one of our most important interfaces with the external environment. It must remain tightly balanced to allow nutrient absorption, but maintain barrier function and immune homoeostasis, a failure of which results in chronic infection or debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The intestinal epithelium mainly consists of absorptive enterocytes and secretory goblet and Paneth cells and has recently come to light as being an essential modulator of immunity as opposed to a simple passive barrier. Each epithelial sub-type can produce specific immune modulating factors, driving innate immunity to pathogens as well as preventing autoimmunity. The enteroendocrine cells comprise just 1% of this epithelium, but collectively form the bodies' largest endocrine system. The mechanisms of enteroendocrine cell peptide secretion during feeding, metabolism and nutrient absorption are well studied; but their potential interactions with the enriched numbers of surrounding immune cells remain largely unexplored. This review focuses on alterations in enteroendocrine cell number and peptide secretion during inflammation and disease, highlighting the few in depth studies which have attempted to dissect the immune driven mechanisms that drive these phenomena. Moreover, the emerging potential of enteroendocrine cells acting as innate sensors of intestinal perturbation and secreting peptides to directly orchestrate immune cell function will be proposed. In summary, the data generated from these studies have begun to unravel a complex cross-talk between immune and enteroendocrine cells, highlighting the emerging immunoendocrine axis as a potential target for therapeutic strategies for infections and inflammatory disorders of the intestine.

  6. [Frequency of intestinal microsporidian infections in HIV-positive patients, as diagnosis by quick hot Gram chromotrope staining and PCR].

    PubMed

    Botero, Jorge H; Montoya, Martha Nelly; Vanegas, Adriana Lucía; Díaz, Abel; Navarro-i-Martínez, Luis; Bornay, Fernando Jorge; Izquierdo, Fernando; del Aguila, Carmen; Agudelo, Sonia del Pilar

    2004-12-01

    Microsporidia are intracellular obligate parasites, today mainly associated with diarrhea in AIDS patients. Microsporidia prevalence ranges from 8% to 52% in different countries, as evaluated by several diagnostic methods, such as the stain test and PCR. In Medellín, Colombia, its frequency is unknown, and hence, a study was undertaken to determine the frequency of intestinal microsporidiosis in HIV patients, by means of the quick-hot Gram chromotrope test and the PCR. A prospective and descriptive study of an intentional population of all HIV-positive patients was sent to the Grupo Interdisciplinario para el Estudio de las Parasitosis Intestinales laboratory by institutions treating the HIV-positive patients of Medellín between August 2001 and September 2002. The clinical-epidemiological survey included a serial stool test with direct concentration and special stains for coccidiae and intestinal microsporidia. In addition, counts of lymphocytes TCD4+ and viral load were requested. One hundred and three patients with ages ranging from 2-74 years were evaluated. Seventy percent presented with diarrhea--mostly in men (83.5%). The overall frequency of intestinal microsporidiosis was 3.9% and that of other intestinal parasitic infections was 39.8%. Three of the four patients positive for microsporida were infected with Enterocytozoon bieneusi and one with Encephalitozoon intestinalis. The microsporidiosis frequency was relatively low with 3 of the 4 cases associated with protracted diarrhea, counts of LTCD4+ below 100 cel/microl and viral loads up to 100,000 copies.

  7. Disseminated fungal infection complicated with pulmonary haemorrhage in a case of acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Thulkar, S; Sharma, S; Das, P; Kumar, L

    2000-01-01

    Pulmonary haemorrhage is a common necropsy finding in acute leukaemia, however, it is rarely diagnosed during life. A man with acute myeloid leukaemia is reported who presented with disseminated fungal infection, anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and subconjuctival and petechial haemorrhages. During the course of the patient's illness, the chest infection was complicated with bilateral pulmonary haemorrhage. The diagnosis of pulmonary haemorrhage was based on characteristic clinical and radiological findings. The patient improved on treatment.


Keywords: leukaemia; pulmonary infiltrate; haemorrhage PMID:11060145

  8. Lipschütz acute vulval ulcers associated with primary cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Martín, José M; Godoy, Rosa; Calduch, Luis; Villalon, Guillermo; Jordá, Esperanza

    2008-01-01

    A previously healthy 16-year-old girl presented with painful acute genital ulcers that appeared in the context of a primary cytomegalovirus infection. Complementary examinations ruled out both venereal disease and other usual causes of genital ulcerations, and the lesions resolved in < 2 weeks with no sequelae or later recurrences. Cytomegalovirus disease should be considered in the screening of acute vulval ulcers.

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Methods Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient’s condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Results Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. Discussion In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Conclusion Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission. PMID:24180319

  10. Increased numbers of granzyme-B-expressing cytotoxic T-lymphocytes in the small intestine of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Snijders, F; Wever, P C; Danner, S A; Hack, C E; ten Kate, F J; ten Berge, I J

    1996-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether granzyme B-expressing cells, which identify activated cytotoxic lymphocytes, are present in the small intestinal mucosa of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with and without diarrhea. Therefore, duodenal biopsy specimens from 29 HIV-infected patients (11 with diarrhea and 18 without diarrhea) and 15 control patients were stained for the presence of granzyme B expressing cells. In HIV-infected patients, a significantly increased expression of granzyme B in the lamina propria was observed (p = 0.00001): In 22 of 29 patients, at least 5-10 cells per high-power field were counted. In contrast, in 13 of 15 control patients, granzyme B was not expressed or minimally so, and in two others a maximum of five granzyme-B-expressing cells could be detected per high-power field. No significant difference was found between the HIV-infected patients with and without diarrhea. Double staining revealed that the granzyme-B-expressing cells were mainly CD3 positive. These data show that activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are present in the duodenal mucosa of HIV-infected patients. No relation between the number of CTLs and the presence of diarrhea was demonstrated. CTLs are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of HIV infection and in the production of tissue injury, but their functional role in intestinal HIV-related pathology has yet to be elucidated.

  11. Nitazoxanide compared with quinfamide and mebendazole in the treatment of helminthic infections and intestinal protozoa in children.

    PubMed

    Davila-Gutierrez, Cesar E; Vasquez, Clemente; Trujillo-Hernandez, Benjamin; Huerta, Miguel

    2002-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of nitazoxanide compared with that of quinfamide, mebendazole, or both in the treatment of intestinal protozoa and helminthic infections. A total of 677 stool specimens from children aged 2-12 years living in 3 communities of Colima, México, were analyzed in order to detect the presence of cysts, trophozoites, eggs, or larvae of intestinal protozoa or helminths. A total of 275 infected children were enlisted in a double-blind controlled study and randomly assigned to one of 2 treatment groups: Group A, nitazoxanide (200 mg for 3 days) and Group B, quinfamide (100 mg for 1 day), mebendazole (200 mg for 3 days), or both. A posttreatment fecal examination was conducted on Day 14 from treatment initiation. In Group A (n = 143), the parasitosis eradication rate was superior to that of Group B (n = 132). However, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P > 0.05).

  12. A qualitative study of patients' perceptions of acute infective conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Everitt, Hazel; Kumar, Satinder; Little, Paul

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute infective conjunctivitis is a self-limiting condition that commonly presents to primary care. Patients' understanding of conjunctivitis, their reasons for attendance, and their responses to different management strategies, are unknown. AIM: To explore patients' understanding of conjunctivitis and its management. DESIGN OF STUDY: Qualitative study using semi-structured one-to-one interviews. SETTING: Three general practices in Hampshire and Wiltshire. METHOD: Twenty-five patients presenting with conjunctivitis at their general practices were interviewed. Main outcome measures were patients' perceptions of conjunctivities, their experience and knowledge of the disease, beliefs regarding treatment, and their responses to different management strategies and a patient information leaflet. RESULTS: Patients regarded conjunctivitis as a minor illness, although some considered it might become more serious if not treated. Nearly all were confident at recognising conjunctivitis. They stated a preference for not taking medication, but believed that conjunctivitis would not clear up without treatment. However, they were open to alternative management approaches; for example, the delayed prescription approach, because they trusted their general practitioners' (GPs') judgement. Once they were aware of the self-limiting nature of conjunctivitis, patients felt they would prefer to wait a few days to see if the condition improved before seeking medical advice, even if this resulted in a few more days of symptoms. CONCLUSION: Patients who attend their general practices with conjunctivitis present for treatment because they are not aware of its self-limiting nature. Providing patients with this information may enable patients, enhance self-management, and reduce the use of topical antibiotics and the demand for urgent general practice appointments. PMID:12564275

  13. Changes in the Porcine Intestinal Microbiome in Response to Infection with Salmonella enterica and Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Borewicz, Klaudyna A; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Singer, Randall S; Gebhart, Connie J; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Johnson, Timothy; Isaacson, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of food borne illness. Recent studies have shown that S. enterica is a pathogen capable of causing alterations to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. A recent prospective study of French pork production farms found a statistically significant association between Lawsonia intracellularis and carriage of S. enterica. In the current study the composition of the gut microbiome was determined in pigs challenged with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and or L. intracellularis and compared to non-challenged control pigs. Principal coordinate analysis demonstrated that there was a disruption in the composition of the gut microbiome in the colon and cecum of pigs challenged with either pathogen. The compositions of the microbiomes of challenged pigs were similar to each other but differed from the non-challenged controls. There also were statistically significant increases in Anaerobacter, Barnesiella, Pediococcus, Sporacetigenium, Turicibacter, Catenibacterium, Prevotella, Pseudobutyrivibrio, and Xylanibacter in the challenged pigs. To determine if these changes were specific to experimentally challenged pigs, we determined the compositions of the fecal microbiomes of naturally infected pigs that were carriers of S. enterica. Pigs that were frequent shedders of S. enterica were shown to have similar fecal microbiomes compared to non-shedders or pigs that shed S. enterica infrequently. In a comparison of the differentially abundant bacteria in the naturally infected pigs compared to experimentally challenged pigs, 9 genera were differentially abundant and each exhibited the same increase or decrease in abundance between the two groups. Thus, there were similar changes in the GI microbiome associated with carriage of S. enterica regardless of whether the pigs were experimentally challenged with S. enterica or acquired it naturally.

  14. Changes in the Porcine Intestinal Microbiome in Response to Infection with Salmonella enterica and Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Randall S.; Gebhart, Connie J.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Johnson, Timothy; Isaacson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of food borne illness. Recent studies have shown that S. enterica is a pathogen capable of causing alterations to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. A recent prospective study of French pork production farms found a statistically significant association between Lawsonia intracellularis and carriage of S. enterica. In the current study the composition of the gut microbiome was determined in pigs challenged with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and or L. intracellularis and compared to non-challenged control pigs. Principal coordinate analysis demonstrated that there was a disruption in the composition of the gut microbiome in the colon and cecum of pigs challenged with either pathogen. The compositions of the microbiomes of challenged pigs were similar to each other but differed from the non-challenged controls. There also were statistically significant increases in Anaerobacter, Barnesiella, Pediococcus, Sporacetigenium, Turicibacter, Catenibacterium, Prevotella, Pseudobutyrivibrio, and Xylanibacter in the challenged pigs. To determine if these changes were specific to experimentally challenged pigs, we determined the compositions of the fecal microbiomes of naturally infected pigs that were carriers of S. enterica. Pigs that were frequent shedders of S. enterica were shown to have similar fecal microbiomes compared to non-shedders or pigs that shed S. enterica infrequently. In a comparison of the differentially abundant bacteria in the naturally infected pigs compared to experimentally challenged pigs, 9 genera were differentially abundant and each exhibited the same increase or decrease in abundance between the two groups. Thus, there were similar changes in the GI microbiome associated with carriage of S. enterica regardless of whether the pigs were experimentally challenged with S. enterica or acquired it naturally. PMID:26461107

  15. Is there a role for lactobacilli in prevention of urogenital and intestinal infections?

    PubMed Central

    Reid, G; Bruce, A W; McGroarty, J A; Cheng, K J; Costerton, J W

    1990-01-01

    This review describes the importance of microbial adhesion in the ecology of the urogenital and intestinal tracts and the influence of host and microbial factors in bacterial interference. In a recent revival of interest in bacterial interference, lactobacillus administration has been studied as a means of treating and preventing disease. Although evidence is conflicting, Lactobacillus acidophilus appears to be involved in beneficial antagonistic and cooperative reactions that interfere with establishment of pathogens in the gastrointestinal tract. The mechanisms of action are believed to involve competitive exclusion and production of inhibitory substances, including bacteriocins. These characteristics, as well as demonstrated adherence abilities in vitro, led to selection of certain Lactobacillus strains for clinical studies of cystitis. Weekly intravaginal Lactobacillus therapy reduced the recurrence rate of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections in women. Use of Lactobacillus strains resistant to Nonoxynol-9, a spermicide that kills members of the protective normal vaginal flora, may have potential for use in women with recurrent cystitis using this contraceptive agent. In veterinary studies, bacterial interference by administration of probiotics has also been beneficial in disease prevention in animals. Carefully selected bacterial mixtures integrate with the gastrointestinal flora of the animals and can confer disease resistance and improve physiological function. Additional human and animal trials are needed to determine the practical, long-term usefulness of bacterial interference as a protective mechanism against infectious diseases. Images PMID:2224835

  16. Prevalence and age-dependent occurrence of intestinal protozoan infections in suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Damriyasa, I Made; Bauer, Christian

    2006-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey was performed on 20 pig breeding farms in southern Hesse, central Germany, to evaluate the prevalence and age-dependent occurrence of intestinal protozoan parasites in unweaned piglets. Faecal samples of 514 clinically unaffected piglets of different age (< 1 to 5-7 weeks) were examined using the sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin (SAF) concentration technique. Infections with the following protozoan species were detected: Balantidium coli (16 of 20 farms), Entamoeba sp. (15), Jodamoeba sp. (14), Isospora (I.) suis (9), Chilomastix sp. (6) and Eimeria spp. (6). The protozoan species differed in the start and course of (oo)cyst excretion. I. suis oocysts and Jodamoeba cysts were detected already in the first week of life whereas shedding of the other parasites started later on. The prevalence of Isospora oocyst excretion increased to a maximum (18%) in 2-3 weeks old animals followed by a sharp decline. The proportion of Balantidium, Entamoeba or Jodamoeba positive suckling piglets continously increased until the age of 5-7 weeks to 60%, 52% and 22%, respectively, whereas that of Chilomastix positive animals remained on a low level of 8-12% independent of the age. Eimeria oocysts were found transiently in the faeces of 1-4 weeks old piglets. PMID:17009710

  17. [General infection prevention in abdominal surgery with special reference to intestinal decontamination].

    PubMed

    Schardey, H M

    1999-01-01

    In surgery prophylaxis for infection is necessary, because patients are immunocompromised due to the underlying disease and the operation while at the same time being increasingly exposed to potentially pathogenic germs. Prophylaxis is based on the control of endogenous and exogenous microorganisms. For this purpose either systemic or locally active topical agents may be employed. Systemically active substances are applied with the aim to kill and eliminate invasive microorganisms in deep tissue levels, either by their own biological activity or by stimulating specific or unspecific host immune reactions. Local topical measures in contrast are to prevent the primary contact between microorganisms and host. The central pillar of systemic measures is the perioperative systemic antibiotic prophylaxis, immunonutrition is beginning to gain importance, and in the future possibly substances such as G-CSF, which directly stimulate the immune system, may be employed. Standard topical measures are sterilization and desinfection while decontamination of the digestive tract has until now not found a wide spread acceptance. For certain indications especially high risk surgical resections with anastomoses at the level of the oesophagus or the lower rectum it is possible to eliminate endogenous intestinal microorganisms effectively using topical decontamination in combination with systemic antibiotics and improve the surgical results, especially anastomotic healing.

  18. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection - Systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kottanattu, Lisa; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Helbling, Rossana; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Bianchetti, Mario G; Milani, Gregorio P

    2016-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis have been occasionally reported in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. We completed a review of the literature and retained 48 scientific reports published between 1966 and 2016 for the final analysis. Acute pancreatitis was recognized in 14 and acalculous cholecystitis in 37 patients with primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. In all patients, the features of acute pancreatitis or acalculous cholecystitis concurrently developed with those of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis resolved following a hospital stay of 25days or less. Acalculous cholecystitis was associated with Gilbert-Meulengracht syndrome in two cases. In conclusion, this thorough analysis indicates that acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis are unusual but plausible complications of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis deserve consideration in cases with severe abdominal pain. These complications are usually rather mild and resolve spontaneously without sequelae. PMID:27434148

  19. Large intestine-targeted, nanoparticle-releasing oral vaccine to control genitorectal viral infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing; Talton, James; Zhang, Guofeng; Cunningham, Tshaka; Wang, Zijian; Waters, Robert C; Kirk, James; Eppler, Bärbel; Klinman, Dennis M; Sui, Yongjun; Gagnon, Susan; Belyakov, Igor M; Mumper, Russell J; Berzofsky, Jay A

    2012-08-01

    Both rectal and vaginal mucosal surfaces serve as transmission routes for pathogenic microorganisms. Vaccination through large intestinal mucosa, previously proven protective for both of these mucosal sites in animal studies, can be achieved successfully by direct intracolorectal (i.c.r.) administration, but this route is clinically impractical. Oral vaccine delivery seems preferable but runs the risk of the vaccine's destruction in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, we designed a large intestine-targeted oral delivery with pH-dependent microparticles containing vaccine nanoparticles, which induced colorectal immunity in mice comparably to colorectal vaccination and protected against rectal and vaginal viral challenge. Conversely, vaccine targeted to the small intestine induced only small intestinal immunity and provided no rectal or vaginal protection, demonstrating functional compartmentalization within the gut mucosal immune system. Therefore, using this oral vaccine delivery system to target the large intestine, but not the small intestine, may represent a feasible new strategy for immune protection of rectal and vaginal mucosa.

  20. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... drugs to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). This guidance finalizes...

  1. SURVEY OF HOUSE RAT INTESTINAL PARASITES FROM SURABAYA DISTRICT, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA THAT CAN CAUSE OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HUMANS.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, R H

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of house rat zoonotic intestinal parasites from Surabaya District, East Java, Indonesia that have the potential to cause opportunistic infection in humans. House rat fecal samples were collected from an area of Surabaya District with a dense rat population during May 2015. Intestinal parasites were detected microscopically using direct smear of feces stained with Lugol's iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. The fecal samples were also cultured for Strongyloides stercoralis. Ninety-eight house rat fecal samples were examined. The potential opportunistic infection parasite densities found in those samples were Strongyloides stercoralis in 53%, Hymenolepis nana in 42%, Cryptosporidium spp in 33%, and Blastocystis spp in 6%. This is the first report of this kind in Surabaya District. Measures need to be taken to control the house rat population in the study area to reduce the risk of the public health problem. Keywords: zoonotic intestinal parasites, opportunistic infection, house rat, densely populated area, Indonesia PMID:27244955

  2. Intestinal mucosal mast cells from rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis contain protease-resistant chondroitin sulfate di-B proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.L.; Lee, T.D.G.; Seldin, D.C.; Austen, K.F.; Befus, A.D.; Bienenstock, J.

    1986-07-01

    Rats infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were injected i.p. with 2 mCi of (/sup 35/S) sulfate on days 13, 15, 17, and 19 after infection. The intestines were removed from animals on day 20 or 21 after infection, the intestinal cells were obtained by collagenase treatment and mechanical dispersion of the tissue, and the /sup 35/S-labeled mucosal mast cells (MMC) were enriched to 60 to 65% purity by Percoll centrifugation. The isolated proteoglycans were of approx. 150,000 m.w., were resistant to pronase degradation, and contained highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate side chains. The presence in normal mammalian cells of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that contain a high percentage of the unusual disulfated di-B disaccharide has not been previously reported. The rat intestinal MMC proteoglycans are the first chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that have been isolated from an enriched populations of normal mast cells. They are homologous to the chondroitin sulfate-rich proteoglycans of the transformed rat basophilic leumekia-1 cell and the cultured interleukin 3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell, in that these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are all highly sulfated, protease-resistant proteoglycans.

  3. A Multi-Omic View of Host-Pathogen-Commensal Interplay in Salmonella-Mediated Intestinal Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Brooke LD; Li, Jie; Sanford, James A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Jones, Marcus B.; Peterson, Christine; Peterson, Scott N.; Frank, Bryan C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Brown, Joseph N.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-06-26

    The potential for commensal microorganisms indigenous to a host (the ‘microbiome’ or ‘microbiota’) to alter infection outcome by influencing host-pathogen interplay is largely unknown. We used a multi-omics “systems” approach, incorporating proteomics, metabolomics, glycomics, and metagenomics, to explore the molecular interplay between the murine host, the pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), and commensal gut microorganisms during intestinal infection with S. Typhimurium. We find proteomic evidence that S. Typhimurium thrives within the infected 129/SvJ mouse gut without antibiotic pre-treatment, inducing inflammation and disrupting the intestinal microbiome (e.g., suppressing Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes while promoting growth of Salmonella and Enterococcus). Alteration of the host microbiome population structure was highly correlated with gut environmental changes, including the accumulation of metabolites normally consumed by commensal microbiota. Finally, the less characterized phase of S. Typhimurium’s lifecycle was investigated, and both proteomic and glycomic evidence suggests S. Typhimurium may take advantage of increased fucose moieties to metabolize fucose while growing in the gut. The application of multiple omics measurements to Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation provides insights into complex molecular strategies employed during pathogenesis between host, pathogen, and the microbiome.

  4. A Multi-Omic View of Host-Pathogen-Commensal Interplay in Salmonella-Mediated Intestinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L.; Li, Jie; Sanford, James A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Jones, Marcus B.; Peterson, Christine T.; Peterson, Scott N.; Frank, Bryan C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Brown, Joseph N.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-01-01

    The potential for commensal microorganisms indigenous to a host (the ‘microbiome’ or ‘microbiota’) to alter infection outcome by influencing host-pathogen interplay is largely unknown. We used a multi-omics “systems” approach, incorporating proteomics, metabolomics, glycomics, and metagenomics, to explore the molecular interplay between the murine host, the pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), and commensal gut microorganisms during intestinal infection with S. Typhimurium. We find proteomic evidence that S. Typhimurium thrives within the infected 129/SvJ mouse gut without antibiotic pre-treatment, inducing inflammation and disrupting the intestinal microbiome (e.g., suppressing Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes while promoting growth of Salmonella and Enterococcus). Alteration of the host microbiome population structure was highly correlated with gut environmental changes, including the accumulation of metabolites normally consumed by commensal microbiota. Finally, the less characterized phase of S. Typhimurium’s lifecycle was investigated, and both proteomic and glycomic evidence suggests S. Typhimurium may take advantage of increased fucose moieties to metabolize fucose while growing in the gut. The application of multiple omics measurements to Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation provides insights into complex molecular strategies employed during pathogenesis between host, pathogen, and the microbiome. PMID:23840608

  5. SURVEY OF HOUSE RAT INTESTINAL PARASITES FROM SURABAYA DISTRICT, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA THAT CAN CAUSE OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HUMANS.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, R H

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of house rat zoonotic intestinal parasites from Surabaya District, East Java, Indonesia that have the potential to cause opportunistic infection in humans. House rat fecal samples were collected from an area of Surabaya District with a dense rat population during May 2015. Intestinal parasites were detected microscopically using direct smear of feces stained with Lugol's iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. The fecal samples were also cultured for Strongyloides stercoralis. Ninety-eight house rat fecal samples were examined. The potential opportunistic infection parasite densities found in those samples were Strongyloides stercoralis in 53%, Hymenolepis nana in 42%, Cryptosporidium spp in 33%, and Blastocystis spp in 6%. This is the first report of this kind in Surabaya District. Measures need to be taken to control the house rat population in the study area to reduce the risk of the public health problem. Keywords: zoonotic intestinal parasites, opportunistic infection, house rat, densely populated area, Indonesia

  6. [The redox potentials and morphological features of the pancreas, small intestines and liver under early enteral nutrition via micro-jejunostomy in modeling of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Khatchapuridze, G; Leonov, V

    2014-01-01

    The article investigates morphological changes in pancreas, liver, and small intestine after early enteral nutrition in Vistar rats after modeling of acute pancreatitis and creation of jejunostomy. Morphological changes and redox potential measurements show that early enteral nutrition via micro-jejunostomy slows down the development of pathological processes in Vistar rats. PMID:24523337

  7. Chikungunya virus infection amongst the acute encephalitis syndrome cases in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Taraphdar, D; Roy, B K; Chatterjee, S

    2015-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection from the acute encephalitis syndrome cases is an uncommon form and has been observed in the year 2010-11 from West Bengal, India. The case-1 and case-2 had the acute encephalitis syndrome; case-3 was of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis whereas the case-4 had the symptoms of meningo-encephalopathy with bulbar involvement. We are reporting four cases with neurological complications involving central nervous system (CNS) due to CHIKV infection from this state for the first time. The virus has spread almost every districts of this state rapidly. At this stage, these cases are public health threat.

  8. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis in 7 dogs from Saskatchewan.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Astrid B; Carr, Anthony P; Gaunt, M Casey

    2016-09-01

    Seven dogs diagnosed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis are described. Disease severity ranged from mild in adults to fatal disease in young dogs. Enteropathogenic E. coli infection should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in dogs with diarrhea. PMID:27587889

  9. Development of Chronic and Acute Golden Syrian Hamster Infection Models with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The golden Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) is frequently used as a model to study virulence for several species of Leptospira. Onset of an acute, lethal infection following infection with several pathogenic Leptospira species has been widely adopted for vaccine testing. An important exceptio...

  10. Inflammation-associated alterations to the intestinal microbiota reduce colonization resistance against non-typhoidal Salmonella during concurrent malaria parasite infection

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Jason P.; Lokken, Kristen L.; Byndloss, Mariana X.; George, Michael D.; Velazquez, Eric M.; Faber, Franziska; Butler, Brian P.; Walker, Gregory T.; Ali, Mohamed M.; Potts, Rashaun; Tiffany, Caitlin; Ahmer, Brian M. M.; Luckhart, Shirley; Tsolis, Renée M.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood malaria is a risk factor for disseminated infections with non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) in sub-Saharan Africa. While hemolytic anemia and an altered cytokine environment have been implicated in increased susceptibility to NTS, it is not known whether malaria affects resistance to intestinal colonization with NTS. To address this question, we utilized a murine model of co-infection. Infection of mice with Plasmodium yoelii elicited infiltration of inflammatory macrophages and T cells into the intestinal mucosa and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines. These mucosal responses were also observed in germ-free mice, showing that they are independent of the resident microbiota. Remarkably, P. yoelii infection reduced colonization resistance of mice against S. enterica serotype Typhimurium. Further, 16S rRNA sequence analysis of the intestinal microbiota revealed marked changes in the community structure. Shifts in the microbiota increased susceptibility to intestinal colonization by S. Typhimurium, as demonstrated by microbiota reconstitution of germ-free mice. These results show that P. yoelii infection, via alterations to the microbial community in the intestine, decreases resistance to intestinal colonization with NTS. Further they raise the possibility that decreased colonization resistance may synergize with effects of malaria on systemic immunity to increase susceptibility to disseminated NTS infections. PMID:26434367

  11. Anomaly Detection in Host Signaling Pathways for the Early Prognosis of Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark D.; Ogle, Serenity; Forero, Adriana; Morrison, Juliet; Slayden, Richard; Katze, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of acute infectious diseases during the early stages of infection is critical to administering the appropriate treatment to improve the disease outcome. We present a data driven analysis of the human cellular response to respiratory viruses including influenza, respiratory syncytia virus, and human rhinovirus, and compared this with the response to the bacterial endotoxin, Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Using an anomaly detection framework we identified pathways that clearly distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients infected with the four different respiratory viruses and that accurately diagnosed patients exposed to a bacterial infection. Connectivity pathway analysis comparing the viral and bacterial diagnostic signatures identified host cellular pathways that were unique to patients exposed to LPS endotoxin indicating this type of analysis could be used to identify host biomarkers that can differentiate clinical etiologies of acute infection. We applied the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) on two human influenza (H1N1 and H3N2) gene expression data sets to define host networks perturbed in the asymptomatic phase of infection. Our analysis identified pathways in the respiratory virus diagnostic signature as prognostic biomarkers that triggered prior to clinical presentation of acute symptoms. These early warning pathways correctly predicted that almost half of the subjects would become symptomatic in less than forty hours post-infection and that three of the 18 subjects would become symptomatic after only 8 hours. These results provide a proof-of-concept for utility of anomaly detection algorithms to classify host pathway signatures that can identify presymptomatic signatures of acute diseases and differentiate between etiologies of infection. On a global scale, acute respiratory infections cause a significant proportion of human co-morbidities and account for 4.25 million deaths annually. The development of clinical

  12. Anomaly Detection in Host Signaling Pathways for the Early Prognosis of Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Langevin, Stanley; O'Hern, Corey S; Shattuck, Mark D; Ogle, Serenity; Forero, Adriana; Morrison, Juliet; Slayden, Richard; Katze, Michael G; Kirby, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of acute infectious diseases during the early stages of infection is critical to administering the appropriate treatment to improve the disease outcome. We present a data driven analysis of the human cellular response to respiratory viruses including influenza, respiratory syncytia virus, and human rhinovirus, and compared this with the response to the bacterial endotoxin, Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Using an anomaly detection framework we identified pathways that clearly distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients infected with the four different respiratory viruses and that accurately diagnosed patients exposed to a bacterial infection. Connectivity pathway analysis comparing the viral and bacterial diagnostic signatures identified host cellular pathways that were unique to patients exposed to LPS endotoxin indicating this type of analysis could be used to identify host biomarkers that can differentiate clinical etiologies of acute infection. We applied the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) on two human influenza (H1N1 and H3N2) gene expression data sets to define host networks perturbed in the asymptomatic phase of infection. Our analysis identified pathways in the respiratory virus diagnostic signature as prognostic biomarkers that triggered prior to clinical presentation of acute symptoms. These early warning pathways correctly predicted that almost half of the subjects would become symptomatic in less than forty hours post-infection and that three of the 18 subjects would become symptomatic after only 8 hours. These results provide a proof-of-concept for utility of anomaly detection algorithms to classify host pathway signatures that can identify presymptomatic signatures of acute diseases and differentiate between etiologies of infection. On a global scale, acute respiratory infections cause a significant proportion of human co-morbidities and account for 4.25 million deaths annually. The development of clinical

  13. Acute intestinal obstruction caused by a persimmon phytobezoar after dissolution therapy with Coca-Cola.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seung Soo; Lee, Hyun Suk; Jung, Min Kyu; Jeon, Seong Woo; Cho, Chang Min; Kim, Sung Kook; Choi, Yong Hwan

    2007-12-01

    Bezoars are concretions or hard masses of foreign matter that are found in the gastrointestinal tract. Recent reports have demonstrated the efficacy of Coca-Cola administration for the dissolution of phytobezors. Here we report on a 73-year-old man with a very large gastric persimmon diospyrobezoar, and this caused small intestinal obstruction after partial dissolution with oral and injected Coca-Cola.

  14. Efficacy of praziquantel and reinfection patterns in single and mixed infection foci for intestinal and urogenital schistosomiasis in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Tchuem Tchuenté, Louis-Albert; Momo, Sabine C; Stothard, J Russell; Rollinson, David

    2013-11-01

    The regular administration of the anthelminthic drug praziquantel (PZQ) to school-aged children (and other high-risk groups) is the cornerstone of schistosomiasis control. Whilst the performance of PZQ against single schistosome species infections is well-known, performance against mixed species infections is less so, as are patterns of re-infection following treatment. To address this, a study using a double treatment with PZQ, administered at 40 mg/kg spaced by 3 weeks, took place in two mixed intestinal-urogenital schistosomiasis foci in northern Cameroon (Bessoum and Ouro-Doukoudje) and in one single intestinal schistosomiasis infection focus (Makenene). A total of just under 1000 children were examined and the Schistosoma-infected children were re-examined at several parasitological follow-ups over a 1-year period posttreatment. Overall cure rates against Schistosoma spp. in the three settings were good, 83.3% (95% confidence interval (CI)=77.9-87.7%) in Bessoum, 89.0% (95% CI=79.1-94.6%) in Ouro Doukoudje, and 95.3% (95% CI=89.5-98.0%) in Makenene. Interestingly, no case of mixed schistosome infection was found after treatment. Cure rates for S. mansoni varied from 99.5% to 100%, while that for S. haematobium were considerably lower, varying from 82.7% to 88.0%. Across transmission settings, patterns of re-infection for each schistosome species were different such that generalizations across foci were difficult. For example, at the 6-month follow-up, re-infection rates were higher for S. haematobium than for S. mansoni with re-infection rates for S. haematobium varying from 9.5% to 66.7%, while for S. mansoni, lower rates were observed, ranging between nil and 24.5%. At the 12-month follow-up, re-infection rates varied from 9.1% to 66.7% for S. haematobium and from nil to 27.6% for S. mansoni. Alongside these parasitological studies, concurrent malacological surveys took place to monitor the presence of intermediate host snails of schistosomiasis. In the two

  15. Prevalence and risk factors of helminths and intestinal protozoa infections among children from primary schools in western Tajikistan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitic infections represent a public health problem in Tajikistan, but epidemiological evidence is scarce. The present study aimed at assessing the extent of helminths and intestinal protozoa infections among children of 10 schools in four districts of Tajikistan, and to make recommendations for control. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out in early 2009. All children attending grades 2 and 3 (age: 7-11 years) from 10 randomly selected schools were invited to provide a stool sample and interviewed about sanitary situation and hygiene behaviour. A questionnaire pertaining to demographic and socioeconomic characteristics was addressed to the heads of households. On the spot, stool samples were subjected to duplicate Kato-Katz thick smear examination for helminth diagnosis. Additionally, 1-2 g of stool was fixed in sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin, transferred to a specialised laboratory in Europe and examined for helminths and intestinal protozoa. The composite results from both methods served as diagnostic 'gold' standard. Results Out of 623 registered children, 602 participated in our survey. The overall prevalence of infection with helminths and pathogenic intestinal protozoa was 32.0% and 47.1%, respectively. There was pronounced spatial heterogeneity. The most common helminth species was Hymenolepis nana (25.8%), whereas the prevalences of Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and Enterobius vermicularis were below 5%. The prevalence of pathogenic intestinal protozoa, namely Giardia intestinalis and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar was 26.4% and 25.9%, respectively. Almost half of the households draw drinking water from unimproved sources, such as irrigation canals, rivers and unprotected wells. Sanitary facilities were pit latrines, mostly private, and a few shared with neighbours. The use of public tap/standpipe as a source of drinking water emerged as a protective factor for G. intestinalis infection. Protected spring water

  16. Acute Heat Stress and Reduced Nutrient Intake Alter Intestinal Proteomic Profile and Gene Expression in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Sarah C.; Lonergan, Steven M.; Huff-Lonergan, Elisabeth; Baumgard, Lance H.; Gabler, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress and reduced feed intake negatively affect intestinal integrity and barrier function. Our objective was to compare ileum protein profiles of pigs subjected to 12 hours of HS, thermal neutral ad libitum feed intake, or pair-fed to heat stress feed intake under thermal neutral conditions (pair-fed thermal neutral). 2D-Differential In Gel Electrophoresis and gene expression were performed. Relative abundance of 281 and 138 spots differed due to heat stress, compared to thermal neutral and pair-fed thermal neutral pigs, respectively. However, only 20 proteins were different due to feed intake (thermal neutral versus pair-fed thermal neutral). Heat stress increased mRNA expression of heat shock proteins and protein abundance of heat shock proteins 27, 70, 90-α and β were also increased. Heat stress reduced ileum abundance of several metabolic enzymes, many of which are involved in the glycolytic or TCA pathways, indicating a change in metabolic priorities. Stress response enzymes peroxiredoxin-1 and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A were decreased in pair-fed thermal neutral and thermal neutral pigs compared to heat stress. Heat stress increased mRNA abundance markers of ileum hypoxia. Altogether, these data show that heat stress directly alters intestinal protein and mRNA profiles largely independent of reduced feed intake. These changes may be related to the reduced intestinal integrity associated with heat stress. PMID:26575181

  17. Acute hepatitis C virus infection related to capillary blood glucose meter

    PubMed Central

    Inayat, Faisal; Rai, Aitzaz BinSultan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects an estimated 130-150 million people worldwide, becoming the major cause of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver transplantation. There are various preventable modes of transmission of HCV infection, including needlestick and sharps injuries. However, HCV infection secondary to needlestick injury by a capillary blood glucose meter (CBGM) lancet has not been previously well reported. We describe an unusual case of a 25-year-old male medical student, acquiring acute HCV infection with a lancing device of CBGM. The source patient was a 54-year-old diabetic male with positive anti-HCV test results. In our patient, after 3 months of initial exposure, a standard set of investigations confirmed the diagnosis of acute HCV infection with the same genotype (3a) as the source. The CBGM, as in our case, may have a role in the transmission of HCV infection warranting radical advancements in diabetes screening and monitoring technology. PMID:26739982

  18. Impact of early cART in the gut during acute HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Deleage, Claire; Schuetz, Alexandra; Alvord, W. Gregory; Johnston, Leslie; Hao, Xing-Pei; Morcock, David R.; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Fletcher, James L.K.; Puttamaswin, Suwanna; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Dewar, Robin; McCune, Joseph M.; Robb, Merlin; Kim, Jerome H.; Schacker, Timothy W.; Hunt, Peter; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2016-01-01

    Early after HIV infection there is substantial depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract lamina propria (LP), with associated epithelial barrier damage, leading to microbial translocation and systemic inflammation and immune activation. In this study, we analyzed these early events in the GI tract in a cohort of Thai acute HIV-infected patients and determined the effect of early combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). HIV-uninfected and chronically and acutely HIV-infected patients at different Fiebig stages (I–V) underwent colonic biopsies and then received cART. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis were performed on cross-sectional and longitudinal colon biopsy specimens (day 0 to week 96) to measure GI tract damage (infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells), inflammation (Mx1, TNF-α), immune activation (Ki-67), and the CD4+ T cell population in the LP. The magnitude of GI tract damage, immune activation, and inflammation was significantly increased, with significantly depleted CD4+ T cells in the LP in all acutely infected groups prior to cART compared with HIV-uninfected control participants. While most patients treated during acute infection resolved GI tract inflammation and immune activation back to baseline levels after 24 weeks of cART, most acutely infected participants did not restore their CD4+ T cells after 96 weeks of cART. PMID:27446990

  19. Impact of early cART in the gut during acute HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Deleage, Claire; Schuetz, Alexandra; Alvord, W. Gregory; Johnston, Leslie; Hao, Xing-Pei; Morcock, David R.; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Fletcher, James L.K.; Puttamaswin, Suwanna; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Dewar, Robin; McCune, Joseph M.; Sereti, Irini; Robb, Merlin; Kim, Jerome H.; Schacker, Timothy W.; Hunt, Peter; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Estes, Jacob D.

    2016-01-01

    Early after HIV infection there is substantial depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract lamina propria (LP), with associated epithelial barrier damage, leading to microbial translocation and systemic inflammation and immune activation. In this study, we analyzed these early events in the GI tract in a cohort of Thai acute HIV-infected patients and determined the effect of early combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). HIV-uninfected and chronically and acutely HIV-infected patients at different Fiebig stages (I–V) underwent colonic biopsies and then received cART. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis were performed on cross-sectional and longitudinal colon biopsy specimens (day 0 to week 96) to measure GI tract damage (infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells), inflammation (M×1, TNF-α), immune activation (Ki-67), and the CD4+ T cell population in the LP. The magnitude of GI tract damage, immune activation, and inflammation was significantly increased, with significantly depleted CD4+ T cells in the LP in all acutely infected groups prior to cART compared with HIV-uninfected control participants. While most patients treated during acute infection resolved GI tract inflammation and immune activation back to baseline levels after 24 weeks of cART, most acutely infected participants did not restore their CD4+ T cells after 96 weeks of cART. PMID:27446990

  20. Relationship of Salmonella infection and inflammatory intestinal response with hematological and serum biochemical values in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Soria, Mario Alberto; Bonnet, María Agustina; Bueno, Dante Javier

    2015-06-15

    There are few studies about the blood serum of laying hens infected with Salmonella. The differential leukocyte count and blood chemistry values are an important aid in the diagnosis of human diseases, but blood parameters in the avian species are not well known. On the other hand, invasive forms of bacterial gastroenteritis, like Salmonella, often cause intestinal inflammation so this study was undertaken to find a biomarker of Salmonella infection and inflammatory intestinal response in the hematological or serum biochemical parameters in laying hens. Furthermore, we evaluated the association of some farm characteristics with Salmonella infection and fecal leukocytes (FL). A fecal sample with at least one fecal leukocyte per field was considered positive for inflammatory intestinal response. False positive serum reactions for Salmonella infection, by serum plate agglutination (SPA) test, were reduced by heating the sample to 56°C for 30 min and then diluting it 5-fold. The range of hematological and biochemical parameter values was very wide, in addition, there was a poor agreement between the SPA and FL results. Comparison of the positive and negative samples in SPA and FL showed that 1.3% and 79.8% of the laying hens were positive and negative in both tests, respectively. Hens with a positive SPA result showed a higher percentage of monocytes than those with a negative SPA result. Hens with a positive FL test had a higher percentage of heterophils, ratio of heterophils to lymphocytes and aspartate aminotransferase values, while the percentage of lymphocytes was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those with a negative FL test. The risk of Salmonella infection increased when the age of laying hens and the number of hens per poultry house was greater than or equal to 18 months old and 10,000 laying hens, compared to less than 18 months old and 10,000 laying hens, respectively. On the other hand, the risk of inflammatory intestinal response was higher in laying

  1. Tissue-Specific B-Cell Dysfunction and Generalized Memory B-Cell Loss during Acute SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Peruchon, Sandrine; Chaoul, Nada; Burelout, Chantal; Delache, Benoit; Brochard, Patricia; Laurent, Pascale; Cognasse, Fabrice; Prévot, Sophie; Garraud, Olivier; Le Grand, Roger; Richard, Yolande

    2009-01-01

    Background Primary HIV-infected patients display severe and irreversible damage to different blood B-cell subsets which is not restored by highly efficient anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Because longitudinal investigations of primary HIV-infection is limited by the availability of lymphoid organs, we studied the tissue-specific B-cell dysfunctions in acutely simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) mac251-infected Cynomolgus macaques. Methods and Findings Experiments were performed on three groups of macaques infected for 14, 21 or 28 days and on three groups of animals treated with HAART for two-weeks either initiated at 4 h, 7 or 14 days post-infection (p.i.). We have simultaneously compared changes in B-cell phenotypes and functions and tissue organization of B-cell areas in various lymphoid organs. We showed that SIV induced a steady decline in SIgG-expressing memory (SIgD−CD27+) B-cells in spleen and lymph nodes during the first 4 weeks of infection, concomitant to selective homing/sequestration of B-cells to the small intestine and spleen. SIV non-specific Ig production was transiently increased before D14p.i., whereas SIV-specific Ig production was only detectable after D14p.i., coinciding with the presence of CD8+ T-cells and IgG-expressing plasma cells within germinal centres. Transient B-cell apoptosis on D14p.i. and commitment to terminal differentiation contributed to memory B-cell loss. HAART abrogated B-cell apoptosis, homing to the small intestine and SIV-specific Ig production but had minimal effect on early Ig production, increased B-cell proportions in spleen and loss of memory B-cells. Therefore, virus–B-cell interactions and SIV-induced inflammatory cytokines may differently contribute to early B-cell dysfunction and impaired SIV/HIV-specific antibody response. Conclusions These data establish tissue-specific impairments in B-cell trafficking and functions and a generalized and steady memory B-cell loss in secondary lymphoid organs

  2. PREVALENCE, RISK FACTORS AND SYMPTOMS ASSOCIATED TO INTESTINAL PARASITE INFECTIONS AMONG PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS IN NAHAVAND, WESTERN IRAN.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Hamed; Haghighi, Ali; Rostami, Ali; Azargashb, Eznollah; Tabaei, Seyyed Javad Seyyed; Solgi, Abbas; Zebardast, Nozhat

    2016-01-01

    We studied the prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs), their risk factors and associated symptoms among patients with gastrointestinal disorders. A total of 1,301 participants aged 22 days-90 years were enrolled in this study. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain socio-demographic and stool examination to investigate intestinal parasite infections. Data analysis was performed using SPSS16. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs) was 32.2% (419/1,301). Three hundred and fifty nine cases/1,301 (27.6%) were infected with a single parasite and 60/1,301 cases (4.6%) presented polyparasitism. The most common IP was Blastocystis sp. 350/1,301 (26.9%), followed by Entamoeba coli 38/1,301 (2.92%), Giardia lamblia 30/1,301 (2.3%) and Cryptosporidium spp. 17/1,301 (1.3%). Regarding the socio-demographic variables, educational status (p = 0.001), contact with domestic animals and soil (p = 0.02), age above 15 years (p = 0.001) and seasons (p = 0.001) were significantly associated to intestinal parasitic infections. Concerning clinical characteristics, the presence of IPs was significantly associated to diarrhea (OR = 1.57; CI 95% = 1.24-1.98; p < 0.001) and dysentery (OR = 1.94; CI 95% = 1.03-3.66; p < 0.04). Our findings suggest that IPs are one of the main causal agents of gastrointestinal disorders. Improving the knowledge on local risk factors such as poverty, low level of education, poor sanitation, contact with soil and contact with domestic animal is warranted. PMID:27253744

  3. PREVALENCE, RISK FACTORS AND SYMPTOMS ASSOCIATED TO INTESTINAL PARASITE INFECTIONS AMONG PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS IN NAHAVAND, WESTERN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    KIANI, Hamed; HAGHIGHI, Ali; ROSTAMI, Ali; AZARGASHB, Eznollah; TABAEI, Seyyed Javad Seyyed; SOLGI, Abbas; ZEBARDAST, Nozhat

    2016-01-01

    We studied the prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs), their risk factors and associated symptoms among patients with gastrointestinal disorders. A total of 1,301 participants aged 22 days-90 years were enrolled in this study. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain socio-demographic and stool examination to investigate intestinal parasite infections. Data analysis was performed using SPSS16. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs) was 32.2% (419/1,301). Three hundred and fifty nine cases/1,301 (27.6%) were infected with a single parasite and 60/1,301 cases (4.6%) presented polyparasitism. The most common IP was Blastocystis sp. 350/1,301 (26.9%), followed by Entamoeba coli 38/1,301 (2.92%), Giardia lamblia 30/1,301 (2.3%) and Cryptosporidium spp. 17/1,301 (1.3%). Regarding the socio-demographic variables, educational status (p = 0.001), contact with domestic animals and soil (p = 0.02), age above 15 years (p = 0.001) and seasons (p = 0.001) were significantly associated to intestinal parasitic infections. Concerning clinical characteristics, the presence of IPs was significantly associated to diarrhea (OR = 1.57; CI 95% = 1.24-1.98; p < 0.001) and dysentery (OR = 1.94; CI 95% = 1.03-3.66; p < 0.04). Our findings suggest that IPs are one of the main causal agents of gastrointestinal disorders. Improving the knowledge on local risk factors such as poverty, low level of education, poor sanitation, contact with soil and contact with domestic animal is warranted. PMID:27253744

  4. Routine Laboratory Screening for Acute and Recent HIV Infection in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jesse L.; Segura, Eddy R.; Montano, Silvia M.; Leon, Segundo R.; Kochel, Tadeusz; Salvatierra, Hector J.; Alcantara, Jorge; Cáceres, Carlos F.; Coates, Thomas J.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Prior to implementing screening programs for acute HIV infection in developing countries, key issues including cost, feasibility, and public health impact must be determined. We compared fourth-generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with pooled HIV-1 RNA assays for the detection of acute and early HIV infection in counseling and testing populations in Lima, Peru. Methods Adults presenting for HIV testing at designated clinics in Lima-Callao, Peru were offered additional screening for acute HIV infection. All serum samples were tested with fourth-generation Ag/Ab EIA and confirmed by line immunoassay (LIA). Negative specimens were combined into 50-sample pools for HIV-1 RNA screening by PCR analysis in standard pooling algorithms. RNA-positive samples were re-tested with a third-generation EIA to evaluate the relative sensitivity of standard testing procedures. Results Between 2007 and 2008 we recruited 1,191 participants. The prevalence of HIV infection was 3.2% (38/1191; 2.2-4.2%) overall and 10.6% (25/237; CI=6.6-14.5%) among men who reported sex with men (MSM). The prevalence of acute or recent HIV infection was 0.2% (CI=0-0.4%) overall and 0.8% (CI=0-2.0%) among MSM. Compared with third generation EIA testing, both fourth generation EIA and RNA PCR increased the rate of HIV case identification by 5.6% overall and by 8.0% within the subpopulation of MSM. Conclusions Screening for acute HIV infection within Peru's resource-limited public health system was acceptable and detected a high prevalence of acute and recent HIV infection among MSM. Additional efforts are needed to screen for and prevent transmission of HIV among MSM in Peru during the acute seroconversion stage. PMID:21113069

  5. Does chronic hepatitis B infection affect the clinical course of acute hepatitis A?

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Rin; Moh, In Ho; Jung, Sung Won; Kim, Jin Bae; Park, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Su; Jang, Myung Kuk; Lee, Myung Seok

    2013-01-01

    The impact of chronic hepatitis B on the clinical outcome of acute hepatitis A remains controversial. The aim of present study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of acute hepatitis A in cases with underlying chronic hepatitis B compared to cases of acute hepatitis A alone. Data on 758 patients with acute hepatitis A admitted at two university-affiliated hospitals were reviewed. Patients were classified into three groups: group A, patients with both acute hepatitis A and underlying chronic hepatitis B (n = 27); group B, patients infected by acute hepatitis A alone whose sexes and ages were matched with patients in group A (n  = 54); and group C, patients with acute hepatitis A alone (n = 731). None of the demographic features of group A were significantly different from those of group B or C, except for the proportion of males and body weight, which differed from group C. When comparing to group B, clinical symptoms were more frequent, and higher total bilirubin and lower albumin levels were observed in group A. When comparing to group C, the albumin levels were lower in group A. There were no differences in the duration of hospital stay, occurrence of acute kidney injury, acute liver failure, prolonged cholestasis, or relapsing hepatitis. This study revealed that clinical symptoms and laboratory findings were less favorable for patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis B compared to those with acute hepatitis A alone. However, there were no differences in fatal outcomes or serious complications.

  6. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  7. Reassessment of HIV-1 Acute Phase Infectivity: Accounting for Heterogeneity and Study Design with Simulated Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Bellan, Steve E.; Dushoff, Jonathan; Galvani, Alison P.; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2015-01-01

    Background The infectivity of the HIV-1 acute phase has been directly measured only once, from a retrospectively identified cohort of serodiscordant heterosexual couples in Rakai, Uganda. Analyses of this cohort underlie the widespread view that the acute phase is highly infectious, even more so than would be predicted from its elevated viral load, and that transmission occurring shortly after infection may therefore compromise interventions that rely on diagnosis and treatment, such as antiretroviral treatment as prevention (TasP). Here, we re-estimate the duration and relative infectivity of the acute phase, while accounting for several possible sources of bias in published estimates, including the retrospective cohort exclusion criteria and unmeasured heterogeneity in risk. Methods and Findings We estimated acute phase infectivity using two approaches. First, we combined viral load trajectories and viral load-infectivity relationships to estimate infectivity trajectories over the course of infection, under the assumption that elevated acute phase infectivity is caused by elevated viral load alone. Second, we estimated the relative hazard of transmission during the acute phase versus the chronic phase (RHacute) and the acute phase duration (dacute) by fitting a couples transmission model to the Rakai retrospective cohort using approximate Bayesian computation. Our model fit the data well and accounted for characteristics overlooked by previous analyses, including individual heterogeneity in infectiousness and susceptibility and the retrospective cohort's exclusion of couples that were recorded as serodiscordant only once before being censored by loss to follow-up, couple dissolution, or study termination. Finally, we replicated two highly cited analyses of the Rakai data on simulated data to identify biases underlying the discrepancies between previous estimates and our own. From the Rakai data, we estimated RHacute = 5.3 (95% credibility interval [95% CrI]: 0

  8. Viral-bacterial interactions and risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Gent, Janneane F; Pyles, Richard B; Miller, Aaron L; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2011-11-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common complication of upper respiratory tract infection whose pathogenesis involves both viruses and bacteria. We examined risks of acute otitis media associated with specific combinations of respiratory viruses and acute otitis media bacterial pathogens. Data were from a prospective study of children ages 6 to 36 months and included viral and bacterial culture and quantitative PCR for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human bocavirus, and human metapneumovirus. Repeated-measure logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between specific viruses, bacteria, and the risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection. In unadjusted analyses of data from 194 children, adenovirus, bocavirus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis were significantly associated with AOM (P < 0.05 by χ(2) test). Children with high respiratory syncytial virus loads (≥3.16 × 10(7) copies/ml) experienced increased acute otitis media risk. Higher viral loads of bocavirus and metapneumovirus were not significantly associated with acute otitis media. In adjusted models controlling for the presence of key viruses, bacteria, and acute otitis media risk factors, acute otitis media risk was independently associated with high RSV viral load with Streptococcus pneumoniae (odds ratio [OR], 4.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.90 and 10.19) and Haemophilus influenzae (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.38 and 3.02). The risk was higher for the presence of bocavirus and H. influenzae together (OR, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.90 and 6.86). Acute otitis media risk differs by the specific viruses and bacteria involved. Acute otitis media prevention efforts should consider methods for reducing infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus, bocavirus, and adenovirus in addition to acute otitis media bacterial pathogens.

  9. Sequential Bottlenecks Drive Viral Evolution in Early Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Kerensa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Pham, Son T.; Chopra, Abha; Cameron, Barbara; Maher, Lisa; Dore, Gregory J.; White, Peter A.; Lloyd, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a pandemic human RNA virus, which commonly causes chronic infection and liver disease. The characterization of viral populations that successfully initiate infection, and also those that drive progression to chronicity is instrumental for understanding pathogenesis and vaccine design. A comprehensive and longitudinal analysis of the viral population was conducted in four subjects followed from very early acute infection to resolution of disease outcome. By means of next generation sequencing (NGS) and standard cloning/Sanger sequencing, genetic diversity and viral variants were quantified over the course of the infection at frequencies as low as 0.1%. Phylogenetic analysis of reassembled viral variants revealed acute infection was dominated by two sequential bottleneck events, irrespective of subsequent chronicity or clearance. The first bottleneck was associated with transmission, with one to two viral variants successfully establishing infection. The second occurred approximately 100 days post-infection, and was characterized by a decline in viral diversity. In the two subjects who developed chronic infection, this second bottleneck was followed by the emergence of a new viral population, which evolved from the founder variants via a selective sweep with fixation in a small number of mutated sites. The diversity at sites with non-synonymous mutation was higher in predicted cytotoxic T cell epitopes, suggesting immune-driven evolution. These results provide the first detailed analysis of early within-host evolution of HCV, indicating strong selective forces limit viral evolution in the acute phase of infection. PMID:21912520

  10. Regulatory T cells are decreased in acute RHDV lethal infection of adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Luzia; Marques, Raquel M; Aguas, Artur P; Ferreira, Paula G

    2012-08-15

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is the etiologic agent of rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD), an acute lethal infection that kills 90% of adult rabbits due to severe acute liver inflammation. Interestingly, young rabbits are naturally resistant to RHDV infection. Here, we have compared naturally occurring CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) between young and adult rabbits after infection by RHDV. The number and frequency of Tregs was decreased in the spleen of adult rabbits 24h after the RHDV infection; this was in contrast with the unchanged number and frequency of splenic Tregs found in young rabbits after the same infection. Also, serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-β were enhanced in the infected adult rabbits whereas no alteration was observed in infected young rabbits. However, this increase is accompanied by a burst of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but seems not able to prevent the death of the animals with severe acute liver inflammation in few days after infection. Since Tregs downregulate inflammation, we conclude that their decrease may contribute to the natural susceptibility of adult rabbits to RHDV infection.

  11. Tetherin/BST-2 promotes dendritic cell activation and function during acute retrovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sam X.; Barrett, Bradley S.; Guo, Kejun; Kassiotis, George; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Gibbert, Kathrin; Santiago, Mario L.

    2016-01-01

    Tetherin/BST-2 is a host restriction factor that inhibits retrovirus release from infected cells in vitro by tethering nascent virions to the plasma membrane. However, contradictory data exists on whether Tetherin inhibits acute retrovirus infection in vivo. Previously, we reported that Tetherin-mediated inhibition of Friend retrovirus (FV) replication at 2 weeks post-infection correlated with stronger natural killer, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. Here, we further investigated the role of Tetherin in counteracting retrovirus replication in vivo. FV infection levels were similar between wild-type (WT) and Tetherin KO mice at 3 to 7 days post-infection despite removal of a potent restriction factor, Apobec3/Rfv3. However, during this phase of acute infection, Tetherin enhanced myeloid dendritic cell (DC) function. DCs from infected, but not uninfected, WT mice expressed significantly higher MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecule CD80 compared to Tetherin KO DCs. Tetherin-associated DC activation during acute FV infection correlated with stronger NK cell responses. Furthermore, Tetherin+ DCs from FV-infected mice more strongly stimulated FV-specific CD4+ T cells ex vivo compared to Tetherin KO DCs. The results link the antiretroviral and immunomodulatory activity of Tetherin in vivo to improved DC activation and MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:26846717

  12. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. Objectives To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011–2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value < 0.001) and longer hospital length of stay (OR: 1.468; P-value < 0.001). In addition, pneumococcal vaccination was found to be a protective factor in terms of degree of respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role. PMID:27096199

  13. Co-endemicity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Intestinal Helminth Infection in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Ren, Zhou-Peng; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Jin-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2016-03-01

    Both pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and intestinal helminth infection (IHI) affect millions of individuals every year in China. However, the national-scale estimation of prevalence predictors and prevalence maps for these diseases, as well as co-endemic relative risk (RR) maps of both diseases' prevalence are not well developed. There are co-endemic, high prevalence areas of both diseases, whose delimitation is essential for devising effective control strategies. Bayesian geostatistical logistic regression models including socio-economic, climatic, geographical and environmental predictors were fitted separately for active PTB and IHI based on data from the national surveys for PTB and major human parasitic diseases that were completed in 2010 and 2004, respectively. Prevalence maps and co-endemic RR maps were constructed for both diseases by means of Bayesian Kriging model and Bayesian shared component model capable of appraising the fraction of variance of spatial RRs shared by both diseases, and those specific for each one, under an assumption that there are unobserved covariates common to both diseases. Our results indicate that gross domestic product (GDP) per capita had a negative association, while rural regions, the arid and polar zones and elevation had positive association with active PTB prevalence; for the IHI prevalence, GDP per capita and distance to water bodies had a negative association, the equatorial and warm zones and the normalized difference vegetation index had a positive association. Moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in western regions, low to moderate prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in north-central regions and the southeast coastal regions, and moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and high prevalence of IHI were predicted in the south-western regions. Thus, co-endemic areas of active PTB and IHI were located in the south-western regions of China, which

  14. Evaluation of a novel kit (TF-Test) for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jancarlo Ferreira; Hoshino-Shimizu, Sumie; Dias, Luiz Cândido S; Araujo, Ana Júlia S A; Castilho, Vera L P; Neves, Fátima A M A

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are currently a source of concern for Public Health agencies in developing and developed countries. Since three ovum-and-parasite stool examinations have been demonstrated to provide sensitive results, we designed a practical and economical kit (TF-Test) that is now commercially available (Immunoassay Com. Ind. Ltda., São Paulo, Brazil). This kit allows the separate collection of three fecal specimens into a preservative solution. The specimens are then pooled, double-filtered, and concentrated by a single rapid centrifugation process. The TF-Test was evaluated in four different laboratories in a study using 1,102 outpatients and individuals living in an endemic area for enteroparasitosis. The overall sensitivity found using the TF-Test (86.2-97.8%) was significantly higher (P<0.01) than the sensitivity of conventional techniques such as the Coprotest (NL Comércio Exterior Ltda, São Paulo, Brazil) and the combination of Lutz/Hoffman, Faust, and Rugai techniques (De Carli, Diagnóstico Laboratorial das Parasitoses Humanas. Métodos e Técnicas, 1994), which ranged from 48.3% to 75.9%. When the above combined three specimen technique was repeated with three specimens collected on different days, its sensitivity became similar (P>0.01) to that of the TF-Test. The kappa index values of agreement for the TF-Test were consistent (P<0.01), being higher and ranking in a better position than conventional techniques. The high sensitivity, cost/benefit ratio, and practical aspects demonstrate that the TF-Test is suitable for individual diagnosis, epidemiological inquiries, or evaluation of chemotherapy in treated communities.

  15. Co-endemicity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Intestinal Helminth Infection in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Ren, Zhou-Peng; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Jin-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2016-03-01

    Both pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and intestinal helminth infection (IHI) affect millions of individuals every year in China. However, the national-scale estimation of prevalence predictors and prevalence maps for these diseases, as well as co-endemic relative risk (RR) maps of both diseases' prevalence are not well developed. There are co-endemic, high prevalence areas of both diseases, whose delimitation is essential for devising effective control strategies. Bayesian geostatistical logistic regression models including socio-economic, climatic, geographical and environmental predictors were fitted separately for active PTB and IHI based on data from the national surveys for PTB and major human parasitic diseases that were completed in 2010 and 2004, respectively. Prevalence maps and co-endemic RR maps were constructed for both diseases by means of Bayesian Kriging model and Bayesian shared component model capable of appraising the fraction of variance of spatial RRs shared by both diseases, and those specific for each one, under an assumption that there are unobserved covariates common to both diseases. Our results indicate that gross domestic product (GDP) per capita had a negative association, while rural regions, the arid and polar zones and elevation had positive association with active PTB prevalence; for the IHI prevalence, GDP per capita and distance to water bodies had a negative association, the equatorial and warm zones and the normalized difference vegetation index had a positive association. Moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in western regions, low to moderate prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in north-central regions and the southeast coastal regions, and moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and high prevalence of IHI were predicted in the south-western regions. Thus, co-endemic areas of active PTB and IHI were located in the south-western regions of China, which

  16. Evaluation of a novel kit (TF-Test) for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jancarlo Ferreira; Hoshino-Shimizu, Sumie; Dias, Luiz Cândido S; Araujo, Ana Júlia S A; Castilho, Vera L P; Neves, Fátima A M A

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are currently a source of concern for Public Health agencies in developing and developed countries. Since three ovum-and-parasite stool examinations have been demonstrated to provide sensitive results, we designed a practical and economical kit (TF-Test) that is now commercially available (Immunoassay Com. Ind. Ltda., São Paulo, Brazil). This kit allows the separate collection of three fecal specimens into a preservative solution. The specimens are then pooled, double-filtered, and concentrated by a single rapid centrifugation process. The TF-Test was evaluated in four different laboratories in a study using 1,102 outpatients and individuals living in an endemic area for enteroparasitosis. The overall sensitivity found using the TF-Test (86.2-97.8%) was significantly higher (P<0.01) than the sensitivity of conventional techniques such as the Coprotest (NL Comércio Exterior Ltda, São Paulo, Brazil) and the combination of Lutz/Hoffman, Faust, and Rugai techniques (De Carli, Diagnóstico Laboratorial das Parasitoses Humanas. Métodos e Técnicas, 1994), which ranged from 48.3% to 75.9%. When the above combined three specimen technique was repeated with three specimens collected on different days, its sensitivity became similar (P>0.01) to that of the TF-Test. The kappa index values of agreement for the TF-Test were consistent (P<0.01), being higher and ranking in a better position than conventional techniques. The high sensitivity, cost/benefit ratio, and practical aspects demonstrate that the TF-Test is suitable for individual diagnosis, epidemiological inquiries, or evaluation of chemotherapy in treated communities. PMID:15065214

  17. Persistence of intestinal parasitic infections during the national de-worming campaign in schoolchildren of northwestern Mexico: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Quihui-Cota, Luis; Morales-Figueroa, Gloria Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitism remains a public health challenge in northwestern Mexico even when a twice yearly single dose of albendazole (400 mg) is administered to schoolchildren. We aimed to determine the current prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in schoolchildren of northwestern Mexico. Methods The Faust and Kato Katz techniques were used to detect and identify the intestinal parasite species. One thousand two hundred and seventy eight children from 12 public schools were invited to participate in this study; 312 children participated in September 2003. Results Sixty eight percent of the subjects had intestinal parasites, 63% had protozoan infections, and 29%, 16% and 10% were infected with Giardia duodenalis, Hymenolepsis nana, and Entamoeba histolytica/dispar/moshkovskii respectively. Fifty children excreted eggs of Hymenolepsis nana. Conclusion Educational strategies should be considered to support the national de-worming campaign, because albendazole alone will not sufficiently improve the health conditions of vulnerable populations. PMID:24714136

  18. Severe Plasmodium falciparum infection mimicking acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Helmi; Ismail, Muhammad Dzafir; Jalalonmuhali, Maisarah; Atiya, Nadia; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela

    2014-08-30

    This case report describes a case of presumed acute myocardial infarction in a returned traveler who was later diagnosed to have severe malaria. Emergency coronary angiography was normal and subsequent peripheral blood film was positive for Plasmodium falciparum.

  19. Influenza A Virus Infection of Intestinal Epithelial Cells Enhances the Adhesion Ability of Crohn’s Disease Associated Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Aleandri, Marta; Conte, Maria Pia; Simonetti, Giovanna; Panella, Simona; Celestino, Ignacio; Checconi, Paola; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Longhi, Catia; Goldoni, Paola; Nicoletti, Mauro; Barnich, Nicolas; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Schippa, Serena; Nencioni, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of intestinal glycoreceptors expression, in particular CEACAM6, typically found in ileal Crohn's disease (CD), favor, among the commensal species of microbiota, the enrichment in Escherichia coli. Removal of protein glycosidic residues by neuraminidase, a sialidase typical of influenza virus, increases adhesion ability of Escherichia coli to Caco-2 intestinal cells. In this study we investigated whether influenza virus infection of human intestinal epithelial cells could influence the adhesiveness of different Escherichia coli strains isolated from CD patients by altering surface glycoreceptors. Influenza virus infection of intestinal cells increased exposure of galactose and mannose residues on the cell surface. In particular, glycoreceptors Thomsen-Friedenreich and CEACAM6 were over-expressed in influenza virus infected cells. In the same experimental conditions, a significant increase in bacterial adhesiveness was observed, independently of their own adhesive ability. The increase was reverted by treatment with anti-TF and anti-CEACAM6 antibodies. Interestingly, influenza virus was able to efficiently replicate in human primary intestinal cells leading to TF exposure. Finally, intestinal infected cells produced high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to control. Overall these data suggest that influenza virus infection, could constitute an additional risk factor in CD patients. PMID:25706391

  20. Effects of Hygiene and Defecation Behavior on Helminths and Intestinal Protozoa Infections in Taabo, Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Schmidlin, Thomas; Hürlimann, Eveline; Silué, Kigbafori D.; Yapi, Richard B.; Houngbedji, Clarisse; Kouadio, Bernadette A.; Acka-Douabélé, Cinthia A.; Kouassi, Dongo; Ouattara, Mamadou; Zouzou, Fabien; Bonfoh, Bassirou; N’Goran, Eliézer K.; Utzinger, Jürg; Raso, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Background More than 1 billion people are currently infected with soil-transmitted helminths and schistosomes. The global strategy to control helminthiases is the regular administration of anthelmintic drugs to at-risk populations. However, rapid re-infection occurs in areas where hygiene, access to clean water, and sanitation are inadequate. Methodology In July 2011, inhabitants from two villages and seven hamlets of the Taabo health demographic surveillance system in south-central Côte d’Ivoire provided stool and urine samples. Kato-Katz and ether-concentration methods were used for the diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni, soil-transmitted helminths (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworm), and intestinal protozoa. Urine samples were subjected to a filtration method for the diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium. A questionnaire was administered to households to obtain information on knowledge, attitude, practice, and beliefs in relation to hygiene, sanitation, and defecation behavior. Logistic regression models were employed to assess for associations between questionnaire data and parasitic infections. Principal Findings A total of 1,894 participants had complete data records. Parasitological examinations revealed prevalences of hookworm, S. haematobium, T. trichiura, S. mansoni, and A. lumbricoides of 33.5%, 7.0%, 1.6%, 1.3% and 0.8%, respectively. Giardia intestinalis and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar were detected in 15.0% and 14.4% of the participants, respectively. Only one out of five households reported the presence of a latrine, and hence, open defecation was common. Logistic regression analysis revealed that age, sex, socioeconomic status, hygiene, and defecation behavior are determinants for helminths and intestinal protozoa infections. Conclusions/Significance We found that inadequate sanitation and hygiene behavior are associated with soil-transmitted helminths and intestinal protozoa infections in the Taabo area of south-central C

  1. Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Intrinsic Deletion of Setd7 Identifies Role for Developmental Pathways in Immunity to Helminth Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chenery, Alistair L.; Redpath, Stephen A.; Braam, Mitchell J.; Perona-Wright, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    The intestine is a common site for a variety of pathogenic infections. Helminth infections continue to be major causes of disease worldwide, and are a significant burden on health care systems. Lysine methyltransferases are part of a family of novel attractive targets for drug discovery. SETD7 is a member of the Suppressor of variegation 3-9-Enhancer of zeste-Trithorax (SET) domain-containing family of lysine methyltransferases, and has been shown to methylate and alter the function of a wide variety of proteins in vitro. A few of these putative methylation targets have been shown to be important in resistance against pathogens. We therefore sought to study the role of SETD7 during parasitic infections. We find that Setd7-/- mice display increased resistance to infection with the helminth Trichuris muris but not Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. Resistance to T. muris relies on an appropriate type 2 immune response that in turn prompts intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to alter differentiation and proliferation kinetics. Here we show that SETD7 does not affect immune cell responses during infection. Instead, we found that IEC-specific deletion of Setd7 renders mice resistant to T. muris by controlling IEC turnover, an important aspect of anti-helminth immune responses. We further show that SETD7 controls IEC turnover by modulating developmental signaling pathways such as Hippo/YAP and Wnt/β-Catenin. We show that the Hippo pathway specifically is relevant during T. muris infection as verteporfin (a YAP inhibitor) treated mice became susceptible to T. muris. We conclude that SETD7 plays an important role in IEC biology during infection. PMID:27598373

  2. New diagnostic antigens for early trichinellosis: the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ge Ge; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Li; Liu, Xiao Lin; Liu, Chun Yin; Zhang, Xi; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies cannot be detected until 2-3 weeks after infection; there is an obvious window period between Trichinella infection and antibody positivity. Intestinal infective larvae (IIL) are the first invasive stage during Trichinella infection, and their ES antigens are firstly exposed to the immune system and might be the early diagnostic markers of trichinellosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early diagnostic values of IIL ES antigens for trichinellosis. The IIL were collected from intestines of infected mice at 6 h postinfection (hpi), and IIL ES antigens were prepared by incubation for 18 h. Anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies in mice infected with 100 ML were detectable by ELISA with IIL ES antigens as soon as 10 days postinfection (dpi), but ELISA with ML ES antigens did not permit detection of infected mice before 12 dpi. When the sera of patients with trichinellosis at 19 dpi were assayed, the sensitivity (100 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was evidently higher than 75 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05) The specificity (96.86 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was also higher than 89.31 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05). The IIL ES antigens provided a new source of diagnostic antigens and could be considered as a potential early diagnostic antigen for trichinellosis.

  3. Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Intrinsic Deletion of Setd7 Identifies Role for Developmental Pathways in Immunity to Helminth Infection.

    PubMed

    Oudhoff, Menno J; Antignano, Frann; Chenery, Alistair L; Burrows, Kyle; Redpath, Stephen A; Braam, Mitchell J; Perona-Wright, Georgia; Zaph, Colby

    2016-09-01

    The intestine is a common site for a variety of pathogenic infections. Helminth infections continue to be major causes of disease worldwide, and are a significant burden on health care systems. Lysine methyltransferases are part of a family of novel attractive targets for drug discovery. SETD7 is a member of the Suppressor of variegation 3-9-Enhancer of zeste-Trithorax (SET) domain-containing family of lysine methyltransferases, and has been shown to methylate and alter the function of a wide variety of proteins in vitro. A few of these putative methylation targets have been shown to be important in resistance against pathogens. We therefore sought to study the role of SETD7 during parasitic infections. We find that Setd7-/- mice display increased resistance to infection with the helminth Trichuris muris but not Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. Resistance to T. muris relies on an appropriate type 2 immune response that in turn prompts intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to alter differentiation and proliferation kinetics. Here we show that SETD7 does not affect immune cell responses during infection. Instead, we found that IEC-specific deletion of Setd7 renders mice resistant to T. muris by controlling IEC turnover, an important aspect of anti-helminth immune responses. We further show that SETD7 controls IEC turnover by modulating developmental signaling pathways such as Hippo/YAP and Wnt/β-Catenin. We show that the Hippo pathway specifically is relevant during T. muris infection as verteporfin (a YAP inhibitor) treated mice became susceptible to T. muris. We conclude that SETD7 plays an important role in IEC biology during infection. PMID:27598373

  4. IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Depla, Marion; Pelletier, Sandy; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunaud, Camille; Bruneau, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Polymorphisms in the type III interferon IFN‐λ3 and the killer cell immunoglobulin‐like receptor (KIR) genes controlling the activity of natural killer (NK) cells can predict spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We hypothesized that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism may modulate NK cell function during acute HCV. Methods We monitored the plasma levels of type III IFNs in relation to the phenotype and the function of NK cells in a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) during acute HCV infection with different outcomes. Results Early acute HCV was associated with high variability in type III IFNs plasma levels and the favorable IFN‐λ3 CC genotype was associated with higher viral loads. Reduced expression of Natural Killer Group Protein 2A (NKG2A) was associated with lower IFN‐λ3 plasma levels and the CC genotype. IFN‐γ production by NK cells was higher in individuals with the CC genotype during acute infection but this did not prevent viral persistence. IFN‐λ3 plasma levels did not correlate with function of NK cells and IFN‐λ3 prestimulation did not affect NK cell activation and function. Conclusions These results suggest that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV but other factors may act in concert to determine the outcome of the infection. PMID:27621819

  5. IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Depla, Marion; Pelletier, Sandy; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunaud, Camille; Bruneau, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Polymorphisms in the type III interferon IFN‐λ3 and the killer cell immunoglobulin‐like receptor (KIR) genes controlling the activity of natural killer (NK) cells can predict spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We hypothesized that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism may modulate NK cell function during acute HCV. Methods We monitored the plasma levels of type III IFNs in relation to the phenotype and the function of NK cells in a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) during acute HCV infection with different outcomes. Results Early acute HCV was associated with high variability in type III IFNs plasma levels and the favorable IFN‐λ3 CC genotype was associated with higher viral loads. Reduced expression of Natural Killer Group Protein 2A (NKG2A) was associated with lower IFN‐λ3 plasma levels and the CC genotype. IFN‐γ production by NK cells was higher in individuals with the CC genotype during acute infection but this did not prevent viral persistence. IFN‐λ3 plasma levels did not correlate with function of NK cells and IFN‐λ3 prestimulation did not affect NK cell activation and function. Conclusions These results suggest that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV but other factors may act in concert to determine the outcome of the infection.

  6. Respiratory syncytial virus, adenoviruses, and mixed acute lower respiratory infections in children in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Diego Andrés; Nino, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting greater severity and worse outcomes in children with mixed as compared to single respiratory virus infections. Howeve