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Sample records for acute intestinal infection

  1. [Morphological changes of the intestine in experimental acute intestinal infection in the treatment of colloidal silver].

    PubMed

    Polov'ian, E S; Chemich, N D; Moskalenko, R A; Romaniuk, A N

    2012-06-01

    At the present stage of infectionist practice in the treatment of acute intestinal infections caused by opportunistic microorganisms, colloidal silver is used with a particle size of 25 nm as an alternative to conventional causal therapy. In 32 rats, distributed in 4 groups of 8 animals each (intact; healthy, got colloidal silver; with a modeled acute intestinal infection in the basic treatment and with the addition of colloidal silver), histological examination was performed of small and large intestine of rats. Oral administration of colloidal silver at a dose of 0.02 mg/day to intact rats did not lead to changes in morphometric parameters compared to the norm, and during early convalescence in rats with acute intestinal infections were observed destructive and compensatory changes in the intestine, which depended on the treatment regimen. With the introduction of colloidal silver decreased activity of the inflammatory process and the severity of morphological changes in tissues of small and large intestine, indicating that the positive effect of study drug compared with baseline therapy.

  2. Infection of cultured intestinal epithelial cells with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Cinatl, J; Hoever, G; Morgenstern, B; Preiser, W; Vogel, J-U; Hofmann, W-K; Bauer, G; Michaelis, M; Rabenau, H F; Doerr, H W

    2004-08-01

    To identify a model for the study of intestinal pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) we tested the sensitivity of six human intestinal epithelial cell lines to infection with SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). In permissive cell lines, effects of SARS-CoV on cellular gene expression were analysed using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. Caco-2 and CL-14 cell lines were found to be highly permissive to SARS-CoV, due to the presence of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 as a functional receptor. In both cell lines, SARS-CoV infection deregulated expression of cellular genes which may be important for the intestinal pathogenesis of SARS.

  3. Default in plasma and intestinal IgA responses during acute infection by simian immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Conflicting results regarding changes in mucosal IgA production or in the proportions of IgA plasma cells in the small and large intestines during HIV-infection have been previously reported. Except in individuals repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 but yet remaining uninfected, HIV-specific IgAs are frequently absent in mucosal secretions from HIV-infected patients. However, little is known about the organization and functionality of mucosal B-cell follicles in acute HIV/SIV infection during which a T-dependent IgA response should have been initiated. In the present study, we evaluated changes in B-cell and T-cell subsets as well as the extent of apoptosis and class-specific plasma cells in Peyer’s Patches, isolated lymphoid follicles, and lamina propria. Plasma levels of IgA, BAFF and APRIL were also determined. Results Plasma IgA level was reduced by 46% by 28 days post infection (dpi), and no IgA plasma cells were found within germinal centers of Peyer’s Patches and isolated lymphoid follicles. This lack of a T-dependent IgA response occurs although germinal centers remained functional with no sign of follicular damage, while a prolonged survival of follicular CD4+ T-cells and normal generation of IgG plasma cells is observed. Whereas the average plasma BAFF level was increased by 4.5-fold and total plasma cells were 1.7 to 1.9-fold more numerous in the lamina propria, the relative proportion of IgA plasma cells in this effector site was reduced by 19% (duodemun) to 35% (ileum) at 28 dpi. Conclusion Our data provide evidence that SIV is unable to initiate a T-dependent IgA response during the acute phase of infection and favors the production of IgG (ileum) or IgM (duodenum) plasma cells at the expense of IgA plasma cells. Therefore, an early and generalized default in IgA production takes place during the acute of phase of HIV/SIV infection, which might impair not only the virus-specific antibody response but also IgA responses to other pathogens and

  4. Intestinal pathogens, diarrhoea and acute phase proteins in naturally infected dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Seppä-Lassila, Leena; Orro, Toomas; Lassen, Brian; Lasonen, Riikka; Autio, Tiina; Pelkonen, Sinikka; Soveri, Timo

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the association between Eimeria spp. related signs and innate immune response in dairy calves was examined. Calves (n=100) aged 15-60 days were clinically examined and faecal samples, blood samples and deep nasopharyngeal swabs obtained. The samples were analysed for intestinal pathogens, acute phase proteins and WBC count, and respiratory tract pathogens, respectively. Diarrhoea was diagnosed in 32.6% (23.3-43.0%, 95% CI) of calves. An association between the pathogenic Eimeria spp. and diarrhoea was detected by multiple correspondence analysis. Eimeria related signs (diarrhoea, presence of pathogenic species and total oocyst count) were combined resulting a four level variable. Calves with weak signs of eimeriosis had decreased haptoglobin concentrations (p=0.02) and increased fibrinogen concentrations (p=0.048) compared to no signs. Increased haptoglobin and fibrinogen concentrations were associated with respiratory tract infection and umbilical infection. Serum amyloid A and WBC counts showed no association with signs of eimeriosis or clinical diagnoses.

  5. Upregulation of ICOS on CD43+ CD4+ murine small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes during acute reovirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Montufar-Solis, Dina; Garza, Tomas; Teng, B.-B.; Klein, John R. . E-mail: john.r.klein@uth.tmc.edu

    2006-04-14

    Murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) can be classified according to expression of a CD43 glycoform recognized by the S7 monoclonal antibody. In this study, we examined the response of S7+ and S7- IELs in mice during acute reovirus serotype 3 (Dearing strain) infection, which was confirmed by virus-specific real-time PCR. In vivo proliferation increased significantly for both S7- and S7+ IELs on day 4 post-infection as determined by BrdU incorporation; however, expression of the inducible costimulatory (ICOS) molecule, which peaked on day 7 post-infection, was upregulated on S7+ CD4+ T cells, most of which were CD4+8- IELs. In vitro ICOS stimulation by syngeneic peritoneal macrophages induced IFN-{gamma} secretion from IELs from day 7 infected mice, and was suppressed by treatment with anti-ICOS mAb. Additionally, IFN-{gamma} mRNA increased in CD4+ IELs on day 6 post-infection. These findings indicate that S7- and S7+ IELs are differentially mobilized during the immune response to reovirus infection; that the regulated expression of ICOS is associated with S7+ IELs; and that stimulation of IELs through ICOS enhances IFN-{gamma} synthesis during infection.

  6. [Optimization of treatment of children with acute intestinal infections by application of Russian biological microbial preparations].

    PubMed

    Feklisova, L V

    2005-01-01

    The article presents the results of long-term (several years) use of Russian bifido- and lactocontaing probiotics and data on the clinicolaboratory effectiveness of bifidumbacterin forte, probifor, bifidin, bifilis, calcidum, florin forte, acipol and acilact in children with various intestinal infections of known and unknown etiology. The presented results were obtained by studies conducted according to the requirements of The Governmental Program of L. A. Tarasevich State Institute of Standartization and Medical Biological Preparation Control, which included randomization of groups of patients receiving codified preparations or placebo according to their age, nosology, the degree of the process severity, premorbid status, and the time when the treatment was started. Each of the programs included several hundreds of children, receiving probiotics; in which of the programs the studies were multicentered. The courses of treatment with probiotics were short (1 to 2 weeks). No significant adverse effects were observed.

  7. Intestinal parasitic infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Suk; Kim, Ki Whang; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Dong Ho

    2008-01-01

    In general, gastrointestinal tract is the primary involvement site of parasites during their life cycle. In this article, we will describe amebiasis, ascariasis, and anisakiasis among the many common intestinal parasitic diseases. We will review the epidemiology, life cycles, clinical manifestations and complications, and illustrate detailed imaging findings of intestinal parasites. Recognizing features of parasitic infection is important to establish an early diagnosis that leads to prompt treatment and helps avoid unnecessary surgery.

  8. Childhood acute leukemia and intestinal parasitosis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Luna, R; Cárdenas-Cardos, R; Martínez-Guerra, G; Ayón, A; Leal, C; Rivera-Ortegón, F

    1989-11-01

    Infectious complications are the leading cause of mortality in children with acute leukemia. Despite the fact that intestinal parasitosis is a rather frequent finding and a health problem in underdeveloped countries, in our experience the incidence of helminthic and protozoan infections among children with leukemia is uncommon. We analyzed 54 consecutive patients with leukemia in a period of 5 years, and only seven (12.9%) had intestinal parasites, four of whom died because of the infection or complication by the parasites. One hundred children without any malignancy were the control group, 26 (26%) of whom had intestinal parasitosis. When we compared the frequency of parasitosis in the control group with the children with leukemia and parasitosis, we found a statistical difference (p less than 0.05). We speculate that parasitic infections may reduce the risk of childhood leukemia.

  9. Infections in intestinal and multivisceral transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Timpone, Joseph G; Girlanda, Raffaele; Rudolph, Lauren; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2013-06-01

    Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation has become an effective treatment option for patients with intestinal failure. More potent immunosuppressive therapy has resulted in a decreased incidence of acute rejection and has improved patient survival. However, infectious complications can cause significant morbidity both before and after transplantation. In comparison with other solid organ transplant recipients, these patients experience higher rates of acute allograft rejection, thus requiring higher levels of immunosuppression and escalating the risk of infection. This article reviews the most common infectious disease complications encountered, and proposes a potential temporal association for types of infections in this patient population.

  10. [INCIDENCE, PREDISPOSING RISK FACTORS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND SPREADING OF ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS IN THE NORTH-EASTERN REGION OF UKRAINE].

    PubMed

    Malysh, N G; Chemych, N D; Zaritsky, A M

    2016-01-01

    Using data of the branch statistical reporting of the State Sanitary and Epidemiological Service in Sumy region and Sumy Regional State Laboratory of Veterinary Medicine, the incidence rate, modern risk factors for the development and spreading of acute infectious diarrheas were determined in the North-Eastern region of Ukraine. Under the current conditions incidence rate indices of acute intestinal infections and food toxicoinfections are within the range of 159.8-193.6 per 100 thousands. pop. Seasonal and epidemical rises are associated with a species of the agent. In the etiological structure of acute diarrheal infections there are dominated viruses, of food toxicoinfections--Klebsiellae pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter cloacae (p < 0.05). Predictors of the complication of epidemiological situation of Shigella infections are the gain in the detection of bacterially contaminated samples of milk and dairy products (r = 0.75), for food toxicoinfections caused by Klebsiellae pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae--pastry with cream and cooking meat products (r = 0.64; r = 0.75). Epizootic situation in the region affects on the salmonellosis incidence rate of the population (r = 0.89). There were revealed correlations between the selection of E. coli bacteria from swabs taken from the enterprises of catering, in child care centers and the levels of incidence rates of salmonellosis, acute intestinal infections of unknown etiology (r = 0.59; r = 0.60). Timely detection and sanitation of Shigella carriers are a powerful instrument to reduce the incidence rate of shigellosis (r = 0.83).

  11. Sub-acute intestinal obstruction by Strongyloides stercolaris.

    PubMed

    al-Bahrani, Z R; al-Saleem, T; al-Gailani, M A

    1995-01-01

    Strongyloides stercolaris infestation is rather rare in Iraq. Individuals with infection confined to the intestinal tract are often asymptomatic. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss and other non-specific complaints. The diagnosis depends upon repeated examination of stool and duodenal aspirate. Two cases presenting as sub-acute intestinal obstruction and mimicking primary intestinal lymphoma (PIL) on presentation are presented. Differentiation between the two conditions regarding presenting features, barium studies and pathology are discussed.

  12. Intestinal obstruction caused by Taenia taeniaeformis infection in a cat.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Rebbecca S; Bowman, Dwight D; Barr, Stephen C; Euclid, James M

    2009-01-01

    An adult domestic shorthair (DSH) cat was presented with acute vomiting, anorexia, lethargy, and dyspnea. The cat's clinical status worsened over 24 hours with conservative medical management. An exploratory celiotomy was performed. Acute intestinal obstruction resulting from infection with Taenia (T.) taeniaeformis was diagnosed. Surgical removal of the cestodes via multiple enterotomies resolved the obstruction. This paper reports, for the first time, small intestinal obstruction caused by T. taeniaeformis infection in a cat.

  13. Induction of immunomodulatory miR-146a and miR-155 in small intestinal epithelium of Vibrio cholerae infected patients at acute stage of cholera

    PubMed Central

    Melgar, Silvia; Aung, Kyaw Min; Rahman, Arman; Qadri, Firdausi; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Shirin, Tahmina

    2017-01-01

    The potential immunomodulatory role of microRNAs in small intestine of patients with acute watery diarrhea caused by Vibrio cholerae O1 or enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection was investigated. Duodenal biopsies were obtained from study-participants at the acute (day 2) and convalescent (day 21) stages of disease, and from healthy individuals. Levels of miR-146a, miR-155 and miR-375 and target gene (IRAK1, TRAF6, CARD10) and 11 cytokine mRNAs were determined by qRT-PCR. The cellular source of microRNAs in biopsies was analyzed by in situ hybridization. The ability of V. cholerae bacteria and their secreted products to cause changes in microRNA- and mRNA levels in polarized tight monolayers of intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. miR-146a and miR-155 were expressed at significantly elevated levels at acute stage of V. cholerae infection and declined to normal at convalescent stage (P<0.009 versus controls; P = 0.03 versus convalescent stage, pairwise). Both microRNAs were mainly expressed in the epithelium. Only marginal down-regulation of target genes IRAK1 and CARD10 was seen and a weak cytokine-profile was identified in the acute infected mucosa. No elevation of microRNA levels was seen in ETEC infection. Challenge of tight monolayers with the wild type V. cholerae O1 strain C6706 and clinical isolates from two study-participants, caused significant increase in miR-155 and miR-146a by the strain C6706 (P<0.01). One clinical isolate caused reduction in IRAK1 levels (P<0.05) and none of the strains induced inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, secreted factors from these strains caused markedly increased levels of IL-8, IL-1β, and CARD10 (P<0.001), without inducing microRNA expression. Thus, miR-146a and miR-155 are expressed in the duodenal epithelium at the acute stage of cholera. The inducer is probably the V. cholerae bacterium. By inducing microRNAs the bacterium can limit the innate immune response of the host, including inflammation

  14. [DISTRIBUTION OF BACTERIA OF THE KLEBSIELLA STRAIN IN WATER OBJECTS AND THEIR VALUE IN DEVELOPING OF THE WATER CAUSED ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Yu A; Ivanova, L V; Artyomova, T Z; Gipp, E K; Zagaynova, A V; Maksimkina, T N; Krasnyak, A V; Zhuravlev, P V; Aleshnya, V V; Panasovets, O P

    2016-01-01

    The wide circulation of Klebsiella bacteria in water ofwater objects of different climatic zones of Russia and various function is established. So bacteria of the Klebsiella strain are in superficial sources of the centralized water supply depending on extent of their biological and chemical pollution; underground waters at the unprotected water-bearing horizons; in drinking water at insufficiently effective system of its cleaning and disinfecting. Klebsiella circulating in water was shown to keep properties of pathogenicity and a virulence, possess resistance both to modern preparations and disinfecting agents (chlorine, an ultraviolet to radiation). Bacteria of the Klebsiella strain have high penetration in the water-bearing horizons. At strains of Klebsiella there is allocated considerable pathogenic potential (adhesive, invasive, phosphatase, lecithinase, DNA-ase, hemolytic activity) and genetic markers of pathogenicity of cnf-1. The etiologic role of bacteria of Klebsiella and an infecting (100, COE/dm3) dose emergence of acute intestinal infections (AII) is established. Detection of Klebsiella in water objects and especially in water of drinking appointment, in the absence of total coliform bacteria (TCB) contributes to the epidemic danger of water use.

  15. Schistosoma Mansoni Infection: Intestinal Schistosomiasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    patients should be :reated. The two mnain Diagnosis oral drugs available for the treatment of all stages of S. mansoni infection are praziquantel and...rep~eatedlly for laterally spilled eggs. Eosino- * praziquantel is administered either as a single dose, philia is usual in acute, but not chronic...with praziquantel , 75 mg/kg in three divided doses 4-hourly. Cortico- steroidls (prednisone, 5 mig t.d.s.) are used for 2-3 days to control the fever and

  16. Chronic Administration of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Intestinal Anti-Inflammatory MicroRNA Expression during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Lawrance C.; Kumar, Vinay; Torben, Workineh; Stouwe, Curtis Vande; Winsauer, Peter; Amedee, Angela; Molina, Patricia E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recreational and medical use of cannabis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals has increased in recent years. In simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques, chronic administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) inhibited viral replication and intestinal inflammation and slowed disease progression. Persistent gastrointestinal disease/inflammation has been proposed to facilitate microbial translocation and systemic immune activation and promote disease progression. Cannabinoids including Δ9-THC attenuated intestinal inflammation in mouse colitis models and SIV-infected rhesus macaques. To determine if the anti-inflammatory effects of Δ9-THC involved differential microRNA (miRNA) modulation, we profiled miRNA expression at 14, 30, and 60 days postinfection (days p.i.) in the intestine of uninfected macaques receiving Δ9-THC (n = 3) and SIV-infected macaques administered either vehicle (VEH/SIV; n = 4) or THC (THC/SIV; n = 4). Chronic Δ9-THC administration to uninfected macaques significantly and positively modulated intestinal miRNA expression by increasing the total number of differentially expressed miRNAs from 14 to 60 days p.i. At 60 days p.i., ∼28% of miRNAs showed decreased expression in the VEH/SIV group compared to none showing decrease in the THC/SIV group. Furthermore, compared to the VEH/SIV group, THC selectively upregulated the expression of miR-10a, miR-24, miR-99b, miR-145, miR-149, and miR-187, previously been shown to target proinflammatory molecules. NOX4, a potent reactive oxygen species generator, was confirmed as a direct miR-99b target. A significant increase in NOX4+ crypt epithelial cells was detected in VEH/SIV macaques compared to the THC/SIV group. We speculate that miR-99b-mediated NOX4 downregulation may protect the intestinal epithelium from oxidative stress-induced damage. These results support a role for differential miRNA induction in THC-mediated suppression of intestinal

  17. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela; Said, Hamid M

    2015-07-15

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines.

  18. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:25999427

  19. [CT - diagnosis and differential diagnosis of inflammatory acute intestinal conditions].

    PubMed

    Wiesner, W

    2011-08-24

    Multidetector-row CT has shown over the past years that it is able to provide reliable diagnoses in various acute intestinal conditions. The presented article provides an overview of primary and secondary inflammatory acute intestinal pathologies and their differential diagnoses.

  20. Intestinal parasitic infections in hosted Saharawi children.

    PubMed

    Soriano, J M; Domènech, G; Martínez, M C; Mañes, J; Soriano, F

    2011-12-01

    Literatures on intestinal parasitic infections in Saharawi children were scarce and distributed in non parasitological journals. This was the first article that specifically highlighted on the prevalence of these infections in 270 Saharawi children aged from 6 to 12 years hosted in Spain. Six different intestinal parasites were identified in this study and 78, 46, 40, 24, 13 and 5 were positive for Giardia lamblia (29%), Entamoeba coli (17%), Blastocystis hominis (15%), Endolimax nana (9%), Hymenolepis nana (5%) and Enterobius vermicularis (2%), respectively. Mixed intestinal parasitic infections were seen in 12 (4.4%) studied children. Six (2.2%) double infections for G. lamblia and B. hominis were seen in these children while in four (1.5%) had G. lamblia and H. nana. Triple intestinal parasitic infections of G. lamblia, B. hominis and H. nana were observed in two (0.7%) of the children studied. In the other hand, about 14.8% of the studied children had a mild anaemia and 15.5 and 16.6% had iron deficiency and eosinophilia, respectively.

  1. [Intestinal diseases in HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Münch, R

    1997-07-16

    The gastrointestinal tract is very frequently affected by the manifestations of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A variety of opportunistic viral, fungal, bacterial, protozoal and helmintic infections and different unusual malignancies such as Kaposi's sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and papilloma-virus associated anal cancer are responsible for much of the morbidity and mortality in AIDS. Because specific therapy is not always available, in particular diagnosis of potentially infections should be attempted.

  2. [Laboratory animal infection in modeling intestinal schistosomiasis].

    PubMed

    Zelia, O P

    1984-01-01

    A comparative efficiency of different regimes for infecting laboratory animals has been determined in order to find out optimal conditions under which an experimental model of intestinal schistosomiasis (infection with Schistosoma mansoni) can be maintained. When evaluating the results of laboratory definitive hosts infection we took into account the character of Schistosoma distribution in animals, which with high probability rate was modelled by means of negative binomial distribution. The main parameters of this distribution were used for determination of effective doses and methods of animals infection alongside with generally accepted indices of infection rate and intensiveness. Analysis of the data obtained has shown that the infection of 150 cercarians per mouse and 200 cercarians per golden and striped hairy-footed hamster by their subcutaneous administration creates optimal density of parasites in the host. Results of investigations have shown that striped hairy-footed hamsters can be used as definitive hosts of Schistosoma.

  3. Intestinal barrier function in response to abundant or depleted mucosal glutathione in Salmonella-infected rats

    PubMed Central

    van Ampting, Marleen TJ; Schonewille, Arjan J; Vink, Carolien; Brummer, Robert Jan M; Meer, Roelof van der; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Glutathione, the main antioxidant of intestinal epithelial cells, is suggested to play an important role in gut barrier function and prevention of inflammation-related oxidative damage as induced by acute bacterial infection. Most studies on intestinal glutathione focus on oxidative stress reduction without considering functional disease outcome. Our aim was to determine whether depletion or maintenance of intestinal glutathione changes susceptibility of rats to Salmonella infection and associated inflammation. Rats were fed a control diet or the same diet supplemented with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO; glutathione depletion) or cystine (glutathione maintenance). Inert chromium ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (CrEDTA) was added to the diets to quantify intestinal permeability. At day 4 after oral gavage with Salmonella enteritidis (or saline for non-infected controls), Salmonella translocation was determined by culturing extra-intestinal organs. Liver and ileal mucosa were collected for analyses of glutathione, inflammation markers and oxidative damage. Faeces was collected to quantify diarrhoea. Results Glutathione depletion aggravated ileal inflammation after infection as indicated by increased levels of mucosal myeloperoxidase and interleukin-1β. Remarkably, intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation were not increased. Cystine supplementation maintained glutathione in the intestinal mucosa but inflammation and oxidative damage were not diminished. Nevertheless, cystine reduced intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation. Conclusion Despite increased infection-induced mucosal inflammation upon glutathione depletion, this tripeptide does not play a role in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and diarrhoea. On the other hand, cystine enhances gut barrier function by a mechanism unlikely to be related to glutathione. PMID:19374741

  4. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than 6 children) Changes in altitude or climate Cold climate Exposure to smoke Family history of ear infections ... or fewer children. This can reduce your child's chances of getting a cold or other infection, and ...

  5. Mucosal immune responses following intestinal nematode infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaph, C; Cooper, P J; Harris, N L

    2014-01-01

    In most natural environments, the large majority of mammals harbour parasitic helminths that often live as adults within the intestine for prolonged periods (1–2 years) 1. Although these organisms have been eradicated to a large extent within westernized human populations, those living within rural areas of developing countries continue to suffer from high infection rates. Indeed, recent estimates indicate that approximately 2·5 billion people worldwide, mainly children, currently suffer from infection with intestinal helminths (also known as geohelminths and soil-transmitted helminths) 2. Paradoxically, the eradication of helminths is thought to contribute to the increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and allergy observed in developed countries. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of host–helminth interactions at the mucosal surface that result in parasite expulsion or permit the establishment of chronic infections with luminal dwelling adult worms. We will also provide insight into the adaptive immune mechanisms that provide immune protection against re-infection with helminth larvae, a process that is likely to be key to the future development of successful vaccination strategies. Lastly, the contribution of helminths to immune modulation and particularly to the treatment of allergy and inflammatory bowel disease will be discussed. PMID:25201407

  6. [Intestinal parasitic infections and leishmaniasis in patients with HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Camacho, A; López-Vélez, R; Muñoz Sanz, A; Labarga-Echevarría, P

    1998-01-01

    Intestinal parasite infections are very frequent in HIV patients with severe immunodeficiency (CD4 < 100/mm3) causing chronic diarrhea and malabsorption in the majority of cases. The most frequent microorganisms are microsporidia and Cryptosporidium parvum while Cyclospora cayetanensis and Isospora belli are more prevalent in subtropical and tropical areas and rare in industrialized areas. The diagnosis can be obtained by stool examination (differences in size and form of cysts), although microsporidia is frequently demonstrated by intestinal biopsy and/or duodenal aspirate. The treatment with cotrimoxazole for C. cayetanensis and I. belli is very effective and does not present any problems in the acute phase, however, due to a high percentage of relapses the treatment must be maintained while the patient is in a severe immunodeficiency state. E. intestinalis usually responds satisfactorily to albendazole while E. bieneusi is resistant to some drugs except in some cases (albendazole, atovaquone ad fumagillin). C parvum is also resistant to most medicaments but shows an adequate or partial clinical: response to paramomicine (< 50%). When there is no response, it is advised to administer octreotide since in half the cases the response is positive either total or partial. Nowadays with the use of protease inhibitors in the antiretroviral treatment a decrease in the incidence of these infections has been observed (microsporidia and C. parvum) even in the stools samples taken from the patients who had them before. As primary prophylaxis for C. parvum, it is better to avoid been exposed to the microorganism taking into account the 1997 preventive measures recommended by the USPHS/IDSA Prevention of Opportunistic Infections Working Group. The coinfection Leishmania-HIV is frequent in the mediterranean area. The most common specie is L. infantum. The incidence is most frequent in immunosuppressed patients (CD4 < 200 mm3) and in parenteral drug addicts. The symptomatology

  7. Early cytokine responses during intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, N; Goyal, P K; Mahida, Y R; Li, K F; Wakelin, D

    1998-01-01

    Infections with gastro-intestinal nematodes elicit immune and inflammatory responses mediated by cytokines released from T-helper type-2 (Th2) cells. In vitro assays of cells from the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of experimentally infected rodents confirm that, after about 1 week, the dominant cytokine responses to mitogens and antigens are those associated with this Th-cell subset. Polarization of the Th response in this way implies an initial local cytokine environment that favours Th2 development. However, experimental infections with Trichinella spiralis and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis show that, within 2 days of worms reaching the intestine, MLN cells (MLNC) respond with a Th1 rather than a Th2 response [i.e. there is an increase in mRNA for the type 1 cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and mitogen-stimulated MLNC release IFN-gamma rather than interleukin-5 (IL-5)]. Antigen stimulation at this time does not elicit IFN-gamma release and the MLNC cannot adoptively transfer immunity. Within a few days the MLNC phenotype changes. There is a Th2 response (IL-5 release) to both mitogen and antigen stimulation and MLNC can adoptively transfer immunity. Early release of IFN-gamma is T-cell dependent, with CD4+ T cells playing the major role. The data are discussed in relation to factors regulating the mucosal response to invasion by parasites. PMID:9616376

  8. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We describe a pediatric patient who presented with acute pancreatitis that revealed acute HIV infection. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis as a primary manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It may represent an uncommon aspect of primary HIV infection. We suggest that acute HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis at all ages. PMID:23569476

  9. Ileo-ileal knot: a rare case of acute strangulated intestinal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Kohei; Iida, Ryo; Watanabe, Tomohiko; Nitta, Masahiko; Tomioka, Masao; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa; Takasu, Akira

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Strangulated intestinal obstruction is one of the most common types of acute abdomen and requires urgent surgical treatment. Herein, we report a very rare case of strangulated intestinal obstruction caused by an ileo-ileal knot. An 80-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of strangulation ileus and underwent emergency laparotomy after investigation by exploratory single-port laparoscopy. During surgery, a small bowel gangrene caused by an ileo-ileal knot was found. The gangrenous segment was resected, and primary anastomosis was performed. Post-operative recovery was uneventful except for a minor wound infection. Our extensive search of the literature found only 7 case reports of ileo-ileal knot including ours. An ileo-ileal knot should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute intestinal obstruction, because this rare phenomenon requires urgent surgical treatment; and some complications should be considered during or after surgery. PMID:28303069

  10. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  11. Severe acute malnutrition and infection.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-12-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice.

  12. Alimentary prion infections: Touchdown in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Da Costa Dias, Bianca; Jovanovic, Katarina; Weiss, Stefan F T

    2011-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are caused by proteinaceous aggregates, usually consisting of misfolded proteins which are often typified by a high proportion of β-sheets, which accumulate in the Central Nervous System. These diseases, including Morbus Alzheimer, Parkinson disease and Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs)--also termed prion disorders--afflict a substantial proportion of the human population and as such the etiology and pathogenesis of these diseases has been the focus of mounting research. Although many of these diseases arise from genetic mutations or are sporadic in nature, the possible horizontal transmissibility of neurodegenerative diseases poses a great threat to population health. In this article we discuss recent studies which suggest that the "non-transmissible" status bestowed upon Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases may need to be revised as these diseases have been successfully induced through tissue transplants. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of investigating the "natural" mechanism of prion transmission including peroral and perenteral transmission, proposed routes of gastrointestinal uptake and neuroinvasion of ingested infectious prion proteins. We examine the multitude of factors which may influence oral transmissibility and discuss the zoonotic threats which Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) and Scrapie may pose resulting in vCJD or related disorders. In addition, we suggest that the 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor on the cell surface of enterocytes, a major cell population in the intestine, may play an important role in the intestinal pathophysiology of alimentary prion infections.

  13. Intestinal immune cells in Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Trajman, A; MacDonald, T T; Elia, C C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strongyloides stercoralis can cause a wide spectrum of disease in man, ranging from a chronic asymptomatic infection to a hyperinfective, often fatal syndrome. In rodents, spontaneous expulsion of Strongyloides spp occurs after experimental infection. Mast cells, goblet cells, and eosinophils have been identified as possible effectors of this expulsion. AIMS: To investigate intestinal histopathology and mucosal immunity in immunocompetent patients with chronic S stercoralis infection. METHODS: Jejunal biopsies were performed in 19 immunocompetent patients with a positive stool examination for S stercoralis and few or no symptoms, and in seven healthy controls. Specimens were processed for histopathological analysis and stained by the immunoperoxidase technique, using the following monoclonal antibodies: CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, anti-T cell receptor (TcR) gamma/delta, RFD1 and RFD7 (two different macrophage markers), Ki67+ (proliferating) cells, antihuman leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, and anticollagen IV. In addition, CD25+ cells, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, calprotectin containing cells, and neutrophil elastase positive cells were stained by the alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS: Jejunal morphology and the numbers of different T cell subsets, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, eosinophils, and goblet cells were unaffected by S stercoralis infection. Conversely, the numbers of mature macrophages and dividing enterocytes in the crypts were reduced significantly. Crypt enterocytes did not express HLA-DR in both groups. The expression of HLA-DR by villus enterocytes was also comparable in patients and controls. There were no activated (CD25+) cells in the mucosa of either patients or controls. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with seven healthy uninfected volunteers, a group of 19 Brazilians with clinically mild strongyloides infection showed no abnormality of mucosal structure and no increase in non-specific inflammatory cells. Likewise, there was no increase in

  14. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Ameliorates Experimental Acute Ileitis and Extra-Intestinal Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Silvia; Fischer, André; Grundmann, Ursula; Alutis, Marie; Kühl, Anja A.; Tamas, Andrea; Toth, Gabor; Dunay, Miklos P.; Göbel, Ulf B.; Reglodi, Dora; Bereswill, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background The neuropeptide Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) plays pivotal roles in immunity and inflammation. So far, potential immune-modulatory properties of PACAP have not been investigated in experimental ileitis. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were perorally infected with Toxoplasma (T.) gondii to induce acute ileitis (day 0) and treated daily with synthetic PACAP38 from day 1 to 6 post infection (p.i.; prophylaxis) or from day 4 to 6 p.i. (therapy). Whereas placebo-treated control mice suffered from acute ileitis at day 7 p.i. and succumbed to infection, intestinal immunopathology was ameliorated following PACAP prophylaxis. PACAP-treated mice exhibited increased abundance of small intestinal FOXP3+ cells, but lower numbers of ileal T lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages, which was accompanied by less ileal expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-23p19, IL-22, IFN-γ, and MCP-1. Furthermore, PACAP-treated mice displayed higher anti-inflammatory IL-4 concentrations in mesenteric lymph nodes and liver and higher systemic anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels in spleen and serum as compared to control animals at day 7 p.i. Remarkably, PACAP-mediated anti-inflammatory effects could also be observed in extra-intestinal compartments as indicated by reduced pro-inflammatory mediator levels in spleen (TNF-α, nitric oxide) and liver (TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP-1, IL-6) and less severe histopathological sequelae in lungs and kidneys following prophylactic PACAP treatment. Strikingly, PACAP prolonged survival of T. gondii infected mice in a time-of-treatment dependent manner. Conclusion/Significance Synthetic PACAP ameliorates acute small intestinal inflammation and extra-intestinal sequelae by down-regulating Th1-type immunopathology, reducing oxidative stress and up-regulating anti-inflammatory cytokine responses. These findings provide novel potential treatment options of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25238233

  15. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng; Cruz Jr, Ruy J; Cai, Jun-Chao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence, risk factors and clinical outcomes of acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) after intestinal transplantation (ITx). METHODS A retrospective single-center analysis was performed to identify cases of acute ABMR after ITx, based on the presence of donor-specific antibody (DSA), acute tissue damage, C4d deposition, and allograft dysfunction. RESULTS Acute ABMR was identified in 18 (10.3%) out of 175 intestinal allografts with an average occurrence of 10 d (range, 4-162) after ITx. All acute ABMR cases were presensitized to donor human leukocyte antigens class I and/or II antigens with a detectable DSA. A positive cross-match was seen in 14 (77.8%) cases and twelve of 18 patients (66.7%) produced newly-formed DSA following ITx. Histological characteristics of acute ABMR include endothelial C4d deposits, interstitial hemorrhage, and severe congestion with focal fibrin thrombin in the lamina propria capillaries. Multivariate analysis identified a liver-free graft and high level of panel reactive antibody as a significant independent risk factor. Despite initial improvement after therapy, eleven recipients (61.1%) lost transplant secondary to rejection. Of those, 9 (50%) underwent graft removal and 4 (22.2%) received second transplantation following acute ABMR. At an average follow-up of 32.3 mo (range, 13.3-76.4), 8 (44.4%) recipients died. CONCLUSION Our results indicate that acute ABMR is an important cause of intestine graft dysfunction, particularly in a liver-exclusive graft and survivors are at an increased risk of developing refractory acute rejection and chronic rejection. More effective strategies to prevent and manage acute ABMR are needed to improve outcomes. PMID:28058223

  16. Physiological Mechanisms of Acute Intestinal Radiation Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    transDlantation (17) and conventional medical treatment (18,19), this is not so for the intestinal radiation s ,’ ndrome . Excluding the recent accident at...OLD ADRESSCURRENT ADDRESS ITELEPHONE NUMBER: C ’ SISUBJECT AREA( s ) OF INTEREST: ZI I DNA OR OTHER GOVERNMENT CONTRACT...ORMANIZArIGN REPORT NUMBER( S ) S . MONITORING ORGANIZATION ;EPORT NQUMýS( S ) DRA-TR-86-241 6a. NAME Or PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 66, OFPCE SYMBOL i7. NAME OF

  17. Acute Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Laxdal, Oliver E.; Robertson, H. E.; Braaten, Virgil; Walker, W. Alan

    1963-01-01

    During a seven-month period from November 1960 to May 1961, 181 infants and children, hospitalized because of acute respiratory infections, were studied intensively to determine the responsible etiologic agents. Forty-two per cent of the illnesses in this group appeared to be caused by bacterial agents, either primary or secondary to virus. Parainfluenza viruses were identified as causes of laryngotracheobronchitis in nearly 50% of the cases. Adenoviruses were also found to be important pathogens, particularly as causes of pneumonia in infants. The over-all infection rate attributed to adenoviruses was 11.6%. An epidemic due to Influenza B virus affected approximately 40% of children in this city just following the hospital study. This study was conducted as the first step in a long-term project undertaken at the Regina General Hospital to determine the effectiveness of vaccines in the prevention and treatment of respiratory infections in children. PMID:20327546

  18. [Food contamination by pathogens of acute intestinal infections and survival of microorganisms in them under some variants of thermal processing and storage].

    PubMed

    Sergevnin, V I

    2013-01-01

    The contamination of the surface of vegetables and fruits with conditionally pathogenic enterobacteria, intestinal protozoa and enteric viruses has been revealed. The experiment showed an opportunity of penetration of enteric viruses inside of vegetables and fruits with intact (without visible damages) surface. S. enteritidis survive on the shells of the eggs 4 months in the refrigerator, in the albumen and yolk--more than 5 months and in the long storage (more than one month) of chicken eggs in the refrigerator S. enteritidis could penetrate into the egg through the intact shell and multiply in the yolk. It was shown in the experiment on the condition laying of chicken eggs of room temperature in cold water and their subsequent cooking S. enteritidis full destruction of pathogens comes on the 5 minute of heat processing, when the temperature inside the eggs reaches more than 80 degrees C. In mayonnaise at the temperature of the refrigerator S. enteritidis reproduce, but remain viable for 13 days. In the egg powder at the room temperature noted smooth death of S. enteritidis, term viability of microorganisms is 5 months. Addition 10% acetic acid to egg powder in the ratio 1:2 provides for the death of S. enteritidis for a minute. In experimental conditions was established that the processing of chicken on the grill in the process of cooking "Shaverma" provides exemption meat from Salmonella only in the thickness of a piece of up to 2 centimeters. The deeper layers of meat and meat juice which accumulates on the pallet grill, throughout the duration of thermal processing may remain contaminated Salmonella.

  19. Interferon-γ-Induced Nitric Oxide Causes Intrinsic Intestinal Denervation in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, Rosa M.E.; Marche, Homero H.F.; Bahia, Maria T.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Rossi, Marcos A.; Silva, João S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in neuronal destruction during acute-phase Trypanosoma cruzi infection was evaluated in male C57BL/6 (WT, wild-type) mice and knockout mice [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)−/− and interferon (IFN)−/−]. Selected animals were infected by intraperitoneal injection of 100 trypomastigote forms of the Y strain of T. cruzi. Others were injected intraperitoneally with an equal volume of saline solution and served as controls. Our findings support those of previous studies regarding myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection. In addition, we clearly demonstrate that, despite the fact that parasite nests and similar inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall were more pronounced in infected iNOS−/− mice than in infected WT mice, the former presented no reduction in myenteric plexus neuron numbers. Neuronal nerve profile expression, as revealed by the general nerve marker PGP 9.5, was preserved in all knockout animals. Infected IFN−/− mice suffered no significant neuronal loss and there was no inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall. On days 5 and 10 after infection, iNOS activity was greater in infected WT mice than in controls, whereas iNOS activity in infected knockout mice remained unchanged. These findings clearly demonstrate that neuronal damage does not occur in NO-impaired infected knockout mice, regardless of whether inflammatory infiltrate is present (iNOS−/−) or absent (IFN−/−). In conclusion, our observations strongly indicate that myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection is because of IFN-γ-elicited NO production resulting from iNOS activation in the inflammatory foci along the intestinal wall. PMID:15039223

  20. Mast cells drive mesenteric afferent signalling during acute intestinal ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Kirkup, Anthony J; Grundy, David

    2011-08-01

    Acute intestinal ischaemia stimulates visceral afferent nerves but the mechanisms responsible for this excitation are not fully understood. Mast cells may participate in this process as they are known to signal to mesenteric afferents during intestinal anaphylaxis and contribute to early inflammation and neuronal damage in response to cerebral ischaemia. We therefore hypothesised that mast cells are early responders to acute intestinal ischaemia and their activation initiates rapid signalling to the CNS via the excitation of mesenteric afferents. Primary afferent firing was recorded from a mesenteric nerve bundle supplying a segment of jejunum in anaesthetized adult rats. Acute focal ischaemia was produced by clamping theme senteric vessels for 8 min, and reperfusion followed removal of the vessel clip. Two episodes of ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R) separated by a 30 min interval were performed. Drugs or their vehicles were administered 10 min before the 2nd I–R episode. Ischaemia caused a reproducible, intense and biphasic afferent firing that was temporally dissociated from the concomitantly triggered complex pattern of intestinal motor activity. The L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, significantly attenuated this afferent firing by a mechanism independent of its action on intestinal tone. Ischaemia-induced afferent firing was also abrogated by the mast cell stabilizer, doxantrazole, and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist, pyrilamine. In contrast, the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, and the N-type calcium channel toxin, ω-conotoxin GVIA, each reduced the ischaemia-evoked motor inhibition but not the concurrent afferent discharge. Similarly, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, naproxen, had no effect on the ischaemic afferent response but reduced the intestinal tone shortly from the onset of ischaemia to the early period of reperfusion. These data support a critical role for mast cell-derived histamine in the direct chemoexcitation of

  1. Intestinal parasitic infections among school children in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Warunee, N; Choomanee, L; Sataporn, P; Rapeeporn, Y; Nuttapong, W; Sompong, S; Thongdee, S; Bang-On, S; Rachada, K

    2007-12-01

    A study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in children from eight schools located in Phuttamonthon District, Nakhon Prathom Province during November 2004 to December 2004. Stool samples were collected from 1920 students; age range from 7 to 12 years old, and examined for intestinal parasites by using formalin-ethyl acetate concentration technique. Of these subjects, 242 (12.6%) were infected with one or more of 10 intestinal parasitic species. In these infected subjects, 214 (11.1%) were single infections whereas 28 (1.5%) were mix infections. The most frequent parasite was Blastocystis hominis (6.2%). Other parasites were Giardia lamblia (1.7%), Entamoeba coli (1.5%), Endolimax nana (1.0%), Entamoeba histolytica (0.3%), Hookworm (0.3%), Trichuris trichiura (< 0.1%), Taenia spp. (< 0.1%), Strongyloides stercolaris (< 0.1%), and liver fluke or small intestinal fluke (Opisthorchis eggs) (< 0.1%). Prevalence of protozoan infections was significantly higher than helminth infections (p < 0.05). Between male and female, there was no significant difference in prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections (p > 0.05). The results suggest that prevention and control programme for intestinal parasites should be discussed in the design of long term use in this area.

  2. Intestinal parasitic infections in Thai HIV-infected patients with different immunity status

    PubMed Central

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2001-01-01

    Background One of the major health problems among HIV seropositive patients is superimposed infection due to the defect of immunity. Furthermore, intestinal parasite infection, which is also one of the basic health problems in tropical region, is common in these patients. In this study, a cross sectional study to document the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection in Thai HIV-infected patients with different immune status was performed. Methods A study of stool samples from 60 Thai HIV-infected patients with different immune status was performed at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thailand. Each patient was examined for CD4 count and screened for diarrheal symptoms. Results The prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among the HIV-infected patients in this study was 50 %. Non- opportunistic intestinal parasite infections such as hookworms, Opisthorchis viverrini and Ascaris lumbricoides were commonly found in HIV-infected people regardless of immune status with or without diarrheal symptoms. Opportunistic intestinal parasites such as Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Microsporidia and Strongyloides stercoralis infection were significantly more frequent in the low immunity group with diarrhea. Conclusion Therefore, opportunistic intestinal parasite infection should be suspected in any HIV infected patient with advanced disease presenting with diarrhea. The importance of tropical epidemic non-opportunistic intestinal parasite infections among HIV-infected patients should not be neglected. PMID:11394966

  3. Bile loss in the acute intestinal radiation syndrome in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Dunston, S.G.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.; Holeski, C.; Eaton, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of bile duct ligation (BDL), choledochostomy, bile acid sequestering within the intestinal lumen by cholestyramine, and fluid and electrolyte replacement on survival time and development of diarrhea after whole-body exposure to doses of ionizing radiation that result in death from acute intestinal injury were studied. BDL significantly prolonged survival and delayed the onset of diarrhea after exposure to /sup 137/Cs gamma rays, fission neutrons, or cyclotron-produced neutrons in the range of doses that produce intestinal death or death from a combination of intestinal and hematopoietic injuries. Cannulation of the bile duct with exteriorized bile flow (choledochostomy) to protect the irradiated intestine from the mucolytic action of bile salts did not duplicate the effect of BDL in increasing survival time. Choledochostomy without fluid replacement eliminated the occurrence of diarrhea in 15.4 Gy irradiated rats. Diarrhea did occur in irradiated animals with choledochostomy if they received duodenal injections of fluid and electrolytes to replace the fluid lost as a result of bile drainage. Duodenal injection of fluid and electrolytes had no significant effect on survival time in irradiated rats. Injection of fluid and electrolytes into the peritoneal cavity of irradiated rats resulted in an increase in survival time that was comparable to that observed after BDL. Addition of antibiotics to the peritoneally injected fluid and electrolytes further increased survival time (up to 9 days). This survival time approached that seen in animals receiving the same radiation dose but which had the intestine exteriorized and shielded to minimize radiation injury to the intestine. Postmortem histological examinations of the irradiated small intestine showed mucosal regeneration in these long-term survivors receiving fluid and antibiotic therapy.

  4. Acute effects of rotavirus and malnutrition on intestinal barrier function in neonatal piglets

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, Sheila K; Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T; Rhoads, J Marc; Corl, Benjamin A; Harrell, Robert J; Odle, Jack

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of protein-energy malnutrition on intestinal barrier function during rotavirus enteritis in a piglet model. METHODS: Newborn piglets were allotted at day 4 of age to the following treatments: (1) full-strength formula (FSF)/noninfected; (2) FSF/rotavirus infected; (3) half-strength formula (HSF)/noninfected; or (4) HSF/rotavirus infected. After one day of adjustment to the feeding rates, pigs were infected with rotavirus and acute effects on growth and diarrhea were monitored for 3 d and jejunal samples were collected for Ussing-chamber analyses. RESULTS: Piglets that were malnourished or infected had lower body weights on days 2 and 3 post-infection (P < 0.05). Three days post-infection, marked diarrhea and weight loss were accompanied by sharp reductions in villus height (59%) and lactase activity (91%) and increased crypt depth (21%) in infected compared with non-infected pigs (P < 0.05). Malnutrition also increased crypt depth (21%) compared to full-fed piglets. Villus:crypt ratio was reduced (67%) with viral infection. There was a trend for reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance with rotavirus infection and malnutrition (P = 0.1). 3H-mannitol flux was significantly increased (50%; P < 0.001) in rotavirus-infected piglets compared to non-infected piglets, but there was no effect of nutritional status. Furthermore, rotavirus infection reduced localization of the tight junction protein, occludin, in the cell membrane and increased localization in the cytosol. CONCLUSION: Overall, malnutrition had no additive effects to rotavirus infection on intestinal barrier function at day 3 post-infection in a neonatal piglet model. PMID:23964143

  5. The Role of Vibrio cholerae Haemagglutinin Protease (HAP) in Extra-Intestinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Koley, Hemanta; Pal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Based on the diversity of surface O antigen Vibrio cholerae can be classified into 206 serogroups. Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of cholera and extra intestinal infections like, septicemia, wound infection and haemorrhagic reactions. Pathogenic factors of V. cholerae extra-intestinal infection are yet to be explored. Aim To identify the pathogenic factor associated with V. cholerae extra-intestinal infection. Materials and Methods This study was carried out between April, 2007 to October 2007 in National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases (NICED). Haemagglutinin Protease (HAP), a major secreted proteolytic enzyme, was purified from the culture supernatant of Vibrio cholerae O1 strain C6709 after removal of outer membrane vesicles using a single step ion-exchange chromatography. Function of HAP was characterized by animal model, like, subcutaneous mouse assay, basement membrane component’s degradation assays and tissue culture assays. Result When suckling mouse was subcutaneously injected with culture supernatant of C6709 strain or purified HAP in both cases, distinct in vivo haemorrhagic response along with histopathological changes like necrosis of the capillaries and muscle layer, acute myofibre degeneration as well as moderate number of erythrocyte scattered through the skin, capillary necrosis, acute myofiber degeneration and necrosis of muscle layer were found. When Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB) media was used, the haemorrhagic effects in suckling mouse were not detectable. The major protein components, laminin and collagen, of basement membrane comprising of vascular endothelial cells, were degraded by HAP. Purified HAP showed cell rounding effects on Int 407 cells. Conclusion Result indicates that HAP may be a causative agent of Vibrio cholerae mediated extra-intestinal infection. This study confirms that Vibrio cholera as a sole pathogen can cause the extra-intestinal infection. This information is important for public health

  6. Intestinal Innate Antiviral Immunity and Immunobiotics: Beneficial Effects against Rotavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Villena, Julio; Vizoso-Pinto, Maria Guadalupe; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    The mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal tract are the main portal entry of pathogens such as rotavirus (RV), which is a leading cause of death due to diarrhea among young children across the globe and a major cause of severe acute intestinal infection in livestock animals. The interactions between intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and immune cells with RVs have been studied for several years, and now, it is known that the innate immune responses triggered by this virus can have both beneficial and detrimental effects for the host. It was demonstrated that natural RV infection in infants and experimental challenges in mice result in the intestinal activation of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and striking secretion of proinflammatory mediators that can lead to increased local tissue damage and immunopathology. Therefore, modulating desregulated intestinal immune responses triggered by PRRs activation are a significant promise for reducing the burden of RV diseases. The ability of immunoregulatory probiotic microorganisms (immunobiotics) to protect against intestinal infections, such as those caused by RVs, is among the oldest effects studied for these important group of beneficial microbes. In this review, we provide an update of the current status on the modulation of intestinal antiviral innate immunity by immunobiotics and their beneficial impact on RV infection. In addition, we describe the research of our group that demonstrated the capacity of immunobiotic strains to beneficially modulated TLR3-triggered immune response in IECs, reduce the disruption of intestinal homeostasis caused by intraepithelial lymphocytes, and improve the resistance to RV infections. PMID:27994593

  7. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Infections in Jiroft, Kerman Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    BARKHORI MAHNI, Maryam; REZAEIAN, Mostafa; KIA, Eshrat Beigom; RAEISI, Ahmad; KHANALIHA, Khadijeh; TARIGHI, Fatemeh; KAMRANRASHANI, Bahare

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intestinal parasitic infections have a worldwide distribution. High prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in individuals with low socioeconomic status and environmental conditions was found. No study has ever been conducted on the prevalence of these infections in Jiroft. Therefore, in this study prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections was evaluated in Jiroft, Kerman Province, Iran. Methods: A total of 1060 individuals from rural and urban areas of Jiroft were sampled accidentally, during 2013–2014. Fresh stool samples were collected from all individuals and examined by formalin ether concentration and agar plate culture. Direct examination was performed on watery samples. Results: Out of 1060 individuals, 563 (53.1%) and 497 (46.9%) people were from rural and urban areas, respectively. In general, 297 individuals (28%) were infected with intestinal parasites. The prevalence of infection for protozoa and helminthes infections were 27.4% and 1.8%, respectively. The most prevalent protozoans were Blastocystis hominis (13.7%) and Giardia lamblia (7.8%), and that of helminth was Hymenolepis nana (1.1%). Conclusion: Intestinal protozoan parasites were more prevalent than helminth parasites. Source of water supply and personal hygiene were important factors in the distribution of parasites in the study area. PMID:28096858

  8. Acute abdomen: An uncommon presentation of a common intestinal nematode

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Ghazala; Rawat, Vinita; Pandey, Hari Shankar; Kumar, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Enterobius vermicularis is a common parasitic infection of the intestine which is rarely symptomatic. It is unusual to find it in the wall or outside the gastrointestinal tract. We encountered five such cases where we observed the worm outside the lumen of the intestine. The pathological findings and the clinical features are discussed. This case series highlight that E. vermicularis can be the cause of pathology within the abdomen and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of some commonly encountered abdominal conditions. PMID:26629456

  9. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived GABA Mediates Interleukin-17 Expression during Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Li, Tiejun; Zeng, Benhua; Li, Wenxia; Wei, Hong; Yin, Zhinan; Wu, Guoyao; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Yin, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota has critical importance in pathogenesis of intestinal infection; however, the role of intestinal microbiota in intestinal immunity during enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is poorly understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intestinal microbiota is associated with intestinal interleukin-17 (IL-17) expression in response to ETEC infection. Here, we found ETEC infection induced expression of intestinal IL-17 and dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota, increasing abundance of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Antibiotics treatment in mice lowered the expression of intestinal IL-17 during ETEC infection, while GABA or L. lactis subsp. lactis administration restored the expression of intestinal IL-17. L. lactis subsp. lactis administration also promoted expression of intestinal IL-17 in germ-free mice during ETEC infection. GABA enhanced intestinal IL-17 expression in the context of ETEC infection through activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling. GABA–mTORC1 signaling also affected intestinal IL-17 expression in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection and in drug-induced model of intestinal inflammation. These findings highlight the importance of intestinal GABA signaling in intestinal IL-17 expression during intestinal infection and indicate the potential of intestinal microbiota-GABA signaling in IL-17-associated intestinal diseases. PMID:28138329

  10. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived GABA Mediates Interleukin-17 Expression during Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Li, Tiejun; Zeng, Benhua; Li, Wenxia; Wei, Hong; Yin, Zhinan; Wu, Guoyao; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota has critical importance in pathogenesis of intestinal infection; however, the role of intestinal microbiota in intestinal immunity during enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is poorly understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intestinal microbiota is associated with intestinal interleukin-17 (IL-17) expression in response to ETEC infection. Here, we found ETEC infection induced expression of intestinal IL-17 and dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota, increasing abundance of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Antibiotics treatment in mice lowered the expression of intestinal IL-17 during ETEC infection, while GABA or L. lactis subsp. lactis administration restored the expression of intestinal IL-17. L. lactis subsp. lactis administration also promoted expression of intestinal IL-17 in germ-free mice during ETEC infection. GABA enhanced intestinal IL-17 expression in the context of ETEC infection through activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling. GABA-mTORC1 signaling also affected intestinal IL-17 expression in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection and in drug-induced model of intestinal inflammation. These findings highlight the importance of intestinal GABA signaling in intestinal IL-17 expression during intestinal infection and indicate the potential of intestinal microbiota-GABA signaling in IL-17-associated intestinal diseases.

  11. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Ayse; Tanir, Gonul; Ozkan, Mehpare; Oguz, Melek; Yıldız, Yasemin Tasci

    2013-03-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an acute demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, which principally affects the brain and spinal cord. It usually follows a benign infection or vaccination in children. Although a number of infectious agents have been implicated in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, Toxoplasma gondii infection has not been described previously in children. Acquired T. gondii infection presents with lymphadenopathy and fever and usually spontaneously resolves in immunocompetent patients. We describe a previously healthy 10-year-old boy with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with acute acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection, the symptoms of which initially began with nuchal stiffness, difficulty in walking, and urinary and stool incontinence; he later had development of motor and sensory impairment in both lower extremities and classical magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of the disease. The patient recovered completely after the specific therapy for acquired T. gondii infection and pulse prednisolone. Although acute acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection has not been reported previously in association with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, clinicians should keep in mind this uncommon cause of a common disease when evaluating a patient with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  12. Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Pregnant Women in Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J.; Barbella, Rosa A.; Case, Cynthia; Arria, Melissa; Ravelo, Marisela; Perez, Henry; Urdaneta, Oscar; Gervasio, Gloria; Rubio, Nestor; Maldonado, Andrea; Aguilera, Ymora; Viloria, Anna; Blanco, Juan J.; Colina, Magdary; Hernández, Elizabeth; Araujo, Elianet; Cabaniel, Gilberto; Benitez, Jesús; Rifakis, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. Intestinal parasitic infections, especially due to helminths, increase anemia in pregnant women. The results of this are low pregnancy weight gain and IUGR, followed by LBW, with its associated greater risks of infection and higher perinatal mortality rates. For these reasons, in the setting of no large previous studies in Venezuela about this problem, a national multicentric study was conducted. Methods. Pregnant women from nine states were studied, a prenatal evaluation with a coproparasitological study. Univariated and multivariated analyses were made to determine risk factors for intestinal parasitosis and related anemia. Results. During 19 months, 1038 pregnant women were included and evaluated. Intestinal parasitosis was evidenced in 73.9%: A lumbricoides 57.0%, T trichiura 36.0%, G lamblia 14.1%, E hystolitica 12.0%, N americanus 8.1%, E vermicularis 6.3%, S stercoralis 3.3%. Relative risk for anemia in those women with intestinal parasitosis was 2.56 (P < .01). Discussion. Intestinal parasitoses could be associated with conditions for development of anemia at pregnancy. These features reflect the need of routine coproparasitological study among pregnant women in rural and endemic zones for intestinal parasites. Further therapeutic and prophylactic protocols are needed. Additional research on pregnant intestinal parasitic infection impact on newborn health is also considered. PMID:17093349

  13. Changes in the small intestine of Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Alencar, Alba Cristina Miranda de Barros; Neves, Renata Heisler; de Oliveira, Albanita Viana; Machado-Silva, José Roberto

    2012-05-01

    The consumption of a high-fat diet modifies both the morphology of the small intestine and experimentally tested effects of schistosomiasis mansoni. However, whether a schistosomiasis infection associated with a high-fat diet causes injury to the small intestine has never been investigated. Mice were fed either a high-fat or a standard-fat diet for 6 months and were then infected with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. Physical characteristics of the intestinal tissue (mucosal thickness, small intestinal villi length and height, and abundance of goblet cells and enterocytes on the villous surface) and the distribution of granulomas along the intestinal segments and their developmental stage were measured at the time of sacrifice (9 or 17 weeks post-infection). The group fed a high-fat diet exhibited different granuloma stages, whereas the control group possessed only exudative granulomas. The chronically infected mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited higher granuloma and egg numbers than the acutely infected group. Exudative, exudative/exudative-productive and exudative-productive granulomas were present irrespective of diet. Computer-aided morphometric analysis confirmed that villus length, villus width, muscular height and submucosal height of the duodenal and jejunal segments were affected by diet and infection. In conclusion, a high-fat diet and infection had a significant impact on the small intestine morphology and morphometry among the animals tested.

  14. Stress and acute respiratory infection

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, N.M.; Douglas, R.M.; Ryan, P.

    1986-09-01

    To examine the relationship between stress and upper respiratory tract infection, 235 adults aged 14-57 years, from 94 families affiliated with three suburban family physicians in Adelaide, South Australia, participated in a six-month prospective study. High and low stress groups were identified by median splits of data collected from the Life Events Inventory, the Daily Hassles Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire, which were administered both before and during the six months of respiratory diary data collection. Using intra-study stress data, the high stress group experienced significantly more episodes (mean of 2.71 vs. 1.56, p less than 0.0005) and symptom days (mean of 29.43 vs. 15.42, p = 0.005) of respiratory illness. The two groups were almost identical with respect to age, sex, occupational status, smoking, passive smoking, exposure to air pollution, family size, and proneness to acute respiratory infection in childhood. In a multivariate model with total respiratory episodes as the dependent variable, 21% of the variance was explained, and two stress variables accounted for 9% of the explained variance. Significant, but less strong relationships were also identified between intra-study stress variables and clinically definite episodes and symptom days in both clinically definite and total respiratory episodes. Pre-study measures of stress emphasized chronic stresses and were less strongly related to measures of respiratory illness than those collected during the study. However, significantly more episodes (mean of 2.50 vs. 1.75, p less than 0.02) and symptom days (mean of 28.00 vs. 17.06, p less than 0.03) were experienced in the high stress group. In the multivariate analyses, pre-study stress remained significantly associated with total respiratory episodes nd symptom days in total and ''definite'' respiratory episodes.

  15. Current Therapy in Acute Mouth Infections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, George; Burnstein, Irwin L.

    1970-01-01

    Until a dental department is added to a college health service, a physician or nurse can give treatment for acute oral infections. Treatment excludes the use of caustic, escharotic chemicals in favor of more benign agents. (Author)

  16. [Prevention of peritoneal desiccation in acute adhesive intestinal obstruction].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The research study was carried out on 30 white Wistar rats, which were divided into three groups. In the first group the effect of carboxyperitoneum on visceral peritoneum during a two hour period at a pressure of 9-10 mm Hg and after 20 minutes its further fractional replacement during 10 seconds was examined. In the second group, the study was carried out after modeling 12-hours acute adhesive intestinal obstruction. To the third group at the beginning was given a single injection of four component mixture (carboxyperitoneum gel carboxymetiltcellulose novocaine and antibiotic) into the abdominal cavity. In the first group under the condition of tension carboxyperitoneum after a day of use there were signs of desiccations of visceral peritoneum. The increase of lipid peroxidation products and decrease of antioxidant enzymes were also observed. In the second group of animals these processes were exacerbated by acute adhesive intestinal obstruction. In the third group intraabdominal use of four component disperse mixture reduced the negative organic and functional changes in visceral peritoneum and improved its protective properties.

  17. Effect of intestinal microbiota alteration on hepatic damage in rats with acute rejection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yirui; Chen, Huazhong; Zhu, Biao; Qin, Nan; Chen, Yunbo; Li, Zhengfeng; Deng, Min; Jiang, Haiyin; Xu, Xiangfei; Yang, Jiezuan; Ruan, Bing; Li, Lanjuan

    2014-11-01

    The previous studies all focus on the effect of probiotics and antibiotics on infection after liver transplantation. Here, we focus on the effect of gut microbiota alteration caused by probiotics and antibiotics on hepatic damage after allograft liver transplantation. Brown-Norway rats received saline, probiotics, or antibiotics via daily gavage for 3 weeks. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) was carried out after 1 week of gavage. Alteration of the intestinal microbiota, liver function and histopathology, serum and liver cytokines, and T cells in peripheral blood and Peyer's patch were evaluated. Distinct segregation of fecal bacterial diversity was observed in the probiotic group and antibiotic group when compared with the allograft group. As for diversity of intestinal mucosal microbiota and pathology of intestine at 2 weeks after OLT, antibiotics and probiotics had a significant effect on ileum and colon. The population of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in the probiotic group was significantly greater than the antibiotic group and the allograft group. The liver injury was significantly reduced in the antibiotic group and the probiotic group compared with the allograft group. The CD4/CD8 and Treg cells in Peyer's patch were decreased in the antibiotic group. The intestinal Treg cell and serum and liver TGF-β were increased markedly while CD4/CD8 ratio was significantly decreased in the probiotic group. It suggested that probiotics mediate their beneficial effects through increase of Treg cells and TGF-β and deduction of CD4/CD8 in rats with acute rejection (AR) after OLT.

  18. Intestinal parasitic infections among school children in Tripoli, Libya.

    PubMed

    Ben Musa, Najla; Sehari, Aisha; Hawas, Ali

    2007-12-01

    An epidemiological survey was carried out in Tripoli district to collect baseline data on the prevalence of intestinal parasites. A sample of 486 school children aged from 5 to 14 years old provided morning stool samples as part of a pilot study of a larger national project. Questionnaires were distributed and general information on each child was recorded. Posters and leaflets were used extensively to increase the public health information and awareness about parasitosis. The results revealed that 14.6% of children were infected with at least one intestinal parasite. Double infections were in 2% of them. Giardia lamblia was the common parasite, followed by Enterobius vermicularis and then Ascqris lumbricoides. This was a preliminary approach to clarify the status on intestinal parasites since reliable reportable data being still comparatively lacking, which might be a guide for a feasible national control program.

  19. Intestinal microbiome in children with severe and complicated acute viral gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Yen; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Lee, Yun-Shien; Lin, Chun-Yuan; Huang, Kuan-Yeh; Chao, Hsun-Ching; Lai, Ming-Wei; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2017-04-11

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the microbiota of children with severe or complicated acute viral gastroenteritis (AGE). To that end, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology was used to sequence the 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene in 20 hospitalized pediatric patients with severe or complicated AGE and a further 20 otherwise healthy children; the fecal microbiome was then assessed. Comparative metagenomics data were analyzed by a Wilcoxon rank-sum test and hierarchical clustering analysis of bacterial reads. The statistical analyses showed a significantly decreased Shannon diversity index (entropy score) of the intestinal microbiota in patients with severe AGE compared with normal controls (P = 0.017) and patients with mild-to-moderate AGE (P = 0.011). The intestinal microbiota score of the 5 patients with rotavirus AGE was significantly lower than that of those with norovirus infection (P = 0.048). Greater richness in Campylobacteraceae (P = 0.0003), Neisseriaceae (P = 0.0115), Methylobacteriaceae (P = 0.0004), Sphingomonadaceae (P = 0.0221), and Enterobacteriaceae (P = 0.0451) was found in patients with complicated AGE compared with normal controls. The data suggest a significant reduction in intestinal microbial diversity in patients with severe AGE, particularly those with rotavirus infection.

  20. Intestinal microbiome in children with severe and complicated acute viral gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Yen; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Lee, Yun-Shien; Lin, Chun-Yuan; Huang, Kuan-Yeh; Chao, Hsun-Ching; Lai, Ming-Wei; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the microbiota of children with severe or complicated acute viral gastroenteritis (AGE). To that end, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology was used to sequence the 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene in 20 hospitalized pediatric patients with severe or complicated AGE and a further 20 otherwise healthy children; the fecal microbiome was then assessed. Comparative metagenomics data were analyzed by a Wilcoxon rank–sum test and hierarchical clustering analysis of bacterial reads. The statistical analyses showed a significantly decreased Shannon diversity index (entropy score) of the intestinal microbiota in patients with severe AGE compared with normal controls (P = 0.017) and patients with mild-to-moderate AGE (P = 0.011). The intestinal microbiota score of the 5 patients with rotavirus AGE was significantly lower than that of those with norovirus infection (P = 0.048). Greater richness in Campylobacteraceae (P = 0.0003), Neisseriaceae (P = 0.0115), Methylobacteriaceae (P = 0.0004), Sphingomonadaceae (P = 0.0221), and Enterobacteriaceae (P = 0.0451) was found in patients with complicated AGE compared with normal controls. The data suggest a significant reduction in intestinal microbial diversity in patients with severe AGE, particularly those with rotavirus infection.

  1. Cytomegalovirus Infection After Intestinal Transplantation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Javier; Green, Michael; Kocoshis, Samuel; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Ahu-Elmagd, Kareem; Yunis, Eduardo; Irish, William; Todo, Satoru; Reyes, Jorge; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen episodes of cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease occurred in 10 of 41 children undergoing intestinal transplantation from 1990 to 1995. Stratification of CMV disease by donor (D)/recipient (R) serological status was as follows: 3 of 8, D+/R−; 3 of 9, D+/R+; 4 of 9, D−/R+; and 0 of 15, D−/R−. Treatment resulted in resolution of CMV disease in 93.3% of episodes. No deaths attributable to CMV disease occurred in this series. CMV in D+/R− children resulted in more extensive and persistent disease. However, patient and graft survival rates were similar in the different D/R subgroups and between children with and without CMV disease. Cumulative dose of steroid boluses (relative risk [RR]. 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]. 1.14–2.21) and history of steroid recycles (RR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.21–6.13) were associated with CMV disease. These results suggest that although CMV-associated morbidity in pediatric intestinal transplant recipients was substantial, it was not associated with an increased rate of mortality or graft loss, even among high-risk D+/R− patients. PMID:9402361

  2. Murine intestinal antibody response to heterologous rotavirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, A A; Groene, W S; Cheng, E H; Shaw, R D

    1991-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most important worldwide cause of severe gastroenteritis. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the design of a vaccine that will prevent disease, but development of a more effective vaccine strategy may require progress in the understanding of the mucosal immune response to replicating viral antigens. In this article, we report the characterization of the intestinal antibody response of a murine model to heterologous infection with the rhesus rotavirus vaccine strain. We have adapted the enzyme-linked immunospot assay to measure this response without the difficulties associated with measurement of antibodies in intestinal contents or the artifacts associated with culturing of lymphocytes. The predominant response in terms of antibody-secreting cells (ASC) is seen in the small intestine lamina propria, which can be measured within 4 days of infection, peaks 3 weeks after infection, and remains near that level for longer than 8 weeks. The magnitude of the immunoglobulin A (IgA) cell response is approximately 10 times greater than the intestinal IgG cell response, and IgM cells are rare. Virus-specific ASC constitute approximately 50% of all ASC in the gut at the peak of the virus-specific response. This response is considerably greater than responses to nonreplicating mucosal antigens measured by similar techniques. Enteral infection engenders minimal virus-specific ASC response in the spleen. Rhesus rotavirus-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and neutralization assays of serum and intestinal contents did not correlate with virus-specific ASC response. Images PMID:1761691

  3. Extra-intestinal and long term consequences of Giardia duodenalis infections.

    PubMed

    Halliez, Marie C M; Buret, André G

    2013-12-21

    Giardiasis is the most common waterborne parasitic infection of the human intestine worldwide. The etiological agent, Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia), is a flagellated, binucleated protozoan parasite which infects a wide array of mammalian hosts. Human giardiasis is a true cosmopolitan pathogen, with highest prevalence in developing countries. Giardiasis can present with a broad range of clinical manifestations from asymptomatic, to acute or chronic diarrheal disease associated with abdominal pain and nausea. Most infections are self-limiting, although re-infection and chronic infection can occur. Recent evidence indicating that Giardia may cause chronic post-infectious gastrointestinal complications have made it a topic of intense research. The causes of the post-infectious clinical manifestations due to Giardia, even after complete elimination of the parasite, remain obscure. This review offers a state-of-the-art discussion on the long-term consequences of Giardia infections, from extra-intestinal manifestations, growth and cognitive deficiencies, to post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome. The discussion also sheds light on some of the novel mechanisms recently implicated in the production of these post-infectious manifestations.

  4. Acute transverse myelitis complicating breakthrough varicella infection.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Asli; Kurugol, Zafer; Gokben, Sarenur

    2014-11-01

    We report a 10-year-old girl who presented with acute transverse myelitis after breakthrough varicella infection. The diagnosis was based on the development of motor weakness, paraparesis and bladder dysfunction, spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings and detection of anti-varicella zoster virus IgG antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid. This case report highlights that breakthrough varicella can result in serious complications such as acute transverse myelitis.

  5. Emerging insights on intestinal dysbiosis during bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tu Anh N; Lawley, Trevor D

    2014-02-01

    Infection of the gastrointestinal tract is commonly linked to pathological imbalances of the resident microbiota, termed dysbiosis. In recent years, advanced high-throughput genomic approaches have allowed us to examine the microbiota in an unprecedented manner, revealing novel biological insights about infection-associated dysbiosis at the community and individual species levels. A dysbiotic microbiota is typically reduced in taxonomic diversity and metabolic function, and can harbour pathobionts that exacerbate intestinal inflammation or manifest systemic disease. Dysbiosis can also promote pathogen genome evolution, while allowing the pathogens to persist at high density and transmit to new hosts. A deeper understanding of bacterial pathogenicity in the context of the intestinal microbiota should unveil new approaches for developing diagnostics and therapies for enteropathogens.

  6. Incidence of intestinal obstruction in children infected with Ascaris lumbricoides.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, D S; Schultz, M G

    1975-09-01

    The most serious consequences of infection with the large roundworm, Ascaris lumbricoides, are complications requiring surgical intervention, particularly intestinal obstruction caused by a bolus of worms. A study was conducted to estimate the incidence of this complication among infected children in an area of the southeastern United States where ascariasis is endemic. A chart review at three rural Louisiana public hospitals revealed that 21 patients had been hospitalized with intestinal obstruction secondary to ascariasis over a 3-year period. The prevalence of ascariasis in three parishes (counties) served by these hospitals was calculated from the results of 2,360 stool examinations performed by the State Health Department and one hospital laboratory. The prevalence of ascariasis in 1- to 5-year-old children was similar to that in 6- to 12-year-olds and ranged from 8% to 28% in the three parishes. Prevalence rates were three times higher for blacks than for whites. It was found that most cases of intestinal obstruction occur in children in the 1- to 5-year age group and that this incidence approximates two such complications per 1,000 infected children per year.

  7. Practical parasitology courses and infection with intestinal parasites in students.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Sh; Rostami, A; Mohammadi, M; Ebrahimzadeh, F; Pournia, Y

    2016-01-01

    Students who are working in research or educational laboratories of parasitology, as well as health care workers providing care for patients, are at the risk of becoming infected with parasites through accidental exposure. The main purpose of this study was to identify potential positive cases of intestinal parasitic infections among students who took practical parasitology courses compared with students who did not take any practical parasitology courses in Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran, in 2013-2014. A total of 310 subjects from various majors were invited to voluntarily participate in the study. Various demographic data were collected using questionnaires. Three stool samples were collected from each individual on alternate days. Saline wet mounts (SWM), formalin-ether sedimentation test (FEST), Sheather floatation test (SHFT) and trichrome and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining methods were used to diagnose the presence of intestinal parasites. The prevalence rate of intestinal parasites (IPs) among the students was 11.93%. There was a significant difference between majors in the infection with IPs (P<0.05). The most frequently observed IPs were Blastocystis hominis (4.51%) and Giardia intestinalis (3.54%). The results of this study showed that the transmission of pathogenic parasites in the educational course of practical parasitology could occur and must be taken into careful consideration.

  8. Intestinal Decontamination of Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae After Recurrent Infections in an Immunocompromised Host

    PubMed Central

    Kronman, Matthew P.; Zerr, Danielle M.; Qin, Xuan; Englund, Janet; Cornell, Cathy; Sanders, Jean E.; Myers, Jeffrey; Rayar, Jaipreet; Berry, Jessica E.; Adler, Amanda L.; Weissman, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae infections are associated with increased morbidity. We describe a 20-year-old hematopoietic cell transplantation recipient with recurrent MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae infection, prolonged intestinal colonization, and subsequent intestinal decontamination. Further study should evaluate stool surveillance, molecular typing, and fecal microbiota transplantation for patients with intestinal MDR Enterobacteriaceae carriage. PMID:25041704

  9. [Influencing factors on infections of human intestinal helminthes in suburb of Shangyu City].

    PubMed

    Song-Lin, Hu

    2011-06-01

    The infections of human intestinal helminthes and socioeconomic status were investigated in suburb of Shangyu City in 1990 and 2005, respectively. The results showed that the economic status, the save drinking water and latrines, working environment, and health habits and consciousness of the residents improved obviously. The infection rate of intestinal helminthes decreased significantly and the prevalence of intestinal helminthosis was controlled effectively.

  10. [Intestinal parasitic diseases in HIV-infected patients in Uzbekistan].

    PubMed

    Nurtaev, Kh S; Badalova, N S; Zalialieva, M V; Osipova, S O

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic diseases were diagnosed in 100 HIV-infected patients at different stages of disease (its asymptomatic form, persistent generalized lymphoadenopathy, pre-AIDS, and AIDS) (Group 1), 100 Tashkent residents (Group 2), and 349 patients with gastrointestinal diseases, allergic dermatoses, and skin depigmentation foci (Group 3). The HIV-infected patients were found to have virtually all parasites, such as Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, Chilomastix mesnili, Entamoeba coli, Iodamoeba butschlii, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Endolimax nana, Blastocystis hominis, Enlerobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides, Hymenolepis nana, detectable in the population of Tashkent. The highest infestation with intestinal protozoa, including nonpathogenic amoebas and helmninths, was found in Groups 1 and 3. However, in all the forms of HIV infection, the infestation with E. histolytical/dispar was 10 times greater than that in Groups 2 and 3 (1% and 0.8%, respectively). G. lamblia was detected in 16, 21, and 45.2% in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In all the HIV-infected patients, the content of CD8 lymphocytes was increased, but that of CD20 lymphocytes was normal. Parasites were detectable with different levels of CD4 lymphocytes, but C. parvum was found only if its count was > 200/ml. In the HIV-infected patients, the hyperproduction of IgE was caused mainly by helminths rather than protozoa. In these patients, the increased level of IgE was also noted in the absence of parasites.

  11. Modeling rotavirus infection and antiviral therapy using primary intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuebang; Bijvelds, Marcel; Dang, Wen; Xu, Lei; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Knipping, Karen; Tuysuz, Nesrin; Dekkers, Johanna F; Wang, Yijin; de Jonge, Jeroen; Sprengers, Dave; van der Laan, Luc J W; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Ten Berge, Derk; Metselaar, Herold J; de Jonge, Hugo; Koopmans, Marion P G; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2015-11-01

    Despite the introduction of oral vaccines, rotavirus still kills over 450,000 children under five years of age annually. The absence of specific treatment prompts research aiming at further understanding of pathogenesis and the development of effective antiviral therapy, which in turn requires advanced experimental models. Given the intrinsic limitations of the classical rotavirus models using immortalized cell lines infected with laboratory-adapted strains in two dimensional cultures, our study aimed to model infection and antiviral therapy of both experimental and patient-derived rotavirus strains using three dimensional cultures of primary intestinal organoids. Intestinal epithelial organoids were successfully cultured from mouse or human gut tissues. These organoids recapitulate essential features of the in vivo tissue architecture, and are susceptible to rotavirus. Human organoids are more permissive to rotavirus infection, displaying an over 10,000-fold increase in genomic RNA following 24h of viral replication. Furthermore, infected organoids are capable of producing infectious rotavirus particles. Treatment of interferon-alpha or ribavirin inhibited viral replication in organoids of both species. Importantly, human organoids efficiently support the infection of patient-derived rotavirus strains and can be potentially harnessed for personalized evaluation of the efficacy of antiviral medications. Therefore, organoids provide a robust model system for studying rotavirus-host interactions and assessing antiviral medications.

  12. [Experimental substantiation of use of sodium hypochlorite and ozone at a formation of intestinal anastomosis in conditions of acute intestinal obstruction and peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lelianov, A D; Ivliev, N V; Bazhenov, S M; Nesterov, A A

    2009-01-01

    Presented are the results of experimental research on 144 animals (the rats Wistar), on whom was carried out resection of a part of large intestine and a intestinal anastamosis was formed in the presents of acute intestinal obstruction and peritonitis. The sanitation of abdominal cavity in the basic group of animals (74) was performed using sodium hypochlorite solution and dissolved ozone. The intestinal lavage was carried out by dissolved ozone with the subsequent introduction of ozonized oil Ozonide in the area of intestinal anastamosis. The combined application of ozone and sodium produces an expressed samative effect which leads to healing of intestinal anastamosis and decreases unstability of intestinal sutures and mortality.

  13. Acute renal failure in Plasmodium malariae infection.

    PubMed

    Neri, S; Pulvirenti, D; Patamia, I; Zoccolo, A; Castellino, P

    2008-04-01

    We report an unusual case of transfusion-transmitted malaria which remained undiagnosed for several months in an Italian woman splenectomised and polytransfused for thalassaemia major. The infecting species was Plasmodium malariae, and the patient developed acute renal failure, severe thrombocytopenia, and hepatic failure. Treatment with chlorochine was followed by a slow, but complete recovery of renal function.

  14. Diagnosis of Clostridium perfringens intestinal infections in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Uzal, F A

    2004-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens produces disease in sheep, goats and other animal species, most of which are generically called enterotoxemias. This micro-organism can be a normal inhabitant of the intestine of most animal species including humans, but when the intestinal environment is altered by sudden changes in diet or other factors, C. perfringens proliferates in large numbers and produces several potent toxins that are absorbed into the general circulation or act locally with usually devastating effects on the host. History, clinical signs and gross post-mortem findings are useful tools for establishing a presumptive diagnosis of enterotoxaemia by C. perfringens in sheep and goats, although no definitive diagnosis of these diseases can be made without laboratory confirmation. Because all types of C. perfringens can be normal inhabitants of the intestine of most animals, culture of this micro-organism from intestinal contents of animals has no diagnostic value unless a colony count is performed and large numbers (usually more than 10(4)-10(7)CFU/g) of C. perfringens are found. The most accepted criterion in establishing a definitive diagnosis of enterotoxaemia by C. perfringens is the detection of its toxins in intestinal contents. However, some of the major toxins of C. perfringens (i.e. epsilon toxin) can also be found, albeit in small amounts, in the small intestine of clinically normal sheep, and this poses a diagnostic challenge. In such cases the histopathology of the brain must be used as an alternative diagnostic tool, since the lesions produced by epsilon toxin in the brains of sheep and goats are unique and pathognomonic for C. perfringens type D enterotoxaemia. Ancillary tests, such as measurement of urine glucose or observation of Gram stained smears of intestinal mucosa can be used and, although they have a presumptive diagnostic value when positive, they cannot be used to rule out a diagnosis of enterotoxaemia if they are negative. In conclusion, the

  15. Molecular appraisal of intestinal parasitic infection in transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pooja; Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Diarrhoea is the main clinical manifestation caused by intestinal parasitic infections in patients, with special reference to transplant recipients who require careful consideration to reduce morbidity and mortality. Further, molecular characterization of some important parasites is necessary to delineate the different modes of transmission to consider appropriate management strategies. We undertook this study to investigate the intestinal parasitic infections in transplant recipients with or without diarrhoea, and the genotypes of the isolated parasites were also determined. Methods: Stool samples from 38 transplant recipients comprising 29 post-renal, two liver and seven bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients presenting with diarrhoea and 50 transplant recipients (42 post-renal transplant, eight BMT) without diarrhoea were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites by light microscopy using wet mount, modified Ziehl–Neelsen staining for intestinal coccidia and modified trichrome staining for microsporidia. Genotypes of Cryptosporidium species were determined by multilocus genotyping using small subunit ribosomal (SSUrRNA), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) as the target genes. Assemblage study for Giardia lamblia was performed using triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) as the target gene. Samples were also screened for bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. Results: The parasites that were detected included Cryptosporidium species (21%, 8/38), Cystoisospora (Isospora) belli (8%, 3), Cyclospora cayetanensis (5%, 2), G. lamblia (11%, 4), Hymenolepis nana (11%, 4), Strongyloides stercoralis (3%, 1) and Blastocystis hominis (3%, 1). Multilocus genotyping of Cryptosporidium species at SSUrRNA, COWP and DHFR loci could detect four isolates of C. hominis; two of C. parvum, one of mixed genotype and one could not be genotyped. All the C. hominis isolates were detected in adult post

  16. Acute neck infections in children.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, A Bülent; Kara, Ateş; Kanra, Güler; Seçmeer, Gülten; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Ozen, Metehan

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective review was conducted on 132 patients aged between two and 15 years with cervical lymphadenitis and/or with abscess formation to determine the epidemiologic and clinical presentation of these infections. The most common locations were the upper anterior cervical space (43.2%) and the submandibular space (27.3%). The duration of symptoms ranged from 12 hours to 20 days. Results of the pus cultures were available in 31 patients (23.5%). Of these, 16 cultures (51.6%) were positive. The isolated organisms were Staphylococcus aureus (50%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (31.3%), group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (12.5%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (6.3%) and Escherichia coli (6.3%). One of the specimens yielded mixed organisms (Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae). Penicillin resistance was documented in six (37.5%) of the 16 gram-positive bacteria isolated from the pus culture. Both throat and blood cultures were available in all 132 patients. Seven throat cultures (5.3%) were positive for group A beta hemolytic streptococci, whereas five blood cultures (3.8%) were reported to have bacterial growth. Sixty-seven patients (50.8%) were treated with ampicillin-sulbactam, 53 patients (40.1%) with ampicillin-sulbactam and ornidazole and 12 patients (9.1%) with ceftriaxone parenterally. The mean duration of hospital stay related to the infection was 7.30 +/- 3.89 days (range, 2-28 days). The mean period for downsizing of the cervical mass by half was 4.05 +/- 2.05 days, and the recovery period (total antibiotic usage period) was 13.72 +/- 5.33 days. All of the patients had an uneventful recovery without complications. Results of both throat and blood cultures were not predictive for etiologic agents in our study group. Since ultrasonographic evaluation of each patient has limited additional benefits in clinical management, it must be reserved for selected cases to document abscess formation.

  17. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. PMID:26199634

  18. Intestinal helminth infections amongst HIV-infected adults in Mthatha General Hospital, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yogeswaran, Parimalaranie; Wright, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Background In South Africa, studies on the prevalence of intestinal helminth co-infection amongst HIV-infected patients as well as possible interactions between these two infections are limited. Aim To investigate the prevalence of intestinal helminth infestation amongst adults living with HIV or AIDS at Mthatha General Hospital. Setting Study participants were recruited at the outpatient department of Mthatha General Hospital, Mthatha, South Africa. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between October and December 2013 amongst consecutive consenting HIV-positive adult patients. Socio-demographic and clinical information were obtained using data collection forms and structured interviews. Stool samples were collected to investigate the presence of helminths whilst blood samples were obtained for the measurement of CD4+ T-cell count and viral load. Results Data were obtained on 231 participants, with a mean age of 34.9 years, a mean CD4 count of 348 cells/µL and a mean viral load of 4.8 log10 copies/mL. Intestinal helminth prevalence was 24.7%, with Ascaris Lumbricoides (42.1%) the most prevalent identified species. Statistically significant association was found between CD4 count of less than 200 cells/µL and helminth infection (p = 0.05). No statistically significant association was found between intestinal helminth infection and the mean CD4 count (p = 0.79) or the mean viral load (p = 0.98). Conclusion A high prevalence of intestinal helminth infections was observed amongst the study population. Therefore, screening and treatment of helminths should be considered as part of the management of HIV and AIDS in primary health care. PMID:26842519

  19. Intestinal parasites infection among immunocompromised patients in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Megrin, Wafa A I

    2010-04-15

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among immunocompromised patients in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Fecal samples were collected from 136 immunocompromised patients (52 females and 84 males), aged 2 to 69 years. Specimens were fixed with 10% formalin for 30 min (2-3 g fecal(-1)) and then concentrated by a formalin-ether sedimentation technique. Samples were examined as wet saline mounts and in iodine preparation for detection of protozoan oocysts, cysts, helminthic eggs and larvae. Permanent stained smears were performed for intestinal coccidian parasites by the modified Ziehl-Neelsen technique and the modified trichrome stain. Intestinal parasites were detected in 54 (39.7%) most of them (25.7%) were with diarrhea. More specifically the following parasites were detected Cryptosporidium parvum 11(8.1%), Giardia lamblia 9 (6.6%), Cyclospora cayetanensis 8 (5.9%), Blastocystis hominis 7 (5.2%), Entamoeba histolytica 7 (5.2%), Entamoeba coli 5 (3.7%), Strongyloides stercoralis 3 (2.2%), Ascaris lumbricoides 1 (0.7%), Hymenolepis nana 1 (0.7%), Dicrocoelium dendriticum 1 (0.7%) and Hook worm 1 (0.7%). The most common parasite associated with diarrhea in patients, was C. parvum (p < 0.001), followed by G. lamblia, C. cayetanensis and E. histolytica. However, differences between different age groups were statistically non-significant. Similarly, no significant difference in the infection rate were found between male and female patients.

  20. Diarrhea incidence and intestinal infections among rotavirus vaccinated infants from a poor area in Brazil: a spatial analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute diarrhea is the second leading cause of mortality among children under 5 years of age in developing countries. The pathogen most strongly associated with diarrhea is rotavirus followed by enteric pathogens such as bacteria, helminthes and protozoan. Adequate sanitation and water supply contribute to decrease acute diarrhea incidence of most etiologic agents, although vaccination remains the most important intervention to control rotavirus acute diarrhea. This study aimed to describe environmental conditions and analyze spatially the acute diarrhea and intestinal infection among rotavirus vaccinated infants from Laranjeiras-Sergipe, Brazil. Methods Children were enrolled between 2 and 11 months of age and followed through 12 months. Demographic, socioeconomic and environmental data were obtained from a questionnaire, and immunization data were obtained from children vaccination card. Children stool samples were collected each month in order to run laboratory analyses. The household spatial localization was obtained by using a Global Positioning System (GPS). Spatial analysis was performed using the TerraView computer program and Kernel intensity estimation. Results A total of 1,113 stool samples were collected with 80 being diarrhea associated. Diarrhea incidence rate was 0.5 ± 1.0 episodes/child/year. The overall infection rates by Ascaris lumbricoides, Endolimax nana, Giardia lamblia and rotavirus were 5.1%, 3.0%, 0.9% and 2.6%, respectively. 3.8% of diarrhea-associated stool samples were positive for rotavirus and 11.3% were positive for helminths and protozoans. There were some changes on spatial distribution of intestinal infections and diarrhea episodes along the four trimesters evaluated. Conclusions The studied infants live equally in precarious conditions of sanitation which probably explain the significant rates of parasitic infections appearing in early life. The low acute diarrhea incidence in the studied rotavirus vaccinated

  1. Bovine Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Reduces Inflammation After Induction of Acute Myocardial Infarction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fiechter, Danielle; Kats, Suzanne; Brands, Ruud; van Middelaar, Ben; Pasterkamp, Gerard; de Kleijn, Dominique; Seinen, Willem

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been increasing evidence suggesting that lipopolysaccharide or endotoxin may be an important activator of the innate immune system after acute myocardial infarction. Bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase reduces inflammation in several endotoxin mediated diseases by dephosphorylation of the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase on reducing inflammation after acute myocardial infarction. Methods Just before permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary (LAD) artery to induce acute myocardial infarction in Balb/c mice, bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (bIAP) was administrated intravenously. After 4 hours, mice were sacrificed and the inflammatory response was assessed. Acute myocardial infarction induced the production of different cytokines, which were measured in blood. Results Treatment with bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase resulted in a significant reduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β and the chymase mouse mast cell protease-1. No difference in the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was observed between the control group and the bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase treated group. Conclusion In a mouse model of permanent LAD coronary artery ligation, bIAP diminishes the pro-inflammatory responses but does not have an effect on the anti-inflammatory response in the acute phase after acute myocardial infarction.

  2. Acute interactions between intestinal sugar and calcium transport in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tharabenjasin, Phuntila; Douard, Veronique; Patel, Chirag; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Johnson, Richard J; Zuo, Jian; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2014-01-01

    Fructose consumption by Americans has increased markedly, whereas Ca(2+) intake has decreased below recommended levels. Because fructose metabolism decreases enterocyte ATP concentrations, we tested the hypothesis that luminal fructose acutely reduces active, diet-inducible Ca(2+) transport in the small intestine. We confirmed that the decrease in ATP concentrations was indeed greater in fructose- compared with glucose-incubated mucosal homogenates from wild-type and was prevented in fructose-incubated homogenates from ketohexokinase (KHK)(-/-) mice. We then induced active Ca(2+) transport by chronically feeding wild-type, fructose transporter glucose transporter 5 (GLUT5)(-/-), as well as KHK(-/-) mice a low Ca(2+) diet and measured transepithelial Ca(2+) transport in everted duodenal sacs incubated in solutions containing glucose, fructose, or their nonmetabolizable analogs. The diet-induced increase in active Ca(2+) transport was proportional to dramatic increases in expression of the Ca(2+)-selective channel transient receptor potential vanilloid family calcium channel 6 as well as of the Ca(2+)-binding protein 9k (CaBP9k) but not that of the voltage-dependent L-type channel Ca(v)1.3. Crypt-villus distribution of CaBP9k seems heterogeneous, but low Ca(2+) diets induce expression in more cells. In contrast, KHK distribution is homogeneous, suggesting that fructose metabolism can occur in all enterocytes. Diet-induced Ca(2+) transport was not enhanced by addition of the enterocyte fuel glutamine and was always greater in sacs of wild-type, GLUT5(-/-), and KHK(-/-) mice incubated with fructose or nonmetabolizable sugars than those incubated with glucose. Thus duodenal Ca(2+) transport is not affected by fructose and enterocyte ATP concentrations but instead may decrease with glucose metabolism, as Ca(2+) transport remains high with 3-O-methylglucose that is also transported by sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 but cannot be metabolized.

  3. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Di Genova, Bruno M.; Tonelli, Renata R.

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite–host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases’ pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death. PMID:26973630

  4. Intestinal immune response to human Cryptosporidium sp. infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    and eliminate the infection, which typically causes acute, self-limited watery diarrhea lasting 5 to 10 days. However, in patients with defects in ...cellular immune responses (e.g., AIDS, malnutrition, or defects in the CD40- CD154 system), Cryptosporidium frequently causes persistent or chronic...diarrhea and may also involve the biliary tract (40). In malnourished children, persistent diarrhea is associated with increased susceptibility to recurrent

  5. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction related to viral infections.

    PubMed

    De Giorgio, R; Ricciardiello, L; Naponelli, V; Selgrad, M; Piazzi, G; Felicani, C; Serra, M; Fronzoni, L; Antonucci, A; Cogliandro, R F; Barbara, G; Corinaldesi, R; Tonini, M; Knowles, C H; Stanghellini, V

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO), one of the most severe gastrointestinal motility disorders, is a condition characterized by a clinical picture mimicking small bowel occlusion with related symptoms and signs in the absence of demonstrable mechanical obstruction. Analysis of full-thickness biopsy samples may unravel structural changes of the neuromuscular layer involving the whole gut, although the midgut is usually worst affected. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction can occur in association with systemic neurological, endocrine, and connective tissue diseases or malignancy but, when no recognizable etiology is found, CIPO is referred to as idiopathic (CIIPO). The latter form can be diagnosed early in life due to a genetic etiology or in adulthood when a viral origin may be considered. This review addresses the hypothesis that some systemic neurotrophic viral infections can affect the enteric nervous system thereby altering normal peristaltic activity. Available data are reviewed, focusing specifically on herpesviruses or polyomaviruses (JC virus). These suggest that in comparison to a proportion of CIIPO patients, healthy controls rarely harbor viral DNA in the myenteric plexus, leaving open the possibility that a viral infection might have an etiologic role in the development of CIIPO. The review thus provides some new perspectives in the pathophysiology and perhaps targeted treatment of CIIPO.

  6. Critical role of intestinal epithelial cell-derived IL-25 in enteric nematode infection-induced changes in intestinal function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current study investigated the mechanism of immune regulation of IL-25 and the contribution of IL-25 to nematode infection-induced alterations in intestinal smooth muscle and epithelial cell function. Mice were infected with an enteric nematode or injected with IL-25 or IL-13. In vitro smooth m...

  7. Intestinal parasitic infections in HIV infected and non-infected patients in a low HIV prevalence region, West-Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Nkenfou, Céline Nguefeu; Nana, Christelle Tafou; Payne, Vincent Khan

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients requires careful consideration in the developing world where poor nutrition is associated with poor hygiene and several tropical diseases. However, there have been very few studies addressing this issue in Cameroon. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Dschang -Cameroon. Stool and blood specimens from HIV/AIDS patients and control group were screened respectively for intestinal parasites and for HIV antibodies. Intestinal parasites were identified using direct microscopy, formalin-ether concentration and Ziehl Neelsen methods. Out of 396 participants recruited among patients consulting at hospital, 42 (10.6%) were HIV positive, thirty of them treatment naïve. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 14.64%. Out of 42 HIV/AIDS patients, 59.5% (25/42) were infected with intestinal parasites, while only 9.32% (33/354) of the HIV negative patients were infected with intestinal parasites. The parasites detected in our study population included Crystosporidium parvum (2.53%), Entamoeba histolytica (7.52%), Entamoeba coli (4.04%), Giardia lamblia (0.25%), Trichuris trichura (0.25%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25%) and Taenia spp. (0.25%). In the HIV infected group, Crystosporidium parvum (19.04%), Entamoeba histolytica (19.04%), Entamoeba coli (21.42%), Giardia lamblia (2.38%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25%) and Taenia spp. (0.25%) were found. Crystosporidium parvum was found to be significantly higher in HIV/AIDS patients than in controls (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that the HIV status and the quality of water were the major risk factors for intestinal parasitosis. Routine examinations of stool samples for parasites would significantly benefit the HIV patients by contributing in reducing morbidity and improving the efficiency of antiretroviral treatment. Even after the introduction of

  8. Antibiotic and Antiinflammatory Therapy Transiently Reduces Inflammation and Hypercoagulation in Acutely SIV-Infected Pigtailed Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pandrea, Ivona; Xu, Cuiling; Stock, Jennifer L.; Frank, Daniel N.; Ma, Dongzhu; Policicchio, Benjamin B.; He, Tianyu; Kristoff, Jan; Cornell, Elaine; Haret-Richter, George S.; Trichel, Anita; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Tracy, Russell; Wilson, Cara; Landay, Alan L.; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Increased chronic immune activation and inflammation are hallmarks of HIV/SIV infection and are highly correlated with progression to AIDS and development of non-AIDS comorbidities, such as hypercoagulability and cardiovascular disease. Intestinal dysfunction resulting in microbial translocation has been proposed as a lead cause of systemic immune activation and hypercoagulability in HIV/SIV infection. Our goal was to assess the biological and clinical impact of a therapeutic strategy designed to reduce microbial translocation through reduction of the microbial content of the intestine (Rifaximin-RFX) and of gut inflammation (Sulfasalazine-SFZ). RFX is an intraluminal antibiotic that was successfully used in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SFZ is an antiinflammatory drug successfully used in patients with mild to moderate inflammatory bowel disease. Both these clinical conditions are associated with increased microbial translocation, similar to HIV-infected patients. Treatment was administered for 90 days to five acutely SIV-infected pigtailed macaques (PTMs) starting at the time of infection; seven untreated SIVsab-infected PTMs were used as controls. RFX+SFZ were also administered for 90 days to three chronically SIVsab-infected PTMs. RFX+SFZ administration during acute SIVsab infection of PTMs resulted in: significantly lower microbial translocation, lower systemic immune activation, lower viral replication, better preservation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and significantly lower levels of hypercoagulation biomarkers. This effect was clear during the first 40 days of treatment and was lost during the last stages of treatment. Administration of RFX+SFZ to chronically SIVsab–infected PTMs had no discernible effect on infection. Our data thus indicate that early RFX+SFZ administration transiently improves the natural history of acute and postacute SIV infection, but has no effect during chronic infection. PMID:26764484

  9. ANTIOXIDANT ENZYME ACTIVITY AMONG ORPHANS INFECTED WITH INTESTINAL PARASITES IN PATHUM THANI PROVINCE, THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Mahittikorn, Aongart; Prasertbun, Rapeepan; Mori, Hirotake; Popruk, Supaluk

    2014-11-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections can negatively impact growth and nutrition in children. The infections can induce oxidative stress, resulting in a variety of illnesses. We measured antioxidant enzyme levels in orphan children infected with intestinal parasites to investigate the influence of nutritional status on antioxidant enzymes. This cross sectional study was conducted at an orphanage in Thailand. Stool samples were obtained from each subject and examined for intestinal parasites. Anthropometric measurements, complete blood count and biochemical parameters, including serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels, were obtained from studied subjects. One hundred twenty-eight children were included in the study. Intestinal parasites were found on microscopic examination of the stools in 36.7% (47/128); 18% (23/128) had a mixed parasite infection. Intestinal protozoa were found in 34.4% of subjects and intestinal helminthes were found in 2.3%. The median GPx level in children infected with intestinal parasites (2.3 ng/ml) was significantly lower than in non-infected children (7.7 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in SOD levels between the two groups. When comparing GPx levels in children with 1) pathogenic parasites, 2) non-pathogenic parasites and 3) no intestinal parasite infection, GPx levels differed significantly among three groups (2.2 ng/ml, 2.4 ng/ml and 7.7 ng/ml, respectively) (p < 0.05). When separating children by BMI and type of infection, the median SOD level in underweight children infected with pathogenic parasites (107.2 ng/ml) was significantly higher than in underweight children infected with non-pathogenic parasites (68.6 ng/ml) and without intestinal parasite infections (72.2 ng/ml). The present study identified two key findings: low GPx levels in children with intestinal parasitic infections, and the potential impact of malnutrition on some antioxidants.

  10. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among public school children in a rural village of Kathmandu Valley.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, P; Bhandary, S; Shakya, P R; Acharya, T; Shrestha, A

    2014-09-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections (IPI) are one of the most prevalent infections in humans residing in developing countries and its burden is high among school aged children. This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection and types of intestinal parasites in rural public school children of Nepal. It included students from Nursery to Class X of a rural public school located in the northeast part of the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. Among the 194 participating children, prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection was found as 23.7%; (28.2% for boys; 20.2% for girls). Amongst the infected children, single and mixed parasitic infection was detected in 43 (93.5%) and 3 (6.5%) children respectively. Among protozoan parasites, Giardia lamblia was the most common (58.6%) whereas Hymenolepis nana was the most common (21.7%) among the helminths. Statistically different prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection was observed among children aged above 10 years and children aged below 6 years as well as 6 to 10 years. Gender-wise, there was no statistical difference in prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection. This study suggests the need of health education program in schools along with regular screening of intestinal parasites and treatment for effective management of the intestinal parasites among school children in Nepal.

  11. Intestinal autophagy activity is essential for host defense against Salmonella typhimurium infection in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Curt, Alexander; Zhang, Jiuli; Minnerly, Justin; Jia, Kailiang

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella typhimurium infects both intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that is present in all eukaryotes. Autophagy has been reported to limit the Salmonella replication in Caenorhabditis elegans and in mammals. However, it is unknown whether intestinal autophagy activity plays a role in host defense against Salmonella infection in C. elegans. In this study, we inhibited the autophagy gene bec-1 in different C. elegans tissues and examined the survival of these animals following Salmonella infection. Here we show that inhibition of the bec-1 gene in the intestine but not in other tissues confers susceptibility to Salmonella infection, which is consistent with recent studies in mice showing that autophagy is involved in clearance of Salmonella in the intestinal epithelial cells. Therefore, the intestinal autophagy activity is essential for host defense against Salmonella infection from C. elegans to mice, perhaps also in humans.

  12. Enhancement of intestinal eosinophilia during Hymenolepis nana infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Niwa, A; Miyazato, T

    1996-03-01

    The ability of Hymenolepis nana oncosphere extract to induce eosinophil chemotactic response was examined in vitro and in vivo. The extract showed a chemotactic activity specific for eosinophils but not for neutrophils. Partially purified eosinophil chemotactic factors (ECFs) from the oncosphere extract showed apparent molecular mass from 5.5 to 9.6kDa and 30 to 40kDa. These were resistant to heating and proteinase K digestion but sensitive to periodate oxidation. Peritoneal injection of the crude extract or partially purified ECFs to mice resulted in a preferential eosinophil infiltration. The chemotactic activity for eosinophils was not separable from the adhesion molecule expression or oxygen radical-inducing activity by means of chromatography or chemical treatments. Furthermore, histological examination demonstrated a marked tissue eosinophilia around H. nana larvae in the intestinal lamina propria of both humoral and cell-mediated immunodeficiency mice. The present findings suggest that H. nana oncosphere-derived molecules facilitate in vivo the intestinal eosinophilia during the infection.

  13. Intestinal parasitic infections among children in central Albania

    PubMed Central

    Sejdini, A; Mahmud, R; Lim, Y A L; Mahdy, M; Sejdini, F; Gjoni, V; Xhaferraj, K; Kasmi, G

    2011-01-01

    Although intestinal parasitic infections (IPI) among children remain a global issue, the current information on such infections in Albanian children is very limited. A cross-sectional study of the IPI in 321 children living in the Albanian counties of Tirana (152) and Elbasan (169) was therefore conducted in 2008, with a pre-tested standard questionnaire employed to gather the relevant personal and clinical data. Using formalin–ether concentration and permanent stains, stool samples were examined microscopically for the ova, cysts and oocysts of any parasites. The overall prevalence of IPI was 19% (61 of 321), with protozoan infections (11·5%) apparently more common than infections with soil-transmitted helminths (STH; 8·1%). Giardia duodenalis was the parasite most frequently detected (10·9%), followed by hookworm (5·6%), Ascaris lumbricoides (1·9%), Trichuris trichiura (0·6%), Cryptosporidium (0·3%) and Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (0·3%). The results of a univariate analysis indicated that the children from Tirana county were significantly more likely to be found infected with STH compared with the children from Elbasan county (12·5% v. 4·1%; P = 0·006). Children sampled in the community were also more likely to be found STH-positive than the children sampled as they attended hospitals and health clinics (10·5% v. 6·0%) but this difference did not reach statistical significance. The children found STH-positive were five times more likely to be suffering from diarrhoea than the other children checked in clinical settings (P = 0·004) and were also more likely to be suffering from abdominal pain (P = 0·054) and/or diminished appetite (P = 0·016). PMID:21801503

  14. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) after pertussis infection.

    PubMed

    Budan, B; Ekici, B; Tatli, B; Somer, A

    2011-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system which is usually precipitated by a viral infection or vaccination. A 3-month-old boy is reported who developed ADEM a week after full recovery from pertussis. MRI detected a high-intensity lesion extending from the pons to the mesencephalon, compatible with ADEM. Following the administration of intravenous immunoglobulins, the patient's clinical symptoms improved. This case report demonstrates that pertussis is capable of inducing an immune-mediated demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system.

  15. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection induces intestinal epithelial cell autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Fengna; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Kong, Xiangfeng; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2014-06-25

    The morbidity and mortality in piglets caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) results in large economic losses to the swine industry, but the precise pathogenesis of ETEC-associated diseases remains unknown. Intestinal epithelial cell autophagy serves as a host defense against pathogens. We found that ETEC induced autophagy, as measured by both the increased punctae distribution of GFP-LC3 and the enhanced conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. Inhibiting autophagy resulted in decreased survival of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. ETEC triggered autophagy in IPEC-1 cells through a pathway involving the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK).

  16. Acute encephalitis as initial presentation of primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Añón, Rosário Pazos; Àguas, Maria João

    2012-07-03

    Acute encephalitis is a life-threatening condition. A wide variety of infectious agents are implicated and in many patients no cause is found. HIV acute seroconversion illness can rarely present as acute encephalitis. Although most experts agree in starting antiretroviral treatment in severe acute HIV infection, the evidence of the benefits are still lacking. The authors report a case of severe acute encephalitis as a primary presentation of HIV infection in which introduction of highly active antiretroviral treatment resulted in clinical recovery. This case highlights the need to consider HIV infection in the differential diagnosis of treatable viral encephalitis.

  17. Thrombosis associated with acute cytomegalovirus infection: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Shany; Eytan, Ori

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis associated with acute cytomegalovirus infection has been reported many times in the literature since the mid 1980s – mainly in case reports and in small case series, but also in four controlled studies. Still, many physicians are unaware of this association although acute cytomegalovirus infection diagnosis in a thrombosis patient may warrant antiviral therapy and may affect anticoagulation therapy duration. Accordingly, the clinical characteristics of patients with thrombosis and acute cytomegalovirus infection are reviewed, and the current knowledge concerning this unique association is presented herein. We believe it is time to add acute cytomegalovirus infection to the list of thrombosis triggers. PMID:25624857

  18. Infective substructures of measles virus from acutely and persistently infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblatt, S; Koch, T; Pinhasi, O; Bratosin, S

    1979-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein from cells acutely or persistently infected with measles virus were shown to be infectious by the calcium phosphate technique. Very little or no infectivity was obtained when calcium phosphate precipitation was omitted. Electron microscopy showed that the majority of ribonucleoprotein structures isolated from acutely infected cells were folded, whereas those from persistently infected cells were linear in appearance. Images PMID:120450

  19. Invasive Fungal Infections in Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Vijaya R.; Viola, George M.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed. PMID:23556092

  20. Invasive fungal infections in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya R; Viola, George M; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed.

  1. Intestinal absorption and histomorphometry of Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Fabio Augusto; Borges, Elizabeth Lage; de Oliveira, Juliana Saes Vilaça; Guedes, Roberto Mauricio Carvalho

    2010-10-26

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the intestinal absorption and histomorphometry of hamsters experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis and correlate these parameters with severity of infection based on immunohistochemistry. Sixty hamsters were equally divided into control and inoculated groups which were orally infected with intestinal mucosa homogenate from pigs naturally infected with L. intracellularis. The intestinal absorption of glucose, sodium, potassium and chloride was evaluated in live animals (25 inoculated and 25 control) on day 26 after inoculation. In this procedure, a standard solution was infused into the cranial jejunum and collected at the terminal ileum. The experimental infection was confirmed by gross and histopathological examination and L. intracellularis antigen labeling by immunohistochemistry. Histomorphometry analysis demonstrated positive correlation between intestinal crypt depth and severity of infection based on immunohistochemistry. Infected animals had significantly lower intestinal absorption of glucose, potassium and chloride. These results indicate a lower intestinal absorption as an important mechanism of diarrhea in hamsters experimentally infected with L. intracellularis. Therefore, malabsorption should be considered as the main mechanism involved in the physiopathology of the diarrhea in L. intracellularis infected animals.

  2. Acute ethanol administration inhibits Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway in rat intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chao; Zhao, Ji; Li, Jing; Wang, Haiying; Tang, Chengwei

    2013-05-01

    Excess alcohol intake, as in binge drinking, increases susceptibility to microbial pathogens. Alcohol impairs macrophage function by suppression of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway. This study investigated the effects of acute ethanol intake on the TLR4 pathway in rat intestinal epithelia, which usually encounters luminal antigens at first and participates in the development of intestinal immunity. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly assigned to an ethanol group given ethanol as a 25% (v/v) solution in water at 7.5 g/kg, or a control group given saline, by oral gavage daily for 3 days. The epithelial histology and ultrastructure, the intestinal microflora, peripheral and portal venous plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels, and somatostatin (SST) levels in the peripheral plasma and small intestine were evaluated. Somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2), TLR4, TANK binding kinase-1 (TBK1), activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the intestinal mucosa were assayed. LPS responsiveness with or without SST pretreatment was assayed in vitro by quantification of TLR4, TBK1, activated NF-κB, IFN-γ and TNF-α in isolated intestinal epithelia. Mucosal damage was observed in the ethanol group by light and electron microscopy. Escherichia coli cultures were unchanged in rat intestine of the ethanol group compared with controls, but lactobacilli cultures were reduced (p < 0.05). LPS levels increased in peripheral and portal venous plasma (p < 0.05), but mucosal TLR4, TBK1, nuclear NF-κB, IFN-γ and TNF-α were unchanged in the ethanol group. LPS treatment in vitro up-regulated the level of TLR4, TBK1 and nuclear NF-κB as well as the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α in isolated intestinal epithelia in the control (p < 0.05), but not the ethanol group. The stimulatory effects of LPS on intestinal epithelia isolated from the control group were significantly inhibited by SST pretreatment (p < 0.05). The

  3. Rhodamine 123 permeability through the catfish intestinal wall: Relationship to thermal acclimation and acute temperature change.

    PubMed

    Kleinow, Kevin M; Johnston, Brad D; Holmes, Earnestine P; McCarrol, Matthew E

    2006-11-01

    Temperature is known to influence xenobiotic retention in fish. The effect of acute and acclimatory temperature change upon Rhodamine 123 (Rho123) permeability through an in vitro catfish multi-segment (3) everted sac intestinal wall model was examined in a 9 cell matrix of acclimation and assay temperatures (10, 20 and 30 degrees C). Changes in Rho123 permeability were examined in context with membrane fluidity, xenobiotic solubility and intestinal morphology. When assayed at the acclimation temperature greater Rho123 permeability was noted at warmer acclimation temperatures for the proximal and middle intestinal segments, while the distal segment exhibited little change and apparent compensation across temperatures. Rho123 permeability was increased as assay temperatures were elevated above the acclimation temperature for most comparisons. Cold acclimation significantly increased total intestinal length (43.2%) and proximal intestine weights while total body weights did not differ. Brush border membranes (BBM) increased fluidity with increased assay temperatures, however, composite anisotropy lines were not significantly different between acclimation treatments. In an additive manner, the membrane probe DPH exhibited increased solubility in BBM with increases in acclimation and assay temperatures. Compositely, these results suggest that acclimation and acute temperature change may differentially influence xenobiotic permeability among intestinal segments with interacting mechanisms.

  4. Outbreak of Intestinal Infection Due to Rhizopus microsporus▿

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Ngan, Antonio H. Y.; To, Kelvin K. W.; Leung, S. Y.; Tsoi, H. W.; Yam, W. C.; Tai, Josepha W. M.; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Tse, Herman; Li, Iris W. S.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Leung, Anskar Y. H.; Lie, Albert K. W.; Liang, Raymond H. S.; Que, T. L.; Ho, P. L.; Yuen, K. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Sinopulmonary and rhinocerebral zygomycosis has been increasingly found in patients with hematological malignancies and bone marrow transplantation, but intestinal zygomycosis remains very rare in the literature. We investigated an outbreak of intestinal infection due to Rhizopus microsporus in 12 patients on treatment for hematological malignancies over a period of 6 months in a teaching hospital. The intake of allopurinol during hospitalization (P < 0.001) and that of commercially packaged ready-to-eat food items in the preceding 2 weeks (P < 0.001) were found to be independently significant risk factors for the development of intestinal zygomycosis. A total of 709 specimens, including 378 environmental and air samples, 181 food samples, and 150 drug samples, were taken for fungal culture. Among them, 16 samples of allopurinol tablets, 3 prepackaged ready-to-eat food items, and 1 pair of wooden chopsticks were positive for Rhizopus microsporus, which was confirmed by ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rRNA gene cluster (internal transcribed spacer [ITS]) sequencing. The mean viable fungal counts of allopurinol obtained from wards and pharmacy were 4.22 × 103 CFU/g of tablet (range, 3.07 × 103 to 5.48 × 103) and 3.24 × 103 CFU/g of tablet (range, 2.68 × 103 to 3.72 × 103), respectively, which were much higher than the mean count of 2 × 102 CFU/g of food. Phylogenetic analysis by ITS sequencing showed multiple clones from isolates of contaminated allopurinol tablets and ready-to-eat food, of which some were identical to patients' isolates, and with one isolate in the cornstarch used as an excipient for manufacture of this drug. We attempted to type the isolates by random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis, with limited evidence of clonal distribution. The primary source of the contaminating fungus was likely to be the cornstarch used in the manufacturing of allopurinol tablets or ready-to-eat food. Rhizopus microsporus is thermotolerant and can multiply even at 50

  5. Toxoplasma gondii Oral Infection Induces Intestinal Inflammation and Retinochoroiditis in Mice Genetically Selected for Immune Oral Tolerance Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Raul Ramos Furtado; de Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiroz; Leite, Carla Cristina da Silva; Tedesco, Roberto Carlos; Calabrese, Katia da Silva; Silva, Antonio Carlos; DaMatta, Renato Augusto; de Fatima Sarro-Silva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide disease with most of the infections originating through the oral route and generates various pathological manifestations, ranging from meningoencephalitis to retinochoroiditis and inflammatory bowel disease. Animal models for these pathologies are scarce and have limitations. We evaluated the outcome of Toxoplasma gondii oral infection with 50 or 100 cysts of the ME-49 strain in two lines of mice with extreme phenotypes of susceptibility (TS) or resistance (TR) to immune oral tolerance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of TS and TR mice, orally infected by T. gondii, and determine its value as a model for inflammatory diseases study. Mortality during the acute stage of the infection for TR was 50% for both dosages, while 10 and 40% of the TS died after infection with these respective dosages. In the chronic stage, the remaining TS succumbed while TR survived for 90 days. The TS displayed higher parasite load with lower intestinal inflammation and cellular proliferation, notwithstanding myocarditis, pneumonitis and meningoencephalitis. TR presented massive necrosis of villi and crypt, comparable to inflammatory bowel disease, with infiltration of lymphoid cells in the lamina propria of the intestines. Also, TR mice infected with 100 cysts presented intense cellular infiltrate within the photoreceptor layer of the eyes, changes in disposition and morphology of the retina cell layers and retinochoroiditis. During the infection, high levels of IL-6 were detected in the serum of TS mice and TR mice presented high amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Both mice lineages developed different disease outcomes, but it is emphasized that TR and TS mice presented acute and chronic stages of the infection, demonstrating that the two lineages offer an attractive model for studying toxoplasmosis. PMID:25437299

  6. Toxoplasma gondii oral infection induces intestinal inflammation and retinochoroiditis in mice genetically selected for immune oral tolerance resistance.

    PubMed

    Dias, Raul Ramos Furtado; Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiroz de; Leite, Carla Cristina da Silva; Tedesco, Roberto Carlos; Calabrese, Katia da Silva; Silva, Antonio Carlos; DaMatta, Renato Augusto; de Fatima Sarro-Silva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide disease with most of the infections originating through the oral route and generates various pathological manifestations, ranging from meningoencephalitis to retinochoroiditis and inflammatory bowel disease. Animal models for these pathologies are scarce and have limitations. We evaluated the outcome of Toxoplasma gondii oral infection with 50 or 100 cysts of the ME-49 strain in two lines of mice with extreme phenotypes of susceptibility (TS) or resistance (TR) to immune oral tolerance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of TS and TR mice, orally infected by T. gondii, and determine its value as a model for inflammatory diseases study. Mortality during the acute stage of the infection for TR was 50% for both dosages, while 10 and 40% of the TS died after infection with these respective dosages. In the chronic stage, the remaining TS succumbed while TR survived for 90 days. The TS displayed higher parasite load with lower intestinal inflammation and cellular proliferation, notwithstanding myocarditis, pneumonitis and meningoencephalitis. TR presented massive necrosis of villi and crypt, comparable to inflammatory bowel disease, with infiltration of lymphoid cells in the lamina propria of the intestines. Also, TR mice infected with 100 cysts presented intense cellular infiltrate within the photoreceptor layer of the eyes, changes in disposition and morphology of the retina cell layers and retinochoroiditis. During the infection, high levels of IL-6 were detected in the serum of TS mice and TR mice presented high amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Both mice lineages developed different disease outcomes, but it is emphasized that TR and TS mice presented acute and chronic stages of the infection, demonstrating that the two lineages offer an attractive model for studying toxoplasmosis.

  7. Intestinal parasite co-infection among pulmonary tuberculosis cases without human immunodeficiency virus infection in a rural county in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of co-infection with tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites in humans have not been extensively investigated in China. A cross-section study was conducted in a rural county of Henan Province, China. Pulmonary TB (PTB) case-patients receiving treatment for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and healthy controls matched for geographic area, age, and sex were surveyed by using questionnaires. Fecal and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal parasites, routine blood examination, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus. The chi-square test was used for univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors. A total of 369 persons with PTB and 366 healthy controls were included; all participants were negative for human immunodeficiency virus. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites in persons with PTB was 14.9%, including intestinal protozoa (7.9%) and helminthes (7.6%). The infection spectrum of intestinal parasites was Entamoeba spp. (1.4%), Blastocystis hominis (6.2%), Trichomonas hominis (0.3%), Clonorchis sinensis (0.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.5%), Trichuris trichiura (2.2%), and hookworm (4.6%). The prevalence of intestinal parasites showed no significant difference between persons with PTB and healthy controls after adjusting for potential confounding factors. There was no factor that affected infection rates for intestinal parasites between the two groups. Infection with intestinal parasites of persons with PTB was associated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-4.17), body mass index ≤ 19 (AOR = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.47-6.20), and anemia (AOR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.17-5.03). Infection of healthy controls was only associated with an annual labor time in farmlands > 2 months (AOR = 4.50, 95% CI = 2.03-10.00). In addition, there was no significant trend between rates of infection with

  8. Kinetics of acute infection with Toxoplasma gondii and histopathological changes in the duodenum of rats.

    PubMed

    Trevizan, Aline Rosa; Vicentino-Vieira, Suellen Laís; da Silva Watanabe, Paulo; Góis, Marcelo Biondaro; de Melo, Gessilda de Alcântara Nogueira; Garcia, João Luiz; José de Almeida Araújo, Eduardo; Sant'Ana, Débora de Mello Gonçales

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii crosses the intestinal barrier to spread into the body. We investigate the intestinal wall and epithelial cells of the duodenum of rats infected with T. gondii during different time points of acute infection. Male Wistar rats, 60 days of age, were assigned into groups that were orally inoculated with 5000 sporulated oocysts T. gondii for 6 h (G6), 12 h (G12), 24 h (G24), 48 h (G48), 72 h (G72), 7 days (G7d), and 10 days (G10d). The control group (CG) received saline. The rats were killed and the duodenum was processed to obtain histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Periodic Acid Schiff, and Alcian blue (pH 2.5 and 1.0). Morphometry was performed on the layers of the intestinal wall and enterocytes, and the number of goblet cells and intraepithelial lymphocytes was counted. The data were compared by ANOVA considering 5% as level of significance. The infection provoked an increase in the width of villi and crypts; decrease in enterocyte height; increase in the smaller-diameter and reduction in the larger-diameter of the enterocytes nuclei, increased number of goblet cells secreting neutral (G6, G12 and G7d) and acidic (G7d and G10d) mucus, and increase in the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (G48). The infected groups showed atrophy of the submucosa and muscular layers and the total wall. Acute infection with T. gondii caused morphological changes in the intestinal wall and epithelial cells of the duodenum in rats.

  9. Haemorrhagic necrosis of small intestine and acute pancreatitis following open-heart surgery

    PubMed Central

    Horton, E. H.; Murthy, S. K.; Seal, R. M. E.

    1968-01-01

    Five cases of haemorrhagic necrosis of the small intestine occurring after valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass are described. In one case, in addition to the above, there was an unusual complication, namely acute pancreatitis. The possible causes are discussed. The importance of hypotension before, during, or after bypass, or in the post-operative phase, is stressed. Images PMID:5664708

  10. Accuracy of using serum D-dimer for diagnosis of acute intestinal ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Da-Li; Li, Shu-Min; Cen, Yun-Yun; Xu, Qing-Wen; Li, Yi-Jun; Sun, Yan-Bo; Qi, Yu-xing; Lin, Yue-Ying; Yang, Ting; An, Li-Ya; Su, Kun; Li, Wei-Ming; Xu, Peng-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this meta-analysis is to comprehensively assess the accuracy of serum D-dimer for the diagnosis of acute intestinal ischemia. Methods: Diagnostic studies of D-dimer for accurate diagnosis of acute intestinal ischemia were extracted from 6 databases, and prospective and retrospective studies that provided adequate data on sensitivity and specificity were included here. Sensitivity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were calculated. The overall diagnostic performance of D-dimer was assessed by plotting a summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) and calculating the area under the curve (AUC). Results: A total of 1300 patients with suspected acute intestinal ischemia from 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. The combined sensitivity, specificity, PLR, NLR, and DOR were 0.94 (95% CI: 0.87–0.97), 0.50 (95% CI: 0.40–0.61), 1.9 (95% CI: 1.5–2.3), 0.12 (95% CI: 0.05–0.26), and 16 (95% CI: 7–39), respectively. The AUC was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.78–0.84). Conclusion: The results of this meta-analysis suggested that plasma D-dimer detection might be a useful means of identifying patients with acute intestinal ischemia of the abdomen. PMID:28353564

  11. Tuberculosis infection causing intestinal perforations in 2 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    González, Luis A; Muñoz, Carolina; Restrepo, Mauricio; Vanegas, Adriana Lucía; Vásquez, Gloria

    2014-08-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have a higher incidence rate of tuberculosis and a more frequent extrapulmonary involvement than the general population. We present 2 SLE patients who developed gastrointestinal tuberculosis complicated with intestinal perforation, a rare but serious complication that could be confused with lupus-associated intestinal vasculitis. Opportunistic infections such as tuberculosis must be suspected in SLE patients with abdominal symptoms on immunosuppressive therapy because its early recognition could prevent catastrophic complications such as intestinal perforation and subsequent peritonitis.

  12. Asymptomatic falciparum malaria and intestinal helminths co-infection among school children in Osogbo, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ojurongbe, Olusola; Adegbayi, Adebola M; Bolaji, Oloyede S; Akindele, Akeem A; Adefioye, Olusegun A; Adeyeba, Oluwaseyi A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malaria and intestinal helminths are parasitic diseases causing high morbidity and mortality in most tropical parts of the world, where climatic conditions and sanitation practices favor their prevalence. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and possible impact of falciparum malaria and intestinal helminths co-infection among school children in Kajola, Osun state, Nigeria. METHODS: Fresh stool and blood samples were collected from 117 primary school children age range 4-15 years. The stool samples were processed using both Kato-Katz and formol-ether concentration techniques and microscopically examined for intestinal parasitic infections. Blood was collected by finger prick to determine malaria parasitemia using thick film method; and packed cell volume (PCV) was determined by hematocrit. Univariate analysis and chi-square statistical tests were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: The prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum, intestinal helminth infections, and co-infection of malaria and helminth in the study were 25.6%, 40.2% and 4.3%, respectively. Five species of intestinal helminths were recovered from the stool samples and these were Ascaris lumbricoides (34.2%), hookworm (5.1%), Trichuris trichiura (2.6%), Diphyllobothrium latum (0.9%) and Trichostrongylus species (0.9%). For the co-infection of both malaria and intestinal helminths, females (5.9%) were more infected than males (2.0%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.3978). Children who were infected with helminths were equally likely to be infected with malaria as children without intestinal helminths [Risk Ratio (RR) = 0.7295]. Children with A. lumbricoides (RR = 1.359) were also likely to be infected with P. falciparum as compared with uninfected children. CONCLUSIONS: Asymptomatic falciparum malaria and intestinal helminth infections do co-exist without clinical symp-toms in school children in Nigeria. PMID:22091292

  13. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  14. Protein deficiency alters impact of intestinal nematode infection on intestinal, visceral and lymphoid organ histopathology in lactating mice.

    PubMed

    Starr, Lisa M; Odiere, Maurice R; Koski, Kristine G; Scott, Marilyn E

    2014-05-01

    Protein deficiency impairs local and systemic immune responses to Heligmosomoides bakeri infection but little is known about their individual and interactive impacts on tissue architecture of maternal lymphoid (thymus, spleen) and visceral (small intestine, kidney, liver, pancreas) organs during the demanding period of lactation. Using a 2 × 2 factorial design, pregnant CD1 mice were fed a 24% protein sufficient (PS) or a 6% protein deficient (PD) isoenergetic diet beginning on day 14 of pregnancy and were infected with 100 H. bakeri larvae four times or exposed to four sham infections. On day 20 of lactation, maternal organs were examined histologically and serum analytes were assayed as indicators of organ function. The absence of villus atrophy in response to infection was associated with increased crypt depth and infiltration of mast cells and eosinophils but only in lactating dams fed adequate protein. Infection-induced lobular liver inflammation was reduced in PD dams, however, abnormalities in the kidney caused by protein deficiency were absent in infected dams. Bilirubin and creatinine were highest in PD infected mice. Infection-induced splenomegaly was not due to an increase in the lymphoid compartment of the spleen. During lactation, infection and protein deficiency have interactive effects on extra-intestinal pathologies.

  15. Micro array analysis of the intestinal host response in Giardia duodenalis assemblage E infected cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Giardia duodenalis is one of the most commonly found intestinal pathogens in humans and animals. However, little is known about the host-parasite interaction in its natural hosts. The objective of this study was to investigate the intestinal response in calves following a G. duodenalis infection, us...

  16. INTESTINAL AND PULMONARY INFECTION BY Cryptosporidium parvum IN TWO PATIENTS WITH HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    REINA, Fábio Tadeu Rodrigues; RIBEIRO, Camila Aparecida; de ARAÚJO, Ronalda Silva; MATTÉ, Maria Helena; CASTANHO, Roberto Esteves Pires; TANAKA, Ioshie Ibara; VIGGIANI, Ana Maria Ferreira Sornas; MARTINS, Luciamáre Perinetti Alves

    2016-01-01

    We describe two patients with HIV/AIDS who presented pulmonary and intestinal infection caused by Cryptosporidium parvum, with a fatal outcome. The lack of available description of changes in clinical signs and radiographic characteristics of this disease when it is located in the extra-intestinal region causes low prevalence of early diagnosis and a subsequent lack of treatment. PMID:27007564

  17. Intestinal obstruction complicating Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:21 infection in an infant.

    PubMed

    Mufti, Areej; Al Kaabi, Nawal A; Rubin, Steven Z; Suh, Kathryn N

    2005-12-01

    Intestinal obstruction is an uncommon complication of Yersinia enterocolitica infection. We report a case of enterocolitis in an 11-month-old infant, complicated by intestinal obstruction. Y. entercolitica serotype O:21, previously reported to cause severe disease, was isolated from the patient's stool. Unusual or complicated presentations of yersiniosis may be associated with more pathogenic strains of Y. enterocolitica.

  18. Duodenal Obstruction Caused by Acute Appendicitis with Intestinal Malrotation in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Biçer, Şenol; Çelik, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 14 Final Diagnosis: Duodenal obstruction Symptoms: Bilious vomiting Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Laparotomy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: In patients with intestinal malrotation, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis can be difficult due to atypical presentation. Duodenal obstruction caused by acute appendicitis with the presence of malrotation has rarely been reported in children. Case Report: We report the case of a 14-year-old male patient with bilious vomiting and abdominal distension. A diagnosis could not be made by computed tomography, ultrasonography, or endoscopy. We observed a dilated stomach and malrotation in laparotomy. The caecum was in the right upper quadrant, and an inflamed appendix was located in the subhepatic region. After the appendectomy, the cecum was mobilized and fixed in the right lower quadrant. Conclusions: In children with intestinal malrotation, acute appendicitis can present as duodenal obstruction without abdominal pain, and standard imaging methods can miss the correct diagnosis. PMID:26317163

  19. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ...

  20. A new in vitro model using small intestinal epithelial cells to enhance infection of Cryptosporidium parvum

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand and study the infection of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, a more sensitive in vitro assay is required. In vivo, this parasite infects the epithelial cells of the microvilli layer in the small intestine. While cell infection models using colon,...

  1. The transcriptome of HIV-1 infected intestinal CD4+ T cells exposed to enteric bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Stephanie M.; Phang, Tzu; Lee, Eric J.; Helm, Karen; Kappes, John C.; McCarter, Martin D.

    2017-01-01

    Global transcriptome studies can help pinpoint key cellular pathways exploited by viruses to replicate and cause pathogenesis. Previous data showed that laboratory-adapted HIV-1 triggers significant gene expression changes in CD4+ T cell lines and mitogen-activated CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood. However, HIV-1 primarily targets mucosal compartments during acute infection in vivo. Moreover, early HIV-1 infection causes extensive depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract that herald persistent inflammation due to the translocation of enteric microbes to the systemic circulation. Here, we profiled the transcriptome of primary intestinal CD4+ T cells infected ex vivo with transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1. Infections were performed in the presence or absence of Prevotella stercorea, a gut microbe enriched in the mucosa of HIV-1-infected individuals that enhanced both TF HIV-1 replication and CD4+ T cell death ex vivo. In the absence of bacteria, HIV-1 triggered a cellular shutdown response involving the downregulation of HIV-1 reactome genes, while perturbing genes linked to OX40, PPAR and FOXO3 signaling. However, in the presence of bacteria, HIV-1 did not perturb these gene sets or pathways. Instead, HIV-1 enhanced granzyme expression and Th17 cell function, inhibited G1/S cell cycle checkpoint genes and triggered downstream cell death pathways in microbe-exposed gut CD4+ T cells. To gain insights on these differential effects, we profiled the gene expression landscape of HIV-1-uninfected gut CD4+ T cells exposed to bacteria. Microbial exposure upregulated genes involved in cellular proliferation, MAPK activation, Th17 cell differentiation and type I interferon signaling. Our findings reveal that microbial exposure influenced how HIV-1 altered the gut CD4+ T cell transcriptome, with potential consequences for HIV-1 susceptibility, cell survival and inflammation. The HIV-1- and microbe-altered pathways unraveled here may serve as a molecular blueprint

  2. Prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections among Orang Asli schoolchildren in Pos Senderut, Pahang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Harazi, Talal; Ghani, Mohamed Kamel Abd; Othman, Hidayatulfathi

    2013-12-01

    The current study determined the prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections among the Orang Asli schoolchildren in Pos Senderut, Pahang, Malaysia. The overall intestinal protozoan infection rate was 85% (261 out of 307). The highest prevalence rates were due to Entamoeba coli (24.4%), Giardia lamblia (21.8%), Blastocystis hominis (21.2%) and Entamoeba histolytica (15.0%). The prevalence of Iodamoeba butschlii was only 2.9%. Among the positive samples, mixed infection with B. hominis and E. histolytica was 3.3%, B. hominis and G. lamblia was 2.9%, G. lamblia and E. histolytica was 2.0% and triple infections (B. hominis, G. lamblia and E. histolytica) was 1.0 %. The prevalence of the infection was high in all age groups (6-14 years old). Thus, we can conclude that intestinal protozoan infections are still representing a serious public health problem in aboriginal communities, especially among children.

  3. Temporal relationship of serum markers and tissue damage during acute intestinal ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    la Garza, Francisco Javier Guzmán-de; Ibarra-Hernández, Juan Manuel; Cordero-Pérez, Paula; Villegas-Quintero, Pablo; Villarreal-Ovalle, Claudia Ivette; Torres-González, Liliana; Oliva-Sosa, Norma Edith; Alarcón-Galván, Gabriela; Fernández-Garza, Nancy Esthela; Muñoz-Espinosa, Linda Elsa; Cámara-Lemarroy, Carlos Rodrigo; Carrillo-Arriaga, José Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It is essential to identify a serological marker of injury in order to study the pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia reperfusion. In this work, we studied the evolution of several serological markers after intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats. The markers of non-specific cell damage were aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase, the markers of inflammation were tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1 beta, and the markers of intestinal mucosal damage were intestinal fatty acid binding protein and D-lactate. We used Chiús classification to grade the histopathological damage. METHODS: We studied 35 Wistar rats divided into groups according to reperfusion time. The superior mesenteric artery was clamped for 30 minutes, and blood and biopsies were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after reperfusion. We plotted the mean ± standard deviation and compared the baseline and maximum values for each marker using Student's t-test. RESULTS: The maximum values of interleukin-1 beta and lactic dehydrogenase were present before the maximal histopathological damage. The maximum tumor necrosis factor alpha and D-lactate expressions coincided with histopathological damage. Alanine aminotransaminase and aspartate aminotransferase had a maximum expression level that increased following the histopathological damage. The maximum expressions of interluken-6 and intestinal fatty acid binding protein were not significantly different from the Sham treated group. CONCLUSION: For the evaluation of injury secondary to acute intestinal ischemia reperfusion with a 30 minute ischemia period, we recommend performing histopathological grading, quantification of D-lactate, which is synthesized by intestinal bacteria and is considered an indicator of mucosal injury, and quantification of tumor necrosis factor alpha as indicators of acute inflammation three hours after reperfusion. PMID:23917671

  4. Neuralgic amyotrophy complicating acute hepatitis E infection: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Theochari, Evangelia; Vincent-Smith, Lisa; Ellis, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus infection (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that is under-recognised in developed countries. Preceding infection manifested by acute transaminitis has been associated with neurological manifestations, predominately involving the peripheral nervous system, even in immunocompetent patients. We present a case of a 65-year-old previously fit and well Caucasian man with bilateral neuralgic amyotrophy (NA) and acute transaminitis. Serology testing for immunoglobulin (Ig) M and G established the diagnosis of acute HEV infection. The patient received immunomodulatory treatment with an excellent long-term outcome. The temporal association of the clinical presentation of bilateral NA and acute transaminitis from HEV infection suggested the causal association of HEV to NA. We propose screening for HEV in patients presenting with NA and acute hepatitis. PMID:25739795

  5. A rare cause of acute abdomen in adults: Parasitic infection-related acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Küpeli, Aydın Hakan; Özdemir, Murat; Topuz, Sezgin; Sözütek, Alper; Paksoy, Tuğba

    2015-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a common parasitic disease all over the world, especially in less developed countries. Acute appendicitis related to parasitic infection is a rare condition. Parasitic infections should be kept in mind in patients who are admitted to the emergency department with acute abdomen, especially in endemic areas.

  6. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli senses low biotin status in the large intestine for colonization and infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Feng, Lu; Wang, Fang; Wang, Lei

    2015-03-20

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen that infects humans by colonizing the large intestine. Here we identify a virulence-regulating pathway in which the biotin protein ligase BirA signals to the global regulator Fur, which in turn activates LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement) genes to promote EHEC adherence in the low-biotin large intestine. LEE genes are repressed in the high-biotin small intestine, thus preventing adherence and ensuring selective colonization of the large intestine. The presence of this pathway in all nine EHEC serotypes tested indicates that it is an important evolutionary strategy for EHEC. The pathway is incomplete in closely related small-intestinal enteropathogenic E. coli due to the lack of the Fur response to BirA. Mice fed with a biotin-rich diet show significantly reduced EHEC adherence, indicating that biotin might be useful to prevent EHEC infection in humans.

  7. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli senses low biotin status in the large intestine for colonization and infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Feng, Lu; Wang, Fang; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen that infects humans by colonizing the large intestine. Here we identify a virulence-regulating pathway in which the biotin protein ligase BirA signals to the global regulator Fur, which in turn activates LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement) genes to promote EHEC adherence in the low-biotin large intestine. LEE genes are repressed in the high-biotin small intestine, thus preventing adherence and ensuring selective colonization of the large intestine. The presence of this pathway in all nine EHEC serotypes tested indicates that it is an important evolutionary strategy for EHEC. The pathway is incomplete in closely related small-intestinal enteropathogenic E. coli due to the lack of the Fur response to BirA. Mice fed with a biotin-rich diet show significantly reduced EHEC adherence, indicating that biotin might be useful to prevent EHEC infection in humans. PMID:25791315

  8. A case of Clostridium difficile infection complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with fecal microbiota transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Gweon, Tae-Geun; Yeo, Chang Dong; Cho, Young-Seok; Kim, Gi Jun; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Hyunho; Lee, Hye Won; Lim, Taeseok; Ham, Hyoju; Oh, Hyun Jin; Lee, Yeongbok; Byeon, Jaeho; Park, Sung Soo

    2014-09-21

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life-threatening disorder caused mainly by pneumonia. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common nosocomial diarrheal disease. Disruption of normal intestinal flora by antibiotics is the main risk factor for CDI. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics for serious medical conditions can make it difficult to treat CDI complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome. Fecal microbiota transplantation is a highly effective treatment in patients with refractory CDI. Here we report on a patient with refractory CDI and acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by pneumonia who was treated with fecal microbiota transplantation.

  9. [Intestinal tuberculosis--cause of acute surgical abdomen].

    PubMed

    Ciurea, M; Ion, D; Ionescu, S; Tica, M R

    2001-01-01

    Tuberculosis, in its various forms, remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries in immunodeficitary patients. The indicatives of epidemiology of tuberculosis show that Romania presents a fresh outbreak of the disease in the last few years. The purpose of this paper is to present from the various forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the intestinal tipe which have a high incidence. The authors describe theirs preliminary experience of intraoperative small and large bowel emergencies resections in a short period (1 year) of three young patients (between 30 and 40 years old) with history of pulmonary tuberculosis. The pathology was complex (bowel obstructions, peritonitis) and so were the surgical operations (resections, devirations). The patients showed short and long term good results.

  10. Immunohistochemical characterization of cellular proliferation in small intestinal hyperplasia of rats with hepatic Strobilocercus fasciolaris infection.

    PubMed

    Lagapa, J T; Oku, Y; Kamiya, M

    2008-07-01

    Rats infected with the larvae of Taenia taeniaeformis harbour the intermediate stage of the parasite Strobilocercus fasciolaris within the liver. Affected animals also develop gastric and intestinal hyperplasia. The pathogenesis of the gastric hyperplasia has been extensively investigated, but few studies have addressed the nature of the intestinal changes. This study characterizes the proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells by immunohistochemical labelling for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake. At 6 weeks post-infection (wpi) there was an increase in villous length but crypt depth was normal. At 9 wpi there was evidence of epithelial hyperplasia, increased villous length and crypt depth, and expansion of zones of epithelial proliferation. Immunohistochemical labelling indicated that an increase in the number of proliferating cells produced a greater number of progeny cells. Intestinal hyperplasia during experimental infection with T. taeniaeformis larvae is likely to be related to the associated gastropathy, although the mechanisms underlying both changes remain undefined.

  11. Intestinal Schistosomiasis as Unusual Aetiology for Acute Appendicitis, Nowadays a Rising Disease in Western Countries

    PubMed Central

    López de Cenarruzabeitia, I.; Landolfi, S.; Armengol Carrasco, M.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal schistosomiasis as unusual aetiology for acute appendicitis, nowadays a rising disease in western countries. Recent changes in global migration has led to an immigration growth in our scenario, upsurging people coming from endemic areas of schistosomiasis. Schistosomal appendicitis, seldom reported in developed countries, is now an expected incrising entity in our hospitals during the near future. Due to this circumstances, we believe that schistosomiasis should be consider as a rising source for acute appendicitis in western countries. In order to illustrate this point, we present a case of a 45-years-old black man, from Africa, was admitted via A&E because of acute abdominal pain, located in right lower quadrant. Acute appendicitis was suspected, and he underwent laparotomy and appendectomy. Pathological study by microscope revealed a gangrenous appendix with abscesses and parasitic ova into the submucosal layer of the appendix, suggesting Schistosomiasis. PMID:22792502

  12. In vivo administration of a JAK3 inhibitor during acute SIV infection leads to significant increases in viral load during chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Albrecht, Christina; Brameier, Markus; Walter, Lutz; Mayne, Ann E; Dunbar, Paul; Russo, Robert; Little, Dawn M; Villinger, Tara; Khowawisetsut, Ladawan; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Villinger, Francois; Ansari, Aftab A

    2014-03-01

    The studies reported herein are the first to document the effect of the in vivo administration of a JAK3 inhibitor for defining the potential role of NK cells during acute SIV infection of a group of 15 rhesus macaques (RM). An additional group of 16 MHC/KIR typed RM was included as controls. The previously optimized in vivo dose regimen (20 mg/kg daily for 35 days) led to a marked depletion of each of the major NK cell subsets both in the blood and gastro-intestinal tissues (GIT) during acute infection. While such depletion had no detectable effects on plasma viral loads during acute infection, there was a significant sustained increase in plasma viral loads during chronic infection. While the potential mechanisms that lead to such increased plasma viral loads during chronic infection remain unclear, several correlates were documented. Thus, during acute infection, the administration of the JAK3 inhibitor besides depleting all NK cell subsets also decreased some CD8⁺ T cells and inhibited the mobilization of the plasmacytoid dendritic cells in the blood and their localization to the GIT. Of interest is the finding that the administration of the JAK3 inhibitor during acute infection also resulted in the sustained maintenance during chronic infection of a high number of naïve and central memory CD4⁺ T cells, increases in B cells in the blood, but decreases in the frequencies and function of NKG2a⁺ NK cells within the GIT and blood, respectively. These data identify a unique role for JAK3 inhibitor sensitive cells, that includes NK cells during acute infection that in concert lead to high viral loads in SIV infected RM during chronic infection without affecting detectable changes in antiviral humoral/cellular responses. Identifying the precise mechanisms by which JAK3 sensitive cells exert their influence is critical with important implications for vaccine design against lentiviruses.

  13. Acute intestinal obstruction due to Kalimate, a potassium-lowering agent: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tongyoo, Assanee; Sriussadaporn, Ekkapak; Limpavitayaporn, Palin; Mingmalairak, Chatchai

    2013-12-01

    Sodium polystyrene sulfonate (Kayexalate) and calcium polystyrene sulfonate (CPS, Kalimate) are commonly used to reduce serum potassium. There were some published evidences of severe gastrointestinal complications from the administration of these agents such as colonic necrosis with or without perforation and acute obstruction. The authors reported a 52-year-old male patient being critically ill from severe soft tissue infection of the right leg and sepsis. Hyperkalemia had occurred due to renal insufficiency and required several doses of Kalimate to reduce the serum potassium level. Subsequently, the patient developed complete intestinal obstruction and an exploratory laparotomy was performed. The intra-operative findings were distended stomach and the small bowel contained a large amount of intraluminal affected Kalimate that was removed via gastrotomy and enterotomy. These findings suggested that the inspissated Kalimate could lead to significant obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract in some groups of patient.

  14. Intestinal parasitic infections in Iranian preschool and school children: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Daryani, Ahmad; Hosseini-Teshnizi, Saeed; Hosseini, Seyed-Abdollah; Ahmadpour, Ehsan; Sarvi, Shahabeddin; Amouei, Afsaneh; Mizani, Azadeh; Gholami, Sara; Sharif, Mehdi

    2017-05-01

    Parasitic infections are a serious public health problem because they cause anemia, growth retardation, aggression, weight loss, and other physical and mental health problems, especially in children. Numerous studies have been performed on intestinal parasitic infections in Iranian preschool and school children. However, no study has gathered and analyzed this information systematically. The aim of this study was to provide summary estimates for the available data on intestinal parasitic infections in Iranian children. We searched 9 English and Persian databases, unpublished data, abstracts of scientific congresses during 1996-2015 using the terms intestinal parasite, Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Enterobiusvermicularis, oxyure, school, children, preschool, and Iran. We conducted meta-analysis using STATA, and for all statistical tests, p-value less than 0.05was considered significant. Among the 68,532 publications searched as a result, 103 were eligible for inclusion in the study. The prevalence rate of intestinal parasitic infections was 38% (95% CI- 33%, 43%). Prevalence of protozoa, helminthic intestinal infections, and non-pathogenic parasites was 16.9%, 9.48%, and 18.5%, respectively, which affected 14.27% males and 15.3% females. The rate of infection in preschool and school children was 38.19% and 43.37% respectively. Giardia, Enterobiusvermicularis and Entamoeba coli were the most common among protozoa, helminthic, and non-pathogenic infections (15.1%, 16.5%, and 7.1%, respectively). The data analyses indicated that the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection is decreasing in Iranian preschool and school children. Improvement of sanitation, personal hygiene, increased awareness of people, seasonal variations, and health education can be effective in reducing parasitic infections in different communities.

  15. Rotavirus Infection Is Not Associated with Small Intestinal Fluid Secretion in the Adult Mouse▿

    PubMed Central

    Kordasti, Shirin; Istrate, Claudia; Banasaz, Mahanez; Rottenberg, Martin; Sjövall, Henrik; Lundgren, Ove; Svensson, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    In contrast to humans, adult but not infant small animals are resistant to rotavirus diarrhea. The pathophysiological mechanism behind this age-restricted diarrhea is currently unresolved, and this question was investigated by studying the secretory state of the small intestines of adult mice infected with rotavirus. Immunohistochemistry and histological examinations revealed that rotavirus (strain EDIM) infects all parts of the small intestines of adult mice, with significant numbers of infected cells in the ilea at 2 and 4 days postinfection. Furthermore, quantitative PCR revealed that 100-fold more viral RNA was produced in the ilea than in the jejuna or duodena of adult mice. In vitro perfusion experiments of the small intestine did not reveal any significant changes in net fluid secretion among mice infected for 3 days or 4 days or in those that were noninfected (37 ± 9 μl · h−1 · cm−1, 22 ± 13 μl · h−1 · cm−1, and 33 ± 6 μl · h−1 · cm−1, respectively) or in transmucosal potential difference (4.0 ± 0.3 mV versus 3.9 ± 0.4 mV), a marker for active chloride secretion, between control and rotavirus-infected mice. In vivo experiments also did not show any differences in potential difference between uninfected and infected small intestines. Furthermore, no significant differences in weight between infected and uninfected small intestines were found, nor were any differences in fecal output observed between infected and control mice. Altogether, these data suggest that rotavirus infection is not sufficient to stimulate chloride and water secretion from the small intestines of adult mice. PMID:16943290

  16. [PROGNOSTICATION OF LIMITED ACCUMULATIONS LIQUID INFECTION BY SEVERE ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Sheiko, V D; Oganezyan, A G

    2015-07-01

    The results of examination and treatment of 53 patients on limited accumulations of liquid (LAL) for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) were analysed. In 62.5% of patients on acute aseptic LAL celebrated parapancreatyc liquid accumulation were determinened. Most (94.6%) patients infected by LAL revealed heterogeneity of their structure according ultrasonography, in 81.1%--secvestral mass in their cavity. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) observed both aseptic and infected LAL. Prognostically important criteria LAL infection in patients on SAP is the heterogeneity of echostructure in absence of a downward trend. Diagnostic puncture under ultrasound control and microbiological studies are safe methods of diagnosis by infected LAL in SAP.

  17. Acute Renal Failure in Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyam, Nambakam Tanuja

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acute Renal Failure (RF) is a rare but well recognized complication of Dengue Infection (DI). There has been paucity of published data regarding renal involvement in DI. Aim The aim of the present study was to elucidate different clinical presentations, disease outcomes of DI. To study the frequency, severity and predictors of RF in DI. Materials and Methods Patients diagnosed either as Dengue Fever (DF) or Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS) respectively were enrolled for this study. The diagnostic criteria for DI were febrile illness associated with one of the following: 1) detection of dengue-specific IgM capture antibody or Non-Structural Protein1 (NS1) antigen; or 2) a four-fold or greater increase of dengue-specific IgG capture antibody by ELISA and haemoagglutination inhibition assay. Patients were diagnosed as having Acute RF, if serum creatinine was >1.2 mg/dl or who showed improvement by 50% in serum creatinine from the initial value. It is an observational study of medical charts, data of age, gender, and medical history of any underlying diseases in association with the severity of DI of each patient recorded. All of the laboratory results were collected. Parameters that influenced the clinical presentations and outcomes for development of classical DF or DHF/DSS in patients with or without RF were analysed and compared. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was carried. The Statistical software namely SAS 9.2, SPSS 15.0, Stata 10.1, Med Calc 9.0.1, Systat 12.0 and R environment ver.2.11.1 were used. Results Most common symptoms were fever followed by headache and pain in abdomen. Among the patients with RF, all patients had recovery. The patients with DHF/DSS were more susceptible to develop renal failure compared to DF group. There were statistically significant higher frequencies of renal failure, haemoconcentration, thrombocytopenia, low serum cholesterol. Patients in the RF group also had significantly

  18. Wastewater quality and the risk of intestinal nematode infection in sewage farming families in Hyderabad, India

    PubMed Central

    Ensink, Jeroen H.J.; Blumenthal, Ursula J.; Brooker, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The use of sewage or wastewater in agriculture is becoming increasingly common as a result of global water scarcity. Intestinal nematode infections have been identified as the main health risk associated with this practise. To protect consumer and farmer health the WHO has set an intestinal nematode water quality standard. However because of a lack of well designed studies the validity of this guideline is questioned. This paper presents the findings of a study on the risk of intestinal nematode infections in farming families occupationally exposed to untreated and partially treated wastewater in Hyderabad, India. The study found an increased risk of hookworm (OR: 3.5, 95% CI 2.2-5.5), Ascaris lumbricoides (OR: 5.3, 95% CI: 2.0-14) and Trichuris trichiura (OR: 5.6, 95% CI: 1.8-18) infection when untreated wastewater (150 intestinal nematode ova/L) was used for crop production. The use of partially treated wastewater (28 intestinal nematode ova/L) was only associated with an increased risk (OR: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.2-8.6) of Ascaris lumbricoides infection. The findings of the study suggest that the current WHO intestinal nematode guideline of 1 ova/L is sufficient to protect farmer health. PMID:18840745

  19. Wastewater quality and the risk of intestinal nematode infection in sewage farming families in hyderabad, India.

    PubMed

    Ensink, Jeroen H J; Blumenthal, Ursula J; Brooker, Simon

    2008-10-01

    Use of sewage or wastewater in agriculture is becoming increasingly common as a result of a global water scarcity. Intestinal nematode infections have been identified as the main health risk associated with this practice. To protect consumer and farmer health, the World Health Organization (WHO) has established an intestinal nematode water quality standard. However, because of a lack of well-designed studies, the validity of this guideline is questioned. This report presents the findings of a study on the risk of intestinal nematode infections in farming families occupationally exposed to untreated and partially treated wastewater in Hyderabad, India. The study found an increased risk of hookworm (odds ratio [OR] 3.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.2-5.5), Ascaris lumbricoides (OR = 5.3, 95% CI = 2.0-14), and Trichuris trichiura (OR = 5.6, 95% CI = 1.8-18) infection when untreated wastewater (150 intestinal nematode ova/liter) was used for crop production. Use of partially treated wastewater (28 intestinal nematode ova/liter) was only associated with an increased risk (OR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.2-8.6) of A. lumbricoides infection. The findings of the study suggest that the current WHO intestinal nematode guideline of 1 ova/liter is sufficient to protect farmer health.

  20. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasite Infections among Individuals with Mental Retardation in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schupf, Nicole; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Prevalence of intestinal parasite infection among program participants of the New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities for 1986-87 was estimated at 7.3%, suggesting that management of parasitic infection is improving. Males and individuals with severe/profound mental retardation were twice as likely to have…

  1. Intestinal helminths regulate lethal acute graft-versus-host disease and preserve the graft-versus-tumor effect in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Chen, Hung-Lin; Bannick, Nadine; Henry, Michael; Holm, Adrian N; Metwali, Ahmed; Urban, Joseph F; Rothman, Paul B; Weiner, George J; Blazar, Bruce R; Elliott, David E; Ince, M Nedim

    2015-02-01

    Donor T lymphocyte transfer with hematopoietic stem cells suppresses residual tumor growth (graft-versus-tumor [GVT]) in cancer patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, donor T cell reactivity to host organs causes severe and potentially lethal inflammation called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). High-dose steroids or other immunosuppressive drugs are used to treat GVHD that have limited ability to control the inflammation while incurring long-term toxicity. Novel strategies are needed to modulate GVHD, preserve GVT, and improve the outcome of BMT. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control alloantigen-sensitized inflammation of GVHD, sustain GVT, and prevent mortality in BMT. Helminths colonizing the alimentary tract dramatically increase the Treg activity, thereby modulating intestinal or systemic inflammatory responses. These observations led us to hypothesize that helminths can regulate GVHD and maintain GVT in mice. Acute GVHD was induced in helminth (Heligmosomoides polygyrus)-infected or uninfected BALB/c recipients of C57BL/6 donor grafts. Helminth infection suppressed donor T cell inflammatory cytokine generation and reduced GVHD-related mortality, but maintained GVT. H. polygyrus colonization promoted the survival of TGF-β-generating recipient Tregs after a conditioning regimen with total body irradiation and led to a TGF-β-dependent in vivo expansion/maturation of donor Tregs after BMT. Helminths did not control GVHD when T cells unresponsive to TGF-β-mediated immune regulation were used as donor T lymphocytes. These results suggest that helminths suppress acute GVHD using Tregs and TGF-β-dependent pathways in mice. Helminthic regulation of GVHD and GVT through intestinal immune conditioning may improve the outcome of BMT.

  2. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y.; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.

 PMID:10325764

  3. Influenza Virus Affects Intestinal Microbiota and Secondary Salmonella Infection in the Gut through Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Deriu, Elisa; Boxx, Gayle M; He, Xuesong; Pan, Calvin; Benavidez, Sammy David; Cen, Lujia; Rozengurt, Nora; Shi, Wenyuan; Cheng, Genhong

    2016-05-01

    Human influenza viruses replicate almost exclusively in the respiratory tract, yet infected individuals may also develop gastrointestinal symptoms, such as vomiting and diarrhea. However, the molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Using an influenza mouse model, we found that influenza pulmonary infection can significantly alter the intestinal microbiota profile through a mechanism dependent on type I interferons (IFN-Is). Notably, influenza-induced IFN-Is produced in the lungs promote the depletion of obligate anaerobic bacteria and the enrichment of Proteobacteria in the gut, leading to a "dysbiotic" microenvironment. Additionally, we provide evidence that IFN-Is induced in the lungs during influenza pulmonary infection inhibit the antimicrobial and inflammatory responses in the gut during Salmonella-induced colitis, further enhancing Salmonella intestinal colonization and systemic dissemination. Thus, our studies demonstrate a systemic role for IFN-Is in regulating the host immune response in the gut during Salmonella-induced colitis and in altering the intestinal microbial balance after influenza infection.

  4. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure in Plasmodium vivax malaria infection, a rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Sangappa, Jainapur Ravi; Choudhary, Prakash Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male presented with 6 days history of intermittent fever with chills, 2 days history of upper abdomen pain, distension of abdomen, and decreased urine output. He was diagnosed to have Plasmodium vivax malaria, acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure. These constellations of complications in P. vivax infection have never been reported in the past. The patient responded to intravenous chloroquine and supportive treatment. For renal failure, he required hemodialysis. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure form an unusual combination in P. vivax infection. PMID:26629455

  5. Undernutrition, the Acute Phase Response to Infection, and Its Effects on Micronutrient Status Indicators12

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Kara A.; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A.

    2014-01-01

    Infection and undernutrition are prevalent in developing countries and demonstrate a synergistic relation. Undernutrition increases infection-related morbidity and mortality. The acute phase response (APR) is an innate, systemic inflammatory reaction to a wide array of disruptions in a host’s homeostasis, including infection. Released from immune cells in response to deleterious stimuli, proinflammatory cytokines act on distant tissues to induce behavioral (e.g., anorexia, weakness, and fatigue) and systemic effects of the APR. Cytokines act to increase energy and protein requirements to manifest fever and support hepatic acute phase protein (APP) production. Blood concentrations of glucose and lipid are augmented to provide energy to immune cells in response to cytokines. Additionally, infection decreases intestinal absorption of nutrients and can cause direct loss of micronutrients. Traditional indicators of iron, zinc, and vitamin A status are altered during the APR, leading to inaccurate estimations of deficiency in populations with a high or unknown prevalence of infection. Blood concentrations of APPs can be measured in nutrition interventions to assess the time stage and severity of infection and correct for the APR; however, standardized cutoffs for nutrition applications are needed. Protein-energy malnutrition leads to increased gut permeability to pathogens, abnormal immune cell populations, and impaired APP response. Micronutrient deficiencies cause specific immune impairments that affect both innate and adaptive responses. This review describes the antagonistic interaction between the APR and nutritional status and emphasizes the need for integrated interventions to address undernutrition and to reduce disease burden in developing countries. PMID:25398733

  6. Intestinal mucosal mast cells in normal and nematode-infected rat intestines are in intimate contact with peptidergic nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Stead, R H; Tomioka, M; Quinonez, G; Simon, G T; Felten, S Y; Bienenstock, J

    1987-01-01

    Inflammatory or allergic conditions, as well as situations where healing and repair processes occur, are characterized by the presence of increased numbers of mast cells. Previous work on the effect of neuropeptides on mast cell mediator release showed that only substance P caused such release from intestinal mucosal mast cells [Shanahan, F., Denburg, J. A., Fox, J., Bienenstock, J. & Befus, A. D. (1985) J. Immunol. 135, 1331-1337]. Accordingly, we investigated the microanatomical relationship between mast cells and enteric nerves in normal rat intestine and parasite-infected rat intestine, in which mucosal mast cell hyperplasia occurs. Combined immunohistochemistry for neuron-specific enolase and staining with alcian blue at pH 0.5 was employed on paraffin-embedded sections of normal and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rat jejunum. Sixty-seven percent of intestinal mucosal mast cells were touching subepithelial nerves, and an additional 20% were within 2 micron of nerves. Assessment of the proportion of the lamina propria occupied by mast cells (12.5%), the average mast cell area (121 +/- 28 microns 2), and the density of enteric nerves (one per 788 +/- 151 microns 2) suggested that the association was 5 times greater than would be expected by chance alone (P less than 0.0001). In consecutive sections, the nerves in contact with mast cells were also shown to contain substance P and/or calcitonin-gene-related peptide. Electron microscopy confirmed this association: 8% of the mast cells in infected rats exhibited membrane-membrane contact with unmyelinated axons containing 70- to 170-nm dense-core vesicles, and an additional 31% were situated less than 250 nm from nerves. Other mast cells appeared to embrace nerve bundles through the projection of lamellopodia. These data provide systematic quantitative evidence that a structural foundation for communication between the immune and nervous systems exists in the rat gastrointestinal tract. Images PMID:2437589

  7. Viral immunity. Transkingdom control of viral infection and immunity in the mammalian intestine.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Julie K; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-01-15

    Viruses that infect the intestine include major human pathogens (retroviruses, noroviruses, rotaviruses, astroviruses, picornaviruses, adenoviruses, herpesviruses) that constitute a serious public health problem worldwide. These viral pathogens are members of a large, complex viral community inhabiting the intestine termed "the enteric virome." Enteric viruses have intimate functional and genetic relationships with both the host and other microbial constituents that inhabit the intestine, such as the bacterial microbiota, their associated phages, helminthes, and fungi, which together constitute the microbiome. Emerging data indicate that enteric viruses regulate, and are in turn regulated by, these other microbes through a series of processes termed "transkingdom interactions." This represents a changing paradigm in intestinal immunity to viral infection. Here we review recent advances in the field and propose new ways in which to conceptualize this important area.

  8. Transkingdom control of viral infection and immunity in the mammalian intestine

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Julie K.; Virgin, Herbert W.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses that infect the intestine include major human pathogens (retroviruses, noroviruses, rotaviruses, astroviruses, picornaviruses, adenoviruses, herpesviruses) constituting a major public health problem worldwide. These viral pathogens are members of a large, complex viral community inhabiting the intestine termed the enteric virome. Enteric viruses have intimate functional and genetic relationships with both the host and other microbial constituents that inhabit the intestine, like the bacterial microbiota, their associated phages, helminthes and fungi which together constitute the microbiome. Emerging data indicate that enteric viruses regulate, and are in turn regulated by, these other microbes through a series of processes termed transkingdom interactions. This represents a changing paradigm in intestinal immunity to viral infection. Here we review recent advances in the field and propose new ways in which to conceptualize this important area. PMID:26816384

  9. Intestinal parasitic infections amongst Orang Asli (indigenous) in Malaysia: has socioeconomic development alleviated the problem?

    PubMed

    Lim, Y A L; Romano, N; Colin, N; Chow, S C; Smith, H V

    2009-08-01

    Orang Asli are the indigenous minority peoples of peninsular Malaysia. Despite proactive socioeconomic development initiated by the Malaysian Government in upgrading the quality of life of the Orang Asli communities since 1978, they still remained poor with a current poverty rate of 76.9%. Poverty exacerbates the health problems faced by these communities which include malnourishment, high incidences of infectious diseases (eg. tuberculosis, leprosy, malaria) and the perpetual problem with intestinal parasitic infections. Studies reported that the mean infection rate of intestinal parasitic infections in Orang Asli communities has reduced from 91.1% in 1978, to 64.1% in the subsequent years. Although the results was encouraging, it has to be interpreted with caution because nearly 80% of studies carried out after 1978 still reported high prevalence (i.e. >50%) of soil-transmitted helminthiases (STH) among Orang Asli communities. Prior to 1978, hookworm infection is the most predominant STH but today, trichuriasis is the most common STH infections. The risk factors for intestinal parasitic infections remained unchanged and studies conducted in recent years suggested that severe STH infections contributed to malnutrition, iron deficiency anaemia and low serum retinol in Orang Asli communities. In addition, STH may also contribute to poor cognitive functions and learning ability. Improvements in socioeconomic status in Malaysia have shown positive impact on the reduction of intestinal parasitic infections in other communities however, this positive impact is less significant in the Orang Asli communities. In view of this, a national parasitic infections baseline data on morbidity and mortality in the 18 subgroups of Orang Asli, will assist in identifying intervention programmes required by these communities. It is hope that the adoption of strategies highlighted in the World Health Organisation- Healthy Village Initiatives (WHO-HVI) into Orang Asli communities will

  10. Rotavirus Infection Increases Intestinal Motility but Not Permeability at the Onset of Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Istrate, Claudia; Hagbom, Marie; Vikström, Elena; Magnusson, Karl-Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disease mechanisms associated with onset and secondary effects of rotavirus (RV) diarrhea remain to be determined and may not be identical. In this study, we investigated whether onset of RV diarrhea is associated with increased intestinal permeability and/or motility. To study the transit time, fluorescent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran was given to RV-infected adult and infant mice. Intestinal motility was also studied with an opioid receptor agonist (loperamide) and a muscarinic receptor antagonist (atropine). To investigate whether RV increases permeability at the onset of diarrhea, fluorescent 4- and 10-kDa dextran doses were given to infected and noninfected mice, and fluorescence intensity was measured subsequently in serum. RV increased transit time in infant mice. Increased motility was detected at 24 h postinfection (h p.i.) and persisted up to 72 h p.i in pups. Both loperamide and atropine decreased intestinal motility and attenuated diarrhea. Analysis of passage of fluorescent dextran from the intestine into serum indicated unaffected intestinal permeability at the onset of diarrhea (24 to 48 h p.i.). We show that RV-induced diarrhea is associated with increased intestinal motility via an activation of the myenteric nerve plexus, which in turn stimulates muscarinic receptors on intestinal smooth muscles. IMPORTANCE We show that RV-infected mice have increased intestinal motility at the onset of diarrhea, and that this is not associated with increased intestinal permeability. These new observations will contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in RV diarrhea. PMID:24371070

  11. Diagnosis of Clostridium perfringens intestinal infections in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; Songer, J Glenn

    2008-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens produces enteric diseases, generically called enterotoxemias, in sheep, goats, and other animals. This microorganism can be a normal inhabitant of the intestine of most animal species, including humans, but when the intestinal environment is altered by sudden changes in diet or other factors, C. perfringens proliferates and produces potent toxins that act locally or are absorbed into the general circulation with usually devastating effects on the host. History, clinical signs, and gross postmortem findings are useful tools for establishing a presumptive diagnosis of clostridial enterotoxemia in sheep and goats. Definitive diagnosis requires laboratory confirmation. Isolation of some types of C. perfringens (e.g., B and C) can be of diagnostic value, but other types (e.g., A) are so commonly found in the intestine of normal animals that isolation is meaningless from a diagnostic point of view. The most accepted criterion in establishing a definitive diagnosis of enterotoxemia is detection of C. perfringens toxins in intestinal contents. Also, histopathological examination of brain is very useful for diagnosis of type D disease, as lesions produced by epsilon toxin in the brains of sheep and goats are pathognomonic for type D enterotoxemia. Ancillary tests, such as measuring urine glucose or observing Gram-stained smears of intestinal mucosa, can be used. However, although such tests have a presumptive diagnostic value when positive, they cannot be used to rule out a diagnosis of enterotoxemia when negative.

  12. Intestinal parasites coinfection does not alter plasma cytokines profile elicited in acute malaria in subjects from endemic area of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Arcila, Juan Camilo; Perce-da-Silva, Daiana de Souza; Vasconcelos, Mariana Pinheiro Alves; Rodrigues-da-Silva, Rodrigo Nunes; Pereira, Virginia Araujo; Aprígio, Cesarino Junior Lima; Lima, Cleoni Alves Mendes; Fonseca e Fonseca, Bruna de Paula; Banic, Dalma Maria; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa; Oliveira-Ferreira, Joseli

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, malaria is prevalent in the Amazon region and these regions coincide with high prevalence of intestinal parasites but few studies explore the interaction between malaria and other parasites. Therefore, the present study evaluates changes in cytokine, chemokine, C-reactive protein, and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in 264 individuals, comparing plasma from infected individuals with concurrent malaria and intestinal parasites to individuals with either malaria infection alone and uninfected. In the studied population 24% of the individuals were infected with Plasmodium and 18% coinfected with intestinal parasites. Protozoan parasites comprised the bulk of the intestinal parasites infections and subjects infected with intestinal parasites were more likely to have malaria. The use of principal component analysis and cluster analysis associated increased levels of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, and CRP and low levels of IL-17A predominantly with individuals with malaria alone and coinfected individuals. In contrast, low levels of almost all inflammatory mediators were associated predominantly with individuals uninfected while increased levels of IL-17A were associated predominantly with individuals with intestinal parasites only. In conclusion, our data suggest that, in our population, the infection with intestinal parasites (mainly protozoan) does not modify the pattern of cytokine production in individuals infected with P. falciparum and P. vivax.

  13. Intestinal Parasites Coinfection Does Not Alter Plasma Cytokines Profile Elicited in Acute Malaria in Subjects from Endemic Area of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Perce-da-Silva, Daiana de Souza; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, malaria is prevalent in the Amazon region and these regions coincide with high prevalence of intestinal parasites but few studies explore the interaction between malaria and other parasites. Therefore, the present study evaluates changes in cytokine, chemokine, C-reactive protein, and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in 264 individuals, comparing plasma from infected individuals with concurrent malaria and intestinal parasites to individuals with either malaria infection alone and uninfected. In the studied population 24% of the individuals were infected with Plasmodium and 18% coinfected with intestinal parasites. Protozoan parasites comprised the bulk of the intestinal parasites infections and subjects infected with intestinal parasites were more likely to have malaria. The use of principal component analysis and cluster analysis associated increased levels of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, and CRP and low levels of IL-17A predominantly with individuals with malaria alone and coinfected individuals. In contrast, low levels of almost all inflammatory mediators were associated predominantly with individuals uninfected while increased levels of IL-17A were associated predominantly with individuals with intestinal parasites only. In conclusion, our data suggest that, in our population, the infection with intestinal parasites (mainly protozoan) does not modify the pattern of cytokine production in individuals infected with P. falciparum and P. vivax. PMID:25309052

  14. Abdominal compartment syndrome after endovascular repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm leads to acute intestinal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiyang; Zhao, Jichun; Huang, Bin; Yuan, Ding; Yang, Yi; Ma, Yukui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) after endovascular repair (EVAR) of rupture abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is a rare emergency situation, which has a high mortality. However, the progression of ACS is rapid and the diagnosis is usually been delayed, which increase the difficulties in treatment and affect the prognosis. We describe a case of a sever complication (acute intestinal necrosis) resulting from ACS after endovascular repair of rAAA. Clinical Finding: An elderly man, 81 years old, complained a sudden lower abdominal and back pain without any predisposing cause. He had a history of hypertension for 20 years without any regular anti-hypertensive therapy. Physical Examination revealed that the blood pressure was 89/54 mmHg, pulse was 120/min, oxygen saturation was 91%. The abdominal ultrasound and the CTA (computed tomography angiography) scan revealed a rAAA. Emergency EVAR under general anesthesia was performed for this patient. Diagnosis: Fourteen hours after endovascular repair, sudden decreased of blood pressure (70/50 mmHg) and oxygen saturation (70%) was observed. ACS or bleeding of retroperitoneal space was diagnosed. Interventions: Abdominal laparotomy was immediately performed. ACS was verified and a severe complication (acute intestinal necrosis) was observed, intestinal resection was performed for this patient. Outcomes: Unfortunately, this patient died after operation because of multi-organ failure in a very short period, which is very rare regarding to this condition. Surgical pathology, diagnosis and management were discussed. Conclusion: ACS was occurred with a severe complication (acute intestinal necrosis) in a very short period, which is very rare regarding to this condition after EVAR, it reminds us the severe result of ACS and more methods to prevent it happened after surgical management. PMID:27893667

  15. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  16. Nosema ceranae Infection Promotes Proliferation of Yeasts in Honey Bee Intestines

    PubMed Central

    Paleolog, Jerzy; Borsuk, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Background Nosema ceranae infection not only damages honey bee (Apis melifera) intestines, but we believe it may also affect intestinal yeast development and its seasonal pattern. In order to check our hypothesis, infection intensity versus intestinal yeast colony forming units (CFU) both in field and cage experiments were studied. Methods/Findings Field tests were carried out from March to October in 2014 and 2015. N. ceranae infection intensity decreased more than 100 times from 7.6 x 108 in March to 5.8 x 106 in October 2014. A similar tendency was observed in 2015. Therefore, in the European eastern limit of its range, N. ceranae infection intensity showed seasonality (spring peak and subsequent decline in the summer and fall), however, with an additional mid-summer peak that had not been recorded in other studies. Due to seasonal changes in the N. ceranae infection intensity observed in honey bee colonies, we recommend performing studies on new therapeutics during two consecutive years, including colony overwintering. A natural decrease in N. ceranae spore numbers observed from March to October might be misinterpreted as an effect of Nosema spp. treatment with new compounds. A similar seasonal pattern was observed for intestinal yeast population size in field experiments. Furthermore, cage experiments confirmed the size of intestinal yeast population to increase markedly together with the increase in the N. ceranae infection intensity. Yeast CFUs amounted to respectively 2,025 (CV = 13.04) and 11,150 (CV = 14.06) in uninfected and N. ceranae-infected workers at the end of cage experiments. Therefore, honey bee infection with N. ceranae supported additional opportunistic yeast infections, which may have resulted in faster colony depopulations. PMID:27736915

  17. Intestinal Helminth Infections in Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinic at Kitale District Hospital, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Wekesa, A. W.; Mulambalah, C. S.; Muleke, C. I.; Odhiambo, R.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal helminth infections during pregnancy are associated with adverse outcomes including low birth weight and prenatal mortality. The infections are a major public health problem in developing countries. A hospital based survey was undertaken for six months to determine the infection prevalence, intensity, and risk factors. The study involved expectant women attending antenatal clinic. Stool samples were screened microscopically for helminth ova using Kato Katz technique. Information on risk factors was collected using semistructured questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS. Epidemiological data was analysed using descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis. The overall prevalence of infection was 21 (13.8%). Ascariasis was the most prevalent 10 (6.5%), hookworm infection was 6 (3.9%), and trichuriasis was 2 (1.3%). Pregnant women aged below 29 years (OR = 3.63, CI = 0.87–11.75) and those with primary level of education (OR = 3.21, CI = 0.88–11.75) were at a higher risk of infection compared to those aged ≥ 29 years with secondary level of education. Hand washing was significantly associated with reduced likelihood of infection (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.06–0.57). It was concluded that intestinal helminth infections were prevalent among pregnant women. We recommended that all expectant women visiting antenatal clinics be screened for intestinal helminth infections and positive cases be advised to seek treatment. PMID:24971167

  18. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland.

    PubMed

    Putkuri, Niina; Kantele, Anu; Levanov, Lev; Kivistö, Ilkka; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Markus; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-05-01

    Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001-2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (<16 years of age) with INKV infection were hospitalized; adults were outpatients with mild disease, except for 1 who was hospitalized with CHATV infection. Symptoms included fever, influenza-like illness, nausea or vomiting, disorientation, nuchal rigidity, headache, drowsiness, and seizures. Although many INKV and CHATV infections appear to be subclinical, these viruses can cause more severe disease, especially in children.

  19. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland

    PubMed Central

    Kantele, Anu; Levanov, Lev; Kivistö, Ilkka; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Markus; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-01-01

    Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001–2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (<16 years of age) with INKV infection were hospitalized; adults were outpatients with mild disease, except for 1 who was hospitalized with CHATV infection. Symptoms included fever, influenza-like illness, nausea or vomiting, disorientation, nuchal rigidity, headache, drowsiness, and seizures. Although many INKV and CHATV infections appear to be subclinical, these viruses can cause more severe disease, especially in children. PMID:27088268

  20. Acute Intestinal Obstruction Complicating Abdominal Pregnancy: Conservative Management and Successful Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Udigwe, Gerald Okanandu; Ihekwoaba, Eric Chukwudi; Udegbunam, Onyebuchi Izuchukwu; Egeonu, Richard Obinwanne; Okwuosa, Ayodele Obianuju

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute intestinal obstruction during pregnancy is a very challenging and unusual nonobstetric surgical entity often linked with considerable fetomaternal morbidity and mortality. When it is synchronous with abdominal pregnancy, it is even rarer. Case Presentation. A 28-year-old lady in her second pregnancy was referred to Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria, at 27 weeks of gestation due to vomiting, constipation, and abdominal pain. Examination and ultrasound scan revealed a single live intra-abdominal extrauterine fetus. Plain abdominal X-ray was diagnostic of intestinal obstruction. Conservative treatment was successful till the 34-week gestational age when she had exploratory laparotomy. At surgery, the amniotic sac was intact and the placenta was found to be adherent to the gut. There was also a live female baby with birth weight of 2.3 kg and Apgar scores of 9 and 10 in the 1st and 5th minutes, respectively, with the baby having right clubbed foot. Adhesiolysis and right adnexectomy were done. The mother and her baby were well and were discharged home nine days postoperatively. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of abdominal pregnancy as the cause of acute intestinal obstruction in the published literature. Management approach is multidisciplinary. PMID:27313923

  1. Distribution of intestinal parasitic infections amongst aborigine children at Post Sungai Rual, Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hartini, Y; Geishamimi, G; Mariam, A Z; Mohamed-Kamel, A G; Hidayatul, F O; Ismarul, Y I

    2013-12-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are important public health problems among underprivileged communities. This study was carried out to evaluate the infection rate of intestinal parasites among aborigine children at Pos Sungai Rual, Kelantan, Malaysia. A total of 111 faecal samples from aborigine children aged 4-12 years were screened for intestinal parasites by direct smear technique. Harada-Mori culture was also performed to identify hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis larvae. The results showed that 87.4% of the children examined were positive for one or more parasites. Intestinal parasites were significantly lower in boys (78.7%) as compared to girls (93.8%). The infection occurred in very young children aged 4-6 years (80.0%) and the percentage of parasite-positive cases appeared to be significantly higher (92.9%) among the children aged 7-9 years. Trichuris trichiura was the most common parasite found in aborigine children (65.8%). Low socioeconomic status, poor environmental sanitation and poor personal hygiene are possible contributing factors that increase the rate of intestinal parasitic infections among the children. Thus, the parasitic diseases will continue to threaten the people's health especially among communities from rural areas if no appropriate actions are taken to diminish the transmission of the parasites.

  2. Effects of acute intra-abdominal hypertension on multiple intestinal barrier functions in rats

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Yuxin; Yi, Min; Fan, Jie; Bai, Yu; Ge, Qinggang; Yao, Gaiqi

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is a common and serious complication in critically ill patients for which there is no well-defined treatment strategy. Here, we explored the effect of IAH on multiple intestinal barriers and discussed whether the alteration in microflora provides clues to guide the rational therapeutic treatment of intestinal barriers during IAH. Using a rat model, we analysed the expression of tight junction proteins (TJs), mucins, chemotactic factors, and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by immunohistochemistry. We also analysed the microflora populations using 16S rRNA sequencing. We found that, in addition to enhanced permeability, acute IAH (20 mmHg for 90 min) resulted in significant disturbances to mucosal barriers. Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota was also induced, as represented by decreased Firmicutes (relative abundance), increased Proteobacteria and migration of Bacteroidetes from the colon to the jejunum. At the genus level, Lactobacillus species and Peptostreptococcaceae incertae sedis were decreased, whereas levels of lactococci remained unchanged. Our findings outline the characteristics of IAH-induced barrier changes, indicating that intestinal barriers might be treated to alleviate IAH, and the microflora may be an especially relevant target. PMID:26980423

  3. Glutamine supplementation improves intestinal barrier function in a weaned piglet model of Escherichia coli infection.

    PubMed

    Ewaschuk, Julia B; Murdoch, Gordon K; Johnson, Ian R; Madsen, Karen L; Field, Catherine J

    2011-09-01

    The weaning period is associated with an increased prevalence of gastrointestinal infection in many species. Glutamine (Gln) has been shown to improve intestinal barrier function and immune function in both in vivo and in vitro models. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of dietary Gln supplementation on intestinal barrier function and intestinal cytokines in a model of Escherichia coli infection. We randomised 21-d-old piglets (n 20) to nutritionally complete isonitrogenous diets with or without Gln (4·4 %, w/w) for 2 weeks. Intestinal loops were isolated from anaesthetised pigs and inoculated with either saline or one of the two E. coli (K88AC or K88 wild-type)-containing solutions. Intestinal tissue was studied for permeability, cytokine expression, fluid secretion and tight-junction protein expression. Animals receiving Gln supplementation had decreased potential difference (PD) and short-circuit current (I(sc)) in E. coli-inoculated intestinal loops (PD 0·628 (SEM 0·151) mV; I(sc) 13·0 (SEM 3·07) μA/cm(2)) compared with control-fed animals (PD 1·36 (SEM 0·227) mV; I(sc) 22·4 (SEM 2·24) μA/cm(2)). Intestinal tissue from control, but not from Gln-supplemented, animals responded to E. coli with a significant increase in mucosal cytokine mRNA (IL-1β, IL-6, transforming growth factor-β and IL-10). Tight-junction protein expression (claudin-1 and occludin) was reduced with exposure to E. coli in control-fed animals and was not influenced in Gln-supplemented piglets. Gln supplementation may be useful in reducing the severity of weaning-related gastrointestinal infections, by reducing the mucosal cytokine response and altering intestinal barrier function.

  4. CD8 epitope escape and reversion in acute HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Timm, Joerg; Lauer, Georg M; Kavanagh, Daniel G; Sheridan, Isabelle; Kim, Arthur Y; Lucas, Michaela; Pillay, Thillagavathie; Ouchi, Kei; Reyor, Laura L; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Chung, Raymond T; Bhardwaj, Nina; Klenerman, Paul; Walker, Bruce D; Allen, Todd M

    2004-12-20

    In the setting of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, robust HCV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses are associated with initial control of viremia. Despite these responses, 70-80% of individuals develop persistent infection. Although viral escape from CD8 responses has been illustrated in the chimpanzee model of HCV infection, the effect of CD8 selection pressure on viral evolution and containment in acute HCV infection in humans remains unclear. Here, we examined viral evolution in an immunodominant human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B8-restricted NS3 epitope in subjects with acute HCV infection. Development of mutations within the epitope coincided with loss of strong ex vivo tetramer and interferon gamma enzyme-linked immunospot responses, and endogenous expression of variant NS3 sequences suggested that the selected mutations altered processing and presentation of the variant epitope. Analysis of NS3 sequences from 30 additional chronic HCV-infected subjects revealed a strong association between sequence variation within this region and expression of HLA-B8, supporting reproducible allele-specific selection pressures at the population level. Interestingly, transmission of an HLA-B8-associated escape mutation to an HLA-B8 negative subject resulted in rapid reversion of the mutation. Together, these data indicate that viral escape from CD8+ T cell responses occurs during human HCV infection and that acute immune selection pressure is of sufficient magnitude to influence HCV evolution.

  5. Orsay, Santeuil and Le Blanc viruses primarily infect intestinal cells in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

    PubMed

    Franz, Carl J; Renshaw, Hilary; Frezal, Lise; Jiang, Yanfang; Félix, Marie-Anne; Wang, David

    2014-01-05

    The discoveries of Orsay, Santeuil and Le Blanc viruses, three viruses infecting either Caenorhabditis elegans or its relative Caenorhabditis briggsae, enable the study of virus-host interactions using natural pathogens of these two well-established model organisms. We characterized the tissue tropism of infection in Caenorhabditis nematodes by these viruses. Using immunofluorescence assays targeting proteins from each of the viruses, and in situ hybridization, we demonstrate viral proteins and RNAs localize to intestinal cells in larval stage Caenorhabditis nematodes. Viral proteins were detected in one to six of the 20 intestinal cells present in Caenorhabditis nematodes. In Orsay virus-infected C. elegans, viral proteins were detected as early as 6h post-infection. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and capsid proteins of Orsay virus exhibited different subcellular localization patterns. Collectively, these observations provide the first experimental insights into viral protein expression in any nematode host, and broaden our understanding of viral infection in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

  6. Human Intestinal Enteroids: a New Model To Study Human Rotavirus Infection, Host Restriction, and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Kapil; Blutt, Sarah E.; Ettayebi, Khalil; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Broughman, James R.; Crawford, Sue E.; Karandikar, Umesh C.; Sastri, Narayan P.; Conner, Margaret E.; Opekun, Antone R.; Graham, David Y.; Qureshi, Waqar; Sherman, Vadim; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human gastrointestinal tract research is limited by the paucity of in vitro intestinal cell models that recapitulate the cellular diversity and complex functions of human physiology and disease pathology. Human intestinal enteroid (HIE) cultures contain multiple intestinal epithelial cell types that comprise the intestinal epithelium (enterocytes and goblet, enteroendocrine, and Paneth cells) and are physiologically active based on responses to agonists. We evaluated these nontransformed, three-dimensional HIE cultures as models for pathogenic infections in the small intestine by examining whether HIEs from different regions of the small intestine from different patients are susceptible to human rotavirus (HRV) infection. Little is known about HRVs, as they generally replicate poorly in transformed cell lines, and host range restriction prevents their replication in many animal models, whereas many animal rotaviruses (ARVs) exhibit a broader host range and replicate in mice. Using HRVs, including the Rotarix RV1 vaccine strain, and ARVs, we evaluated host susceptibility, virus production, and cellular responses of HIEs. HRVs infect at higher rates and grow to higher titers than do ARVs. HRVs infect differentiated enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells, and viroplasms and lipid droplets are induced. Heterogeneity in replication was seen in HIEs from different patients. HRV infection and RV enterotoxin treatment of HIEs caused physiological lumenal expansion detected by time-lapse microscopy, recapitulating one of the hallmarks of rotavirus-induced diarrhea. These results demonstrate that HIEs are a novel pathophysiological model that will allow the study of HRV biology, including host restriction, cell type restriction, and virus-induced fluid secretion. IMPORTANCE Our research establishes HIEs as nontransformed cell culture models to understand human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology and the epithelial response, including host restriction of

  7. Changes in intestinal microflora of Caenorhabditis elegans following Bacillus nematocida B16 infection

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qiuhong; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Keqin; Huang, Xiaowei; Hui, Fengli; Kan, Yunchao; Yao, Lunguang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of pathogenic bacteria on a host and its symbiotic microbiota is vital and widespread in the biotic world. The soil-dwelling opportunistic bacterium Bacillus nematocida B16 uses a “Trojan horse” mechanism to kill Caenorhabditis elegans. The alterations in the intestinal microflora that occur after B16 infection remain unknown. Here, we analyzed the intestinal bacteria presented in normal and infected worms. The gut microbial community experienced a complex change after B16 inoculation, as determined through marked differences in species diversity, structure, distribution and composition between uninfected and infected worms. Regardless of the worm’s origin (i.e., from soil or rotten fruits), the diversity of the intestinal microbiome decreased after infection. Firmicutes increased sharply, whereas Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Acidobacteria decreased to different degrees. Fusobacteria was only present 12 h post-infection. After 24 h of infection, 1228 and 1109 bacterial species were identified in the uninfected and infected groups, respectively. The shared species reached 21.97%. The infected group had a greater number of Bacillus species but a smaller number of Pediococcus, Halomonas, Escherichia and Shewanella species (P < 0.01). Therefore, this study provides the first evaluation of the alterations caused by pathogenic bacteria on symbiotic microbiota using C. elegans as the model species. PMID:26830015

  8. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  9. Intestinal helminthic infections in striped field mice, Apodemus agrarius, from two southern regions of Korea.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Woon-Mok; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Song, Hyeon-Je; Kim, Chung-Mo; Nam, Gi-Jin

    2014-08-01

    The present study was performed to know the infection status of intestinal helminths in a most common species of field mice, Apodemus agrarius, from 2 southern regions of Korea. Total 133 and 103 mice were collected by the mouse trap in Hapcheon-gun, Gyeongsangnam-do and Gurye-gun, Jeollanam-do, respectively, from July 2005 to June 2006. The small intestine of each mouse was resected and longitudinally opened with a pair of scissors. The intestinal contents were washed with 0.85% saline until the supernatant became clear. Helminths were collected with naked eyes or under a stereomicroscope from the sediment of the intestinal content. More than 11 species of helminths (4 nematode spp., 5 trematode spp., and 2 cestode spp.) were recovered. Among these, heligmosomoid nematodes (97.5%) was the most highly and heavily infected species. As the members of trematodes, Plagiorchis muris, Brachylaima sp., Echinostoma hortense, Echinostoma cinetorchis, and unidentified echinostome larvae were found in the small intestines of 35 (14.8%), 12 (5.1%), 6 (2.5%), 1 (0.4%), and 1 (0.4%) mice respectively. Two species of tapeworms, Hymenolepis nana and Hymenolepis diminuta were also detected in 79 (33.5%) and 21 (8.9%) mice, respectively. Conclusively, heligmosomoid nematodes were the most prevalent (dominant) species among more than 11 helminth species detected, and Brachylaima sp. fluke is newly added in the list of intestinal trematodes in Korea.

  10. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Coyne G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and

  11. Studies with inulin-type fructans on intestinal infections, permeability, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Francisco

    2007-11-01

    Symbiosis between host and gut bacteria can be optimized by prebiotics. Inulin-type fructans have been shown to improve the microbial balance of the intestinal ecosystem by stimulating the growth of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. These changes have been associated with several health benefits, including the prevention of gastrointestinal and systemic infections in animal models and human studies. Inulin-type fructans induce changes of the intestinal mucosa characterized by higher villi, deeper crypts, increased number of goblet cells, and a thicker mucus layer on the colonic epithelium. Bacterial antagonism and competition of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli with pathogens, as well as the trophic effects on the intestinal epithelium, may explain the protective role of inulin against enteric infections. In contrast, studies with rats fed a low-calcium diet suggested a negative effect of prebiotics on intestinal barrier function. However, the adverse effect was clearly ascribed to the strong reduction of dietary calcium, as it could be reversed by oral administration of calcium. The adverse effect of a low-calcium diet on intestinal permeability has not been observed in humans. Inulin and oligofructose are now being tested in human studies aimed at prevention of bacterial translocation in critical health conditions. Mixtures of probiotics and prebiotics including inulin or oligofructose significantly reduced the rate of postoperative infections in liver transplant patients. Finally, inulin and oligofructose have proven useful to prevent mucosal inflammatory disorders in animal models and in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment Proposal for Acute Endodontic Infection.

    PubMed

    Keine, Kátia Cristina; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Kamila Figueiredo; Diniz, Ana Carolina Soares; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Galoza, Marina Oliveira Gonçalves; Magro, Miriam Graziele; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the main lesions that simulate clinically and propose a treatment protocol for acute endodontic infection. Signs and clinical symptoms of periodontal abscess, gingival abscess, odontoma, herpes simplex, pericoronitis, acute pulpitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis/periodontitis (NUG/NUP) were described and compared with acute endodontic infections. A treatment protocol was described by optimizing the procedures in access cavity, microbial decontamination and detoxification of the root canal, apical debridement, intracanal and systemic medication and surgical drainage procedures. The convenience of the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, root canal instrumentation using a crown-down technique, intracanal medication with 2% chlorhexidine or triple antibiotic paste and the convenience of the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and surgical drainage to solve cases of acute dentoalveolar abscess was discussed.

  13. Intestinal parasitic infection among five interior communities at upper Rejang River, Sarawak, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sagin, D D; Mohamed, M; Ismail, G; Jok, J J; Lim, L H; Pui, J N F

    2002-03-01

    Intestinal parasitic infection among five interior communities at Bakun Valley, upper Rejang River, Sarawak, Malaysia, was investigated as part of a public health impact assessment of the proposed US$ 3 billion Bakun Hydroelectric Project. Coproparasitological examination of 355 stool samples from 7 of 16 villages representing 5 of 7 tribes in the area revealed infection rate of 41%. A higher infection rate was found among the settled Kayans (56%) than the seminomadic Penans (29%). Infection rate was high (68%) among children less than 14 years old. Trichuris trichiura accounted for more than 90% of all infections; less common were Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworms and Strongyloides stercoralis. Polyparasitism was found in 8% of the individuals surveyed with dual infection due to T. trichiura and A. lumbricoides being more common than dual infection with T. trichiura and hookworm. Women had higher infection rates (57%) than men (33%).

  14. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Infection among Food Handlers in Northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Balarak, Davoud; Modrek, Mohammad Jafari; Bazrafshan, Edris; Ansari, Hossein; Kord Mostafapour, Ferdos

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases are among the most important infectious diseases and pose health problems in many countries, most especially in developing countries. Workers at food centers could transmit parasitic infections in the absence of sanitation. This is a descriptive study conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in food clerks in the city of Tabriz in 2014. Data was recorded in the offices of the health center for all food handlers who were referred to the laboratory for demographic and stool tests to receive the health card. Parasitic infection was observed in 172 cases (3.73%) of 4612 samples. A total of 156 positive samples (90.69%) were related to protozoa and 16 (9.3%) were related to helminthes. Most of the parasitic infections were related to Giardia and Entamoeba coli and the lowest infection was related to H. nana. Also, there was a significant relationship between level of education and parasitic infection rate (P = 0.0044). But there was no significant difference between the type of infection and amount of intestinal parasites. The results show that the prevalence of intestinal parasites, especially pathogenic protozoa, is common in some food handlers. Therefore, more sanitary controls are required and increasing of education will play a crucial role in improving the health of these people.

  15. Mesenteric lymph duct drainage attenuates acute lung injury in rats with severe intraperitoneal infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhang, Shukun; Tsui, Naiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the hypothesis that the mesenteric lymphatic system plays an important role in acute lung injury in a rat model induced by severe intraperitoneal infection. Male Wistar rats weighing 250∼300 g were randomly divided into 3 groups and subjected to sham operation, intraperitoneal infection, or mesenteric lymphatic drainage. The activity of diamine oxidase (DAO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured by enzymatic assay. The endotoxin levels in plasma, lymph, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated using the limulus amoebocyte lysate reagent. The cytokines, adhesion factors, chemokines, and inflammatory factors were detected by ELISA. TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 were analyzed by Western blotting. Compared with sham-operated rats, rats with intraperitoneal infection had increased MPO and decreased DAO activity in intestinal tissues. Mesenteric lymph drainage reduced the alterations in MPO and DAO activity induced by intraperitoneal infection. The MPO activity in pulmonary tissue and the permeability of pulmonary blood vessels were also increased, which were partially reversed by mesenteric lymph drainage. The endotoxin levels in lymphatic fluid and alveolar perfusion fluid were elevated after intraperitoneal infection but decreased to control levels after lymph drainage. No alterations in the levels of plasma endotoxin were observed. The number of neutrophils was increased in BALF and lymph in the infected rats, and was also reduced after drainage. Lymph drainage also decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion factors in the plasma, lymph, and BALF, as well as the levels of TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 in pulmonary and intestinal tissues. The mesenteric lymphatic system is the main pathway involved in early lung injury caused by severe intraperitoneal infection, in which activation of the TLR-4 signal pathway may play a role.

  16. [Major intestinal resections and short-bowel syndrome in patients with the acute mesenterial thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Khripun, A I; Shurygin, S N; Priamikov, A D; Mironkov, A B; Urvantseva, O M; Movsesiants, M Iu; Izvekov, A A; Abashin, M V

    2012-01-01

    The study represents the retrospective analysis of major intestinal resections (the length of the left in olace bowel less then 200 sm) and non-major resections in 52 patients operated on the acute mesenterial thrombosis. Major bowel resection was performed in 30 patients (57.7%). 66.7% of those patients (20 of 30) died soon after the operation. Whereas lethality rate among patients with non-major resections was 54.5% (12 of 22). All 10 survived patients demonstrated the short-bowel syndrome during the follow-up period (the median follow-up time was 25 months).

  17. Intestinal parasitic infection among children and neonatus admitted to Ibn-Sina Hospital, Sirt, Libya.

    PubMed

    Kasssem, Hamed H; Zaed, Hana Abdalsalam; Sadaga, Gazala A

    2007-08-01

    A total of 350 stool samples from 196 males and 154 female children and neonatus admitted in Ibn-Sina hospital, Sirt, were examined from June 2001 to May 2002, to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites. Intestinal parasitic infections were identified in 196 (56%) of children and neonates. No intestinal helminthic parasites were detected but 13 intestinal protozoan parasites were detected. The most prevalent protozoan was Entamoeba histolytica /E. dispar (36.57%); Blastocystis hominis (12.57%), Giardia lamblia (10.29%), Isospora belli (3.14%) and Balantidium coli (0.86%), the latter was detected in non-Libyan children. The non-pathogenic ones were Entamoeba coli (15.14%), Endolimax nana (13.71%), Entamoeba hartmanni (4.29%), Chilomastix mesnilli (4.29%), Retortamonas intestinalis (3.43%), Dientamoeba fragilis (2%), Iodamoeba butschlii (0.86%) and Trichomonas hominis (0.86%). The result showed a significant difference exists between the prevalence of pathogenic and non-pathogenic protozoan parasites (P < 0.05). High prevalence of E. histolytica/ E. dispar followed by E. coli, E. nana, B. hominis and G. lamblia in both sexes of children, while the prevalence of other intestinal parasites were low in both sexes, significantly different existed in the prevalence of intestinal parasites between males and females children (t = 24.68; P < 0.05). Age groups had no effect on the prevalence of intestinal parasites (F = 0.66; P < 0.05). Significant differences existed in the prevalence between single and multiple infections with pathogenic protozoa. The socio-economic status of children parents revealed that high prevalence in children from medium socio-economic status. The family size had no significant effect on the prevalence of the intestinal parasites.

  18. Sex influence on chronic intestinal inflammation in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Robert S; Myles, Mathew H; Livingston, Beth A; Criley, Jennifer M; Franklin, Craig L

    2004-06-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus is a bacterial pathogen of mice that has been reported to cause chronic intestinal inflammation in A/JCr, germfree Swiss Webster, and immunodeficient mice. To the authors' knowledge, the influence of sex on development of chronic intestinal inflammation in H. hepaticus-infected mice has not been investigated. The purposes of the study reported here were to determine whether severity of intestinal inflammation differs between male and female A/JCr mice chronically infected with H. hepaticus and to characterize the mucosal immune response in these mice. The cecum of male and female A/JCr mice infected with H. hepaticus for 1 month and 3 months was objectively evaluated histologically for intestinal disease. Also, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was done to measure interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha), interferon-inducible protein of 10 kDa (IP-10), and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) mRNA values in the cecal tissue of these mice. Significant differences in cecal lesion scores were not present at 1 month after infection. However, infected female mice had significantly up-regulated expression of cecal IL-10, MIP-1alpha, IP-10, and MIG mRNA compared with that in uninfected females, and expression of IL-10 and MIP-1alpha was significantly greater than that detected in infected male mice (P < or = 0.05). At 3 months after infection, cecal lesion scores were significantly (P < or = 0.05) increased in female and male mice compared with uninfected controls, and infected female mice had significantly (P < or = 0.05) higher cecal lesion scores than did infected male mice. In addition, infected females had significant (P < or = 0.05) increases in cecal IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-10, MIP-1alpha, IP-10, and MIG mRNA values compared with values in uninfected females and infected males

  19. Imaging in acute renal infection in children

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Starshak, R.J.; Schroeder, B.A.

    1987-03-01

    Infection is the most common disease of the urinary tract in children, and various imaging techniques have been used to verify its presence and location. On retrospective analysis, 50 consecutive children with documented upper urinary tract infection had abnormal findings on renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate. The infection involved the renal poles only in 38 and the poles plus other renal cortical areas in eight. Four had abnormalities that spared the poles. Renal sonograms were abnormal in 32 of 50 children. Excretory urograms were abnormal in six of 23 children in whom they were obtained. Vesicoureteral reflux was found in 34 of 40 children in whom voiding cystourethrography was performed. These data show the high sensitivity of renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate in documenting upper urinary tract infection. The location of the abnormalities detected suggests that renal infections spread via an ascending mode and implies that intrarenal reflux is a major contributing factor.

  20. Bacteriocin from epidemic Listeria strains alters the host intestinal microbiota to favor infection

    PubMed Central

    Quereda, Juan J.; Dussurget, Olivier; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Ghozlane, Amine; Volant, Stevenn; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Regnault, Béatrice; Kennedy, Sean; Mondot, Stanislas; Villoing, Barbara; Cossart, Pascale; Pizarro-Cerda, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is responsible for gastroenteritis in healthy individuals and for a severe invasive disease in immunocompromised patients. Among the three identified L. monocytogenes evolutionary lineages, lineage I strains are overrepresented in epidemic listeriosis outbreaks, but the mechanisms underlying the higher virulence potential of strains of this lineage remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that Listeriolysin S (LLS), a virulence factor only present in a subset of lineage I strains, is a bacteriocin highly expressed in the intestine of orally infected mice that alters the host intestinal microbiota and promotes intestinal colonization by L. monocytogenes, as well as deeper organ infection. To our knowledge, these results therefore identify LLS as the first bacteriocin described in L. monocytogenes and associate modulation of host microbiota by L. monocytogenes epidemic strains to increased virulence. PMID:27140611

  1. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Sayyari, A A; Imanzadeh, F; Bagheri Yazdi, S A; Karami, H; Yaghoobi, M

    2005-05-01

    A national survey of the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in the Islamic Republic of Iran was made on a random sample of families covered by local health centres affiliated to the medical universities. Out of 53,995 people aged 2+ years, from 12,495 families (0.1% of all families in 1999), 45,128 stool samples were analysed by formalin-ether precipitation. Intestinal parasitic infections were found in 19.3% of the study population (19.7% male, 19.1% female). Giardia lamblia (10.9%), Ascaris lumbricoides (1.5%), Entamoeba histolytica (1.0%) and Enterobius vermicularis (0.5%) were the most common infections. The infection rate was highest in the 2-14 years age group (25.5%) and in rural residents (23.7%).

  2. Giardia duodenalis infection reduces granulocyte infiltration in an in vivo model of bacterial toxin-induced colitis and attenuates inflammation in human intestinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Cotton, James A; Motta, Jean-Paul; Schenck, L Patrick; Hirota, Simon A; Beck, Paul L; Buret, Andre G

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the development of diarrheal disease and fever. Conversely, separate observations have indicated Giardia infections may enhance the severity of diarrheal disease from a co-infecting pathogen. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils (PMNs) are granulocytic, innate immune cells characteristic of acute intestinal inflammatory responses against bacterial pathogens that contribute to the development of diarrheal disease following recruitment into intestinal tissues. Giardia cathepsin B cysteine proteases have been shown to attenuate PMN chemotaxis towards IL-8/CXCL8, suggesting Giardia targets PMN accumulation. However, the ability of Giardia infections to attenuate PMN accumulation in vivo and how in turn this effect may alter the host inflammatory response in the intestine has yet to be demonstrated. Herein, we report that Giardia infection attenuates granulocyte tissue infiltration induced by intra-rectal instillation of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in an isolate-dependent manner. This attenuation of granulocyte infiltration into colonic tissues paralled decreased expression of several cytokines associated with the recruitment of PMNs. Giardia trophozoite isolates that attenuated granulocyte infiltration in vivo also decreased protein expression of cytokines released from inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues collected from patients with active Crohn's disease, including several cytokines associated with PMN recruitment. These results demonstrate for the first time that certain

  3. Taurine drinking attenuates the burden of intestinal adult worms and muscle larvae in mice with Trichinella spiralis infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan-Rong; Liu, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Jin-Sheng; Ji, Chao-Yue; Qi, Yong-Fen

    2013-10-01

    The parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis can cause trichinellosis, which leads to pathological processes in the intestine and muscle. The intestinal invasion determines the development, subsequent course, and consequences of the disease. Gastrointestinal nematode infection, including with T. spiralis, is accompanied by a rapid and reversible expansion of mucosal mast cell and goblet cell in the intestinal epithelium, which play important roles in the host immune response to parasite and worm expulsion from the intestine. Taurine and its derivatives have anti-infection and anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated whether taurine supplementation in mice could influence the development and pathological processes of infection with T. spiralis. Supplementing 1% taurine in drinking water in mice infected with T. spiralis could alleviate the burden of intestinal adult worms on days 7 and 10 postinfection (all p < 0.01) and the formation of infective muscle larvae in striated muscle during T. spiralis infection (p < 0.01). As compared with T. spiralis infection alone, taurine treatment increased the number of goblet cells on days 7, 10, and 15 (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05) and alleviated intestinal mucosal mast cell hyperplasia on days 10 and 15 (all p < 0.01). So taurine supplementation in drinking water increased infection-induced intestinal goblet cell hyperplasia and ameliorated mucosal mastocytosis. Thus, taurine can ameliorate the pathological processes of trichinellosis and may be of great value for the treatment and prevention of infection with T. spiralis and other gastrointestinal nematodes.

  4. Precision-cut intestinal slices as a culture system to analyze the infection of differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Winter, Christine; Mork, Ann-Kathrin; Amiri, Mahdi; Naim, Hassan Y; Rautenschlein, Silke; Herrler, Georg

    2015-02-01

    Many viruses infect and replicate in their host via the intestinal tract, e.g. many picornaviruses, several coronaviruses and avian influenza viruses of waterfowl. To analyze infection of enterocytes is a challenging task as culture systems for differentiated intestinal epithelial cells are not readily available and often have a life span that is too short for infection studies. Precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) from chicken embryos were prepared and shown that the epithelial cells lining the lumen of the intestine are viable for up to 4 days. Using lectin staining, it was demonstrated that α2,3-linked sialic acids, the preferred receptor determinants of avian influenza viruses, are present on the apical side of the epithelial cells. Furthermore, the epithelial cells (at the tips) of the villi were shown to be susceptible to infection by an avian influenza virus of the H9N2 subtype. This culture system will be useful to analyze virus infection of intestinal epithelial cells and it should be applicable also to the intestine of other species.

  5. Pericardial Tamponade in an Adult Suffering from Acute Mumps Infection

    PubMed Central

    Flieger, Robert Rainer; Mankertz, Annette; Yilmaz, Kadir; Roepke, Torsten Kai

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a case of a 51-year-old man with acute pericardial tamponade requiring emergency pericardiocentesis after he suffered from sore throat, headache, malaise, and sweats for two weeks. Serological analyses revealed increased mumps IgM and IgG indicating an acute mumps infection whereas other bacterial and viral infections were excluded. In addition, MRI revealed atypical swelling of the left submandibular gland. Whereas mumps has become a rare entity in children due to comprehensive vaccination regimens in western civilizations, our case highlights mumps as an important differential diagnosis also in adults, where the virus can induce life-threatening complications such as pericardial tamponade. PMID:27818687

  6. Prostate stem cell antigen gene TT genotype and development of intestinal metaplasia in Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Uotani, Takahiro; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Tomohisa; Graham, David Y.; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Aim Gastric cancer is etiologically related to interactions between Helicobacter pylori infection, environmental, and host factors. Gastric carcinoma is associated with a cascade of increasing atrophic gastric mucosal damage. Prostate stem cell antigen polymorphisms have been associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. Here, we examined the interaction between prostate stem cell antigen polymorphisms and H. pylori in the progression of H. pylori gastritis. Methods Prostate stem cell antigen polymorphisms (TT, TC and CC) among H. pylori infected and uninfected Bhutanese were compared with the severity of H. pylori gastritis (neutrophils, monocytes, atrophy scores, H. pylori density, and the presence and extent of intestinal metaplasia) using the updated Sydney system. Results Biopsies from 339 patients were included. The proportion of biopsies with intestinal metaplasia was also significantly (P<0.05) greater among those with the TT genotype than with either the CT or CC genotype. Despite no significant differences in inflammation or H. pylori density scores, the scores for the premalignant condition, intestinal metaplasia in both the gastric corpus and antrum, among H. pylori infected with the TT genotype was significantly (P <0.05) greater than C allele carriers. Conclusions Prostate stem cell antigen TT genotype was associated with more than a 3-fold increase in the prevalence and extent of gastric mucosal intestinal metaplasia compared to C allele carriers among H. pylori infected Bhutanese. PMID:26706772

  7. Early type I Interferon response induces upregulation of human β-defensin 1 during acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Antonella C.; Körner, Christian; Schiff, Abigail E.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Kwon, Douglas S.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 is able to evade innate antiviral responses during acute infection to establish a chronic systemic infection which, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART), typically progresses to severe immunodeficiency. Understanding these early innate immune responses against HIV-1 and their mechanisms of failure is relevant to the development of interventions to better prevent HIV-1 transmission. Human beta defensins (HBDs) are antibacterial peptides but have recently also been associated with control of viral replication. HBD1 and 2 are expressed in PBMCs as well as intestinal tissue, but their expression in vivo during HIV-1 infection has not been characterized. We demonstrate that during acute HIV-1 infection, HBD1 but not HBD2 is highly upregulated in circulating monocytes but returns to baseline levels during chronic infection. HBD1 expression in monocytes can be induced by HIV-1 in vitro, although direct infection may not entirely account for the increase in HBD1 during acute infection. We provide evidence that HIV-1 triggers antiviral IFN-α responses, which act as a potent inducer of HBD1. Our results show the first characterization of induction of an HBD during acute and chronic viral infection in humans. HBD1 has been reported to have low activity against HIV-1 compared to other defensins, suggesting that in vivo induced defensins may not significantly contribute to the robust early antiviral response against HIV-1. These data provide important insight into the in vivo kinetics of HBD expression, the mechanism of HBD1 induction by HIV-1, and the role of HBDs in the early innate response to HIV-1 during acute infection. PMID:28253319

  8. Molecular Control of Innate Immune Response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection by Intestinal let-7 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daoyong; Wang, Dayong

    2017-01-01

    The microRNA (miRNA) let-7 is an important miRNA identified in Caenorhabditis elegans and has been shown to be involved in the control of innate immunity. The underlying molecular mechanisms for let-7 regulation of innate immunity remain largely unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis for intestinal let-7 in the regulation of innate immunity. Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 decreased let-7::GFP expression. Intestine- or neuron-specific activity of let-7 was required for its function in the regulation of innate immunity. During the control of innate immune response to P. aeruginosa PA14 infection, SDZ-24 was identified as a direct target for intestinal let-7. SDZ-24 was found to be predominantly expressed in the intestine, and P. aeruginosa PA14 infection increased SDZ-24::GFP expression. Intestinal let-7 regulated innate immune response to P. aeruginosa PA14 infection by suppressing both the expression and the function of SDZ-24. Knockout or RNA interference knockdown of sdz-24 dampened the resistance of let-7 mutant to P. aeruginosa PA14 infection. Intestinal overexpression of sdz-24 lacking 3’-UTR inhibited the susceptibility of nematodes overexpressing intestinal let-7 to P. aeruginosa PA14 infection. In contrast, we could observed the effects of intestinal let-7 on innate immunity in P. aeruginosa PA14 infected transgenic strain overexpressing sdz-24 containing 3’-UTR. In the intestine, certain SDZ-24-mediated signaling cascades were formed for nematodes against the P. aeruginosa PA14 infection. Our results highlight the crucial role of intestinal miRNAs in the regulation of the innate immune response to pathogenic infection. PMID:28095464

  9. A matter of timing: early, not chronic phase intestinal nematode infection restrains control of a concurrent enteric protozoan infection.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Sebastian; Held, Josephin; Stange, Joerg; Lendner, Matthias; Hepworth, Matthew R; Klotz, Christian; Lucius, Richard; Pogonka, Thomas; Hartmann, Susanne

    2010-10-01

    Infections with parasitic worms are often long lasting and associated with modulated immune responses. We analyzed the influence of the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri dwelling in the small intestine on concurrent protozoan infection with Eimeria falciformis residing in the cecum. To dissect the effects of a nematode infection in the early versus chronic phase, we infected animals with E. falciformis 6 or 28 days post H. p. bakeri infection. Only a concurrent early nematode infection led to an increased replication of the protozoan parasite, whereas a chronic worm infection had no influence on the control of E. falciformis. Increased protozoan replication correlated with the reduced production of IFN-γ, IL-12/23, CCL4, CXCL9 and CXCL10, reduced migration of T cells and increased expression of Foxp3 at the site of protozoan infection. This was accompanied by a stronger nematode-specific Th2 response in gut-draining LN. Protection of mice against challenge infections with the protozoan parasite was not altered. Hence, the detrimental effect of a nematode infection on the control of a concurrent protozoan infection is transient and occurs only in the narrow time window of the early phase of infection.

  10. Intestinal parasitic infections in Srimum suburban area of Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kitvatanachai, Sirima; Boonslip, Siriphan; Watanasatitarpa, Suphatra

    2008-12-01

    A survey on intestinal parasitic infections and some risk factors of infection (social, economic and behavioral) was conducted in suburban area at Simum subdistrict, Mueang district, Nakhon Ratchasima Province during the period of April 3rd to April 11th, 2007. A total of 214 stool samples, from 85 males and 129 females were examined using simple direct smear, Kato's thick smear and modified Harada-Mori Filter Paper Strip culture technique. The results showed that the prevalence rate of protozoa infections by simple direct smear method was 17.3% (37 infected samples) in 11 males and 26 females and were from all age groups. Mixed infections (56.8%), showed higher results than single infection. The highest number of intestinal protozoan infections was Entamoeba histolytica (11.7%), followed by Blastocystis hominis (5.6%). Fifty four percent of protozoan infection was at a moderate to high level. Ninety five percent of infected cases consumed unboiled water. The prevalence rate of helminthic infections was 7% total by Kato's thick smear and Modified Harada-Mori Filter Paper Strip culture technique. Kato's Thick smear Technique showed the highest rate of Strongyloides stercolaris (2.8%), followed by hookworm infection (1.4%) Taenia spp. (0.9%), and Enterobius vermicularis (0.5%), respectively. All infections showed a light intensity, (< 200 epg), using Kato-Katz thick smear. Although Modified Harada-Mori's culture Technique showed higher S. stercolaris (3.3%) and hookworm infection (2.3%) than Kato's thick smear in the area where there is low Soil transmitted helminthes, we recommend using Simple or Kato's thick smear to determine the prevalence of parasitic infection due to these techniques being able to detect various groups of parasites, and being inexpensive and less time consuming.

  11. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  12. Neutrophil-derived JAML Inhibits Repair of Intestinal Epithelial Injury During Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Dominique A.; Sumagin, Ronen; McCall, Ingrid C.; Leoni, Giovanna; Neumann, Philipp A.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Brazil, Jennifer C.; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Denning, Timothy L.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil transepithelial migration (TEM) during acute inflammation is associated with mucosal injury. Using models of acute mucosal injury in-vitro and in-vivo, we describe a new mechanism by which neutrophils infiltrating the intestinal mucosa disrupt epithelial homeostasis. We report that junctional adhesion molecule-like protein (JAML) is cleaved from neutrophil surface by zinc-metalloproteases during TEM. Neutrophil-derived soluble JAML bound to the epithelial tight junction protein coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) resulting in compromised barrier and inhibition of wound repair, through decreased epithelial proliferation. The deleterious effects of JAML on barrier and wound repair were reversed with an anti-JAML mAb that inhibits JAML-CAR binding. Thus, JAML released from transmigrating neutrophils across inflamed epithelia can promote recruitment of leukocytes and aid in clearance of invading microorganisms. However, sustained release of JAML under pathologic conditions associated with persistence of large numbers of infiltrated neutrophil would compromise intestinal barrier and inhibit mucosal healing. Targeting JAML-CAR interactions may thus improve mucosal healing responses under conditions of dysregulated neutrophil recruitment. PMID:24621992

  13. Kinetics of early cholera infection in the removable intestinal tie-adult rabbit diarrhea model.

    PubMed Central

    Spira, W M; Sack, R B

    1982-01-01

    The colonization of the small intestine of adult rabbits challenged with 5 X 10(7) cells of Vibrio cholerae strain Ogawa 395 has been examined in the removable intestinal tie-adult rabbit diarrhea (RITARD) model. During the first 6 h of infection, numbers of both free and adherent vibrios increased at a rate representing a generation time of about 71 min. Detectable fluid output in response to infection began at about 4 to 5 h postchallenge, and overt diarrhea was observed as early as 11 h. By 8 h after challenge, adherent V. cholerae reached a saturation concentration on the intestinal epithelium of approximately 5 X 10(8) cells per g of intestine, whereas numbers of free cells continued to increase at an exponential rate for at least 12 to 14 h. The concentration of adherent cells remained relatively constant at the saturation level during this period. This saturation level was similar in all parts of the small intestine. The concentration of adherent organisms increased significantly in moribund animals, suggesting that factors responsible for the earlier saturation equilibrium began changing as animals neared death. PMID:7068225

  14. Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) with simultaneous intestinal Giardia sp., Spironucleus sp., and trichomonad infections.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Barbara J; Stockdale Walden, Heather D; Kondo, Hirotaka

    2013-11-01

    A commercial facility producing hamsters with a history of infection by dwarf tapeworm (Hymenolepis nana) submitted 15 animals for necropsy and postmortem parasitological and microscopic examination. No tapeworms were detected grossly or microscopically. Fecal examination including gastrointestinal mucosal smears demonstrated mixed intestinal bacteria and low numbers of Giardia sp. Histologic examination of small intestine demonstrated filling of the small intestinal crypts by large numbers of 7-9 µm × 3 µm, rod to crescent or teardrop-shaped flagellates consistent with Spironucleus sp. These organisms had two 1-µm, basophilic, oval nuclei and multiple superficial flagella-like structures. Much larger 10-15 µm × 8-10 µm, oval to pear-shaped organisms were also present in lower numbers and usually located with the crypts. These larger flagellates had multiple flagella and a basophilic rod-shaped nucleus. The larger flagellates included Giardia sp., which had an intimate interface with the surface of the mucosal epithelium, bilaterally symmetry, and binucleation. Lower numbers of trichomonads were also present and were distinguished by an undulating surface membrane and a single nucleus. The mucosa was hyperplastic and moderately inflamed. Although the tapeworm infection was resolved, diagnosis of multiple intestinal flagellates by fecal examination is complicated by the varying sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of different types of fecal analysis for different flagellate types. Key differences in the morphology and location of the different types of flagellates as observed by histology of intestinal tissues provide important additional diagnostic information to distinguish trichomonads, Spironucleus sp., and Giardia sp.

  15. Intestinal bacterial overgrowth includes potential pathogens in the carbohydrate overload models of equine acute laminitis.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Janet C; Park, Joong-Wook; Prado, Julio; Eades, Susan C; Mirza, Mustajab H; Fugaro, Michael N; Häggblom, Max M; Reinemeyer, Craig R

    2012-10-12

    Carbohydrate overload models of equine acute laminitis are used to study the development of lameness. It is hypothesized that a diet-induced shift in cecal bacterial communities contributes to the development of the pro-inflammatory state that progresses to laminar failure. It is proposed that vasoactive amines, protease activators and endotoxin, all bacterial derived bioactive metabolites, play a role in disease development. Questions regarding the oral bioavailability of many of the bacterial derived bioactive metabolites remain. This study evaluates the possibility that a carbohydrate-induced overgrowth of potentially pathogenic cecal bacteria occurs and that bacterial translocation contributes toward the development of the pro-inflammatory state. Two groups of mixed-breed horses were used, those with laminitis induced by cornstarch (n=6) or oligofructan (n=6) and non-laminitic controls (n=8). Cecal fluid and tissue homogenates of extra-intestinal sites including the laminae were used to enumerate Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Horses that developed Obel grade2 lameness, revealed a significant overgrowth of potentially pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative intestinal bacteria within the cecal fluid. Although colonization of extra-intestinal sites with potentially pathogenic bacteria was not detected, results of this study indicate that cecal/colonic lymphadenopathy and eosinophilia develop in horses progressing to lameness. It is hypothesized that the pro-inflammatory state in carbohydrate overload models of equine acute laminitis is driven by an immune response to the rapid overgrowth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative cecal bacterial communities in the gut. Further equine research is indicated to study the immunological response, involving the lymphatic system that develops in the model.

  16. Effects of p-chlorophenylalanine on the sensitivity of rat intestine to agonists and on intestinal 5-hydroxytryptamine levels during Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, S. G.; Laniyonu, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    Infection of rats with the nematode N. brasiliensis caused non-specific increases in maximum response of isolated intestine to acetylcholine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and a specific subsensitivity to 5-HT. Intestinal levels of 5-HT, measured fluorimetrically, increased approximately 2 fold during infection. Treatment of infected rats with parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA) depleted the gut of 5-HT, and prevented the specific subsensitivity to the amine but not the increases in maximum response. Depletion of intestinal 5-HT did not prevent the immune expulsion of the parasites. It is concluded that the specific subsensitivity of the gut is due to the elevated levels of 5-HT during infection, but that the increased maximum responses are due to some other factor. Further, the lack of effect of PCPA on parasite rejection casts doubt on the proposed role of 5-HT in this process. PMID:6236863

  17. Selective intestinal decontamination for the prevention of early bacterial infections after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Resino, Elena; San-Juan, Rafael; Aguado, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection in the first month after liver transplantation is a frequent complication that poses a serious risk for liver transplant recipients as contributes substantially to increased length of hospitalization and hospital costs being a leading cause of death in this period. Most of these infections are caused by gram-negative bacilli, although gram-positive infections, especially Enterococcus sp. constitute an emerging infectious problem. This high rate of early postoperative infections after liver transplant has generated interest in exploring various prophylactic approaches to surmount this problem. One of these approaches is selective intestinal decontamination (SID). SID is a prophylactic strategy that consists of the administration of antimicrobials with limited anaerobicidal activity in order to reduce the burden of aerobic gram-negative bacteria and/or yeast in the intestinal tract and so prevent infections caused by these organisms. The majority of studies carried out to date have found SID to be effective in the reduction of gram-negative infection, but the effect on overall infection is limited due to a higher number of infection episodes by pathogenic enterococci and coagulase-negative staphylococci. However, difficulties in general extrapolation of the favorable results obtained in specific studies together with the potential risk of selection of multirresistant microorganisms has conditioned controversy about the routinely application of these strategies in liver transplant recipients. PMID:27468189

  18. Migration of epithelial cells in the small intestine of mice perorally infected with coxsackievirus B5.

    PubMed

    Shadoff, N; Loria, R M; Kibrick, S; Broitman, S A

    1979-03-01

    The rate of cell migration in the small intestine during enteric viral infections has not been assessed previously. CD-1 mice (33 days old) were infected perorally with 1.0 X 10(8) plague-forming units of coxsackievirus B5 and 12 hr later were injected intraperitoneally with 2 micron Ci of [3H]thymidine/g of body weight. After 2, 12, 24, 48, 60, and 72 hr, mice were killed, and the small intestine was removed. Specimens obtained at each interval were examined by radioautography; similar specimens were titrated for virus by plaque assay in HeLa cells. In mice perorally infected with coxsackievirus B5, epithelial cells migrated from crypt to villus tip in 60 hr, as compared with 48 hr in uninfected control mice and 24 hr previously reported for mice perorally infected with enteric bacteria (e.g., Salmonella typhimurium). Virus was recovered from intestinal tissue, but no inflammatory response in the limina propria was apparent. These observations are consistent with previous report that substrate absorption rates may be altered during viral and bacterial enteric infection.

  19. Intestinal immune response of Silurus glanis and Barbus barbus naturally infected with Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala).

    PubMed

    Dezfuli, B S; Castaldelli, G; Bo, T; Lorenzoni, M; Giari, L

    2011-02-01

    Immunopathological and ultrastructural studies were conducted on the intestine of barbel Barbus barbus and sheatfish Silurus glanis that were naturally infected with the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus laevis. Enteric helminths often cause inflammation of the digestive tract, inducing the recruitment of different types of immune cells at the site of infection. The results of our study clearly demonstrated that mast cells (MC) were the dominant immune cells which occur at the site of inflammation in both hosts. MC were associated with fibroblasts and were found in close proximity to, and inside, the capillaries of the intestine, thus, migration of mast cells via the bloodstream was suggested. Significant degranulation of MC was present. Immunohistochemical staining revealed met-enkephalin and serotonin (5-HT) in intestinal MC of both uninfected and infected barbel and the absence of the antimicrobial peptides piscidin 3 and piscidin 4 in both species. Data are discussed with respect to host immune response to an intestinal helminth and compared with other host-parasite systems.

  20. A cross-sectional study on intestinal parasitic infections in rural communities, northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Boonmars, Thidarut; Kaewsamut, Butsara; Ekobol, Nuttapon; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Wonkchalee, Nadchanan; Juasook, Amornrat; Sriraj, Pranee

    2013-12-01

    Despite the existence of effective anthelmintics, parasitic infections remain a major public health problem in Southeast Asia, including Thailand. In rural communities, continuing infection is often reinforced by dietary habits that have a strong cultural basis and by poor personal hygiene and sanitation. This study presents a survey of the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among the people in rural Thailand. The community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in villages in Khon Kaen Province, northeastern Thailand, from March to August 2013. A total of 253 stool samples from 102 males and 140 females, aged 2-80 years, were prepared using formalin-ethyl acetate concentration methods and examined using light microscopy. Ninety-four individuals (37.2%) were infected with 1 or more parasite species. Presence of parasitic infection was significantly correlated with gender (P=0.001); nearly half of males in this survey (49.0%) were infected. Older people had a higher prevalence than younger members of the population. The most common parasite found was Opisthorchis viverrini (26.9%), followed by Strongyloides stercoralis (9.5%), Taenia spp. (1.6%), echinostomes (0.4%), and hookworms (0.4%). The prevalence of intestinal protozoa was Blastocystis hominis 1.6%, Entamoeba histolytica 0.8%, Entamoeba coli 0.8%, Balantidium coli 0.4%, Iodamoeba bütschlii 0.4%, and Sarcocystis hominis 0.4%. Co-infections of various helminths and protozoa were present in 15.9% of the people. The present results show that the prevalence of parasitic infections in this region is still high. Proactive education about dietary habits, personal hygiene, and sanitation should be provided to the people in this community to reduce the prevalence of intestinal parasite infections. Moreover, development of policies and programs to control parasites is needed.

  1. Immunoregulatory role of intestinal surfactant-like particles during Salmonella typhimurium infection

    PubMed Central

    Sofi, M. Hanief; Bhatnagar, Archana; Sapra, Saveeta; Mahmood, Akhtar; Majumdar, Sidhartha

    2007-01-01

    Surfactants like particles (SLP) are secreted by Intestinal epithelium. These particles have the ability to lower surface tension of intestinal epithelial cells and contain small amounts of surfactant specific proteins A, B, and D. In the intestinal lumen they are known to function as lubricants and/or as a vehicle to deliver digestive enzymes to the luminal fluid. These particles have been found to have the ability in binding of uropathogenic E.coli. But their immunological function is not known. The present study was designed to assess the role of the SLP in the regulation of immune response during Salmonella (S) typhimurium infection using a rat an enteric model. The animals were divided in four different groups including control (PBS), rats fed fat diet (corn oil), rats fed fat diet followed with S. typhimurium infection and rats with S. typhimurium infection alone. The Peyer's patches (PP), intraepithelial (IE) and lamina propria (LP) mononuclear cells were isolated from the above-mentioned groups. These mononuclear cells were then incubated in presence of S. typhimurium lysate alone, SLP alone and S. typhimurium lysate and SLP together. T cell markers CD4 and CD8, cytokines mainly pro-inflammatory ones including IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12 etc were studied under such conditions. In addition histological studies were also carried out under these conditions. We report in this study that SLP plays an important role in modulating the cytokine level during infection. The pro-inflammatory cytokines were found significantly reduced in SLP induced diet along with the infection group compared to the infection group alone. Histopathological studies revealed the breakdown of duodenal villi after infection while only broadening of villi was observed in rats given corn oil induced SLP along with infection. These results suggested an important immuno-modulatory role for SLP during Salmonella infection. PMID:18026566

  2. Borrelia crocidurae infection in acutely febrile patients, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Mediannikov, Oleg; Socolovschi, Cristina; Bassene, Hubert; Diatta, Georges; Ratmanov, Pavel; Fenollar, Florence; Sokhna, Cheikh; Raoult, Didier

    2014-08-01

    As malaria cases in Africa decline, other causes of acute febrile illness are being explored. To determine incidence of Borrelia crocidurae infection during June 2010-October 2011, we collected 1,566 blood specimens from febrile patients in Senegal. Incidence was high (7.3%). New treatment strategies, possibly doxycycline, might be indicated for febrile patients.

  3. Massive Hemolysis Causing Renal Failure in Acute Hepatitis E Infection

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pragya; Malik, Sarthak; Mallick, Bipadabhanjan; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute viral hepatitis is usually a self-limiting illness. However, it can lead to complications that can be life-threatening, such as acute liver failure. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the setting of acute viral hepatitis can lead to a massive hemolysis, manifesting as acute kidney injury and markedly raised bilirubin levels; although cases are rare. Here, we report such a case. The patient had a viral hepatitis E infection and presented with kidney injury requiring dialysis. Examination showed very high mixed hyperbilirubinemia due to massive intravascular hemolysis. The patient experienced a long, protracted course of illness, requiring renal replacement therapy with other supportive management, which led to improvement over a period of four weeks. This case highlights the importance of recognizing associated hemolysis in a patient with viral hepatitis who presents with very high bilirubin levels or associated kidney injury. Such patients will require aggressive supportive care with prompt fluid and electrolyte management. PMID:28097104

  4. Chronic Trichuris muris Infection Decreases Diversity of the Intestinal Microbiota and Concomitantly Increases the Abundance of Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Kiilerich, Pia; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Estellé, Jordi; Ma, Tao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Svensson-Frej, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance of the immune system. In line with this, the prevalence of persistent worm infections is inversely correlated with the incidence of immune-associated diseases, prompting the use of controlled parasite infections for therapeutic purposes. Despite this, the impact of parasite infection on the intestinal microbiota, as well as potential downstream effects on the immune system, remain largely unknown. We have assessed the influence of chronic infection with the large-intestinal nematode Trichuris muris, a close relative of the human pathogen Trichuris trichiura, on the composition of the murine intestinal microbiota by 16S ribosomal-RNA gene-based sequencing. Our results demonstrate that persistent T. muris infection dramatically affects the large-intestinal microbiota, most notably with a drop in the diversity of bacterial communities, as well as a marked increase in the relative abundance of the Lactobacillus genus. In parallel, chronic T. muris infection resulted in a significant shift in the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cells in the intestinal adaptive immune system, in favour of inflammatory cells. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic parasite infection strongly influences the intestinal microbiota and the adaptive immune system. Our results illustrate the complex interactions between these factors in the intestinal tract, and contribute to furthering the understanding of this interplay, which is of crucial importance considering that 500 million people globally are suffering from these infections and their potential use for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25942314

  5. L-Glutamine and L-arginine protect against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection via intestinal innate immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Ren, Wenkai; Fang, Jun; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Guan, Guiping; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Yin, Jie; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Chen, Shuai; Peng, Yuanyi; Yin, Yulong

    2017-03-15

    Dietary glutamine (Gln) or arginine (Arg) supplementation is beneficial for intestinal health; however, whether Gln or Arg may confer protection against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is not known. To address this, we used an ETEC-infected murine model to investigate the protective effects of Gln and Arg. Experimentally, we pre-treated mice with designed diet of Gln or Arg supplementation prior to the oral ETEC infection and then assessed mouse mortality and intestinal bacterial burden. We also determined the markers of intestinal innate immunity in treated mice, including secretory IgA response (SIgA), mucins from goblet cells, as well as antimicrobial peptides from Paneth cells. ETEC colonized in mouse small intestine, including duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, and inhibited the mRNA expression of intestinal immune factors, such as polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), cryptdin-related sequence 1C (CRS1C), and Reg3γ. We found that dietary Gln or Arg supplementation decreased bacterial colonization and promoted the activation of innate immunity (e.g., the mRNA expression of pIgR, CRS1C, and Reg3γ) in the intestine of ETEC-infected mice. Our results suggest that dietary arginine or glutamine supplementation may inhibit intestinal ETEC infection through intestinal innate immunity.

  6. Nasopharyngeal Protein Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Burke, Thomas W; Henao, Ricardo; Soderblom, Erik; Tsalik, Ephraim L; Thompson, J Will; McClain, Micah T; Nichols, Marshall; Nicholson, Bradly P; Veldman, Timothy; Lucas, Joseph E; Moseley, M Arthur; Turner, Ronald B; Lambkin-Williams, Robert; Hero, Alfred O; Woods, Christopher W; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2017-02-21

    Infection of respiratory mucosa with viral pathogens triggers complex immunologic events in the affected host. We sought to characterize this response through proteomic analysis of nasopharyngeal lavage in human subjects experimentally challenged with influenza A/H3N2 or human rhinovirus, and to develop targeted assays measuring peptides involved in this host response allowing classification of acute respiratory virus infection. Unbiased proteomic discovery analysis identified 3285 peptides corresponding to 438 unique proteins, and revealed that infection with H3N2 induces significant alterations in protein expression. These include proteins involved in acute inflammatory response, innate immune response, and the complement cascade. These data provide insights into the nature of the biological response to viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, and the proteins that are dysregulated by viral infection form the basis of signature that accurately classifies the infected state. Verification of this signature using targeted mass spectrometry in independent cohorts of subjects challenged with influenza or rhinovirus demonstrates that it performs with high accuracy (0.8623 AUROC, 75% TPR, 97.46% TNR). With further development as a clinical diagnostic, this signature may have utility in rapid screening for emerging infections, avoidance of inappropriate antibacterial therapy, and more rapid implementation of appropriate therapeutic and public health strategies.

  7. Overexpressed miRNA-155 dysregulates intestinal epithelial apical junctional complex in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Rui; Wang, Rui-Lan; Xie, Hui; Jin, Wei; Yu, Kang-Long

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether miRNA-155 (miR-155) dysregulates apical junctional complex (AJC) protein expression in experimental severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Twenty-four male BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to two groups: the SAP group (n = 12) receiving sequential intraperitoneal injection of 50 µg/kg caerulein and 10 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide over 6 h, and the control group (n = 12) receiving intraperitoneal injection of normal saline. Animals were sacrificed 3 h following the last injection for collection of blood samples and pancreas and distal ileal segment specimens. Routine pancreas and intestine histology was used to assess SAP pathology and intestinal epithelial barrier damage. Levels of serum amylase, diamine oxidase (DAO), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were determined using commercial kits. Total RNA samples were isolated from intestinal epithelial specimens and reversely transcribed into cDNA. miR-155 and RhoA mRNA expression profiles were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Target genes for miR-155 were predicted using the miRTarBase database, RNA22 and PicTar computational methods. Western blotting was performed to quantitate the protein expression levels of the target gene RhoA, as well as zonula occludens (ZO)-1 and E-cadherin, two AJC component proteins. RESULTS: Intraperitoneal injection of caerulein and lipopolysaccharide successfully induced experimental acute pancreatic damage (SAP vs control, 10.0 ± 2.0 vs 3.2 ± 1.2, P < 0.01) and intestinal epithelial barrier damage (3.2 ± 0.7 vs 1.4 ± 0.7, P < 0.01). Levels of serum amylase (21.6 ± 5.1 U/mL vs 14.3 ± 4.2 U/mL, P < 0.01), DAO (21.4 ± 4.1 mg/mL vs 2.6 ± 0.8 mg/mL, P < 0.01), and TNF-α (61.0 ± 15.1 ng/mL vs 42.9 ± 13.9 ng/mL, P < 0.01) increased significantly in SAP mice compared to those in control mice. miR-155 was significantly overexpressed in SAP intestinal epithelia (1.94 ± 0.50 fold vs 1.03 ± 0.23 fold, P < 0.01), and Rho

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in acute canine distemper virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bathen-Noethen, A; Stein, V M; Puff, C; Baumgaertner, W; Tipold, A

    2008-09-01

    Demyelination is the prominent histopathological hallmark in the acute stage of canine distemper virus infection. Magnetic resonance imaging is an important diagnostic tool in human beings to determine demyelination in the brain, for example in multiple sclerosis. Five young dogs with clinically suspected canine distemper virus infection were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Hyperintense lesions and loss of contrast between grey and white matter were detected in T2-weighted images in the cerebellum and/or in the brainstem of three dogs, which correlated with demyelination demonstrated in histopathological examination. Furthermore, increased signal intensities in T2-weighted images were seen in the temporal lobe of four dogs with no evidence of demyelination. Magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a sensitive tool for the visualisation of in vivo myelination defects in dogs with acute canine distemper virus infection. Postictal oedema and accumulation of antigen positive cells have to be considered an important differential diagnosis.

  9. Differential Regulation of Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Macrophages in Response to Intestinal Parasite Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mei Xing; Png, Chin Wen; Tay, Crispina Yan Bing; Teo, Joshua Ding Wei; Jiao, Huipeng; Lehming, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis is a common enteric protistan parasite that can cause acute, as well as chronic, infection and is associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, the pathogenic status of Blastocystis infection remains unclear. In this study, we found that Blastocystis antigens induced abundant expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in mouse intestinal explants, in mouse colitis colon, and in macrophages. Further investigation utilizing RAW264.7 murine macrophages showed that Blastocystis treatment in RAW264.7 macrophages induced the activation of ERK, JNK, and p38, the three major groups of mammalian mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases that play essential roles in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. ERK inhibition in macrophages significantly suppressed both mRNA and protein expression of IL-6 and TNF-α and mRNA expression of IL-1β. On the other hand, JNK inhibition resulted in reductions in both c-Jun and ERK activation and significant suppression of all three proinflammatory cytokines at both the mRNA and protein levels. Inhibition of p38 suppressed only IL-6 protein expression with no effect on the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α. Furthermore, we found that serine proteases produced by Blastocystis play an important role in the induction of ERK activation and proinflammatory cytokine expression by macrophages. Our study thus demonstrated for the first time that Blastocystis could induce the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines via the activation of MAP kinases and that infection with Blastocystis may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory intestinal diseases through the activation of inflammatory pathways in host immune cells, such as macrophages. PMID:25156742

  10. Motile invaded neutrophils in the small intestine of Toxoplasma gondii-infected mice reveal a potential mechanism for parasite spread

    PubMed Central

    Coombes, Janine L.; Charsar, Brittany A.; Han, Seong-Ji; Halkias, Joanna; Chan, Shiao Wei; Koshy, Anita A.; Striepen, Boris; Robey, Ellen A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection occurs through the oral route, but we lack important information about how the parasite interacts with the host immune system in the intestine. We used two-photon laser-scanning microscopy in conjunction with a mouse model of oral T. gondii infection to address this issue. T. gondii established discrete foci of infection in the small intestine, eliciting the recruitment and transepithelial migration of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. Neutrophils accounted for a high proportion of actively invaded cells, and we provide evidence for a role for transmigrating neutrophils and other immune cells in the spread of T. gondii infection through the lumen of the intestine. Our data identify neutrophils as motile reservoirs of T. gondii infection and suggest a surprising retrograde pathway for parasite spread in the intestine. PMID:23650399

  11. Eimeria tenella infection induces local gamma interferon production and intestinal lymphocyte subpopulation changes.

    PubMed

    Yun, C H; Lillehoj, H S; Choi, K D

    2000-03-01

    The role of intestinal lymphocytes and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production in protective immunity to Eimeria tenella infection was evaluated in two inbred strains of chickens (SC and TK) that display different patterns of susceptibility to coccidiosis. Oral inoculation of either strain with E. tenella led to parasite invasion of the intestinal cecum and cecal tonsils. Greater fecal oocyst shedding was seen in TK chickens. Flow cytometric analyses of cecal tonsil lymphocytes demonstrated greater numbers of CD4(+) and T-cell receptor gammadelta-positive (TCR1(+)) cells in SC chickens and elevated numbers of CD8(+) and TCR2(+) cells in TK chickens following primary infection. IFN-gamma mRNA expression was significantly increased in cecal tonsil and intraepithelial lymphocytes at days 6 and 8, respectively, after primary infection in SC compared to TK chickens. While no differences were noted between cecal tonsil lymphocytes of the two strains following secondary infection, TK chickens showed elevated IFN-gamma transcript levels in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes at this time. Selective depletion of CD4(+), but not CD8(+), cecal tonsil lymphocytes in SC chickens resulted in a reduced IFN-gamma mRNA expression, indicating that CD4(+) cells are the primary source of this cytokine. Collectively, these results indicate that local lymphocyte responses and production of IFN-gamma are influenced by host genetic factors.

  12. Cryptosporidiosis and other intestinal protozoan infections in children less than one year of age in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vega, José T; Tay-Zavala, Jorge; Aguilar-Chiu, Artemisa; Ruiz-Sánchez, Dora; Malagón, Filiberto; Rodríguez-Covarrubias, José A; Ordóñez-Martínez, Javier; Calderón-Romero, Leticia

    2006-12-01

    Parasitic diseases are very important in Mexico because of their economic impact and adverse effects on normal growth in children. Cryptosporidiosis has been associated with acute diarrhea in immune competent and incompetent human hosts, fecal contamination of drinking water sources, and handling of animals. Due to the lack of reports on cryptosporidiosis in Mexico, we conducted a parasitologic study in children with diarrhea and other clinical symptoms. The main objectives were 1) to determine the prevalence of cryptosporidiosis in children less than one year of age in Mexico City, and 2) to correlate Cryptosporidium infection with gastrointestinal symptoms. Two hundred fecal samples from children seen at the Gabriel Mancera Familiar Medicine Unit of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social were studied. Children were divided into two groups. Group A was composed of sick children with 6-8 watery diarrheic episodes every 24 hours attended at the emergency service. Group B was composed of healthy babies getting routine check ups. Only children in group A were found to be infected with intestinal protozoa (50% with Giardia lamblia, 41% with Cryptosporidium spp., and 4% with Entamoeba histolytica). The results suggested a high incidence of Cyrptosporidium infections in children in Mexico City, which make these observations useful for future studies.

  13. Intestinal Parasite Infections in Symptomatic Children Attending Hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Catrin E.; Nget, Phot; Saroeun, Mao; Kuong, Suy; Chanthou, Seng; Kumar, Varun; Bousfield, Rachel; Nader, Johanna; Bailey, J. Wendi; Beeching, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections with helminths and other intestinal parasites are an important but neglected problem in children in developing countries. Accurate surveys of intestinal parasites in children inform empirical treatment regimens and can assess the impact of school based drug treatment programmes. There is limited information on this topic in Cambodia. Methods In a prospective study of intestinal parasites in symptomatic children attending Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia, April-June 2012, samples were examined by microscopy of a direct and concentrated fecal sample. Two culture methods for hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were employed when sufficient sample was received. Demographic, clinical and epidemiological data were collected. Principal Findings We studied 970 samples from 865 children. The median (inter-quartile range) age of the children was 5.4 (1.9-9.2) years, 54% were male. The proportion of children with abdominal pain was 66.8%, diarrhea 34.9%, anemia 12.7% and malnutrition 7.4%. 458 parasitic infections were detected in 340 (39.3%) children. The most common parasites using all methods of detection were hookworm (14.3%), Strongyloides stercoralis (11.6%) and Giardia lamblia (11.2%). Giardia lamblia was most common in children aged 1-5 years, hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were more common with increasing age. Hookworm, Strongloides stercoralis and Giardia lamblia were more common in children living outside of Siem Reap town. In a multivariate logistic regression increasing age was associated with all three infections, defecating in the forest for hookworm infection, the presence of cattle for S. stercoralis and not using soap for handwashing for G. lamblia. Conclusions/Significance This study confirms the importance of intestinal parasitic infections in symptomatic Cambodian children and the need for adequate facilities for laboratory diagnosis together with education to improve personal hygiene and sanitation. PMID

  14. Intestinal and hepatobiliary diseases in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J D; Winter, H S

    1995-03-01

    Children with HIV disease and gastrointestinal disease should be evaluated for enteric pathogens. Bacterial, protozoal, and viral agents can cause chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and contribute to growth retardation. This article presents an approach to the evaluation of the HIV-infected child with gastrointestinal symptoms. Therapeutic and nutritional interventions are discussed with emphasis on the multidisciplinary approach required to initiate successful management.

  15. Infection by Intestinal Parasites, Stunting and Anemia in School-Aged Children from Southern Angola

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Dinamene; Atouguia, Jorge; Fortes, Filomeno; Guerra, António

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal parasites are responsible for morbidity in children worldwide, especially in low income countries. In the present study we determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites and explore its association with anemia and stunting in school-aged children. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from September to October 2010 enrolling 328 children attending the primary school in Lubango, the second largest city after the capital Luanda. Stool samples were collected for parasite detection through microscopy and molecular identification of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar. Stunting was assessed using the z-scores of height for age and hemoglobin concentration was determined using a portable hemoglobin analyzing system. Results The global prevalence of pathogenic intestinal parasites was 44.2%, the most common being Ascaris lumbricoides (22.0%), Giardia lamblia (20.1%) and Hymenolepis nana (8.8%). Molecular detection revealed that 13.1% of the children carried E. dispar and 0.3% were infected with E. histolytica. The prevalence of stunting (mild to severe) was 41.5%. Stunting was more frequent in older children (p = 0.006, OR = 1.886), while anemia was more frequent in younger children (p = 0.005, OR = 2.210). The prevalence of anemia was 21.6%, and we found a significant association with infection by H. nana (p = 0.031, OR = 2.449). Conclusions This is one of the few published studies reporting intestinal parasites infection, nutritional status and anemia in children from Angola. Furthermore, the present work highlights the importance of regular intestinal parasites screening in children. PMID:26371758

  16. Intestinal protozoan infections in relation to nutritional status and gastrointestinal morbidity in Colombian school children.

    PubMed

    Boeke, Caroline E; Mora-Plazas, Mercedes; Forero, Yibby; Villamor, Eduardo

    2010-10-01

    While Giardia duodenalis infection has been consistently associated with nutrient malabsorption and stunting in children, the effects of other protozoans on nutritional status or gastrointestinal morbidity are less clear. We sought to determine whether infection with common intestinal protozoans including Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba coli and Blastocystis hominis was associated with anthropometric and micronutrient status, gastrointestinal symptoms, visits to the doctor or school absenteeism in children 5-12 years of age from Bogotá, Colombia. We obtained stool samples from 442 children enrolled in primary schools in 2006 and examined the presence of intestinal protozoans in relation to height, body mass index, plasma concentrations of vitamins A and B12, ferritin and zinc and erythrocyte folate. In addition, we examined the associations between protozoan infections and the incidence of common gastrointestinal symptoms, which were registered prospectively in morbidity diaries. The prevalence rates of G. duodenalis, E. coli and B. hominis infection were 6.3, 23.1 and 22.4%, respectively. Giardia infection was associated with lower height-for-age z-score (p = 0.04), whereas E. coli infection was associated with low erythrocyte folate (p = 0.04), and B. hominis infection was related to higher vitamin A levels (p = 0.05). Infection with E. coli was also associated with a significantly higher incidence of fever but fewer visits to the doctor, while B. hominis infection was associated with significantly less diarrhea, diarrhea with vomiting, doctor visits and school absenteeism. In conclusion, G. duodenalis and E. coli infections were associated with indicators of poor nutritional status in this population, while B. hominis was related to apparently decreased morbidity.

  17. Plasma albumin concentrations and intestinal permeability in Bangladeshi children infected with Ascaris lumbricoides.

    PubMed

    Northrop, C A; Lunn, P G; Wainwright, M; Evans, J

    1987-01-01

    Plasma albumin concentration and intestinal permeability have been investigated in Bangladeshi children before and 9-14 d after successful treatment for ascariasis. Children infected with A. lumbricoides had lower plasma albumin concentrations than counterparts not harbouring this worm and values increased with successful treatment. Intestinal permeability tests indicated that the children had impaired gastrointestinal function and some loss of mucosal integrity; these factors had not improved 9-14 d after A. lumbricoides expulsion. The lowered nitrogen nutritional status implied by the reduced plasma albumin values in infected children, and the improvement following treatment, are in keeping with previous reports that A. lumbricoides impairs protein digestion or absorption. This may be the basis of the better growth rates of dewormed children in this area.

  18. Mycophenolate mofetil toxicity mimicking acute cellular rejection in a small intestinal transplant

    PubMed Central

    Apostolov, Ross; Asadi, Khashayar; Lokan, Julie; Kam, Ning; Testro, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an important medication used for maintenance immunosuppression in solid organ transplants. A common gastrointestinal (GI) side effect of MMF is enterocolitis, which has been associated with multiple histological features. There is little data in the literature describing the histological effects of MMF in small intestinal transplant (SIT) recipients. We present a case of MMF toxicity in a SIT recipient, with histological changes in the donor ileum mimicking persistent acute cellular rejection (ACR). Concurrent biopsies of the patient’s native colon showed similar changes to those from the donor small bowel, suggesting a non-graft specific process, raising suspicion for MMF toxicity. The MMF was discontinued and complete resolution of these changes occurred over three weeks. MMF toxicity should therefore be considered as a differential diagnosis for ACR and graft-versus-host disease in SITs. PMID:28280702

  19. Protective effects of seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils against radiation-induced acute intestinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Lan; Lu, Yan; Ji, Yue; Wang, Yaqing; Dong, Ke; Kong, Xiangqing; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, including nausea, diarrhea and dehydration, contributes to morbidity and mortality after medical or industrial radiation exposure. No safe and effective radiation countermeasure has been approved for clinical therapy. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils against radiation-induced acute intestinal injury. C57/BL6 mice were orally administered seabuckthorn pulp oil, seed oil and control olive oil once per day for 7 days before exposure to total-body X-ray irradiation of 7.5 Gy. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used for the measurement of apoptotic cells and proteins, inflammation factors and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Seabuckthorn oil pretreatment increased the post-radiation survival rate and reduced the damage area of the small intestine villi. Both the pulp and seed oil treatment significantly decreased the apoptotic cell numbers and cleaved caspase 3 expression. Seabuckthorn oil downregulated the mRNA level of inflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. Both the pulp and seed oils elevated the level of phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and reduced the levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38. Palmitoleic acid (PLA) and alpha linolenic acid (ALA) are the predominant components of pulp oil and seed oil, respectively. Pretreatment with PLA and ALA increased the post-radiation survival time. In conclusion, seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils protect against mouse intestinal injury from high-dose radiation by reducing cell apoptosis and inflammation. ALA and PLA are promising natural radiation countermeasure candidates. PMID:27422938

  20. Differential expression and regulation of ADAM17 and TIMP3 in acute inflamed intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Annabelle; Abakar-Mahamat, Abakar; Brest, Patrick; Lassalle, Sandra; Selva, Eric; Filippi, Jérôme; Hébuterne, Xavier; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Doglio, Alain; Galland, Franck; Naquet, Philippe; Vouret-Craviari, Valérie; Mograbi, Baharia; Hofman, Paul M

    2009-06-01

    The acute phase of Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by a large afflux of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) into the mucosa and by the release of TNF-alpha. Conversion of inactive TNF-alpha into an active form requires the cleavage of a transmembrane TNF-alpha precursor by the TNF-alpha-converting enzyme (ADAM17), a protease mainly regulated by the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3). The aim of the present study was to investigate in an in vitro model of PMNL transepithelial migration and in the intestinal mucosa of patients with CD the expression and regulation of ADAM17 and TIMP3 in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). ADAM17 and TIMP3 expression was analyzed by Western blotting, RT-PCR, confocal microscopy, and immunohistochemistry by using the T84 model and digestive biopsies. ADAM17 expression in IEC was increased at a posttranscriptional level during the early phase (from 2 to 4 h) of PMNL transepithelial migration whereas TIMP3 was only increased 24 h later. TNF-alpha induced an early upregulation of ADAM17 in T84 cells, whereas PMNL adhesion, H(2)O(2), or epithelial tight junction opening alone did not affect the amount of ADAM17. Immunohistochemistry of intestinal biopsies revealed that strong expression of ADAM17 was associated with a high activity of CD. In contrast, TIMP3 was very poorly expressed in these biopsies. ADAM17 and TIMP3 profiling did not correlated with the NOD2/CARD15 status. The ADAM17 activity was higher both in the early phase of PMNL transepithelial migration and in active CD. These results showed early posttranscriptional upregulation of ADAM17 in IEC linked to PMNL transepithelial migration and a high activity of CD.

  1. PPARγ Agonists as an Anti-Inflammatory Treatment Inhibiting Rotavirus Infection of Small Intestinal Villi

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Dory; Muñoz, Natalia; Guerrero, Rafael; Acosta, Orlando; Guerrero, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus infection has been reported to induce an inflammatory response in the host cell accompanied by the increased expression or activation of some cellular molecules including ROS, NF-κB, and COX-2. PPARγ stimulation and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment have been found to interfere with viral infections including rotavirus infection. Small intestinal villi isolated from in vivo infected mice with rotavirus ECwt were analyzed for the percentage of ECwt-infected cells, the presence of rotavirus antigens, and infectious virion yield following treatment with pioglitazone. Isolated villi were also infected in vitro and treated with PPARγ agonists (PGZ, TZD, RGZ, DHA, and ALA), all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), and NAC. After treatments, the expression of cellular proteins including PPARγ, NF-κB, PDI, Hsc70, and COX-2 was analyzed using immunochemistry, ELISA, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting. The results showed that rotavirus infection led to an increased accumulation of the cellular proteins studied and ROS. The virus infection-induced accumulation of the cellular proteins studied and ROS was reduced upon pioglitazone treatment, causing also a concomitant reduction of the infectious virion yield. We hypothesized that rotavirus infection is benefiting from the induction of a host cell proinflammatory response and that the interference of the inflammatory pathways involved leads to decreased infection. PMID:27382365

  2. Acute lupus pneumonitis followed by intestinal pseudo-obstruction in systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report

    PubMed Central

    JI, CAIHONG; YU, XING; WANG, YONG; SHI, LUFENG

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IpsO) and acute lupus pneumonitis (ALP) are uncommon severe complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study reports the case of a 26-year-old female who presented with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting as initial symptoms. Computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed the jejunal wall was thickened and streaky, mimicking the presentation of intestinal obstruction. Following emergency surgery, the patient's general condition was aggravated, with evident limb erythematous rashes. A series of laboratory examinations revealed SLE, and combined with patient's medical history IpsO was diagnosed, with a disease Activity Index score of 10. During the therapeutic period, high fever, dyspnea and oxygen saturation (SaO2) reductions were detected, and CT scans indicated lung infiltration, excluding other causes through a comprehensive infectious work-up and a bronchoalveolar lavage examination. ALP was confirmed and treated with high-dose methylprednisolone and gamma globulin supplement. The patient responded well and was discharged in 2 weeks. In the one-year tapering period and after stopping corticosteroids, the patient recovered well with no relapse detected. In conclusion, the manifestation of IpsO in SLE is rare and represents a challenge for the surgeon to establish the correct diagnosis and avoid inappropriate surgical intervention. ALP may be the consequence of emergency surgery, and immediate high-dose glucocorticoid therapy is recommended. PMID:27347044

  3. The role of selenium in intestinal motility and morphology in a murine model of Typanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Andréa Pereira; Sieberg, Ryan; Li, Hua; Cahill, Hannah R.; Zhao, Dazhi; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2010-01-01

    Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi causes mega-syndromes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in humans and animals. In the present study, we employed magnetic resonance imaging to non-invasively monitor the effect of selenium supplementation on alterations in the GI tract of T. cruzi-infected mice. CD1 mice infected with T. cruzi (Brazil strain) exhibited dilatation of the intestines similar to that we recently reported in infected C57Bl/6 mice. The average intestine lumen diameter increased by 65% and the increase was reduced to 29% in mice supplemented with 2 ppm selenium in the drinking water. When supplemented with 3 ppm selenium in chow the lumen diameter was also significantly reduced although the difference between the infected and infected supplemented mice was smaller. Intestinal motility in infected mice fed with selenium-enriched chow was increased compared with infected mice fed with normal unsupplemented chow and was not significantly different from intestinal motility in uninfected mice. We suggest that Se may be used to modulate the inflammatory, immunological, and/or antioxidant responses involved in intestinal disturbances caused by T. cruzi infection. PMID:20195635

  4. [Prevalence of microsporidia and other intestinal parasites in patients with HIV infection, Bogota, 2001].

    PubMed

    Flórez, Astrid Carolina; García, Dabeiba Adriana; Moncada, Ligia; Beltrán, Mauricio

    2003-09-01

    Opportunistic intestinal parasites are a common cause of diarrhea in HIV-infected patients. To determine the prevalence of microsporidia and other opportunistic parasites infecting HIV patients in Bogotá, Colombia, 115 patients were examined for these infections during the year 2001. The institution and the sample percent from each are as follows: Santa Clara Hospital, 33.0%; San Pedro Claver, 20.0%; Simón Bolívar Hospital, 14.8%; San José Hospital, 13.9%; Central de la Policía Hospital, 6.1%; Compensar, 5.2%; Colombian League against AIDS, 2.6%; San Ignacio Hospital, 2.6%, and the Military Hospital, 1.7%. The average patient age was 36 years, with a range from 18 to 71 years. Patients with complaint of gastrointestinal symptoms were asked to provide two consecutive stool samples. The samples were concentrated in formalin-ether and examined microscopically for intestinal coccidian parasites by direct wet slide mounts. The prevalence of intestinal opportunistic parasites was 10.4% for Cryptosporidium sp. Initially, 29% of the samples were found to be positive for microsporidian spores using a modified Ziehl Neelsen chromotrope stain, but only 3.5% of them were confirmed as positive when a calcofluor/Gram chromotrope stain was used. The general prevalence of intestinal parasites was 59.1%. The most frequently found pathogens were Blastocystis hominis, 25.2%, and Entamoeba histolytica, 13%. In other studies with HIV patients in Colombia, lower prevalences of Cryptosporidium sp. infection were observed.

  5. Cytokine response in the intestinal mucosa of hamsters infected with Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Avila, Guillermina; Aguilar, Laura; Romero-Valdovinos, Mirza; Garcia-Vazquez, Francisco; Flisser, Ana

    2008-12-01

    Taenia solium grows in experimentally infected hamsters. An inflammatory reaction in the intestinal mucosa surrounding the scolex of the worms is produced. We searched for mRNA of Th1 and Th2 cytokines by in situ hybridization in intestinal biopsies. Hamsters were infected with T. solium cysticerci and necropsied on different days post infection (d.p.i.). Tissue from the small intestine was taken from the area surrounding the tapeworm scolex, fixed, and processed for histology. Antisense probes for the detection of interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-13 were used. Kinetics of each cytokine was defined through detection on specific mRNA by counting the number of positive infected hamsters and of positive cells per 100 enterocytes on different d.p.i. IFN-gamma was detected as of d.p.i. 2; all animals were positive on d.p.i. 4 and 8; and on d.p.i. 16, only 20% were still positive. IL-13 had a pattern similar to IFN-gamma, but all hamsters remained positive until d.p.i. 16 when the experiment was terminated. IL-4 was positive in 40% of infected hamsters on d.p.i. 6. On d.p.i. 8, IL-5 was only detected in 20% but increased to 100% by d.p.i. 16. These data suggest that tapeworms induce a mixed Th1/Th2 response with a polarization toward Th2 at 2 weeks post infection, which may influence the expulsion of worms.

  6. Intestinal protozoa in HIV-infected patients in Apulia, South Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Brandonisio, O.; Maggi, P.; Panaro, M. A.; Lisi, S.; Andriola, A.; Acquafredda, A.; Angarano, G.

    1999-01-01

    Protozoa are important enteric pathogens in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In this study the prevalence of intestinal protozoa in 154 HIV-infected patients, with or without diarrhoea, in our region (Apulia, South Italy) was evaluated between December 1993 and February 1998. In the majority of patients CD4+ T cell count was below 200/microl. The overall prevalence of intestinal protozoa was 43/154 (27.92%). Twenty-eight (43.08%) out of 65 patients with diarrhoea and 15 (16-85%) out of 89 non-diarrhoeic patients were parasitized. In particular, in the group of 65 patients with diarrhoea the following protozoa were identified: Cryptosporidium parvum in 14 (21.54%), Blastocystis hominis in 7 (10.77%), microsporidia in 6 (9.23%), Giardia lamblia in 4 (6.15%) and Isospora belli in 1 (1.54%). Three patients were Cryptosporidium parvum-microsporidia co-infected. In patients without intestinal symptoms, prevalence was 3/89 (3.37%) for Cryptosporidium parvum, 9/89 (10.11%) for Blastocystis hominis, 1/89 (1.12%) for microsporidia and 2/89 (2.25%) for Giardia lamblia. A significant (P<0.001) correlation was observed between protozoan infection and the presence of diarrhoea. In particular, Cryptosporidium parvum and microsporidia infections were significantly (P<0.001) and P = 0.046, respectively) associated with diarrhoeal illness. Moreover, the majority of cases of cryptosporidiosis were first diagnosed in the periods of heaviest rainfall. Therefore, drinking water contamination may be a possible source of human infection in our area. PMID:10694157

  7. Minireview: Invasive fungal infection complicating acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Däbritz, Jan; Schneider, Markward; Just-Nuebling, Gudrun; Groll, Andreas H

    2011-07-01

    Malaria is the most important parasitic infection in people, affecting 5-10% of the world's population with more than two million deaths a year. Whereas invasive bacterial infections are not uncommon during severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria, only a few cases of opportunistic fungal infections have been reported. Here, we present a fatal case of disseminated hyalohyphomycosis associated with acute P. falciparum malaria in a non-immune traveller, review the cases reported in the literature and discuss the theoretical foundations for the increased susceptibility of non-immune individuals with severe P. falciparum malaria to opportunistic fungal infections. Apart from the availability of free iron as sequelae of massive haemolysis, tissue damage, acidosis and measures of advanced life support, patients with complicated P. falciparum malaria also are profoundly immunosuppressed by the organism's interaction with innate and adaptive host immune mechanisms.

  8. Role of Infections in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are prone to developing bacterial infections. Moreover, bacterial infection is the most common identifiable trigger of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), which is characterized by organ failures and a high risk of death. There is evidence of an excessive immune response of the host as a major mechanism leading to the development of organ failures in patients with cirrhosis. However, a role for direct tissue damage caused by bacterial toxins and virulence factors cannot be excluded. Failed tolerance mechanisms may also contribute to organ failures, although the involved mechanisms are unclear. A proportion of patients with infection-related ACLF have a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. These patients have immune suppression, increased risk of superinfection and poor outcome. Immune suppression might be a consequence of the first infection episode that has led patients to be admitted to hospital.

  9. Status of Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Primary School Children in Rivers State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abah, A E; Arene, F O I

    2015-01-01

    Status of intestinal parasitic infections among primary school children in Rivers State, Nigeria, was investigated between January and December 2011. A total of 3,826 stool samples were collected from school children (1,828 males and 1998 females) in 36 primary schools from 13 local government areas of Rivers State. The samples were analyzed using wet saline/iodine and formol ether concentration methods. Of the 3,826 stool samples examined, 1059 (27.66%) were positive for different intestinal parasites, namely, Ascaris lumbricoides (51.78%), hookworm sp. (25.0%), Trichuris trichiura (15.18%), Strongyloides stercoralis (7.14%), Taenia sp. (0.89%), and Enterobius vermicularis (0.01%). The prevalence of the infection was generally higher in males (57.60%) than females (42.40%). The differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Among these intestinal parasites, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm sp., and Trichuris trichiura were found in all the 13 local government areas studied while Strongyloides stercoralis was found in 12, Taenia sp. in five, and Enterobius vermicularis in only one community in Ahoada Local Government Area. The overall infection rate remains high and would require coordinated deworming of the school children within the state.

  10. Status of Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Primary School Children in Rivers State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Abah, A. E.; Arene, F. O. I.

    2015-01-01

    Status of intestinal parasitic infections among primary school children in Rivers State, Nigeria, was investigated between January and December 2011. A total of 3,826 stool samples were collected from school children (1,828 males and 1998 females) in 36 primary schools from 13 local government areas of Rivers State. The samples were analyzed using wet saline/iodine and formol ether concentration methods. Of the 3,826 stool samples examined, 1059 (27.66%) were positive for different intestinal parasites, namely, Ascaris lumbricoides (51.78%), hookworm sp. (25.0%), Trichuris trichiura (15.18%), Strongyloides stercoralis (7.14%), Taenia sp. (0.89%), and Enterobius vermicularis (0.01%). The prevalence of the infection was generally higher in males (57.60%) than females (42.40%). The differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Among these intestinal parasites, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm sp., and Trichuris trichiura were found in all the 13 local government areas studied while Strongyloides stercoralis was found in 12, Taenia sp. in five, and Enterobius vermicularis in only one community in Ahoada Local Government Area. The overall infection rate remains high and would require coordinated deworming of the school children within the state. PMID:26600945

  11. Acute phase response in cattle infected with Anaplasma marginale.

    PubMed

    Nazifi, S; Razavi, S M; Kaviani, F; Rakhshandehroo, E

    2012-03-23

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the acute phase responses via the assessment of the concentration of serum sialic acids (total, lipid bound and protein bound), inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ and TNF-α) and acute phase proteins (Hp and SAA) in 20 adult crossbred cattle naturally infected by Anaplasma marginale. The infected animals were divided into 2 subgroups on the basis of parasitemia rate (<20% and >20%). Also, as a control group, 10 clinically healthy cattle from the same farms were sampled. Our data revealed significant decreases in red blood cell count (RBC), hematocrite (PCV) and hemoglobine (Hb) in infected cattle compared to healthy ones. Conversely, the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, serum sialic acids and the circulatory IFN-γ and TNF-α were increased in the diseased cattle (P<0.05). In addition, it was evident that the progression of parasitemia in infected cattle did not induce any significant alterations in the hematological indices (RBCs, PCV and Hb) and the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin and fibrinogen. SAA was the most sensitive factor to change in the diseased cattle. Therefore, increase in SAA concentration may be a good indicator of inflammatory process in cattle naturally infected with Anaplasma marginale.

  12. Multiphasic acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with atypical rubella virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Koji; Asahara, Hideaki; Uehara, Taira; Miyoshi, Katsue; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Iwaki, Toru; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2015-02-01

    We report the first case of an occurrence of multiphasic acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) associated with atypical rubella virus infection with no rash and long-term increased titers of serum anti-rubella IgM in a 17-year-old male who had no history of rubella vaccination. He suffered from at least six clinical exacerbations with disseminated hyperintense lesions on FLAIR MR images during the course of 18 months. Repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy resolved the exacerbations. In patients with multiphasic ADEM of unknown etiology, clinicians should also consider the possibility of preceding infection with rubella virus.

  13. ANA testing in the presence of acute and chronic infections.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Christine M; Binder, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibody testing is performed to help diagnose patients who have clinical symptoms suggestive of possible autoimmune diseases. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are present in many systemic autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, a positive ANA test may also be seen with non-autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including both acute and chronic infections. When the ANA test is used as an initial screen in patients with non-specific clinical symptoms, such as fever, joint pain, myalgias, fatigue, rash, or anemia, the likelihood of a positive result due to infection will increase, especially in children. This article identifies acute and chronic infectious diseases that are likely to produce a positive ANA result and summarizes recent literature addressing both the causes and consequences of these findings.

  14. Cost of acute hepatitis B infection in Swedish adults.

    PubMed

    Struve, J; Giesecke, J

    1993-01-01

    In order to register data on costs for episodes of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in adults, the medical records from 70 adults with acute HBV infection seen at Roslagstull's Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, were reviewed. All cost-consuming events due to medical treatment, absence from work, and secondary prophylaxis were registered. The average cost was 1,230 pounds for medical treatment, 570 pounds for work loss and 290 pounds for secondary cases and prophylaxis, a total of 2,090 pounds in 1992 prices. This figure is considerably lower than that reported in 3 previous European studies. Accurate estimates of the costs for a case of HBV, as well as those of different vaccination strategies, are essential when economic aspects of HBV vaccination programmes are discussed.

  15. Augmented plasma microparticles during acute Plasmodium vivax infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the last few years, the study of microparticles (MPs) - submicron vesicles released from cells upon activation or apoptosis - has gained growing interest in the field of inflammation and in infectious diseases. Their role in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax remains unexplored. Because acute vivax malaria has been related to pro-inflammatory responses, the main hypothesis investigated in this study was that Plasmodium vivax infection is associated with elevated levels of circulating MPs, which may play a role during acute disease in non-immune patients. Methods Plasma MPs were analysed among thirty-seven uncomplicated P. vivax infections from an area of unstable malaria transmission in the Brazilian Amazon. The MP phenotype was analysed by flow cytometry using the classical MP marker, annexin, and fluorochrome-labeled monoclonal antibodies against specific cell surface markers. The frequencies of plasma MPs in P. vivax patients (n = 37) were further compared to malaria-unexposed controls (n = 15) and ovarian carcinoma patients (n = 12), a known MPs-inducing disease non-related to malaria. Results The frequencies of plasma circulating MPs were markedly increased in P. vivax patients, as compared to healthy age-matched malaria-unexposed controls. Although platelets, erythrocytes and leukocytes were the main cellular sources of MPs during vivax malaria, platelet derived-MPs (PMPs) increased in a linear fashion with the presence of fever at the time of blood collection (β = 0.06, p < 0.0001) and length of acute symptoms (β = 0.36, p < 0.0001). Finally, the results suggest that plasma levels of PMPs diminish as patient experience more episodes of clinical malaria (β = 0.07, p < 0.003). Conclusions Abundant circulating MPs are present during acute P. vivax infection, and platelet derived-MPs may play a role on the acute inflammatory symptoms of malaria vivax. PMID:21080932

  16. Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae or boulardii yeasts on acute stress induced intestinal dysmotility

    PubMed Central

    West, Christine; Stanisz, Andrew M; Wong, Annette; Kunze, Wolfgang A

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) and Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) yeasts to reverse or to treat acute stress-related intestinal dysmotility. METHODS Adult Swiss Webster mice were stressed for 1 h in a wire-mesh restraint to induce symptoms of intestinal dysmotility and were subsequently killed by cervical dislocation. Jejunal and colon tissue were excised and placed within a tissue perfusion bath in which S. cerevisiae, S. boulardii, or their supernatants were administered into the lumen. Video recordings of contractility and gut diameter changes were converted to spatiotemporal maps and the velocity, frequency, and amplitude of propagating contractile clusters (PCC) were measured. Motility pre- and post-treatment was compared between stressed animals and unstressed controls. RESULTS S. boulardii and S. cerevisiae helped to mediate the effects of stress on the small and large intestine. Restraint stress reduced jejunal transit velocity (mm/s) from 2.635 ± 0.316 to 1.644 ± 0.238, P < 0.001 and jejunal transit frequency (Hz) from 0.032 ± 0.008 to 0.016 ± 0.005, P < 0.001. Restraint stress increased colonic transit velocity (mm/s) from 0.864 ± 0.183 to 1.432 ± 0.329, P < 0.001 and frequency to a lesser degree. Luminal application of S. boulardii helped to restore jejunal and colonic velocity towards the unstressed controls; 1.833 ± 0.688 to 2.627 ± 0.664, P < 0.001 and 1.516 ± 0.263 to 1.036 ± 0.21, P < 0.001, respectively. S. cerevisiae also had therapeutic effects on the stressed gut, but was most apparent in the jejunum. S. cerevisiae increased PCC velocity in the stressed jejunum from 1.763 ± 0.397 to 2.017 ± 0.48, P = 0.0031 and PCC frequency from 0.016 ± 0.009 to 0.027 ± 0.007, P < 0.001. S. cerevisiae decreased colon PCC velocity from 1.647 ± 0.187 to 1.038 ± 0.222, P < 0.001. Addition of S. boulardii or S. cerevisiae supernatants also helped to restore motility to unstressed values in similar

  17. Effect of Valproic Acid on Acute Lung Injury in a Rodent Model of Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyuseok; Li, Yongqing; Jin, Guang; Chong, Wei; Liu, Baoling; Lu, Jennifer; Lee, Kyoungbun; deMoya, Marc; Velmahos, George; Alam, Hasan B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Acute lung injury (ALI) is developed in many clinical situations and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Valproic acid (VPA), a well-known anti-epileptic drug, has been shown to have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in various ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) models. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether VPA could affect survival and development of ALI in a rat model of intestinal I/R. Methods Two experiments were performed. Experiment I: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–300 g) were subjected to intestinal ischemia (1 hour) and reperfusion (3 hours). They were randomized into 2 groups (n=7/group) 30 min after ischemia: Vehicle (Veh) and VPA (300 mg/kg, IV). Primary end-point for this study was survival over 4 hours from the start of ischemia. Experiment II: The histological and biochemical effects of VPA treatment on lungs were examined 3 hours (1 hr ischemia + 2 hrs reperfusion) after intestinal I/R injury (Veh vs. VPA, n = 9/group). An objective histological score was used to grade the degree of ALI. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to measure serum levels of cytokine interleukins (IL-6 and 10), and lung tissue of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). In addition, the activity of 8-isoprostane was analyzed for pulmonary oxidative damage. Results In Experiment I, four-hour survival rate was significantly higher in VPA treated animals compared to Veh animals (71.4% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.006). In Experiment II, ALI was apparent in all of the Veh group animals. Treatment with VPA prevented the development of ALI, with a reduction in the histological score (3.4 ± 0.3 vs. 5.3 ± 0.6, p = 0.025). Moreover, compared to the Veh control group the animals from the VPA group displayed decreased serum levels of IL-6 (952 ± 213 vs. 7709 ± 1990 pg/ml, p = 0.011), and lung tissue concentrations of CINC (1188 ± 28 vs. 1298 ± 27, p < 0.05), MPO activity (368 ± 23 vs. 490

  18. [Longitudinal investigation on intestinal parasite infections among rural people in West Dongting Lake region].

    PubMed

    Hou, Guo-Hong; Xiao, Zeng; Yao, Xiao-Ming; Xiao, Jun-Wen; Zhou, Ying-Cai; Xie, Zhao-Mei; Yu, Qiu-Lan; Guo, Feng-Ying; Zhao, Zheng-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    The nylon pocket concentration method and modified Kato-Katz technique were used to detect the eggs of intestinal parasites and the iodine smear method was used for the detection of protozoa among the rural population in West Dongting Lake region. The infection rate of parasites in 2006 was 11.84%, and it declined by 86.63%, 81.34%, and 47.28%, respectively, compared to the rates in 1983, 1993, and 2003. Six major parasites were detected including Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Fasciolopsis buski, hookworm, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia, and their infection rates were 8.60%, 6.41%, 1.75%, 0.14%, 2.50%, and 1.22%, respectively. The rate of multiple infections was 22.98%. The infection rates in the 5-9 years age group and 10-14 years age group were higher than those in other age groups.

  19. Homeostasis alteration within small intestinal mucosa after acute enteral refeeding in total parenteral nutrition mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongjia; Barrett, Meredith; Hou, Yue; Yoon, Hong Keun; Ochi, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Feeding strategies to care for patients who transition from enteral nutrient deprivation while on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) to enteral feedings generally proceed to full enteral nutrition once the gastrointestinal tract recovers; however, an increasing body of literature suggests that a subgroup of patients may actually develop an increased incidence of adverse events, including death. To examine this further, we studied the effects of acute refeeding in a mouse model of TPN. Interestingly, refeeding led to some beneficial effects, including prevention in the decline in intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation. However, refeeding led to a significant increase in mucosal expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as an upregulation in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4). Refeeding also failed to prevent TPN-associated increases in IEC apoptosis, loss of epithelial barrier function, and failure of the leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5-positive stem cell expression. Transitioning from TPN to enteral feedings led to a partial restoration of the small bowel microbial population. In conclusion, while acute refeeding led to some restoration of normal gastrointestinal physiology, enteral refeeding led to a significant increase in mucosal inflammatory markers and may suggest alternative strategies to enteral refeeding should be considered. PMID:26635320

  20. Changes in intestinal microflora in rats with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Liu, Xiang-Yong; Ma, Ming-Ming; Qi, Zhi-Jiang; Zhang, Xiao-Qiang; Li, Zhi; Cao, Guo-Hong; Li, Jun; Zhu, Wei-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To implement high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing to study microbial diversity in the fecal matter of rats with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). METHODS: Intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide was used to induce ALI, and the pathological changes in the lungs and intestines were observed. D-lactate levels and diamine oxidase (DAO) activities were determined by enzymatic spectrophotometry. The fragments encompassing V4 16S rDNA hypervariable regions were PCR amplified from fecal samples, and the PCR products of V4 were sequenced by Illumina MiSeq. RESULTS: Increased D-lactate levels and DAO activities were observed in the model group (P < 0.01). Sequencing results revealed the presence of 3780 and 4142 species in the control and model groups, respectively. The percentage of shared species was 18.8419%. Compared with the control group, the model group had a higher diversity index and a lower number of species of Fusobacteria (at the phylum level), Helicobacter and Roseburia (at the genus level) (P < 0.01). Differences in species diversity, structure, distribution and composition were found between the control group and early ARDS group. CONCLUSION: The detection of specific bacteria allows early detection and diagnosis of ALI/ARDS. PMID:24914345

  1. Pteropine orthoreovirus infection among out-patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Voon, Kenny; Tan, Yeh Fong; Leong, Pooi Pooi; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Gunnasekaran, Rajasekaran; Ujang, Kamsiah; Chua, Kaw Bing; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the incidence rate of Pteropine orthreovirus (PRV) infection in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a suburban setting in Malaysia, where bats are known to be present in the neighborhood. Using molecular detection of PRVs directly from oropharyngeal swabs, our study demonstrates that PRV is among one of the common causative agents of acute URTI with cough and sore throat as the commonest presenting clinical features. Phylogenetic analysis on partial major outer and inner capsid proteins shows that these PRV strains are closely related to Melaka and Kampar viruses previously isolated in Malaysia. Further study is required to determine the public health significance of PRV infection in Southeast Asia, especially in cases where co-infection with other pathogens may potentially lead to different clinical outcomes.

  2. Development of an in vitro immunobiotic evaluation system against rotavirus infection in bovine intestinal epitheliocytes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Kanmani, P; Ishizuka, T; Miyazaki, A; Soma, J; Albarracin, L; Suda, Y; Nochi, T; Aso, H; Iwabuchi, N; Xiao, J-Z; Saito, T; Villena, J; Kitazawa, H

    2017-01-02

    The bovine intestinal epithelial cell line (BIE cells) expresses the Toll-like receptor (TLR)3 and is able to mount an antiviral immune response after the stimulation with poly(I:C). In the present study, we aimed to further characterise the antiviral defence mechanisms in BIE cells by evaluating the innate immune response triggered by rotavirus (RV) infection. In addition, we attempted to determine whether immunobiotic bifidobacteria are able to confer protection of BIE cells against RV infection by beneficially modulating the antiviral immune response. RV OSU (porcine) and UK (bovine) effectively infected BIE cells, while a significant lower capacity to infect BIE cells was observed for human (Wa) and murine (EW) RV. We observed that viral infection in BIE cells triggered TLR3/RIG-I-mediated immune responses with activation of IRF3 and TRAF3, induction of interferon beta (IFN-β) and up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines. Our results also demonstrated that preventive treatments with Bifidobacterium infantis MCC12 or Bifidobacterium breve MCC1274 significantly reduced RV titres in infected BIE cells and differentially modulated the innate immune response. Of note, both strains significantly improved the production of the antiviral factor IFN-β in RV-infected BIE cells. In conclusion, this work provides comprehensive information on the antiviral immune response of BIE cells against RV, that can be further studied for the development of strategies aimed to improve antiviral defences in bovine intestinal epithelial cells. Our results also demonstrate that BIE cells could be used as a newly immunobiotic evaluation system against RV infection for application in the bovine host.

  3. Tuberculin Skin-Test Reactions Are Unaffected by the Severity of Hyperendemic Intestinal Helminth Infections and Co-Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zevallos, Karine; Vergara, Katherine C.; Vergara, Antonio; Vidal, Carlos; Garcia, Hector H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2010-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) quantifies cell-mediated immunity to tuberculosis antigens. Helminths suppress cell-mediated immunity, so we studied the effect of helminth infection and deworming on the TST in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in an indigenous Amazon community (N = 195). Stool microscopy diagnosed helminths in 98% and co-infection with multiple species in 24% of study subjects. The TST was positive (≥ 10 mm) for 49%, and responses increased with age (P < 0.001), Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccination (P = 0.01), and tuberculosis contact (P = 0.05). TST results had no association with helminth-egg concentrations, species, or co-infections (all P > 0.1). One month after deworming with albendazole (three daily 400-mg doses), helminths were reduced, but 63% remained infected with helminths. Albendazole did not cause a change in TST size (P = 0.8) or positivity (P = 0.9) relative to placebo. Thus, TST reactions were unaffected by albendazole therapy that partially cured intestinal helminth infections, and TST interpretation was unaffected by high-burden helminth infections and co-infection with multiple helminth species. PMID:20682875

  4. Defective proviruses rapidly accumulate during acute HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Katherine M; Murray, Alexandra J; Pollack, Ross A; Soliman, Mary G; Laskey, Sarah B; Capoferri, Adam A; Lai, Jun; Strain, Matthew C; Lada, Steven M; Hoh, Rebecca; Ho, Ya-Chi; Richman, Douglas D; Deeks, Steven G; Siliciano, Janet D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses viral replication to clinically undetectable levels, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) persists in CD4(+) T cells in a latent form that is not targeted by the immune system or by ART. This latent reservoir is a major barrier to curing individuals of HIV-1 infection. Many individuals initiate ART during chronic infection, and in this setting, most proviruses are defective. However, the dynamics of the accumulation and the persistence of defective proviruses during acute HIV-1 infection are largely unknown. Here we show that defective proviruses accumulate rapidly within the first few weeks of infection to make up over 93% of all proviruses, regardless of how early ART is initiated. By using an unbiased method to amplify near-full-length proviral genomes from HIV-1-infected adults treated at different stages of infection, we demonstrate that early initiation of ART limits the size of the reservoir but does not profoundly affect the proviral landscape. This analysis allows us to revise our understanding of the composition of proviral populations and estimate the true reservoir size in individuals who were treated early versus late in infection. Additionally, we demonstrate that common assays for measuring the reservoir do not correlate with reservoir size, as determined by the number of genetically intact proviruses. These findings reveal hurdles that must be overcome to successfully analyze future HIV-1 cure strategies.

  5. Efficacy of ivermectin in a patient population concomitantly infected with intestinal helminths and ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Heukelbach, Jörg; Wilcke, Thomas; Winter, Benedikt; Sales de Oliveira, Fabíola Araújo; Sabóia Moura, Rômulo César; Harms, Gundel; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    Ivermectin (CAS 70288-86-7) is a potent antiparasitic drug. However, studies have not been published evaluating the efficacy of ivermectin in a patient population concomitantly infected with intestinal helminths and ectoparasites. Here the results of an open trial on the efficacy of ivermectin in a heavily poly-parasitized population in northeast Brazil are presented. Two hundred and fifty-one patients were enrolled. Two doses of ivermectin (200 microg/kg) were given at an interval of 10 days. The cure rates for intestinal helminthiases were: 100% for strongyloidiasis and enterobiasis, 99% for ascariasis, 84% for trichuriasis, 68% for hookworm disease, and 50% for hymenolepiasis. Cure rates for ectoparasitoses were: 100% for cutaneous larva migrans, 99% for pediculosis, 88% for scabies and 64% for tungiasis. The results show that two doses of ivermectin are highly efficacious for most intestinal helminths and ectoparasites simultaneously present in an impoverished population. The drug seems to be particularly useful when polyparasitism is expected to occur or when public health measures aim to reduce both intestinal helminthiases and parasitic skin diseases by mass chemotherapy.

  6. Intestinal cytokine response of commercial source broiler chicks to Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Fasina, Y O; Holt, P S; Moran, E T; Moore, R W; Conner, D E; McKee, S R

    2008-07-01

    Development of molecular-based immunotherapeutic strategies for controlling Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) infection in poultry requires a better understanding of intestinal and cecal cytokine responses. Accordingly, an experiment was conducted to measure changes in intestinal cytokine expression when commercial source broiler chickens were challenged with a nalidixic acid-resistant ST. Ross broiler chicks were nonchallenged with ST (control treatment) or challenged by orally giving 7.8 x 10(6) cfu at 4 d of age (STC treatment). Each treatment consisted of 4 replicate pens with 14 chicks per pen. Expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines, interferon-gamma, and antiinflammatory interleukin (IL)-10 were determined at 5 and 10 d postchallenge (PC). Intestinal flushes were also collected from each treatment at 7 d PC to estimate IgA and IgG. Results showed an upregulation in IL-1beta mRNA in STC chicks at 5 d PC. By 10 d PC, the expression of IL-1beta was further increased and accompanied by an upregulation of IL-6 and interferon-gamma mRNA, whereas IL-10 mRNA expression decreased. It was concluded that ST induced an intestinal mucosal inflammatory response in commercial source broiler chicks less than 2 wk of age.

  7. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Acute Hematogenous Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO) is one of the commonest bone infection in childhood. Staphylococcus aureus is the commonest organism causing AHO. With use of advanced diagnostic methods, fastidious Kingella kingae is increasingly becoming an important organism in etiology of osteoarticular infections in children under the age of 3 y. The diagnosis of AHO is primarily clinical. The main clinical symptom and sign in AHO is pain and tenderness over the affected bone especially in the metaphyseal region. However, in a neonate the clinical presentation may be subtle and misleading. Laboratory and radiological investigations supplement the clinical findings. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are frequently elevated. Ultrasonography and MRI are key imaging modalities for early detection of AHO. Determination of infecting organism in AHO is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management and therefore, organism isolation using blood cultures and site aspiration should be attempted. Several effective antibiotics regimes are available for managing AHO in children. The choice of antibiotic and its duration and mode of delivery requires individualization depending upon severity of infection, causative organism, regional sensitivity patterns, time elapsed between onset of symptoms and child's presentation and the clinical and laboratory response to the treatment. If pus has been evidenced in the soft tissues or bone region, surgical decompression of abscess is mandatory.

  8. Increased intestinal endotoxin absorption during enteric nematode but not protozoal infections through a mast cell-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Farid, Ayman Samir; Jimi, Fumiko; Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko; Horii, Yoichiro

    2008-06-01

    It is known that hypersensitivity reactions in the gastrointestinal tract, which are primarily mediated by mast cells, are associated with a secretory response of the epithelium and often increased permeability to macromolecules. Studies to date have not examined the effects of hyperpermeability on the absorption of toxic substances normally present in the intestinal lumen such as bacterial LPS. In the present study, we observed that Strongyloides venezuelensis infection in mice decreases the mRNA expression of intestinal epithelial cell junctional molecules (occludin and zonula occludens 1) and increases portal endotoxin levels 4 h after intragastric administration of LPS (20 mg/kg body weight). Furthermore, an increase in the flux of immunoglobulin G into the intestinal lumen was observed 10 days postinfection (PI). An increased rate of LPS absorption was also seen in mice infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis on day 14 PI and rats concurrently infected with S. venezuelensis and N. brasiliensis on day 20 PI. On the other hand, infection with Eimeria vermiformis and Eimeria pragensis was not observed to enhance LPS absorption 4 h after intragastric administration of LPS (20 mg/kg body weight), although E. vermiformis infection did inhibit the epithelial cell mRNA expression of zonula occludens 1, but not occludin, on day 9 PI, resulting in a reduced immunoglobulin G flux than that produced by S. venezuelensis infection. Our results suggest that mastocytosis accompanying intestinal nematode infection increases the intestinal absorption of LPS into the portal circulation by suppressing the expression of tight junction molecules.

  9. Strongyloides ratti: transplantation of adults recovered from the small intestine at different days after infection into the colon of naive and infection-primed Wistar rats, and the effect of antioxidant treatment on large intestinal parasitism.

    PubMed

    Shintoku, Y; Takagi, H; Kadosaka, T; Nagaoka, F; Kondo, S; Itoh, M; Honda, S; Kimura, E

    2011-07-01

    Strongyloides ratti (Nagoya strain) is unique in that a portion of adults parasitizing the small intestine withstands 'worm expulsion', which starts at around day 8 post-infection (p.i.) by host immunity, and establishes in the large intestine after day 19 p.i. To investigate the mechanism, adults obtained from the small intestine at day 7 or 19 p.i. were transplanted into the colon of infection-primed immune rats. Adults obtained at day 7 p.i. were rejected quickly, whereas those obtained at day 19 p.i. could establish infection. Moreover, the body length and the number of intrauterine eggs increased in the large intestine. In a separate experiment, large intestinal parasitism was abolished by the treatment of host rats with an anti-oxidant, butylated hydroxyanisole. These results indicate that small intestinal adults between days 7 and 19 p.i. acquired the ability to parasitize the large intestine of immune rats, and that free radicals produced by the host may have played a significant role in the process.

  10. Granulomatous encephalomyelitis and intestinal ganglionitis in a spectacled Amazon parrot (Amazona albifrons) infected with Mycobacterium genavense.

    PubMed

    Gomez, G; Saggese, M D; Weeks, B R; Hoppes, S M; Porter, B F

    2011-01-01

    An approximately 30-year-old male spectacled Amazon parrot (Amazona albifrons) was presented with a 2-week history of ataxia, head shaking, weight loss and seizures. Gross findings on necropsy examination included atrophy of the musculature, ruffled feathers and minimal epicardial and abdominal fat. Microscopically, there were perivascular cuffs of macrophages with fewer lymphocytes in the grey and white matter of the brain and spinal cord. These lesions were accompanied by gliosis and mild vacuolation of the white matter. In the small intestine, up to 70% of the intestinal ganglia were effaced by infiltrates of macrophages and fewer lymphocytes. The intestinal lamina propria contained multiple inflammatory aggregates of a similar nature. Ziehl-Neelsen staining revealed the presence of numerous bacilli within the cytoplasm of macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS) and enteric ganglia. Amplification of the DNAJ gene confirmed a mycobacterial infection and subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a species-specific primer confirmed the aetiology as Mycobacterium genavense. Infection of the CNS with Mycobacterium spp. is uncommon and has not been previously reported in a parrot. This case is unusual in that the organism exhibited tropism for neural tissue.

  11. Replication and Distribution of Toxoplasma gondii in the Small Intestine after Oral Infection with Tissue Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Beth; Taylor, Betsy C.; John, Beena; Tait-Wojno, Elia D.; Girgis, Natasha M.; Miller, Natalie; Wagage, Sagie; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Natural infection by Toxoplasma gondii occurs via oral ingestion of tissue cysts that rupture in the small intestine, releasing zoites that infect locally before disseminating throughout the host. The studies presented here used fluorescent parasites combined with flow cytometry and multiphoton microscopy techniques to understand the events associated with parasite replication in the mucosa. At 3 days postinfection with tissue cysts, parasites were localized in small foci and flow cytometry revealed parasites present in macrophages, neutrophils, and monocytes in the lamina propria. By day 6 postinfection, there were large foci of replicating parasites; however, foci unexpectedly varied in the number of villi involved and were associated with the presence of viable tachyzoites within the intestinal lumen. Consistent with the flow cytometry data, neutrophils and monocytes in the lamina propria were preferentially associated with parasite plaques. In contrast, dendritic cells comprised a small fraction of the infected immune cell population and were localized at the periphery of parasite plaques. Together, these findings reveal the formation of localized sites of parasite replication and inflammation early during infection and suggest that sustained replication of T. gondii in the gut may be a function of pathogen luminal spread. PMID:23460516

  12. The prevalence and clinical significance of intestinal parasites in HIV-infected patients in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Stensvold, Christen Rune; Nielsen, Susanne Dam; Badsberg, Jens-Henrik; Engberg, Jørgen; Friis-Møller, Nina; Nielsen, Sanne Søgaard; Nielsen, Henrik Vedel; Friis-Møller, Alice

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence and clinical significance of intestinal parasites in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, faecal specimens from 96 HIV-infected patients were submitted to microbiological analyses, including microscopy and polymerase chain reaction for protozoa and enteropathogenic bacteria. Results of microbiological analyses were compared with self-reported gastrointestinal complaints collected using a validated questionnaire. Thirty-two (33%) patients were positive for parasites. However, opportunistic parasites (Isospora and Cryptosporidium) were detected in only 2 instances. Entamoeba dispar was detected in 10 cases, 9 of which represented men who have sex with men (MSM). Despite generally low HIV RNA loads and high CD4+ T-cell counts, 42% of the 76 patients reporting symptoms complained of diarrhoea, 31% of whom were parasite-positive. The presence of diarrhoea was not associated with the presence or absence of parasites; neither was it associated with receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) in general, or protease inhibitors (PI) in particular. A CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/mm³ was not associated with parasitic infection or with diarrhoea. The data show that diarrhoea is a common symptom among HIV-infected patients in Denmark, but do not indicate that the diarrhoea is due to intestinal parasites.

  13. Epidemiology of intestinal parasitic infections in school children in Ghazni Province, eastern Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Augustynowicz, Alina; Smoleń, Agata; Lass, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of intestinal parasites and their species in Afghan school children and to establish appropriate treatment methods for detected pathogens. Methods: Parasitological examination of stool samples collected from 1369 children aged 8-18, students of the Jahan Malika High School in Ghazni Province in eastern Afghanistan, was conducted in the period November 2013-April 2014. Three stool samples were collected from each patient every second day; the samples were fixed in 10% formalin and tested by light microscopy using the methods of direct smear in Lugol’s solution, decantation in distilled water, and Fülleborn’s flotation. Results: Of 535 examined children (39.1% of the study group) were infected with nematodes (n=324), cestodes (n=118), trematodes (n=12), and protozoa (n=228), 132 were diagnosed with co-infections (mainly ascariasis+giardiasis, ascariasis+hymenolepiasis) and received single or combined therapy. Conclusions: The Afghan community is an example of population characterized by a high rate of parasitic infections. Owing to high prevalence of multiple infections among inhabitants of Afghanistan, it seems that a mass deworming campaign with a single-dose chemotherapy may prove ineffective in eradicating intestinal parasites in the local population. PMID:26870108

  14. Intermittent fasting promotes bacterial clearance and intestinal IgA production in Salmonella typhimurium-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Godínez-Victoria, M; Campos-Rodriguez, R; Rivera-Aguilar, V; Lara-Padilla, E; Pacheco-Yepez, J; Jarillo-Luna, R A; Drago-Serrano, M E

    2014-05-01

    The impact of intermittent fasting versus ad libitum feeding during Salmonella typhimurium infection was evaluated in terms of duodenum IgA levels, bacterial clearance and intestinal and extra-intestinal infection susceptibility. Mice that were intermittently fasted for 12 weeks or fed ad libitum were infected with S. typhimurium and assessed at 7 and 14 days post-infection. Next, we evaluated bacterial load in the faeces, Peyer's patches, spleen and liver by plate counting, as well as total and specific intestinal IgA and plasmatic corticosterone levels (by immunoenzymatic assay) and lamina propria IgA levels in plasma cells (by cytofluorometry). Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, α- and J-chains, Pax-5 factor, pro-inflammatory cytokine (tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (transforming growth factor-β) mRNA levels were assessed in mucosal and liver samples (by real-time PCR). Compared with the infected ad libitum mice, the intermittently fasted infected animals had (1) lower intestinal and systemic bacterial loads; (2) higher SIgA and IgA plasma cell levels; (3) higher mRNA expression of most intestinal parameters; and (4) increased or decreased corticosterone levels on day 7 and 14 post-infection, respectively. No contribution of liver IgA was observed at the intestinal level. Apparently, the changes following metabolic stress induced by intermittent fasting during food deprivation days increased the resistance to S. typhimurium infection by triggering intestinal IgA production and presumably, pathogen elimination by phagocytic inflammatory cells.

  15. Atypical presentations of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Ansuya; Paruk, Hoosain; Bhagwan, Bhupendra; Moodley, Anand

    2017-02-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a monophasic demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system associated with various viral infections including HIV infection. We present the findings of seven HIV-infected patients with mild to moderate immunosuppression presenting with atypical features. Four patients had a multiphasic course; three patients had tumefactive lesions, and two patients had corpus callosum lesions. Two patients with the multiphasic course also had tumefactive lesions. Their clinical and radiological findings are presented. Despite the few cases, we propose that the dysimmune process lying between marked immunosuppression (CD4 < 200 cells/μL) and normal CD4 counts (CD4 > 500 cells/μL) might be responsible for these atypical presentations.

  16. Effects of BmCPV Infection on Silkworm Bombyx mori Intestinal Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenli; Lu, Yahong; Zhang, Hao; Kumar, Dhiraj; Liu, Bo; Gong, Yongchang; Zhu, Min; Zhu, Liyuan; Liang, Zi; Kuang, Sulan; Chen, Fei; Hu, Xiaolong; Cao, Guangli; Xue, Renyu; Gong, Chengliang

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has a crucial role in the growth, development and environmental adaptation in the host insect. The objective of our work was to investigate the microbiota of the healthy silkworm Bombyx mori gut and changes after the infection of B. mori cypovirus (BmCPV). Intestinal contents of the infected and healthy larvae of B. mori of fifth instar were collected at 24, 72 and 144 h post infection with BmCPV. The gut bacteria were analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. 147(135) and 113(103) genera were found in the gut content of the healthy control female (male) larvae and BmCPV-infected female (male) larvae, respectively. In general, the microbial communities in the gut content of healthy larvae were dominated by Enterococcus, Delftia, Pelomonas, Ralstonia and Staphylococcus, however the abundance change of each genus was depended on the developmental stage and gender. Microbial diversity reached minimum at 144 h of fifth instar larvae. The abundance of Enterococcus in the females was substantially lower and the abundance of Delftia, Aurantimonas and Staphylococcus was substantially higher compared to the males. Bacterial diversity in the intestinal contents decreased after post infection with BmCPV, whereas the abundance of both Enterococcus and Staphylococcus which belongs to Gram-positive were increased. Therefore, our findings suggested that observed changes in relative abundance was related to the immune response of silkworm to BmCPV infection. Relevance analysis of plenty of the predominant genera showed the abundance of the Enterococcus genus was in negative correlation with the abundance of the most predominant genera. These results provided insight into the relationship between the gut microbiota and development of the BmCPV-infected silkworm.

  17. Comparison of intestinal parasitic infection in newly arrived and resident workers in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The rapid growth of Qatar in the last two decades has been associated with an enormous expansion of building programs in its cities and in the provision of new service industries. This in turn has attracted a large influx of immigrant workers seeking employment in jobs associated with food handling, domestic service and the building industry. Many of these immigrants come from countries in the tropics and subtropics where intestinal parasitic infections are common. Methods We analyzed intestinal parasitic infections recorded in 2008 among immigrant and long-term resident workers in Doha city, Qatar (n = 1538). Stool examinations were carried out at the Hamad Medical Corporation and at the Medical Commission in Doha using standard procedures. Results Overall, 21.5% of subjects were infected with at least one of the species recorded (8 helminth and 4 protozoan species; the highest prevalence was for hookworms = 8.3%) and there were strong regional effects on prevalence of helminths, with subjects from North East Africa and Nepal showing particularly high prevalence. Most helminths declined in prevalence in subjects that acquired residency status in Qatar, especially among female subjects, but there was a marked exception among male Nepalese workers, who continued to harbour helminth infections (notably hookworms) after they became residents. Contrary to all other regional groups the prevalence of Giardia duodenalis was higher among Nepalese residents compared with new arrivals, while Blastocystis hominis infections were more common among residents of all regions, and especially among North East Africans. Conclusions Our analysis has identified male Nepalese workers as a particular risk group continuing to harbour hookworm infection and G. duodenalis as residents, and subjects from North East Africa are as particularly likely to acquire B. hominis infection after settling in the country. These conclusions have important implications for the health

  18. Geospatial distribution of intestinal parasitic infections in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) and its association with social determinants

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Clarissa Perez; Zanini, Graziela Maria; Dias, Gisele Silva; da Silva, Sidnei; de Freitas, Marcelo Bessa; Almendra, Ricardo; Santana, Paula; Sousa, Maria do Céu

    2017-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitic infections remain among the most common infectious diseases worldwide. This study aimed to estimate their prevalence and provide a detailed analysis of geographical distribution of intestinal parasites in the metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro, considering demographic, socio-economic, and epidemiological contextual factors. Methods/Principal findings The cross-section survey was conducted among individuals attending the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases (FIOCRUZ, RJ) during the period from April 2012 to February 2015. Stool samples were collected and processed by sedimentation, flotation, Kato-Katz, Baermann-Moraes and Graham methods, iron haematoxylin staining and safranin staining. Of the 3245 individuals analysed, 569 (17.5%) were infected with at least one parasite. The most common protozoa were Endolimax nana (28.8%), Entamoeba coli (14.8%), Complex Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (13.5%), Blastocystis hominis (12.7%), and Giardia lamblia (8.1%). Strongyloides stercoralis (4.3%), Schistosoma mansoni (3.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (1.6%), and hookworms (1.5%) were the most frequent helminths. There was a high frequency of contamination by protozoa (87%), and multiple infections were observed in 141 participants (24.8%). A positive association between age (young children) and gender (male) with intestinal parasites was observed. Geospatial distribution of the detected intestinal parasitic infections was not random or homogeneous, but was influenced by socioeconomic conditions (through the material deprivation index (MDI)). Participants classified in the highest levels of deprivation had higher risk of having intestinal parasites. Conclusions/Significance This study provides the first epidemiological information on the prevalence and distribution of intestinal parasitic infections in the Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area. Intestinal parasites, especially protozoa, are highly prevalent, indicating that

  19. Defective proviruses rapidly accumulate during acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Katherine M.; Murray, Alexandra J.; Pollack, Ross A.; Soliman, Mary G.; Laskey, Sarah B.; Capoferri, Adam A.; Lai, Jun; Strain, Matthew C.; Lada, Steven M.; Hoh, Rebecca; Ho, Ya-Chi; Richman, Douglas D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses viral replication to clinically undetectable levels, HIV-1 persists in CD4+ T cells in a latent form not targeted by the immune system or ART1–5. This latent reservoir is a major barrier to cure. Many individuals initiate ART during chronic infection, and in this setting, most proviruses are defective6. However, the dynamics of the accumulation and persistence of defective proviruses during acute HIV-1 infection are largely unknown. Here we show that defective proviruses accumulate rapidly within the first few weeks of infection to make up over 93% of all proviruses, regardless of how early ART is initiated. Using an unbiased method to amplify near full-length proviral genomes from HIV-1 infected adults treated at different stages of infection, we demonstrate that early ART initiation limits the size of the reservoir but does not profoundly impact the proviral landscape. This analysis allows us to revise our understanding of the composition of proviral populations and estimate the true reservoir size in individuals treated early vs. late in infection. Additionally, we demonstrate that common assays for measuring the reservoir do not correlate with reservoir size. These findings reveal hurdles that must be overcome to successfully analyze future HIV-1 cure strategies. PMID:27500724

  20. Molecular testing for clinical diagnosis and epidemiological investigations of intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Jaco J; Stensvold, C Rune

    2014-04-01

    Over the past few decades, nucleic acid-based methods have been developed for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections. Advantages of nucleic acid-based methods are numerous; typically, these include increased sensitivity and specificity and simpler standardization of diagnostic procedures. DNA samples can also be stored and used for genetic characterization and molecular typing, providing a valuable tool for surveys and surveillance studies. A variety of technologies have been applied, and some specific and general pitfalls and limitations have been identified. This review provides an overview of the multitude of methods that have been reported for the detection of intestinal parasites and offers some guidance in applying these methods in the clinical laboratory and in epidemiological studies.

  1. Molecular Testing for Clinical Diagnosis and Epidemiological Investigations of Intestinal Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Stensvold, C. Rune

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Over the past few decades, nucleic acid-based methods have been developed for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections. Advantages of nucleic acid-based methods are numerous; typically, these include increased sensitivity and specificity and simpler standardization of diagnostic procedures. DNA samples can also be stored and used for genetic characterization and molecular typing, providing a valuable tool for surveys and surveillance studies. A variety of technologies have been applied, and some specific and general pitfalls and limitations have been identified. This review provides an overview of the multitude of methods that have been reported for the detection of intestinal parasites and offers some guidance in applying these methods in the clinical laboratory and in epidemiological studies. PMID:24696439

  2. Methionine deficiency reduces autophagy and accelerates death in intestinal epithelial cells infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Li, Fengna; Ren, Wenkai; Kong, Xiangfeng; Qiu, Wei; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2015-10-01

    Infections by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) result in large economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Dietary supplementation with amino acids has been considered as a potential mechanism to improve host defenses against infection. The goal of this study was to determine whether methionine deprivation alters ETEC interactions with porcine intestinal epithelial cells. IPEC-1 cells were cultured in media with or without L-methionine. Methionine deprivation resulted in enhanced ETEC adhesion and increased both the cytotoxicity and apoptotic responses of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. Methionine deprivation inhibited IPEC-1 cell autophagic responses, suggesting that the increased cytotoxicity of ETEC to methionine-deprived IPEC-1 cells might be due to defects in autophagy.

  3. Mouse intestinal innate immune responses altered by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Zhu, Xiaoping; Chen, Shuai; Li, Tiejun; Wang, Shengping; Tang, Yulong; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2014-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of human and porcine morbidity and mortality. The current study was conducted to identify intestinal immunity that is altered in a mouse model of ETEC infection. Innate immune responses and inflammation were analyzed. The activation of signal transduction pathways, including toll like receptor 4 (TLR-4)-nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), was analyzed using immunoblotting and PCR array analyses. We found that ETEC infection promoted the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines through the activation of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Meanwhile, ETEC infection affected sIgA transportation and Paneth cell function. These data improve our understanding of how ETEC causes disease in animals.

  4. Distribution and risk factors associated with intestinal parasite infections among children with gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Hamed; Haghighi, Ali; Salehi, Roya; Azargashb, Eznollah

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Prevalence and risk factors associated with intestinal parasites among children ≤ 12 years old in Nahavand county western Iran, was the objective of this search. Background: Intestinal parasites (IPs) are important health problems among most societies. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out during 6 months from April to September 2014 in Nahavand County western Iran. Fecal samples were collected from 500 children suffering from gastrointestinal disorders (GIDs) and examined by macroscopy and microscopic (using saline and iodine wet mount, formalin-ether sedimentation, Trichrome and modified Ziehl Neelsen staining) methods. Finally, data was analyzed using Chi-square (Chi2) test and Fisher’s exact test as well as logistic regression. Results: 21.8% (109/500) of the samples were infected by one or more IPs. The most common parasites were Blastocystis sp. (16.2%), followed by Cryptosporidium spp. (2.6%), Giardia lamblia (1.6%), and Entamoeba coli (1.6%). Prevalence of intestinal parasite infections were significantly associated with age (OR= 2.280; CI 95% = 1.375-3.830; P<0.002), gender (OR= 0551; CI 95% = 0.348-0.875; P<0.011), contact with domestic animal or soil (OR= 0.492; CI 95% = 0.282-0.860; P<0.013) and seasons (OR= 2.012; CI 95% = 1.254-3.227; P<0.004). There was a significant correlation between IPs with diarrhea (OR= 3.027; CI 95% = 1.712-5.345; P<0.001) and nausea or vomiting (OR= 3.261; CI 95% = 1.281-8.175; P<0.013). Conclusion: Blastocystis sp. was the most prevalent parasites among children in Nahavand County and Helminthes infection have been dramatically decreased. Our finding shown that gender, age, season and contact with domestic animals or soil polluted are main predictive factors for intestinal parasite infections among children in this region. Moreover, IPs infection among children with gastrointestinal disorders were significantly associated with diarrhea and vomiting or nausea signs. PMID:28224033

  5. Infection prevention and control measures for acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings: an update.

    PubMed

    Seto, W H; Conly, J M; Pessoa-Silva, C L; Malik, M; Eremin, S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses account for the majority of the acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) globally with a mortality exceeding 4 million deaths per year. The most commonly encountered viruses, in order of frequency, include influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza and adenovirus. Current evidence suggests that the major mode of transmission of ARls is through large droplets, but transmission through contact (including hand contamination with subsequent self-inoculation) and infectious respiratory aerosols of various sizes and at short range (coined as "opportunistic" airborne transmission) may also occur for some pathogens. Opportunistic airborne transmission may occur when conducting highrisk aerosol generating procedures and airborne precautions will be required in this setting. General infection control measures effective for all respiratory viral infections are reviewed and followed by discussion on some of the common viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and the recently discovered novel coronavirus.

  6. Relationship between expression of triggering receptor-1 on myeloid cells in intestinal tissue and intestinal barrier dysfunction in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kai; Dang, Sheng-chun; Zhang, Jian-xin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) in the intestine was upregulated and correlated with disease activity in inflammatory bowel diseases. Membrane-bound TREM-1 protein is increased in the pancreas, liver and kidneys of patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), suggesting that TREM-1 may act as an important mediator of inflammation and subsequent extra-pancreatic organ injury. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the expression of TREM-1 in intestinal tissue and intestinal barrier dysfunction in SAP. METHODS: Sixty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a sham operation group (SO group, n=32) and a SAP group (n=32). A SAP model was established by retrograde injection of 5% sodium deoxycholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. Specimens were taken from blood and intestinal tissue 2, 6, 12, and 48 hours after operation respectively. The levels of D-lactate, diamine oxidase (DAO) and endotoxin in serum were measured using an improved spectro-photometric method. The expression levels of TREM-1, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA in terminal ileum were detected by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Specimens of the distal ileum were taken to determine pathological changes by a validated histology score. RESULTS: The serum levels of D-lactate, DAO and endotoxin were significantly increased in each subgroup of SAP compared with the SO group (P<0.01, P<0.05). The expression levels of TREM-1, IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA in the terminal ileum in each subgroup of SAP were significantly higher than those in the SO group (P<0.01, P<0.05). The expression level of TREM-1mRNA was positively correlated with IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA (r=0.956, P=0.044; r=0.986, P=0.015), but the correlation was not found between IL-1β mRNA and TNF-α mRNA (P=0.133). Compared to the SO group, the pathological changes were aggravated significantly in the SAP group. CONCLUSIONS

  7. Expression of digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in the small intestine of Eimeria acervulina-infected chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coccidiosis is a major disease of poultry caused by the intestinal protozoa Eimeria. Eimeria acervulina mainly infects the duodenum, causing lesions in epithelial tissue. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of E. acervulina infection on the expression of 18 nutrient transport...

  8. Actinomyces infection causing acute right iliac fossa pain

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajah, Narendranath; Hameed, Waseem; Middleton, Simon; Booth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This is a case of a 75-year-old man being admitted to the on-call surgical department with acute abdominal pain. On arrival he was clinically dehydrated and shocked with localised pain over McBurney's point and examination findings were suggestive of appendiceal or other colonic pathology. Full blood testing revealed a white cell count of 38×109/L and a C reactive protein (CRP) of 278 mg/L. A CT scan revealed a gallbladder empyema that extended into the right iliac fossa. This case highlights the potential for a hyperdistended gallbladder empyema to present as acute right iliac fossa pain with blood tests suggestive of complicated disease. Further analysis confirmed Actinomyces infection as the underlying aetiology prior to a laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy. This case serves to remind clinicians of this as a rare potential cause of atypical gallbladder pathology. PMID:24872493

  9. The Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Schober, Megan; Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by pediatricians. Currently, the diagnosis and management of acute urinary tract infection and recurrent urinary tract infection in children remains controversial. Recently published guidelines and large clinical trials have attempted to clarify UTI diagnostic and management strategies. In this manuscript, we review the diagnosis and management of acute and recurrent urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. PMID:25421102

  10. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity.

    PubMed

    van de Heijning, Bert J M; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M

    2015-07-08

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%-75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed.

  11. The magnitude and risk factors of intestinal parasitic infection in relation to Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection and immune status, at ALERT Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Taye, Biruhalem; Desta, Kassu; Ejigu, Selamawit; Dori, Geme Urge

    2014-06-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and intestinal parasitic infections are among the main health problems in developing countries like Ethiopia. Particularly, co-infections of these diseases would worsen the progression of HIV to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude and risk factors for intestinal parasites in relation to HIV infection and immune status. The study was conducted in (1) HIV positive on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and (2) ART naïve HIV positive patients, and (3) HIV-negative individuals, at All African Leprosy and Tuberculosis (TB) Eradication and Rehabilitation Training Center (ALERT) hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Study participants were interviewed using structured questionnaires to obtain socio-demographic characteristics and assess risk factors associated with intestinal parasitic infection. Intestinal parasites were identified from fecal samples by direct wet mount, formol ether concentration, and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining techniques. The immune status was assessed by measuring whole blood CD4 T-cell count. The overall magnitude of intestinal parasite was 35.08%. This proportion was different among study groups with 39.2% (69/176), 38.83% (40/103) and 27.14% (38/140) in ART naïve HIV positives patients, in HIV negatives, and in HIV positive on ART patients respectively. HIV positive patients on ART had significantly lower magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection compared to HIV negative individuals. Intestinal helminths were significantly lower in HIV positive on ART and ART naïve patients than HIV negatives. Low monthly income, and being married, divorced or widowed were among the socio-demographic characteristics associated with intestinal parasitic infection. No association was observed between the magnitude of intestinal parasites and CD4 T-cell count. However, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Isospora belli were exclusively identified in individuals with CD4 T

  12. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed. PMID:26091450

  13. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  14. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  15. IL-6 ameliorates acute lung injury in influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chung-Teng; Yang, Shiu-Ju; Leu, Chia-Hsing; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is involved in innate and adaptive immune responses to defend against pathogens. It also participates in the process of influenza infection by affecting viral clearance and immune cell responses. However, whether IL-6 impacts lung repair in influenza pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of IL-6 in acute influenza infection in mice. IL-6-deficient mice infected with influenza virus exhibited higher lethality, lost more body weight and had higher fibroblast accumulation and lower extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover in the lung than their wild-type counterparts. Deficiency in IL-6 enhanced proliferation, migration and survival of lung fibroblasts, as well as increased virus-induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. IL-6-deficient lung fibroblasts produced elevated levels of TGF-β, which may contribute to their survival. Furthermore, macrophage recruitment to the lung and phagocytic activities of macrophages during influenza infection were reduced in IL-6-deficient mice. Collectively, our results indicate that IL-6 is crucial for lung repair after influenza-induced lung injury through reducing fibroblast accumulation, promoting epithelial cell survival, increasing macrophage recruitment to the lung and enhancing phagocytosis of viruses by macrophages. This study suggests that IL-6 may be exploited for lung repair during influenza infection. PMID:28262742

  16. Anisakiasis and intestinal endometriosis: under-recognized conditions in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Justicia, Carlos; Granero Peiró, Lucia; Arabe Paredes, Jorge Ali

    2017-01-01

    Anisakiasis and endometriosis is rare cause of intestinal obstruction and even perforation, the latter being extremely rare. We report the case of a patient with intestinal obstruction that progress to perforation and whose differential diagnosis is complex. The interest in this clinical case lies in the unexpected histology of the surgical specimen after the intervention of the patient, because the intestinal endometriosis as intestinal anisakiasis are rare entities that make diagnosis difficult.

  17. Epidemiology of infections with intestinal parasites and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among sugar-estate residents in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Fontanet, A L; Sahlu, T; Rinke de Wit, T; Messele, T; Masho, W; Woldemichael, T; Yeneneh, H; Coutinho, R A

    2000-04-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections could play an important role in the progression of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), by further disturbing the immune system whilst it is already engaged in the fight against HIV. HIV and intestinal parasitic infections were investigated in 1239, randomly selected individuals, aged 15-54 years, living on a sugar estate in central Ethiopia. Intestinal parasites were identified in faecal samples (one/subject) using direct, concentration, and (for Strongyloides stercoralis larvae) Baermann methods. HIV serological status was determined using ELISA, with ELISA-positive samples confirmed as positive by western blotting. Most (70.1%) of the subjects were infected with at least one intestinal parasite and 3.1% were seropositive (but asymptomatic) for HIV. The intestinal parasites identified in the study population were amoebic parasites (Entamoeba histolytica/Enta. dispar) (24.6%), hookworms (23.8%), Ascaris lumbricoides (22.2%), Trichuris trichiura (19.5%), S. stercoralis (13.0%), Taenia saginata (4.5%), Giardia lamblia (3.0%), and Enterobius vermicularis (1.3%). Overall, the HIV-positives were no more or less likely to carry intestinal parasites than the HIV-negatives (76.2% v. 69.9%; P > 0.05). However, when each parasite was considered separately, amoebic parasites were found to be more common in the HIV-positives than the HIV-negatives (43.7% v. 24.0%; P < 0.05). This difference remained significant in a multivariate analysis, after controlling for the socio-demographic characteristics of the study participants. In conclusion, there was moderate interaction between intestinal parasites and HIV at the asymptomatic stage of HIV infection. The observed association between amoebic and HIV infections requires confirmation in a prospective study, allowing for the analysis of biological mechanisms involved in the association.

  18. Evolution of the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among the French armed forces in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Christen, Jacques-Robert; Mura, Marie; Roudaut, Gwenaëlle; Drogoul, Anne-Sophie; Demar, Magalie; Briolant, Sébastien; Garnotel, Eric; Simon, Fabrice; Pommier De Santi, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    Two cross-sectional studies were performed 2 years apart in French military personnel deployed from France to French Guiana. In 2011, military medical centres in French Guiana reported 40 cases of intestinal parasitism in service members returning from illegal gold mining sites in the rainforest. In 2013, 48 out of 132 service members returning from French Guiana after a 4-month mission had eosinophilia and seven were infected with hookworm. A presumptive first-line treatment with albendazole could be the most pragmatic strategy.

  19. Microbial transformation from normal oral microbiota to acute endodontic infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endodontic infections are a leading cause of oro-facial pain and tooth loss in western countries, and may lead to severe life-threatening infections. These infections are polymicrobial with high bacterial diversity. Understanding the spatial transition of microbiota from normal oral cavities through the infected root canal to the acute periapical abscess can improve our knowledge of the pathogenesis of endodontic infections and lead to more effective treatment. We obtained samples from the oral cavity, infected root canal and periapical abscess of 8 patients (5 with localized and 3 with systemic infections). Microbial populations in these samples were analyzed using next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons. Bioinformatics tools and statistical tests with rigorous criteria were used to elucidate the spatial transition of the microbiota from normal to diseased sites. Results On average, 10,000 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from each sample. All sequences fell into 11 different bacterial phyla. The microbial diversity in root canal and abscess samples was significantly lower than in the oral samples. Streptococcus was the most abundant genus in oral cavities while Prevotella and Fusobacterium were most abundant in diseased samples. The microbiota community structures of root canal and abscess samples were, however, more similar to each other than to the oral cavity microbiota. Using rigorous criteria and novel bioinformatics tools, we found that Granulicatella adiacens, Eubacterium yurii, Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella salivae, Streptococcus mitis, and Atopobium rimae were over-represented in diseased samples. Conclusions We used a novel approach and high-throughput methodologies to characterize the microbiota associated normal and diseased oral sites in the same individuals. PMID:22839737

  20. Patient Risk Factors for Mechanical Wound Complications and Postoperative Infections after Elective Open Intestinal Resection

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei Chao; Turner, Akiva; Imon, Michael; Dyda, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies focused on the construction of preoperative patient surgical risk profile using only patients’ personal, social history, and comorbidity profiles. Objective To identify risk factors for mechanical wound complications and postoperative infections in patients’ preoperative profiles. Design Quantitative retrospective cohort study using 2009–2011 Health Care Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) databases. Patients 56,853 patients who underwent elective open intestinal resection. Measurements Predictors of mechanical wound complications and postoperative infections in patients’ personal, social history, and comorbidity profiles. Results Patients age 18–39 were more likely to suffer mechanical wound complications compared to patients age 65–79 (OR = 1.9, 95% CI [1.5, 2.4], p < .01) and to patients age 80 and over (OR = 2.9, 95% CI [2.2, 3.8], p < .01). Patients age 18–39 were also more likely to suffer postoperative infections compared to patients age 65–79 (OR = 1.4, 95% CI [1.1, 1.6], p < .01) and to patients age 80 and over (OR = 2.0, 95% CI [1.6, 2.6], p < .01). Other most significant predictors included male gender, fluid and electrolyte disorders, pulmonary circulation disorders, and weight loss, as well as patients with comorbidities. All statistically significant predictors with positive estimates for postoperative infections were also statistically significant predictors of mechanical wound complications. Conclusions Individual patient risk profile can be constructed using preoperative patient profiles for improving perioperative care coordination and patient care quality. Postoperative infections were associated with mechanical wound complications in patients undergoing elective open intestinal resection. PMID:27833511

  1. Self-medication with tannin-rich browse in goats infected with gastro-intestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Amit, M; Cohen, I; Marcovics, A; Muklada, H; Glasser, T A; Ungar, E D; Landau, S Y

    2013-12-06

    Primates self-medicate to alleviate symptoms caused by gastro-intestinal nematodes (GIN) by consuming plants that contain secondary compounds. Would goats display the same dietary acumen? Circumstantial evidence suggests they could: goats in Mediterranean rangelands containing a shrub - Pistacia lentiscus - with known anthelmintic properties consume significant amounts of the shrub, particularly in the fall when the probability of being infected with GIN is greatest, even though its tannins impair protein metabolism and deter herbivory. In order to test rigorously the self-medication hypothesis in goats, we conducted a controlled study using 21 GIN-infected and 23 non-infected goats exposed to browse foliage from P. lentiscus, another browse species - Phillyrea latifolia, or hay during the build-up of infection. GIN-infected goats showed clear symptoms of infection, which was alleviated by P. lentiscus foliage but ingesting P. lentiscus had a detrimental effect on protein metabolism in the absence of disease. When given a choice between P. lentiscus and hay, infected goats of the Mamber breed showed higher preference for P. lentiscus than non-infected counterparts, in particular if they had been exposed to Phillyrea latifolia before. This was not found in Damascus goats. Damascus goats, which exhibit higher propensity to consume P. lentiscus may use it as a drug prophylactically, whereas Mamber goats, which are more reluctant to ingest it, select P. lentiscus foliage therapeutically. These results hint at subtle trade-offs between the roles of P. lentiscus as a food, a toxin and a medicine. This is the first evidence of self-medication in goats under controlled conditions. Endorsing the concept of self-medication could greatly modify the current paradigm of veterinary parasitology whereby man decides when and how to treat GIN-infected animals, and result in transferring this decision to the animals themselves.

  2. Acute intestinal injury induced by acetic acid and casein: prevention by intraluminal misoprostol

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.; Zhang, x.J.; Gu, x.A.; Clark, D.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Acute injury was established in anesthetized rabbits by intraluminal administration of acetic acid with and without bovine casein, into loops of distal small intestine. Damage was quantified after 45 minutes by the blood-to-lumen movement of {sup 51}Cr-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-tagged bovine serum albumin as well as luminal fluid histamine levels. The amount of titratable acetic acid used to lower the pH of the treatment solutions to pH 4.0 was increased by the addition of calcium gluconate. Luminal acetic acid caused a 19-fold increase in {sup 51}Cr-EDTA accumulation over saline controls; casein did not modify this effect. In saline controls, loop fluid histamine levels bordered on the limits of detection (1 ng/g) but were elevated 19-fold by acetic acid exposure and markedly increased (118-fold) by the combination of acid and casein. Intraluminal misoprostol (3 or 30 micrograms/mL), administered 30 minutes before acetic acid, significantly attenuated the increase in epithelial permeability (luminal {sup 51}Cr-EDTA, fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine serum albumin accumulation) and histamine release (P less than 0.05). Diphenhydramine, alone or in combination with cimetidine, and indomethacin (5 mg/kg IV) were not protective. It is concluded that exposure of the epithelium to acetic acid promotes the transepithelial movement of casein leading to enhanced mast cell activation and mucosal injury. Damage to the epithelial barrier can be prevented by misoprostol.

  3. Recent Toxoplasmosis Infection With Acute Myopericarditis and Persistent Troponin Elevation in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Roubille, François; Roubille, Camille; Lattuca, Benoît; Gervasoni, Richard; Vernhet-Kovacsik, Hélène; Leclercq, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Although often considered as "begnin", acute infections in young healthy adults can lead to heart inflammation, including acute myocarditis. We report a rare case of myopericarditis in a young immunocompetent adult, in the context of recent toxoplasmosis infection. Clinical presentation was common acute pericarditis, but with risk biomarkers: high troponin I levels and multiple inflammation-compatible images on MR-scan. Diagnosis of myopericarditis was established. In spite of spontaneous favourable clinical evolution, troponin remained elevated. MR-scan is shown; acute myocarditis in the context of an acute toxoplasmosis infection is discussed.

  4. [Cryptosporidium sp infections and other intestinal parasites in food handlers from Zulia state, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Freites, Azael; Colmenares, Deisy; Pérez, Marly; García, María; Díaz de Suárez, Odelis

    2009-03-01

    Cryptosporidiosis in food handlers from Venezuela is unknown, being this an important public health problem in immunosuppressed patients. To determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium sp and other intestinal parasites in food handlers from Zulia State, one hundred nineteen fecal samples were evaluated by wet mount, concentrated according to Ritchie and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining. Fourteen (11.8%) were positive for Cryptosporidium sp and associated with other protozoosis (P < 0.05), being most frequent Endolimax nana (42.9%). The general prevalence of the intestinal parasitism was 48.7%, emphasizing E. nana (41.2%), followed by Blastocystis hominis (38.7%) and Entamoeba coli (17.6%). The most frequent pathogenic protozoa was Giardia lamblia (13.4%), followed by the complex Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar (9.2%). 4.1% were positive for intestinal helminthes. The infection by Cryptosporidium sp is frequent in food handlers from Zulia State. Given to the results of this investigation and the nonexistence of studies in this population, is necessary to deepen in the impact of this parasitism in food handlers and the consumers of their products.

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of intestinal protozoan and helminth infections among pulmonary tuberculosis patients without HIV infection in a rural county in P. R. China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-09-01

    Although co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites, including protozoa and helminths, in humans has been widely studied globally, very little of this phenomenon is known in China. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a rural county of China to investigate such co-infections. Patients with pulmonary TB (PTB) undergoing anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (anti-MTB) treatment were surveyed by questionnaires, and their feces and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal protozoa and helminths, routine blood examination and HIV detection. The χ(2) test and multivariate logistic regression model were used to identify risk factors. A total of 369 patients with PTB were included and all of them were HIV negative. Overall, only 7.3% of participants were infected with intestinal protozoa, among which prevalence of Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba spp. and Trichomonas hominis were 6.0%, 1.1% and 0.3%, respectively; 7.0% were infected with intestinal helminths, among which prevalence of hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides and Clonorchis sinensis were 4.3%, 1.9%, 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively; and 0.5% were simultaneously infected with intestinal protozoa and helminths. Among patients with PTB, body mass index (BMI)≤18 (OR=3.30, 95% CI=1.44-7.54) and raised poultry or livestock (e.g., chicken, duck, pig) (OR=3.96, 95% CI=1.32-11.89) were significantly associated with harboring intestinal protozoan infection, while BMI≤18 (OR=3.32, 95% CI=1.39-7.91), anemia (OR=3.40, 95% CI=1.44-8.02) and laboring barefoot in farmlands (OR=4.54, 95% CI=1.88-10.92) were significantly associated with having intestinal helminth infection. Additionally, there was no significant relationship between duration of anti-MTB treatment and infection rates of intestinal parasites including protozoa and helminths. Therefore, preventing malnutrition, avoiding unprotected contact with reservoirs of protozoa, and improving health education for good

  6. Effect of immunologic reactions on rat intestinal epithelium. Correlation of increased permeability to chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and ovalbumin during acute inflammation and anaphylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramage, J.K.; Stanisz, A.; Scicchitano, R.; Hunt, R.H.; Perdue, M.H.

    1988-06-01

    In these studies we compared jejunal permeability to two probes--chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) (mol wt, 360) and ovalbumin (mol wt, 45,000)--under control conditions, during acute intestinal inflammation, and in response to systemic anaphylaxis. Acute inflammation was produced after infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and rats were studied at day 0 (control), day 4 (early), day 10 (acute), and day 35 (postinfection). At the latter stage, immune rats were also studied during anaphylaxis induced by i.v. N. brasiliensis antigen. In each study, blood and urine were sampled over 5 h after the probes were simultaneously injected into ligated loops in anesthetized rats. In controls, small quantities (less than 0.04% and 0.002% of the administered dose for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin, respectively) appeared in the circulation and plateaued at 1 h. During acute inflammation, the appearance of both probes continued to increase with time. Compared with controls, 5-h values for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin were (a) significantly elevated at day 4 (p less than 0.005), (b) increased approximately 20-fold at day 10 (p less than 0.005 and less than 0.01, respectively), and (c) normal at day 35. Urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA followed the same pattern. During anaphylaxis, appearance of the probes in the circulation increased at 1 h to values approximately 10-fold those in controls (p less than 0.001 and less than 0.01, for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin, respectively), and then declined. Urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA over 5 h was also significantly increased. We conclude that epithelial barrier function becomes impaired during both acute inflammation and anaphylaxis. In this rat model, gut permeability changes to 51Cr-EDTA reflect gut permeability changes to macromolecular antigens.

  7. Differentiation of distinct long-lived memory CD4 T cells in intestinal tissues after oral Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, P A; Fu, H H; Qiu, Z; Khairallah, C; Pham, Q M; Puddington, L; Khanna, K M; Lefrançois, L; Sheridan, B S

    2017-03-01

    Mucosal antigen-specific CD4 T-cell responses to intestinal pathogens remain incompletely understood. Here we examined the CD4 T-cell response after oral infection with an internalin A 'murinized' Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Oral Lm infection induced a robust endogenous listeriolysin O (LLO)-specific CD4 T-cell response with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics in the intestine. Circulating LLO-specific CD4 T cells transiently expressed the 'gut-homing' integrin α4β7 and accumulated in the intestinal lamina propria and epithelium where they were maintained independent of interleukin (IL)-15. The majority of intestinal LLO-specific CD4 T cells were CD27(-) Ly6C(-) and CD69(+) CD103(-) while the lymphoid LLO-specific CD4 T cells were heterogeneous based on CD27 and Ly6C expression and predominately CD69(-). LLO-specific effector CD4 T cells transitioned into a long-lived memory population that phenotypically resembled their parent effectors and displayed hallmarks of residency. In addition, intestinal effector and memory CD4 T cells showed a predominant polyfunctional Th1 profile producing IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-2 at high levels with minimal but detectable levels of IL-17A. Depletion of CD4 T cells in immunized mice led to elevated bacterial burden after challenge infection highlighting a critical role for memory CD4 T cells in controlling intestinal intracellular pathogens.

  8. Differentiation of distinct long-lived memory CD4 T cells in intestinal tissues after oral Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, PA; Fu, HH; Qiu, Z; Khairallah, C; Pham, QM; Puddington, L; Khanna, KM; Lefrançois, L; Sheridan, BS

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal antigen-specific CD4 T cell responses to intestinal pathogens remain incompletely understood. Here we examined the CD4 T cell response after oral infection with an internalin A ‘murinized’ Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Oral Lm infection induced a robust endogenous listeriolysin O (LLO)-specific CD4 T cell response with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics in the intestine. Circulating LLO-specific CD4 T cells transiently expressed the ‘gut-homing’ integrin α4β7 and accumulated in the intestinal lamina propria and epithelium where they were maintained independent of IL-15. The majority of intestinal LLO-specific CD4 T cells were CD27− Ly6C− and CD69+ CD103− while the lymphoid LLO-specific CD4 T cells were heterogeneous based on CD27 and Ly6C expression and predominately CD69−. LLO-specific effector CD4 T cells transitioned into a long-lived memory population that phenotypically resembled their parent effectors and displayed hallmarks of residency. In addition, intestinal effector and memory CD4 T cells showed a predominant polyfunctional Th1 profile producing IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2 at high levels with minimal but detectable levels of IL-17A. Depletion of CD4 T cells in immunized mice led to elevated bacterial burden after challenge infection highlighting a critical role for memory CD4 T cells in controlling intestinal intracellular pathogens. PMID:27461178

  9. Preparing for the next round: convalescent care after acute infection.

    PubMed

    Rohde, J E

    1978-12-01

    Infections pose a nutritional stress on the growing child. No therapeutic goal is as important as the rapid recovery of preillness weight after acute infections. Successful convalescence, with supernormal growth rates, can be achieved with relatively brief periods of intensive refeeding, offsetting any tendency toward reduced immune defenses or other nutritionally determined susceptibilities to further infection. Since the mother is the only person who can effectively manage convalescent care, she must be given specific tasks with measurable targets in order to reliably oversee the child's rehabilitation. Not generally considered in the realm of preventive medicine, effective home-based convalencent care is the first crucial step in preventing the next round of illness. An approach to the widespread mobilization of mothers to monitor and sustain their children's growth is proposed in this paper. Rather than a passive recipient of health services, the mother becomes the basic health worker, providing diagnostic and therapeutic primary care for her child. Only the mother can break the malnutrition-infection cycle.

  10. INTESTINAL PARASITIC INFECTIONS AND ATOPIC DISEASES IN CHILDREN: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY.

    PubMed

    Al Ghwass, Mohamed Me; El Dash, Hanaa H; Amin, Sayed A; Hussin, Shimaa S

    2015-08-01

    Different helminth parasites may have different effects on allergy depending on the timing of the exposure. A meta-analysis of many of studies reported the association between the presence of geohelminth eggs in stool samples and asthma provided some evidence for parasite-specific effects. This study evaluated the occurrence of allergy among different intestinal parasitic infected patients. A cross sectional study was carried out from June, 2013 to October, 2013 in the Pediatric Outpatient Clinic of Al-Fayoum University Hospitals among 55 children aged 2 years to 13 years. The data were collected using ISSAC questionnaire of allergy (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood) also laboratory analysis of complete blood picture, stool analysis and measurement of total serum IgE were performed for the patients. Among the patients 27 suffered from allergy and 28 had no allergic complain. Stool examinations showed Entrobius vernicularis (15), Trichostrongylus species (9), Hymenolepis nana (8), Entameba histolytica (8), Giardia lamblia (6), and mixed infections (9). The allergic group by parasitological examination 7 children (25.9%) had Entrobius vermicularis; 6 children (22.2%) Entameba histolytica; and 2 children (7.4 %) Giardia lamblia, with eosinophilic count was higher in the enterobiasis infected children than in protozoa infected ones. There were significantly high IgE levels in mixed parasitic infection (P= 0.006) and with Entrobius vermicularis infections (P=0.04). Also statistically significant difference between allergic groups by ISAAC score and the non allergic group regarding Ig E levels (P= 0.03). There was no significant difference between numbers of children with allergy and those without allergy among different parasitic infections. However, a marked significant association between the allergy and parasitic infected children was not declaimed.

  11. Membrane Vesicles Released by Intestinal Epithelial Cells Infected with Rotavirus Inhibit T-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Alfonso; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Rojas, Olga Lucía; Wolf, Marie; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Rotavirus (RV) predominantly replicates in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), and “danger signals” released by these cells may modulate viral immunity. We have recently shown that human model IEC (Caco-2 cells) infected with rhesus-RV release a non-inflammatory group of immunomodulators that includes heat shock proteins (HSPs) and TGF-β1. Here we show that both proteins are released in part in association with membrane vesicles (MV) obtained from filtrated Caco-2 supernatants concentrated by ultracentrifugation. These MV express markers of exosomes (CD63 and others), but not of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or nuclei. Larger quantities of proteins associated with MV were released by RV-infected cells than by non-infected cells. VP6 co-immunoprecipitated with CD63 present in these MV, and VP6 co-localized with CD63 in RV-infected cells, suggesting that this viral protein is associated with the MV, and that this association occurs intracellularly. CD63 present in MV preparations from stool samples from 36 children with gastroenteritis due or not due to RV were analyzed. VP6 co-immunoprecipitated with CD63 in 3/8 stool samples from RV-infected children, suggesting that these MV are released by RV-infected cells in vivo. Moreover, fractions that contained MV from RV-infected cells induced death and inhibited proliferation of CD4+ T cells to a greater extent than fractions from non-infected cells. These effects were in part due to TGF-β, because they were reversed by treatment of the T cells with the TGF-β-receptor inhibitor ALK5i. MV from RV-infected and non-infected cells were heterogeneous, with morphologies and typical flotation densities described for exosomes (between 1.10 and 1.18 g/mL), and denser vesicles (>1.24 g/mL). Both types of MV from RV-infected cells were more efficient at inhibiting T-cell function than were those from non-infected cells. We propose that RV infection of IEC releases MV that modulate viral immunity. PMID:21142445

  12. Impact of drainage and sewerage on intestinal nematode infections in poor urban areas in Salvador, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moraes, L R S; Cancio, Jacira Azevedo; Cairncross, Sandy

    2004-04-01

    This cross-sectional study was conducted in 1989 among children aged between 5 and 14 years old living in nine poor urban areas of the city of Salvador (pop. 2.44 million), capital of Bahia State, in Northeast Brazil. Three of these areas had benefited from both drainage and sewerage, 3 from improved drainage only, and 3 from neither. The children studied thus belonged to 3 exposure groups regarding their level of sanitation infrastructure. An extensive questionnaire was applied to collect information on each child and on the conditions of the household, and stool examinations of the children 5-14 years old were performed to measure nematode infection. Comparison of the sewerage group with the drainage-only group and the latter with the control (no sewerage or drainage) group showed that, when the level of community sanitation was better, the prevalence of infection among children was less, but risk factors identified for infection were more numerous and more significant. Intensity of infection with Trichuris, but not with Ascaris or hookworm, was also less. The results suggest that sewerage and drainage can have a significant effect on intestinal nematode infections, by reducing transmission occurring in the public domain.

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection with intestinal metaplasia: An independent risk factor for colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ye; Chen, Yi-Na; Zhao, Qian; Chen, Chao; Lin, Chun-Jing; Jin, Yin; Pan, Shuang; Wu, Jian-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To explore the association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection status, intestinal metaplasia (IM), and colorectal adenomas. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed 1641 individuals aged ≥ 40 years who underwent physical examination, laboratory testing, 13C-urea breath testing, gastroscopy, colonoscopy, and an interview to ascertain baseline characteristics and general state of health. Histopathological results were obtained by gastric and colorectal biopsies. RESULTS The prevalence of H. pylori infection and adenomas was 51.5% (845/1641) and 18.1% (297/1641), respectively. H. pylori infection was significantly correlated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas (crude OR = 1.535, 95%CI: 1.044-1.753, P = 0.022; adjusted OR = 1.359, 95%CI: 1.035-1.785, P = 0.028). Individuals with IM had an elevated risk of colorectal adenomas (crude OR = 1.664, 95%CI: 1.216-2.277, P = 0.001; adjusted OR = 1.381, 95%CI: 0.998-1.929, P = 0.059). Stratification based on H. pylori infection stage and IM revealed that IM accompanied by H. pylori infection was significantly associated with an increased risk of adenomas (crude OR = 2.109, 95%CI: 1.383-3.216, P = 0.001; adjusted OR = 1.765, 95%CI: 1.130-2.757, P = 0.012). CONCLUSION H. pylori-related IM is associated with a high risk of colorectal adenomas in Chinese individuals. PMID:28293091

  14. The gastro-intestinal helminth infections of domestic fowl in Dschang, western Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Mpoame, M; Agbede, G

    1995-01-01

    Three hundred and fifty one chickens purchased from the Dschang animal market were examined for gastro-intestinal helminths. Ten species were found with the following prevalences: Heterakis brevispiculum (59.3%), Ascaridia galli (51.6%), Hymenolepis carioca (48.4%), Dispharynx spiralis (20.8%), Tetrameres americana (17.1%), Amoebotaenia cuneata (15.1%), Raillietina tetragona (14.5%), Syngamus trachea (13.7%), Hymenolepis cantaniana (5.7%) and Capillaria contorta (2.0%). Infections were predominantly mixed (93.5%). The infection rates were not influenced by host sex except for A. galli which was more prevalent in cocks. Older chickens showed some resistance to A. cuneata and S. trachea. Parasite prevalence and/or worm burdens were generally higher during the rainy season (April to October).

  15. Intestinal smooth muscle cells locally enhance stem cell factor (SCF) production against gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Masahiro

    2011-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells can produce stem cell factor (SCF) in the normal state for the preservation of mast cells, but it is still unknown whether smooth muscle cells can enhance SCF production in response to the pathological stimuli. The present study showed that smooth muscle cells in mast cell-increased regions around worm cysts of intestinal nematodes significantly enhanced SCF gene expression compared with mast cell non-increased regions in same sample. SCF gene expression in mast cell non-increased regions in nematode-infected mice showed almost the same level as in non-infected control groups. These results indicate that smooth muscle cells can locally enhance SCF gene expression, and may have a role in local immunological reactions as growth factor-producing cells.

  16. The intestinal microbiota dysbiosis and Clostridium difficile infection: is there a relationship with inflammatory bowel disease?

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Justyna; Palagani, Vindhya

    2013-01-01

    Gut microbiota is a compilation of microorganisms dwelling in the entire mammalian gastrointestinal tract. They display a symbiotic relationship with the host contributing to its intestinal health and disease. Even a slight fluctuation in this equipoise may be deleterious to the host, leading to many pathological conditions like Clostridium difficile infection or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this review, we focus on the role of microbial dysbiosis in initiation of C. difficile infection and IBD, and we also touch upon the role of specific pathogens, particularly C. difficile, as causative agents of IBD. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms activated by C. difficile that contribute to the development and exacerbation of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23320050

  17. Maturation of intestinal defenses against peroral infection with group B coxsackievirus in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Loria, R M; Shadoff, N; Kibrick, S; Broitman, S

    1976-01-01

    The intestinal tract of adult mice provides effective protection against peroral infection with group B coxsackievirus. This protective function consists of at least two separate components. One is a barrier effect that prevents virus from passing through the mucosal side of the gut into the circulation. It becomes clearly evident at 18 days of life and is present thereafter. The other is a clearance mechanism that acts to eliminate virus from the enteric tract after infection has occurred. This is first demonstrable at about 14 to 18 days and also persists. The appearance of these protective functions coincides with the known development of enzymatic and morphological changes in the gut associated with the transition from suckling to weanling. PMID:1270146

  18. Maturation of intestinal defenses against peroral infection with group B coxsackievirus in mice.

    PubMed

    Loria, R M; Shadoff, N; Kibrick, S; Broitman, S

    1976-05-01

    The intestinal tract of adult mice provides effective protection against peroral infection with group B coxsackievirus. This protective function consists of at least two separate components. One is a barrier effect that prevents virus from passing through the mucosal side of the gut into the circulation. It becomes clearly evident at 18 days of life and is present thereafter. The other is a clearance mechanism that acts to eliminate virus from the enteric tract after infection has occurred. This is first demonstrable at about 14 to 18 days and also persists. The appearance of these protective functions coincides with the known development of enzymatic and morphological changes in the gut associated with the transition from suckling to weanling.

  19. Microbiota and pathogen 'pas de deux': setting up and breaking down barriers to intestinal infection.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Elizabeth S; Kendall, Melissa M

    2016-07-01

    The gut microbiota plays essential roles in human health and disease. In this review, we focus on the role of the intestinal microbiota in promoting resistance to infection by bacterial pathogens as well as how pathogens overcome this barrier. We discuss how the resident microbiota restricts growth and colonization of invading pathogens by limiting availability of nutrients and through generation of a hostile environment. Additionally, we examine how microbiota-derived signaling molecules interfere with bacterial virulence. In turn, we discuss how pathogens exploit non-competitive metabolites to replicate in vivo as well as to precisely control virulence and cause disease. This bacterial two step of creating and overcoming challenges important in preventing and establishing infection highlights the complexities of elucidating interactions between the commensal bacteria and pathogens. Better understanding of microbiota-pathogen interplay will have significant implications for developing novel therapeutics to treat infectious diseases.

  20. Application of PCR-based methods for diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Jaco J

    2014-12-01

    For many years PCR- and other DNA-based methods of pathogen detection have been available in most clinical microbiology laboratories; however, until recently these tools were not routinely exploited for the diagnosis of parasitic infections. Laboratories were initially reluctant to implement PCR as incorporation of such assays within the algorithm of tools available for the most accurate diagnosis of a large variety of parasites was unclear. With regard to diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections, the diversity of parasites that one can expect in most settings is far less than the parasitological textbooks would have you believe, hence developing a simplified diagnostic triage is feasible. Therefore the classical algorithm based on population, patient groups, use of immuno-suppressive drugs, travel history etc. is also applicable to decide when to perform and which additional techniques are to be used, if a multiplex PCR panel is used as a first-line screening diagnostic.

  1. [Epidemiology and bacteriological diagnosis of paediatric acute osteoarticular infections].

    PubMed

    Ferroni, A

    2007-10-01

    Acute paediatric osteo-articular infections require a fast and sensitive diagnosis allowing a treatment directed to the causative pathogen. Many micro-organisms can be incriminated, but Staphylococcus aureus and Kingella kingae markedly prevail. K. kingae became the first bacterial species responsible for septic arthritis in children < 3 years. More rarely, (2)haemolytic Streptococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae are found. The incidence of community acquired S. aureus resistant to oxacillin in osteo-articular infections is still low in France. The microbiological diagnosis of septic arthritis relies upon analysis of articular fluid, which requires systematic inoculation of a blood culture vial to increase the recovery rate of K. kingae. If the culture is negative, it is recommended to carry out a universal PCR or a PCR targeted to the main germs responsible for septic arthritis. Indeed, PCR represents an undeniable benefice for the diagnosis of paediatric septic arthritis, particularly for the DNA detection of K. kingae. The diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis relies primarily upon blood cultures, since the bone puncture is not a systematic procedure in this setting. Their efficiency is low, and there is still a need to look for other arguments of diagnosis such as search of possible portals of entry or specific serologies.

  2. Acute renal damage in infants after first urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Salvatore; Chertin, Boris; Yoneda, Akihiro; Rolle, Udo; Kelleher, Jeremiah; Puri, Prem

    2002-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common causes of unexplained fever in neonates. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of urinary tract anomalies and acute renal damage in neonates who presented with first urinary tract infection in the first 8 weeks of life. We reviewed the records of 95 infants, who were hospitalised with UTI during a 6-year period (1994-1999). Patients with antenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis and incomplete radiological investigations were excluded from the study. Of the remaining 57 patients, 42 were boys and 15 girls. The mean age at diagnosis was 32 days (range 5-60 days). All patients underwent renal ultrasonography (US), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan. Urinary tract abnormalities were detected in 20 (35%) patients. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was found in 19 (33%) neonates, 7 girls and 12 boys. Acute cortical defects on DMSA scan were present in 19 kidneys of patients with VUR and in 25 of those without reflux. Only one-third of neonates after first symptomatic UTI had VUR. We recommend that US, VCUG, and DMSA scan should be routinely performed after the first UTI in infants younger than 8 weeks.

  3. Intestinal Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Bacteria Mitigate Bovine Leukemia Virus Infection in Experimentally Infected Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Ferens, Witold A.; Cobbold, Rowland; Hovde, Carolyn J.

    2006-01-01

    Ruminants often carry gastrointestinal Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Stxs belong to a large family of ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), found in many plants and some bacteria. Plant RIPs, secreted into extracellular spaces, limit the spread of viruses through plant tissues by penetrating and killing virally infected cells. Previously, we showed Stx activity against bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cells in vitro and hypothesized that STEC bacteria have antiviral activity in ruminant hosts. Here, we investigated the impact of STEC on the initial phases of BLV infection in sheep. Sheep were treated with biweekly oral doses of E. coli O157:H7 (an STEC) or an isogenic stx mutant strain. A different group of sheep were similarly treated with five naturally occurring ovine STEC isolates or stx-negative E. coli. Intestinal STEC bacteria were enumerated and identified by standard fecal culture and DNA hybridization. Oral STEC treatment did not always result in carriage of STEC, although many animals consistently presented with >104 CFU/g feces. BLV viremia was assessed by spontaneous lymphocyte proliferation (SLP) in cultures of blood mononuclear cells and by syncytium formation in cocultures of the same with F-81 indicator cells. SLP was lower (P < 0.05) and syncytia were fewer (P < 0.05) in STEC-treated sheep than in untreated sheep. Both lower SLP and fewer syncytia positively correlated with fecal STEC numbers. Average weight gain post-BLV challenge was higher in STEC-treated sheep than in untreated sheep (P < 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that in ruminants, intestinal STEC bacteria have antiviral activity and mitigate BLV-induced disease. PMID:16622229

  4. Intestinal Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli bacteria mitigate bovine leukemia virus infection in experimentally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Ferens, Witold A; Cobbold, Rowland; Hovde, Carolyn J

    2006-05-01

    Ruminants often carry gastrointestinal Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Stxs belong to a large family of ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), found in many plants and some bacteria. Plant RIPs, secreted into extracellular spaces, limit the spread of viruses through plant tissues by penetrating and killing virally infected cells. Previously, we showed Stx activity against bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cells in vitro and hypothesized that STEC bacteria have antiviral activity in ruminant hosts. Here, we investigated the impact of STEC on the initial phases of BLV infection in sheep. Sheep were treated with biweekly oral doses of E. coli O157:H7 (an STEC) or an isogenic stx mutant strain. A different group of sheep were similarly treated with five naturally occurring ovine STEC isolates or stx-negative E. coli. Intestinal STEC bacteria were enumerated and identified by standard fecal culture and DNA hybridization. Oral STEC treatment did not always result in carriage of STEC, although many animals consistently presented with >10(4) CFU/g feces. BLV viremia was assessed by spontaneous lymphocyte proliferation (SLP) in cultures of blood mononuclear cells and by syncytium formation in cocultures of the same with F-81 indicator cells. SLP was lower (P < 0.05) and syncytia were fewer (P < 0.05) in STEC-treated sheep than in untreated sheep. Both lower SLP and fewer syncytia positively correlated with fecal STEC numbers. Average weight gain post-BLV challenge was higher in STEC-treated sheep than in untreated sheep (P < 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that in ruminants, intestinal STEC bacteria have antiviral activity and mitigate BLV-induced disease.

  5. Apical leptin induces chloride secretion by intestinal epithelial cells and in a rat model of acute chemotherapy-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hoda, Raschid M.; Scharl, Michael; Keely, Stephen J.; McCole, Declan F.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether luminal leptin alters ion transport properties of the intestinal epithelium under acute inflammatory conditions. Monolayers of human intestinal T84 epithelial cells and a rat model of chemotherapy-induced enterocolitis were used. Cells were treated with leptin and mounted in Ussing chambers to measure basal and secretagogue-induced changes in transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc). Furthermore, the role of MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathways in mediating responses to leptin was investigated. Acute colitis in Sprague-Dawley rats was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 40 mg/kg methotrexate. Leptin (100 ng/ml) induced a time-dependent increase in basal Isc in T84 intestinal epithelial cells (P < 0.01). Moreover, pretreatment of T84 cells with leptin for up to 1 h significantly potentiated carbachol- and forskolin-induced increases in Isc. Pretreatment with an inhibitor of MAPK abolished the effect of leptin on basal, carbachol- and forskolin-induced chloride secretion (P < 0.05). However, the PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin, only blunted the effect of leptin on forskolin-induced increases in Isc. Furthermore, leptin treatment evoked both ERK1/2 and Akt1 phosphorylation in T84 cells. In the rat model, luminal leptin induced significant increases in Isc across segments of proximal and, to a lesser extent, distal colon (P < 0.05). We conclude that luminal leptin is likely an intestinal chloride secretagogue, particularly when present at elevated concentrations and/or in the setting of inflammation. Our findings may provide a mechanistic explanation, at least in part, for the clinical condition of secretory diarrhea both in hyperleptinemic obese patients and in patients with chemotherapy-induced intestinal inflammation. PMID:20203064

  6. Impact of a Citywide Sanitation Program in Northeast Brazil on Intestinal Parasites Infection in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Mauricio L.; Genser, Bernd; Strina, Agostino; Teixeira, Maria Gloria; Assis, Ana Marlucia O.; Rego, Rita F.; Teles, Carlos A.; Prado, Matildes S.; Matos, Sheila M.A.; Alcântara-Neves, Neuza M.; Cairncross, Sandy

    2010-01-01

    Background Sanitation affects health, especially that of young children. Residents of Salvador, in Northeast Brazil, have had a high prevalence of intestinal parasites. A citywide sanitation intervention started in 1996 aimed to raise the level of sewer coverage from 26% to 80% of households. Objectives We evaluated the impact of this intervention on the prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichuria, and Giardia duodenalis infections in preschool children. Methods The evaluation was composed of two cross-sectional studies (1998 and 2003–2004), each of a sample of 681 and 976 children 1–4 years of age, respectively. Children were sampled from 24 sentinel areas chosen to represent the range of environmental conditions in the study site. Data were collected using an individual/household questionnaire, and an environmental survey was conducted in each area before and after the intervention to assess basic household and neighborhood sanitation conditions. Stool samples were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites. The effect of the intervention was estimated by hierarchical modeling, fitting a sequence of multivariate regression models. Findings The prevalence of A. lumbricoides infection was reduced from 24.4% to 12.0%, T. trichuria from 18.0% to 5.0%, and G. duodenalis from 14.1% to 5.3%. Most of this reduction appeared to be explained by the increased coverage in each neighborhood by the sewage system constructed during the intervention. The key explanatory variable was thus an ecological measure of exposure and not household-based, suggesting that the parasite transmission prevented by the program was mainly in the public (vs. the domestic) domain. Conclusion This study, using advanced statistical modeling to control for individual and ecological potential confounders, demonstrates the impact on intestinal parasites of sanitation improvements implemented at the scale of a large population. PMID:20705544

  7. Infection levels of intestinal helminths in two commensal rodent species from rural households in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Panti-May, J A; Hernández-Betancourt, S F; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Robles, M R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to calculate the prevalence and intensity of intestinal helminths in the house mouse (Mus musculus) and the black rat (Rattus rattus) trapped in rural households of Yucatan, Mexico. Sampling was conducted during the rainy season from October to December 2011 and the dry season from January to March 2012. A total of 154 M. musculus and 46 R. rattus were examined, with 84.2% of M. musculus being infected with helminths compared with a significantly lower prevalence of 52.2% in R. rattus (P< 0.01). Adult M. musculus were more likely to be infected with helminths (89%) than subadults (63%) (P< 0.01). Four helminth species were identified: Taenia taeniaeformis larvae, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Syphacia muris and Trichuris muris. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis was present more frequently in M. musculus than in R. rattus (P< 0.01) and in adult mice compared to subadults (P< 0.01). Trichuris muris was present only in adult mice. This is the first report of N. brasiliensis, S. muris and T. muris in Yucatan, Mexico, as well as the first to report the presence of N. brasiliensis in M. musculus from Mexico. The helminth fauna of commensal rodents present in households appears to constitute a low potential health risk to local inhabitants; however, it would be advisable to conduct further studies to better understand the public health risk posed by these rodent intestinal helminths.

  8. Food-borne intestinal trematode infections in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jong-Yil; Lee, Soon-Hyung

    2002-06-01

    A total of 19 species of food-borne intestinal trematodes have been reported in humans in the Republic of Korea. They include 12 species of the Heterophyidae, Metagonimus yokogawai, M. takahashii, M. miyatai, Heterophyes nocens, H. heterophyes (imported), H. dispar (imported), Heterophyopsis continua, Pygidiopsis summa, Stellantchasmus falcatus, Centrocestus armatus, Stictodora fuscata, and S. lari; four species of the Echinostomatidae, Echinostoma hortense, E. cinetorchis, Echinochasmus japonicus, and Acanthoparyphium tyosenense; and one species each of the Neodiplostomidae, Neodiplostomum seoulense, Plagiorchiidae, Plagiorchis muris, and Gymnophallidae, Gymnophalloides seoi. Fresh water fish harbor the metacercarial stage of M. yokogawai, M. takahashii, M. miyatai, C. armatus, E. hortense, E. cinetorchis, E. japonicus, or P. muris. Brackish water fish serve as the second intermediate hosts for H. nocens, H. continua, P. summa, S. falcatus, S. fuscata, and S. lari. Brackish water bivalves are the source of infection with A. tyosenense. Tadpoles and frogs are the second intermediate hosts for N. seoulense, but the major source of human infection is the grass snake Rhabdophis tigrina, a paratenic host. The metacercariae of G. seoi are observed in oysters. The natural definitive hosts are, in most cases, mammals such as rats, cats and dogs. However, several species (C. armatus, S. lari, E. japonicus, A. tyosenense, and G. seoi) have birds as natural definitive hosts. Host-parasite relationships, pathogenesis and pathology, immunity, clinical aspects, differential diagnosis, treatment, prevention and control of these intestinal trematodes are briefly discussed.

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant enhance neonatal resistance to systemic Escherichia coli K1 infection by accelerating development of intestinal defense

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaolong; Zeng, Qing; Puthiyakunnon, Santhosh; Zeng, Zhijie; Yang, Weijun; Qiu, Jiawen; Du, Lei; Boddu, Swapna; Wu, Tongwei; Cai, Danxian; Huang, Sheng-He; Cao, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant (LCS) has a preventive effect against gut-derived systemic neonatal Escherichia coli (E. coli) K1 infection. The preventive effects were evaluated in human colonic carcinoma cell line Caco-2 and neonatal rat models. Our in vitro results showed that LCS could block adhesion, invasion and translocation of E. coli K1 to Caco-2 monolayer via up-regulating mucin production and maintaining intestinal integrity. In vivo experiments revealed that pre-treatment with LCS significantly decrease susceptibility of neonatal rats to oral E. coli K1 infection as reflected by reduced bacterial intestinal colonization, translocation, dissemination and systemic infections. Further, we found that LCS treated neonatal rats have higher intestinal expressions of Ki67, MUC2, ZO-1, IgA, mucin and lower barrier permeability than those in untreated rats. These results indicated that LCS could enhance neonatal resistance to systemic E. coli K1 infection via promoting maturation of neonatal intestinal defense. In conclusions, our findings suggested that LCS has a prophylactic effect against systemic E. coli K1 infection in neonates. Future studies aimed at identifying the specific active ingredients in LCS will be helpful in developing effective pharmacological strategies for preventing neonatal E. coli K1 infection. PMID:28262688

  10. Incidence of acute otitis media and sinusitis complicating upper respiratory tract infection: the effect of age.

    PubMed

    Revai, Krystal; Dobbs, Laura A; Nair, Sangeeta; Patel, Janak A; Grady, James J; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2007-06-01

    Infants and young children are prone to developing upper respiratory tract infections, which often result in bacterial complications such as acute otitis media and sinusitis. We evaluated 623 upper respiratory tract infection episodes in 112 children (6-35 months of age) to determine the proportion of upper respiratory tract infection episodes that result in acute otitis media or sinusitis. Of all upper respiratory tract infections, 30% were complicated by acute otitis media and 8% were complicated by sinusitis. The rate of acute otitis media after upper respiratory tract infection declined with increasing age, whereas the rate of sinusitis after upper respiratory tract infection peaked in the second year of life. Risk for acute otitis media may be reduced substantially by avoiding frequent exposure to respiratory viruses (eg, avoidance of day care attendance) in the first year of life.

  11. Acute effects of the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, on intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thymann, Thomas; Stoll, Barbara; Mecklenburg, Lars; Burrin, Douglas G; Vegge, Andreas; Qvist, Niels; Eriksen, Thomas; Jeppesen, Palle B; Sangild, Per T

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal short bowel syndrome following massive gut resection is associated with malabsorption of nutrients. The intestinotrophic factor glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) improves gut function in adult patients with short bowel syndrome, but its effect in pediatric patients remains unknown. Our objective was to test the efficacy of the long-acting synthetic human GLP-2 analogue, teduglutide (ALX-0600), in a neonatal piglet jejunostomy model. Two-day-old pigs were subjected to resection of 50% of the small intestine (distal part), and the remnant intestine was exteriorized on the abdominal wall as a jejunostomy. All pigs were given total parenteral nutrition for 7 days and a single daily injection of the following doses of teduglutide: 0.01 (n = 6), 0.02 (n = 6), 0.1 (n = 5), or 0.2 mg · kg · day (n = 6), and compared with placebo (n = 9). Body weight increment was similar for all 4 teduglutide groups but higher than placebo (P < 0.05). There was a dose-dependent increase in weight per length of the remnant intestine (P < 0.01) and fractional protein synthesis rate in the intestine was increased in the 0.2 mg · kg · day group versus placebo (P < 0.001); however, functional and structural endpoints including activity of digestive enzymes, absorption of enteral nutrients, and immunohistochemistry (Ki67, villin, FABP2, ChgA, and GLP-2R) were not affected by the treatment. Teduglutide induces trophicity on the remnant intestine but has limited acute effects on functional endpoints. Significant effects of teduglutide on gut function may require a longer adaptation period and/or a more frequent administration of the peptide. In perspective, GLP-2 or its analogues may be relevant to improve intestinal adaptation in pediatric patients with short bowel syndrome.

  12. Vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibits liver pathology in acute murine schistosomiasis mansoni and modulates IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-alpha production.

    PubMed

    Allam, Gamal

    2007-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) exerts a broad range of biologic actions that may include modulation of hepatic granuloma formation. This study aimed to investigate the effect of VIP administration on the course of acute murine schistosomiasis mansoni. Mice were infected each with 40 Schistosoma (S.) mansoni cercariae and injected intraperitoneally with VIP at a total dose of 1mug/kg body weight. VIP treatment was very effective in diminishing worm fecundity, hepatic granuloma size and number by about 54%, 75% and 51%, respectively, and reducing liver collagen content. Serum level of interleukin (IL)-10 was increased, while level of IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were decreased as a result of VIP administration. Carbohydrate antigen 19.9 (CA 19.9) induced by S. mansoni infection was decreased with VIP treatment. Activities of hepatic gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in liver tissue homogenate of infected treated mice were increased. These results indicate that suitable administration of exogenous VIP can be effective in ameliorating immunopathologic damage associated with schistosomiasis.

  13. Risk factors for intestinal parasitic infections in preschoolers in a low socio-economic area, Diamantina, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Luciana N; Silva, Renata V; Macedo, Mariana S; Teixeira, Romero A; Lamounier, Joel A; Franceschini, Sylvia C C

    2013-01-01

    Objective To verify the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among preschoolers and to identify the associated risk factors. Methods The study is a cross-sectional study nested in a cohort of children who were born and resident in Diamantina, Minas Gerais, Brazil. At the time of the study, all children were aged 60 months ± five months. They were recruited after written informed consent was obtained from parents or guardians. The study was carried out between July 2009 and July 2010. In total 214 children provided a stool sample for examination on intestinal parasitic infections. Information on potential risk factors for parasitosis was obtained from parents and guardians of the children by a questionnaire. Logistic regression was used for analysis. Results Intestinal parasitic infections were found in 27.5% (n = 59) of children. The boys' infection prevalence (26.1%, n = 36) was slightly lower than the infection prevalence of the girls (30.3%, n = 23), but not statistically different (p = 0.51). Fourteen children, (23.7%) were infected with two or more parasite species and forty-five (76.3%) with single parasites. A low per capita income of family was strongly associated with an increased risk for an infection (OR = 2.89; P = 0.003). Preschoolers whose mothers did not work outside home had a significantly lower risk for infection (OR = 0.41; p = 0.01). Conclusion Intestinal parasite infection is a health problem among Diamantina preschoolers. Poverty was implicated as an important risk factor for infection, while the presence of the mother at home full-time was a protective factor. PMID:23683337

  14. Salt intake and type of intestinal metaplasia in Helicobacter pylori-infected Portuguese men.

    PubMed

    Pintalhao, Mariana; Dias-Neto, Marina; Peleteiro, Bárbara; Lopes, Carla; Figueiredo, Céu; David, Leonor; Lunet, Nuno

    2010-01-01

    The relation between salt intake and intestinal metaplasia (IM) types and the potential interaction with H. pylori virulence are poorly understood and may contribute to further understand gastric carcinogenesis. We quantified the association between dietary salt exposure and complete, incomplete, and mixed IM, taking into account the potential effect modification according to the virulence of H. pylori infecting strains. H. pylori-infected male volunteers (n = 233) underwent an upper digestive endoscopy and completed questionnaires comprising different measures of salt exposure (main food items/groups contributing to dietary salt intake, estimated dietary sodium intake, visual analogical scale for salt intake, preference for salty/salted foods). A histological diagnosis was assigned based on the most severe lesion observed. H. pylori virulence was assessed by characterizing vacA and cagA genes. Odds ratios were estimated through age- and education-adjusted logistic regression models. The risk of IM was not significantly increased in H. pylori infected subjects with higher levels of salt consumption. The lack of association was consistent across measures of salt exposure, categories of H. pylori virulence, and types of IM. In conclusion, in this H. pylori positive population, salt intake did not increase the risk of any IM type, regardless of the virulence of the infecting strains.

  15. Novel determinants of intestinal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium identified in bovine enteric infection.

    PubMed

    Elfenbein, Johanna R; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Porwollik, Steffen; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M; Cheng, Pui; Guo, Jinbai; Zheng, Yi; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Talamantes, Marissa; Shields, Christine; Maple, Aimee; Ragoza, Yury; DeAtley, Kimberly; Tatsch, Tyler; Cui, Ping; Andrews, Katharine D; McClelland, Michael; Lawhon, Sara D; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

    2013-11-01

    Cattle are naturally infected with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and exhibit pathological features of enteric salmonellosis that closely resemble those in humans. Cattle are the most relevant model of gastrointestinal disease resulting from nontyphoidal Salmonella infection in an animal with an intact microbiota. We utilized this model to screen a library of targeted single-gene deletion mutants to identify novel genes of Salmonella Typhimurium required for survival during enteric infection. Fifty-four candidate mutants were strongly selected, including numerous mutations in genes known to be important for gastrointestinal survival of salmonellae. Three genes with previously unproven phenotypes in gastrointestinal infection were tested in bovine ligated ileal loops. Two of these mutants, STM3602 and STM3846, recapitulated the phenotype observed in the mutant pool. Complementation experiments successfully reversed the observed phenotypes, directly linking these genes to the colonization defects of the corresponding mutant strains. STM3602 encodes a putative transcriptional regulator that may be involved in phosphonate utilization, and STM3846 encodes a retron reverse transcriptase that produces a unique RNA-DNA hybrid molecule called multicopy single-stranded DNA. The genes identified in this study represent an exciting new class of virulence determinants for further mechanistic study to elucidate the strategies employed by Salmonella to survive within the small intestines of cattle.

  16. Berberine inhibits acute radiation intestinal syndrome in human with abdomen radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-hui; Wang, Dong-lin; Hu, Yi-de; Pu, Ping; Li, De-zhi; Wang, Wei-dong; Zhu, Bo; Hao, Ping; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xian-qiong; Wan, Jiu-qing; Zhou, Yi-bing; Chen, Zheng-tang

    2010-09-01

    Radiation-induced acute intestinal symptoms (RIAISs) are the most relevant complication of abdominal or pelvic radiation. Considering the negative impact of RIAIS on patients' daily activities, the preventive effects of berberine on RIAIS in patients were investigated. Thirty-six patients with seminoma or lymphomas were randomized to receive berberine oral (n = 18) or not (n = 18). Forty-two patients with cervical cancer were randomized to a trial group (n = 21) and control group (n = 21). Radiotherapy used a parallel opposed anterior and posterior. 300-mg berberine was administered orally three times daily in trial groups. Eight patients with RIAIS were treated with 300-mg berberine three times daily from the third to the fifth week. Toxicities, such as fatigue, anorexia/nausea, etc., were graded weekly according to CTC version 2.0. Patients with abdominal/pelvic radiation in the control group showed grade 1 fatigue, anorexia/nausea, colitis, vomiting, proctitis, weight loss, diarrhea and grade 2 anorexia/nausea, fatigue. Only grade 1 colitis, anorexia/nausea, and fatigue were seen in patients of abdominal radiation treated with berberine. Grade 1 fatigue, colitis, anorexia/nausea, and proctitis occurred in patients of pelvic radiotherapy treated with berberine. Pretreatment with berberine significantly decreased the incidence and severity of RIAIS in patients with abdominal/pelvic radiotherapy when compared with the patients of the control group (P < 0.05). RIAIS were reduced in patients with abdominal radiotherapy/pelvic radiation after receiving berberine treatment. Berberine significantly reduced the incidence and severity of RIAIS and postponed the occurrence of RIAIS in patients with abdominal or whole pelvic radiation.

  17. New agents approved for treatment of acute staphylococcal skin infections

    PubMed Central

    Tatarkiewicz, Jan; Staniszewska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin has been a predominant treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections for decades. However, growing reservations about its efficacy led to an urgent need for new antibiotics effective against MRSA and other drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. This review covers three new anti-MRSA antibiotics that have been recently approved by the FDA: dalbavancin, oritavancin, and tedizolid. The mechanism of action, indications, antibacterial activity profile, microbial resistance, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, adverse effects, interactions as well as available formulations and administration of each of these new antibiotics are described. Dalbavancin is a once-a-week, two-dose, long-acting intravenous bactericidal lipoglycopeptide antibiotic. Oritavancin, a lipoglycopeptide with bactericidal activity, was developed as a single-dose intravenous treatment for acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSI), which offers simplifying treatment of infections. Tedizolid is an oxazolidinone-class bacteriostatic once-daily agent, available for intravenous as well as oral use. Increased ability to overcome bacterial resistance is the main therapeutic advantage of the novel agents over existing antibiotics. PMID:27904526

  18. An eco-epidemiological study of contamination of soil with infective forms of intestinal parasites.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Thevenet, Paula; Nancufil, Adrian; Oyarzo, Cintia Mariela; Torrecillas, Claudia; Raso, Silvana; Mellado, Ivana; Flores, Maria Elizabeth; Cordoba, Mirta Graciela; Minvielle, Marta Cecilia; Basualdo, Juan Angel

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the present work were to screen topsoil samples collected from public squares in two cities within the Argentine Patagonia for the presence of infective forms of intestinal parasites and to examine the possible relationship between positive findings and the environmental, socioeconomic, and cultural conditions of that region. For this purpose we studied 13 public squares, their 13 custodians, and 44 family groups within their respective surrounding areas. Of the 226 topsoil samples analyzed, 44.3% proved positive for infective forms of intestinal parasites, with 17.3% of these containing more than one species. The frequency of appearance of positive samples was dependent on the season of the year (p < 0.001), while presence of the parasites was related to the soil pH (p < 0.05) but independent of the soil relative humidity (p > 0.05). Some of the organisms detected are associated with zoonoses. We observed the presence of Capillaria spp. and Spirocerca spp. under cool desert climatic conditions. Within the group of custodians we detected hematologic alterations one positive serology for toxoplasmosis and documented behavior conducive to risk of infection with the parasites found in those squares. Within the family group an acquaintance with parasitic zoonoses and their prevention was an inconsistent finding, with toxocarosis and toxoplasmosis being the diseases associated with the greatest degree of ignorance. Furthermore, we consider the failure to de-parasitize pets and the practice of feeding them with raw meat, as typically found in our family survey, to be factors contributing to a greater likelihood of public square contamination. From the results obtained here, we propose a spatial organization approach for the purpose of detecting zones at risk of contracting zoonotic parasitoses within urban environments.

  19. Intestinal infection following aerosol challenge of calves with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A challenge experiment was performed to investigate whether administration of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) via the respiratory route leads to MAP infection in calves. Eighteen calves from test negative dams were randomly allocated to four groups. Six calves were challenged with MAP nasally and six calves were challenged by transtracheal injection; three orally challenged calves served as positive controls, and three non challenged calves as negative controls. The challenge was performed as a nine-fold trickle dose, 107 CFU in total. Blood and faecal samples were collected frequently. Calves were euthanized three months post-challenge and extensively sampled. Blood samples were tested for the presence of antibodies and interferon gamma producing cells by ELISA. Faecal and tissue samples were cultured in a liquid culture system and the presence of MAP was confirmed by IS900 realtime PCR. Fourteen out of fifteen calves had no MAP antibody response. The negative controls remained negative; all positive controls became infected. Two nasally challenged calves showed a Purified Protein Derivative Avian (PPDA) specific interferon gamma response. In all nasally challenged calves, MAP positive intestinal samples were detected. In three calves of the nasal group MAP positive retropharyngeal lymph nodes or tonsils were detected. In all calves of the transtracheal group MAP positive intestinal tissues were detected as well and three had a MAP positive tracheobronchial lymph node. These findings indicate that inhalation of MAP aerosols can result in infection. These experimental results may be relevant for transmission under field conditions since viable MAP has been detected in dust on commercial dairy farms. PMID:22136728

  20. Feline immunodeficiency virus can be experimentally transmitted via milk during acute maternal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sellon, R K; Jordan, H L; Kennedy-Stoskopf, S; Tompkins, M B; Tompkins, W A

    1994-01-01

    Postnatal transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in neonates nursed by acutely infected mothers and infection resulting from oral inoculation of kittens with FIV were evaluated. Ten of 16 kittens nursed by four queens with FIV infection established immediately postpartum developed FIV infection. Five of 11 neonates orally administered cell-free FIV culture supernatant developed FIV infection. Kittens that developed FIV infection had greater proportions of CD4+ and Pan-T+ lymphocytes at birth than negative kittens. Infectious virus was recovered from the milk of acutely infected mothers. We conclude that FIV may be experimentally transmitted via milk from queens with acute infections and that oral administration of FIV to neonatal kittens results in infection. Images PMID:8151797

  1. Toxoplasma gondii Rhoptry 16 Kinase Promotes Host Resistance to Oral Infection and Intestinal Inflammation Only in the Context of the Dense Granule Protein GRA15

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kirk D. C.; Hu, Kenneth; Whitmarsh, Ryan J.; Hassan, Musa A.; Julien, Lindsay; Lu, Diana; Chen, Lieping; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii transmission between intermediate hosts is dependent on the ingestion of walled cysts formed during the chronic phase of infection. Immediately following consumption, the parasite must ensure survival of the host by preventing adverse inflammatory responses and/or by limiting its own replication. Since the Toxoplasma secreted effectors rhoptry 16 kinase (ROP16) and dense granule 15 (GRA15) activate the JAK-STAT3/6 and NF-κB signaling pathways, respectively, we explored whether a particular combination of these effectors impacted intestinal inflammation and parasite survival in vivo. Here we report that expression of the STAT-activating version of ROP16 in the type II strain (strain II+ROP16I) promotes host resistance to oral infection only in the context of endogenous GRA15 expression. Protection was characterized by a lower intestinal parasite burden and dampened inflammation. Host resistance to the II+ROP16I strain occurred independently of STAT6 and the T cell coinhibitory receptors B7-DC and B7-H1, two receptors that are upregulated by ROP16. In addition, coexpression of ROP16 and GRA15 enhanced parasite susceptibility within tumor necrosis factor alpha/gamma interferon-stimulated macrophages in a STAT3/6-independent manner. Transcriptional profiling of infected STAT3- and STAT6-deficient macrophages and parasitized Peyer's patches from mice orally challenged with strain II+ROP16I suggested that ROP16 activated STAT5 to modulate host gene expression. Consistent with this supposition, the ROP16 kinase induced the sustained phosphorylation and nuclear localization of STAT5 in Toxoplasma-infected cells. In summary, only the combined expression of both GRA15 and ROP16 promoted host resistance to acute oral infection, and Toxoplasma may possibly target the STAT5 signaling pathway to generate protective immunity in the gut. PMID:23545295

  2. Antibody responses to Toxoplasma gondii in sera, intestinal secretions, and milk from orally infected mice and characterization of target antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Chardès, T; Bourguin, I; Mevelec, M N; Dubremetz, J F; Bout, D

    1990-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii-specific antibody responses in serum, intestinal secretions, and milk were identified with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay following a single oral infection of mice with strain 76K cysts of T. gondii. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) production began during week 2 of infection in serum and milk and during week 3 of infection in intestinal secretions and persisted in all three throughout the experiment (17 weeks). IgG but not IgM antibodies were detected in intestinal secretions later in the infection. Serum and milk IgG and IgM production began at the same time after infection as did the IgA response. In Western blotting (immunoblotting), intestinal IgA antibodies were shown to react with antigens comigrating with the T. gondii proteins p22, p23, p30, and p43, the 28-kilodalton antigen, and the 55- and 60-kilodalton rhoptry proteins, as recognized by specific monoclonal antibodies. Milk IgA antibodies reacted with antigens comigrating with p30 and p43. Most of the antigens recognized by IgA antibodies were also detected by IgG antibodies. IgA antibodies from all three biological samples detected the same major T. gondii antigens; thus, there was apparently no specific antibody production unique to one locality. Images PMID:2323815

  3. Infection with the carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini modifies intestinal and biliary microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Plieskatt, Jordan L.; Deenonpoe, Raksawan; Mulvenna, Jason P.; Krause, Lutz; Sripa, Banchob; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Brindley, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini is a fish-borne trematode endemic in East Asia. Following ingestion, the flukes locate to the biliary treȩ where chronic infection frequently leads to cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). The mechanisms by which O. viverrini infection culminates in CCA remain unknown. An unexplored aspect is its influence on the host microbiome. In the hamster, infection with this pathogen reliably leads to CCA. Genomic DNAs of microbiota from colorectal contents and bile of hamsters and from whole O. viverrini were examined in this model of fluke-induced CCA. Microbial communities were characterized by high-throughput sequencing of variable regions 7–9 of prokaryotic 16S ribosomal DNA. Of ∼1 million sequences, 536,009 with useable reads were assignable to 29,776 operational taxonomy units (OTUs) and, in turn, to 20 phyla and 273 genera of Bacteria or Archaea. Microbial community analyses revealed that fluke infection perturbed the gastrointestinal tract microbiome, increasing Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Lactobacillaceae, while decreasing Porphyromonadaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae, and Eubacteriaceae (P≤0.05). More than 60 OTUs were detected in the biliary system, which confirmed bacteriobilia and a noteworthy community of microbes associated with the parasites. The fluke-associated microorganisms included potential pathogens from the Enterobacteriaceae and Listeriaceae and others, including Cyanobacteria and Deinococci, usually found in external environments. Given that opisthorchiasis is distinguished from other helminth infections by a robust inflammatory phenotype with conspicuously elevated IL-6, and that inflammation of the biliary system leads to periductal fibrosis, which is a precursor of CCA, the flukes and their microbiota may together drive this distinctive immune response.—Plieskatt, J. L., Raksawan, D., Mulvenna, J. P., Krause, L., Sripa, B., Bethony, J. M., Brindley, P. J. Infection with the carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini

  4. 75 FR 52755 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... the development of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin...

  5. Coxsackievirus A21, Enterovirus 68, and Acute Respiratory Tract Infection, China

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zichun; Gonzalez, Richard; Wang, Zhong; Ren, Lili; Xiao, Yan; Li, Jianguo; Li, Yongjun; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi

    2012-01-01

    During August 2006–April 2010, in Beijing, China, 2 rare human enterovirus serotypes, coxsackievirus A21 and enterovirus 68, were detected most frequently in human enterovirus–positive adults with acute respiratory tract infections. Thus, during some years, these 2 viruses cause a substantial proportion of enterovirus-associated adult acute respiratory tract infections. PMID:22516379

  6. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  7. Microbiologically documented infections and infection-related mortality in children with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lillian; Lange, Beverly J; Gerbing, Robert B; Alonzo, Todd A; Feusner, James

    2007-11-15

    The primary objective was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of microbiologically defined infections and infection-related mortality (IRM) in 492 children with acute myeloid leukemia enrolled on CCG 2961. Secondary objectives were to determine the relationship between demographic, disease-related, and therapeutic variables, and infections and IRM. Institutions documented infections prospectively. Age, ethnicity, body mass index, leukemia karyotype, treatment, and institutional size were examined for association with infection outcomes. More than 60% of children experienced such infections in each of 3 phases of chemotherapy. There were 58 infectious deaths; cumulative incidence of IRM was 11% plus or minus 2%. Thirty-one percent of infectious deaths were associated with Aspergillus, 25.9% with Candida, and 15.5% with alpha hemolytic streptococci. Age older than 16 years (hazard ratio [HR], 3.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.87-5.89; P < .001), nonwhite ethnicity (HR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.10-3.09; P = .02), and underweight status (HR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.51-6.22; P = .002) were associated with IRM, while size of the treating institution was not. Thus, age, ethnicity, and BMI were important contributors to IRM. Fungi and Gram-positive cocci were the most common organisms associated with IRM and, in particular, Aspergillus species was the largest contributor to infectious deaths.

  8. A transcriptome analysis focusing on inflammation-related genes of grass carp intestines following infection with Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuehong; Hu, Xiaolong; Sun, Bingyao; Bo, Yunxuan; Wu, Kang; Xiao, Lanying; Gong, Chengliang

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is a protective response that is implicated in bacterial enteritis and other fish diseases. The inflammatory mechanisms behind Aeromonas hydrophila infections in fish remain poorly understood. In this study, we performed a de novo grass carp transcriptome assembly using Illumina’s Solexa sequencing technique. On this basis we carried out a comparative analysis of intestinal transcriptomes from A. hydrophila-challenged and physiological saline solution (PSS/mock) -challenged fish, and 315 genes were up-regulated and 234 were down-regulated in the intestines infected with A. hydrophila. The GO enrichment analysis indicated that the differentially expressed genes were enriched to 12, 4, and 8 GO terms in biological process, molecular function, and cellular component, respectively. A KEGG analysis showed that 549 DEGs were involved in 165 pathways. Moreover, 15 DEGs were selected for quantitative real-time PCR analysis to validate the RNA-seq data. The results confirmed the consistency of the expression levels between RNA-seq and qPCR data. In addition, a time-course analysis of the mRNA expression of 12 inflammatory genes further demonstrated that the intestinal inflammatory responses to A. hydrophila infection simultaneously modulated gene expression variations. The present study provides intestine-specific transcriptome data, allowing us to unravel the mechanisms of intestinal inflammation triggered by bacterial pathogens. PMID:28094307

  9. Commensal-pathogen interactions in the intestinal tract: lactobacilli promote infection with, and are promoted by, helminth parasites.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Lisa A; Smith, Katherine A; Filbey, Kara J; Harcus, Yvonne; Hewitson, James P; Redpath, Stephen A; Valdez, Yanet; Yebra, María J; Finlay, B Brett; Maizels, Rick M

    2014-07-01

    The intestinal microbiota are pivotal in determining the developmental, metabolic and immunological status of the mammalian host. However, the intestinal tract may also accommodate pathogenic organisms, including helminth parasites which are highly prevalent in most tropical countries. Both microbes and helminths must evade or manipulate the host immune system to reside in the intestinal environment, yet whether they influence each other's persistence in the host remains unknown. We now show that abundance of Lactobacillus bacteria correlates positively with infection with the mouse intestinal nematode parasite, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, as well as with heightened regulatory T cell (Treg) and Th17 responses. Moreover, H. polygyrus raises Lactobacillus species abundance in the duodenum of C57BL/6 mice, which are highly susceptible to H. polygyrus infection, but not in BALB/c mice, which are relatively resistant. Sequencing of samples at the bacterial gyrB locus identified the principal Lactobacillus species as L. taiwanensis, a previously characterized rodent commensal. Experimental administration of L. taiwanensis to BALB/c mice elevates regulatory T cell frequencies and results in greater helminth establishment, demonstrating a causal relationship in which commensal bacteria promote infection with an intestinal parasite and implicating a bacterially-induced expansion of Tregs as a mechanism of greater helminth susceptibility. The discovery of this tripartite interaction between host, bacteria and parasite has important implications for both antibiotic and anthelmintic use in endemic human populations.

  10. Low dietary iron intake restrains the intestinal inflammatory response and pathology of enteric infection by food-borne bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kortman, Guus AM; Mulder, Michelle LM; Richters, Thijs JW; Shanmugam, Nanda KN; Trebicka, Estela; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Roelofs, Rian; Wiegerinck, Erwin T; Laarakkers, Coby M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Bolhuis, Albert; Cherayil, Bobby J; Tjalsma, Harold

    2015-01-01

    Orally administrated iron is suspected to increase susceptibility to enteric infections among children in infection endemic regions. Here we investigated the effect of dietary iron on the pathology and local immune responses in intestinal infection models. Mice were held on iron-deficient, normal-iron, or high-iron diets and after two weeks they were orally challenged with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Microbiome analysis by pyrosequencing revealed profound iron- and infection-induced shifts in microbiota composition. Fecal levels of the innate defensive molecules and markers of inflammation lipocalin-2 and calprotectin were not influenced by dietary iron intervention alone, but were markedly lower in mice on the iron-deficient diet after infection. Next, mice on the iron-deficient diet tended to gain more weight and to have a lower grade of colon pathology. Furthermore, survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was prolonged after iron-deprivation. Together, these data show that iron limitation restricts disease pathology upon bacterial infection. However, our data also showed decreased intestinal inflammatory responses of mice fed on high-iron diets. Thus additionally, our study indicates that the effects of iron on processes at the intestinal host-pathogen interface may highly depend on host iron status, immune status and gut microbiota composition. PMID:26046550

  11. Airway microbiota and acute respiratory infection in children.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs), such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, are the leading cause of hospitalization of infants in the US. While the incidence and severity of ARI can vary widely among children, the reasons for these differences are not fully explained by traditional risk factors (e.g., prematurity, viral pathogens). The recent advent of molecular diagnostic techniques has revealed the presence of highly functional communities of microbes inhabiting the human body (i.e., microbiota) that appear to influence development of local and systemic immune response. We propose a 'risk and resilience' model in which airway microbiota are associated with an increased (risk microbiota) or decreased (resilience microbiota) incidence and severity of ARI in children. We also propose that modulating airway microbiota (e.g., from risk to resilience microbiota) during early childhood will optimize airway immunity and, thereby, decrease ARI incidence and severity in children.

  12. Acute and Chronic Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Infection in Lambs.

    PubMed

    Ersdal, C; Jørgensen, H J; Lie, K-I

    2015-07-01

    Polyarthritis caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a relatively common infection in lambs characterized by low mortality and high morbidity. E. rhusiopathiae is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterium that is both a commensal and a pathogen of vertebrates. The disease was studied during an outbreak in a Norwegian Spæl sheep flock. In the acute phase, 48 of 230 (20%) lambs developed clinical signs and 4 died (1.7%). One acute case was necropsied and E. rhusiopathiae was cultured from all major organs investigated and from joints. There was a fibrinous polyarthritis, increased presence of monocytes in vessels, and necrosis of Purkinje cells. Sixteen of the diseased animals (33%) developed a chronic polyarthritis. Eight of these lambs were necropsied; all had lesions in major limb joints, and 3 of 8 also had lesions in the atlanto-occipital joint. At this stage, E. rhusiopathiae was cultured only from the joints in 7 of 8 (87.5%) lambs, but by real-time polymerase chain reaction, we showed persistence of the bacterium in several organs. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of the bacterial isolates indicated that the same strain caused the acute and chronic disease. Five of 6 (83%) chronically affected animals had amyloidosis of the spleen, and 6 of 8 (75%) had amyloidosis of the liver. All chronically affected animals had a glomerulonephritis, and 6 of 8 (75%) had sparse degeneration in the brain. Ceruloplasmin and haptoglobin were significantly increased in the chronically diseased lambs. These results show that chronic ovine erysipelas is not restricted to joints but is a multisystemic disease.

  13. Acute hepatitis C: changing epidemiology and association with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Brejt, Nick; Gilleece, Yvonne; Fisher, Martin

    2007-03-01

    Over the past 6 to 7 years an increasing incidence of acute hepatitis C virus (AHCV) has been fuelled by two different changing epidemics: (1) a new resurgence of AHCV amongst intravenous drug users (IVDU); and (2) presumed sexually transmitted AHCV amongst predominantly HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Increasing incidence amongst IVDUs is likely to be a consequence of changing injecting behaviour, possibly related to changes in perception of HIV as well as HCV risk and consequences. Increasing incidence amongst MSM is likely to be a consequence of changing sexual practices, for example number of sexual partners and type of sexual behaviour, as well as increasing availability of recreational drugs associated with sexual risk-taking, and wider availability of casual sexual partners via the internet or sex-on-premises venues. It remains unclear whether the current outbreaks in MSM, predominantly seen in HIV-positive individuals, reflect a predisposition to AHCV secondary to HIV status per se, or whether this reflects differences in behaviour amongst HIV-positive versus HIV-negative MSM, or potentially increased screening (either routine or secondary to abnormal liver function tests) in HIV-positive MSM. The majority of individuals with AHCV are asymptomatic and therefore routine screening of individuals in at-risk groups with abnormal liver function tests should be considered. Previous historical studies suggest that individuals with concomitant HIV infection are far less likely than those without to spontaneously clear HCV. It is currently recommended that such individuals acutely infected with HCV should undergo monitoring of HCV viral load levels to determine whether spontaneous clearance is likely or whether the opportunity for early treatment should be considered.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection but not small intestinal bacterial overgrowth may play a pathogenic role in rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Federico, A; Ruocco, E; Lo Schiavo, A; Masarone, M; Tuccillo, C; Peccerillo, F; Miranda, A; Romano, L; de Sio, C; de Sio, I; Persico, M; Ruocco, V; Riegler, G; Loguercio, C; Romano, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Recent studies suggest a potential relationship between rosacea and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), but there is no firm evidence of an association between rosacea and H. pylori infection or SIBO. We performed a prospective study to assess the prevalence of H. pylori infection and/or SIBO in patients with rosacea and evaluated the effect of H. pylori or SIBO eradication on rosacea. Methods We enrolled 90 patients with rosacea from January 2012 to January 2013 and a control group consisting of 90 patients referred to us because of mapping of nevi during the same period. We used the 13C Urea Breath Test and H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA) test to assess H. pylori infection and the glucose breath test to assess SIBO. Patients infected by H. pylori were treated with clarithromycin-containing sequential therapy. Patients positive for SIBO were treated with rifaximin. Results We found that 44/90 (48.9%) patients with rosacea and 24/90 (26.7%) control subjects were infected with H. pylori (p = 0.003). Moreover, 9/90 (10%) patients with rosacea and 7/90 (7.8%) subjects in the control group had SIBO (p = 0.6). Within 10 weeks from the end of antibiotic therapy, the skin lesions of rosacea disappeared or decreased markedly in 35/36 (97.2%) patients after eradication of H. pylori and in 3/8 (37.5%) patients who did not eradicate the infection (p < 0.0001). Rosacea skin lesions decreased markedly in 6/7 (85.7%) after eradication of SIBO whereas of the two patients who did not eradicate SIBO, one (50%) showed an improvement in rosacea (p = 0.284). Conclusions Prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in patients with rosacea than control group, whereas SIBO prevalence was comparable between the two groups. Eradication of H. pylori infection led to a significant improvement of skin symptoms in rosacea patients. PMID:25653855

  15. Prevalence and predisposing factors regarding intestinal parasitic infections among rural primary school pupils at Minia Governorate, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahium, Fatma A.A.

    2011-01-01

    About 400 million school-age children are infected with roundworm, whipworm and hookworm worldwide. This study aims to assess prevalence of parasitic infections among rural primary school pupils at Minia Governorate, Egypt, and to identify relevant predisposing factors of the school and pupils to intestinal parasitic infections. A total of 264 pupils out of 1,053, aged 6–12 years, were randomly selected for parasitological investigation and the school was inspected on site for sanitary facilities and conditions of hygiene, as well as the conditions of hygiene of the pupils. The pupils were examined for ova, cysts and/or larvae of intestinal parasites using direct wet mount and formal-ether concentration techniques. Inspection of sanitary facilities and the conditions of hygiene of the school, as well pupil's conditions of hygiene, were carried out through observation checklists. Findings revealed the following intestinal parasites: Entamoeba coli (in 19.3% of pupils), Ascaris lumbricoides (3.8%), Hymenolepiasis nana (12.5%), Enterobious vermicularis (5.7%) and Giardia lamblia (12.5%), with varying percentages between male and female pupils, and a highly statistical association between pupil sex and type of parasites (P<0.001). Unapproved sanitary facilities and conditions of hygiene of the school and pupils were observed. Many intestinal parasitic infections among the primary school pupils were found. Unapproved and low inventory school sanitary facilities were observed, in addition to poor conditions of hygiene of pupils which may play a crucial role in these infections. The school facilities and sanitary conditions, especially the quality of water in the toilets, should be improved. Pupils and school personnel have a real need for health education about modes of transmission and preventive methods of intestinal parasitic infections. PMID:28299070

  16. Acute phase response to Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' infection in FIV-infected and non-FIV-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Korman, R M; Cerón, J J; Knowles, T G; Barker, E N; Eckersall, P D; Tasker, S

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenicity of Haemoplasma spp. in cats varies with 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (CMhm) causing subclinical infection while Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) often induces haemolytic anaemia. The aims of this study were to characterise the acute phase response (APR) of the cat to experimental infection with Mhf or CMhm, and to determine whether chronic feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection influences this response. The acute phase proteins serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations were measured pre-infection and every 7-14 days up to day 100 post-infection (pi) in cats infected with either Mhf or CMhm. Half of each group of cats (6/12) were chronically and subclinically infected with FIV. Marbofloxacin treatment was given on days 16-44 pi to half of the Mhf-infected cats, and on days 49-77 pi to half of the CMhm-infected cats. FIV-infected animals had significantly lower AGP concentrations, and significantly greater Hp concentrations than non-FIV-infected cats when infected with CMhm and Mhf, respectively. Both CMhm and Mhf infection were associated with significant increases in SAA concentrations, while AGP concentrations were only significantly increased by Mhf infection. Mhf-infected cats had significantly greater SAA concentrations than CMhm-infected animals. Both Mhf and CMhm infections were associated with an APR, with Mhf infection inducing a greater response. Chronic FIV infection appeared to modify the APR, which varied with the infecting Haemoplasma species.

  17. Intestinal parasitic infections among patients attending Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, P K; Rai, S K; Khanal, L K; Ghimire, G; Banjara, M R; Singh, A

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to find out the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among patients attending Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu from July 2011 to February 2012. A total of 312 stool samples collected in a clean, dry screw capped plastic container were examined using the formal-ether concentration and sucrose-flotation techniques. Overall parasite positivity rate was 30.1% with significant difference between males (34.2%) and Female (26.3%) (p < 0.05). Out of total positive, 90.4% had single parasitism whereas 9.6% had multiple parasitism. Children aged < or = 5 years were found to be highly infected (35.8%), followed by 6-15 years (32.1%) and > 15 years old (26.9%). Rate of infection was significantly higher among patients from inside Kathmandu Valley (31.1%) than outside valley (17.4%) (p < 0.05). E. histolytica (38.5%) and Hookworm (10.6%) were the commonest protozoa and helminthes respectively. Other parasites detected were G. lamblia (26.0%), E. coli (1.0%), T. trichiura (7.7%), A. lumbricoides (6.7%), H. nana (5.8%) and Taenia species (3.8%). Out of total parasites detected, 65.4% were protozoa and 34.6% were helminthes. Positive rate was higher in Dalit (37.5%) and Aadibasi-Janjati (34.3%) than Brahman-Chhetri (22.6%) (p < 0.05).

  18. DOCK2 confers immunity and intestinal colonization resistance to Citrobacter rodentium infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiping; Man, Si Ming; Zhu, Qifan; Vogel, Peter; Frase, Sharon; Fukui, Yoshinori; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2016-01-01

    Food poisoning is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. Citrobacter rodentium is an enteric pathogen which attaches itself to enterocytes and induces attachment and effacing (A/E) lesions. The ability of the bacterium to cause infection requires subversion of the host actin cytoskeleton. Rac-dependent actin polymerization is activated by a guanine nucleotide exchange factor known as Dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2). However, the role of DOCK2 in infectious disease is largely unexplored. Here, we found that mice lacking DOCK2 were susceptible to C. rodentium infection. These mice harbored increased levels of C. rodentium bacteria, showed more pronounced weight loss and inflammation-associated pathology, and were prone to bacterial dissemination to the systemic organs compared with wild-type mice. We found that mice lacking DOCK2 were more susceptible to C. rodentium attachment to intestinal epithelial cells. Therefore, our results underscored an important role of DOCK2 for gastrointestinal immunity to C. rodentium infection. PMID:27291827

  19. Improved Perceptions and Practices Related to Schistosomiasis and Intestinal Worm Infections Following PHAST Intervention on Kome Island, North-Western Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mwanga, Joseph R.; Kaatano, Godfrey M.; Siza, Julius E.; Chang, Su Young; Ko, Yunsuk; Kullaya, Cyril M.; Nsabo, Jackson; Eom, Keeseon S.; Yong, Tai-Soon; Chai, Jong-Yil; Min, Duk-Young; Rim, Han-Jong; Changalucha, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections are widespread diseases of public health importance in Tanzania. A study on perceptions and practices related to schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections was undertaken among a community population of Kome Island in Sengerema District, north-western Tanzania, where intestinal schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections are endemic. Schistosomiasis and intestinal worm-related perceptions and practices were assessed before and 3 years after implementation of a participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation (PHAST) intervention as a control measure. Data were obtained from baseline and post-intervention knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) questionnaire surveys conducted twice in 2009 and 2012 among 82 individuals aged ≥15 years. We found significant increases in respondents’ knowledge of the cause, transmission, symptoms, health consequences, and prevention of schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections after PHAST intervention. The increase in respondents’ knowledge on almost all aspects of the said infections was translated into actions to control schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections. This has not been achieved by chance, but due to well-designed and locally-adapted PHAST intervention. We conclude that despite criticisms, PHAST approach is still useful in empowering communities to control water, sanitation, and hygiene related infectious diseases such as schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections. PMID:26537035

  20. Improved Perceptions and Practices Related to Schistosomiasis and Intestinal Worm Infections Following PHAST Intervention on Kome Island, North-Western Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mwanga, Joseph R; Kaatano, Godfrey M; Siza, Julius E; Chang, Su Young; Ko, Yunsuk; Kullaya, Cyril M; Nsabo, Jackson; Eom, Keeseon S; Yong, Tai-Soon; Chai, Jong-Yil; Min, Duk-Young; Rim, Han-Jong; Changalucha, John M

    2015-10-01

    Schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections are widespread diseases of public health importance in Tanzania. A study on perceptions and practices related to schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections was undertaken among a community population of Kome Island in Sengerema District, north-western Tanzania, where intestinal schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections are endemic. Schistosomiasis and intestinal worm-related perceptions and practices were assessed before and 3 years after implementation of a participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation (PHAST) intervention as a control measure. Data were obtained from baseline and post-intervention knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) questionnaire surveys conducted twice in 2009 and 2012 among 82 individuals aged ≥15 years. We found significant increases in respondents' knowledge of the cause, transmission, symptoms, health consequences, and prevention of schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections after PHAST intervention. The increase in respondents' knowledge on almost all aspects of the said infections was translated into actions to control schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections. This has not been achieved by chance, but due to well-designed and locally-adapted PHAST intervention. We conclude that despite criticisms, PHAST approach is still useful in empowering communities to control water, sanitation, and hygiene related infectious diseases such as schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections.

  1. X-ray microanalysis of rotavirus-infected mouse intestine: A new concept of diarrhoeal secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, A.J.; Osborne, M.P.; Haddon, S.J.; Collins, J.; Starkey, W.G.; Candy, D.C.; Stephen, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Neonatal mice were infected at 7 days of age with rotavirus (epizootic diarrhea of infant mice (EDIM) virus) and killed at 24-h intervals postinfection (PI). Cytoplasmic concentrations of Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, and Ca intestinal epithelial cells from infected and age-matched control animals were measured by x-ray microanalysis. In villus tip cells, Ca concentration increased at 24-96 h PI; Na concentration increased at 24-72 h PI; Ca and Na concentrations were near normal by 168 h PI. K concentration decreased 24-72 h PI, and Cl concentration decreased 48-96 h PI. In crypt cells, changes were observed without a discernible pattern: at 96 h PI, Na, Mg, S, and Cl concentrations increased and K concentration decreased; at 120 h PI, the concentrations of all elements except Na and Ca increased. In villus base cells, the mean concentrations of all elements except Ca peaked at 48-72 h PI and at 120 h PI. Na and Cl concentrations increased dramatically in some cells from 48 h PI onward. All the above concentration values were obtained from freeze-dried specimens and expressed in millimoles per kilogram of dry weight. Conversion of a limited number of data, pertaining to villus base cells, from dry weight to wet weight was possible. This conversion revealed that villus base cells in infected animals were more hydrated than corresponding cells from control animals. Also, the Na and Cl concentrations in mmol/kg H2O were significantly higher in villus base cells from infected animals than in those from corresponding controls: 137 +/- 7 versus 38 +/- 4 (Na) and 121 +/- 5 versus 89 +/- 6 (Cl). Wet weight concentrations of other elements were either the same (Mg) or lower (P, S, and K) after infection with virus.

  2. Proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in the intestine of Salmo trutta trutta naturally infected with an acanthocephalan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in the production of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a 36 kd protein involved in protein synthesis, within intestinal epithelia can provide an early indication of deviations to normal functioning. Inhibition or stimulation of cell proliferation and PCNA can be determined through immunohistochemical staining of intestinal tissue. Changes in the expression of PCNA act as an early warning system of changes to the gut and this application has not been applied to the fields of aquatic parasitology and fish health. The current study set out to determine whether a population of wild brown trout, Salmo trutta trutta (L.) harbouring an infection of the acanthocephalan Dentitruncus truttae Sinzar, 1955 collected from Lake Piediluco in Central Italy also effected changes in the expression of PCNA. Methods A total of 29 brown trout were investigated, 19 of which (i.e. 65.5%) were found to harbour acanthocephalans (5–320 worms fish-1). Histological sections of both uninfected and infected intestinal material were immunostained for PCNA. Results The expression of PCNA was observed in the epithelial cells in the intestinal crypts and within the mast cells and fibroblasts in the submucosa layer which is consistent with its role in cell proliferation and DNA synthesis. The number of PCNA-positive cells in both the intestinal epithelium and the submucosa layer in regions close to the point of parasite attachment were significantly higher than the number observed in uninfected individuals and in infected individuals in zones at least 0.7 cm from the point of parasite attachment (ANOVA, p < 0.05). Conclusions An infection of the acanthocephalan D. truttae within the intestinal tract of S. t. trutta effected a significant increase in the number of PCNA positive cells (mast cells and fibroblasts) at the site of parasite attachment when compared to the number of positive cells found in uninfected conspecifics and in tissue zones away from the point

  3. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Remolina, Yuly Andrea; Ulloa, María Mercedes; Vargas, Hernán; Díaz, Liliana; Gómez, Sandra Liliana; Saavedra, Alfredo; Sánchez, Edgar; Cortés, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained. Setting Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Participants Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female). Measurements Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality. Results Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%). Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients. Conclusions The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality. PMID:26576054

  4. Bacterial translocation: a potential source for infection in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, L; Munda, R; Alexander, J W; Tchervenkov, J I; Babcock, G F

    1993-09-01

    Infections from enteric bacteria are a major cause of morbidity and mortality during acute pancreatitis (AP), but the pathways by which these organisms reach distant organs remains speculative. Experiments were conducted to determine if bacterial translocation could be a mechanism for infection during this disease. AP was induced in Lewis rats by i.v. infusion of caerulein (experiment I) or ligation of the head of the pancreas (experiment II). In a third experiment, rats were gavaged with 1 x 10(8) 14C-radiolabeled Escherichia coli and pancreatitis was induced with caerulein. Results in all three experiments showed that AP increased the number of viable bacteria recovered in peritoneal fluid, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, lungs, and pancreas. Radionuclide counting indicated that AP enhanced the gut permeability to 14C E. coli. To estimate the impact of AP on the magnitude of translocation and on the ability of the host to clear bacteria, the nuclide and colony-forming units (CFU) ratios were calculated between animals with and without AP. Blood, peritoneal fluid, and MLN had the highest nuclide ratio. During AP, these tissues may be the principal routes for bacterial spreading from the gut lumen. Peritoneal fluid, pancreas, and lung were the tissues with the highest CFU ratio. Bacterial killing ability of these tissues is likely impaired during AP.

  5. Acute hemorrhagic encephalitis: An unusual presentation of dengue viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Vikram, Naval Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a common viral infection worldwide with presentation varying from clinically silent infection to dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and severe fulminant dengue shock syndrome. Neurological manifestation usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to vascular leak. Presentation as hemorrhagic encephalitis is very rare. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old female admitted with generalized tonic clonic seizures. Plain computed tomography (CT) scan of head revealed hypodensities in bilateral deep gray matter nuclei and right posterior parietal lobe without any hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serology were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue viral antigen. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral parenchyma including basal ganglia. No hemorrhage was seen. She was managed with steroids. As her clinical condition deteriorated, after being stable for 2 days, repeat MRI was done which revealed development of hemorrhage within the lesions, and diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis of dengue viral etiology was made. PMID:25709166

  6. Acute hemorrhagic encephalitis: An unusual presentation of dengue viral infection.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Vikram, Naval Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a common viral infection worldwide with presentation varying from clinically silent infection to dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and severe fulminant dengue shock syndrome. Neurological manifestation usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to vascular leak. Presentation as hemorrhagic encephalitis is very rare. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old female admitted with generalized tonic clonic seizures. Plain computed tomography (CT) scan of head revealed hypodensities in bilateral deep gray matter nuclei and right posterior parietal lobe without any hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serology were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue viral antigen. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral parenchyma including basal ganglia. No hemorrhage was seen. She was managed with steroids. As her clinical condition deteriorated, after being stable for 2 days, repeat MRI was done which revealed development of hemorrhage within the lesions, and diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis of dengue viral etiology was made.

  7. Acute kidney injury associated with Plasmodium malariae infection.

    PubMed

    Badiane, Aida S; Diongue, Khadim; Diallo, Seydou; Ndongo, Aliou A; Diedhiou, Cyrille K; Deme, Awa B; Ma, Diallo; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou; Seck, Mame C; Dieng, Therese; Ndir, Omar; Mboup, Souleymane; Ndiaye, Daouda

    2014-06-07

    According to current estimates, Plasmodium malariae is not very common in Senegal, as more than 98% of malaria cases are suspected to be due to Plasmodium falciparum. However, it is possible that other malarial species are being under-reported or misdiagnosed. This is a report of a case of P. malariae in a 30-year-old man previously hospitalized with acute kidney injury after treatment with quinine and re-hospitalized three months later. He was diagnosed with renal cortical necrosis post malaria treatment. Plasmodium malariae was identified with light microscope and confirmed using species-specific small-subunit rRNA (ssrRNA) amplification.The patient was treated for malaria with intravenous quinine for seven days, followed by three days of oral treatment; the bacterial infection was treated using ceftriaxone during the first hospitalization and ciprofloxacin associated with ceftriaxone the second time. He also had four rounds of dialysis after which he partially recovered the renal function. Given the complications that can be caused by P. malariae infection, it should be systematically looked for, even if the predominant species is P. falciparum in Senegal.

  8. Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Disruption through Altered Mucosal MicroRNA Expression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gaulke, Christopher A.; Porter, Matthew; Han, Yan-Hong; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Grishina, Irina; George, Michael D.; Dang, Angeline T.; Ding, Shou-Wei; Jiang, Guochun; Korf, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial barrier dysfunction during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has largely been attributed to the rapid and severe depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although it is known that changes in mucosal gene expression contribute to intestinal enteropathy, the role of small noncoding RNAs, specifically microRNA (miRNA), has not been investigated. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected nonhuman primate model of HIV pathogenesis, we investigated the effect of viral infection on miRNA expression in intestinal mucosa. SIV infection led to a striking decrease in the expression of mucosal miRNA compared to that in uninfected controls. This decrease coincided with an increase in 5′-3′-exoribonuclease 2 protein and alterations in DICER1 and Argonaute 2 expression. Targets of depleted miRNA belonged to molecular pathways involved in epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and immune response. Decreased expression of several miRNA involved in maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the gut was localized to the proliferative crypt region of the intestinal epithelium. Our findings suggest that SIV-induced decreased expression of miRNA involved in epithelial homeostasis, disrupted expression of miRNA biogenesis machinery, and increased expression of XRN2 are involved in the development of epithelial barrier dysfunction and gastroenteropathy. IMPORTANCE MicroRNA (miRNA) regulate the development and function of intestinal epithelial cells, and many viruses disrupt normal host miRNA expression. In this study, we demonstrate that SIV and HIV disrupt expression of miRNA in the small intestine during infection. The depletion of several key miRNA is localized to the proliferative crypt region of the gut epithelium. These miRNA are known to control expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell death, and epithelial maturation. Our data indicate that this disruption might be caused by altered expression of mi

  9. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Michael S.; Guo, Kejun; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lee, Eric J.; Dillon, Stephanie M.; Barrett, Bradley S.; McCarter, Martin D.; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Wilson, Cara C.; Santiago, Mario L.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs) likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8) and weak (IFNα1) subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies. PMID:26529416

  10. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  11. Aggressive Early Debridement in Treatment of Acute Periprosthetic Joint Infections After Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Volpin, Andrea; Sukeik, Mohamed; Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic Joint Infection Remains a Dreaded Complication After Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery. Treatment Options for Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Include Arthroscopic or Open Debridement With Retention or Exchange of the Prostheses. This Review Article Aims to Summarize the Evidence for Management of Acute Postoperative And Acute Hematogenous Infections. Methods: A Systematic Literature Search Was Performed Using a Computer-based Search Engine Covering Medline (OvidSP), PubMed Database (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health), Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane and Google Scholar for Relevant Articles. Results: Common Themes Around Treatment of Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Discussed in this Review Include the Timing of Intervention, Description of the Optimal Procedure and How we Perform it at our Institution, the Role of Arthroscopic Debridement, Most Commonly Isolated Micro-organisms and Prognostic Factors for Infection Control. Conclusion: Success in Treating Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Depends on Early Diagnosis and Aggressive Surgical Debridement Combined With Effective Antibiotic Therapy. PMID:28144377

  12. Food proteins and gut mucosal barrier. IV. Effects of acute and chronic ethanol administration on handling and uptake of bovine serum albumin by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.; Carter, E.A.; Walker, W.A.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of ethanol exposure on small intestinal handling and uptake of radiolabeled bovine serum albumin were investigated using everted gut sacs. There was less breakdown of BSA after acute ethanol administration in vitro and after acute and chronic in vivo exposure. Thus, the vascular compartment of the small intestine was confronted with more complete and potentially more antigenic material after ethanol. Changes in BSA binding and uptake after acute exposure were shown to be reversible after 4-6 hr. In all groups, there was more BSA binding when the small intestine was exposed to ethanol. This difference was most pronounced after chronic exposure. In the same group, uptake of BSA was correlated with binding and significantly increased. Combined effects of ethanol on the gut mucosal barrier may account for changes in food antigen handling and uptake.

  13. Enterovirus D68 Infection in Children with Acute Flaccid Myelitis, Colorado, USA, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Messacar, Kevin; Pastula, Daniel M.; Robinson, Christine C.; Leshem, Eyal; Sejvar, James J.; Nix, W. Allan; Oberste, M. Steven; Feikin, Daniel R.; Dominguez, Samuel R.

    2016-01-01

    During August 8, 2014–October 14, 2014, a total of 11 children with acute flaccid myelitis and distinctive neuroimaging changes were identified near Denver, Colorado, USA. A respiratory prodrome was experienced by 10, and nasopharyngeal specimens were positive for enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) for 4. To determine whether an association exists between EV-D68 infection and acute flaccid myelitis, we conducted a retrospective case–control study comparing these patients with 2 groups of outpatient control children (1 group tested for acute respiratory illness and 1 for Bordetella pertussis infection). Adjusted analyses indicated that, for children with acute flaccid myelitis, the odds of having EV-D68 infection were 10.3 times greater than for those tested for acute respiratory infection and 4.5 times greater than for those tested for B. pertussis infection. No statistical association was seen between acute flaccid myelitis and non–EV-D68 enterovirus or rhinovirus infection. These findings support an association between EV-D68 infection and acute flaccid myelitis. PMID:27434186

  14. Phylogenetic reconstruction of transmission events from individuals with acute HIV infection: toward more-rigorous epidemiological definitions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alison E; Gifford, Robert J; Clewley, Jonathan P; Kucherer, Claudia; Masquelier, Bernard; Porter, Kholoud; Balotta, Claudia; Back, Nicole K T; Jorgensen, Louise Bruun; de Mendoza, Carmen; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Gill, O Noel; Johnson, Anne M; Pillay, Deenan

    2009-02-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions of transmission events from individuals with acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are conducted to illustrate this group's heightened infectivity. Varied definitions of acute infection and assumptions about observed phylogenetic clusters may produce misleading results. We conducted a phylogenetic analysis of HIV pol sequences from 165 European patients with estimated infection dates and calculated the difference between dates within clusters. Nine phylogenetic clusters were observed. Comparison of dates within clusters revealed that only 2 could have been generated during acute infection. Previous analyses may have incorrectly assigned transmission events to the acutely HIV infected when they were more likely to have occurred during chronic infection.

  15. Acute middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in livestock Dromedaries, Dubai, 2014.

    PubMed

    Wernery, Ulrich; Corman, Victor M; Wong, Emily Y M; Tsang, Alan K L; Muth, Doreen; Lau, Susanna K P; Khazanehdari, Kamal; Zirkel, Florian; Ali, Mansoor; Nagy, Peter; Juhasz, Jutka; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Sunitha; Syriac, Ginu; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Woo, Patrick C Y; Drosten, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Camels carry Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, but little is known about infection age or prevalence. We studied >800 dromedaries of all ages and 15 mother-calf pairs. This syndrome constitutes an acute, epidemic, and time-limited infection in camels <4 years of age, particularly calves. Delayed social separation of calves might reduce human infection risk.

  16. Acute Respiratory Infections in Children and Adolescents with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Hana; Dallas, Ronald; Zhou, Yinmei; Pei, Dequing; Cheng, Cheng; Flynn, Patricia M.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the incidence, clinical course and impact of respiratory viral infections in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is limited. Methods A retrospective cohort of patients with newly diagnosed ALL on Total Therapy XVI protocol at St Jude Children’s Research Hospital between 2007 and 2011 was evaluated. Results Of 223 children, 95 (43%) developed 133 episodes of viral acute respiratory illness (ARI) (incidence = 1.1/1,000 patient-days). ARI without viral etiology was identified in 65 (29%) patients and no ARI in 63 (28%). There were no significant associations between race, gender, age, or ALL risk group and development of ARI. Children receiving induction chemotherapy were at the highest risk for viral ARI (incidence, 2.3 per 1,000 patient-days). Influenza virus was the most common virus (38%) followed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (33%). Of 133 episodes of viral ARI, 61% of patients were hospitalized, 26% suffered a complicated course, 80% had their chemotherapy delayed, and 0.7% died. Twenty-four (18%) patients developed viral lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI); of which 5 (21%) had complications. Patients with viral LRTI had significantly lower nadir absolute lymphocyte count, were sicker at presentation, and were more likely to have RSV, to be hospitalized, and to have their chemotherapy delayed for longer time compared to those with viral URTI. Conclusion Despite the low incidence of viral ARI in children with ALL, the associated morbidity, mortality, and delay in chemotherapy remain clinically significant. Viral LRTI was particularly associated with high morbidity requiring intensive care level support. PMID:26700662

  17. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Macrophages expressing arginase 1 and nitric oxide synthase 2 accumulate in the small intestine during Giardia lamblia infection.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Jenny; Keselman, Aleksander; Li, Erqiu; Singer, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to inhibit Giardia lamblia in vitro and in vivo. This study sought to determine if Giardia infection induces arginase 1 (ARG1) expression in host macrophages to reduce NO production. Stimulations of RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells with Giardia extract induced arginase activity. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry showed increased ARG1 and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) expression in mouse intestine following infection. Flow cytometry demonstrated increased numbers of macrophages positive for both ARG1 and NOS2 in lamina propria following infection, but there was no evidence of increased expression of ARG1 in these cells.

  19. Ascaridia galli in chickens: intestinal localization and comparison of methods to isolate the larvae within the first week of infection.

    PubMed

    Ferdushy, Tania; Nejsum, Peter; Roepstorff, Allan; Thamsborg, Stig M; Kyvsgaard, Niels C

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted to observe the localization and to compare methods for isolation of minute Ascaridia galli larvae in chicken intestine. Firstly, six 7-week-old layer pullets were orally infected with 2,000 embryonated A. galli eggs and necropsied either at 3, 5 or 7 days post infection (dpi). More than 95 % of the recovered larvae were obtained from the anterior half of the jejunoileum, suggesting this part as the initial predilection site for A. galli larvae. Secondly, the intestinal wall of one layer pullet infected with 20,000 A. galli eggs 3 days earlier was digested in pepsin-HCl for 90 min. The initial 10 min of digestion released 51 % of the totally recovered larvae and the last 30 min of continuous digestion yielded only 5 %. This indicates that the majority of larvae were located superficially in the intestinal mucosa. Thirdly, 48 7-week-old layer pullets were infected with 500 A. galli eggs and necropsied at 3 dpi to compare three different larval isolation methods from the intestinal wall, viz., EDTA incubation, agar-gel incubation and pepsin-HCl digestion, resulting in mean percentages of the recovered larvae: 14.4, 18.2 and 20.0 %, respectively (P = 0.15). As conclusion, we recommended Pepsin-HCl digestion as the method of choice for larval recovery from the intestinal wall in future population dynamics study due to high efficiency and quick and simple detection. The agar-gel method was considered to be a prerequisite for molecular and immunological investigations as the larvae were more active and fully intact.

  20. [Clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nguen, V Kh; Stroganov, P V; Geshelin, S A

    2011-09-01

    The results of treatment of 81 patients, suffering tuberculosis and operated in emergency for an acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs, are adduced, in 29 of them--nonspecific diseases of nontuberculosis genesis were diagnosed. In 52 patients the indication for emergency operation performance were complications of abdominal tuberculosis (perforation of the tuberculosis ulcers of small intestine--in 37, the tuberculosis mesadenitis--in 15), of them in 34--pulmonary tuberculosis was in inactive phase, that's why the HIV presence was supposed. In 26 patients the diagnosis was confirmed, basing on serologic analysis data. The presence of intraabdominal catastrophe, caused by abdominal tuberculosis complications on inactive pulmonary tuberculosis background witnesses with 85.3% probability the HIV-infectioning of the patient.

  1. Liver Fibrosis during an Outbreak of Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV-Infected Men: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Daniel S.; Uriel, Alison J.; Carriero, Damaris C.; Klepper, Arielle; Dieterich, Douglas T.; Mullen, Michael P.; Thung, Swan N.; Fiel, M. Isabel; Branch, Andrea D.

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are occurring in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. We evaluated risk factors and liver histopathology in 11 consecutively enrolled men with newly acquired HCV infection that was diagnosed on the basis of antibody seroconversion, new elevations in alanine aminotransferase level, and wide fluctuations in HCV RNA level. Ten patients reported unprotected anal intercourse, and 7 reported “club-drug” use, including methamphetamine. Liver biopsy showed moderately advanced fibrosis (Scheuer stage 2) in 9 patients (82%). No cause of liver damage other than acute HCV infection was identified. The specific pathways leading to periportal fibrosis in HIV-infected men with newly acquired HCV infection require investigation. PMID:18627270

  2. Acute cholecystitis associated with infection of Enterobacteriaceae from gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Yan, Q; Luo, F; Shang, D; Wu, D; Zhang, H; Shang, X; Kang, X; Abdo, M; Liu, B; Ma, Y; Xin, Y

    2015-09-01

    Acute cholecystitis (AC) is one of the most common surgical diseases. Bacterial infection accounts for 50% to 85% of the disease's onset. Since there is a close relationship between the biliary system and the gut, the aims of this study were to characterize and determine the influence of gut microbiota on AC, to detect the pathogenic microorganism in the biliary system, and to explore the relationship between the gut and bile microbiota of patients with AC. A total of 185 713 high-quality sequence reads were generated from the faecal samples of 15 patients and 13 healthy controls by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Patients' samples were significantly enriched in Akkermansia, Enterobacter and Escherichia/Shigella group. The healthy controls, however, showed significant enrichment of Clostridiales, Coprococcus, Coprobacillaceae, Paraprevotella, Turicibacter and TM7-3 in their faecal samples. Escherichia coli was the main biliary pathogenic microorganism, among others such as Klebsiella spp., Clostridium perfringens, Citrobacter freundii and Enterobacter cloacae in the bile of the patients. Additionally, the amount of bile endotoxin significantly correlated with the number of Enterobacteriaceae, especially E. coli. Our data indicate that Enterobacteriaceae might play essential role in the pathogenesis and/or progress of AC. This was verified in an in vivo model using a pathogenic E. coli isolated from one of the patients in guinea pigs and observed marked gallbladder inflammation and morphologic changes. This study thus provides insight which could be useful for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of AC and related diseases by controlling the growth of Enterobacteriaceae to alleviate the infection.

  3. [Rhinoviruses. Frequency in nonhospitalized children with acute respiratory infection].

    PubMed

    Marcone, Débora N; Ricarte, Carmen; Videla, Cristina; Ekstrom, Jorge; Carballal, Guadalupe; Vidaurreta, Santiago; Echavarría, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    Molecular methods for human rhinoviruses (HRV) have increased the sensitivity in their diagnosis. HRV may cause acute respiratory infections (ARI) of the upper and lower respiratory tract. HRV infection during childhood is a predictor of asthma development. In this study, the HRV frequency in outpatient children with ARI was determined, and their clinical features and previous conditions were evaluated. A total of 186 respiratory samples of children under 6 year old attending the CEMIC pediatric emergency room from June 1, 2008 to May 31, 2010, were studied. Classical respiratory viruses were detected by immunofluorescence. A real time RT-PCR that amplifies part of the 5' non coding genomic region was used for HRV detection. Viral detection was obtained in 61% of children. The frequency was: 27% for HRV, 16% for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 9% for influenza, 8% for parainfluenza, 7% for metapneumovirus and 0.5% for adenovirus. Dual coinfection was detected in 8 children and HRV were the most frequent, detected in 4 of them. HRV circulated during the two year period of the study, with peaks during winter and spring. No clinical difference was observed between patients with or without HRV, except an increase percent of children with HRV without fever. HRV were the most frequent viruses detected in this population, mainly in children under 2 year old, the second cause of bronchiolitis after RSV and more frequently detected in children exposed to passive smoking (OR = 2.91; p = 0.012), and were detected as the sole etiologic agent in 28% of bronchiolitis.

  4. Does meatiness of pigs depend on the level of gastro-intestinal parasites infection?

    PubMed

    Knecht, Damian; Popiołek, Marcin; Zaleśny, Grzegorz

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the present paper was to determine an influence of the presence and a level of intestine parasites infection on the quality of pork carcass expressed by the content of meat in carcass (meatiness) in pigs. The experimental part of the study was conducted on pigs farm produced in a closed cycle. The population in the study included 120 fattening pigs maintained in two keeping systems: group I--60 individuals kept on slatted floor, and group II--60 individuals kept on deep litter. All the experimental animals were treated in the same manner. The analysed fatteners were slaughtered in Meat Processing Plant when their body mass reached 110 kg, and the post-slaughter assessment was conducted according to the EUROP classification of pigs carcass using the Ultra-Fom 300 device. The study concerning the internal parasites were conducted basing on coproscopic quantitative McMaster method. As a results, the eggs of three nematode taxa were isolated and identified: Oesophagostomum spp., Ascaris suum and Strongyloides ransomi. Overall prevalence of infection of fatteners kept on litter was lower (25%±11.2) as compared to those kept on slatted floor (38.3%±12.6), however the differences were not statistically significant (χ(2)=2.465; df=1; P=0.116). The mean value of meatiness for pigs free from parasites was 53.68, while in the case of infected pigs the meatiness was statistically lower and was 52.12 (t=2.35; P=0.02). The analysed pigs were classified into three categories and conducted analysis of an influence of parasites on meatiness demonstrate the relationship that is statistically significant. The analysis of correlation between meatiness and an average number of helminth eggs also demonstrated the negative, statistically significant, relationship (F=5.52; P=0.020), i.e. in fatteners with higher EPG value the meatiness was lower.

  5. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Intestinal Protozoan Infections with Cryptosporidium, Giardia, Blastocystis and Dientamoeba among Schoolchildren in Tripoli, Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Benamrouz, Sadia; Nourrisson, Céline; Poirier, Philippe; Pereira, Bruno; Razakandrainibe, Romy; Pinon, Anthony; Lambert, Céline; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Dabboussi, Fouad; Delbac, Frederic; Favennec, Loïc; Hamze, Monzer; Viscogliosi, Eric; Certad, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Background Intestinal protozoan infections are confirmed as major causes of diarrhea, particularly in children, and represent a significant, but often neglected, threat to public health. No recent data were available in Lebanon concerning the molecular epidemiology of protozoan infections in children, a vulnerable population at high risk of infection. Methodology and Principal Findings In order to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of intestinal pathogenic protozoa, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a general pediatric population including both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. After obtaining informed consent from the parents or legal guardians, stool samples were collected in January 2013 from 249 children in 2 schools in Tripoli, Lebanon. Information obtained from a standard questionnaire included demographic characteristics, current symptoms, socioeconomic status, source of drinking water, and personal hygiene habits. After fecal examination by both microscopy and molecular tools, the overall prevalence of parasitic infections was recorded as 85%. Blastocystis spp. presented the highest infection rate (63%), followed by Dientamoeba fragilis (60.6%), Giardia duodenalis (28.5%) and Cryptosporidium spp. (10.4%). PCR was also performed to identify species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium, subtypes of Blastocystis, and assemblages of Giardia. Statistical analysis using a logistic regression model showed that contact with family members presenting gastrointestinal disorders was the primary risk factor for transmission of these protozoa. Conclusions This is the first study performed in Lebanon reporting the prevalence and the clinical and molecular epidemiological data associated with intestinal protozoan infections among schoolchildren in Tripoli. A high prevalence of protozoan parasites was found, with Blastocystis spp. being the most predominant protozoans. Although only 50% of children reported digestive symptoms, asymptomatic infection was

  6. Recovery from an acute infection in C. elegans requires the GATA transcription factor ELT-2.

    PubMed

    Head, Brian; Aballay, Alejandro

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms involved in the recognition of microbial pathogens and activation of the immune system have been extensively studied. However, the mechanisms involved in the recovery phase of an infection are incompletely characterized at both the cellular and physiological levels. Here, we establish a Caenorhabditis elegans-Salmonella enterica model of acute infection and antibiotic treatment for studying biological changes during the resolution phase of an infection. Using whole genome expression profiles of acutely infected animals, we found that genes that are markers of innate immunity are down-regulated upon recovery, while genes involved in xenobiotic detoxification, redox regulation, and cellular homeostasis are up-regulated. In silico analyses demonstrated that genes altered during recovery from infection were transcriptionally regulated by conserved transcription factors, including GATA/ELT-2, FOXO/DAF-16, and Nrf/SKN-1. Finally, we found that recovery from an acute bacterial infection is dependent on ELT-2 activity.

  7. [Mortality from acute respiratory infections and influenza (1976-1980)].

    PubMed

    Morales Suárez-Varela, M M; Llopis González, A; Sanz Aliaga, S A; Sancho Izquierdo, E

    1992-06-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) and influenza (flu) are extremely common illnesses, which make up the main causes of medical consultation and absence from work. OBJECTIVE. To discover the level of mortality because of ARI and flu in the Health Areas within the Community of Valencia; to analyse their possible relationship with socio-economic factors and also to identify higher-risk groups according to age and sex. DESIGN. Retrospective study. SITE. The Community of Valencia. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS. Mortality data across the Community were obtained from the mortality statistics published by the Generalitat (Government) of Valencia during the five-year period of 1976 to 1980. MAIN MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS. The results establish that Health Areas 4, 6, 7, 9-12 and 18 present less mortality because of ARI and flu. These are the better areas, socio-economically speaking, although the data are without statistical significance. A spectacular increase in mortality in the age-group of those over 70 was observed, with no great differences found between the sexes. CONCLUSIONS. Given that the main interventions to prevent these diseases are based on vaccination, it would be useful to carry out vaccination programmes with greater thoroughness in those areas identified as of high risk.

  8. Acute HIV infection among pregnant women in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Gay, Cynthia L; Mwapasa, Victor; Murdoch, David M; Kwiek, Jesse J; Fiscus, Susan A; Meshnick, Steven R; Cohen, Myron S

    2010-04-01

    There are limited data on acute HIV infection (AHI) prevalence during pregnancy. Malawian pregnant women admitted in the third trimester and meeting eligibility criteria underwent dual HIV rapid antibody testing. AHI prevalence was retrospectively detected through HIV RNA pooling of seronegative plasma. Among 3,825 pregnant women screened, dual HIV rapid testing indicated that 30.2% were HIV positive, 69.7% were HIV negative, and 0.1% were indeterminate. Sensitivity and specificity of dual rapid testing was 99.0% and 98.7%, respectively. Of 2,666 seronegative specimens, 2,327 had samples available for HIV RNA pooling; 5 women (0.21%) (95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.40%) had AHI with a median peripartum viral load of 1,324,766 copies/mL. Pregnant women are at risk for AHI, warranting counseling of all women and their sexual partners about incident HIV during pregnancy. Dual HIV rapid tests have high sensitivity and specificity. HIV testing should be repeated in the third trimester and/or at delivery.

  9. Acute HIV Infection among Pregnant Women in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Cynthia L.; Mwapasa, Victor; Murdoch, David M.; Kwiek, Jesse J.; Fiscus, Susan A.; Meshnick, Steven R.; Cohen, Myron S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There are limited data on acute HIV infection (AHI) prevalence during pregnancy. Methods Malawian pregnant women admitted in the third trimester and meeting eligibility criteria underwent dual HIV rapid antibody testing. AHI prevalence was retrospectively detected through HIV RNA pooling of seronegative plasma. Results Among 3825 pregnant women screened, dual HIV rapid testing indicated that 30.2% were HIV positive, 69.7% were HIV negative and 0.1% were indeterminate. Sensitivity and specificity of dual rapid testing was 99.0% and 98.7%, respectively. Of 2666 seronegative specimens, 2327 had samples available for HIV RNA pooling; 5 women (0.21%) (95% CI: 0.03, 0.40%) had AHI with a median peripartum viral load of 1,324,766 copies/mL. Discussion Pregnant women are at risk for AHI, warranting counseling of all women and their sexual partners about incident HIV during pregnancy. Dual HIV rapid tests have high sensitivity and specificity. HIV testing should be repeated in the third trimester and/or at delivery. PMID:20226326

  10. Neurobehavioral Disturbances During Acute and Early HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Rujvi; Doyle, Katie L.; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Morgan, Erin E.; Morris, Sheldon; Smith, Davey M.; Little, Susan J.; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Acute and early human immunodeficiency virus infection (AEH) is accompanied by neuroinflammatory processes as well as impairment in neurocognitive and everyday functions, but little is known about the frequency and clinical correlates of the neurobehavioral disturbances during this period. We compared pre-seroconversion with current levels of apathy, disinhibition, and executive dysfunction; we also examined everyday function and HIV disease correlates of neuropsychiatric impairment in individuals with AEH. Methods In this study, 34 individuals with AEH and 39 HIV-seronegative participants completed neuromedical and neuropsychological assessments, a structured psychiatric interview, and the apathy, disinhibition, and executive dysfunction subscales of the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale. Results Independent of any substance use and mood disorders, the AEH group had significantly higher levels of current apathy and executive dysfunction than the controls, but not greater disinhibition. Retrospective ratings of pre-seroconversion levels of apathy, disinhibition, and executive dysfunction were all higher in the AEH group than the controls. After seroconversion, the AEH cohort had increases in current apathy and executive dysfunction, but not disinhibition. In the AEH cohort, higher current global neurobehavioral dysfunction was significantly associated with lower nadir CD4 counts, slowed information processing speed, and more everyday function problems. Conclusions These data suggest that individuals who have recently acquired HIV experienced higher-than-normal premorbid levels of neurobehavioral disturbance. Apathy and executive dysfunction are exacerbated during AEH, particularly in association with lower CD4 counts. PMID:27008244

  11. Derivation of Intestinal Organoids from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Use as an Infection System.

    PubMed

    Forbester, Jessica L; Hannan, Nicholas; Vallier, Ludovic; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-08-31

    Intestinal human organoids (iHOs) provide an effective system for studying the intestinal epithelium and its interaction with various stimuli. By using combinations of different signaling factors, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) can be driven to differentiate down the intestinal lineage. Here, we describe the process for this differentiation, including the derivation of hindgut from hIPSCs, embedding hindgut into a pro-intestinal culture system and passaging the resulting iHOs. We then describe how to carry out microinjections to introduce bacteria to the apical side of the intestinal epithelial cells (IECs).

  12. Acute Small-Bowel Obstruction From Intestinal Anisakiasis After the Ingestion of Raw Clams; Documenting a New Method of Marine-to-Human Parasitic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Rittenhouse, David W.; Ochoa, Joana E.; Punja, Viren P.; Zubair, Muhammad H.; Baliff, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Enteric anisakiasis is a known parasitic infection. To date, human infection has been reported as resulting from the inadvertent ingestion of the anisakis larvae when eating raw/undercooked fish, squid, or eel. We present a first reported case of intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis, after the ingestion of raw clams. PMID:25734153

  13. Effects of feed additives and mixed eimeria species infection on intestinal microbial ecology of broilers.

    PubMed

    Hume, M E; Clemente-Hernández, S; Oviedo-Rondón, E O

    2006-12-01

    Evaluation of digestive microbial ecology is necessary to understand effects of growth-promoting feed. In the current study, the dynamics of intestinal microbial communities (MC) were examined in broilers fed diets supplemented with a combination of antibiotic (bacitracin methylene disalicylate) and ionophore (Coban 60), and diets containing 1 of 2 essential oil (EO) blends, Crina Poultry (CP) and Crina Alternate (CA). Five treatments were analyzed: 1) unmedicated uninfected control; 2) unmedicated infected control; 3) feed additives monensin (bacitracin methylene disalicylate) + monensin (Coban 60; AI); 4) EO blend CP; and 5) EO blend CA. Additives were mixed into a basal feed mixture, and EO were adjusted to 100 ppm. Chicks were infected by oral gavage at 19 d of age with Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria maxima, and Eimeria tenella. Duodenal, ileal, and cecal samples were taken from 12 birds per treatment just before and 7 d after challenge; 2 samples each were pooled to give a final number of 6 samples total; and all pooled samples were frozen until used for DNA extraction. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to examine PCR-amplified fragments of the bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA variable region. Results are presented as percentages of similarity coefficients (SC). Dendrograms of PCR amplicon or band patterns indicated MC differences due to intestinal location, feed additives, and cocci challenge. Essential oil blends CP and CA affected MC in all gut sections. Each EO had different effects over MC, and they differed in most instances from the AI group. The cocci challenge caused drastic MC population shifts in duodenal, ileal, and cecal sections (36.7, 55.4, and 36.2% SC, respectively). Diets supplemented with CP supported higher SC between pre- and postchallenge MC (89.9, 83.3, and 76.4%) than AI (81.8., 57.4, and 60.0%). We concluded that mixed coccidia challenge caused drastic shifts in MC. These EO blends modulated MC better than AI, avoiding drastic

  14. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  15. Requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute burn and chronic surgical wound infection.

    PubMed

    Turner, Keith H; Everett, Jake; Trivedi, Urvish; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-07-01

    Opportunistic infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be acute or chronic. While acute infections often spread rapidly and can cause tissue damage and sepsis with high mortality rates, chronic infections can persist for weeks, months, or years in the face of intensive clinical intervention. Remarkably, this diverse infectious capability is not accompanied by extensive variation in genomic content, suggesting that the genetic capacity to be an acute or a chronic pathogen is present in most P. aeruginosa strains. To investigate the genetic requirements for acute and chronic pathogenesis in P. aeruginosa infections, we combined high-throughput sequencing-mediated transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) and genome-wide insertion mutant fitness profiling (Tn-seq) to characterize gene expression and fitness determinants in murine models of burn and non-diabetic chronic wound infection. Generally we discovered that expression of a gene in vivo is not correlated with its importance for fitness, with the exception of metabolic genes. By combining metabolic models generated from in vivo gene expression data with mutant fitness profiles, we determined the nutritional requirements for colonization and persistence in these infections. Specifically, we found that long-chain fatty acids represent a major carbon source in both chronic and acute wounds, and P. aeruginosa must biosynthesize purines, several amino acids, and most cofactors during infection. In addition, we determined that P. aeruginosa requires chemotactic flagellar motility for fitness and virulence in acute burn wound infections, but not in non-diabetic chronic wound infections. Our results provide novel insight into the genetic requirements for acute and chronic P. aeruginosa wound infections and demonstrate the power of using both gene expression and fitness profiling for probing bacterial virulence.

  16. Systemic acute phase proteins response in calves experimentally infected with Eimeria zuernii.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Brian; Bangoura, Berit; Lepik, Triin; Orro, Toomas

    2015-09-15

    Acute phase proteins (APPs) have been demonstrated to be useful in evaluating general health stress and diseases in cattle. Serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin (Hp) are APPs that are produced during inflammation, and likely play a role in host immunological defence against Eimeria infection and the associated intestinal tissue damage. We investigated the involvement of SAA and HP in an experimental study, including three groups of calves: a control group (group 0, n=11), and two groups infected with either 150,000 or 250,000 Eimeria zuernii oocysts (group 1 (n=11) and group 2 (n=12), respectively). The calves were monitored for 28 days and data was collected on oocyst excretion, faecal score, animal weight, and SAA and Hp serum concentrations. Generalized linear mixed models showed that the clinical symptoms, indicated by an increase in the number of oocysts in the faeces and severe diarrhoea, manifested at patency for group 1 and 2. Serum Hp and SAA levels also increased during this period. Hp appeared to be a more sensitive marker than SAA, and differences between groups 1 and 2 were observed only for Hp. Linear regression models showed a negative association between weight gain and Hp concentrations, calculated as the area under the curve (AUC) during the overall experimental period and the patency period. A similar result was seen for SAA only during the patency period. This result supports the assumption that reduced weight gain due to E. zuernii infection is an immunologically driven process that involves an increase in APPs. A random intercept regression model of oocyst shedding groups showed that calves shedding 1-500 oocysts had reduced concentrations of Hp, indicating that a different immunological reaction occurs during mild shedding of E. zuernii oocysts than during more intensive shedding. A similar model was used to examine associations between faecal scores and Hp concentrations for each group. Group 2 calves with haemorrhagic diarrhoea displayed

  17. Behçet's disease diagnosed after acute HIV infection: viral replication activating underlying autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Clay; Kinney, Rebecca; Gilles, Ryan; Blue, Sky

    2015-05-01

    Behçet's disease is an autoimmune systemic vasculitis that can occur after exposure to infectious agents. Behçet's disease also has been associated with HIV infection, including de novo development of this condition during chronic HIV infection and resolution of Behçet's disease symptoms following initiation of antiretroviral therapy. We describe a patient who presented with systemic vasculitis with skin and mucous membrane ulcerations in the setting of acute HIV infection, who was eventually diagnosed with Behçet's disease, demonstrating a possible link between acute HIV infection, immune activation and development of autoimmunity.

  18. Serologically proven acute rubella infection in patients with clinical diagnosis of dengue.

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, J.; Hamdan, A.; Loroño, M. A.; Montero, M. T.; Gómez, B.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with a clinical diagnosis of dengue but negative by serological testing were studied for rubella infection. Paired sera were obtained from 69 patients during an outbreak in Yucatán, México. The presence of specific anti-viral IgM in the acute sera was considered as diagnostic for rubella infection. The immunoglobulin was determined by measuring the difference in the inhibition of hemagglutination between the non-reduced and the reduced fractionated sera. Immunoglobulins were separated by sucrose density centrifugation. Acute rubella infection was found in 7 (10.1%) of the patients. These results demonstrate active rubella infection in patients clinically diagnosed as dengue. PMID:2323361

  19. A role for stem cell factor (SCF): c-kit interaction(s) in the intestinal tract response to Salmonella typhimurium infection

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) has been shown to induce stem cell factor (SCF) production in mouse ligated intestinal loops. Further, SCF interaction(s) with its receptor (c-kit) was shown to be important for the intestinal tract secretory response after CT exposure. In this study, we have investigated whether SCF production is induced in the intestinal tract after exposure to Salmonella typhimurium and whether this production could be an important intestinal tract response to Salmonella infection. Using a mouse ligated intestinal loop model, increased levels of SCF mRNA were detected at 2-4 h post-Salmonella challenge. Intestinal fluid obtained from Salmonella-challenged loops contained high levels of SCF by ELISA. Human and murine intestinal epithelial cell lines were also shown to have increased levels of SCF mRNA after exposure to Salmonella. Inhibition of Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells was shown to be one potentially important role for SCF:c-kit interactions in host defense to Salmonella infection. Pretreatment of human or murine intestinal cell lines with SCF resulted in a cellular state that was resistant to Salmonella invasion. Finally, mice having mutations in the white spotting (W) locus, which encodes the SCF-receptor (c-kit), were significantly more susceptible to oral Salmonella challenge than their control littermates. Taken together, the above results suggest that an important intestinal tract response to Salmonella infection is an enhanced production of SCF and its subsequent interactions with c-kit. PMID:8691142

  20. Elevated IL-23R Expression and Foxp3+Rorgt+ Cells in Intestinal Mucosa During Acute and Chronic Colitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiayin; Xu, Lili

    2016-08-08

    BACKGROUND IL-23/IL-23R signaling plays a pivotal role during the course of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly characterized. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells are critical in the maintenance of gut immune homeostasis and therefore are important in preventing the development of IBD. This study was performed to clarify the association between IL-23/IL-23R signaling and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in colitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Acute and chronic mouse colitis models were established by administering mice DSS in drinking water. IL-23R, IL-23, IL-I7, and IFN-γ expression level, as well as regulatory T cell, Th17-, and Th1-related transcription factors Foxp3, RORgt, and T-bet were assayed by real-time PCR. The frequency of Foxp3+ RORγt+ cells in a Foxp3+ cell population in colon mucosa during acute and chronic colitis was evaluated through flow cytometry. The signaling pathway mediated by IL-23R in the colon mucosa from acute colitis mice and chronic colitis mice was monitored by Western blot analysis. RESULTS We detected elevated IL-23R, IL-23, and IFN-γ expression in colon mucosa during acute and chronic colitis and found increased IL-17 in acute colitis mice. Transcription factors Foxp3 and T-bet were elevated in colon mucosa during acute and chronic colitis. Phosphorylation of Stat3 was greatly enhanced, indicating the activation of IL-23R function in colitis mice. The percentage of Foxp3+ T cells in acute and chronic colitis mice was comparable to control mice, but there was a 2-fold increase of Foxp3+ RORγt+ cells among the Foxp3+ cell population in acute and chronic colitis mice compared to control mice. CONCLUSIONS These findings indicate that the induction of Foxp3+ RORgt+ T cells could be enhanced during inflammation in the intestine where IL-23R expression is greatly induced. Our study highlights the importance of IL-23R expression level and the instability of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the development of

  1. The intestinal immunoendocrine axis: novel cross-talk between enteroendocrine cells and the immune system during infection and inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, John J

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium represents one of our most important interfaces with the external environment. It must remain tightly balanced to allow nutrient absorption, but maintain barrier function and immune homoeostasis, a failure of which results in chronic infection or debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The intestinal epithelium mainly consists of absorptive enterocytes and secretory goblet and Paneth cells and has recently come to light as being an essential modulator of immunity as opposed to a simple passive barrier. Each epithelial sub-type can produce specific immune modulating factors, driving innate immunity to pathogens as well as preventing autoimmunity. The enteroendocrine cells comprise just 1% of this epithelium, but collectively form the bodies’ largest endocrine system. The mechanisms of enteroendocrine cell peptide secretion during feeding, metabolism and nutrient absorption are well studied; but their potential interactions with the enriched numbers of surrounding immune cells remain largely unexplored. This review focuses on alterations in enteroendocrine cell number and peptide secretion during inflammation and disease, highlighting the few in depth studies which have attempted to dissect the immune driven mechanisms that drive these phenomena. Moreover, the emerging potential of enteroendocrine cells acting as innate sensors of intestinal perturbation and secreting peptides to directly orchestrate immune cell function will be proposed. In summary, the data generated from these studies have begun to unravel a complex cross-talk between immune and enteroendocrine cells, highlighting the emerging immunoendocrine axis as a potential target for therapeutic strategies for infections and inflammatory disorders of the intestine. PMID:26551720

  2. The intestinal immunoendocrine axis: novel cross-talk between enteroendocrine cells and the immune system during infection and inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Worthington, John J

    2015-08-01

    The intestinal epithelium represents one of our most important interfaces with the external environment. It must remain tightly balanced to allow nutrient absorption, but maintain barrier function and immune homoeostasis, a failure of which results in chronic infection or debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The intestinal epithelium mainly consists of absorptive enterocytes and secretory goblet and Paneth cells and has recently come to light as being an essential modulator of immunity as opposed to a simple passive barrier. Each epithelial sub-type can produce specific immune modulating factors, driving innate immunity to pathogens as well as preventing autoimmunity. The enteroendocrine cells comprise just 1% of this epithelium, but collectively form the bodies' largest endocrine system. The mechanisms of enteroendocrine cell peptide secretion during feeding, metabolism and nutrient absorption are well studied; but their potential interactions with the enriched numbers of surrounding immune cells remain largely unexplored. This review focuses on alterations in enteroendocrine cell number and peptide secretion during inflammation and disease, highlighting the few in depth studies which have attempted to dissect the immune driven mechanisms that drive these phenomena. Moreover, the emerging potential of enteroendocrine cells acting as innate sensors of intestinal perturbation and secreting peptides to directly orchestrate immune cell function will be proposed. In summary, the data generated from these studies have begun to unravel a complex cross-talk between immune and enteroendocrine cells, highlighting the emerging immunoendocrine axis as a potential target for therapeutic strategies for infections and inflammatory disorders of the intestine.

  3. [Frequency of intestinal microsporidian infections in HIV-positive patients, as diagnosis by quick hot Gram chromotrope staining and PCR].

    PubMed

    Botero, Jorge H; Montoya, Martha Nelly; Vanegas, Adriana Lucía; Díaz, Abel; Navarro-i-Martínez, Luis; Bornay, Fernando Jorge; Izquierdo, Fernando; del Aguila, Carmen; Agudelo, Sonia del Pilar

    2004-12-01

    Microsporidia are intracellular obligate parasites, today mainly associated with diarrhea in AIDS patients. Microsporidia prevalence ranges from 8% to 52% in different countries, as evaluated by several diagnostic methods, such as the stain test and PCR. In Medellín, Colombia, its frequency is unknown, and hence, a study was undertaken to determine the frequency of intestinal microsporidiosis in HIV patients, by means of the quick-hot Gram chromotrope test and the PCR. A prospective and descriptive study of an intentional population of all HIV-positive patients was sent to the Grupo Interdisciplinario para el Estudio de las Parasitosis Intestinales laboratory by institutions treating the HIV-positive patients of Medellín between August 2001 and September 2002. The clinical-epidemiological survey included a serial stool test with direct concentration and special stains for coccidiae and intestinal microsporidia. In addition, counts of lymphocytes TCD4+ and viral load were requested. One hundred and three patients with ages ranging from 2-74 years were evaluated. Seventy percent presented with diarrhea--mostly in men (83.5%). The overall frequency of intestinal microsporidiosis was 3.9% and that of other intestinal parasitic infections was 39.8%. Three of the four patients positive for microsporida were infected with Enterocytozoon bieneusi and one with Encephalitozoon intestinalis. The microsporidiosis frequency was relatively low with 3 of the 4 cases associated with protracted diarrhea, counts of LTCD4+ below 100 cel/microl and viral loads up to 100,000 copies.

  4. Human Herpesvirus 6 Infection Presenting as an Acute Febrile Illness Associated with Thrombocytopenia and Leukopenia

    PubMed Central

    Avšič-Županc, Tatjana; Uršič, Tina; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    We present an infant with acute fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia, coming from an endemic region for tick-borne encephalitis, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and hantavirus infection. The primary human herpesvirus 6 infection was diagnosed by seroconversion of specific IgM and IgG and by identification of viral DNA in the acute patient's serum. The patient did not show skin rash suggestive of exanthema subitum during the course of illness. PMID:27980872

  5. From gut microflora imbalance to mycobacteria infection: is there a relationship with chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases?

    PubMed

    Tomasello, Giovanni; Bellavia, Maurizio; Palumbo, Vincenzo Davide; Gioviale, Maria Concetta; Damiani, Provvidenza; Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio

    2011-01-01

    The gut of a healthy adult harbours a myriad of different microbial species. It is estimated that approximately 10 14 are present in total bacterial colony forming units (CFU). Each colony colonizes a specific intestinal tract. In healthy adult, the main control of intestinal bacterial colonization occurs through gastric acidity but also other factors can influence the intestinal microenvironment such as pH, temperature, competition among different bacterial strains, peristalsis, drugs, radiotherapy and much more. Impaired microbial homeostasis leads to an alteration of the permeability of tissue, together with the activation of the intestinal immune system MALT (mucosal associated lymphoid tissue). In this regard we discuss the increasing experimental evidences of the role of commensal microbiota in the activation of specific intestinal immunocompetent cells. The aforementioned micro-environmental changes provide the substrate for the etiopathogenetic outbreak of numerous pathologies of gastro-intestinal tract, such as intestinal chronic inflammation (Crohn's disease and Ulcerative Colitis), together with a miscellany of extra intestinal disorders. This article is an overview of the latest scientific findings about the close causal relationship between intestinal microbial flora and inflammatory bowel diseases or other extra-intestinal diseases; it is also mentioned the possible relationship between mycobacteria and Chron's disease. Finally we analyse the beneficial role of probiotics.

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Methods Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient’s condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Results Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. Discussion In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Conclusion Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission. PMID:24180319

  7. Ukrain (NSC 631570) ameliorates intestinal ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute lung injury by reducing oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Kocak, Cengiz; Kocak, Fatma Emel; Akcilar, Raziye; Akcilar, Aydin; Savran, Bircan; Zeren, Sezgin; Bayhan, Zulfu; Bayat, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) causes severe destruction in remote organs. Lung damage is a frequently seen complication after intestinal I/R. Ukrain (NSC 631570) is a synthetic thiophosphate derivative of alkaloids from the extract of the celandine (Chelidonium majus L.) plant. We investigated the effect of Ukrain in animals with lung injury induced by intestinal I/R. Adult male Spraque-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, Ukrain, I/R, I/R with Ukrain. Before intestinal I/R was induced, Ukrain was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 7.0 mg/body weight. After 1 h ischemia and 2 h reperfusion period, lung tissues were excised. Tissue levels of total oxidative status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured and oxidative stress indices (OSI) were calculated. Lung tissues were also examined histopathologically. TOS and OSI levels markedly increased and TAS levels decreased in the I/R group compared to the control group (P < 0.05). TOS and OSI levels markedly decreased and TAS levels increased in the I/R with Ukrain group compared with the group subjected to IR only (P < 0.05). Severe hemorrhage, alveolar septal thickening, and leukocyte infiltration were observed in the I/R group. In the I/R with Ukrain group, morphologic changes occurring as a result of lung damage attenuated and histopathological scores reduced compared to the I/R group (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that Ukrain pretreatment could reduce lung injury induced by intestinal I/R induced via anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. PMID:26773189

  8. Mortality in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition is related to intestinal and systemic inflammation: an observational cohort study12

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Sara J; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Zhang, Ling; Richardson, Susan; van Rheenen, Patrick F

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diarrhea affects a large proportion of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). However, its etiology and clinical consequences remain unclear. Objective: We investigated diarrhea, enteropathogens, and systemic and intestinal inflammation for their interrelation and their associations with mortality in children with SAM. Design: Intestinal pathogens (n = 15), cytokines (n = 29), fecal calprotectin, and the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) butyrate and propionate were determined in children aged 6–59 mo (n = 79) hospitalized in Malawi for complicated SAM. The relation between variables, diarrhea, and death was assessed with partial least squares (PLS) path modeling. Results: Fatal subjects (n = 14; 18%) were younger (mean ± SD age: 17 ± 11 compared with 25 ± 11 mo; P = 0.01) with higher prevalence of diarrhea (46% compared with 18%, P = 0.03). Intestinal pathogens Shigella (36%), Giardia (33%), and Campylobacter (30%) predominated, but their presence was not associated with death or diarrhea. Calprotectin was significantly higher in children who died [median (IQR): 1360 mg/kg feces (2443–535 mg/kg feces) compared with 698 mg/kg feces (1438–244 mg/kg feces), P = 0.03]. Butyrate [median (IQR): 31 ng/mL (112–22 ng/mL) compared with 2036 ng/mL (5800–149 ng/mL), P = 0.02] and propionate [median (IQR): 167 ng/mL (831–131 ng/mL) compared with 3174 ng/mL (5819–357 ng/mL), P = 0.04] were lower in those who died. Mortality was directly related to high systemic inflammation (path coefficient = 0.49), whereas diarrhea, high calprotectin, and low SCFA production related to death indirectly via their more direct association with systemic inflammation. Conclusions: Diarrhea, high intestinal inflammation, low concentrations of fecal SCFAs, and high systemic inflammation are significantly related to mortality in SAM. However, these relations were not mediated by the presence of intestinal pathogens. These findings offer an important understanding of

  9. An in vitro model of intestinal infection reveals a developmentally regulated transcriptome of Toxoplasma sporozoites and a NF-κB-like signature in infected host cells.

    PubMed

    Guiton, Pascale S; Sagawa, Janelle M; Fritz, Heather M; Boothroyd, John C

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a zoonotic infection affecting approximately 30% of the world's human population. After sexual reproduction in the definitive feline host, Toxoplasma oocysts, each containing 8 sporozoites, are shed into the environment where they can go on to infect humans and other warm-blooded intermediate hosts. Here, we use an in vitro model to assess host transcriptomic changes that occur in the earliest stages of such infections. We show that infection of rat intestinal epithelial cells with mature sporozoites primarily results in higher expression of genes associated with Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) signaling via NF-κB. Furthermore, we find that, consistent with their biology, these mature, invaded sporozoites display a transcriptome intermediate between the previously reported day 10 oocysts and that of their tachyzoite counterparts. Thus, this study uncovers novel host and pathogen factors that may be critical for the establishment of a successful intracellular niche following sporozoite-initiated infection.

  10. An in vitro model of intestinal infection reveals a developmentally regulated transcriptome of Toxoplasma sporozoites and a NF-κB-like signature in infected host cells

    PubMed Central

    Sagawa, Janelle M.; Fritz, Heather M.; Boothroyd, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a zoonotic infection affecting approximately 30% of the world’s human population. After sexual reproduction in the definitive feline host, Toxoplasma oocysts, each containing 8 sporozoites, are shed into the environment where they can go on to infect humans and other warm-blooded intermediate hosts. Here, we use an in vitro model to assess host transcriptomic changes that occur in the earliest stages of such infections. We show that infection of rat intestinal epithelial cells with mature sporozoites primarily results in higher expression of genes associated with Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) signaling via NF-κB. Furthermore, we find that, consistent with their biology, these mature, invaded sporozoites display a transcriptome intermediate between the previously reported day 10 oocysts and that of their tachyzoite counterparts. Thus, this study uncovers novel host and pathogen factors that may be critical for the establishment of a successful intracellular niche following sporozoite-initiated infection. PMID:28362800

  11. Household Air Pollution and Acute Lower Respiratory Infections in Adults: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Hope; Havens, Deborah; Manda, Geoffrey; Pope, Daniel; Bruce, Nigel; Mortimer, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Household air pollution from solid fuel burning kills over 4 million people every year including half a million children from acute lower respiratory infections. Although biologically plausible, it is not clear whether household air pollution is also associated with acute lower respiratory infections in adults. We systematically reviewed the literature on household air pollution and acute lower respiratory infection in adults to identify knowledge gaps and research opportunities. Methods Ten bibliographic databases were searched to identify studies of household air pollution and adult acute lower respiratory infection. Data were extracted from eligible studies using standardised forms. Results From 4617 titles, 513 abstracts and 72 full-text articles were reviewed. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria of which 2 found a significant adjusted increased risk of acute lower respiratory infection, 2 identified a univariate association whilst 4 found no significant association. Study quality was generally limited. Heterogeneity in methods and findings precluded meta-analysis. Discussion A systematic review of the literature found limited evidence for an association between household air pollution and risk of acute lower respiratory infection in adults. Additional research, with carefully defined exposure and outcome measures, is required to complete the risk profile caused by household air pollution in adults. Registration number CRD42015028042. PMID:27907205

  12. Changes in the Porcine Intestinal Microbiome in Response to Infection with Salmonella enterica and Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Randall S.; Gebhart, Connie J.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Johnson, Timothy; Isaacson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of food borne illness. Recent studies have shown that S. enterica is a pathogen capable of causing alterations to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. A recent prospective study of French pork production farms found a statistically significant association between Lawsonia intracellularis and carriage of S. enterica. In the current study the composition of the gut microbiome was determined in pigs challenged with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and or L. intracellularis and compared to non-challenged control pigs. Principal coordinate analysis demonstrated that there was a disruption in the composition of the gut microbiome in the colon and cecum of pigs challenged with either pathogen. The compositions of the microbiomes of challenged pigs were similar to each other but differed from the non-challenged controls. There also were statistically significant increases in Anaerobacter, Barnesiella, Pediococcus, Sporacetigenium, Turicibacter, Catenibacterium, Prevotella, Pseudobutyrivibrio, and Xylanibacter in the challenged pigs. To determine if these changes were specific to experimentally challenged pigs, we determined the compositions of the fecal microbiomes of naturally infected pigs that were carriers of S. enterica. Pigs that were frequent shedders of S. enterica were shown to have similar fecal microbiomes compared to non-shedders or pigs that shed S. enterica infrequently. In a comparison of the differentially abundant bacteria in the naturally infected pigs compared to experimentally challenged pigs, 9 genera were differentially abundant and each exhibited the same increase or decrease in abundance between the two groups. Thus, there were similar changes in the GI microbiome associated with carriage of S. enterica regardless of whether the pigs were experimentally challenged with S. enterica or acquired it naturally. PMID:26461107

  13. [Morphologic changes in the intestine of swine after infection with verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Appel, G; Ewald, C; Heer, A; von Mickwitz, G; Aleksić, S; Rüssmann, H; Meyer, T; Karch, H

    1990-09-01

    Spontaneous morphologic lesions are described in 12 of 66 pigs submitted for necropsy. All 12 pigs were culture positive for Verotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC). 10 of them were weaned pigs, one a suckling piglet and one a fattening hog. In 6 cases E. coli serovar 0139:H1 and in one case each the serovars 0139:H40; 0138:H-; 0125ac:H27 and 0154:H- were isolated. From the fecal samples of 2 animals E. coli ONT (O-group non typable):H- were cultured. Macroscopically there were cyanosis, edema of the eye lids, catarrhal enteritis and/or colitis as well as edema of the mesentery, swelling of the mesenteric lymph nodes and congestion of the lung to varying degrees. Histopathologic examination of 5 animals was carried out. In 3 animals atrophy and edema of the villi in the jejunum and ileum were discovered. In one animal an additional infection with corona virus was confirmed electron microscopically. Furthermore there was disseminated necrosis of lymphocytes in Peyer's patches of the small intestine and in secondary follicles of the mesenteric lymph nodes. In one of the animals a hemorrhagic-necrotising ileitis, occurred characterized by necrosis of villi and thrombosis of blood vessels in the mucosa. The highest number of VTEC with seven out of twelve animals was found in weaned pigs in association with the E. coli serovar 0139.

  14. Is there a role for lactobacilli in prevention of urogenital and intestinal infections?

    PubMed Central

    Reid, G; Bruce, A W; McGroarty, J A; Cheng, K J; Costerton, J W

    1990-01-01

    This review describes the importance of microbial adhesion in the ecology of the urogenital and intestinal tracts and the influence of host and microbial factors in bacterial interference. In a recent revival of interest in bacterial interference, lactobacillus administration has been studied as a means of treating and preventing disease. Although evidence is conflicting, Lactobacillus acidophilus appears to be involved in beneficial antagonistic and cooperative reactions that interfere with establishment of pathogens in the gastrointestinal tract. The mechanisms of action are believed to involve competitive exclusion and production of inhibitory substances, including bacteriocins. These characteristics, as well as demonstrated adherence abilities in vitro, led to selection of certain Lactobacillus strains for clinical studies of cystitis. Weekly intravaginal Lactobacillus therapy reduced the recurrence rate of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections in women. Use of Lactobacillus strains resistant to Nonoxynol-9, a spermicide that kills members of the protective normal vaginal flora, may have potential for use in women with recurrent cystitis using this contraceptive agent. In veterinary studies, bacterial interference by administration of probiotics has also been beneficial in disease prevention in animals. Carefully selected bacterial mixtures integrate with the gastrointestinal flora of the animals and can confer disease resistance and improve physiological function. Additional human and animal trials are needed to determine the practical, long-term usefulness of bacterial interference as a protective mechanism against infectious diseases. Images PMID:2224835

  15. Bacillus cereus catheter related bloodstream infection in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gurler, N; Oksuz, L; Muftuoglu, M; Sargin, Fd; Besisik, Sk

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus infection is rarely associated with actual infection and for this reason single positive blood culture is usually regarded as contamination . However it may cause a number of infections, such catheter-related bloodstream infections. Significant catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) caused by Bacillus spp. are mainly due to B. cereus and have been predominantly reported in immunocompromised hosts. Catheter removal is generally advised for management of infection. In this report, catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with acute lymphoblast c leukemia (ALL) in Istanbul Medical Faculty was presented.

  16. Large intestine-targeted nanoparticle-releasing oral vaccine to control genitorectal viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Talton, James; Zhang, Guofeng; Cunningham, Tshaka; Wang, Zijian; Waters, Robert C.; Kirk, James; Eppler, Bärbel; Dennis M, Klinman; Sui, Yongjun; Gagnon, Susan; Belyakov, Igor M.; Mumper, Russell J.; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    2012-01-01

    Both rectal and vaginal mucosal surfaces serve as transmission routes for pathogenic microorganisms. Vaccination through large intestinal mucosa, previously proven protective for both mucosal sites in animal studies, can be achieved successfully by direct intra-colorectal (i.c.r.) administration, which is, however, clinically impractical. Oral delivery seems preferable, but risks vaccine destruction in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, we designed a large intestine-targeted oral delivery with pH-dependent microparticles containing vaccine nanoparticles, which induced colorectal immunity in mice comparably to colorectal vaccination and protected against rectal or vaginal viral challenge. Conversely, vaccine targeted to the small intestine induced only small intestinal immunity and provided no rectal or vaginal protection, demonstrating functional compartmentalization within the gut mucosal immune system. Therefore, using this oral vaccine delivery system to target the large intestine, but not the small intestine, may represent a feasible novel strategy for immune protection of rectal and vaginal mucosa. PMID:22797811

  17. Long-Term Relationships: the Complicated Interplay between the Host and the Developmental Stages of Toxoplasma gondii during Acute and Chronic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Toxoplasma gondii represents one of the most common parasitic infections in the world. The asexual cycle can occur within any warm-blooded animal, but the sexual cycle is restricted to the feline intestinal epithelium. T. gondii is acquired through consumption of tissue cysts in undercooked meat as well as food and water contaminated with oocysts. Once ingested, it differentiates into a rapidly replicating asexual form and disseminates throughout the body during acute infection. After stimulation of the host immune response, T. gondii differentiates into a slow-growing, asexual cyst form that is the hallmark of chronic infection. One-third of the human population is chronically infected with T. gondii cysts, which can reactivate and are especially dangerous to individuals with reduced immune surveillance. Serious complications can also occur in healthy individuals if infected with certain T. gondii strains or if infection is acquired congenitally. No drugs are available to clear the cyst form during the chronic stages of infection. This therapeutic gap is due in part to an incomplete understanding of both host and pathogen responses during the progression of T. gondii infection. While many individual aspects of T. gondii infection are well understood, viewing the interconnections between host and parasite during acute and chronic infection may lead to better approaches for future treatment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of what is known and unknown about the complex relationship between the host and parasite during the progression of T. gondii infection, with the ultimate goal of bridging these events. PMID:26335719

  18. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... drugs to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). This guidance finalizes...

  19. Intestinal mucosal mast cells from rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis contain protease-resistant chondroitin sulfate di-B proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.L.; Lee, T.D.G.; Seldin, D.C.; Austen, K.F.; Befus, A.D.; Bienenstock, J.

    1986-07-01

    Rats infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were injected i.p. with 2 mCi of (/sup 35/S) sulfate on days 13, 15, 17, and 19 after infection. The intestines were removed from animals on day 20 or 21 after infection, the intestinal cells were obtained by collagenase treatment and mechanical dispersion of the tissue, and the /sup 35/S-labeled mucosal mast cells (MMC) were enriched to 60 to 65% purity by Percoll centrifugation. The isolated proteoglycans were of approx. 150,000 m.w., were resistant to pronase degradation, and contained highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate side chains. The presence in normal mammalian cells of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that contain a high percentage of the unusual disulfated di-B disaccharide has not been previously reported. The rat intestinal MMC proteoglycans are the first chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that have been isolated from an enriched populations of normal mast cells. They are homologous to the chondroitin sulfate-rich proteoglycans of the transformed rat basophilic leumekia-1 cell and the cultured interleukin 3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell, in that these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are all highly sulfated, protease-resistant proteoglycans.

  20. A Multi-Omic View of Host-Pathogen-Commensal Interplay in Salmonella-Mediated Intestinal Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Brooke LD; Li, Jie; Sanford, James A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Jones, Marcus B.; Peterson, Christine; Peterson, Scott N.; Frank, Bryan C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Brown, Joseph N.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-06-26

    The potential for commensal microorganisms indigenous to a host (the ‘microbiome’ or ‘microbiota’) to alter infection outcome by influencing host-pathogen interplay is largely unknown. We used a multi-omics “systems” approach, incorporating proteomics, metabolomics, glycomics, and metagenomics, to explore the molecular interplay between the murine host, the pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), and commensal gut microorganisms during intestinal infection with S. Typhimurium. We find proteomic evidence that S. Typhimurium thrives within the infected 129/SvJ mouse gut without antibiotic pre-treatment, inducing inflammation and disrupting the intestinal microbiome (e.g., suppressing Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes while promoting growth of Salmonella and Enterococcus). Alteration of the host microbiome population structure was highly correlated with gut environmental changes, including the accumulation of metabolites normally consumed by commensal microbiota. Finally, the less characterized phase of S. Typhimurium’s lifecycle was investigated, and both proteomic and glycomic evidence suggests S. Typhimurium may take advantage of increased fucose moieties to metabolize fucose while growing in the gut. The application of multiple omics measurements to Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation provides insights into complex molecular strategies employed during pathogenesis between host, pathogen, and the microbiome.

  1. SURVEY OF HOUSE RAT INTESTINAL PARASITES FROM SURABAYA DISTRICT, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA THAT CAN CAUSE OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HUMANS.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, R H

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of house rat zoonotic intestinal parasites from Surabaya District, East Java, Indonesia that have the potential to cause opportunistic infection in humans. House rat fecal samples were collected from an area of Surabaya District with a dense rat population during May 2015. Intestinal parasites were detected microscopically using direct smear of feces stained with Lugol's iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. The fecal samples were also cultured for Strongyloides stercoralis. Ninety-eight house rat fecal samples were examined. The potential opportunistic infection parasite densities found in those samples were Strongyloides stercoralis in 53%, Hymenolepis nana in 42%, Cryptosporidium spp in 33%, and Blastocystis spp in 6%. This is the first report of this kind in Surabaya District. Measures need to be taken to control the house rat population in the study area to reduce the risk of the public health problem. Keywords: zoonotic intestinal parasites, opportunistic infection, house rat, densely populated area, Indonesia

  2. Concurrent urinary and intestinal schistosomiasis and intestinal helminthic infections in schoolchildren in Ilobu, South-western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ugbomoiko, U S; Dalumo, V; Danladi, Y K; Heukelbach, J; Ofoezie, I E

    2012-07-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in a schistosome-endemic rural community in Southwestern Nigeria. We assessed prevalence and intensity of soil-transmitted nematodes and the co-occurrence with Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni. Urine and stool samples from 419 schoolchildren were examined, and a questionnaire was administered to obtain socio-demographic characteristics. In total, 78.3% (328/419) were infected with at least one helminth species, with a prevalence (mean egg-count) of 55.1% (3069.2) of Ascaris lumbricoides, 41.1% (127.5) of S. haematobium, 22.7% (98.6) of hookworms, 17.9% (161.3) of Trichuris trichiura, and 10.3% (12.9) of S. mansoni. Multiple infections were significantly more common among children from households with more playmates, absence of toilet facilities and low income level (all p<0.001). Children with heavy hookworm burden were at a significantly higher chance of acquiring S. mansoni (OR=36.35; 95% Cl: 13.22-100.97; p<0.0001). The risk of S. mansoni and A. lumbricoides infections was increased in co-infections with S. haematobium. Logistic regression analysis revealed infections by hookworms and S. mansoni (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=3.90, 95% Cl: 2.03-7.46; p<0.0001), and by hookworms and T. trichiura (aOR=2.46, 95% Cl: 1.44-4.22; p=0.001) as significant risk factors for multiple infections. Our study shows that polyparasitism is common in the study area. Focused interventions such as mass treatment with anthelminthics and health education are needed to improve the well-being of the affected population.

  3. SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN THE BRAIN AND LUNG LEADS TO DIFFERENTIAL TYPE I INTERFERON SIGNALING DURING ACUTE INFECTION*

    PubMed Central

    Alammar, Luna; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E.

    2011-01-01

    Using an accelerated and consistent simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) pigtailed macaque model of HIV associated neurological disorders, we have demonstrated that virus enters the brain during acute infection. However, neurological symptoms do not manifest until late stages of infection, suggesting that immunological mechanisms exist within the central nervous system (CNS) that control viral replication and associated inflammation. We have shown that interferon beta, a type I interferon central to viral innate immunity, is a major cytokine present in the brain during acute infection and is responsible for limiting virus infection and inflammatory cytokine expression. However, the induction and role of interferon alpha in the CNS during acute SIV infection has never been examined in this model. In the classical model of interferon signaling, interferon beta signals through the interferon α/β receptor, leading to expression of interferon alpha. Surprisingly, although interferon beta is up regulated during acute SIV infection, we found that interferon alpha is down regulated. We demonstrate that this down regulation is coupled with a suppression of signaling molecules downstream of the interferon receptor, namely tyk2, STAT1 and IRF7, as indicated by either lack of protein phosphorylation, lack of nuclear accumulation, or transcriptional and/or translational repression. In contrast to brain, interferon alpha is up regulated in lung and accompanied by activation of tyk2 and STAT1. These data provide a novel observation that during acute SIV infection in the brain there is differential signaling through the interferon α/β receptor that fails to activate expression of interferon alpha in the brain. PMID:21368232

  4. Acute intestinal obstruction caused by a persimmon phytobezoar after dissolution therapy with Coca-Cola.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seung Soo; Lee, Hyun Suk; Jung, Min Kyu; Jeon, Seong Woo; Cho, Chang Min; Kim, Sung Kook; Choi, Yong Hwan

    2007-12-01

    Bezoars are concretions or hard masses of foreign matter that are found in the gastrointestinal tract. Recent reports have demonstrated the efficacy of Coca-Cola administration for the dissolution of phytobezors. Here we report on a 73-year-old man with a very large gastric persimmon diospyrobezoar, and this caused small intestinal obstruction after partial dissolution with oral and injected Coca-Cola.

  5. Acute Heat Stress and Reduced Nutrient Intake Alter Intestinal Proteomic Profile and Gene Expression in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Sarah C.; Lonergan, Steven M.; Huff-Lonergan, Elisabeth; Baumgard, Lance H.; Gabler, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress and reduced feed intake negatively affect intestinal integrity and barrier function. Our objective was to compare ileum protein profiles of pigs subjected to 12 hours of HS, thermal neutral ad libitum feed intake, or pair-fed to heat stress feed intake under thermal neutral conditions (pair-fed thermal neutral). 2D-Differential In Gel Electrophoresis and gene expression were performed. Relative abundance of 281 and 138 spots differed due to heat stress, compared to thermal neutral and pair-fed thermal neutral pigs, respectively. However, only 20 proteins were different due to feed intake (thermal neutral versus pair-fed thermal neutral). Heat stress increased mRNA expression of heat shock proteins and protein abundance of heat shock proteins 27, 70, 90-α and β were also increased. Heat stress reduced ileum abundance of several metabolic enzymes, many of which are involved in the glycolytic or TCA pathways, indicating a change in metabolic priorities. Stress response enzymes peroxiredoxin-1 and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A were decreased in pair-fed thermal neutral and thermal neutral pigs compared to heat stress. Heat stress increased mRNA abundance markers of ileum hypoxia. Altogether, these data show that heat stress directly alters intestinal protein and mRNA profiles largely independent of reduced feed intake. These changes may be related to the reduced intestinal integrity associated with heat stress. PMID:26575181

  6. Inflammation-associated alterations to the intestinal microbiota reduce colonization resistance against non-typhoidal Salmonella during concurrent malaria parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Jason P; Lokken, Kristen L; Byndloss, Mariana X; George, Michael D; Velazquez, Eric M; Faber, Franziska; Butler, Brian P; Walker, Gregory T; Ali, Mohamed M; Potts, Rashaun; Tiffany, Caitlin; Ahmer, Brian M M; Luckhart, Shirley; Tsolis, Renée M

    2015-10-05

    Childhood malaria is a risk factor for disseminated infections with non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) in sub-Saharan Africa. While hemolytic anemia and an altered cytokine environment have been implicated in increased susceptibility to NTS, it is not known whether malaria affects resistance to intestinal colonization with NTS. To address this question, we utilized a murine model of co-infection. Infection of mice with Plasmodium yoelii elicited infiltration of inflammatory macrophages and T cells into the intestinal mucosa and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines. These mucosal responses were also observed in germ-free mice, showing that they are independent of the resident microbiota. Remarkably, P. yoelii infection reduced colonization resistance of mice against S. enterica serotype Typhimurium. Further, 16S rRNA sequence analysis of the intestinal microbiota revealed marked changes in the community structure. Shifts in the microbiota increased susceptibility to intestinal colonization by S. Typhimurium, as demonstrated by microbiota reconstitution of germ-free mice. These results show that P. yoelii infection, via alterations to the microbial community in the intestine, decreases resistance to intestinal colonization with NTS. Further they raise the possibility that decreased colonization resistance may synergize with effects of malaria on systemic immunity to increase susceptibility to disseminated NTS infections.

  7. Development of Chronic and Acute Golden Syrian Hamster Infection Models with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The golden Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) is frequently used as a model to study virulence for several species of Leptospira. Onset of an acute, lethal infection following infection with several pathogenic Leptospira species has been widely adopted for vaccine testing. An important exceptio...

  8. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis in 7 dogs from Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    Kjaergaard, Astrid B.; Carr, Anthony P.; Gaunt, M. Casey

    2016-01-01

    Seven dogs diagnosed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis are described. Disease severity ranged from mild in adults to fatal disease in young dogs. Enteropathogenic E. coli infection should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in dogs with diarrhea. PMID:27587889

  9. Anomaly Detection in Host Signaling Pathways for the Early Prognosis of Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark D.; Ogle, Serenity; Forero, Adriana; Morrison, Juliet; Slayden, Richard; Katze, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of acute infectious diseases during the early stages of infection is critical to administering the appropriate treatment to improve the disease outcome. We present a data driven analysis of the human cellular response to respiratory viruses including influenza, respiratory syncytia virus, and human rhinovirus, and compared this with the response to the bacterial endotoxin, Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Using an anomaly detection framework we identified pathways that clearly distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients infected with the four different respiratory viruses and that accurately diagnosed patients exposed to a bacterial infection. Connectivity pathway analysis comparing the viral and bacterial diagnostic signatures identified host cellular pathways that were unique to patients exposed to LPS endotoxin indicating this type of analysis could be used to identify host biomarkers that can differentiate clinical etiologies of acute infection. We applied the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) on two human influenza (H1N1 and H3N2) gene expression data sets to define host networks perturbed in the asymptomatic phase of infection. Our analysis identified pathways in the respiratory virus diagnostic signature as prognostic biomarkers that triggered prior to clinical presentation of acute symptoms. These early warning pathways correctly predicted that almost half of the subjects would become symptomatic in less than forty hours post-infection and that three of the 18 subjects would become symptomatic after only 8 hours. These results provide a proof-of-concept for utility of anomaly detection algorithms to classify host pathway signatures that can identify presymptomatic signatures of acute diseases and differentiate between etiologies of infection. On a global scale, acute respiratory infections cause a significant proportion of human co-morbidities and account for 4.25 million deaths annually. The development of clinical

  10. Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Acute Ischemic Stroke from Septic Embolus: Successful Solitaire FR Thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jackson J; Bishu, Kalkidan G; Anavekar, Nandan S

    2012-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is often complicated by systemic embolization. Acute stroke due to septic emboli is a particularly dreaded complication. Optimal treatment for acute stroke in IE has not been well outlined. Fibrinolytic therapy may be associated with increased risk for hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke in the setting of IE. We present a case of IE complicated by acute stroke which was successfully treated with mechanical thrombectomy. This case illustrates a role of mechanical thrombectomy devices in this patient population.

  11. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Paim, Francine C.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A.; Fischer, David D.; Langel, Stephanie N.; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A.; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103+ and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of helminths and intestinal protozoa infections among children from primary schools in western Tajikistan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitic infections represent a public health problem in Tajikistan, but epidemiological evidence is scarce. The present study aimed at assessing the extent of helminths and intestinal protozoa infections among children of 10 schools in four districts of Tajikistan, and to make recommendations for control. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out in early 2009. All children attending grades 2 and 3 (age: 7-11 years) from 10 randomly selected schools were invited to provide a stool sample and interviewed about sanitary situation and hygiene behaviour. A questionnaire pertaining to demographic and socioeconomic characteristics was addressed to the heads of households. On the spot, stool samples were subjected to duplicate Kato-Katz thick smear examination for helminth diagnosis. Additionally, 1-2 g of stool was fixed in sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin, transferred to a specialised laboratory in Europe and examined for helminths and intestinal protozoa. The composite results from both methods served as diagnostic 'gold' standard. Results Out of 623 registered children, 602 participated in our survey. The overall prevalence of infection with helminths and pathogenic intestinal protozoa was 32.0% and 47.1%, respectively. There was pronounced spatial heterogeneity. The most common helminth species was Hymenolepis nana (25.8%), whereas the prevalences of Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and Enterobius vermicularis were below 5%. The prevalence of pathogenic intestinal protozoa, namely Giardia intestinalis and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar was 26.4% and 25.9%, respectively. Almost half of the households draw drinking water from unimproved sources, such as irrigation canals, rivers and unprotected wells. Sanitary facilities were pit latrines, mostly private, and a few shared with neighbours. The use of public tap/standpipe as a source of drinking water emerged as a protective factor for G. intestinalis infection. Protected spring water

  13. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Anastasia N; Paim, Francine C; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A; Fischer, David D; Langel, Stephanie N; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103(+) and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing the rates

  14. Efficacy of praziquantel and reinfection patterns in single and mixed infection foci for intestinal and urogenital schistosomiasis in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Tchuem Tchuenté, Louis-Albert; Momo, Sabine C; Stothard, J Russell; Rollinson, David

    2013-11-01

    The regular administration of the anthelminthic drug praziquantel (PZQ) to school-aged children (and other high-risk groups) is the cornerstone of schistosomiasis control. Whilst the performance of PZQ against single schistosome species infections is well-known, performance against mixed species infections is less so, as are patterns of re-infection following treatment. To address this, a study using a double treatment with PZQ, administered at 40 mg/kg spaced by 3 weeks, took place in two mixed intestinal-urogenital schistosomiasis foci in northern Cameroon (Bessoum and Ouro-Doukoudje) and in one single intestinal schistosomiasis infection focus (Makenene). A total of just under 1000 children were examined and the Schistosoma-infected children were re-examined at several parasitological follow-ups over a 1-year period posttreatment. Overall cure rates against Schistosoma spp. in the three settings were good, 83.3% (95% confidence interval (CI)=77.9-87.7%) in Bessoum, 89.0% (95% CI=79.1-94.6%) in Ouro Doukoudje, and 95.3% (95% CI=89.5-98.0%) in Makenene. Interestingly, no case of mixed schistosome infection was found after treatment. Cure rates for S. mansoni varied from 99.5% to 100%, while that for S. haematobium were considerably lower, varying from 82.7% to 88.0%. Across transmission settings, patterns of re-infection for each schistosome species were different such that generalizations across foci were difficult. For example, at the 6-month follow-up, re-infection rates were higher for S. haematobium than for S. mansoni with re-infection rates for S. haematobium varying from 9.5% to 66.7%, while for S. mansoni, lower rates were observed, ranging between nil and 24.5%. At the 12-month follow-up, re-infection rates varied from 9.1% to 66.7% for S. haematobium and from nil to 27.6% for S. mansoni. Alongside these parasitological studies, concurrent malacological surveys took place to monitor the presence of intermediate host snails of schistosomiasis. In the two

  15. The Microbiota Contributes to CD8+ T Cell Activation and Nutrient Malabsorption following Intestinal Infection with Giardia duodenalis

    PubMed Central

    Keselman, Aleksander; Li, Erqiu; Maloney, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a noninvasive luminal pathogen that impairs digestive function in its host in part by reducing intestinal disaccharidase activity. This enzyme deficiency has been shown in mice to require CD8+ T cells. We recently showed that both host immune responses and parasite strain affected disaccharidase levels during murine giardiasis. However, high doses of antibiotics were used to facilitate infections in that study, and we therefore decided to systematically examine the effects of antibiotic use on pathogenesis and immune responses in the mouse model of giardiasis. We found that antibiotic treatment did not overtly increase the parasite burden but significantly limited the disaccharidase deficiency observed in infected mice. Moreover, while infected mice had more activated CD8+ αβ T cells in the small intestinal lamina propria, this increase was absent in antibiotic-treated mice. Infection also led to increased numbers of CD4+ αβ T cells in the lamina propria and activation of T cell receptor γδ-expressing intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL), but these changes were not affected by antibiotics. Finally, we show that activated CD8+ T cells express gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and granzymes but that granzymes are not required for sucrase deficiency. We conclude that CD8+ T cells become activated in giardiasis through an antibiotic-sensitive process and contribute to reduced sucrase activity. These are the first data directly demonstrating activation of CD8+ T cells and γδ T cells during Giardia infections. These data also demonstrate that disruption of the intestinal microbiota by antibiotic treatment prevents pathological CD8+ T cell activation in giardiasis. PMID:27456829

  16. Relationship of Salmonella infection and inflammatory intestinal response with hematological and serum biochemical values in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Soria, Mario Alberto; Bonnet, María Agustina; Bueno, Dante Javier

    2015-06-15

    There are few studies about the blood serum of laying hens infected with Salmonella. The differential leukocyte count and blood chemistry values are an important aid in the diagnosis of human diseases, but blood parameters in the avian species are not well known. On the other hand, invasive forms of bacterial gastroenteritis, like Salmonella, often cause intestinal inflammation so this study was undertaken to find a biomarker of Salmonella infection and inflammatory intestinal response in the hematological or serum biochemical parameters in laying hens. Furthermore, we evaluated the association of some farm characteristics with Salmonella infection and fecal leukocytes (FL). A fecal sample with at least one fecal leukocyte per field was considered positive for inflammatory intestinal response. False positive serum reactions for Salmonella infection, by serum plate agglutination (SPA) test, were reduced by heating the sample to 56°C for 30 min and then diluting it 5-fold. The range of hematological and biochemical parameter values was very wide, in addition, there was a poor agreement between the SPA and FL results. Comparison of the positive and negative samples in SPA and FL showed that 1.3% and 79.8% of the laying hens were positive and negative in both tests, respectively. Hens with a positive SPA result showed a higher percentage of monocytes than those with a negative SPA result. Hens with a positive FL test had a higher percentage of heterophils, ratio of heterophils to lymphocytes and aspartate aminotransferase values, while the percentage of lymphocytes was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those with a negative FL test. The risk of Salmonella infection increased when the age of laying hens and the number of hens per poultry house was greater than or equal to 18 months old and 10,000 laying hens, compared to less than 18 months old and 10,000 laying hens, respectively. On the other hand, the risk of inflammatory intestinal response was higher in laying

  17. PREVALENCE, RISK FACTORS AND SYMPTOMS ASSOCIATED TO INTESTINAL PARASITE INFECTIONS AMONG PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS IN NAHAVAND, WESTERN IRAN.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Hamed; Haghighi, Ali; Rostami, Ali; Azargashb, Eznollah; Tabaei, Seyyed Javad Seyyed; Solgi, Abbas; Zebardast, Nozhat

    2016-01-01

    We studied the prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs), their risk factors and associated symptoms among patients with gastrointestinal disorders. A total of 1,301 participants aged 22 days-90 years were enrolled in this study. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain socio-demographic and stool examination to investigate intestinal parasite infections. Data analysis was performed using SPSS16. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs) was 32.2% (419/1,301). Three hundred and fifty nine cases/1,301 (27.6%) were infected with a single parasite and 60/1,301 cases (4.6%) presented polyparasitism. The most common IP was Blastocystis sp. 350/1,301 (26.9%), followed by Entamoeba coli 38/1,301 (2.92%), Giardia lamblia 30/1,301 (2.3%) and Cryptosporidium spp. 17/1,301 (1.3%). Regarding the socio-demographic variables, educational status (p = 0.001), contact with domestic animals and soil (p = 0.02), age above 15 years (p = 0.001) and seasons (p = 0.001) were significantly associated to intestinal parasitic infections. Concerning clinical characteristics, the presence of IPs was significantly associated to diarrhea (OR = 1.57; CI 95% = 1.24-1.98; p < 0.001) and dysentery (OR = 1.94; CI 95% = 1.03-3.66; p < 0.04). Our findings suggest that IPs are one of the main causal agents of gastrointestinal disorders. Improving the knowledge on local risk factors such as poverty, low level of education, poor sanitation, contact with soil and contact with domestic animal is warranted.

  18. PREVALENCE, RISK FACTORS AND SYMPTOMS ASSOCIATED TO INTESTINAL PARASITE INFECTIONS AMONG PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS IN NAHAVAND, WESTERN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    KIANI, Hamed; HAGHIGHI, Ali; ROSTAMI, Ali; AZARGASHB, Eznollah; TABAEI, Seyyed Javad Seyyed; SOLGI, Abbas; ZEBARDAST, Nozhat

    2016-01-01

    We studied the prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs), their risk factors and associated symptoms among patients with gastrointestinal disorders. A total of 1,301 participants aged 22 days-90 years were enrolled in this study. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain socio-demographic and stool examination to investigate intestinal parasite infections. Data analysis was performed using SPSS16. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs) was 32.2% (419/1,301). Three hundred and fifty nine cases/1,301 (27.6%) were infected with a single parasite and 60/1,301 cases (4.6%) presented polyparasitism. The most common IP was Blastocystis sp. 350/1,301 (26.9%), followed by Entamoeba coli 38/1,301 (2.92%), Giardia lamblia 30/1,301 (2.3%) and Cryptosporidium spp. 17/1,301 (1.3%). Regarding the socio-demographic variables, educational status (p = 0.001), contact with domestic animals and soil (p = 0.02), age above 15 years (p = 0.001) and seasons (p = 0.001) were significantly associated to intestinal parasitic infections. Concerning clinical characteristics, the presence of IPs was significantly associated to diarrhea (OR = 1.57; CI 95% = 1.24-1.98; p < 0.001) and dysentery (OR = 1.94; CI 95% = 1.03-3.66; p < 0.04). Our findings suggest that IPs are one of the main causal agents of gastrointestinal disorders. Improving the knowledge on local risk factors such as poverty, low level of education, poor sanitation, contact with soil and contact with domestic animal is warranted. PMID:27253744

  19. Impact of early cART in the gut during acute HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Deleage, Claire; Schuetz, Alexandra; Alvord, W. Gregory; Johnston, Leslie; Hao, Xing-Pei; Morcock, David R.; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Fletcher, James L.K.; Puttamaswin, Suwanna; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Dewar, Robin; McCune, Joseph M.; Robb, Merlin; Kim, Jerome H.; Schacker, Timothy W.; Hunt, Peter; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2016-01-01

    Early after HIV infection there is substantial depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract lamina propria (LP), with associated epithelial barrier damage, leading to microbial translocation and systemic inflammation and immune activation. In this study, we analyzed these early events in the GI tract in a cohort of Thai acute HIV-infected patients and determined the effect of early combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). HIV-uninfected and chronically and acutely HIV-infected patients at different Fiebig stages (I–V) underwent colonic biopsies and then received cART. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis were performed on cross-sectional and longitudinal colon biopsy specimens (day 0 to week 96) to measure GI tract damage (infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells), inflammation (Mx1, TNF-α), immune activation (Ki-67), and the CD4+ T cell population in the LP. The magnitude of GI tract damage, immune activation, and inflammation was significantly increased, with significantly depleted CD4+ T cells in the LP in all acutely infected groups prior to cART compared with HIV-uninfected control participants. While most patients treated during acute infection resolved GI tract inflammation and immune activation back to baseline levels after 24 weeks of cART, most acutely infected participants did not restore their CD4+ T cells after 96 weeks of cART. PMID:27446990

  20. Does chronic hepatitis B infection affect the clinical course of acute hepatitis A?

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Rin; Moh, In Ho; Jung, Sung Won; Kim, Jin Bae; Park, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Su; Jang, Myung Kuk; Lee, Myung Seok

    2013-01-01

    The impact of chronic hepatitis B on the clinical outcome of acute hepatitis A remains controversial. The aim of present study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of acute hepatitis A in cases with underlying chronic hepatitis B compared to cases of acute hepatitis A alone. Data on 758 patients with acute hepatitis A admitted at two university-affiliated hospitals were reviewed. Patients were classified into three groups: group A, patients with both acute hepatitis A and underlying chronic hepatitis B (n = 27); group B, patients infected by acute hepatitis A alone whose sexes and ages were matched with patients in group A (n  = 54); and group C, patients with acute hepatitis A alone (n = 731). None of the demographic features of group A were significantly different from those of group B or C, except for the proportion of males and body weight, which differed from group C. When comparing to group B, clinical symptoms were more frequent, and higher total bilirubin and lower albumin levels were observed in group A. When comparing to group C, the albumin levels were lower in group A. There were no differences in the duration of hospital stay, occurrence of acute kidney injury, acute liver failure, prolonged cholestasis, or relapsing hepatitis. This study revealed that clinical symptoms and laboratory findings were less favorable for patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis B compared to those with acute hepatitis A alone. However, there were no differences in fatal outcomes or serious complications.

  1. Routine Laboratory Screening for Acute and Recent HIV Infection in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jesse L.; Segura, Eddy R.; Montano, Silvia M.; Leon, Segundo R.; Kochel, Tadeusz; Salvatierra, Hector J.; Alcantara, Jorge; Cáceres, Carlos F.; Coates, Thomas J.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Prior to implementing screening programs for acute HIV infection in developing countries, key issues including cost, feasibility, and public health impact must be determined. We compared fourth-generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with pooled HIV-1 RNA assays for the detection of acute and early HIV infection in counseling and testing populations in Lima, Peru. Methods Adults presenting for HIV testing at designated clinics in Lima-Callao, Peru were offered additional screening for acute HIV infection. All serum samples were tested with fourth-generation Ag/Ab EIA and confirmed by line immunoassay (LIA). Negative specimens were combined into 50-sample pools for HIV-1 RNA screening by PCR analysis in standard pooling algorithms. RNA-positive samples were re-tested with a third-generation EIA to evaluate the relative sensitivity of standard testing procedures. Results Between 2007 and 2008 we recruited 1,191 participants. The prevalence of HIV infection was 3.2% (38/1191; 2.2-4.2%) overall and 10.6% (25/237; CI=6.6-14.5%) among men who reported sex with men (MSM). The prevalence of acute or recent HIV infection was 0.2% (CI=0-0.4%) overall and 0.8% (CI=0-2.0%) among MSM. Compared with third generation EIA testing, both fourth generation EIA and RNA PCR increased the rate of HIV case identification by 5.6% overall and by 8.0% within the subpopulation of MSM. Conclusions Screening for acute HIV infection within Peru's resource-limited public health system was acceptable and detected a high prevalence of acute and recent HIV infection among MSM. Additional efforts are needed to screen for and prevent transmission of HIV among MSM in Peru during the acute seroconversion stage. PMID:21113069

  2. Superinfection exclusion is absent during acute Junin virus infection of Vero and A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Raphaël; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Many viruses have evolved strategies of so-called “superinfection exclusion” to prevent re-infection of a cell that the same virus has already infected. Although Old World arenavirus infection results in down-regulation of its viral receptor and thus superinfection exclusion, whether New World arenaviruses have evolved such a mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that acute infection by the New World Junin virus (JUNV) failed to down-regulate the transferrin receptor and did not induce superinfection exclusion. We observed that Vero cells infected by a first round of JUNV (Candid1 strain) preserve an ability to internalize new incoming JUNV particles that is comparable to that of non-infected cells. Moreover, we developed a dual infection assay with the wild-type Candid1 JUNV and a recombinant JUNV-GFP virus to discriminate between first and second infections at the transcriptional and translational levels. We found that Vero and A549 cells already infected by JUNV were fully competent to transcribe viral RNA from a second round of infection. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis of viral protein expression indicated that viral translation was normal, regardless of whether cells were previously infected or not. We conclude that in acutely infected cells, Junin virus lacks a superinfection exclusion mechanism. PMID:26549784

  3. Superinfection exclusion is absent during acute Junin virus infection of Vero and A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Raphaël; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2015-11-09

    Many viruses have evolved strategies of so-called "superinfection exclusion" to prevent re-infection of a cell that the same virus has already infected. Although Old World arenavirus infection results in down-regulation of its viral receptor and thus superinfection exclusion, whether New World arenaviruses have evolved such a mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that acute infection by the New World Junin virus (JUNV) failed to down-regulate the transferrin receptor and did not induce superinfection exclusion. We observed that Vero cells infected by a first round of JUNV (Candid1 strain) preserve an ability to internalize new incoming JUNV particles that is comparable to that of non-infected cells. Moreover, we developed a dual infection assay with the wild-type Candid1 JUNV and a recombinant JUNV-GFP virus to discriminate between first and second infections at the transcriptional and translational levels. We found that Vero and A549 cells already infected by JUNV were fully competent to transcribe viral RNA from a second round of infection. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis of viral protein expression indicated that viral translation was normal, regardless of whether cells were previously infected or not. We conclude that in acutely infected cells, Junin virus lacks a superinfection exclusion mechanism.

  4. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute cystitis; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... cause. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  5. Comparative microarray analysis of intestinal lymphocytes following Eimeria acervulina, E. maxima, or E. tenella infection in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk Kyung; Lillehoj, Hyun; Min, Wongi; Kim, Chul Hong; Park, Myeong Seon; Hong, Yeong Ho; Lillehoj, Erik P

    2011-01-01

    Relative expression levels of immune- and non-immune-related mRNAs in chicken intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes experimentally infected with Eimeria acervulina, E. maxima, or E. tenella were measured using a 10K cDNA microarray. Based on a cutoff of >2.0-fold differential expression compared with uninfected controls, relatively equal numbers of transcripts were altered by the three Eimeria infections at 1, 2, and 3 days post-primary infection. By contrast, E. tenella elicited the greatest number of altered transcripts at 4, 5, and 6 days post-primary infection, and at all time points following secondary infection. When analyzed on the basis of up- or down-regulated transcript levels over the entire 6 day infection periods, approximately equal numbers of up-regulated transcripts were detected following E. tenella primary (1,469) and secondary (1,459) infections, with a greater number of down-regulated mRNAs following secondary (1,063) vs. primary (890) infection. On the contrary, relatively few mRNA were modulated following primary infection with E. acervulina (35 up, 160 down) or E. maxima (65 up, 148 down) compared with secondary infection (E. acervulina, 1,142 up, 1,289 down; E. maxima, 368 up, 1,349 down). With all three coccidia, biological pathway analysis identified the altered transcripts as belonging to the categories of "Disease and Disorder" and "Physiological System Development and Function". Sixteen intracellular signaling pathways were identified from the differentially expressed transcripts following Eimeria infection, with the greatest significance observed following E. acervulina infection. Taken together, this new information will expand our understanding of host-pathogen interactions in avian coccidiosis and contribute to the development of novel disease control strategies.

  6. Co-endemicity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Intestinal Helminth Infection in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Ren, Zhou-Peng; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Jin-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2016-03-01

    Both pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and intestinal helminth infection (IHI) affect millions of individuals every year in China. However, the national-scale estimation of prevalence predictors and prevalence maps for these diseases, as well as co-endemic relative risk (RR) maps of both diseases' prevalence are not well developed. There are co-endemic, high prevalence areas of both diseases, whose delimitation is essential for devising effective control strategies. Bayesian geostatistical logistic regression models including socio-economic, climatic, geographical and environmental predictors were fitted separately for active PTB and IHI based on data from the national surveys for PTB and major human parasitic diseases that were completed in 2010 and 2004, respectively. Prevalence maps and co-endemic RR maps were constructed for both diseases by means of Bayesian Kriging model and Bayesian shared component model capable of appraising the fraction of variance of spatial RRs shared by both diseases, and those specific for each one, under an assumption that there are unobserved covariates common to both diseases. Our results indicate that gross domestic product (GDP) per capita had a negative association, while rural regions, the arid and polar zones and elevation had positive association with active PTB prevalence; for the IHI prevalence, GDP per capita and distance to water bodies had a negative association, the equatorial and warm zones and the normalized difference vegetation index had a positive association. Moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in western regions, low to moderate prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in north-central regions and the southeast coastal regions, and moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and high prevalence of IHI were predicted in the south-western regions. Thus, co-endemic areas of active PTB and IHI were located in the south-western regions of China, which

  7. Evaluation of a novel kit (TF-Test) for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jancarlo Ferreira; Hoshino-Shimizu, Sumie; Dias, Luiz Cândido S; Araujo, Ana Júlia S A; Castilho, Vera L P; Neves, Fátima A M A

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are currently a source of concern for Public Health agencies in developing and developed countries. Since three ovum-and-parasite stool examinations have been demonstrated to provide sensitive results, we designed a practical and economical kit (TF-Test) that is now commercially available (Immunoassay Com. Ind. Ltda., São Paulo, Brazil). This kit allows the separate collection of three fecal specimens into a preservative solution. The specimens are then pooled, double-filtered, and concentrated by a single rapid centrifugation process. The TF-Test was evaluated in four different laboratories in a study using 1,102 outpatients and individuals living in an endemic area for enteroparasitosis. The overall sensitivity found using the TF-Test (86.2-97.8%) was significantly higher (P<0.01) than the sensitivity of conventional techniques such as the Coprotest (NL Comércio Exterior Ltda, São Paulo, Brazil) and the combination of Lutz/Hoffman, Faust, and Rugai techniques (De Carli, Diagnóstico Laboratorial das Parasitoses Humanas. Métodos e Técnicas, 1994), which ranged from 48.3% to 75.9%. When the above combined three specimen technique was repeated with three specimens collected on different days, its sensitivity became similar (P>0.01) to that of the TF-Test. The kappa index values of agreement for the TF-Test were consistent (P<0.01), being higher and ranking in a better position than conventional techniques. The high sensitivity, cost/benefit ratio, and practical aspects demonstrate that the TF-Test is suitable for individual diagnosis, epidemiological inquiries, or evaluation of chemotherapy in treated communities.

  8. The drug monosodium luminol (GVT) preserves crypt-villus epithelial organization and allows survival of intestinal T cells in mice infected with the ts1 retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Virginia L; Yan, Mingshan; Kuang, Xianghong; Kim, Soo-Jin; Wong, Paul K Y

    2009-02-21

    Of the cytopathic retroviruses that affect mammals, including HIV-1, many selectively infect CD4+ T cells and cause immunosuppressive syndromes. These diseases destroy both the thymus and the small and large intestines, after infecting and killing T-lineage cells in both tissues. A mutant of the murine leukemia retrovirus MoMuLV-TB, called ts1, causes this syndrome in susceptible strains of mice. In FVB/N strain mice that are infected at birth, thymic atrophy, CD4+ T cell loss, intestinal collapse, body wasting, and death occur by approximately 30-40 days postinfection (dpi). Apoptosis of ts1-infected T-lineage cells, in the thymus, peripheral lymphoid system and intestines is caused by accumulation of the ts1 mutant viral envelope preprotein gPr80(env), which is inefficiently cleaved into the mature viral proteins gp70 and PrP15E. We show here that ts1 infection in the small intestine is followed by loss of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and cell cycling gradients (along the crypt-villus axes), accumulation of gPr80(env) in intestinal cells, apoptosis of developing T cells in the lamina propria (LP), and intestinal collapse by approximately 30 dpi. In infected mice treated with the antioxidant drug monosodium luminol (GVT), however, normal intestinal epithelial cell gradients are still in place at 30 dpi, and IECs covering both the crypts and villi contain large amounts of the antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2. In addition, no apoptotic cells are present, and accumulated gpr80(env) is absent from the tissue at this time. We conclude that GVT treatment can make ts1 a noncytopathic virus for intestinal lymphoid cells, as it does for thymocytes [25]. As in the thymus, GVT may protect the intestine by reducing oxidant stress in infected intestinal T cells, perhaps by prevention of gPr80(env) accumulation via Nrf2 upregulation in the IECs. These results identify GVT as a potential therapy for intestinal diseases or inflammatory

  9. Persistence of intestinal parasitic infections during the national de-worming campaign in schoolchildren of northwestern Mexico: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Quihui-Cota, Luis; Morales-Figueroa, Gloria Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitism remains a public health challenge in northwestern Mexico even when a twice yearly single dose of albendazole (400 mg) is administered to schoolchildren. We aimed to determine the current prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in schoolchildren of northwestern Mexico. Methods The Faust and Kato Katz techniques were used to detect and identify the intestinal parasite species. One thousand two hundred and seventy eight children from 12 public schools were invited to participate in this study; 312 children participated in September 2003. Results Sixty eight percent of the subjects had intestinal parasites, 63% had protozoan infections, and 29%, 16% and 10% were infected with Giardia duodenalis, Hymenolepsis nana, and Entamoeba histolytica/dispar/moshkovskii respectively. Fifty children excreted eggs of Hymenolepsis nana. Conclusion Educational strategies should be considered to support the national de-worming campaign, because albendazole alone will not sufficiently improve the health conditions of vulnerable populations. PMID:24714136

  10. Defining nervous system susceptibility during acute and latent herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Chandra M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2017-03-08

    Herpes simplex viruses are neurotropic human pathogens that infect and establish latency in peripheral sensory neurons of the host. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) readily infects the facial mucosa that can result in the establishment of a latent infection in the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia (TG). From latency, HSV-1 can reactivate and cause peripheral pathology following anterograde trafficking from sensory neurons. Under rare circumstances, HSV-1 can migrate into the central nervous system (CNS) and cause Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE), a devastating disease of the CNS. It is unclear whether HSE is the result of viral reactivation within the TG, from direct primary infection of the olfactory mucosa, or from other infected CNS neurons. Areas of the brain that are susceptible to HSV-1 during acute infection are ill-defined. Furthermore, whether the CNS is a true reservoir of viral latency following clearance of virus during acute infection is unknown. In this context, this review will identify sites within the brain that are susceptible to acute infection and harbor latent virus. In addition, we will also address findings of HSV-1 lytic gene expression during latency and comment on the pathophysiological consequences HSV-1 infection may have on long-term neurologic performance in animal models and humans.

  11. Tetherin/BST-2 promotes dendritic cell activation and function during acute retrovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sam X.; Barrett, Bradley S.; Guo, Kejun; Kassiotis, George; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Gibbert, Kathrin; Santiago, Mario L.

    2016-01-01

    Tetherin/BST-2 is a host restriction factor that inhibits retrovirus release from infected cells in vitro by tethering nascent virions to the plasma membrane. However, contradictory data exists on whether Tetherin inhibits acute retrovirus infection in vivo. Previously, we reported that Tetherin-mediated inhibition of Friend retrovirus (FV) replication at 2 weeks post-infection correlated with stronger natural killer, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. Here, we further investigated the role of Tetherin in counteracting retrovirus replication in vivo. FV infection levels were similar between wild-type (WT) and Tetherin KO mice at 3 to 7 days post-infection despite removal of a potent restriction factor, Apobec3/Rfv3. However, during this phase of acute infection, Tetherin enhanced myeloid dendritic cell (DC) function. DCs from infected, but not uninfected, WT mice expressed significantly higher MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecule CD80 compared to Tetherin KO DCs. Tetherin-associated DC activation during acute FV infection correlated with stronger NK cell responses. Furthermore, Tetherin+ DCs from FV-infected mice more strongly stimulated FV-specific CD4+ T cells ex vivo compared to Tetherin KO DCs. The results link the antiretroviral and immunomodulatory activity of Tetherin in vivo to improved DC activation and MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:26846717

  12. A Systematic Meta-analysis of Immune Signatures in Patients With Acute Chikungunya Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Terk-Shin; Kam, Yiu-Wing; Lee, Bernett; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige Chanditha; Wimal, Abeyewickreme; Ng, Lee-Ching; Ng, Lisa F. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Individuals infected with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) normally exhibit a variety of clinical manifestations during the acute phase of infection. However, studies in different patient cohorts have revealed that disease manifestations vary in frequency. Methods. Disease profiles between patients with acute CHIKV-infection and febrile patients without CHIKV were compared and examined to determine whether any clinical presentations were associated with the clinical outcome of CHIKV infection. Circulatory immune mediators profiles were then characterized and compared with data from 14 independent patient cohort studies. The particular immune mediator signature that defines acute CHIKV infection was determined. Results. Our findings revealed a specific pattern of clinical presentations of joint-specific arthralgia from this CHIKV cohort. More importantly, we identified an immune mediator signature dominated by proinflammatory cytokines, which include interferon α and γ and interleukin 2, 2R, 6, 7, 12, 15, 17, and 18, across different patient cohorts of CHIKV load associated with arthralgia. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study that associated levels of CHIKV load with arthralgia as an indicator of acute CHIKV infection. Importantly, our findings also revealed specific immune mediator signatures that can be used to better define CHIKV infection. PMID:25635123

  13. Cross-genotype-specific T-cell responses in acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection.

    PubMed

    Gisa, A; Suneetha, P V; Behrendt, P; Pischke, S; Bremer, B; Falk, C S; Manns, M P; Cornberg, M; Wedemeyer, H; Kraft, A R M

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E is an inflammatory liver disease caused by infection with the hepatitis E virus (HEV). In tropical regions, HEV is highly endemic and predominantly mediated by HEV genotypes 1 and 2 with >3 million symptomatic cases per year and around 70 000 deaths. In Europe and America, the zoonotic HEV genotypes 3 and 4 have been reported with continues increasing new infections per year. So far, little is known about T-cell responses during acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Therefore, we did a comprehensive study investigating HEV-specific T-cell responses using genotypes 3- and 1-specific overlapping peptides. Additional cytokines and chemokines were measured in the plasma. In four patients, longitudinal studies were performed. Broad functional HEV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were detectable in patients acutely infected with HEV genotype 3. Elevated of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels during acute HEV infection correlated with ALT levels. Memory HEV-specific T-cell responses were detectable up to >1.5 years upon infection. Importantly, cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses (between genotypes 1 and 3) were measurable in all investigated patients. In conclusion, we could show for the first time HEV-specific T-cell responses during and after acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Our data of cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses might suggest a potential role in cross-genotype-specific protection between HEV genotypes 1 and 3.

  14. The Correlation between Intestinal Parasitic Infections and Bruxism among 3-6 Year-Old Children in Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Maryam Haje Norouzali; Pestechian, Nader; Yousefi, Hoseinali; Sekhavati, Hajar; Attarzadeh, Hajar

    2010-01-01

    Background: Given the fact that bruxism is a prevalent oral habit among children and a potential destructor of oral tissues, the present study aimed to investigate the relationship between intestinal parasitic infections and bruxism among kindergarten children. Methods: Questionnaires were administered among parents of kindergarten children in Isfahan to select 50 children identified by their parents to have the habit of bruxism and 50 without the habit as control group. Informed consent was obtained prior to the investigation. Parents were delivered sampling instruments with proper instructions to collect stool samples from both groups for parasitological tests. The diagnostic parasitological tests involved the direct stool smear, formol-ether concentration, and Scotch tape tests. Comparison for the frequency distribution of intestinal parasitic infections between the two groups was performed using the chi-square test (α = 0.05). Results: Parasitic infections were observed in 19 (11/50 cases and 8/50 controls) children. A statistically significant relationship was observed between infection with pathogenic parasites and bruxism (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pathogenic parasites may serve as the cause of initiation of bruxism habits among children. PMID:22013457

  15. New diagnostic antigens for early trichinellosis: the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ge Ge; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Li; Liu, Xiao Lin; Liu, Chun Yin; Zhang, Xi; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies cannot be detected until 2-3 weeks after infection; there is an obvious window period between Trichinella infection and antibody positivity. Intestinal infective larvae (IIL) are the first invasive stage during Trichinella infection, and their ES antigens are firstly exposed to the immune system and might be the early diagnostic markers of trichinellosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early diagnostic values of IIL ES antigens for trichinellosis. The IIL were collected from intestines of infected mice at 6 h postinfection (hpi), and IIL ES antigens were prepared by incubation for 18 h. Anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies in mice infected with 100 ML were detectable by ELISA with IIL ES antigens as soon as 10 days postinfection (dpi), but ELISA with ML ES antigens did not permit detection of infected mice before 12 dpi. When the sera of patients with trichinellosis at 19 dpi were assayed, the sensitivity (100 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was evidently higher than 75 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05) The specificity (96.86 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was also higher than 89.31 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05). The IIL ES antigens provided a new source of diagnostic antigens and could be considered as a potential early diagnostic antigen for trichinellosis.

  16. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. Objectives To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011–2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value < 0.001) and longer hospital length of stay (OR: 1.468; P-value < 0.001). In addition, pneumococcal vaccination was found to be a protective factor in terms of degree of respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role. PMID:27096199

  17. IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Depla, Marion; Pelletier, Sandy; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunaud, Camille; Bruneau, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Polymorphisms in the type III interferon IFN‐λ3 and the killer cell immunoglobulin‐like receptor (KIR) genes controlling the activity of natural killer (NK) cells can predict spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We hypothesized that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism may modulate NK cell function during acute HCV. Methods We monitored the plasma levels of type III IFNs in relation to the phenotype and the