Science.gov

Sample records for acute lateral ankle

  1. Serial Testing of Postural Control After Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, W. E.; Denegar, Craig R.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To identify subjects' changes in postural control during single-leg stance in the 4 weeks after acute lateral ankle sprain. Design and Setting: We used a 2 × 2 × 3 (side-by-plane-by-session) within-subjects design with repeated measures on all 3 factors. All tests were performed in a university laboratory. Subjects: Seventeen young adults (9 men, 8 women; age, 21.8 ± 5.9 years; mass, 74.9 ± 10.5 kg; height, 176.9 ± 7.1 cm) who had sustained unilateral acute mild or moderate lateral ankle sprains. Measurements: Measures of center-of-pressure excursion length, root mean square velocity of center-of-pressure excursions (VEL), and range of center-of-pressure excursions (RANGE) were calculated separately in the frontal and sagittal planes during 5-second trials of static single-leg stance. Results: We noted significant side-by-plane-by-session interactions for magnitude of center-of-pressure excursions in a given trial (PSL) (P = .004), VEL (P = .011), and RANGE (P = .009). Both PSL and VEL in the frontal plane were greater in the injured limbs compared with the uninjured limbs on day 1 and during week 2 but not during week 4, whereas sagittal-plane differences existed during all 3 testing sessions. Injured-limb, frontal-plane RANGE scores were greater than uninjured values at day 1 but not during weeks 2 or 4. No significant differences in sagittal-plane RANGE scores were seen. Conclusions: Postural control was significantly impaired in the injured limbs at day 1 and during week 2 after lateral ankle sprain but not during week 4. Consistent improvement in postural control measures on both injured and uninjured limbs was seen throughout the 4 weeks after ankle sprain. PMID:12937477

  2. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  3. [Lateral instability of the upper ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Harrasser, N; Eichelberg, K; Pohlig, F; Waizy, H; Toepfer, A; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R

    2016-11-01

    Because of their frequency, ankle sprains are of major clinical and economic importance. The simple sprain with uneventful healing has to be distinguished from the potentially complicated sprain which is at risk of transition to chronic ankle instability. Conservative treatment is indicated for the acute, simple ankle sprain without accompanying injuries and also in cases of chronic instability. If conservative treatment fails, good results can be achieved by anatomic ligament reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments. Arthroscopic techniques offer the advantage of joint inspection and addressing intra-articular pathologies in combination with ligament repair. Accompanying pathologies must be adequately addressed during ligament repair to avoid persistent ankle discomfort. If syndesmotic insufficiency and tibiofibular instability are suspected, the objective should be early diagnosis with MRI and surgical repair.

  4. An Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain Significantly Decreases Physical Activity across the Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Wikstrom, Erik A; Guderian, Sophie; Turner, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    We do not know the impact an ankle sprain has on physical activity levels across the lifespan. With the negative consequences of physical inactivity well established, understanding the effect of an ankle sprain on this outcome is critical. The objective of this study was to measure physical activity across the lifespan after a single ankle sprain in an animal model. Thirty male mice (CBA/J) were randomly placed into one of three groups: the transected calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) group, the transected anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL)/CFL group, and a SHAM group. Three days after surgery, all of the mice were individually housed in a cage containing a solid surface running wheel. Physical activity levels were recorded and averaged every week across the mouse's lifespan. The SHAM mice ran significantly more distance each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p = 0.011). Daily duration was different between the three running groups (p = 0.048). The SHAM mice ran significantly more minutes each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p=0.046) while the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly less minutes each day (post hoc p = 0.028) compared to both the SHAM and CFL only group. The SHAM mice ran at a faster daily speed versus the remaining two groups of mice (post hoc p = 0.019) and the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly slower each day compared to the SHAM and CFL group (post hoc p = 0.005). The results of this study indicate that a single ankle sprain significantly decreases physical activity across the lifespan in mice. This decrease in physical activity can potentially lead to the development of numerous chronic diseases. An ankle sprain thus has the potential to lead to significant long term health risks if not treated appropriately. Key pointsA single ankle significantly decreased physical activity levels in mice across the lifespan.Decreased physical activity could significantly negatively impact overall health if not modified

  5. An Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain Significantly Decreases Physical Activity across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Wikstrom, Erik A.; Guderian, Sophie; Turner, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We do not know the impact an ankle sprain has on physical activity levels across the lifespan. With the negative consequences of physical inactivity well established, understanding the effect of an ankle sprain on this outcome is critical. The objective of this study was to measure physical activity across the lifespan after a single ankle sprain in an animal model. Thirty male mice (CBA/J) were randomly placed into one of three groups: the transected calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) group, the transected anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL)/CFL group, and a SHAM group. Three days after surgery, all of the mice were individually housed in a cage containing a solid surface running wheel. Physical activity levels were recorded and averaged every week across the mouse’s lifespan. The SHAM mice ran significantly more distance each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p = 0.011). Daily duration was different between the three running groups (p = 0.048). The SHAM mice ran significantly more minutes each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p=0.046) while the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly less minutes each day (post hoc p = 0.028) compared to both the SHAM and CFL only group. The SHAM mice ran at a faster daily speed versus the remaining two groups of mice (post hoc p = 0.019) and the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly slower each day compared to the SHAM and CFL group (post hoc p = 0.005). The results of this study indicate that a single ankle sprain significantly decreases physical activity across the lifespan in mice. This decrease in physical activity can potentially lead to the development of numerous chronic diseases. An ankle sprain thus has the potential to lead to significant long term health risks if not treated appropriately. Key points A single ankle significantly decreased physical activity levels in mice across the lifespan. Decreased physical activity could significantly negatively impact overall health if not

  6. Modified Evans peroneus brevis lateral ankle stabilization for balancing varus ankle contracture during total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Lateral ankle instability is frequently encountered when performing total ankle replacement and remains a challenge. In the present techniques report, I have described a modification of the Evans peroneus brevis tendon lateral ankle stabilization harvested through limited incisions using simple topographic anatomic landmarks. The harvested peroneus brevis is then transferred either to the anterior distal tibia concomitantly with total ankle replacement or through the tibia when performed after total ankle replacement and secured with plate and screw fixation. This modified Evans peroneus brevis tendon is useful in providing lateral ankle stability during or after primary and revision total ankle replacement.

  7. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  8. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL).

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all-inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive.

  9. Treatment algorithm for chronic lateral ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Sandro; Ruffilli, Alberto; Pagliazzi, Gherardo; Mazzotti, Antonio; Evangelisti, Giulia; Buda, Roberto; Faldini, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction: ankle sprains are a common sports-related injury. A 20% of acute ankle sprains results in chronic ankle instability, requiring surgery. Aim of this paper is to report the results of a series of 38 patients treated for chronic lateral ankle instability with anatomic reconstruction. Materials and methods: thirty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. Seventeen patients underwent a surgical repair using the Brostrom-modified technique, while the remaining underwent anatomic reconstruction with autologous or allogenic graft. Results: at a mean follow-up of 5 years the AOFAS score improved from 66.1 ± 5.3 to 92.2 ± 5.6. Discussion: the findings of this study confirm that anatomic reconstruction is an effective procedure with satisfactory subjective and objective results which persist at long-term follow-up along with a low complication rate. No differences, in term of clinical and functional outcomes, were observed between the Brostrom-modified repair and the anatomic reconstruction technique. Level of evidence: level IV. PMID:25767783

  10. Laboratory Measures of Postural Control During the Star Excursion Balance Test After Acute First-Time Lateral Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris M.; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    Context No researchers, to our knowledge, have investigated the immediate postinjury-movement strategies associated with acute first-time lateral ankle sprain (LAS) as quantified by center of pressure (COP) and kinematic analyses during performance of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). Objective To analyze the kinematic and COP patterns of a group with acute first-time LAS and a noninjured control group during performance of the SEBT. Design Case-control study. Setting University biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 81 participants with acute first-time LAS (53 men, 28 women; age = 23.22 ± 4.93 years, height = 1.73 ± 0.09 m, mass = 75.72 ± 13.86 kg) and 19 noninjured controls (15 men, 4 women; age = 22.53 ± 1.68 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.08 m, mass = 71.55 ± 11.31 kg). Intervention Participants performed the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the SEBT. Main Outcome Measure(s) We assessed 3-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremity joints and associated fractal dimension (FD) of the COP path during performance of the SEBT. Results The LAS group had decreased normalized reach distances in the ANT, PL, and PM directions when compared with the control group on their injured (ANT: 58.16% ± 6.86% versus 64.86% ± 5.99%; PL: 85.64% ± 10.62% versus 101.14% ± 8.39%; PM: 94.89% ± 9.26% versus 107.29 ± 6.02%) and noninjured (ANT: 60.98% ± 6.74% versus 64.76% ± 5.02%; PL: 88.95% ± 11.45% versus 102.36% ± 8.53%; PM: 97.13% ± 8.76% versus 106.62% ± 5.78%) limbs (P < .01). This observation was associated with altered temporal sagittal-plane kinematic profiles throughout each reach attempt and at the point of maximum reach (P < .05). This result was associated with a reduced FD of the COP path for each reach direction on the injured limb only (P < .05). Conclusions Acute first-time LAS was associated with bilateral deficits in postural control, as evidenced by the bilateral

  11. Ankle instability and arthroscopic lateral ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Jorge I; Mangone, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle ligament insufficiency has focused on 2 main categories: local soft-tissue reconstruction and tendon grafts/transfer procedures. There is an increasing interest in the arthroscopic solutions for chronic instability of the ankle. Recent biomechanical studies suggest the at least one of the arthroscopic techniques can provide equivalent results to current open local soft-tissue reconstruction (such as the modified Brostrom technique). Arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament reconstruction is becoming an increasingly acceptable method for the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle instability.

  12. Autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization.

    PubMed

    Budny, Adam M; Schuberth, John M

    2012-01-01

    Lateral ankle instability is a common clinical entity, and a variety of surgical procedures are available for stabilization after conservative management fails. Herein the authors reviewed outcomes after performing autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization, using a previously described surgical technique to anatomically recreate the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. Twenty-five consecutive patients from 2 surgeons' practices underwent reconstruction between March 2007 and January 2011 with a minimum follow-up of 12 (range 12 to 51) months (mean 29.5 months). Follow-up interviews demonstrated 92.0% good or excellent outcomes with only 8.0% rating the outcome as fair and none as poor; 92.0% had no recurrent sprains or difficulty going up or down hills; 88.0% related no difficulty with uneven ground. The authors conclude that the autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization results in a stable ankle with a low rate of complications and high patient satisfaction.

  13. All-inside, anatomical lateral ankle stabilization for revision and complex primary lateral ankle stabilization: a technique guide.

    PubMed

    Prissel, Mark A; Roukis, Thomas S

    2014-12-01

    Lateral ankle instability is a common mechanical problem that often requires surgical management when conservative efforts fail. Historically, myriad open surgical approaches have been proposed. Recently, consideration for arthroscopic management of lateral ankle instability has become popular, with promising results. Unfortunately, recurrent inversion ankle injury following lateral ankle stabilization can occur and require revision surgery. To date, arthroscopic management for revision lateral ankle stabilization has not been described. We present a novel arthroscopic technique combining an arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization kit with a suture anchor ligament augmentation system for revision as well as complex primary lateral ankle stabilization.

  14. A double blind, randomised, parallel group study on the efficacy and safety of treating acute lateral ankle sprain with oral hydrolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoffs, G; Struijs, P; de Wit, C; Rahlfs, V; Zwipp, H; van Dijk, C N

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness and safety of the triple combination Phlogenzym (rutoside, bromelain, and trypsin) with double combinations, the single substances, and placebo. Design: Multinational, multicentre, double blind, randomised, parallel group design with eight groups structured according to a factorial design. Setting: Orthopaedic surgery and emergency departments in 27 European hospitals. Participants: A total of 721 patients aged 16–53 years presenting with acute unilateral sprain of the lateral ankle joint. Primary efficacy criteria: (a) Pain on walking one or two steps, as defined by the patient on a visual analogue scale. (b) The range of motion, as measured by the investigator and expressed as a sum of flexion and extension. (c) The volume of the injured ankle measured with a volometer. Results: At the primary end point at seven days, the greatest reduction in pain was in the bromelain/trypsin group (73.7%). The Phlogenzym group showed a median reduction of 60.3%, and the placebo group showed a median reduction of 73.3%. The largest increase in range of motion (median) was in the placebo group (60% change from baseline). The Phlogenzym group showed a median increase of 42.9%. The biggest decrease in swelling was in the trypsin group (3.9% change from baseline). The Phlogenzym group showed a –2.30% change from baseline and the placebo group a –2.90% change. In the subgroup analysis of patients who did not use a Caligamed brace, Phlogenzym was superior to placebo for the summarising directional test of the primary efficacy criteria (MW = 0.621; LB-CI 0.496; p = 0.029; one sided Wei-Lachin procedure). The vast majority of doctors and patients rated the tolerability of all treatments tested as very good or at least good. Conclusions: Phlogenzym was not found to be superior to the three two-drug combinations, the three single substances, or placebo for treatment of patients with acute unilateral sprain of the lateral ankle joint. The small

  15. Lateral ligament reconstruction procedures for the ankle.

    PubMed

    Tourné, Y; Mabit, C

    2017-02-01

    Capsule/ligament lesions of the lateral compartment of the ankle lead to lateral laxity, which is a prime contributor to chronic ankle instability. Lateral ligament reconstruction stabilizes the joint. Exhaustive preoperative clinical and paraclinical work-up is essential. The present article classifies, presents and criticizes the main techniques in terms of long-term stabilization and reduction of osteoarthritis risk. Anatomic ligament repair with reinforcement (mainly extensor retinaculum) or anatomic ligament reconstruction are the two recommended options. Non-anatomic reconstructions using the peroneus brevis should be abandoned. Arthroscopy is increasingly being developed, but results need assessment on longer follow-up than presently available. Postoperative neuromuscular reprogramming is fundamental to optimal recovery. Finally, the concept of complex ankle instability is discussed from the diagnostic and therapeutic points of view. The various forms of ligament reconstruction failure and corresponding treatments are reported.

  16. [Lateral ligament injuries of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Walther, M; Kriegelstein, S; Altenberger, S; Volkering, C; Röser, A; Wölfel, R

    2013-09-01

    Lateral ligament injuries are the most common sports injury and have a high incidence even in non-sportive activities. Although lateral ligament injuries are very common there is still a controversial debate on the best management. The diagnosis is based on clinical examination and X-ray images help to rule out fractures. Further imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to diagnose associated injuries. According to the recommendations of the various scientific societies the primary therapy of lateral ligament injuries is conservative. Chronic ankle instability develops in 10-20 % of patients and the instability can be a result of sensomotoric deficits or insufficient healing of the lateral ligament complex. If the patient does not respond to an intensive rehabilitation program an operative reconstruction of the lateral ligaments has to be considered. Most of the procedures currently performed are anatomical reconstructions due to better long-term results compared to tenodesis procedures.

  17. Imaging appearances of lateral ankle ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chien, Alexander J; Jacobson, Jon A; Jamadar, David A; Brigido, Monica Kalume; Femino, John E; Hayes, Curtis W

    2004-01-01

    Six patients were retrospectively identified as having undergone lateral ligament reconstruction surgery. The surgical procedures were categorized into four groups: direct lateral ligament repair, peroneus brevis tendon rerouting, peroneus brevis tendon loop, and peroneus brevis tendon split and rerouting. At radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the presence of one or more suture anchors in the region of the anterior talofibular ligament indicates direct ligament repair, whereas a fibular tunnel indicates peroneus brevis tendon rerouting or loop. Both ultrasonography (US) and MR imaging demonstrate rerouted tendons as part of lateral ankle reconstruction; however, MR imaging can also depict the rerouted tendon within an osseous tunnel if present, especially if T1-weighted sequences are used. Artifact from suture material may obscure the tendon at MR imaging but not at US. With both modalities, the integrity of the rerouted peroneus brevis tendon is best evaluated by following the tendon proximally from its distal attachment site, which typically remains unchanged. The rerouted tendon or portion of the tendon can then be traced proximally to its reattachment site. Familiarity with the surgical procedures most commonly used for lateral ankle ligament reconstruction, and with the imaging features of these procedures, is essential for avoiding diagnostic pitfalls and ensuring accurate assessment of the ligament reconstruction.

  18. Assessment of acute foot and ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Louise

    2006-07-01

    Acute ankle and foot trauma is a regular emergency presentation and prompt strategic assessment skills are required to enable nurses to categorise and prioritise these injuries appropriately. This article provides background information on the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb to help nurses to identify various grades of ankle sprain as well as injuries that are limb threatening

  19. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles.

  20. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tp; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick Sh; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-07-30

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing - a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60-90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41-45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not be

  1. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not

  2. The relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Stephanie; Moore, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    The lateral ligament complex of the ankle is the most frequently injured structure in the body. Although most simple ankle sprains do not result in long-term disability, a significant number do not completely resolve, leading to residual symptoms that may persist for years. The most commonly reported symptoms, particularly among athletes, include instability, re-injury, and tendinitis. Ballet dancers are a combination of artist and high-performance athlete; consequently, they are subjected to the same types of injuries as other athletes, including lateral ankle sprains and their sequelae. Furthermore, ballet dancers perform in unusual positions such as en pointe, which places the ankle in extreme plantar flexion, requiring stabilization by surrounding muscles. Dancers' extraordinary performance demands place them at risk for other ankle injuries as well, including inflammation ofseveral tendons, especially the peroneals. This report reviews the relevant literature to characterize the scope of lateral ankle sprains and sequelae, discuss the importance of the peroneal muscles in ankle stability, and explore a relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers. Informal interviews were conducted with physical therapists who specialize in treating ballet dancers, providing a clinical context for this report. An extensive review of the literature was conducted, including electronic databases, reference lists from papers, and relevant reference texts. Numerous studies have investigated ankle sprains and residual complaints; nearly all report that lateral ankle sprains commonly lead to chronic ankle instability. Studies exploring ankle stability have demonstrated that the peroneal muscles play a crucial role in ankle stabilization; EMG studies confirm they are the first to contract during ankle inversion stress. The dancer's need for exceptional ankle stabilization may lead to peroneal overuse and tendinitis. Studies have linked peroneal

  3. Limiting the use of routine radiography for acute ankle injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cockshott, W. P.; Jenkin, J. K.; Pui, M.

    1983-01-01

    In the diagnosis of ankle injuries routine radiography is often productive. An international survey of the average number of radiographs made of injured ankles suggested that two projections are adequate to detect fractures. This was confirmed in a prospective study of 242 patients coming to a hospital emergency department with recent ankle injuries. All the fractures could be identified on an anteroposterior or a lateral projection, although some were more obvious on an oblique view. As well, all the fractures were associated with malleolar soft-tissue swelling. Thus, radiography for acute ankle injuries could safely be restricted to patients with soft-tissue swelling, and fractures could be diagnosed using only two routine projections, though for management purposes additional projections might be needed. With a policy of limiting the use of radiography substantial cost reductions are possible. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6407744

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Split Peroneal Tendon Lateral Ankle Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Bazán, D Issac; Evans, Andrew M; Agarwal, Monica R; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability is a common condition. Split peroneal tendon lateral ankle stabilization, a modification of the Chrisman-Snook procedure, is biomechanically stable and often used for severe and/or recurrent chronic lateral ankle instability. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this technique. Specifically, the midterm recurrence of instability and postoperative complications, such as stiffness, neurologic pain, and wound healing complications, were evaluated. We evaluated 30 consecutive procedures with a minimal follow-up period of 1 year. The mean follow-up period was 25 ± 13 (median 19, range 13 to 62) months. Five patients (17%) developed recurrent ankle instability, of whom 4 underwent revision surgery. One superficial infection and two wound disruptions developed. Two patients experienced stiffness and eight (27%) surgically induced neurologic complaints, such as sural neuritis. Finally, 2 patients developed complex regional pain syndrome.

  5. The ANKLE TRIAL (ANKLE treatment after injuries of the ankle ligaments): what is the benefit of external support devices in the functional treatment of acute ankle sprain? : a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries are very common problems in present health care. Still there is no hard evidence about which treatment strategy is superior. Current evidence supports the view that a functional treatment strategy is preferable, but insufficient data are present to prove the benefit of external support devices in these types of treatment. The hypothesis of our study is that external ankle support devices will not result in better outcome in the treatment of acute ankle sprains, compared to a purely functional treatment strategy. Overall objective is to compare the results of three different strategies of functional treatment for acute ankle sprain, especially to determine the advantages of external support devices in addition to functional treatment strategy, based on balance and coordination exercises. Methods/design This study is designed as a randomised controlled multi-centre trial with one-year follow-up. Adult and healthy patients (N = 180) with acute, single sided and first inversion trauma of the lateral ankle ligaments will be included. They will all follow the same schedule of balancing exercises and will be divided into 3 treatment groups, 1. pressure bandage and tape, 2. pressure bandage and brace and 3. no external support. Primary outcome measure is the Karlsson scoring scale; secondary outcomes are FAOS (subscales), number of recurrent ankle injuries, Visual Analogue Scales of pain and satisfaction and adverse events. They will be measured after one week, 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. Discussion The ANKLE TRIAL is a randomized controlled trial in which a purely functional treated control group, without any external support is investigated. Results of this study could lead to other opinions about usefulness of external support devices in the treatment of acute ankle sprain. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2151 PMID:22340371

  6. Reconstruction of compound loss of lateral malleolus and lateral ankle ligaments with double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dukhwan; Jung, Hong-Geun; Kim, Hyeung-June; Cha, Seung-Han; Nam, Kyoung-Mo

    2014-01-01

    Open ankle fracture, including compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and overlying skin, is a severe injury and can result in ankle instability and permanent disability. Treatment of this injury is challenging and requires bone grafting and soft tissue reconstruction. In the present report, we describe a unique reconstruction technique for compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and the overlying skin using a double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft combined with a reverse sural fasciocutaneous flap. The patient obtained a stable ankle with nearly full range of motion and displayed satisfactory function during the follow-up period.

  7. Rehabilitation of the Ankle after Acute Sprain or Chronic Instability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattacola, Carl G.; Dwyer, Maureen K.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines rehabilitation concepts applicable to acute and chronic ankle injury, providing evidence for current techniques used in ankle rehabilitation and describing a functional rehabilitation program that progresses from basic to advanced, while taking into account empirical data from the literature and clinical practice. The article notes that…

  8. Endoscopic Resection of the Lateral Ankle Bursa With Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-06-01

    Bursal chondromatosis is synovial chondromatosis of the bursae. It is a rare disease entity that can involve the adventitial bursa of the lateral ankle. Complete synovectomy, removal of loose bodies, and bursectomy comprise the treatment of choice. Detailed preoperative radiologic assessment and surgical planning are the keys to success. Any accompanying synovial chondromatosis of the ankle or subtalar joint or tenosynovial chondromatosis of the peroneal tendon sheath should be treated together with the bursectomy. Endoscopic bursectomy can be performed through the bursal portal. The proximal and distal peroneal tendoscopy portals serve as viewing portals. The resection of the diseased tissues should be performed in a step-by-step zonal manner. Complete synovectomy and removal of loose bodies should be performed before bursectomy. Internal drainage of the bursal sac into the peroneal tendon sheath may be indicated if the sac is adherent to the skin. It should only be performed after complete synovectomy and removal of loose bodies.

  9. Total ankle replacement through a lateral approach: surgical tips

    PubMed Central

    Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Indino, Cristian; Maccario, Camilla; Manzi, Luigi; Salini, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, the Zimmer Trabecular Metal Total Ankle Replacement (Zimmer TM TAR) was developed to be used through a lateral transfibular approach. The purpose of this paper is to describe the surgical technique and early outcomes of the TAR via the lateral approach using the Zimmer TM TARs. Methods: Sixty-seven patients underwent primary TAR using the Zimmer TM TAR between May 2013 and May 2015. Patients were clinically evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at six and twelve months and annually using the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot scores, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score, and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) questionnaire. The minimum follow-up was 12 months. Results: The mean AOFAS hindfoot score increased from 32.8 preoperatively to 85.0 at the latest follow-up (p-value < 0.001). The mean VAS pain score decreased from 8.0 to 2.0 at the latest follow-up (p-value < 0.001). The Physical and Mental Health Composite Scale scores (PCS and MCS) of the SF-12 passed from a mean value of 30.2 preoperatively to 43.1 (p-value < 0.001) and from a mean value of 44.6 to 53.5 at the latest follow-up (p-value < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: We present our surgical tips and the early results of this prosthetic design which are encouraging. They could be useful as an adjunct to the manufacturer’s surgical technique guidance for surgeons who utilize these implants. PMID:27855774

  10. Valdecoxib provides effective pain relief following acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Diaz, J A; Cuervo, C; Valderrama, A M; Kohles, J

    2006-01-01

    We sought to determine whether valdecoxib is as effective as diclofenac in treating acute ankle sprain. Patients (n=202) with acute first- and second-degree ankle sprain were randomized to valdecoxib (40 mg twice daily on day 1 followed by 40 mg once daily on days 2-7) or diclofenac (75 mg twice daily). The primary efficacy end-point was the Patient's Assessment of Ankle Pain visual analogue scale (VAS, 0-100 mm) value on day 4. Valdecoxib was as efficacious as diclofenac in treating the signs and symptoms of acute ankle sprain. The mean VAS reduction in ankle pain on day 4 was not different between groups; the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the between-group difference was within the prespecified limit for non-inferiority (10 mm). There were no significant differences between groups for all secondary efficacy end-points. The two treatments were similarly effective and well tolerated for treatment of acute ankle sprain.

  11. Lateral ankle instability: MR imaging of associated injuries and surgical treatment procedures.

    PubMed

    Alparslan, Leyla; Chiodo, Christopher P

    2008-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability has been defined as the development of recurrent ankle sprains and persistent symptoms after initial lateral ankle sprain. The diagnosis of ankle instability is usually established on the patient's history, physical examination, and radiographic assessment. Patients have signs of both functional and mechanical instability, and the repetitive, chronic nature of the injury may lead to intra-articular and periarticular pathologies. This article discusses the incidence, etiology, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of these pathologies, reviews the surgical treatment procedures for lateral ankle instability, and presents the postoperative MR imaging findings.

  12. MIDFOOT AND FOREFOOT INVOLVEMENT IN LATERAL ANKLE SPRAINS AND CHRONIC ANKLE INSTABILITY. PART 1: ANATOMY AND BIOMECHANICS

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The modern human foot is the culmination of more than five million years of evolution. The ankle-foot complex absorbs forces during loading, accommodates uneven surfaces, and acts as a lever for efficient propulsion. The ankle-foot complex has six independent functional segments that should be understood for proper assessment and treatment of foot and ankle injuries: the shank, rearfoot, midfoot, lateral forefoot, and the medial forefoot. The compliance of the individual segments of the foot is dependent on velocity, task, and active and passive coupling mechanisms within each of the foot segments. It is also important to understand the passive, active, and neural subsystems that are functionally intertwined to provide structure and control to the multisegmented foot. The purpose of the first part of this clinical commentary and current concepts review was to examine foot and ankle anatomy, detail the roles of the intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle musculature from a multisegmented foot perspective, and discuss the biomechanics of the ankle-foot complex during function. The interplay of segmental joint mobility, afferent and efferent sensorimotor function, and movement and stabilization provided by the extrinsic and intrinsic musculature is required to coordinate and execute the complex kinematic movements in the ankle-foot complex during propulsion. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27904801

  13. MIDFOOT AND FOREFOOT INVOLVEMENT IN LATERAL ANKLE SPRAINS AND CHRONIC ANKLE INSTABILITY. PART 1: ANATOMY AND BIOMECHANICS.

    PubMed

    Fraser, John J; Feger, Mark A; Hertel, Jay

    2016-12-01

    The modern human foot is the culmination of more than five million years of evolution. The ankle-foot complex absorbs forces during loading, accommodates uneven surfaces, and acts as a lever for efficient propulsion. The ankle-foot complex has six independent functional segments that should be understood for proper assessment and treatment of foot and ankle injuries: the shank, rearfoot, midfoot, lateral forefoot, and the medial forefoot. The compliance of the individual segments of the foot is dependent on velocity, task, and active and passive coupling mechanisms within each of the foot segments. It is also important to understand the passive, active, and neural subsystems that are functionally intertwined to provide structure and control to the multisegmented foot. The purpose of the first part of this clinical commentary and current concepts review was to examine foot and ankle anatomy, detail the roles of the intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle musculature from a multisegmented foot perspective, and discuss the biomechanics of the ankle-foot complex during function. The interplay of segmental joint mobility, afferent and efferent sensorimotor function, and movement and stabilization provided by the extrinsic and intrinsic musculature is required to coordinate and execute the complex kinematic movements in the ankle-foot complex during propulsion.

  14. CLINICAL COMMENTARY ON MIDFOOT AND FOREFOOT INVOLVEMENT IN LATERAL ANKLE SPRAINS AND CHRONIC ANKLE INSTABILITY. PART 2: CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LAS) and chronic ankle instability (CAI) are common musculoskeletal injuries that are a result of inversion injury during sport. The midfoot and forefoot is frequently injured during a LAS, is often overlooked during clinical examination, and maybe contributory to the development of CAI. The purpose of part two of this clinical commentary and current concept review is to increase clinician's awareness of the contribution of midfoot and forefoot impairment to functional limitation and disability of individuals who experience LAS and CAI and to facilitate future research in this area. The importance of multisegmented foot and ankle assessment from a clinical and research perspective is stressed. Select physical assessment and manual therapeutic techniques are presented to assist the clinician in examination and treatment of the ankle-foot complex in patients with LAS and CAI. PMID:27999731

  15. The Effects of Kinesiotape Applied to the Lateral Aspect of the Ankle: Relevance to Ankle Sprains – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brendan; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify, evaluate and synthesise evidence on the effect of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources A search for quantitative studies was undertaken using key terms of “kinesiotape” and “ankle” in seven electronic databases, using the maximum date ranges. Databases included: the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science. Study Selection Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 107 database hits, 8 quantitative studies were included. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological rigour of the studies using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. Data were extracted on participant characteristics, kinesiotape parameters, comparison interventions, outcome measures and findings. Data Syntheses Most studies (n=7) had good to very good methodological rigour. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity in participants, interventions and outcome measures. No adverse events were reported. Kinesiotape may produce different effects in healthy and injured ankles. In healthy ankles, kinesiotape may increase postural control, whereas in injured ankles it may improve proprioception, plantarflexor endurance and the performance of activities. These trends were identified from a small body of evidence including 276 participants. Conclusions It is recommended that kinesiotape may be used in clinical practice to prevent lateral ankle injuries (through its effects on postural control) and manage lateral ankle injuries due to its positive effects on proprioception, muscle endurance and activity performance. It appears that kinesiotape may not provide sufficient mechanical support to improve postural control in unstable ankles. Adverse events associated with kinseiotape are unlikely. PMID

  16. Partial transmalleolar approach for lateral impingement after total ankle arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Nakamura, Ichiro; Miura, Ayumi; Momoyama, Gen; Ito, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Advances in implant technology have made total ankle arthroplasty an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of ankle arthritis. However, a frequent complication of the procedure is nerve impingement related to either to heterotrophic bone growth or the prosthesis itself. Successful resolution of this complication presents a challenge to clinicians. We present a case of lateral impingement following total ankle arthroplasty that was successfully treated using a partial transmalleolar approach to effect a partial osteotomy of the lateral malleolus and create a fragment attached to the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. This approach provides a good operative field in the lateral gutter with minimal soft tissue impairment. It also facilitates curettage, and resolution of tissue impingement. The osteotomy site healed fully by 3 months postoperative, and the pain around the lateral malleolus resolved. Furthermore, the patient's score on the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot Ankle/Hindfoot Scale improved from 33 preoperatively to 82 at 6 months postoperative.

  17. [Treatment of lateral ankle joint instability. Open or arthroscopic?].

    PubMed

    Galla, M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic ankle joint instability often necessitates operative treatment. Operative treatment methods are classified into non-anatomical tenodesis, anatomical reconstruction and direct repair. In addition to open approaches, arthroscopic techniques are increasingly becoming established. This article describes the various operative treatment procedures, their advantages and disadvantages and in particular the arthroscopic feasibility.

  18. Examining the relation of osteochondral lesions of the talus to ligamentous and lateral ankle tendinous pathologic features: a comprehensive MRI review in an asymptomatic lateral ankle population.

    PubMed

    Galli, Melissa M; Protzman, Nicole M; Mandelker, Eiran M; Malhotra, Amit D; Schwartz, Edward; Brigido, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Given the frequency and burden of ankle sprains, the pathologic features identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are widely known in the symptomatic population. Ankle MRI pathologic features in the asymptomatic population, however, are poorly understood. Such examinations are rarely undertaken unless an ankle has been injured or is painful. We report the systematic MRI findings from the reports of 108 consecutive asymptomatic lateral ankles (104 patients). Our purpose was to (1) report the prevalence of osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) and pathologic features of the medial and lateral ligaments, peroneal tendons, and superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR); (2) correlate the presence of OLTs with the pathologic features of the medial and lateral ligaments, peroneal tendons, and SPR; and (3) correlate ligamentous discontinuity with the peroneal pathologic features, OLTs, and SPR pathologic features. A total of 16 OLTs (14.81%) were present (13 medial and 3 lateral). Of the 16 patients with OLTs, 8 (50.00%) had concomitant peroneal pathologic findings. Healthy medial and lateral ligaments were noted in 41 patients (37.96%), and ligamentous discontinuity was grade I in 25 (23.15%), II in 32 (29.63%), III in 5 (4.63%), and grade IV in 5 patients (4.63%). A weak positive correlation was found between attenuation or tears of the superficial deltoid and medial OLTs (phi coefficient = 0.23, p = .0191) and a moderate positive correlation between tears of the posterior talofibular ligament and lateral OLTs (phi coefficient = 0.30, p = .0017). Additionally, a moderate positive correlation between ligamentous discontinuity and tendinopathy of the peroneus brevis was noted [Spearman's coefficient(106) = 0.29, p = .0024]. These findings add to the evidence of concomitant pathologic features in the asymptomatic population. To definitively assess causation and evaluate the clinical evolution of radiologic findings, future, prospective, longitudinal

  19. The Effect of Modified Brostrom-Gould Repair for Lateral Ankle Instability on In Vivo Tibiotalar Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Wainright, William B; Spritzer, Charles E.; Lee, Jun Young; Easley, Mark E.; DeOrio, James K.; Nunley, James A.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lateral ankle instability leads to an increased risk of tibiotalar joint osteoarthritis. Previous studies have found abnormal tibiotalar joint motions with lateral ankle instability that may contribute to this increased incidence of osteoarthritis, including increased anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under weight-bearing loading. Surgical repairs for lateral ankle instability have shown good clinical results, but the effects of repair on in vivo ankle motion are not well understood. Hypothesis The modified Broström-Gould lateral ligament reconstruction decreases anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under in vivo weight-bearing loading conditions. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Seven patients underwent modified Brostöm-Gould repair for unilateral lateral ankle instability. Ankle joint kinematics as a function of increasing body weight were studied with magnetic resonance imaging and biplanar fluoroscopy. Tibiotalar kinematics were measured in unstable ankles preoperatively and postoperatively at a mean follow-up of 12 months, as well as in the uninjured contralateral ankles of the same individuals. Results Surgical repair resulted in statistically significant decreases in anterior translation of the talus (0.9±0.3mm, p=0.018) at 100% bodyweight and internal rotation of the talus at 75% (2.6±0.8°, p=0.019) and 100% (2.7±0.8°, p=0.013) bodyweight compared to ankle kinematics measured before repair. No statistically significant differences were detected between repaired ankles and contralateral normal ankles. Conclusion The modified Broström-Gould repair improved the abnormal joint motion observed in patients with lateral ankle instability, decreasing anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus. Clinical Relevance Altered kinematics may contribute to the tibiotalar joint degeneration that occurs with chronic lateral ankle instability. The findings of the current study support

  20. The Effects of a Lateral Wedge Insole on Knee and Ankle Joints During Slope Walking.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yuki; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kiyama, Ryoji; Kawada, Masayuki; Tokunaga, Ken; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Ohshige, Tadasu; Yoshimoto, Yoichi; Yone, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint.

  1. Changes in joint position sense after surgically treated chronic lateral ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Halasi, T; Kynsburg, A; Tallay, A; Berkes, I

    2005-01-01

    Background: A search of the literature shows that the effect of surgery on ankle proprioception has been hardly investigated. Objective: To examine the effect of anatomical reconstruction of the anterolateral capsuloligamentous complex on ankle joint position sense. Methods: A prospective study using the "slope box" test. Ten consecutive patients were included in the study, and 10 healthy athletes represented the control group. Results: Similar test-retest reliability rates (overall reliability 0.92; p = 0.0013) were obtained to those of the original designers of the method. There were no significant differences with respect to side dominance (p = 0.9216). Investigation of the characteristics of mean absolute estimate errors showed that the controls tested became error prone in the range of slope altitudes 7.5–25° in every direction, compared with the range 0–5° (range of p values 0.00003–0.00072). The results of the intervention group showed that, for the two main directions of interest (anterior and lateral), preoperative differences in mean absolute estimate errors between injured (anterior 3.91 (2.81)°; lateral 4.06 (2.85)°) and healthy (anterior 2.94 (2.21)°, lateral 3.19 (2.64)°) sides (anterior, p = 0.0124; lateral, p = 0.0250) had disappeared (postoperative differences: anterior, p = 0.6906; lateral, p = 0.4491). The afflicted ankle had improved significantly after surgery in both important directions (anterior, p<0.0001; lateral, p = 0.0023). Conclusions: The study shows that differences in joint position sense between healthy and injured ankles disappeared as the result of surgery. Preoperative data show that proprioceptive malfunction is a cause of functional instability. If treatment is by means of surgery, the retensioning of the original anterolateral structures is inevitable, even if other grafting or surgical techniques are used. PMID:16244190

  2. Reconstruction of the form and function of lateral malleolus and ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Kiduka, Yuichiro; Inoue, Yojiro; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Tai, Yoshiaki

    2005-08-01

    Soft-tissue reconstruction alone cannot obtain normal ankle function in patients with large defects in the area of the lateral malleolus. The authors report a functional reconstructive method for the lateral malleolus, utilized in a male patient whose osteosarcoma in the fibula was resected with surrounding soft tissue. In order to reconstruct the lateral malleolus, the remaining half of the fibula at the knee was removed, and the fibular head was fixed with the tibia at the ankle joint. Ligaments were reconstructed with tendon grafts. Skin and soft-tissue defects were reconstructed with a combined composite flap comprised of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and a serratus anterior muscle flap. Dead space around the bone graft was filled with the serratus anterior muscle flap that was divided into two portions. The surface was covered with the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. The patient regained almost normal function of the ankle joint. This technique would be a useful functional reconstructive method for patients with large defects in the area of the lateral malleolus.

  3. Is deltoid and lateral ligament reconstruction necessary in varus and valgus ankle osteoarthritis, and how should these procedures be performed?

    PubMed

    Hogan, Macalus V; Dare, David M; Deland, Jonathan T

    2013-09-01

    Varus and valgus ankle deformities represent a challenge to the foot and ankle surgeons. The presence of degenerative changes of the tibiotalar joint articular surfaces introduces an additional layer of complexity. Reconstruction of such deformities requires a customized approach to each patient. Surgical intervention often requires joint-sparing realignment, arthroplasty, and/or arthrodesis, depending on the severity of deformity and the joint surface integrity. The ligamentous stability of the ankle plays an essential role in the preservation and optimization of function. This article reviews the role of deltoid and lateral ligament reconstruction in the treatment of varus and valgus ankle osteoarthritis.

  4. Arthroscopic anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments: A technical simplification.

    PubMed

    Lopes, R; Decante, C; Geffroy, L; Brulefert, K; Noailles, T

    2016-12-01

    Anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments has become a pivotal component of the treatment strategy for chronic ankle instability. The recently described arthroscopic version of this procedure is indispensable to ensure that concomitant lesions are appropriately managed, yet remains technically demanding. Here, we describe a simplified variant involving percutaneous creation of the calcaneal tunnel for the distal attachment of the calcaneo-fibular ligament. The rationale for this technical stratagem was provided by a preliminary cadaver study that demonstrated a correlation between the lateral malleolus and the distal footprint of the calcaneo-fibular ligament. The main objectives are simplification of the operative technique and decreased injury to tissues whose function is crucial to the recovery of proprioception.

  5. Measurement of plantar pressure distribution during gait for diagnosis of functional lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Becker, HP; Rosenbaum, D; Claes, L; Gerngro, H

    1997-04-01

    INTRODUCTION:: Chronic functional instability of the lateral ankle may be difficult to distinguish from mechanical instability when radiological stress tests reveal only small ligamentous defects. For decision making whether to surgically reconstruct the ligaments or not, it can be helpful to use additional information on joint and foot function. Therefore, the aim of a prospective study of patients with longstanding chronic ankle instability was to demonstrate that the dynamic measurement of plantar pressure distribution can identify patients with functional ankle instability. [Table: see text] MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Sixty five patients (mean age 24 (4.6 years)) were included. After clinical examination and radiological stress views, plantar pressure patterns were measured during gait using a capacitive platform, the EMED-SF 2-system. Five trials of each foot were documented and the maximum impulses in eight points of the foot (central heel, lateral and medial heel, midfoot, 1st, 2nd, 5th metatarsal head and hallux) were calculated intraindividually and compared with a group of 100 healthy subjects. The medio-lateral loading factor (MLF) as the quotient of the medial and lateral relative impulses indicated the tendency to walk on the lateral edge of the foot. RESULTS:: Based on clinical criteria alone, two comparable groups of patients were separated, 35 with functional instability and 30 with mechanical instability. After collective analyses of the results, the patients with functional instability showed a significantly increased lateral loading of the unstable foot (p=0 0 1), whereas the mechanically unstable group tended to walk more on the medial side of the unstable foot (Table 1). DISCUSSION:: Dynamic measurement of plantar pressure can identify a group of patients walking on the lateral side of the unstable foot when compared with the stable foot. This finding is explained by a deficit of peroneal strength during stance phase based on a proprioceptive

  6. Changes in joint position sense after conservatively treated chronic lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kynsburg, A; Halasi, T; Tállay, A; Berkes, I

    2006-12-01

    Improvement of ankle proprioception through physiotherapy (a.k.a. proprioceptive training) is a widely accepted conservative treatment modality of chronic functional lateral ankle instability. Clinical studies provided controversial data on its proprioceptive effect. Aim of this study was to gain evidence on the efficacy of proprioceptive training on ankle joint position sense. Ten patients (five males and five females, aged 23.3+/-5.4 years) were treated conservatively for chronic lateral ankle instability with a special training programme over 6 weeks. For the assessment of joint position sense we used the slope-box test, first applied and described by Robbins et al. (Br J Sports Med 29:242-247, 1995). The test was performed before the start and after the end of the training programme, measuring joint position sense on 11 different slope amplitudes in four directions (anterior, posterior, lateral and medial) in random order each on both ankles. Comparisons were made between pre- and post-training results as well as versus a control-group of ten healthy athletes. Overall the proprioceptive sensory function of the studied group has improved, but this improvement was not significant in all directions. Only two patients have shown significant improvement of joint position sense in all directions (mean estimate error improvement: 2.47 degrees ), while conservative treatment was partially successful in five others (mean estimate error improvement: 0.73 degrees ). The follow-up results of these seven patients were comparable with the values measured in the control-group. Three patients did not show any improvements (mean estimate error improvement: -0.55 degrees ) (overall difference between improving and non-improving patients: P<0.0001). Mean absolute estimate error profiles of the seven improving patients became similar to the profiles of healthy athletes, while these changes could not be observed in the case of the three non-improving participants. Proprioceptive

  7. The anterior talo-fibular ligament reconstruction in surgical treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Trc, Tomás; Handl, Milan; Havlas, Vojtech

    2010-10-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability causes significant problems in physical activity and accelerates development of osteoarthritic changes. The results of treatment for chronic ankle instability are often meets controversial. A surgical reconstruction of ATFL as described in this paper was performed during the period 1997-2005 on 47 patients (26 male, 21 female), with a mean age of 29.3 years. The average follow-up period was 46.2 months. All patients had clinical examination, X-ray and MRI. The mean values of the Good score improved from an average 3.32 prior to surgery to 1.19 one year after the operation. Paired t-tests showed improvements of great significance (p < 10(-28)). The Good score prior to surgery ranged from 2-4, whereas the scores one year after surgery were either 1 or 2, with a score of 1 being recorded in 38 cases (81%). In the postoperative follow-up, MRI showed a newly-formed ligament structure in all cases. The authors describe their own technique for a reconstruction of lateral ankle instability using remnants of the former ATFL. The scar tissue seems to be sufficient to form a new duplicated structure providing good stability. MRI proved to be a sensitive and specific method for identifying the extent of talo-fibular ligament injury.

  8. Prevalence and clinical significance of occult fractures in children with radiograph-negative acute ankle injury

    PubMed Central

    Najaf-Zadeh, Abolfazl; Nectoux, Eric; Dubos, François; Happiette, Laurent; Demondion, Xavier; Gnansounou, Magloire; Herbaux, Bernard; Martinot, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Plain radiographs may fail to reveal an ankle fracture in children because of developmental and anatomical characteristics. In this systematic review and meta- analysis, we estimated the prevalence of occult fractures in children with acute ankle injuries and clinical suspicion of fracture, and assessed the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound (US) in the detection of occult fractures. Methods We searched the literature and included studies reporting the prevalence of occult fractures in children with acute ankle injuries and clinical suspicion of fracture. Proportion meta-analysis was performed to calculate the pooled prevalence of occult fractures. For each individual study exploring the US diagnostic accuracy, we calculated US operating characteristics. Results 9 studies (involving 187 patients) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (n = 5) or late radiographs (n = 4) as reference standard were included, 2 of which also assessed the diagnostic accuracy of US. Out of the 187 children, 41 were found to have an occult fracture. The pooled prevalence of occult fractures was 24% (95% CI: 18–31). The operating characteristics for detection of occult ankle fractures by US ranged in positive likelihood ratio (LR) from 9 to 20, and in negative LR from 0.04 to 0.08. Interpretation A substantial proportion of fractures may be overlooked on plain radiographs in children with acute ankle injuries and clinical suspicion of fracture. US appears to be a promising method for detection of ankle fractures in such children when plain radiographs are negative. PMID:24875057

  9. The use of Bioptron light (polarized, polychromatic, non-coherent) therapy for the treatment of acute ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Stasinopoulos, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, Costas; Lamnisos, Dimitrios; Stasinopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of Bioptron light therapy for the treatment of acute ankle sprains. Method A parallel group, single-blind, controlled study was carried out in patients with grade II acute ankle sprains. Patients were randomly allocated into two treatment groups (n = 25 for each). Both groups received cryotherapy, and the test group also received Bioptron light therapy. All treatments were performed daily for 5 d. Evaluations included self-reported pain via a visual analogue scale, degree of ankle edema, and ankle range of motion via goniometry carried out before the treatment and at the end of the treatment. Results The test group showed the largest magnitude of improvement for all evaluations at treatment five, and the between-group differences observed were statistically significant (p < 0.0005 for each). Conclusions These data provide preliminary evidence of the efficacy of Bioptron light therapy supplemented with cryotherapy for the treatment of acute ankle sprains; however, larger studies are required to confirm these results. Implications for Rehabilitation Ankle sprains are common acute injuries among professional and recreational sports players but also among people in general. Cryotherapy is the first-standard treatment of acute ankle sprains. Phototherapy such as Bioptron light has been recommended supplement to cryotherapy to reduce the symptoms of ankle sprains. The results of the present trial showed that using BIOPTRON LIGHT and cryotherapy the rehabilitation period of acute ankle sprains can be reduced.

  10. Shoes influence lower limb muscle activity and may predispose the wearer to lateral ankle ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Robin; Arnold, Graham P; Drew, Tim S; Cochrane, Lynda A; Abboud, Rami J

    2009-03-01

    Lateral ankle ligaments are injured by hyperinversion of the foot. Foot position is controlled by the lower limb muscles. Awareness of foot position is impaired by wearing shoes. We aimed to determine the influence of wearing shoes upon muscle activity. Sixty-two healthy subjects underwent the same measurements, barefoot and with standardized shoes in a random order. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from the peroneus longus muscle in response to sudden and unanticipated inversion of the ipsilateral foot. Following foot inversion, the EMG signal showed an initial peak muscle contraction followed by a sustained smaller contraction. Both changes were significantly greater in shoes compared to the barefoot condition for all tested degrees of inversion. Muscle contraction following sudden inversion of the foot was significantly greater when wearing shoes. This greater muscular contraction may be an intrinsic mechanism to oppose the increased moment created by the inverted foot/shoe condition, and hence, may counter balance the increased tendency to injure the lateral ankle ligaments created by wearing shoes.

  11. Anatomy of the inferior extensor retinaculum and its role in lateral ankle ligament reconstruction: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Dalmau-Pastor, M; Yasui, Y; Calder, J D; Karlsson, J; Kerkhoffs, G M M J; Kennedy, J G

    2016-04-01

    The inferior extensor retinaculum (IER) is an aponeurotic structure, which is in continuation with the anterior part of the sural fascia. The IER has often been used to augment the reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments, for instance in the Broström-Gould procedure, with good outcomes reported. However, its anatomy has not been described in detail and only a few studies are available on this structure. The presence of a non-constant oblique supero-lateral band appears to be important. This structure defines whether the augmentation of the lateral ankle ligaments reconstruction is performed using true IER or only the anterior part of the sural fascia. It is concluded that the use of this structure will have an impact on the resulting ankle stability.

  12. Acupuncture Treatment for Acute Ankle Injury in the Emergency Department: A Preliminary Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tantivesruangdet, Nopmanee

    2016-02-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient medical treatment that is increasingly attracting the interest of the public. It is a complementary therapy that is widely used for management of pain, especially chronic discomfort caused by migraine, low-back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee(¹⁻³). The evidence base for the effectiveness of acupuncture and its clinical applications is controversial, and although its efficacy and safety in the management of acute pain have been demonstrated, the quality of this modality is still questionable. The present study reports a case of acute ankle injury, which was treated with acupuncture. A 33-year-old man presented with acute twisted ankle injury. He had pain with swelling around the ankle, and he was experiencing difficulty in walking. His clinical diagnosis was acute ankle sprain with severe pain. Several drug treatments are used for pain control, but in this case, we used acupuncture. After treatment, his pain diminished significantly with a decrease in VAS pain level from 8 to 4 in 20 minutes. At follow-up after one month, we found no skin infection in this case.

  13. Clinical outcome after anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments using the Duquennoy technique in chronic lateral instability of the ankle: a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Muijs, S P J; Dijkstra, P D S; Bos, C F A

    2008-01-01

    We performed a retrospective study to assess the long-term outcome of non-augmented anatomical direct repair of the lateral ankle ligaments, as originally described by Duquennoy et al, for the treatment of chronic lateral instability of the ankle. This procedure aims to restore stability by the re-insertion and tightening of the original talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments without division of the ligament. We examined the outcome in terms of the post-operative quality of life, the function of the joint and the development of osteoarthritis. Between 1985 and 2002, 23 patients (11 males, 12 females) with a mean age of 32 years (15 to 58) who had undergone this procedure completed the Short-Form 36 assessment of quality of life and the Olerud and Molander Ankle score for the subjective evaluation of symptoms. Clinical re-evaluation, including examination of the ankle and the completion of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society questionnaire was performed on 21 patients after a mean follow-up of 13 years (3 to 22.2). At the final follow-up radiographs of both ankles were taken to assess the development of osteoarthritis. The mean total Short-Form 36 and Olerud and Molander Ankle scores in 23 patients at final follow-up were 79.6 points (37 to 100) and 81.6 points (40 to 100), respectively. The mean total post-operative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score in 21 patients was 89.7 points (72 to 100). We found a significant post-operative reduction in talar tilt and anterior drawer sign (chi-squared test, p <0.001). The functional outcome of the procedure was excellent in ten patients (48%), good in seven (33%) and fair in four (19%). The results in terms of ankle function and stability did not deteriorate with time and there was little restriction in movement. This procedure is simple and effective with a very low rate of complications.

  14. Treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability using the Broström-Gould procedure in athletes: long-term results

    PubMed Central

    RUSSO, ADRIANO; GIACCHÈ, PAOLO; MARCANTONI, ENRICO; ARRIGHI, ANNALISA; MOLFETTA, LUIGI

    2016-01-01

    Purpose this study was conducted to evaluate long-term results following treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability using the Broström-Gould technique in athletes. Methods eighteen athletes involved in competitive sports at different levels, who suffered from chronic lateral ankle instability, underwent Broström-Gould ligamentoplasty between 2000 and 2005. The results of the surgery were evaluated using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale. Results the results at 10–15 years of follow-up were excellent in 94.5% of these cases and good in the remaining 5.5%. An increase of 31.2 points in the AOFAS scale score was recorded at follow-up (with the score rising to 98.8, from 67.6 preoperatively). All the athletes returned to their respective sports at the same level as prior to the surgery. Imaging at long-term follow-up showed no signs of arthritic degeneration. Conclusions the results of this study show that the Broström-Gould technique is an effective procedure for the treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability in the athlete, giving excellent long-term results. Level of evidence therapeutic case series, level IV. PMID:27602349

  15. Traumeel vs. diclofenac for reducing pain and improving ankle mobility after acute ankle sprain: A multicentre, randomised, blinded, controlled and non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    González de Vega, C; Speed, C; Wolfarth, B; González, J

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute ankle sprains are common and activity limiting injuries, and topical diclofenac gel has proven efficacy in alleviating pain and restoring function. This trial aimed to compare a topical natural agent, Traumeel with topical diclofenac gel (1%) in the management of acute ankle sprain. Methods This prospective, multicentre, randomised, blinded, active-control and non-inferiority study involved 449 physically active adults sustaining unilateral grade 1 or 2 ankle sprain within the past 24 h. Participants were randomised to receive 2 g of Traumeel ointment (T-O) (n = 152) or Traumeel gel (T-G) (n = 150) or diclofenac gel (D-G) (n = 147), administered topically to the ankle three times a day for 14 days, with 6-weeks follow up. Results Day 7 median percentage reductions in Visual Analogue Scale pain score were 60.6%, 71.1% and 68.9% for the T-O, T-G and D-G groups, respectively. Total pain relief was reported by 12 (8.5%), 7 (5.0%) and 8 (5.9%) participants in each group, respectively. Median improvements in Foot and Ankle Ability Measure Activities of Daily Living subscale score were 26.2, 26.2 and 25.0 points for T-O, T-G and D-G groups, respectively. Mann–Whitney effect sizes and lower bound confidence intervals demonstrated non-inferiority of Traumeel vs. diclofenac for reducing pain and functional improvement. At 6 weeks, participants reported total pain relief and normal functioning. Adverse events (n = 43) were reported by 31/447 participants (6.9%). Treatments were equally well tolerated. Conclusions T-O and T-G decreased pain and improved joint function to the same extent as D-G in acute ankle sprain, and were well tolerated. PMID:23889885

  16. Ankle motion influences the external knee adduction moment and may predict who will respond to lateral wedge insoles?: an ancillary analysis from the SILK trial

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, G.J.; Parkes, M.J.; Forsythe, L.; Felson, D.T.; Jones, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Lateral wedge insoles are a potential simple treatment for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients by reducing the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). However in some patients, an increase in their EKAM is seen. Understanding the role of the ankle joint complex in the response to lateral wedge insoles is critical in understanding and potentially identifying why some patients respond differently to lateral wedge insoles. Method Participants with medial tibiofemoral OA underwent gait analysis whilst walking in a control shoe and a lateral wedge insole. We evaluated if dynamic ankle joint complex coronal plane biomechanical measures could explain and identify those participants that increased (biomechanical non-responder) or decreased (biomechanical responder) EKAM under lateral wedge conditions compared to the control shoe. Results Of the 70 participants studied (43 male), 33% increased their EKAM and 67% decreased their EKAM. Overall, lateral wedge insoles shifted the centre of foot pressure laterally, increased eversion of the ankle/subtalar joint complex (STJ) and the eversion moment compared to the control condition. Ankle angle at peak EKAM and peak eversion ankle/STJ complex angle in the control condition predicted if individuals were likely to decrease EKAM under lateral wedge conditions. Conclusions Coronal plane ankle/STJ complex biomechanical measures play a key role in reducing EKAM when wearing lateral wedge insoles. These findings may assist in the identification of those individuals that could benefit more from wearing lateral wedge insoles. PMID:25749010

  17. Talocalcaneal coalition. Diagnosis with the C-sign on lateral radiographs of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, A; Sallomi, D; Janzen, D L; Munk, P L; Claridge, R J; Kiri, V A

    2000-05-01

    We analysed 42 weight-bearing lateral radiographs of the ankle, 20 of which were from patients with a clinical and plain radiological diagnosis of talocalcaneal coalition (TCC) who subsequently had CT. The remainder were from 22 healthy volunteers with no clinical findings suggestive of hindfoot pathology. Four observers, blinded to the CT findings, independently evaluated the radiographs on two separate occasions. With the 95% confidence interval and using the CT findings as the comparison we calculated the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values for the C-sign, and for other signs known to be associated with TCC. Similarly, we also calculated the interobserver and intraobserver reliability for these signs using the kappa statistic. Our results suggest that the C-sign is highly sensitive and specific for TCC. It is an accurate indicator and significantly more reliable than other previously recognised radiological signs of TCC. Features of the C-sign, however, cannot be relied upon to indicate whether the TCC is fibrous or bony.

  18. A minimally invasive surgical technique for augmented reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments with woven polyester tape.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alex P; Sidhom, Sameh; Sefton, Graham

    2007-01-01

    Although stabilization of the lateral ankle ligament complex (LALC) with augmented techniques is known to be successful, it is associated with a number of complications. We hypothesize that successful stabilization of LALC can be achieved with a woven polyester tape implant via a minimally invasive procedure, as an alternative to tenodesis. Four men with chronic instability of the ankle underwent a minimally invasive surgical stabilization of LALC with a woven polyester tape. This tape was passed through the distal fibula to the base of the fifth metatarsal and then back to the fibula once more before being tied. The foot was immobilized in a neutral position for 2 weeks. Partial weightbearing with a walking stick began on the same day, and physiotherapy began for 10 weeks. Evaluation was performed at a mean follow-up of 24.5 months postoperatively. Preoperatively, all patients had a chronically unstable index ankle both functionally and clinically. At a mean of 24.5 months postoperatively, functional stability for all patients was normal (Sefton grade 1). Subjective ankle performance grades were normal in all cases, and all patients felt the outcome was excellent. Objective measurement with clinical stress testing showed anterior drawer and inversion tests to be the same as the contralateral ankle in all patients. However, each displayed limited inversion of the ankle. No complications such as wound dehiscence, infection, pain, or nerve injury were observed after the procedure. All were able to return to their preinjury activity level within 3 months. Stabilization of LALC may be simply and successfully achieved with a woven polyester graft as an alternative to tenodesis.

  19. The Association of Ankle Dorsiflexion Range of Motion With Hip and Knee Kinematics During the Lateral Step-down Test.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Alon; Portnoy, Sigal; Kozol, Zvi

    2016-11-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Altered hip and knee kinematics have been associated with several knee disorders, including anterior cruciate ligament tear, patellofemoral pain, and iliotibial band syndrome. Limited ankle dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM), which has been linked with some of these disorders, has also been associated with altered knee kinematics. Objective To explore the association of ankle DF ROM with hip and knee kinematics during a step-down task. Methods Thirty healthy participants underwent a 3-D analysis of hip and knee kinematics during a lateral step-down test, followed by measurement of ankle DF ROM in weight bearing (WB) and non-weight bearing (NWB). Participants were dichotomized using the median values into low- and high-DF subgroups within both WB and NWB. Hip and knee kinematics were compared between the low- and high-DF subgroups. Results Participants in the low-DF subgroups exhibited greater peak hip adduction (WB, P = .02; NWB, P<.01) and greater peak knee external rotation (WB, P = .02; NWB, P<.01) compared with participants in the high-DF subgroups. In addition, participants in the low-DF WB subgroup exhibited decreased peak knee flexion compared with participants in the high-DF WB subgroup (P<.01). Conclusion Individuals with lower ankle DF ROM exhibited hip and knee kinematics previously associated with several knee disorders, suggesting that this impairment may be involved in the pathogenesis of the same disorders. Assessment of ankle DF ROM may be useful as part of a preparticipation screening. Furthermore, deficits in ankle DF ROM may need to be addressed in individuals with altered movement patterns. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(11):-1. Epub 29 Sep 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6621.

  20. Effect of early supervised physiotherapy on recovery from acute ankle sprain: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Day, Andrew G; Pelland, Lucie; Pickett, William; Johnson, Ana P; Aiken, Alice; Pichora, David R; Brouwer, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of a programme of supervised physiotherapy on the recovery of simple grade 1 and 2 ankle sprains. Design A randomised controlled trial of 503 participants followed for six months. Setting Participants were recruited from two tertiary acute care settings in Kingston, ON, Canada. Participants The broad inclusion criteria were patients aged ≥16 presenting for acute medical assessment and treatment of a simple grade 1 or 2 ankle sprain. Exclusions were patients with multiple injuries, other conditions limiting mobility, and ankle injuries that required immobilisation and those unable to accommodate the time intensive study protocol. Intervention Participants received either usual care, consisting of written instructions regarding protection, rest, cryotherapy, compression, elevation, and graduated weight bearing activities, or usual care enhanced with a supervised programme of physiotherapy. Main outcome measures The primary outcome of efficacy was the proportion of participants reporting excellent recovery assessed with the foot and ankle outcome score (FAOS). Excellent recovery was defined as a score ≥450/500 at three months. A difference of at least 15% increase in the absolute proportion of participants with excellent recovery was deemed clinically important. Secondary analyses included the assessment of excellent recovery at one and six months; change from baseline using continuous scores at one, three, and six months; and clinical and biomechanical measures of ankle function, assessed at one, three, and six months. Results The absolute proportion of patients achieving excellent recovery at three months was not significantly different between the physiotherapy (98/229, 43%) and usual care (79/214, 37%) arms (absolute difference 6%, 95% confidence interval −3% to 15%). The observed trend towards benefit with physiotherapy did not increase in the per protocol analysis and was in the opposite direction by six months

  1. [Surgery of ipsilateral Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck and ankle joint fractures via internal and lateral approaches with Herbert screws].

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Dong, Q R; Wang, Z Y; Chen, B; Wan, J H; Wang, L

    2016-11-08

    Objective: To explore the manual operation skills of operative treatment of ipsilateral Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck and ankle joint fractures via internal and lateral approaches with Herbert screws, and to study the clinical results. Method: From Jan 2009 to Dec 2014, the clinical data of 13 patients with ipsilateral Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck and ankle joint fractres via internal and lateral approaches with Herbert screws were retrospectively analyzed in our department.There were 10 males and 3 female, ranging in age from 20 to 60 years with an average age of 31.5 years.The fractures occurred on the right side in 9 patients and on the left side in 4 patients.Three cases had the complication of medial malleolar fracture.Ten cases had the complication of medial and lateral malleolar fracture. Totally 11 cases were made calcaneal skeletal traction, and all the were made CT with three-dimensional image reconstruction.Two cases were treated with emergency operation.Eleven cases were treated with selective operation.The operation time was 5 hours-10 days after injury. The functional results were evaluated by American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). Result: The average duration of follow-up was 22.6 months (range, 14-65 months). There was skin necrosis in one cases, no incision infection, malunion and nonunion of the fractures and loss of reduction. At final follow-up, AOFAS ankle score was 75.2 (range, 42 to 93), higher than preoperative 39.2 (range, 23 to 60), the difference was statistically significant (P=0.023). The result was excellent in 4 cases, good in 5 cases, fair in 3 cases and 1 cases in poor, and the overall excellent or good rate was 69.2%. Avascular necrosis occurred in 3 cases (23.1%, 3/13). Traumatic arthritis was found in 5 cases (38.5%, 5/13), involved tibial astragaloid joint in 2 cases, involved subtalar joint in 1 case, involved tibial astragaloid joint and subtalar joint in 2 cases. Conclusion: The effect of surgical treatment for ipsilateral

  2. [Chronic ankle instability in sports -- a review for sports physicians].

    PubMed

    Valderrabano, V; Leumann, A; Pagenstert, G; Frigg, A; Ebneter, L; Hintermann, B

    2006-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability represents a typical sports injury which can mostly be seen in basketball, soccer, orienteering and other high risk sports. 20 to 40 % of the acute ankle sprains develop into chronic ankle instability. From a sports orthopaedic point of view, chronic ankle instability can be subdivided into a lateral, medial or a combination of both so called rotational ankle instability. From a pathophysiological point of view, chronic ankle instability can be either mechanical with a structural ligament lesion or functional with loss of the neuromuscular control. For the sports physician, the chronic ankle instability is a difficult entity as the diagnosis is usually complex and the therapy usually surgical. This review on chronic ankle instability addresses pathomechanism, diagnostics, indications for conservative and surgical treatments, and possible long-term sequelae, as ligamentous osteoarthritis.

  3. Positional effects of the knee and ankle on the ends of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Wray, Walter H; Regan, Conor; Patel, Sagar; May, Ryan; Parekh, Selene G

    2009-10-01

    Conservative management of acute Achilles tendon ruptures in a plantarflexed short leg cast or functional brace is a viable alternative to surgery. The ideal plantarflexion angle to allow the free ends of the tendon to oppose one another has not been clearly defined. The purpose of this cadaveric study was to define a plantarflexion angle where the free Achilles tendon ends reliably oppose one another. Ten cadaveric legs amputated at the distal femur were obtained. A laceration of the Achilles tendon was made 4 cm above the calcaneal insertion. A joint-spanning external fixator was placed across the knee. With differing degrees of knee flexion (0, 45, and 90 degrees), the diastasis between the free ends of the Achilles tendon was measured as the ankle was moved from 20 degrees of dorsiflexion to 30 degrees of plantarflexion (-20, -10, neutral, 10, 20, and 30 degrees). Regardless of knee flexion angle, the ankle plantarflexion angle where the free ends of the Achilles tendon opposed one another was 28.0 (95% confidence interval: 25.0-33.6) degrees. The ideal ankle angle in which to immobilize patients appears tightly clustered around 28 degrees of plantarflexion.

  4. The acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on postural sway and gastrocnemius muscle activity during single-leg balance tasks.

    PubMed

    Lima, Bráulio N; Lucareli, Paulo R G; Gomes, Willy A; Silva, Josinaldo J; Bley, Andre S; Hartigan, Erin H; Marchetti, Paulo H

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on surface electromyography (sEMG) and the center of pressure (COP) during a single-leg balance task in both lower limbs. Fourteen young healthy, non-athletic individuals performed unipodal quiet standing for 30s before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch) a unilateral ankle plantar flexor static- stretching protocol [6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort (POD)]. Postural sway was described using the COP area, COP speed (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions) and COP frequency (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions). Surface EMG (EMG integral [IEMG] and Median frequency[FM]) was used to describe the muscular activity of gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion increased in the stretched limb before and after the static-stretching protocol (mean ± SD: 15.0° ± 6.0 and 21.5° ± 7.0 [p < 0.001]). COP area and IEMG increased in the stretch limb between pre-stretching and immediately post-stretching (p = 0.015 and p = 0.036, respectively). In conclusion, our static- stretching protocol effectively increased passive ankle ROM. The increased ROM appears to increase postural sway and muscle activity; however these finding were only a temporary or transient effect. Key PointsThe postural control can be affected by static- stretching protocol.The lateral gastrocnemius muscle action was increased after the static- stretching protocol.The static- stretching effects remain for less than 10 minutes.

  5. Reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting for one-stage soft tissue reconstruction of foot and ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Duke-Whan

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this report is to present the clinical result and efficacy of reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting for one stage soft tissue reconstruction of the foot and ankle joints. Reconstruction using a reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting was performed in eight cases between January 2005 and March 2009. All the subjects were male with a mean age of 53 years. The mean follow-up period was 20 months. The reasons for soft tissue defects were diabetic foot, infected bursitis, open injuries of the foot, and chronic osteomyelitis. The mean size of the flaps was 3.5 (3-4) × 4.5 (4-6) cm. The flaps were elevated in the form of an adipofascial flap and split-thickness skin grafting was performed over the flaps and adjoining raw areas. Flaps survived in all cases. The implantation of the split-thickness skin graft over the flap was also successful in all cases. Neither partial necrosis in the adipofascial flap nor venous congestion was observed. At the last follow-up, there were no limited motions in the ankle and the toe. No cases complained of inconveniences in ambulation or had difficulties in selecting footwear. In cases that require a flap for the exposed bone or tendon of the foot with a small-sized defect, reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting is considered a useful method as it lowers the morbidity rate of the donor site and reconstructs soft tissues.

  6. Ankle pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  7. Chronic ankle instability: Current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprain is reported to be among the most common recurrent injuries. About 20% of acute ankle sprain patients develop chronic ankle instability. The failure of functional rehabilitation after acute ankle sprain leads to the development of chronic ankle instability. Differentiation between functional and anatomical ankle instability is very essential to guide the proper treatment. Stability testing by varus stress test and anterior drawer test should be carried out. Subtalar instability is an important pathology that is commonly by passed during the assessment of chronic ankle instability. Unlike acute ankle sprain, chronic ankle instability might require surgical intervention. The surgical and conservative management options can be very much developed by in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics, and pathology. Anatomical repair, augmentation by tendon, or both are the basic methods of surgical intervention. Arthroscopy is becoming more popular in the management of chronic ankle instability. PMID:27843798

  8. A literature-based guide to the conservative and surgical management of the acute Charcot foot and ankle

    PubMed Central

    Schade, Valerie L.; Andersen, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Acute Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle presents with the insidious onset of a unilateral acutely edematous, erythematous, and warm lower extremity. The acute stages are typically defined as Eichenholtz Stage 1, or Stage 0, which was first described by Shibata et al. in 1990. The ultimate goal of treatment is maintenance of a stable, plantigrade foot which can be easily shod, minimizing the risk of callus, ulceration, infection, and amputation. The gold standard of treatment is non-weight-bearing immobilization in a total contact cast. Surgical intervention remains controversial. A review of the literature was performed to provide an evidenced-based approach to the conservative and surgical management of acute Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle. PMID:25795102

  9. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  10. Avulsion of the perforating branch of the peroneal artery secondary to an ankle sprain: a cause of acute compartment syndrome in the leg.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Mark A; Barnes, James R; Thorpe, Paul L; Williams, James L

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we describe the case of an adult male who developed an acute compartment syndrome localized to the anterior compartment of the leg following an ankle sprain. Compartment syndrome in association with ankle sprain is unusual, and has been previously described in association with avulsion of the perforating peroneal artery. Because of the potential for severe morbidity, we feel that it is important to make foot and ankle surgeons aware of this unusual injury.

  11. Assessment of ankle and hindfoot stability and joint pressures using a human cadaveric model of a large lateral talar process excision: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Sands, Andrew; White, Charles; Blankstein, Michael; Zderic, Ivan; Wahl, Dieter; Ernst, Manuela; Windolf, Markus; Hagen, Jennifer E; Richards, R Geoff; Stoffel, Karl; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2015-03-01

    Lateral talar process fragment excision may be followed by hindfoot instability and altered biomechanics. There is controversy regarding the ideal fragment size for internal fixation versus excision and a concern that excision of a large fragment may lead to significant instability. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a simulated large lateral talar process excision on ankle and subtalar joint stability.A custom-made seesaw rig was designed to apply inversion/eversion stress loading on 7 fresh-frozen human cadaveric lower legs and investigate them in pre-excision, 5 cm and 10 cm lateral talar process fragment excision states. Anteroposterior radiographs were taken to assess ankle and subtalar joint tilt and calculate angular change from neutral hindfoot alignment to 10-kg forced inversion/eversion. Ankle joint pressures and contact areas were measured under 30-kg axial load in neutral hindfoot alignment.In comparison to the pre-excision state, no significantly different mediolateral angular change was observed in the subtalar joint after 5 and 10 cm lateral talar process fragment excision in inversion and eversion. With respect to the ankle joint, 10-cm fragment excision produced significantly bigger inversion tibiotalar tilt compared with the pre-excision state, P = .04. No significant change of the ankle joint pressure and contact area was detected after 5 and 10-cm excision in comparison with the pre-excison state.An excision of up to 10 cm of the lateral talar process does not cause a significant instability at the level of the subtalar joint but might be a destabilizing factor at the ankle joint under inversion stress. The latter could be related to extensive soft tissue dissection required for resection.

  12. Acute traumatic open posterolateral dislocation of the ankle without tearing of the tibiofibular syndesmosis ligaments: a case report.

    PubMed

    Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Komurcu, Mahmut; Ozturk, Cagatay; Ozturan, Kutay; Tasatan, Ersin; Erler, Kaan

    2008-01-01

    Pure open dislocation of the ankle, or dislocation not accompanied by rupture of the tibiofibular syndesmosis ligaments or fractures of the malleoli or of the posterior border of the tibia, is an extremely rare injury. A 62-year-old man injured his right ankle in a motor vehicle accident. Besides posterolateral ankle dislocation, there was a 7-cm transverse skin cut on the medial malleolus, and the distal end of the tibia was exposed. After reduction, we made a 2- to 2.5-cm longitudinal incision on the lateral malleolus; the distal fibular fracture was exposed. Two Kirschner wires were placed intramedullary in a retrograde manner, and the fracture was stabilized. The deltoid ligament and the medial capsule were repaired. The tibiofibular syndesmosis ligaments were intact. At the end of postoperative year 1, right ankle joint range of motion had a limit of approximately 5 degrees in dorsiflexion, 10 degrees in plantarflexion, 5 degrees in inversion, and 0 degrees in eversion. The joint appeared normal on radiographs, with no signs of osteoarthritis or calcification. The best result can be obtained with early reduction, debridement, medial capsule and deltoid ligament restoration, and early rehabilitation. Clinical and radiographic features at long-term follow-up also confirm good mobility of the ankle without degenerative change or mechanical instability.

  13. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: 30 years later.

    PubMed

    Lesur, O; Berthiaume, Y; Blaise, G; Damas, P; Deland, E; Guimond, J G; Michel, R P

    1999-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was first described about 30 years ago. Modern definitions and statements have recently been proposed to describe ARDS accurately, but none is perfect. Diffuse alveolar damage is the basic pathological pattern most commonly observed in ARDS, and the term includes permeability edema. The alveolar epithelium of the alveolar-capillary barrier is clearly a key component requiring repair, given its multipotent functional activity. Lung inflammation and neutrophil accumulation are essential markers of disease in ARDS, and a wide variety of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been described in the alveolar fluid and blood of patients. These molecules still have to prove their value as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of ARDS. Supportive therapy in ARDS improved in the past decade; mechanical ventilation with lung protective strategies and patient positioning are gaining interest, but the indications for corticosteroids for ARDS are still debated. Nitric oxide may have a place in the treatment of one-third of patients. Novel approaches, such as surfactant replacement and liquid ventilation, may further improve supportive therapy. Innovative interventions may be on the horizon in treatments that help to resolve or modulate common pathways of ARDS, such as inflammation (eg, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor) or epithelial repair (eg, keratinocyte growth factor).

  14. Acute syndesmosis injuries associated with ankle fractures: current perspectives in management.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason C; McLaurin, Toni M

    2009-01-01

    Ankle syndesmosis injuries frequently occur with ankle fractures, but their treatment remains controversial. Although specific clinical and radiographic diagnostic measures are generally well-accepted, there remains a lack of consensus with respect to the treatment of these injuries. Controversy arises at almost every phase of treatment including: type of fixation (screw size, type of implant), number of cortices required for fixation, and need for hardware removal. Regardless of fixation technique chosen, the most important goal should be anatomic reduction and restoration of the syndesmosis and ankle mortise as this is the only significant predictor of functional outcome.

  15. Lateral distribution and the energy determination of showers along the ankle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, G.; Medina-Tanco, G.A.; De Donato, C.; del Peral, L.; Rodríguez-Frías, D.; D'Olivo, J.C.; Valdés-Galicia, J.F.; Arqueros, F.

    The normalization constant of the lateral distribution function (LDF) of an extensive air shower is a monotonous (almost linear) increasing function of the energy of the primary, as well as a monotonous decreasing function of the distance from the shower core. Therefore, the interpolated signal at some fixed distance from the core can be calibrated to estimate the energy of the shower. There is, somehow surprisingly, a reconstructed optimal distance, r_opt, at which the effects on the inferred signal, S(r_opt), of the uncertainties on true core location, LDF functional form and shower-to-shower fluctuations are minimized. We calculate the value of r_opt and study the robustness of the method as a function of surface detector separation (400 m to 1500 m), energy (0.1 EeV to 10 EeV) and zenith angle (0 to 60 deg) for a realistic distribution of core determination errors along the space parameter used. We also investigate the effects of silent and saturated stations and give a rough estimate of the systematic errors introduced by varying cosmic ray composition inside the considered energy range.

  16. Using Balance Tests to Discriminate Between Participants With a Recent Index Lateral Ankle Sprain and Healthy Control Participants: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Pourkazemi, Fereshteh; Hiller, Claire; Raymond, Jacqueline; Black, Deborah; Nightingale, Elizabeth; Refshauge, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Context:  The first step to identifying factors that increase the risk of recurrent ankle sprains is to identify impairments after a first sprain and compare performance with individuals who have never sustained a sprain. Few researchers have restricted recruitment to a homogeneous group of patients with first sprains, thereby introducing the potential for confounding. Objective:  To identify impairments that differ in participants with a recent index lateral ankle sprain versus participants with no history of ankle sprain. Design:  Cross-sectional study. Patients or Other Participants:  We recruited a sample of convenience from May 2010 to April 2013 that included 70 volunteers (age = 27.4 ± 8.3 years, height = 168.7 ± 9.5 cm, mass = 65.0 ± 12.5 kg) serving as controls and 30 volunteers (age = 31.1 ± 13.3 years, height = 168.3 ± 9.1 cm, mass = 67.3 ± 13.7 kg) with index ankle sprains. Main Outcome Measure(s):  We collected demographic and physical performance variables, including ankle-joint range of motion, balance (time to balance after perturbation, Star Excursion Balance Test, foot lifts during single-legged stance, demi-pointe balance test), proprioception, motor planning, inversion-eversion peak power, and timed stair tests. Discriminant analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between explanatory variables and sprain status. Sequential discriminant analysis was performed to identify the most relevant variables that explained the greatest variance. Results:  The average time since the sprain was 3.5 ± 1.5 months. The model, including all variables, correctly predicted a sprain status of 77% (n = 23) of the sprain group and 80% (n = 56) of the control group and explained 40% of the variance between groups ( = 42.16, P = .03). Backward stepwise discriminant analysis revealed associations between sprain status and only 2 tests: Star Excursion Balance Test in the anterior direction and foot lifts during single-legged stance ( = 15

  17. Simultaneous strain measurement with determination of a zero strain reference for the medial and lateral ligaments of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Satoru; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kaneda, Kiyoshi; Yamakoshi, Kenichi; Yamanoi, Takahiro

    2002-09-01

    The strain changes of the central part of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL), the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), and the tibiocalcaneal ligament (TCL) were measured simultaneously for a full range of ankle motion. Twelve fresh frozen amputated ankles were used. To measure the strain changes of the ligaments, a Galium-Indium-filled silastic strain transducer was implanted in the center of each ligament. The zero strain reference was determined immediately after the measurement of strain changes in five of the 12 ankles by tensile testing of each bone-ligament-bone preparation. The maximum strain change of the ATFL, the PTFL, the CFL and the TFL were 7.9%, 5.9%, 5.3% and 5.2%, respectively. The ATFL was elongated in plantar flexion and shortened in dorsiflexion. The PTFL and the CFL were shortened in plantar flexion and elongated in dorsiflexion. The TCL was the longest around the neutral position and became shorter in planter flexion and dorsiflexion. The results showed that the ATFL was taut in plantar flexion over 16.2 degrees, the PTFL and the CFL were taut in dorsiflexion over 18 degrees and 17.8 degrees respectively, and the TCL was taut between 9.5 degrees of dorsiflexion and 9.5 degrees of plantar flexion. The length change pattern was different among the ankle ligaments, although there was only a slight difference between that of the PTFL and the CFL. This study provides fundamental data useful in studying ankle ligament reconstruction.

  18. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases.

  19. An unusual case of chronic lateral foot pain following ankle inversion injury: osteoid osteoma of the tarsal cuboid bone.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Umur; Dellenbaugh, Samuel G

    2014-04-01

    Osteoid osteomas are common benign tumors normally seen in the femur, tibia, and spine. They rarely are seen in the foot. We present an unusual case of osteoid osteoma of the cuboid in a 26-year-old man. This was initially thought to be an ankle sprain, as its first presentation was after a sporting injury. It was then treated as an infection before the true diagnosis--that of osteoid osteoma--was obtained.

  20. Peroneal Tendon Reconstruction and Coverage for Treatment of Septic Peroneal Tenosynovitis: A Devastating Complication of Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction With a Tendon Allograft.

    PubMed

    Schade, Valerie L; Harsha, Wayne; Rodman, Caitlin; Roukis, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Septic peroneal tenosynovitis is a rare and significant challenge. A search of peer-reviewed published studies revealed only 5 case reports to guide treatment, none of which resulted in significant loss of both peroneal tendons necessitating reconstruction. No clear guidance is available regarding how to provide reliable reconstruction of both peroneal tendons after a significant loss secondary to septic tenosynovitis. In the present report, we describe the case of a young, active-duty soldier who underwent lateral ankle ligament reconstruction with a tendon allograft whose postoperative course was complicated by septic peroneal tenosynovitis resulting in significant loss of both peroneal tendons. Reconstruction was achieved in a staged fashion with the use of silicone rods and external fixation to maintain physiologic tension and preserve peroneal tendon function, followed by reconstruction of both peroneal tendons and the superior peroneal retinaculum with a tensor fascia lata autograft. Soft tissue coverage was obtained with an anterolateral thigh free tissue transfer and a split-thickness skin graft. The patient returned to full activity as an active-duty soldier with minimal pain and no instability of the right lower extremity. The muscle strength of both peroneal tendons remained at 5 of 5, and no objective findings of ankle instability were seen at 3.5 years postoperatively.

  1. A Study of H-Reflexes in Subjects with Acute Ankle Inversion Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-21

    nerve root, and is useful in studies of peripheral neuropathies .(48, 63, 90) Normative data have been published comparing the Soleus H-reflex to those...in patients with peripheral and acute proximal neuropathy .(48) Johnson and Braddom suggested that H-reflex amplitude studies were not practical or...action potential evoked by weak electrical stimulation of afferent fibers of a mixed peripheral nerve. Originally described by Hoffman in 1918.(38) Open

  2. Ankle Sprain Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Page Content Article Body Acute ankle and foot injuries are common in athletes and other active young ... heels by pushing on the balls of your feet. Repeat steps 1 through 3. ... criteria Because injuries and recovery rates are different for every athlete, ...

  3. Vascular Physiology according to Clinical Scenario in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: Evaluation using the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index.

    PubMed

    Goto, Toshihiko; Wakami, Kazuaki; Mori, Kento; Kikuchi, Shohei; Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Increased aortic stiffness may be an important cause of acute heart failure (AHF). Clinical scenario (CS), which classifies the pathophysiology of AHF based on the initial systolic blood pressure (sBP), was proposed to provide the most appropriate therapy for AHF patients. In CS, elevated aortic stiffness, vascular failure, has been considered as a feature of patients categorized as CS1 (sBP > 140 mmHg at initial presentation). However, whether elevated aortic stiffness, vascular failure, is present in such patients has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we assessed aortic stiffness in AHF patients using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), which is considered to be independent of instantaneous blood pressure. Sixty-four consecutive AHF patients (mean age, 70.6 ± 12.8 years; 39 men) were classified with CS, based on their initial sBP: CS1: sBP > 140 mmHg (n = 29); CS2: sBP 100-140 mmHg (n = 22); and CS3: sBP < 100 mmHg (n = 13). There were significant group differences in CAVI (CS1 vs. CS2 vs. CS3: 9.7 ± 1.4 vs. 8.4 ± 1.7 vs. 8.3 ± 1.7, p = 0.006, analysis of variance). CAVI was significantly higher in CS1 than in CS2 (p = 0.02) and CS3 (p = 0.04). CAVI did not significantly correlate with sBP at the time of measurement of CAVI (r = 0.24 and p = 0.06). Aortic stiffness assessed using blood pressure-independent methodology apparently increased in CS1 AHF patients. We conclude that vascular failure is a feature of CS1 AHF initiation.

  4. [Back to the emergency department with a painful ankle].

    PubMed

    van Egmond, Pim W; van de Rest, Hendrik J M; Nolte, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    A 31-year-old woman came to the Emergency Department with a painful ankle 2 days after a fall off a horse. On the day of the accident, she was misdiagnosed with a lateral ankle sprain. A lateral X-ray of the ankle showed a positive 'V-sign', which is pathognomonic for a fracture of the lateral process of the talus.

  5. Ankle Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sole of the foot is facing inwards, stretching and possibly damaging the ligaments on the outer ... sprains: Always warm up and use the recommended stretching techniques for your ankles before playing sports, exercising, ...

  6. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is surgery to replace the damaged bone and cartilage in the ankle joint. Artificial joint parts (prosthetics) ... Your surgeon will remove the damaged bone and cartilage. Your surgeon will replace the damaged part of: ...

  7. Sprained Ankles

    MedlinePlus

    ... are usually stronger than the growing bones and cartilage to which they are attached. Therefore, the growing part of the bone might separate or tear away before the ligament is injured. Types of Sprains In young children, the ankle is ...

  8. Reverse Evans peroneus brevis medial ankle stabilization for balancing valgus ankle contracture during total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Medial ankle instability secondary to deltoid ligament insufficiency is frequently encountered when performing total ankle replacement and remains a challenge. In the present techniques report, we describe a "reverse" Evans peroneus brevis tendon nonanatomic deltoid ligament reconstruction for medial ankle stabilization harvested through limited incisions using simple topographic anatomic landmarks. The harvested peroneus brevis tendon is brought through a drill hole in the talus from laterally to medially, aiming for the junction of the talar neck and body plantar to the midline. The tendon is the brought superiorly and obliquely to the anterior medial aspect of the distal tibia where it is secured under a plate and screw construct. This modified Evans peroneus brevis tendon nonanatomic deltoid ligament reconstruction is useful in providing medial ankle stability during or after primary and revision total ankle replacement.

  9. An EMG-Controlled SMA Device for the Rehabilitation of the Ankle Joint in Post-Acute Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.

    2011-07-01

    The capacity of flexing one's ankle is an indispensible segment of gait re-learning, as imbalance, wrong compensatory use of other joints and risk of falling may depend on the so-called drop-foot. The rehabilitation of ankle dorsiflexion may be achieved through active exercising of the relevant musculature (especially tibialis anterior, TA). This can be troublesome for patients affected by weakness and flaccid paresis. Thus, as needs evolve during patient's improvements, a therapeutic device should be able to guide and sustain gradual recovery by providing commensurate aid. This includes exploiting even initial attempts at voluntary motion and turns those into effective workout. An active orthosis powered by two rotary actuators containing NiTi wire was designed to obtain ankle dorsiflexion. A computer routine that analyzes the electromyographic (sEMG) signal from TA muscle is used to control the orthosis and trigger its activation. The software also provides instructions and feed-back for the patient. Tests on the orthosis proved that it can produce strokes up to 36° against resisting torques exceeding 180 Ncm. Three healthy subjects were able to control the orthosis by modulating their TA sEMG activity. The movement produced in the preliminary tests is interesting for lower limb rehabilitation, and will be further improved by optimizing body-orthosis interface. It is hoped that this device will enhance early rehabilitation and recovery of ankle mobility in stroke patients.

  10. Lateral left ventricular wall rupture following acute myocardial infarction: pathophysiological interpretation by multimodality imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Avegliano, Gustavo; Conde, Diego; González Ruiz, María Isabel; Kuschnir, Paola; Sciancalepore, Agustina; Castro, Florencia; Ronderos, Ricardo

    2014-11-01

    Lateral left ventricular wall rupture (LVWR) is a rare complication following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) less than 1%. After cardiogenic shock, LVWR constitutes the most common cause of in-hospital death in AMI patients. Around 40% of all LVWR occurred during the first 24 hours and 85% within the first week. In the present case, 76 hours following the intervention, LVWR was observed likely due to a small infarction at the lateral left ventricular wall possibly due to the marginal lesion. Our patient refused surgery and was followed clinically. Eighteen months later, real time three-dimensional echocardiography showed a pseudoaneurysm.

  11. Ankle replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You had an ankle replacement. Your surgeon removed and reshaped damaged bones, and put in an artificial ankle joint. You received pain medicine and were shown how to treat swelling around your new ankle joint.

  12. Chronic Ankle Instability

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  13. Position versus force control: using the 2-DOF robotic ankle trainer to assess ankle's motor control.

    PubMed

    Farjadian, Amir B; Nabian, Mohsen; Hartman, Amber; Corsino, Johnathan; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Holden, Maureen K

    2014-01-01

    An estimated of 2,000,000 acute ankle sprains occur annually in the United States. Furthermore, ankle disabilities are caused by neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and stroke. The virtually interfaced robotic ankle and balance trainer (vi-RABT) was introduced as a cost-effective platform-based rehabilitation robot to improve overall ankle/balance strength, mobility and control. The system is equipped with 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF) controlled actuation along with complete means of angle and torque measurement mechanisms. Vi-RABT was used to assess ankle strength, flexibility and motor control in healthy human subjects, while playing interactive virtual reality games on the screen. The results suggest that in the task with 2-DOF, subjects have better control over ankle's position vs. force.

  14. Effect of acute lateral hemisection of the spinal cord on spinal neurons of postural networks.

    PubMed

    Zelenin, P V; Lyalka, V F; Orlovsky, G N; Deliagina, T G

    2016-12-17

    In quadrupeds, acute lateral hemisection of the spinal cord (LHS) severely impairs postural functions, which recover over time. Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections in intact animals. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute LHS on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits, responses of individual neurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs were recorded before and during reversible LHS (caused by temporal cold block of signal transmission in lateral spinal pathways at L1), as well as after acute surgical LHS at L1. Results obtained after Sur-LHS were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that acute LHS caused disappearance of PLRs on the affected side. It also changed a proportion of different types of neurons on that side. A significant decrease and increase in the proportion of F- and non-modulated neurons, respectively, was found. LHS caused a significant decrease in most parameters of activity in F-neurons located in the ventral horn on the lesioned side and in E-neurons of the dorsal horn on both sides. These changes were caused by a significant decrease in the efficacy of posture-related sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to both F- and E-neurons. These distortions in operation of postural networks underlie the impairment of postural control after acute LHS, and represent a starting point for the subsequent recovery of postural functions.

  15. Total ankle joint replacement.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  16. Primary ankle arthrodesis for neglected open Weber B ankle fracture dislocation.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Katherine; Ramesh, Ashwanth; McGoldrick, Niall; Cove, Richard; Walsh, James C; Stephens, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Primary ankle arthrodesis used to treat a neglected open ankle fracture dislocation is a unique decision. A 63-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a 5-day-old open fracture dislocation of his right ankle. After thorough soft tissue debridement, primary arthrodesis of the tibiotalar joint was performed using initial Kirschner wire fixation and an external fixator. Definitive soft tissue coverage was later achieved using a latissimus dorsi free flap. The fusion was consolidated to salvage the limb from amputation. The use of primary arthrodesis to treat a compound ankle fracture dislocation has not been previously described.

  17. Treatment of common deficits associated with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Alison; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2009-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are amongst the most common injuries incurred by athletes, with the high rate of reoccurrence after initial injury becoming of great concern. Chronic ankle instability (CAI) refers to the development of repetitive ankle sprains and persistent residual symptoms post-injury. Some of the initial symptoms that occur in acute sprains may persist for at least 6 months post-injury in the absence of recurrent sprains, despite the athlete having returned to full functional activity. CAI is generally thought to be caused by mechanical instability (MI) or functional instability (FI), or both. Although previously discussed as separate entities, recent research has demonstrated that deficits associated with both MI and FI may co-exist to result in CAI. For clinicians, the main deficits associated with CAI include deficits in proprioception, neuromuscular control, strength and postural control. Based on the literature reviewed, it does seem that subjects with CAI have a deficit in frontal plane ankle joint positional sense. Subjects with CAI do not appear to exhibit any increased latency in the peroneal muscles in response to an external perturbation. Preliminary data suggest that feed-forward neuromuscular control may be more important than feed-back neuromuscular control and interventions are now required to address deficits in feed-forward neuromuscular control. Balance training protocols have consistently been shown to improve postural stability in subjects with CAI. Subjects with CAI do not experience decreased peroneus longus strength, but instead may experience strength deficits in the ankle joint invertor muscles. These findings are of great clinical significance in terms of understanding the mechanisms and deficits associated with CAI. An appreciation of these is vital to allow clinicians to develop effective prevention and treatment programmes in relation to CAI.

  18. Subperiosteal Hematoma of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S H; Lui, T H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periosteal reaction has a long list of differential diagnoses ranging from trauma, infection, metabolic disease to malignancy. The morphology of periosteal reaction shown in imaging studies helps to narrow down the list of differential diagnoses. Case report: A 25 year old gentleman had an inversion injury to his left ankle. He complained of lateral ankle and posterior heel pain and swelling after the injury. Radiograph of his left ankle revealed solid, smooth periosteal reaction at posterior aspect of left distal tibia. MRI showed periosteal reaction at the corresponding site, which was better demonstrated in CT scan. Follow up MRI and CT showed maturation of the new bone formation at the site of periosteal reaction. Findings were compatible with subperiosteal hematoma formation from injury, which ossified with time. Conclusion: Smooth, thick periosteal reaction favours benign process, while interrupted pattern is an alarming feature for more aggressive causes. PMID:27299131

  19. A case of acute tarsal tunnel syndrome following lateralizing calcaneal osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Walls, Raymond J; Chan, Jeremy Y; Ellis, Scott J

    2015-03-01

    Surgical correction of hindfoot varus is frequently performed with a lateral displacement calcaneal osteotomy. It has rarely been associated with iatrogenic tarsal tunnel syndrome in patients with pre-existing neurological disease. We report the first case of acute postoperative tarsal tunnel syndrome in a neurologically intact patient with post-traumatic hindfoot varus. Early diagnosis and emergent operative release afforded an excellent clinical outcome. Imaging studies can help outrule a compressive hematoma and assess for possible nerve transection; however it is paramount that a high index of suspicion is utilized with judicious operative intervention to minimize long-term sequelae.

  20. Foot and ankle injuries in theatrical dancers.

    PubMed

    Hardaker, W T; Margello, S; Goldner, J L

    1985-10-01

    The theatrical dancer is a unique combination of athlete and artist. The physical demands of dance class, rehearsal, and performance can lead to injury, particularly to the foot and ankle. Ankle sprains are the most common acute injury. Chronic injuries predominate and relate primarily to the repeated impact loading of the foot and ankle on the dance floor. Contributing factors include anatomic variation, improper technique, and fatigue. Early and aggressive conservative management is usually successful and surgery is rarely indicated. Orthotics play a limited but potentially useful role in treatment. Following treatment, a structured rehabilitation program is fundamental to the successful return to dance.

  1. Misdiagnosis of Talar Body or Neck Fractures as Ankle Sprains in Low Energy Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki-Won; Kim, Jin-Su; Cho, Hun-Ki; Choo, Ho-Sik; Park, Jang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The talus has a very complex anatomical morphology and is mainly fractured by a major force caused by a fall or a traffic accident. Therefore, a talus fracture is not common. However, many recent reports have shown that minor injuries, such as sprains and slips during sports activities, can induce a talar fracture especially in the lateral or posterior process. Still, fractures to the main parts of the talus (neck and body) after ankle sprains have not been reported as occult fractures. Methods Of the total 102 cases from January 2005 to December 2012, 7 patients had confirmed cases of missed/delayed diagnosis of a talus body or neck fracture and were included in the study population. If available, medical records, X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging of the confirmed cases were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Results In the 7-patient population, there were 3 talar neck fractures and 4 talar body fractures (coronal shearing type). The mechanisms of injuries were all low energy trauma episodes. The causes of the injuries included twisting of the ankle during climbing (n = 2), jumping to the ground from a 1-m high wall (n = 2), and twisting of the ankle during daily activities (n = 3). Conclusions A talar body fracture and a talar neck fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute and chronic ankle pain after a minor ankle injury. PMID:27583114

  2. Minimum reporting standards for copers in chronic ankle instability research.

    PubMed

    Wikstrom, Erik A; Brown, Cathleen N

    2014-02-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LASs) are among the most common sports-related injuries and a high percentage of individuals who sprain their ankle go on to develop chronic ankle instability (CAI). The condition of CAI is often classified as having pain, loss of function, and a restriction of, or failure to, return to levels of previous activity. Historically, uninjured healthy controls are used as a comparison group to study the biomechanical and neuromuscular consequences of CAI. However, this model is not ideal to determine why a portion of the population experiencing an ankle sprain does not recover. A more appropriate comparison may be individuals who had an ankle sprain, and thus the exposure, but did not go on to develop CAI (i.e., copers). Thus, the purpose of this review was to determine the existing discrepancies and common standards in definitions of, terminology used for, and the inclusionary/exclusionary criteria used to describe copers within the CAI literature. Multiple databases were searched by keywords and specific authors. Potential studies were screened independently by both authors. Inclusion criteria consisted of an explicit definition of copers and explicit inclusionary/exclusionary criteria. A total of 21 studies were included in the current study and had four outcomes extracted: (1) the definition of copers; (2) the terminology used; (3) specific inclusionary/exclusionary criteria; and (4) injury characteristics of the copers. Based on the included operational definitions, it is recommend that future operational definitions of copers include three key components: (1) an initial LAS; (2) subsequent lack of CAI symptoms (i.e., no complaints of disability or giving way); and (3) a time since injury component. The term coper was overwhelming used within the existing literature (n = 15) and is thus recommended to be used in future studies when describing individuals who have suffered an LAS but failed to develop CAI. Minimal inclusionary criteria should

  3. Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index and C-Reactive Protein Are Useful Parameters for Identification of Ischemic Heart Disease in Acute Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kiuchi, Shunsuke; Hisatake, Shinji; Kabuki, Takayuki; Oka, Takashi; Dobashi, Shintaro; Fujii, Takahiro; Ikeda, Takanori

    2017-01-01

    Background The most common cause of heart failure (HF) is ischemic heart disease (IHD). Evaluation of IHD with non-invasive examinations is useful for the treatment of HF, and cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is a good parameter for detecting systemic arteriosclerosis. However, the relationship between IHD and CAVI in acute HF (AHF) patients is still unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effect of non-invasive examinations, including CAVI to detect IHD. Methods We studied 53 consecutive patients (average age of 66.5 ± 10.9 years old, 36 males) with AHF from January 2009 to December 2012. These patients were classified into the IHD group (n = 19) and non-IHD group (n = 34) according to the coronary artery angiography results. We evaluated the vital signs, laboratory findings and CAVI. Results According to the laboratory findings, the C-reactive protein (CRP) in IHD group was significantly higher than non-IHD group (1.5 ± 2.1 mg/dL vs. 0.4 ± 0.4 mg/dL, P = 0.002). CAVI in IHD group was significantly higher than non-IHD group (9.58 ± 1.73 vs. 7.83 ± 1.86, P < 0.001). In the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for discriminating the probability of IHD, the cut-off point of the CRP plus CAVI was 9.00. At that cut-off point, the sensitivity and the specificity were 69.7% and 89.5%, respectively. The mean area under the ROC curve (AUC) defined by the CRP plus CAVI was the greatest at all parameters. Conclusion The CRP and CAVI were useful parameters for the identification of IHD in patients with AHF. PMID:28392865

  4. Bilateral ankle edema with bilateral iritis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil

    2007-07-01

    I report two patient presented to me with bilateral symmetrical ankle edema and bilateral acute iritis. A 42-year-old female of Indian origin and 30-year-old female from Somalia both presented with bilateral acute iritis. In the first patient, bilateral ankle edema preceded the onset of bilateral acute iritis. Bilateral ankle edema developed during the course of disease after onset of ocular symptoms in the second patient. Both patients did not suffer any significant ocular problem in the past, and on systemic examination, all clinical parameters were within normal limit. Lacrimal gland and conjunctival nodule biopsy established the final diagnosis of sarcoidosis in both cases, although the chest x-rays were normal.

  5. A review of ligament augmentation with the InternalBrace™: the surgical principle is described for the lateral ankle ligament and ACL repair in particular, and a comprehensive review of other surgical applications and techniques is presented.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Gordon M; Blyth, Mark J G; Anthony, Iain; Hopper, Graeme P; Ribbans, William J

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the surgical decision-making considerations when preparing to undertake an anatomic ligament repair with augmentation using the InternalBrace™. Lateral ankle ligament stabilization of the Broström variety and ACL repair in particular are used to illustrate its application. The InternalBrace™ supports early mobilization of the repaired ligament and allows the natural tissues to progressively strengthen. The principle established by this experience has resulted in its successful application to other distal extremity ligaments including the deltoid, spring, and syndesmosis complex. Knee ligament augmentation with the InternalBrace™ has been successfully applied to all knee ligaments including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial collateral ligament (MCL), lateral collateral ligament (LCL), anterolateral ligament (ALL), and patellofemoral ligament (PFL). The surgical technique and early results will be reviewed including multi-ligament presentations. Upper limb experience with acromioclavicular (AC) joint augmentation and ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) repair of the elbow with the InternalBrace™ will also be discussed. This article points to a change in orthopaedic practice positioning reconstruction as a salvage procedure that has additional surgical morbidity and should be indicated only if the tissues fail to heal adequately after augmentation and repair.

  6. Preparatory co-activation of the ankle muscles may prevent ankle inversion injuries.

    PubMed

    DeMers, Matthew S; Hicks, Jennifer L; Delp, Scott L

    2017-02-08

    Ankle inversion sprains are the most frequent acute musculoskeletal injuries occurring in physical activity. Interventions that retrain muscle coordination have helped rehabilitate injured ankles, but it is unclear which muscle coordination strategies, if any, can prevent ankle sprains. The purpose of this study was to determine whether coordinated activity of the ankle muscles could prevent excessive ankle inversion during a simulated landing on a 30° incline. We used a set of musculoskeletal simulations to evaluate the efficacy of two strategies for coordinating the ankle evertor and invertor muscles during simulated landing scenarios: planned co-activation and stretch reflex activation with physiologic latency (60-ms delay). A full-body musculoskeletal model of landing was used to generate simulations of a subject dropping onto an inclined surface with each coordination condition. Within each condition, the intensity of evertor and invertor co-activity or stretch reflexes were varied systematically. The simulations revealed that strong preparatory co-activation of the ankle evertors and invertors prior to ground contact prevented ankle inversion from exceeding injury thresholds by rapidly generating eversion moments after initial contact. Conversely, stretch reflexes were too slow to generate eversion moments before the simulations reached the threshold for inversion injury. These results suggest that training interventions to protect the ankle should focus on stiffening the ankle with muscle co-activation prior to landing. The musculoskeletal models, controllers, software, and simulation results are freely available online at http://simtk.org/home/ankle-sprains, enabling others to reproduce the results and explore new injury scenarios and interventions.

  7. Snowboarders' ankle.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Irene Fleur; Brouwers, Lars; Brink, Peter R G; Poeze, Martijn

    2014-10-29

    In this case study we report a fracture of the lateral process of the talus (LPF) in a snowboarder. The fracture is frequently overlooked initially, due to subtle clinical and radiological findings and a low incidence rate. However, LPF are associated with significant morbidity when missed. To address this, we report one case of a patient with a LPF and provide a review of the available literature.

  8. Naproxen Twice Daily Versus as Needed (PRN) Dosing: Efficacy and Tolerability for Treatment of Acute Ankle Sprain, a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hajimaghsoudi, Majid; Jalili, Mohammad; Mokhtari, Mehdi; Nejati, Amir; Mesbahi, Javad; Paydary, Koosha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of naproxen 500 mg twice daily (BID) versus naproxen 500 mg as needed (PRN) for treatment of ankle sprain. Methods In this seven-day, randomized, parallel group trial, 135 patients with ankle sprain occurring less than 48 hours prior to the first dose of study medication were randomized to receive naproxen 500 mg BID (67 patients) and naproxen 500 mg as needed (PRN) (68 patients). The ankle pain was assessed at rest and on full weight bearing using Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) from 0 (no pain) to 10 (the worst imaginable pain). Ankle swelling was assessed as a 4-point scale ranging from 0 (no swelling) to 3 (severe swelling) rated by the investigator. The primary efficacy end point was the patient's assessment of ankle pain via NRS and the degree of swelling on day seven. Results Results showed a significant decrease in pain on weight bearing, pain at rest and the extent of swelling (P<0.001) in both groups, but there was no substantial difference between the two groups (P>0.05) after seven days. Assessing the safety profile of the two different dosing, 13.3% of the naproxen BID group and 6.7% of the as needed group had adverse events, showing that the as needed regimen was safer (P<0.001). Conclusion Results showed that naproxen as needed may reduce the pain and edema of the sprained ankle with no significant difference compared to the BID regimen, while it possesses better safety profile and lower total drug use. PMID:24799999

  9. Progressive valgus angulation of the ankle secondary to loss of fibular congruity treated with medial tibial hemiepiphysiodesis and fibular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lesiak, Alex C; Esposito, Paul W

    2014-06-01

    The fibula is an important stabilizer of the lateral ankle. Discontinuity of the fibular shaft can lead to progressive pain and shortening of the fibula, ultimately causing loss of lateral support to the ankle. Two children, who sustained segmental bone loss of the shaft of the fibula, developed progressive symptomatic valgus of the ankle with widening of the mortice and lateral subluxation of the talus. Both patients were treated with fibular plating and grafting with tricalcium sulfate with acute reconstitution of fibular length. Distal medial tibial hemiepiphysiodesis was simultaneously performed. One patient required revision plating and grafting 14 months after the index surgery because of plate failure. The valgus angulation and the widened medial mortice were corrected in the ankles of both patients, who returned to full activities. The patients were followed to maturity; the correction has been maintained, and they remain asymptomatic. The technique used in these cases can correct valgus angulation secondary to loss of fibular congruity rather than only halting progression of the deformity.

  10. Management of Osseous and Soft-Tissue Ankle Equinus During Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Simonson, Devin C

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining functional alignment of a total ankle replacement, including physiologic sagittal plane range of motion, is paramount for a successful outcome. This article reviews the literature on techniques available for correction of osseous and soft-tissue equinus at the time of index total ankle replacement. These techniques include anterior tibiotalar joint cheilectomy, posterior superficial muscle compartment lengthening, posterior ankle capsule release, and release of the posterior portions of the medial and lateral collateral ligament complexes. The rationale for these procedures and the operative sequence of events for these procedures are presented.

  11. The proportion of distal fibula Salter-Harris type I epiphyseal fracture in the paediatric population with acute ankle injury: a prospective MRI study.

    PubMed

    Hofsli, Mikael; Torfing, Trine; Al-Aubaidi, Zaid

    2016-03-01

    Ankle injuries are common among the paediatric population. There are few prospective studies utilizing MRI to diagnose a clinically suspected Salter-Harris type I of the distal fibula (SH1FDF). The aim of this study was to examine the proportion of clinically suspected SH1FDF in children. All paediatric patients with ankle injury, seen at the emergency room from September 2012 to May 2013 at a single institution, underwent a standardized clinical examination, and their radiographs were obtained if found necessary. All images and data were recorded prospectively and patients suspected of having SH1FDF were referred for MRI of the ankle joint. Out of 391 paediatric patients seen at the emergency room with ankle injury, 38 patients had a clinical suspicion of SH1FDF. A total of 31 patients, 18 male and 13 female, with a mean age of 10 ± 2.86 years, were included in the study. Only seven patients were excluded from the study. MRI was obtained on an average of 6.9 ± 2.87 days. None of the included patients had evidence of SH1FDF on MRI. Our study and review of the literature verifies the high false-positive rate of clinically suspected SH1FDF. Most children had ligamentous lesions, bone contusion or joint effusion, rather than SH1FDF.

  12. Neuromuscular control and rehabilitation of the unstable ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hung, You-jou

    2015-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is a common orthopedic injury with a very high recurrence rate in athletes. After decades of research, it is still unclear what contributes to the high recurrence rate of ankle sprain, and what is the most effective intervention to reduce the incident of initial and recurrent injuries. In addition, clinicians often implement balance training as part of the rehabilitation protocol in hopes of enhancing the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint. However, there is no consensus on whether the neuromuscular control and proprioception are compromised in unstable ankles. To reduce the prevalence of ankle sprains, the effectiveness of engaging balance training to enhance the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint is also questionable. PMID:26085985

  13. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  14. Ankle injuries. Tips from sports medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Swain, R A; Holt, W S

    1993-02-15

    In dealing with an ankle sprain, worrisome features are few but important to recognize. A "pop" heard or felt at the time of injury, a prolonged course, or a history of several previous injuries are all of concern. Medial tenderness on palpation, positive results on a squeeze test, or markedly positive results on stress testing are also indicators of severe injuries, which may require referral for treatment. Stress testing by an experienced clinician is appropriate for chronic or severe cases. Otherwise, treatment of the acute, uncomplicated ankle injury is straightforward, focusing on early mobilization, rehabilitation, and protection.

  15. A novel method of reduction for first-time acute lateral patellar dislocations in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ong, Gene Yong-Kwang

    2016-03-01

    Five pediatric patients with acute traumatic "first-time" lateral patellar dislocations were successfully reduced using a novel, atraumatic, and simple technique. Uniquely, unlike the traditional method of patellar reduction, the patellar dislocations were reduced without any direct manipulation of the patella. In co-operative patients, no analgesia was required. Further validation of the reproducibility of the effectiveness of this method for successful patellar reduction in pediatric and adult populations are required.

  16. Rehabilitation of Syndesmotic (High) Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Glenn N.; Allen, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: High ankle sprains are common in athletes who play contact sports. Most high ankle sprains are treated nonsurgically with a rehabilitation program. Evidence Acquisition: All years of PUBMED, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL PLUS, SPORTDiscuss, Google Scholar, and Web of Science were searched to August 2010, cross-referencing existing publications. Keywords included syndesmosis ankle sprain or high ankle sprain and the following terms: rehabilitation, treatment, cryotherapy, braces, orthosis, therapeutic modalities, joint mobilization, massage, pain, pain medications, TENS (ie, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation), acupuncture, aquatic therapy, strength, neuromuscular training, perturbation training, and outcomes. Results: Level of evidence, 5. A 3-phase rehabilitation program is described. The acute phase is directed at protecting the joint while minimizing pain, inflammation, muscle weakness, and loss of motion. Most patients are treated with some form of immobilization and have weightbearing restrictions. A range of therapeutic modalities are used to minimize pain and inflammation. Gentle mobilization and resistance exercises are used to gain mobility and maintain muscle size and strength. The subacute phase is directed at normalizing range of motion, strength, and function in activities of daily living. Progressive mobilization and strengthening are hallmarks of this phase. Neuromuscular training is begun and becomes the central component of rehabilitation. The advanced training phase focuses on preparing the patient for return to sports participation. Perturbation of support surfaces, agility drills, plyometrics, and sport-specific training are central components of this phase. Conclusion: The rehabilitation guidelines discussed may assist clinicians in managing syndesmotic ankle sprains. PMID:23015976

  17. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Malleolar fracture; Tri-malleolar; Bi-malleolar; Distal tibia fracture; Distal fibula fracture; Malleolus fracture ... Some ankle fractures may require surgery when: The ends of the bone are out of line with each other (displaced). The ...

  18. Thirty Years Later: Evolution of Treatment for Acute Left Main Coronary Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Dov, Nissan; Karkabi, Basheer; Jaffe, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Acute occlusion of left main coronary artery is a catastrophic event. We describe two patients with acute occlusion of the left main coronary artery treated thirty years apart. The first patient was treated in 1982 and survived the event without revascularization but developed severe heart failure. His survival was so unusual that it merited a case report at that time. The second patient was treated at the end of 2015. Early revascularization resulted in myocardial reperfusion and near normal left ventricular function. These patients exemplify the progress in therapeutic cardiology over the last 30 years. PMID:28078145

  19. Stresses in the ankle joint and total ankle replacement design.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Rahul; Siddique, M S

    2011-06-01

    The ankle is a highly congruent joint with a surface area of 11-13 cm(2). Total ankle replacements have been attempted since the early 1970s and design has continually evolved as the early designs were a failure. This was because the stresses involved and the mutiaxial motion of the ankle has not been understood until recently. It has been shown that the talus slides as well as rolls during the ankle arc of motion from plantarflexion to dorsiflexion. Furthermore, the articular surfaces and the calcaneofibular and tibiocalcaneal ligaments have been shown to form a four bar linkage dictating ankle motion. A new design ankle replacement has been suggested recently which allows multiaxial motion at the ankle while maintaining congruency throughout the arc of motion. The early results of this ankle replacement have been encouraging without any reported failures due to mechanical loosening.

  20. Arthroscopic Management of Posteromedial Ankle Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Posteromedial ankle impingement is a rare clinical entity. It usually follows an inversion injury, with compression of the posterior tibiotalar ligament between the medial malleolus and talus. This can be treated by posterior ankle endoscopy through the posteromedial and posterolateral portals. The flexor hallucis longus tendon can be examined for any tenosynovitis or tendinopathy. The posteromedial corner of the ankle joint is reached with the instruments staying on the lateral side of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. The inflamed synovium, scar tissue, and fibrillated cartilage are debrided. PMID:26697299

  1. Arthroscopic Management of Posteromedial Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Posteromedial ankle impingement is a rare clinical entity. It usually follows an inversion injury, with compression of the posterior tibiotalar ligament between the medial malleolus and talus. This can be treated by posterior ankle endoscopy through the posteromedial and posterolateral portals. The flexor hallucis longus tendon can be examined for any tenosynovitis or tendinopathy. The posteromedial corner of the ankle joint is reached with the instruments staying on the lateral side of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. The inflamed synovium, scar tissue, and fibrillated cartilage are debrided.

  2. [Arthroscopically assisted treatment of ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Braunstein, M; Baumbach, S F; Böcker, W; Mutschler, W; Polzer, H

    2016-02-01

    Acute ankle fractures are one of the most common fractures in adults with an incidence of 0.1-0.2 % per year. Operative treatment by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is the standard method of treatment for unstable or dislocated fractures. The main goal of the operation is the anatomical realignment of the joint and restoration of ankle stability; nevertheless, anatomical reduction does not automatically lead to favorable clinical results. According to several studies the mid-term and in particular the long-term outcome following operative treatment is often poor with residual symptoms including chronic pain, stiffness, recurrent swelling and ankle instability. There is growing evidence that this poor outcome might be related to occult intra-articular injuries involving cartilage and soft tissues. In recent studies the frequency of fracture-related osteochondral lesions was reported to be approximately 64 %. By physical examination, standard radiography or even computed tomography (CT), these intra-articular pathologies cannot be reliably diagnosed; therefore, many authors emphasize the value of ankle arthroscopy in acute fracture treatment as it has become a safe and effective diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Arthroscopically assisted open reduction and internal fixation (AORIF) allows control of the reduction as well examination of all intra-articular structures. If necessary, intra-articular pathologies can be addressed by removing ruptured ligaments and loose bodies, performing chondroplasty or microfracturing. So far there is no evidence that supplementary ankle arthroscopy increases the complication rate. On the other hand, the positive effect of AORIF has also not been clearly documented; nevertheless, there are clear indications that arthroscopically assisted fracture treatment is beneficial, especially in complex fractures.

  3. Reverse sural flap for ankle and heel soft tissues reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ciofu, RN; Zamfirescu, DG; Popescu, SA; Lascar, I

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The potential of the medial calf integument, as donor site for a free flap based on musculocutaneous branches of the medial sural artery, was first identified by Taylor and Daniel, following cadaver investigation. In 1981, Pontén described the fasciocutaneous sural flap as a reconstructive option for soft tissue loss of the lower extremity, particularly around the knee. Two years later, Donski and Fogdestram presented the distally based fasciocutaneous flap from the sural region followed by Montegut and Allen who considered the sural artery perforator flap as a viable alternative for the gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap. The sural flap proved a considerable versatility at the level of the lower leg (from the knee to the ankle and heel) as well as for other anatomical regions. The most common usage of the flap is for the distal-third defects of the leg. Materials and method: A group of 10 patients with soft tissue losses at the ankle or heal due to a various etiopathogeny represented by cancer excision, trauma, unstable scars, chronic osteomyelitis, in which a microsurgical free transfer had no indication or was not wanted, was presented. Our group reported a 30% complication rate in a high-risk patient population, including patients with diabetes mellitus, peripheral vascular disease, and venous insufficiency. Results: All the defects were covered successfully, without major complications. Usually, only a minor margin of the tip of the flap was lost, which was easily solved with a guided secondary healing. Most flaps showed a slight venous congestion, which cleared in a few days. The functional result was very good in all the patients, while the aesthetic appearance was acceptable even in female patients. Discussion: An ideal indication of a reverse sural flap may be a defect over an intact but partially exposed Achilles tendon. Conclusions: The sural reverse flap is useful in the ankle and foot soft tissues reconstruction whenever we have reasons not

  4. Broken Ankle/Broken Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... not warming up and stretching, also can cause foot and ankle injuries. Work in certain occupations. Certain work environments, such ... too little light may lead to falls and foot and ankle injuries. Have certain conditions. Having fragile bones (osteoporosis) or ...

  5. Symptomatic anterior subtalar arthrosis after ankle arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-05-13

    A 76-year-old man reported right lateral heel pain 11 years after ankle arthrodesis. Clinically, there was tenderness in the right sinus tarsi and over the junction point between the talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints. Radiographs showed that the joint spaces of the posterior subtalar joint and the talonavicular joint were preserved although there were osteophytes at both joints. Arthroscopic findings showed degeneration of the anterior subtalar and talonavicular joints. The symptoms subsided after arthroscopic debridement.

  6. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  7. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  8. Acute Effects of Lateral Thigh Foam Rolling on Arterial Tissue Perfusion Determined by Spectral Doppler and Power Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hotfiel, Thilo; Swoboda, Bernd; Krinner, Sebastian; Grim, Casper; Engelhardt, Martin; Uder, Michael; Heiss, Rafael U

    2017-04-01

    Hotfiel, T, Swoboda, B, Krinner, S, Grim, C, Engelhardt, M, Uder, M, and Heiss, R. Acute effects of lateral thigh foam rolling on arterial tissue perfusion determined by spectral Doppler and power Doppler ultrasound. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 893-900, 2017-Foam rolling has been developed as a popular intervention in training and rehabilitation. However, evidence on its effects on the cellular and physiological level is lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of foam rolling on arterial blood flow of the lateral thigh. Twenty-one healthy participants (age, 25 ± 2 years; height, 177 ± 9 cm; body weight, 74 ± 9 kg) were recruited from the medical and sports faculty. Arterial tissue perfusion was determined by spectral Doppler and power Doppler ultrasound, represented as peak flow (Vmax), time average velocity maximum (TAMx), time average velocity mean (TAMn), and resistive index (RI), and with semiquantitative grading that was assessed by 4 blindfolded investigators. Measurement values were assessed under resting conditions and twice after foam rolling exercises of the lateral thigh (0 and 30 minutes after intervention). The trochanteric region, mid portion, and distal tibial insertion of the lateral thigh were representative for data analysis. Arterial blood flow of the lateral thigh increased significantly after foam rolling exercises compared with baseline (p ≤ 0.05). We detected a relative increase in Vmax of 73.6% (0 minutes) and 52.7% (30 minutes) (p < 0.001), in TAMx of 53.2% (p < 0.001) and 38.3% (p = 0.002), and in TAMn of 84.4% (p < 0.001) and 68.2% (p < 0.001). Semiquantitative power Doppler scores at all portions revealed increased average grading of 1.96 after intervention and 2.04 after 30 minutes compared with 0.75 at baseline. Our results may contribute to the understanding of local physiological reactions to self-myofascial release.

  9. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    PubMed

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted.

  10. Treatment of PCL, ACL, and lateral-side knee injuries: acute and chronic.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce A; Stuart, Michael J

    2012-09-01

    Combined posterior cruciate ligament, anterior cruciate ligament, and lateral-side disruption is one of the more common patterns of multiligament knee injury. This is a devastating injury with significant long-term functional sequelae, making accurate diagnosis and management extremely important. While surgical intervention is necessary to restore function, the specific management strategies remain controversial. This article will review the current literature and the authors' preferred approach including physical examination, imaging, timing of surgery, surgical technique, and postoperative rehabilitation.

  11. Ultrasound of ankle and foot: overuse and sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Viviane; Guillin, Raphaël; Dhanju, Jag; Cardinal, Etienne

    2007-06-01

    Sports and overuse injuries of the ankle and foot are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Ultrasound (US) has been established as an excellent diagnostic modality for foot and ankle injuries, providing a rapid noninvasive, economical, and readily available tool that is well tolerated by the patient with acute or chronic pain. The opportunity for dynamic examination is another advantage of US in evaluating ankle and foot pathology, where maneuvers such as muscle contraction and stressing of the joint may be particularly helpful. In many cases, US can be used as a first-line and only imaging modality for diagnosis. This article focuses on ankle disorders related to sports or overuse that affect tendons, including tendinosis, tenosynovitis, paratendinitis, rupture, dislocation, and ligaments that are commonly torn. The sonographic features of certain common foot disorders related to physical activity and overuse are also discussed, including plantar fasciitis, Morton's neuroma, stress fractures, and plantar plate injury.

  12. Public Health Lessons from Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome a Decade Later

    PubMed Central

    Butler-Jones, David; Tsang, Thomas; Yu, Wang

    2013-01-01

    The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in 2002–2003 exacted considerable human and economic costs from countries involved. It also exposed major weaknesses in several of these countries in coping with an outbreak of a newly emerged infectious disease. In the 10 years since the outbreak, in addition to the increase in knowledge of the biology and epidemiology of this disease, a major lesson learned is the value of having a national public health institute that is prepared to control disease outbreaks and designed to coordinate a national response and assist localities in their responses. PMID:23739634

  13. Current thoughts on ankle arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ritterman, Scott A; Fellars, Todd A; Digiovanni, Christopher W

    2013-03-01

    The ankle is the most commonly injured joint in athletic and work activities. In contrast, osteoarthritis of the ankle joint is relatively rare and is typically post-traumatic or inflammatory in nature. Common symptoms that prompt an orthopaedic consultation include pain, disability and altered gait mechanics. Non-operative management has been the mainstay for previously undiagnosed patients. For those with advanced disease, ankle fusion or total ankle replacement may be the only surgical options. Though some recent studies have shown patients' preference for a well functioning ankle replacement, significant long- term follow-up data is lacking.

  14. Ankle sprain - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100209.htm Ankle sprain - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  15. Foot and ankle injuries in dance.

    PubMed

    Brown, Treg D; Micheli, Lyle J

    2004-06-01

    This review focuses on many of the foot and ankle injuries commonly seen among dancers. These unique athletes place extreme demands on their musculoskeletal system and thereby face a variety of acute and overuse injuries. Conservative treatment is successful in the majority of cases, but these patients often continue to dance while healing--commonly prolonging and at times complicating treatment. When surgery is being contemplated, the dancer's performance level and expectations about returning to dance after surgery should be thoroughly explored. Foot and ankle surgeries that routinely yield good to excellent results in the general population can prematurely end a dancer's otherwise promising career. The physician must consider all these factors when designing an appropriate treatment plan for a dancer.

  16. Diminished Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes in Young Adults With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Snell, Shannon; Handsfield, Geoffrey G.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Wombacher, Emily; Fry, Rachel; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Park, Joseph S.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    % CIs that did not overlap. No other significant differences were identified. Conclusion: Patients with CAI demonstrate atrophy of intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle musculature accompanied by lower ankle strength. Clinical Relevance: Clinicians should be aware of the muscle atrophy and strength deficits when prescribing rehabilitation for patients with lateral ankle sprain or CAI. PMID:27570782

  17. Decompression of Posterior Ankle Impingement With Concomitant Anterior Ankle Pathology by Posterior Ankle Arthroscopy in the Supine Position.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle endoscopy is a safe and effective approach for treatment of posterior ankle impingement. This is usually performed with the patient in prone position. The purpose of this technical note is to describe an arthroscopic approach of decompression of posterior ankle impingement with the patient in supine position. This is indicated if there is posterior ankle impingement together with other ankle pathology requiring anterior ankle arthroscopy. This approach allows treatment of both anterior ankle and posterior ankle pathology with the patient in the supine position. Concomitant anterior ankle arthroscopy can be performed with the usual orientation without the need of change of patient's position.

  18. Functional instability in non-contact ankle ligament injuries

    PubMed Central

    Rose, A.; Lee, R.; Williams, R.; Thomson, L.; Forsyth, A.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To measure objectively functional standing balance in the acute stages of non-contact ankle sprain, and to compare patients with controls. Methods—A Chattanooga balance machine was used to measure postural stability in patients with acute ankle sprain and uninjured controls over a two week period, in one and two legged stance, with eyes open and closed. Participants also completed the Olerud and Molander questionnaire to provide a subjective measure of ankle function. Results—There was a highly significant improvement in questionnaire scores for the patients during the study period (p<0.0001). Patients appeared to be less stable than controls in all balance tests, although the difference did not reach significance. There was evidence of improvement over time in the number of tests successfully completed on the injured leg in single legged stance with eyes closed (p = 0.043) between visits 1 and 3. Conclusions—The patient group showed a subjective improvement, which supports clinical experience of treating acute ankle injuries. There is some evidence that on average the patient group appeared to be less stable than controls in all balance tests, although the difference did not reach statistical significance, even on the uninjured leg. There is a need to carry out further studies to confirm the results found in this pilot study and to investigate the hypotheses generated. It would be useful to evaluate a simple test that could be used clinically to monitor progress after ankle injury, and also to identify athletes with decreased functional stability, who may be more at risk of sustaining ankle injury. Key Words: balance; ankle; sprain; postural stability; injury prevention PMID:11049145

  19. Spatio-temporal processing of words and nonwords: hemispheric laterality and acute alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Marinkovic, Ksenija; Rosen, Burke Q.; Cox, Brendan; Hagler, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined neurofunctional correlates of reading by modulating semantic, lexical, and orthographic attributes of letter strings. It compared the spatio-temporal activity patterns elicited by real words (RW), pseudowords, orthographically regular, pronounceable nonwords (PN) that carry no meaning, and orthographically illegal, nonpronounceable nonwords (NN). A double-duty lexical decision paradigm instructed participants to detect RW while ignoring nonwords and to additionally respond to words that refer to animals (AW). Healthy social drinkers (N=22) participated in both alcohol (0.6 g/kg ethanol for men, 0.55 g/kg for women) and placebo conditions in a counterbalanced design. Whole-head MEG signals were analyzed with an anatomically-constrained MEG method. Simultaneously acquired ERPs confirm previous evidence. Spatio-temporal MEG estimates to RW and PN are consistent with the highly replicable left-lateralized ventral visual processing stream. However, the PN elicit weaker activity than other stimuli starting at ~230 ms and extending to the M400 (magnetic equivalent of N400) in the left lateral temporal area, indicating their reduced access to lexicosemantic stores. In contrast, the NN uniquely engage the right hemisphere during the M400. Increased demands on lexicosemantic access imposed by AW result in greater activity in the left temporal cortex starting at ~230 ms and persisting through the M400 and response preparation stages. Alcohol intoxication strongly attenuates early visual responses occipito-temporally overall. Subsequently, alcohol selectively affects the left prefrontal cortex as a function of orthographic and semantic dimensions, suggesting that it modulates the dynamics of the lexicosemantic processing in a top-down manner, by increasing difficulty of semantic retrieval. PMID:24565928

  20. Arthroscopic Capsular Release of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the ankle is also known as frozen ankle and results in marked fibrosis and contracture of the ankle capsule. Arthroscopic capsular release is indicated for symptomatic frozen ankle that is resistant to conservative treatment. It is contraindicated for ankle stiffness due to degenerative joint disease, intra-articular malunion, or adhesion of the extensors of the ankle. The procedure consists of endoscopic posterior ankle capsulectomy and arthroscopic anterior ankle capsulotomy. It has the advantages of being minimally invasive surgery and allowing early postoperative vigorous mobilization of the ankle joint.

  1. Movements causing ankle fractures in parachuting.

    PubMed Central

    Ellitsgaard, N; Warburg, F

    1989-01-01

    The parachutist injured in a dramatic accident often describes the injury in an incomplete and biased way and evaluation of materials based solely upon subjective information of this kind can be misleading and of no value for recommendations. As the relation between the mechanical factors of the injury and the lesion in ankle fractures is well documented, an investigation of clinical, radiological and operative findings in 46 parachutists with ankle fractures was conducted. Classification was possible in 44 of 46 fractures. The description of the cause of the trauma in 21 supination-eversion fractures and in 13 pronation-eversion fractures was most frequently faulty landing position or obstacles. The cause of seven supination fractures was oscillation of the parachutist whilst descending with sudden impact against the lateral aspect of the foot. For prophylaxis we recommend improvement of landing and steering techniques and the support of semi-calf boots. PMID:2730996

  2. Temporary Sternoclavicular Plating for an Unusual Double Clavicle Fracture (Medial Nonunion, Lateral Acute) Complicated by an Intraoperative Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Skedros, John G.; Knight, Alex N.; Mears, Chad S.; Langston, Tanner D.

    2014-01-01

    Double (segmental) clavicle fractures, involving both the medial and lateral aspects of the clavicle, are very uncommon. Even less common is an asynchronous double fracture with one of the fractures being a nonunion. We report the case of a 30-year-old healthy male patient who had an unusual double clavicle fracture (medial nonunion, lateral acute) that occurred in separate traumatic events during motocross (motorcycle) racing. His fractures were treated surgically in two stages. In the first stage a long reconstruction plate was used that spanned onto the sternum and two transcortical screws were placed into the manubrium to enhance purchase for the deficient bone of the medial clavicle. In accordance with the preoperative plan, the medial one-third of the plate and the medial four screws (of the total 13 used) were removed. Although our patient had an excellent final result, he did have an intraoperative pneumothorax that was treated uneventfully with a chest tube. Medial clavicle fractures are difficult to treat, especially if they are nonunions and surgical complication rates can be high. Our case is one of the few that has been described where temporary sternoclavicular plating was successful in achieving an excellent long-term outcome. PMID:25258689

  3. Diagnosing deltoid injury in ankle fractures: the gravity stress view.

    PubMed

    Michelson, J D; Varner, K E; Checcone, M

    2001-06-01

    In the lateral malleolar ankle fracture without talar shift there is much uncertainty regarding the diagnosis of deltoid ligament injury severe enough to require surgical treatment. The current study evaluated the mechanical integrity of the ankle using a novel gravity-stress mortise radiographic view, which is practical for clinical use. Eight cadaveric lower extremities were tested under the following conditions: (1) intact ankle, (2) distal fibular oblique osteotomy, (3) plated fibula after osteotomy, (4) transection of the superficial deltoid with fibula osteotomized or plated, and (5) all possible combinations of deep deltoid transection with superficial deltoid transected or repaired and fibula osteotomized or plated. For each condition, a mortise radiograph was taken of the specimen while it was mounted horizontally, lateral side down. Fibular osteotomy with or without transection of the superficial deltoid did not alter the mortise radiograph appearance of the ankles. With combined deep and superficial deltoid transection and fibular osteotomy, the talus always (eight of eight specimens) showed a lateral shift of 2 mm or greater and a valgus tilt of 15 degrees or more. The gravity stress view of the ankle was found to reproducibly document destabilizing deltoid ligament damage.

  4. Effects of Kinesio taping on joint position sense of the ankle

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun-Do; Kim, Min-Young; Choi, Jung-Eun; Lim, Ga-Hee; Jung, Seong-In; Park, So-Hyun; Cheon, Song-Hee; Lee, Hae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Kinesio taping on the joint position sense of the ankle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 26 nomal adults who had experienced ankle sprain. Kinesio taping was applied over the ankle medial ligament and ankle lateral ligament with eight pattern reinforcement taping. Joint position sense was measured using isokinetic equipment (Biodex System 4 pro dynamometer, Biodex Medical systems Inc., USA) during dorsiflexion/plantarflexion and inversion/eversion, before and after taping. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0 for Windows. [Results] Joint position sense after Kinesio taping was improved in the dorsiflexion and inversion positions. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, Kinesio taping of the ankle is effective for the prevention of ankle sprain. PMID:27190446

  5. US in ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, Lionel; Guillo, Stephane; Meyer, Philippe; Hauger, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Ankle impingement is a common condition occurring secondary to sprain or repeated microtrauma. Clinical symptoms are chronic pain located in the affected region and limited range of ankle motion. There are three types of ankle impingement syndrome: anterior impingement, which can be subdivided into anterolateral, anteromedial and purely anterior impingement; posterior impingement, which can be subdivided into posterior and posteromedial impingement; and calcaneal peroneal impingement which is secondary to planovalgus foot deformity. This paper evaluates physiological and clinical elements of these three types of ankle impingement syndrome as well as the role of ultrasound (US) imaging and US-guided treatment.

  6. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  7. Osteoarthritis of the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  8. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  9. In vitro measurement of intraarticular pressure in the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Suckel, Andreas; Muller, Otto; Wachter, Nikolaus; Kluba, Torsten

    2010-05-01

    Ankle joint affections and injuries are common problems in sports traumatology and in the daily routine of arthroscopic surgeons. However, there is little knowledge regarding intraarticular loads. Pressures on the ankle were determined in a dynamic model on 8 cadaver specimens, applying forces to tendons of the foot over the stance phase under vertical loading. A characteristic course of loading in the tibiotalar joint with a rapid increase upon heel contact was observed. It increased gradually to reach a maximum after 70% of the stance phase, during the push-off phase. The major torque in the ankle joint is located anterolaterally. A dynamic loading curve of the ankle joint can be demonstrated. These observations explain phenomena such as the appearance of osteophytes on the anterior tibia in the case of ankle osteoarthritis and the relatively low incidence of posterior tibial edge fragments in the case of trimalleolar ankle fracture. Furthermore, the medial side of the talus is less loaded compared to the lateral side, which appears relevant to the treatment of osteochondrosis dissecans.

  10. Conservative management of posterior ankle impingement: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Senécal, Isabelle; Richer, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the pain and functional improvements of a patient with posterior ankle impingement following a treatment plan incorporating soft tissue therapy, chiropractic adjustment and a progressive rehabilitation program. Clinical Features: A 37-year- old male presented with posterolateral ankle pain exacerbated by plantar flexion two weeks after sustaining an inversion ankle sprain. Oedema was present and the patient was describing a sensation of instability while walking. The initial diagnosis of lateral ankle sprain was found to be complicated by a posterior ankle impingement caused by a tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus sheath suspected during the physical examination and confirmed by MRI. Intervention and Outcome: The patient was treated over a 14-week period. Soft tissue therapy, a rehabilitation program and cortisone injection were used to treat this condition. A precise description of the rehabilitation program that contains open kinetic chain, closed kinetic chain, proprioception, and conditioning exercises prescribed to the patient is given. After the treatment plan, the patient returned to play pain free and had no daily living restrictions. Summary: A protocol including rest, soft tissue therapy, open and closed kinetic chain exercises, sport-specific exercises and cortisone injection appeared to facilitate complete recovery of this patient’s posterior ankle impingement. PMID:27385836

  11. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Relaxed Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Neurological or biomechanical disorders may distort ankle mechanical impedance and thereby impair locomotor function. This paper presents a quantitative characterization of multivariable ankle mechanical impedance of young healthy subjects when their muscles were relaxed, to serve as a baseline to compare with pathophysiological ankle properties of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. Measurements using a highly backdrivable wearable ankle robot combined with multi-input multi-output stochastic system identification methods enabled reliable characterization of ankle mechanical impedance in two degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) simultaneously, the sagittal and frontal planes. The characterization included important ankle properties unavailable from single DOF studies: coupling between DOFs and anisotropy as a function of frequency. Ankle impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness in both seated (knee flexed) and standing (knee straightened) postures. Stiffness in the sagittal plane was greater than in the frontal plane and furthermore, was greater when standing than when seated, most likely due to the stretch of bi-articular muscles (medial and lateral gastrocnemius). Very low off-diagonal partial coherences implied negligible coupling between dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion. The directions of principal axes were tilted slightly counterclockwise from the original joint coordinates. The directional variation (anisotropy) of ankle impedance in the 2-D space formed by rotations in the sagittal and frontal planes exhibited a characteristic “peanut” shape, weak in inversion-eversion over a wide range of frequencies from the stiffness dominated region up to the inertia dominated region. Implications for the assessment of neurological and biomechanical impairments are discussed. PMID:24686292

  12. Stabilization of a three-dimensional limit cycle walking model through step-to-step ankle control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myunghee; Collins, Steven H

    2013-06-01

    Unilateral, below-knee amputation is associated with an increased risk of falls, which may be partially related to a loss of active ankle control. If ankle control can contribute significantly to maintaining balance, even in the presence of active foot placement, this might provide an opportunity to improve balance using robotic ankle-foot prostheses. We investigated ankle- and hip-based walking stabilization methods in a three-dimensional model of human gait that included ankle plantarflexion, ankle inversion-eversion, hip flexion-extension, and hip ad/abduction. We generated discrete feedback control laws (linear quadratic regulators) that altered nominal actuation parameters once per step. We used ankle push-off, lateral ankle stiffness and damping, fore-aft foot placement, lateral foot placement, or all of these as control inputs. We modeled environmental disturbances as random, bounded, unexpected changes in floor height, and defined balance performance as the maximum allowable disturbance value for which the model walked 500 steps without falling. Nominal walking motions were unstable, but were stabilized by all of the step-to-step control laws we tested. Surprisingly, step-by-step modulation of ankle push-off alone led to better balance performance (3.2% leg length) than lateral foot placement (1.2% leg length) for these control laws. These results suggest that appropriate control of robotic ankle-foot prosthesis push-off could make balancing during walking easier for individuals with amputation.

  13. Behavioral and Autonomic Responses to Acute Restraint Stress Are Segregated within the Lateral Septal Area of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Daniel G.; Scopinho, América A.; Guimarães, Francisco S.; Corrêa, Fernando M. A.; Resstel, Leonardo B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The Lateral Septal Area (LSA) is involved with autonomic and behavior responses associated to stress. In rats, acute restraint (RS) is an unavoidable stress situation that causes autonomic (body temperature, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) increases) and behavioral (increased anxiety-like behavior) changes in rats. The LSA is one of several brain regions that have been involved in stress responses. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the neurotransmission blockade in the LSA would interfere in the autonomic and behavioral changes induced by RS. Methodology/Principal Findings Male Wistar rats with bilateral cannulae aimed at the LSA, an intra-abdominal datalogger (for recording internal body temperature), and an implanted catheter into the femoral artery (for recording and cardiovascular parameters) were used. They received bilateral microinjections of the non-selective synapse blocker cobalt chloride (CoCl2, 1 mM/ 100 nL) or vehicle 10 min before RS session. The tail temperature was measured by an infrared thermal imager during the session. Twenty-four h after the RS session the rats were tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM). Conclusions/Significance Inhibition of LSA neurotransmission reduced the MAP and HR increases observed during RS. However, no changes were observed in the decrease in skin temperature and increase in internal body temperature observed during this period. Also, LSA inhibition did not change the anxiogenic effect induced by RS observed 24 h later in the EPM. The present results suggest that LSA neurotransmission is involved in the cardiovascular but not the temperature and behavioral changes induced by restraint stress. PMID:21858017

  14. Acute stress induces down-regulation of large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels in the lateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan-yan; Liu, Shui-bing; Cui, Guang-Bin; Ma, Lan; Feng, Bin; Xing, Jiang-hao; Yang, Qi; Li, Xiao-qiang; Wu, Yu-mei; Xiong, Li-ze; Zhang, Weiqi; Zhao, Ming-gao

    2012-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels (BKCa) are highly expressed in the lateral amygdala (LA), which is closely involved in assigning stress disorders, but data on their role in the neuronal circuits of stress disorders are limited. In the present study, a significant reduction in BKCa channel expression in the amygdala of mice accompanied anxiety-like behaviour induced by acute stress. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from LA neurons of the anxious animals revealed a pronounced reduction in the fast after-hyperpolarization (fAHP) of action potentials mediated by BKCa channels that led to hyperexcitability of the LA neurons. Activation of BKCa channels in the LA reversed stress-induced anxiety-like behaviour after stress. Furthermore, down-regulated BKCa channels notably increased the evoked NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the thalamo-LA synapses. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that restraint stress-induced anxiety-like behaviour could at least partly be explained by alterations in the functional BKCa channels in the LA. PMID:22199169

  15. In vivo kinematics and articular surface congruency of total ankle arthroplasty during gait.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Banks, Scott; Kosugi, Shinichi; Sasho, Takahisa; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Takakura, Yoshinori

    2012-08-09

    Relatively high rates of loosening and implant failure have been reported after total ankle arthroplasty. Abnormal kinematics and incongruency of the articular surface may cause increased contact pressure and rotational torque applied to the implant, leading to loosening and implant failure. We measured in vivo kinematics of two-component total ankle arthroplasty (TNK ankle), and assessed congruency of the articular surface during the stance phase of gait. Eighteen ankles of 15 patients with a mean age of 75±6 years (mean±standard deviation) and follow-up of 44±38 months were enrolled. Lateral fluoroscopic images were taken during the stance phase of gait. 3D-2D model-image registration was performed using the fluoroscopic image and the implant models, and three-dimensional kinematics of the implant and incongruency of the articular surface were determined. The mean ranges of motion were 11.1±4.6°, 0.8±0.4°, and 2.6±1.5° for dorsi-/plantarflexion, inversion/eversion, and internal/external rotation, respectively. At least one type of incongruency of the articular surface occurred in eight of 18 ankles, including anterior hinging in one ankle, medial or lateral lift off in four ankles, and excessive axial rotation in five ankles. Among the four ankles in which lift off occurred during gait, only one ankle showed lift off in the static weightbearing radiograph. Our observations will provide useful data against which kinematics of other implant designs, such as three-component total ankle arthroplasty, can be compared. Our results also showed that evaluation of lift off in the standard weightbearing radiograph may not predict its occurrence during gait.

  16. Incidence and variance of foot and ankle injuries in elite college football players.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Lee D; Jost, Patrick W; Honkamp, Nicholas; Norwig, John; West, Robin; Bradley, James P

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a study on the risk for foot and ankle injuries in college football players on the basis of injury type and player position. In February 2006, we evaluated 320 intercollegiate football players at the National Football League Combine. All pathologic conditions and surgical procedures of the foot and ankle were recorded, and data were analyzed by player position to detect any trends. Seventy-two percent (n = 231) of the players had a history of foot and ankle injuries, with a total of 287 foot and ankle injuries (1.24 injuries/player injured). The most common injuries were lateral ankle sprain (n = 115), syndesmotic sprain (50), metatarsophalangeal dislocation/turf toe (36), and fibular fracture (25). Foot and ankle injuries were most common in kickers/punters (100% incidence), special teams (100%), running backs (83%), wide receivers (83%), and offensive linemen (80%). Lateral ankle sprains, the most common injuries, were treated surgically only 2.6% of the time. Offensive linemen were most likely to have had syndesmotic sprains (32%), and quarterbacks had the highest incidence of fibular fractures (16%). Foot and ankle injuries are common in collegiate football players, affecting 72% of players. Thirteen percent underwent surgical treatment. Trends are seen in the types of injuries for the different player positions.

  17. A new paradigm for rehabilitation of patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Luke; Hertel, Jay

    2012-11-01

    Lateral ankle sprains have been shown to be one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries in both athletes and the recreationally active population. Moreover, it is estimated that approximately 30% of people who incur a lateral ankle sprain will sustain recurrent ankle sprains and experience symptoms of pain and instability that last > 1 year. Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is the term used to describe cases involving repetitive ankle sprains, multiple episodes of the ankle "giving way," persistent symptoms, and diminished self-reported function for > 1 year after the initial ankle sprain. The optimal conservative treatment for CAI is yet to be determined; however, comparison between patients with CAI and individuals showing no history of ankle sprain has revealed several characteristic features of CAI. These include diminished range of motion, decreased strength, impaired neuromuscular control, and altered functional movement patterns. We propose a new treatment paradigm for conservative management of CAI with the aim of assessing and treating specific deficits exhibited by individual patients with CAI.

  18. [Ankle brachial index measurement].

    PubMed

    Rucigaj, Tanja Planinsek

    2014-10-01

    Ultrasound examinations are noninvasive diagnostic methods which, along with appropriate history and clinical examination, provide basic information on the etiology and spread of the disease, as well as on treatment options required in patients with chronic venous insufficiency and arterial flow impairment. Doppler flow meter offers useful data on venous blood return, primarily in great veins, while both deep and superficial veins as well as arteries can be visualized and data on venous and arterial hemodynamics obtained by duplex ultrasonography. In addition, Doppler flow meter provides data on the peripheral arterial system action through ankle brachial index measurement, which will guide the choice of compression therapy when deciding on the treatment of peripheral arterial disease and mixed arteriovenous leg ulcers. However, diagnosis of arterial insufficiency requires additional examinations.

  19. Does ice immersion influence ankle joint position sense?

    PubMed

    Hopper, D; Whittington, D; Davies, J; Chartier, J D

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a fifteen minute ice immersion treatment influenced the normal ankle joint position sense at 40% and 80% range of inversion and to establish the length of treatment effect through monitoring the rewarming process. Forty nine healthy volunteers between the ages of 17 and 28 were tested. Subjects were screened to exclude those with a history of ankle injuries. The subject's skin temperature over antero-lateral aspect of the ankle was measured using a thermocouple device during the fifteen minutes ice intervention and thirty minutes post-intervention. Testing of ankle joint position sense using the pedal goniometer was performed before and after a clinical application of ice immersion. The testing required the subject to actively reposition their ankle at 40% and 80% of their total range of inversion. The majority of subjects experienced numbness of the foot and ankle by the fifth or sixth minute during ice immersion. One minute after immersion skin temperatures averaged 15 degrees C + 1.7 degrees C. Skin temperature was seen to rise relatively rapidly for the first ten minutes and then slowed considerably. Subjects had not returned to the pre-test skin temperatures by thirty minutes. A significant difference in ankle joint position sense (p < 0.0499) following fifteen minutes of ice immersion was found. However, the magnitude of this difference (0.5 degree) would not be deemed significant in clinical practice. The research found no significant difference in joint position sense between 40% and 80% of the range of inversion both before and after cryotherapy. These findings suggest that the clinical application of cryotherapy is not deleterious to joint position sense and assuming normal joint integrity patients may resume exercise without increased risk of injury.

  20. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lötscher, P; Lang, T H; Zwicky, L; Hintermann, B; Knupp, M

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ankle joint osteoarthritis.

  1. Foot and Ankle Conditioning Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... and ankle pain and prevent further injury. Flexibility: Stretching the muscles that you strengthen is important for restoring range of motion and preventing injury. Gently stretching after strengthening exercises can help reduce muscle soreness ...

  2. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... 51. Trayes KP, Studdiford JS, Pickle S, Tully AS. Edema: Diagnosis and management. Am Fam Phys . 2013;88( ...

  3. Effects of spiral taping on proprioception in subjects with unilateral functional ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-Sook

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The Purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of spiral taping on proprioception in functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five participants in this study had discomfort in only one ankle and Cumberland ankle instability score of ≤23. ST was applied to the unstable ankle, and proprioception was measured baseline and 30 min later. Proprioception was measured using the active joint angle reproduction test. [Results] Plantar flexions of 10° (ES, 0.303) and 20° (ES, 1.369) and inversion 20° (ES, 0.998) showed a significant improvement. [Conclusion] Spiral taping improved on proprioception. Therefore, spiral taping may be an effective method for functional ankle instability. PMID:28210052

  4. Effects of spiral taping on proprioception in subjects with unilateral functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Sook

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The Purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of spiral taping on proprioception in functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five participants in this study had discomfort in only one ankle and Cumberland ankle instability score of ≤23. ST was applied to the unstable ankle, and proprioception was measured baseline and 30 min later. Proprioception was measured using the active joint angle reproduction test. [Results] Plantar flexions of 10° (ES, 0.303) and 20° (ES, 1.369) and inversion 20° (ES, 0.998) showed a significant improvement. [Conclusion] Spiral taping improved on proprioception. Therefore, spiral taping may be an effective method for functional ankle instability.

  5. Supramalleolar osteotomies for degenerative joint disease of the ankle joint: indication, technique and results.

    PubMed

    Barg, Alexej; Pagenstert, Geert I; Horisberger, Monika; Paul, Jochen; Gloyer, Marcel; Henninger, Heath B; Valderrabano, Victor

    2013-09-01

    Patients with varus or valgus hindfoot deformities usually present with asymmetric ankle osteoarthritis. In-vitro biomechanical studies have shown that varus or valgus hindfoot deformity may lead to altered load distribution in the tibiotalar joint which may result in medial (varus) or lateral (valgus) tibiotalar joint degeneration in the short or medium term. The treatment of asymmetric ankle osteoarthritis remains challenging, because more than half of the tibiotalar joint surface is usually preserved. Therefore, joint-sacrificing procedures like total ankle replacement or ankle arthrodesis may not be the most appropriate treatment options. The shortand midterm results following realignment surgery, are very promising with substantial pain relief and functional improvement observed post-operatively. In this review article we describe the indications, surgical techniques, and results from of realignment surgery of the ankle joint in the current literature.

  6. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability.

  7. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability. PMID:26311206

  8. Prevalence of chronic ankle instability and associated symptoms in university dance majors: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Janet; Hall, Emily; Docherty, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigations have established that dancers suffer a large number of injuries to the lower leg, foot, and ankle, with a portion of these being significant time loss injuries or in some cases career ending. Lateral ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers and can often lead to recurrent instability and repetitive injuries. Research in other active populations has linked ankle sprains to the development of chronic ankle instability (CAI). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of CAI and related symptoms of ankle sprain in a student dance population. Individuals were included if they were currently a modern or ballet dance major at the investigators' university (exclusion criterion: a history of fracture or surgery in the lower extremities). A self-reported demographic questionnaire and the Identification of Functional Ankle Instability survey were used to identify the presence and characteristics of CAI. A total of 83 questionnaires were collected, and after exclusions, 77 participants remained: 43 modern dancers and 34 ballet dancers (10 males and 67 females, mean age 19.61 ± 2.53 years, mean dance experience 13.61 ± 3.16 years). Of all dancers surveyed, 41 (53.2%) had CAI, and of those 24 (58.5%) were modern dancers, and 17 (41.5%) were ballet dancers. When looking only at those dancers who had a previous lateral ankle sprain, 75.9% were identified as having CAI. Chronic Ankle Instability can create long-term problems for anyone but especially female dancers, who place extreme stress on their feet and ankles from being en pointe or demi-pointe. It is important to educate dancers, instructors, and medical staff of the importance of recognizing CAI and seeking medical care for ankle sprains and their residual symptoms.

  9. Total ankle replacement. Design evolution and results.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Alexander; Van Bouwel, Saskia; Dereymaeker, Greta

    2010-04-01

    The ankle joint has unique anatomical, biomechanical and cartilaginous structural characteristics that allow the joint to withstand the very high mechanical stresses and strains over years. Any minor changes to any of these features predispose the joint to osteoarthritis. Total ankle replacement (TAR) is evolving as an alternative to ankle arthrodesis for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Initial implant designs from the early 1970s had unacceptably high failure and complication rates. As a result many orthopaedic surgeons have restricted the use of TAR in favour of ankle arthrodesis. Long term follow-up studies following ankle arthrodesis show risks of developing adjacent joint osteoarthritis. Therefore research towards a successful ankle replacement continues. Newer designs and longer-term outcome studies have renewed the interest in ankle joint replacement. We present an overview of the evolution, results and current concepts of total ankle replacement.

  10. Stress fractures of the ankle and forefoot in patients with inflammatory arthritides.

    PubMed

    Mäenpää, Heikki; Lehto, Matti U K; Belt, Eero A

    2002-09-01

    Twenty-four stress fractures occurring in the metatarsal bones and ankle region were examined in 17 patients with inflammatory arthritides. There were 16 metatarsal, four distal fibular, two distal tibial, and two calcaneus fractures. Radiographic analyses were performed to determine the presence of possible predisposing factors for stress fractures. Metatarsal and ankle region stress fractures were analyzed separately. Stress fractures occurred most frequently in the second and third metatarsals. In metatarsal fractures, there was a trend for varus alignment of the ankle to cause fractures of the lateral metatarsal bones and valgus alignment of the medial metatarsal bones. Valgus deformity of the ankle was present in patients with distal fibular fractures in the ankle region group. Calcaneus fractures showed neutral ankle alignment. Malalignment of the ankle and hindfoot is often present in distal tibial, fibular, and metatarsal stress fractures. Additionally, patients tend to have long disease histories with diverse medication, reconstructive surgery and osteoporosis. If such patients experience sudden pain, tenderness, or swelling in the ankle region, stress fractures should be suspected and necessary examinations performed.

  11. Chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Gerstner Garces, Juan Bernardo

    2012-09-01

    Chronic instability of the ankle and anterolateral impingement syndrome are abnormalities that present as a result of inversion and forced plantar-flexion traumas of the foot, despite strict conservative management in the ER and in rehabilitation. A conservative approach is always the first choice of treatment, including anti-inflammatory medications, rehabilitation and proprioception, infiltration with steroids in impingement cases, and use of orthotics, whose true effectiveness is the subject of multiple studies and much debate. Good to excellent results can be obtained surgically with a minimally invasive approach, such as the arthroscopic technique presented herein. Such an approach is useful in managing a combination of conditions such as anterolateral impingement, synovitis, and osteochondral lesions of the talus. The method is easily reproducible, its learning curve is rapid, and it has the advantage of not preventing the use other arthroscopic methods, or open anatomic or nonanatomic methods (tendon transfers), in the case of failure. No nerve lesion was recorded, probably owing to the use of the security zone, and neither was there any arthrofibrosis, possibly related to the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications in the immediate postsurgical period coupled with aggressive rehabilitation from the fourth week. The success of the technique is due to multidisciplinary team work leading to the ultimate achievement of patient satisfaction. This technique is not indicated for patients with a high sports demand or for sport professionals, until further biomechanical studies on its use and success are completed.

  12. Proximally placed alignment control strap for ankle varus deformity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oh-Park, Mooyeon; Park, Geun Young; Hosamane, Sadvi; Kim, Dennis D

    2007-01-01

    Ankle varus is a commonly encountered deformity in patients with neurologic or musculoskeletal disorders. It impedes stability during the stance phase of gait and often causes skin lesions on the lateral ankle area. Plastic or conventional ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) with supplementary features such as a T-strap or increased contact area of the lateral flange have been used for correctable varus deformities. These supplementary modifications, however, have limitations as effective tools for varus control, and ankle varus may persist despite their use. We are revisiting the concept of a proximally placed alignment control strap for ankle varus, which may overcome the limitations of currently available modifications. This alignment control strap is designed to provide a medially directed force on the tibia and fibula against the force of varus deformation of the ankle. This modification can be easily added to various types of existing AFOs with acceptable aesthetic appearance. We describe 2 cases of manually correctable but persistent varus deformities of the ankle that were successfully controlled by utilization of the proximally placed alignment control strap.

  13. Acute Exposure to Di(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate in Adulthood Causes Adverse Reproductive Outcomes Later in Life and Accelerates Reproductive Aging in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Patrick R.; Niermann, Sarah; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Humans are ubiquitously exposed to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), which is an environmental toxicant incorporated in consumer products. Studies have shown that DEHP targets the ovary to disrupt essential processes required for reproductive and nonreproductive health. Specifically, 10-day exposure to DEHP accelerates primordial follicle recruitment and disrupts estrous cyclicity in adult mice. However, it is unknown if these effects on folliculogenesis and cyclicity following acute DEHP exposure can have permanent effects on reproductive outcomes. Further, the premature depletion of primordial follicles can cause early reproductive senescence, and it is unknown if acute DEHP exposure accelerates reproductive aging. This study tested the hypothesis that acute DEHP exposure causes infertility, disrupts estrous cyclicity, alters hormone levels, and depletes follicle numbers by inducing atresia later in life, leading to accelerated reproductive aging. Adult CD-1 mice were orally dosed with vehicle or DEHP (20 μg/kg/day–500 mg/kg/day) daily for 10 days, and reproductive outcomes were assessed at 6 and 9 months postdosing. Acute DEHP exposure significantly altered estrous cyclicity compared to controls at 6 and 9 months postdosing by increasing the percentage of days the mice were in estrus and metestrus/diestrus, respectively. DEHP also significantly decreased inhibin B levels compared to controls at 9 months postdosing. Further, DEHP significantly increased the BAX/BCL2 ratio in primordial follicles leading to a significant decrease in primordial and total follicle numbers compared to controls at 9 months postdosing. Collectively, the adverse effects present following acute DEHP exposure persist later in life and are consistent with accelerated reproductive aging. PMID:26678702

  14. [Chronic instability in the ankle area].

    PubMed

    Dubrana, F; Poichotte, A; Toullec, E; Colin, D; Guillodo, Y; Moati, J-C; Brilhauht, J; Musset, T; Feron, F; Richou, J; Henri, M; Guillemot, E

    2006-06-01

    For ankle sprains, the initial radiological work-up must include weight-bearing AP and lateral stress views of the sprained and healthy ankle. Films are taken in auto-varus. Other explorations included arthroMRI, arthroscanner or MRI which can be indicated preoperatively to confirm suspected cartilage injury or an associated ligament tear. These techniques should be employed when pertinent information can be expected according to the clinical situation and the operator's experience. In the emergency setting, ultrasonography can provide a simple low-cost confirmation of joint hematoma which is more precise than x-rays with a positive predictive value of nearly 100%. The objective and subjective clinical outcome after surgical anatomic repair or ligamentoplasty are quite similar. The two principal differences relate to persistent subjective instability and post-operative surgical complications. Thus there are advantages and disadvantages for each option advantage for anatomical repair because of the low rate of surgical complications and advantage for ligament repairs which stabilize the subtalar joint with a low rate of residual instability.

  15. In vivo kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints with functional ankle instability during weight-bearing ankle internal rotation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; No, Yumi; Yoneta, Kei; Sadakiyo, Masashi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    Functional ankle instability (FAI) may involve abnormal kinematics. However, reliable quantitative data for kinematics of FAI have not been reported. The objective of this study was to determine if the abnormal kinematics exist in the talocrural and subtalar joints in patients with FAI. Five male subjects with unilateral FAI (a mean age of 33.4 ± 13.2 years) were enrolled. All subjects were examined with stress radiography and found to have no mechanical ankle instability (MAI). Lateral radiography at weight-bearing ankle internal rotation of 0° and 20° was taken with the ankle at 30° dorsiflexion and 30° plantar flexion. Patients underwent computed tomography scan at 1.0 mm slice pitch spanning distal one third of the lower leg and the distal end of the calcaneus. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints as well as the ankle joint complex (AJC) were determined using a 3D-to-2D registration technique using a 3D-to-2D registration technique with 3D bone models and plain radiography. FAI joints in ankle dorsiflexion demonstrated significantly greater subtalar internal rotation from 0° to 20° internal rotation. No statistical differences in plantar flexion were detected in talocrural, subtalar or ankle joint complex kinematics between the FAI and contralateral healthy joints. During ankle internal rotation in dorsiflexion, FAI joints demonstrated greater subtalar internal rotation. The FAI joints without mechanical instability presented abnormal kinematics. This suggests that abnormal kinematics of the FAI joints may contribute to chronic instability. FAI joints may involve unrecognized abnormal subtalar kinematics during internal rotation in ankle dorsiflexion which may contribute to chronic instability and frequent feelings of instability.

  16. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  17. American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week @ ACFAS Poll Results Arthroscopy e-Book The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery Read some of the latest research from the official peer-reviewed scientific journal of ACFAS, The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery ( ...

  18. Feedforward ankle strategy of balance during quiet stance in adults

    PubMed Central

    Gatev, Plamen; Thomas, Sherry; Kepple, Thomas; Hallett, Mark

    1999-01-01

    We studied quiet stance investigating strategies for maintaining balance. Normal subjects stood with natural stance and with feet together, with eyes open or closed. Kinematic, kinetic and EMG data were evaluated and cross-correlated.Cross-correlation analysis revealed a high, positive, zero-phased correlation between anteroposterior motions of the centre of gravity (COG) and centre of pressure (COP), head and COG, and between linear motions of the shoulder and knee in both sagittal and frontal planes. There was a moderate, negative, zero-phased correlation between the anteroposterior motion of COP and ankle angular motion.Narrow stance width increased ankle angular motion, hip angular motion, mediolateral sway of the COG, and the correlation between linear motions of the shoulder and knee in the frontal plane. Correlations between COG and COP and linear motions of the shoulder and knee in the sagittal plane were decreased. The correlation between the hip angular sway in the sagittal and frontal planes was dependent on interaction between support and vision.Low, significant positive correlations with time lags of the maximum of cross-correlation of 250-300 ms were found between the EMG activity of the lateral gastrocnemius muscle and anteroposterior motions of the COG and COP during normal stance. Narrow stance width decreased both correlations whereas absence of vision increased the correlation with COP.Ankle mechanisms dominate during normal stance especially in the sagittal plane. Narrow stance width decreased the role of the ankle and increased the role of hip mechanisms in the sagittal plane, while in the frontal plane both increased.The modulation pattern of the lateral gastrocnemius muscle suggests a central program of control of the ankle joint stiffness working to predict the loading pattern. PMID:9882761

  19. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  20. Acute hydrocephalus secondary to obstruction of the foramen of monro and cerebral aqueduct caused by a choroid plexus cyst in the lateral ventricle. Case report.

    PubMed

    Nahed, Brian V; Darbar, Aneela; Doiron, Robert; Saad, Ali; Robson, Caroline D; Smith, Edward R

    2007-09-01

    Choroid plexus cysts are common and typically asymptomatic abnormal folds of the epithelial lining of the choroid plexus. Rarely, these cysts may gradually enlarge and cause outflow obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid. The authors present a case of a large choroid plexus cyst causing acute hydrocephalus in a previously healthy 2-year-old boy. The patient presented with markedly declining mental status, vomiting, and bradycardia over the course of several hours. Computed tomography scans demonstrated enlarged lateral and third ventricles with sulcal effacement, but no obvious mass lesions or hemorrhage. There was no antecedent illness or trauma. A right frontal external ventricular drain was placed in the patient, resulting in decompression of only the right lateral ventricle. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a lobulated cyst arising from the choroid plexus of the left lateral ventricle and herniating through the foramen of Monro into the third ventricle, occluding both the foramen of Monro and the cerebral aqueduct. The patient underwent an endoscopic fenestration of the cyst, and histological results confirmed that it was a choroid plexus cyst. Postoperative MR imaging showed a marked reduction in the cyst size. The cyst was no longer in the third ventricle, the foramen of Monro and the aqueduct were patent, and the ventricles were decompressed. The patient was discharged home with no deficits. To the authors' knowledge, there are no previous reports of a choroid plexus cyst causing acute hydrocephalus due to herniation into the third ventricle. This case is illustrative because it describes this entity for the first time, and more importantly highlights the need to obtain a diagnosis when a patient presents with acute hydrocephalus without a clear cause.

  1. The Incidence of Ankle Sprains in Orienteering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrand, Jan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigates relationship between ankle sprains and participation time in competitive orienteering. Examined 15,474 competitors in races in the Swedish O-ringen 5-day event in 1987. Injuries requiring medical attention were analyzed, showing 137 (23.9 percent) ankle sprains. Injury incidence was 8.4/10,000 hours. Incidence of ankle sprains was…

  2. Soluble Flt-1 improves the repair of ankle joint injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Xie, Bing; Xiang, Liangbi; Zhao, Yong; Zhou, Dapeng

    2016-01-01

    The ankle injuries create great pain to a great number of patients worldwide. Past studies have focused on the development of practical treatments to relieve pain and improve recovery, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the ankle injuries, especially the local inflammation in the damaged ankle joint, have been rarely studied. Moreover, although reduction of production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines may reduce the pain and promote the recovery, a practical approach is currently lacking. Here, we detected significantly higher levels of placental growth factor (PLGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joint fluid from the patients of acute ankle joint injury (AAJI). Interestingly, the levels of PLGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joint fluid strongly correlated. In order to examine whether PLGF may regulate the production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the injured joint, we used a rat carrageenan-induced ankle injury model for AAJI in humans. We injected soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) into the articular cavity of the injured ankle joint to block PLGF signaling and found that injection of sFlt-1 significantly improved the rat behavior in activity wheels test, which appeared to result from reduced secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines in the ankle joint. Thus, our study suggests that blocking PLGF signaling may be a novel therapeutic approach for treating AAJI in humans. PMID:27904694

  3. Lateral Cervical Spine Radiography to Demonstrate Absence of Bony Displacement After Intubation in a Patient with an Acute Type III Odontoid Fracture.

    PubMed

    Easker, David D; Policeni, Bruno A; Hindman, Bradley J

    2015-07-15

    A 72-year-old patient with an acute traumatic Type III odontoid fracture presented to the operating room for an urgent orthopedic procedure with a history of uncontrolled gastroesophageal reflux, a full stomach, and active vomiting. Rather than fiberoptic intubation, a rapid sequence intubation with manual inline stabilization was performed using a videolaryngoscope. A lateral cervical spine radiograph immediately after intubation showed no change in alignment of the fracture of C1-C2. In the presence of cervical spine instability, a postintubation radiograph provides assurance that the cervical spine is appropriately aligned during subsequent surgery.

  4. Measurement of T2 value by using 3.0T MRI for patient with ankle arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae Ouk

    2013-01-01

    This study intended to evaluate shape of ankle joint cartilage and damage to the ankle joint cartilage by measuring changes in T2 value of cartilage of healthy people without ankle arthritis and patients with ankle arthritis. The multi-echo technique was used for 20 healthy persons who had no ankle arthritis in the past or in the present clinically and 20 patients who were examined to have ankle arthritis in order to obtain T2 map image of knee joint cartilage. We divided the talotibial joint into medial position, middle position and lateral position to calculate the mean values of T2 in 18 spots that included anterior part, middle part and posterior part of cartilage of neck bone and ankle bone. Mean T2 values were measured in the healthy people group and the ankle arthritis patient group. According to the measurement results, the mean T2 value of the ankle arthritis patient group was measured to be higher than that of the healthy people group.

  5. Foot and ankle problems in dancers.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The dancer's foot and ankle are subjected to high forces and unusual stresses in training and performance. Injuries are common in dancers, and the foot and ankle are particularly vulnerable. Ankle sprains, ankle impingement syndromes, flexor hallucis longus tendonitis, cuboid subluxation, stress fractures, midfoot injuries, heel pain, and first metatarsophalangeal joint problems including hallux valgus, hallux rigidus, and sesamoid injuries will be reviewed. This article will discuss these common foot and ankle problems in dancers and give typical clinical presentation and diagnostic and treatment recommendations.

  6. Posterior tibial nerve lesions in ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cugat, Ramon; Ares, Oscar; Cuscó, Xavier; Garcia, Montserrat; Samitier, Gonzalo; Seijas, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Ankle arthroscopy provides a minimally invasive approach to the diagnosis and treatment of certain ankle disorders. Neurological complications resulting from ankle arthroscopy have been well documented in orthopaedic and podiatric literature. Owing to the superficial location of the ankle joint and the abundance of overlying periarticular neurovascular structures, complications reported in ankle arthroscopy are greater than those reported for other joints. In particular, all reported neurovascular injuries following ankle arthroscopy have been the direct result of distractor pin or portal placement. The standard posteromedial portal has recognized risks because of the proximity of the posterior neurovascular structures. There can be considerable variability in the course of these portals and their proximity to the neurovascular structures. We found one report of intra-articular damage to the posterior tibial nerve as a result of ankle arthroscopy in the English-language literature and we report this paper as a second case described in the literature.

  7. Changes in Pain, Dysfunction, and Grip Strength of Patients with Acute Lateral Epicondylitis Caused by Frequency of Physical Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soyoung; Ko, Youngjun; Lee, Wanhee

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in pain, dysfunction, and grip strength of patients with acute lateral epicondylitis and to suggest the appropriate treatment frequency and period. [Subjects] The subjects were divided into three: 2 days per week group (n=12), 3 days per week group (n=15), and 6 days per week group (n=13). [Methods] All groups received conventional physical therapy for 40 minutes and therapeutic exercises for 20 minutes per session during 6 weeks. The outcome measurements were the visual analogue scale (VAS), Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE), and grip strength. [Results] The results of this study were as follows: at 3 weeks, there were no significant differences in VAS and PRTEE in the 3 groups, but at 6 weeks, 6 days per week group significantly decreased these two outcomes. Grip strength was significantly increased in 3 and 6 days per week groups at 6 weeks. [Conclusion] In conclusion, physical therapy is needed 3 days per week for 3 weeks in patients with acute lateral epicondylitis. After 3 weeks, 6 days per week is the most effective treatment frequency. PMID:25140091

  8. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  9. Different corticospinal control between discrete and rhythmic movement of the ankle

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yumeno; Jono, Yasutomo; Hatanaka, Ryota; Nomura, Yoshifumi; Tani, Keisuke; Chujo, Yuta; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement. The H-reflex was evoked at an intensity eliciting a small M-wave and MEPs were elicited at an intensity of 1.2 times the motor threshold of the soleus MEPs. Only trials in which background EMG level, ankle angle, and ankle velocity were similar among the movement conditions were included for data analysis. In addition, only trials with a similar M-wave were included for data analysis in the experiment evoking H-reflexes. Results showed that H reflex and MEP amplitudes in the soleus muscle during discrete movement were not significantly different from those during rhythmic movement. MEP amplitude in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement was significantly larger than that during the initial cycle of the rhythmic movement or during discrete movement. Higher corticospinal excitability in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement may reflect changes in corticospinal control from the initial cycle to the later cycles of rhythmic movement. PMID:25126066

  10. Foot and ankle injuries in dance.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, J; Joy, E

    2000-04-01

    Acute traumatic injuries are common in ballet dancers. A careful history, thorough examination, and appropriate imaging should allow for the diagnosis of most problems. The clinician must have a high index of suspicion for occult bony injuries, especially if the patient fails to recover as expected. Aggressive treatment of the sprained ankle is essential to maintain foot and ankle mobility and prevent prolonged disability and subsequent overuse injuries. Kinetic chain dysfunctions are common in ballet dancers with overuse injuries and commonly follow ankle sprains. They may represent a secondary phenomenon that developed in response to the compensatory movement changes caused by the initial injury. It is important to remember, however, that these dysfunctions may have been long standing and a causative factor in the injury. Regardless of the time of onset of the dysfunction, residual kinetic chain dysfunction associated with incomplete rehabilitation of an injury may predispose the dancer to further injuries. Untreated dysfunctions at one site in the kinetic chain may predispose to compensatory dysfunction at other sites in the chain. Accordingly, it is essential to thoroughly examine the entire chain for functional movements when dealing with an injury, because identification and treatment of the kinetic chain dysfunction is important in the rehabilitation of the dancing athlete. Kinetic chain dysfunctions are common in injured ballet dancers and may be a cause of repeated injury. Why then are these dysfunctions left untreated? Medical personnel caring for dancers are sometimes guilty of tunnel vision, and focus solely on the injured site without considering what is happening at other sites in the kinetic chain. This oversight is compounded when the physicians or therapists are satisfied with discovering simply what injury has occurred rather than asking why the injury has occurred. The significance of kinetic chain dysfunctions is only just beginning to be

  11. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements

    PubMed Central

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-01-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met. PMID:26955224

  12. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements.

    PubMed

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-03-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met.

  13. Analysis of 3-dimensional finite element after reconstruction of impaired ankle deltoid ligament

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yunhan; Tang, Xianzhong; Li, Yifan; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    We compared four repair techniques for impaired ankle ligament deltoideum, namely Wiltberger, Deland, Kitaoka and Hintermann using a 3-dimensional finite element. We built an ankle ligament deltoideum model, including six pieces of bone structures, gristles and main ligaments around the ankle. After testing the model, we built an impaired ligament deltoideum model plus four reconstruction models. Subsequently, different levels of force on ankles with different flexion were imposed and ankle biomechanics were compared. In the course of bending, from plantar flexion 20° to back flexion 20°, the extortion of talus decreased while the eversion increased. Four reconstruction models failed to bring back the impaired ankle to normal, with an obvious increase of extortion and eversion. The Kitaoka technique was useful to reduce the extortion angle in a consequential manner. Compared with the other three techniques, the Kitaoka technique produced better results for extortion angle and the difference was statistically significant. However, in case of eversion, there was no significant difference among the four techniques (P>0.05). Lateral ligament's stress in all the four models was different from the normal one. When the ankle was imposed with extortion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with the Kitaoka reconstruction method was close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. When ankle was imposed with eversion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with Kitaoka and Deland reconstruction methods were close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. We concluded that Kitaoka and Deland tendon reconstruction technique could recover impaired ankle deltoid ligament and re-established its normal biomechanics characteristics. PMID:28105122

  14. Analysis of 3-dimensional finite element after reconstruction of impaired ankle deltoid ligament.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yunhan; Tang, Xianzhong; Li, Yifan; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Wenjun

    2016-12-01

    We compared four repair techniques for impaired ankle ligament deltoideum, namely Wiltberger, Deland, Kitaoka and Hintermann using a 3-dimensional finite element. We built an ankle ligament deltoideum model, including six pieces of bone structures, gristles and main ligaments around the ankle. After testing the model, we built an impaired ligament deltoideum model plus four reconstruction models. Subsequently, different levels of force on ankles with different flexion were imposed and ankle biomechanics were compared. In the course of bending, from plantar flexion 20° to back flexion 20°, the extortion of talus decreased while the eversion increased. Four reconstruction models failed to bring back the impaired ankle to normal, with an obvious increase of extortion and eversion. The Kitaoka technique was useful to reduce the extortion angle in a consequential manner. Compared with the other three techniques, the Kitaoka technique produced better results for extortion angle and the difference was statistically significant. However, in case of eversion, there was no significant difference among the four techniques (P>0.05). Lateral ligament's stress in all the four models was different from the normal one. When the ankle was imposed with extortion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with the Kitaoka reconstruction method was close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. When ankle was imposed with eversion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with Kitaoka and Deland reconstruction methods were close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. We concluded that Kitaoka and Deland tendon reconstruction technique could recover impaired ankle deltoid ligament and re-established its normal biomechanics characteristics.

  15. Biochemical T2* MR quantification of ankle arthrosis in pes cavovarus.

    PubMed

    Krause, Fabian G; Klammer, Georg; Benneker, Lorin M; Werlen, Stefan; Mamisch, Tallal C; Weber, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Pes cavovarus affects the ankle biomechanics and may lead to ankle arthrosis. Quantitative T2 STAR (T2*) magnetic resonance (MR) mapping allows high resolution of thin cartilage layers and quantitative grading of cartilage degeneration. Detection of ankle arthrosis using T2* mapping in cavovarus feet was evaluated. Eleven cavovarus patients with symptomatic ankle arthrosis (13 feet, mean age 55.6 years, group 1), 10 cavovarus patients with no or asymptomatic, mild ankle arthrosis (12 feet, mean age 41.8 years, group 2), and 11 controls without foot deformity (18 feet, mean age 29.8 years, group 3) had quantitative T2* MR mapping. Additional assessment included plain radiographs and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score (groups 1 and 2 only). Mean global T2* relaxation time was significantly different between groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.001) and groups 1 and 3 (p = 0.017), but there was no significance for decreased global T2* values in group 2 compared to group 3 (p = 0.345). Compared to the medial compartment T2* values of the lateral compartment were significantly (p = 0.025) higher within group 1. T2* values in the medial ankle joint compartment of group 2 were significantly lower than those of group 1 (p = 0.019). Ankle arthrosis on plain radiographs and the AOFAS score correlated significantly with T2* values in the medial compartment of group 1 (p = 0.04 and 0.039, respectively). Biochemical, quantitative T2* MR mapping is likely effective to evaluate ankle arthrosis in cavovarus feet but further studies are required.

  16. Acute effects of lateral shoe wedges on joint biomechanics of patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis during stationary cycling.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jacob K; Klipple, Gary; Stewart, Candice; Asif, Irfan; Zhang, Songning

    2016-09-06

    Cycling is commonly prescribed for individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) but very little biomechanical research exists on the topic. Individuals with OA may be at greater risk of OA progression or other knee injuries because of their altered knee kinematics. This study investigated the effects of lateral wedges on knee joint biomechanics and pain in patients with medial compartment knee OA during stationary cycling. Thirteen participants with OA and 11 paired healthy participants volunteered for this study. A motion analysis system and a customized instrumented pedal were used to collect 5 pedal cycles of kinematics and kinetics, respectively, during 2 minutes of cycling in 1 neutral and 2 lateral wedge (5° and 10°) conditions. Participants pedaled at 60 RPM and an 80W workrate and rated their knee pain on a visual analog scale during each minute of each condition. There was a 22% decrease in the internal knee abduction moment with the 10° wedge. However, this finding was not accompanied by a decrease in knee adduction angle or subjective pain. Additionally, there was an increase in vertical and horizontal pedal reaction force which may negate the advantages of the decreased internal knee abduction moment. For people with medial knee OA, cycling with 10° lateral wedges may not be sufficient to slow the progression of OA beyond the neutral riding condition.

  17. Use of infrared thermography for the diagnosis and grading of sprained ankle injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, João; Vardasca, Ricardo; Pimenta, Madalena; Gabriel, Joaquim; Torres, João

    2016-05-01

    Ankle joint sprains are a common medical condition estimated to be responsible for 15-25% of all musculoskeletal injuries worldwide. The pathophysiology of the lesion can represent considerable time lost to injury, as well as long-term disability in up to 60% of patients. A percentage between 10% and 20% may complicate with chronic instability of the ankle joint and disability in walking, contributing to morbidity and poor life quality. Ankle sprains can be classified as grade I, II, or III, based on the extent of damage and number of ligaments affected. The diagnostic grading is important for setting further treatment and rehabilitation, since more severe injuries carries risk of recurrence, added morbidity and decrease in life quality. The aim of this work was to evaluate the adequacy of infrared thermography as a potential complimentary diagnostic tool of the distinct lesions grades. Evaluation of different thermographic values of the ankle region (in both affected and non-affected foot) was conducted for this purpose. The principal results to be highlighted are that some of the regions, namely anterior view for non defined time after injury analysis, and anterior, frontal, posterior and anterior talofibular ligament regions and proximal calcaneofibular ligament regions in acute lesions (herein defined as less than 6 h post-traumatic event) presented consistent profiles of variation. The analyses were performed considering affected and non-affected ankles results on plotted graphics representing termographic evaluation and grading of these lesions performed using ultrasound by experimented medical radiologists. An increase in temperature values was observed when progressing from mild to severe ankle sprain injuries, with these regions presenting lower values for the affected ankle when compared to the non-affected ankle in all the analysis performed. The remaining analysed regions did not present the same variations. Statistical analysis using Kruskal

  18. A systematic review on ankle injury and ankle sprain in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Chan, Lap-Ki; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This article systematically reviews epidemiological studies on sports injury from 1977 to 2005 in which ankle injury was included. A total of 227 studies reporting injury pattern in 70 sports from 38 countries were included. A total of 201,600 patients were included, with 32,509 ankle injuries. Ankle injury information was available from 14,098 patients, with 11 847 ankle sprains. Results show that the ankle was the most common injured body site in 24 of 70 included sports, especially in aeroball, wall climbing, indoor volleyball, mountaineering, netball and field events in track and field. Ankle sprain was the major ankle injury in 33 of 43 sports, especially in Australian football, field hockey, handball, orienteering, scooter and squash. In sports injuries throughout the countries studied, the ankle was the second most common injured body site after the knee, and ankle sprain was the most common type of ankle injury. The incidence of ankle injury and ankle sprain was high in court games and team sports, such as rugby, soccer, volleyball, handball and basketball. This systematic review provides a summary of the epidemiology of ankle injury in sports.

  19. Effects of ankle joint cooling on peroneal short latency response.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, J Ty; Hunter, Iain; McLoda, Todd

    2006-01-01

    While cryotherapy has direct physiological effects on contractile tissues, the extent to which joint cooling affects the neuromuscular system is not well understood. The purpose of the study was to detect changes in ankle dynamic restraint (peroneal short latency response and muscle activity amplitude) during inversion perturbation following ankle joint cryotherapy. A 2x3 factorial design was used to compare reaction time and EMG amplitude data of treatment conditions (cryotherapy and control) across time (pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 30 min post-treatment). Thirteen healthy volunteers (age 23 ± 4 yrs, ht 1.76 ± 0.09 m, mass 78.8 ± 16.6 kg), with no history of lower extremity joint injury participated in this study. Surface EMG was collected from the peroneus longus (PL) of the dominant leg during an ankle inversion perturbation triggered while walking. Subjects walked the length of a 6.1 m runway 30 times. A trap door mechanism, inducing inversion perturbation, was released at heel contact during six randomly selected trials for each leg. Following baseline measurements, a 1.5 L bag of crushed ice was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the treatment group with an elastic wrap. A bag similar in weight and consistency was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the control group. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare treatment conditions across time (p < 0.05). Maximum inversion range of motion was 28.4 ± 1.8° for all subjects. No overall condition by time difference was detected (p > 0.05) for PL reaction time. Average RMS EMG, normalized to an isometric reference position, increased in the cryotherapy group at the 30 min post-treatment interval relative to the control group (p < 0.05). Joint cooling does not result in deficiencies in reaction time or immediate muscle activation following inversion perturbation compared to a control. Key PointsJoint cooling is used as a treatment intervention prior to activity. Whether ankle cooling

  20. Physiological coxa varus-genu valgus influences internal knee and ankle joint moments in females during crossover cutting.

    PubMed

    Nyland, J A; Caborn, D N M

    2004-07-01

    This study evaluated the ankle and knee electromyographic, kinematic, and kinetic differences of 20 nonimpaired females with either neutral (group 1) or coxa varus-genu valgus (group 2) alignment during crossover cutting stance phase. Two-way mixed model ANOVA (group, session) assessed mean differences ( p<0.05) and correlation analysis further delineated relationships. During impact absorption, group 2 displayed earlier peak horizontal braking (anterior-posterior) ground reaction force timing, decreased and earlier peak internal knee extension moments (eccentric function), and earlier peak internal ankle dorsiflexion moment timing (eccentric function). During the pivot phase, group 2 displayed later and eccentrically-biased peak ankle plantar flexion moments, increased peak internal knee flexion moments (eccentric function), and later peak knee internal rotation timing. Correlation analysis revealed that during impact absorption, subjects with coxa varus-genu valgus alignment (group 2) displayed a stronger relationship between knee internal rotation velocity and peak internal ankle dorsiflexion moment onset timing ( r= -0.64 vs r = -0.26) and between peak horizontal braking ground reaction forces and peak internal ankle dorsiflexion moment onset timing ( r= 0.61 vs r= 0.24). During the pivot phase these subjects displayed a stronger relationship between peak horizontal braking ground reaction forces and peak internal ankle plantar flexion moment onset timing ( r= -0.63 vs r= -0.09) and between peak horizontal braking forces and peak internal ankle plantar flexion moments ( r= -0.72 vs r= -0.26). Group differences suggest that subjects with coxa varus-genu valgus frontal-plane alignment have an increased dependence on both ankle dorsiflexor and plantar flexor muscle group function during crossover cutting. Greater dependence on ankle muscle group function during the performance of a task that requires considerable 3D dynamic knee joint control suggests a greater

  1. Dimensions and attachments of the ankle ligaments: evaluation for ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wenny, Raphael; Duscher, Dominik; Meytap, Emmy; Weninger, Patrick; Hirtler, Lena

    2015-06-01

    For operative reconstruction, precise anatomic information on the dimensions of the ankle ligaments is important and can help to optimize these procedures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the length and width dimensions of the ankle ligaments and to contrast the results with the published literature. Seventeen non-paired adult, formalin-fixed ankle specimen were dissected to expose the capsuloligamentous structures. The following ligaments were investigated: tibiofibular syndesmosis (anterior and posterior tibiofibular ligament/ATiFL and PTiFL), lateral ankle ligaments (anterior and posterior talofibular ligament, calcaneofibular ligament/ATFL, PTFL and CFL), medial ankle ligaments (deltoid ligament, anterior and posterior tibiotalar ligament/ATTL and PTTL). After identification of the ligaments, the dimensions were measured with a ruler and a sliding caliper. Additionally, the attachment area and the center of insertion (COI) were evaluated. The dimensions of the ligaments were recorded. Measurements were calculated and discussed according to the existing literature. The tibial COI of the ATiFL was situated 8.35 ± 2.05 mm from the inferior articular surface of the tibia and 5.04 ± 1.32 mm from the fibular notch. Its fibular COI was situated 25.45 ± 5.84 mm from the tip of the lateral malleolus and 3.12 ± 1.01 mm from the malleolar articular surface. The calcaneal COI of the CFL was situated 20.63 ± 3.56 mm anterior and 5.73 ± 1.89 mm plantar to the superior edge of the calcaneal. Its fibular attachment of the CFL was directly at the tip of the lateral malleolus, dorsal to the fibular attachment of the ATFL. Studies of the therapeutic options in severe ankle ligament injuries have shown better results in anatomical reconstructions compared to other operative treatments. To optimize these procedures, exact anatomical information on the dimensions of the ankle ligaments should be beneficial.

  2. Posterior ankle impingement in the dancer.

    PubMed

    Moser, Brad R

    2011-01-01

    Dancers spend a lot of time in the relevé position in demi-pointe and en pointe in their training and their careers. Pain from both osseous and soft tissue causes may start to occur in the posterior aspect of their ankle. This article reviews the potential causes of posterior ankle impingement in dancers. It will discuss the clinical evaluation of a dancer and the appropriate workup and radiographic studies needed to further evaluate a dancer with suspected posterior ankle impingement.

  3. A cadaveric study showing the anatomical variations in the branches of the dorsalis pedis artery at the level of the ankle joint and its clinical implication in ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Parikh, S; Dawe, E; Lee, C; Whitehead-Clarke, T; Smith, C; Bendall, S

    2016-09-23

    Introduction Pseudoaneurysm formation following ankle arthroscopy is a rare but potentially catastrophic complication. The placement of anterior ankle portals carries inherent risk to the superficial and deep peroneal nerves, as well as to the dorsalis pedis artery. Anatomical variations in the dorsalis pedis and the presence of branches at the joint line may increase the risk of vascular injury and pseudoaneurysm formation during arthroscopy. There is limited anatomical evidence available regarding the branches of the dorsalis pedis artery, which occur at the point at which they cross the ankle joint. Objectives The objective of the study was to describe the frequency and direction of branches of the dorsalis pedis crossing the ankle joint. Materials and Methods Nineteen cadaveric feet were carefully dissected to explore the course of the dorsalis pedis artery, noting in particular the branching pattern at the joint line. Results Eleven of the nineteen feet had a branch of the dorsalis pedis artery that crossed the level of the ankle joint. Out of these, six were lateral, four medial and one bilateral. Eight of the eleven specimens had one branch at, or just before, the level of the joint. Two specimens had two branches and one had three branches crossing the ankle, which were all in the same direction, crossing laterally to the main trunk of the dorsalis pedis. Conclusions Our study demonstrated high rates of branching of the dorsalis pedis artery at the level of the ankle joint. The role of these branches in pseudoaneurysm formation during anterior hindfoot surgery remains unclear.

  4. Interactions of norepinephrine and galanin in the central amygdala and lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis modulate the behavioral response to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Morilak, David A; Cecchi, Marco; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2003-06-27

    Many aspects of drug abuse and addiction share neurobiological substrates with the modulatory processes underlying the response and adaptation to acute stress. In particular, the ascending noradrenergic system has been implicated in facilitating the response to stress, and in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking behavior. Thus, to better understand the link between stress and addictive behaviors, it would be informative to understand better the modulatory function of the ascending noradrenergic system, and its interaction with other neurotransmitters with which it is closely associated or co-localized, such as the neuropeptide galanin. In this paper, we review a series of studies investigating the functional interactions of norepinephrine and galanin in modulating the behavioral response to acute stress in two components of the extended amygdala, the central nucleus of the amygdala and the lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. We showed that norepinephrine facilitates behavioral reactivity to stress on the elevated plus-maze and social interaction tests. However, when stress-induced activation of the noradrenergic system was enhanced by blocking inhibitory adrenergic autoreceptors, galanin release was recruited in the central amygdala, acting to attenuate the behavioral response to stress. By contrast, stress-induced galanin release in the lateral bed nucleus appeared to be independent of enhanced noradrenergic activation, and unlike the central amygdala, both galanin and norepinephrine facilitated behavioral stress reactivity in the bed nucleus. The different modes of interaction and differential region- and response-specificity of galanin and norepinephrine suggest that a complex neural circuit interconnecting these two regions is involved in the modulatory effects of norepinephrine and galanin on the behavioral response to stress. Such complexity may allow for flexibility and plasticity in stress adaptation, and may also contribute to behavioral

  5. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Rae; Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E.; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice. PMID:27134529

  6. Complications of Pediatric Foot and Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Denning, Jaime R

    2017-01-01

    Ankle fractures account for 5% and foot fractures account for approximately 8% of fractures in children. Some complications are evident early in the treatment or natural history of foot and ankle fractures. Other complications do not become apparent until weeks, months, or years after the original fracture. The incidence of long-term sequelae like posttraumatic arthritis from childhood foot and ankle fractures is poorly studied because decades or lifelong follow-up has frequently not been accomplished. This article discusses a variety of complications associated with foot and ankle fractures in children or the treatment of these injuries.

  7. Fusion following failed total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Wünschel, Markus; Leichtle, Ulf G; Leichtle, Carmen I; Walter, Christian; Mittag, Falk; Arlt, Eva; Suckel, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Although mid- to long-term results after total ankle replacement have improved because of available second- and third-generation devices, failure of total ankle replacement is still more common compared with total hip replacement and total knee replacement. The portfolio of available total ankle replacement revision component options is small. Furthermore, the bone stock of the tibiotalar region is scarce making it difficult and in some situations impossible to perform revision total ankle replacement. In these cases tibiotalar and tibiotalocalcaneal fusions are valuable options. This article describes which surgical procedures should be performed depending on the initial situation and gives detailed advice on surgical technique, postoperative care, and clinical results.

  8. Search the Foot and Ankle: Interactive Foot Diagram

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  9. SHADE: A Shape-Memory-Activated Device Promoting Ankle Dorsiflexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.; Rossini, M.; Magoni, L.; Pirovano, S.; Villa, E.; Besseghini, S.; Molteni, F.

    2009-08-01

    Acute post-stroke rehabilitation protocols include passive mobilization as a means to prevent contractures. A device (SHADE) that provides repetitive passive motion to a flaccid ankle by using shape memory alloy actuators could be of great help in providing this treatment. A suitable actuator was designed as a cartridge of approximately 150 × 20 × 15 mm, containing 2.5 m of 0.25 mm diameter NiTi wire. This actuator was activated by Joule’s effect employing a 7 s current input at 0.7 A, which provided 10 N through 76 mm displacement. Cooling and reset by natural convection took 30 s. A prototype of SHADE was assembled with two thermoplastic shells hinged together at the ankle and strapped on the shin and foot. Two actuators were fixed on the upper shell while an inextensible thread connected each NiTi wire to the foot shell. The passive ankle motion (passive range of motion, PROM) generated by SHADE was evaluated optoelectronically on three flaccid patients (58 ± 5 years old); acceptability was assessed by a questionnaire presented to further three flaccid patients (44 ± 11.5 years old) who used SHADE for 5 days, 30 min a day. SHADE was well accepted by all patients, produced good PROM, and caused no pain. The results prove that suitable limb mobilization can be produced by SMA actuators.

  10. Diagnostic Ultrasonography of an Ankle Fracture Undetectable by Conventional Radiography: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Clinton J.; Welk, Aaron B.; Enix, Dennis E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to present diagnostic ultrasonography assessment of an occult fracture in a case of persistent lateral ankle pain. Clinical Features A 35-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with bruising, swelling, and pain along the distal fibula 3 days following an inversion ankle trauma. Prior radiographic examination at an urgent care facility was negative for fracture. Conservative care over the next week noted improvement in objective findings, but the pain persisted. Intervention and Outcome Diagnostic ultrasonography was ordered to assess her persistent ankle pain and showed a minimally displaced fracture of the fibula 4 cm proximal to the lateral malleolus. The patient was referred to her primary care physician and successfully managed with conservative care. Conclusion In this case, diagnostic ultrasonography was able to identify a Danis-Weber subtype B1 fracture that was missed by plain film radiography. PMID:27069430

  11. Treatment of Varus Ankle Osteoarthritis and Instability With a Novel Mortise-Plasty Osteotomy Procedure.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hayato; Kageyama, Yasunori; Shido, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    Although joint-preserving surgery for intermediate ankle osteoarthritis has been reported to be effective, failures of supramalleolar osteotomy and plafond-plasty can occur because of persistent malalignment of the distal tibia and incongruent ankle mortise. We introduce a novel opening wedge distal tibial osteotomy procedure (mortise-plasty) with rigid plate fixation combined with synthetic bone wedges. We performed 27 mortise-plasties in 25 patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis and instability. Six males (24%) and 19 females (76%), with a mean age of 63 (range 28 to 79) years, were followed up for a mean of 27.3 (range 14 to 45) months. The mean preoperative visual analog scale score, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score, and Takakura ankle scale score were 7.4 (range 5.4 to 10), 58.7 (range 18 to 84), and 55.9 (range 29 to 88), respectively. These scores improved significantly to 2.1 (range 0 to 6.5), 89.3 (range 67 to 100), and 84.7 (range 55 to 100) postoperatively (p < .001). The mean preoperative tibial-anterior surface angle and talar tilt angle were 84.9° (range 78° to 90°) and 8.3° (range 3° to 21°), respectively. At the most recent follow-up visit, the corresponding values were 95.0° (range 82° to 99°) and 1.8° (range 0° to 8°), respectively (p < .001). Computed tomography scans indicated that the ankle mortise narrowed by approximately 1.8 mm and the tibial plafond was lowered after osteotomy. No patients underwent lateral ligament reconstruction, ankle joint replacement, or arthrodesis. Mortise-plasty osteotomy corrects the intra-articular and extra-articular deformities simultaneously and provides good clinical and radiographic outcomes for patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis and instability.

  12. [Conventional X-Rays of Ankle Joint Fractures in Older Patients are Not Always Predictive].

    PubMed

    Jubel, A; Faymonville, C; Andermahr, J; Boxberg, S; Schiffer, G

    2017-02-01

    Background: Ankle fractures are extremely common in the elderly, with an incidence of up to 39 fractures per 100,000 persons per year. We found a discrepancy between intraoperative findings and preoperative X-ray findings. It was suggested that many relevant lesions of the ankle joint in the elderly cannot be detected with plain X-rays. Methods: Complete data sets and preoperative X-rays of 84 patients aged above 60 years with ankle fractures were analysed retrospectively. There were 59 women and 25 men, with a mean age of 69.9 years. Operation reports and preoperative X-rays were analysed with respect to four relevant lesions: multifragmentary fracture pattern of the lateral malleolus, involvement of the medial malleolus, posterior malleolar fractures and bony avulsion of anterior syndesmosis. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and prevalence were calculated. Results: The prevalence of specific ankle lesions in the analyzed cohort was 24 % for the multifragmentary fracture pattern of the lateral malleolus, 38 % for fractures of the medial malleolus, 25 % for posterior malleolar fractures and 22.6 % for bony avulsions of the anterior syndesmosis. Multifragmentary fracture patterns of the lateral malleolus (sensitivity 0 %) and bony avulsions of the anterior syndesmosis (sensitivity 5 %) could not be detected in plain X-rays of the ankle joint at all. Fractures of the medial malleolus and involvement of the dorsal tibial facet were detected with a sensitivity of 96.8 % and 76.2 %, respectively, and specificity of 100 % in both cases. Conclusions: This study confirms that complex fracture patterns, such as multifragmentary involvement of the lateral malleolus, additional fracture of the medial malleolus, involvement of the dorsal tibial facet or bony avulsion of the anterior syndesmosis are common in ankle fractures of the elderly. Therefore, CT scans should be routinely considered for primary

  13. Acute food deprivation enhances fear extinction but inhibits long-term depression in the lateral amygdala via ghrelin signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Chun; Chou, Dylan; Yeh, Che-Ming; Hsu, Kuei-Sen

    2016-02-01

    Fear memory-encoding thalamic input synapses to the lateral amygdala (T-LA) exhibit dynamic efficacy changes that are tightly correlated with fear memory strength. Previous studies have shown that auditory fear conditioning involves strengthening of synaptic strength, and conversely, fear extinction training leads to T-LA synaptic weakening and occlusion of long-term depression (LTD) induction. These findings suggest that the mechanisms governing LTD at T-LA synapses may determine the behavioral outcomes of extinction training. Here, we explored this hypothesis by implementing food deprivation (FD) stress in mice to determine its effects on fear extinction and LTD induction at T-LA synapses. We found that FD increased plasma acylated ghrelin levels and enhanced fear extinction and its retention. Augmentation of fear extinction by FD was blocked by pretreatment with growth hormone secretagogue receptor type-1a antagonist D-Lys(3)-GHRP-6, suggesting an involvement of ghrelin signaling. Confirming previous findings, two distinct forms of LTD coexist at thalamic inputs to LA pyramidal neurons that can be induced by low-frequency stimulation (LFS) or paired-pulse LFS (PP-LFS) paired with postsynaptic depolarization, respectively. Unexpectedly, we found that FD impaired the induction of PP-LFS- and group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-induced LTD, but not LFS-induced LTD. Ghrelin mimicked the effects of FD to impair the induction of PP-LFS- and DHPG-induced LTD at T-LA synapses, which were blocked by co-application of D-Lys(3)-GHRP-6. The sensitivity of synaptic transmission to 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine was not altered by either FD or ghrelin treatment. These results highlight distinct features of fear extinction and LTD at T-LA synapses.

  14. Acute Effects of Foot Rotation in Healthy Adults during Running on Knee Moments and Lateral-Medial Shear Force

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Kevin A.; Lynn, Scott K.; Noffal, Guillermo J.; Brown, Lee E.

    2016-01-01

    As runners age, the likelihood of developing osteoarthritis (OA) significantly increases as 10% of people 55+ have symptomatic knee OA while 70% of people 65+ have radiographic signs of knee OA. The lateral-medial shear force (LMF) and knee adduction moment (KAM) during gait have been associated with cartilage loading which can lead to OA. Foot rotation during gait has been shown to alter the LMF and KAM, however it has not been investigated in running. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in the KAM and LMF with foot rotation during running. Twenty participants volunteered and performed five running trials in three randomized conditions (normal foot position [NORM], external rotation [EXT], and internal rotation [INT]) at a running speed of 3.35m·s-1 on a 20 meter runway. Kinematic and kinetic data were gathered using a 9-camera motion capture system and a force plate, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVAs determined differences between conditions. The KAM and LMF were lower in both EXT and INT conditions compared to the NORM, but there were no differences between EXT and INT conditions. The decreases in KAM and LMF in the EXT condition were expected and concur with past research in other activities. The reductions in the INT condition were unexpected and contradict the literature. This may indicate that participants are making mechanical compensations at other joints to reduce the KAM and LMF in this abnormal internal foot rotation condition. Key points External rotation of the foot during running reduced the loads on the medial compartment of the knee Internal rotation of the foot also reduced the medial loads, but is a more unnatural intervention External and internal rotation reduced the shear forces on the knee, which may help slow the degeneration of knee joint cartilage PMID:26957926

  15. Long-term neuromuscular training and ankle joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Kynsburg, A; Pánics, G; Halasi, T

    2010-06-01

    Preventive effect of proprioceptive training is proven by decreasing injury incidence, but its proprioceptive mechanism is not. Major hypothesis: the training has a positive long-term effect on ankle joint position sense in athletes of a high-risk sport (handball). Ten elite-level female handball-players represented the intervention group (training-group), 10 healthy athletes of other sports formed the control-group. Proprioceptive training was incorporated into the regular training regimen of the training-group. Ankle joint position sense function was measured with the "slope-box" test, first described by Robbins et al. Testing was performed one day before the intervention and 20 months later. Mean absolute estimate errors were processed for statistical analysis. Proprioceptive sensory function improved regarding all four directions with a high significance (p<0.0001; avg. mean estimate error improvement: 1.77 degrees). This was also highly significant (p< or =0.0002) in each single directions, with avg. mean estimate error improvement between 1.59 degrees (posterior) and 2.03 degrees (anterior). Mean absolute estimate errors at follow-up (2.24 degrees +/-0.88 degrees) were significantly lower than in uninjured controls (3.29 degrees +/-1.15 degrees) (p<0.0001). Long-term neuromuscular training has improved ankle joint position sense function in the investigated athletes. This joint position sense improvement can be one of the explanations for injury rate reduction effect of neuromuscular training.

  16. Haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle treated by total ankle replacement: a case series.

    PubMed

    Barg, A; Elsner, A; Hefti, D; Hintermann, B

    2010-07-01

    The standard treatment for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint in haemophilic patients has been fusion of the ankle joint. Total ankle replacement is still controversial as a treatment option. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the mid-term outcome in patients treated with total ankle replacement using an unconstrained three-component ankle implant. Ten haemophilic ankles in eight patients (mean age: 43.2 years, range 26.7-57.5) treated with total ankle replacement were followed up for a minimum of 2.7 years (mean: 5.6, range 2.7-7.6). The outcome was measured with clinical and radiological evaluations. There were no intra- or peri-operative complications. The AOFAS-hindfoot-score increased from 38 (range 8-57) preoperatively to 81 (range 69-95) postoperatively. All patients were satisfied with the results. Four patients became pain free; in the whole patient cohort pain level decreased from 7.1 (range 4-9) preoperatively to 0.8 (range 0-3) postoperatively. All categories of SF-36 score showed significant improvements in quality of life. In one patient, open ankle arthrolysis was performed because of painful arthrofibrosis. For patients with haemophilic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint, total ankle replacement is a valuable alternative treatment to ankle fusion.

  17. Incidence and Severity of Foot and Ankle Injuries in Men’s Collegiate American Football

    PubMed Central

    Lievers, W. Brent; Adamic, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: American football is an extremely physical game with a much higher risk of injury than other sports. While many studies have reported the rate of injury for particular body regions or for individual injuries, very little information exists that compares the incidence or severity of particular injuries within a body region. Such information is critical for prioritizing preventative interventions. Purpose: To retrospectively analyze epidemiological data to identify the most common and most severe foot and ankle injuries in collegiate men’s football. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Injury data were obtained from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) for all foot and ankle injuries during the 2004-2005 to 2008-2009 seasons. Injuries were analyzed in terms of incidence and using multiple measures of severity (time loss, surgeries, medical disqualifications). This frequency and severity information is summarized in tabular form as well as in a 4 × 4 quantitative injury risk assessment matrix (QIRAM). Results: The rate of foot and ankle injuries was 15 per 10,000 athletic exposures (AEs). Five injuries were found to be responsible for more than 80% of all foot and ankle injuries: lateral ankle ligament sprains, syndesmotic (high ankle) sprains, medial ankle ligament sprains, midfoot injuries, and first metatarsophalangeal joint injuries. Ankle dislocations were found to be the most severe in terms of median time loss (100 days), percentage of surgeries (83%), and percentage of medical disqualifications (94%), followed by metatarsal fractures (38 days, 36%, and 49%, respectively) and malleolus fractures (33 days, 41%, and 59%, respectively). Statistical analysis suggests that the 3 measures of severity are highly correlated (r > 0.94), thereby justifying the use of time loss as a suitable proxy for injury severity in the construction of the QIRAM. Conclusion: Based on the QIRAM analysis

  18. How to Care for a Sprained Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... in shape with good muscle balance, flexibility and strength in your soft tissues. Additional Resources How to Stretch Your Ankle After a Sprain How to Strengthen Your Ankle After a Sprain This material was codeveloped by the American Academy of Orthopaedic ...

  19. Common injuries of the foot and ankle in the child and adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard A; Ramirez-Del Toro, Jose A

    2008-05-01

    A myriad problems in the foot and ankle are specific to child and adolescent athletes. The anatomy of young athletes with respect to the presence of a growth plate makes their injury patterns different from those seen in adults. The main general injury patterns seen in the feet and ankles of children are related to growth and development or occur from overuse syndromes or acute trauma. In this article we outline in an anatomically oriented manner most of the common problems in this population.

  20. The effect of ankle bracing on knee kinetics and kinematics during volleyball-specific tasks.

    PubMed

    West, T; Ng, L; Campbell, A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of ankle bracing on knee kinetics and kinematics during volleyball tasks. Fifteen healthy, elite, female volleyball players performed a series of straight-line and lateral volleyball tasks with no brace and when wearing an ankle brace. A 14-camera Vicon motion analysis system and AMTI force plate were used to capture the kinetic and kinematic data. Knee range of motion, peak knee anterior-posterior and medial-lateral shear forces, and peak ground reaction forces that occurred between initial contact with the force plate and toe off were compared using paired sample t-tests between the braced and non-braced conditions (P < 0.05). The results revealed no significant effect of bracing on knee kinematics or ground reaction forces during any task or on knee kinetics during the straight-line movement volleyball tasks. However, ankle bracing was demonstrated to reduce knee lateral shear forces during all of the lateral movement volleyball tasks. Wearing the Active Ankle T2 brace will not impact knee joint range of motion and may in fact reduce shear loading to the knee joint in volleyball players.

  1. Total ankle replacement - surgical treatment and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting.

  2. Tumours of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Hussain, Shakir; Carter, Simon R

    2015-09-01

    Sarcomas are rare tumours and particularly rarer in the foot and ankle region. The complex anatomy of the foot and ankle makes it unique and hence poses a challenge to the surgeon for limb salvage surgery. Other lesions found in the foot and ankle region are benign bone and soft tissue tumours, metastasis and infection. The purpose of this article is to discuss the relevance of the complex anatomy of the foot and ankle in relation to tumours, clinical features, their general management principles and further discussion about some of the more common bone and soft tissue lesions. Discussion of every single bone and soft tissue lesion in the foot and ankle region is beyond the scope of this article.

  3. Prospective Epidemiological Study of Basketball Injuries During One Competitive Season: Ankle Sprains and Overuse Knee Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Cumps, Elke; Verhagen, Evert; Meeusen, Romain

    2007-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to assess the overall incidence of acute and overuse basketball injuries and identifies risk factors associated with ankle sprains and knee overuse injuries. In total, 164 senior players (23.7 years ± 7.0) of all levels of play, and including both men and women, participated voluntarily during one season. A total of 139 acute and 87 overuse injuries were reported, resulting in an overall injury incidence of 9.8 (8.5 to 11.1) per 1,000 hours. The incidence of acute injuries was 6.0/1,000 hours. Ankle sprains (n = 34) accounted for most acute injuries, and 52.9% of all players with ankle sprains reported a previous ankle sprain. Relative Risks (RR) and Odds Ratio (OR) with their 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated to determine significant differences. Landing on an opponent’s foot was the major inciting event, significantly more so than non contact mechanisms (RR=2.1 [95% CI: 1.0-4.2]). Acute knee injuries resulted in the highest playing absence (7 weeks 2 days ± 9 weeks 1 day). Overuse injury incidence was 3.8/1,000 hours. The knee (1.5/1,000 hours) was the most common site. Forward players sustained less knee overuse injuries than players of all other playing positions, and significantly less than center players (OR=0.5 [95% CI: 0.2-0.9]). This study showed that ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries are the most common injuries in basketball, both accounting for 14.8%. Injury prevention programmes however should not concentrate on those injuries only, but might one to consider that acute knee injuries, in spite of the fact that they occur less frequently, also merit further research. Key pointsAnkle sprains are the most common acute injuries in basketball with the inciting event being landing on an opponent’s foot or changing direction.Anterior knee pain is the most common overuse injury. Etiologic factors are well described in literature, but prevention strategies are lacking.Acute knee injuries account for the

  4. Intraarticular Entrapment of Os Subfibulare Following a Severe Inversion Injury of the Ankle: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Ozkan; Kilicaslan, Omer Faruk; Guler, Ferhat; Aktan, Cemil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior Talofibular Ligament (ATFL) rupture is the most commonly injured anatomic structure in lateral ankle sprain. In some cases, ATFL avulsion fracture from the lateral malleolus may occur instead of purely ligamentous injuries. The ATFL avulsion fracture is detected as a small ossicle at the tip of lateral malleolus on direct radiographs, which is called os subfibulare in chronic cases. Case Presentation: Severe displacement of this ossicle to the tibiotalar joint space is an extremely rare injury. Herein, a case of intra-articular entrapment of os subfibulare following a severe inversion injury of the ankle, which caused a diagnostic challenge was presented. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of entrapment of os subfibulare in the talotibial joint space. Fixation of the os subfibulare to lateral malleolus resulted in union and excellent functional results. PMID:26101763

  5. Reliability and smallest real difference of the ankle lunge test post ankle fracture.

    PubMed

    Simondson, David; Brock, Kim; Cotton, Susan

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the reliability and the smallest real difference of the Ankle Lunge test in an ankle fracture patient population. In the post immobilisation stage of ankle fracture, ankle dorsiflexion is an important measure of progress and outcome. The Ankle Lunge test measures weight bearing dorsiflexion, resulting in negative scores (knee to wall distance) and positive scores (toe to wall distance), for which the latter has proven reliability in normal subjects only. A consecutive sample of ankle fracture patients with permission to commence weight bearing, were recruited to the study. Three measurements of the Ankle Lunge Test were performed each by two raters, one senior and one junior physiotherapist. These occurred prior to therapy sessions in the second week after plaster removal. A standardised testing station was utilised and allowed for both knee to wall distance and toe to wall distance measurement. Data was collected from 10 individuals with ankle fracture, with an average age of 36 years (SD 14.8). Seventy seven percent of observations were negative. Intra and inter-rater reliability yielded intra class correlations at or above 0.97, p < .001. There was a significant systematic bias towards improved scores during repeated measurement for one rater (p = .01). The smallest real difference was calculated as 13.8mm. The Ankle Lunge test is a practical and reliable tool for measuring weightbearing dorsiflexion post ankle fracture.

  6. Management of complications of open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alan; Barnes, Esther S

    2009-01-01

    The management of complications resulting from the open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures is discussed in detail. The initial radiographic findings of the most common postsurgical complications of ankle fracture reduction are briefly discussed, namely lateral, medial, and posterior malleolar malunion or nonunion, syndesmotic widening, degenerative changes, and septic arthritis with or without concomitant osteomyelitis. Emphasis is placed on the management of these complications, with a review of the treatment options proposed in the literature, a detailed discussion of the authors' recommendations, and an inclusion of different case presentations.

  7. Results of Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis with Fixation Using Two Parallel Headless Compression Screws in a Heterogenic Group of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, Lukas; Sadlik, Boguslaw; Sokolowski, Sebastian; Bohatyrewicz, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Background: As orthopedic surgeons become skilled in ankle arthroscopy technique and evidence -based data is supporting its use, arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis (AAA) will likely continue to increase, but stabilization methods have not been described clearly. We present a technique for two parallel 7.3-mm headless compression screws fixation (HCSs) for AAA in cases of ankle arthritis with different etiology, both traumatic and non-traumatic, including neuromuscular and inflammatory patients. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively verified 24 consecutive patients (25 ankles) who underwent AAA between 2011 and 2015. The average follow-up was 26 months (range 18 to 52 months). Arthrodesis was performed in 16 patients due to posttraumatic arthritis (in 5 as a sequela of pilon, 6 ankles, 3 tibia fractures, and 2 had arthritis due to chronic instability after lateral ligament injury), in 4 patients due to neuromuscular ankle joint deformities, and in 4 patients due to rheumatoid arthritis. Results: Fusion occurred in 23 joints (92%) over an average of 12 weeks (range 6 to 18 weeks). Ankle arthrodesis was not achieved in 2 joints (8%), both in post-pilon fracture patients. The correct foot alignment was not achieved in 4 feet (16%). None of the treated patients required hardware removal. Conclusion: The presented technique was effective in achieving a high fusion rate in a variety of diseases, decreasing intra- and post-operative hardware complications while maintaining adequate bone stability.

  8. How to Stretch Your Ankle After a Sprain

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankle, which orthopaedic foot and ankle specialists call proprioception. Consider these home exercises when recuperating from an ankle sprain. Perform them twice per day. While seated, bring your ankle and foot all the way up as much as you can. Do this slowly, ...

  9. Revision of the aseptic and septic total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Norman; Wirth, Stephan Hermann

    2013-04-01

    Total ankle replacement has become a popular treatment of symptomatic end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Contemporary total ankle replacement systems provide more anatomic and biomechanically sound function. However, longevity is still limited and long-term results of modern total ankle replacement designs are not available. In the case of failure, conversion into arthrodesis has remained the treatment of choice but at the cost of hindfoot function and potential degeneration of the adjacent joints. Thus, revision total ankle replacement by exchange of the prosthetic components represents an attractive solution. This article focuses on revision total ankle replacement and conversion to ankle arthrodesis.

  10. Ankle fractures in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Sandro; Chiarello, Eugenio; Persiani, Valentina; Luciani, Deianira; Cadossi, Matteo; Tedesco, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of ankle fractures (AFs) in the elderly is rising due to the increase in life expectancy. Rather than directly related to osteoporosis, AFs are a predictor of osteoporotic fractures in other sites. In women AFs are associated with weight and BMI. AFs are difficult to categorize; therapeutic options are non-operative treatment with plaster casts or surgical treatment with Kirschner's wires, plates and screws. The choice of treatment should be based not only on the fracture type but also on the local and general comorbidity of the patient. Considering the new evidence that postmenopausal women with AFs have disrupted microarchitecture and decreased stiffness of the bone compared with women with no fracture history, in our opinion low-trauma AFs should be considered in a similar way to the other classical osteoporotic fractures.

  11. Conversion of ankle autofusion to total ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Emilie R C; Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; Ellis, Scott J

    2016-09-01

    Few reports in the literature have described the conversion of a surgically fused ankle to a total ankle replacement. The takedown of an autofusion and conversion to a prosthesis has not been described. We report the case of a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis with an ankle autofusion fixed in equinus and severe talonavicular arthritis that was converted to ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision system. We describe the reasons why the decision was made to perform total ankle arthroplasty while concomitantly fusing the talonavicular joint, and discuss the rationale of the various surgical treatment options considered. We describe the clinical and radiographic outcomes achieved in this case. At 12 months post-operatively the patient reported significant reduction of pain, increased FAOS scores and had increased ankle range of motion.

  12. Biomechanics of the ankle joint and clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Michael, Junitha M; Golshani, Ashkahn; Gargac, Shawn; Goswami, Tarun

    2008-10-01

    Until the 1970s ankle arthrodesis was considered to be the "gold-standard" to treat arthritis. But the low fusion rate of ankle arthrodeses along with the inability to achieve normal range of motion led to the growing interest in the development of total ankle replacements. Though the short-term outcomes were good, their long-term outcomes were not as promising. To date, most models do not exactly mimic the anatomical functionality of a natural ankle joint. Therefore, research is being conducted worldwide to either enhance the existing models or develop new models while understanding the intricacies of the joint more precisely. This paper reviews the anatomical and biomechanical aspects of the ankle joint. Also, the evolution and comparison of clinical outcomes of various total ankle replacements are presented.

  13. The Salto Talaris XT Revision Ankle Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    The Salto Talaris XT Revision Ankle Prosthesis is an anatomically designed fixed-bearing prosthesis available in the United States based on the design of previous Salto systems. The Salto Talaris XT Revision Ankle Prosthesis design optimizes surface area, cortical contact, and ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene conformity. Two tibial component designs, both with the same base plate dimensions, are available, the standard conical fixation plug affixed to a short keel and a long-stemmed version. The author presents an overview of the Salto Talaris XT Revision Ankle Prosthesis surgical technique and pearls for successful application.

  14. [The reorientational rearthrodesis of the upper ankle joint following failed arthrodesis].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H; Grass, R; Rammelt, S

    2005-12-01

    There are three important principles for the correction of nonunion and/or malunion of the ankle joint: (1) reorientation back to anatomic shape and to the normal biomechanical axis of the ankle and foot; (2) respect for the biology of bone by resecting all sclerotic bone and/or transplantation of autogenous bone graft; and (3) achievement of optimal biomechanical stability by using the four-screw technique, a limited-contact dynamic-compression plate or a blade plate. CT scanning is the most reliable method for detecting nonunion of the ankle joint after arthrodesis. According to Saltzman, in order to understand the pathology of malunions and nonunions and to plan their correction, weight-bearing anteroposterior radiographs with a 20 degrees internal rotation of the feet, precise lateral views, and rear views of both sides are highly recommended.

  15. Transfibular ankle arthrodesis: A novel method for ankle fusion – A short term retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, S Muthukumar; Selvaraj, V; Devadoss, Sathish; Devadoss, Annamalai

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ankle arthrodesis has long been the traditional operative treatment for posttraumatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, infection, neuromuscular conditions, and salvage of failed ankle arthroplasty. It remains the treatment of choice for patients in whom heavy and prolonged activity is anticipated. We present our short term followup study of functional outcome of patients who underwent transfibular ankle arthrodesis for arthritis of ankle due to various indications. Materials and Methods: 29 transfibular ankle arthrodesis in 29 patients performed between April 2009 and April 2014 were included in this study. The mean age was 50 years (range 22-75 years). The outcome analysis with a minimum of 1-year postoperative followup were included. All the patients were assessed with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Hindfoot scale. Results: All cases of ankle fusions (100%) progressed to solid union in a mean postoperative duration of 3.8 months (range 3–6 months). All patients had sound arthrodesis. The mean followup period was 32.52 months (standard deviation ± 10.34). The mean AOFAS score was 74 (pain score = 32, functional score = 42). We found that twenty patients (68.96%) out of 29, had excellent results, 7 (24.13%) had good, and 2 (6.89%) showed fair results. Conclusion: Transfibular ankle arthrodesis is a simple and effective procedure for ankle arthritis. It achieves a high rate of union and good functional outcome on midterm followup. PMID:28216754

  16. Design and development of ankle-foot prosthesis with delayed release of plantarflexion.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael; Craig, Katelynn; Kyberd, Peter; Biden, Edmund; Bush, Greg

    2013-01-01

    A computer-controlled mechanism that fits a standard ankle-foot prosthesis was designed to capture the absorbed energy in the ankle and delay its release until specific times in the gait cycle. This mechanism used a direct current motor to take up and hold the compression of a carbon-fiber ankle joint. Based on the timing of the contact forces between the foot and the ground, a microprocessor released the spring at preset times later in the gait cycle. This mechanism was added to a Talux prosthetic foot and was employed by a user of a conventional energy-storage ankle-foot prosthesis. His gait was recorded using a motion analysis system. Five settings: 0, 55, 65, 75, and 85 ms delay were tested on separate days, and the standard kinematic and kinetic gait data were recorded. The user reported some settings were more comfortable than others. When these preferences were tested with a randomized double-blind trial, the preferences were not consistent. A second user showed a preference for the 55 ms delay. The modifications to the device resulted in changes to the gait of the subjects, including increased cadence and kinematics of the unaffected joints and a longer, slower push from the ankle, which was noticed by both of the subjects.

  17. Anterior Approach Total Ankle Arthroplasty: Superficial Peroneal Nerve Branches at Risk.

    PubMed

    McAlister, Jeffrey E; DeMill, Shyler L; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    In ankle arthroplasty, little attention has been given to intraoperative nerve injury and its postoperative sequelae. The aim of the present anatomic study was to determine the relationship of the superficial peroneal nerve to the standard anterior approach for total ankle arthroplasty. The superficial peroneal nerve was dissected in 10 below-the-knee cadaver specimens. The medial and intermediate dorsal cutaneous branches were identified. A needle was placed at the ankle joint. The following measurements were recorded: bifurcation into the medial and intermediate dorsal cutaneous branches, reference needle to the branches of the medial and intermediate superficial peroneal nerve, and the crossing branches of the medial dorsal cutaneous nerve. Two specimens (20%) had a medial dorsal cutaneous branch cross from medially to laterally. Eight specimens (80%) had a crossing branch of the medial dorsal cutaneous branch within 5 cm of the incision. No intermediate dorsal cutaneous branches were within the incision. The results from the present cadaver study suggest that during an anterior ankle approach, aberrant branches of the superficial peroneal nerve could require transection in 20% of patients at the joint level and ≤80% of patients with distal extension >35 mm from the ankle joint. The risk of injury to branches of the superficial peroneal nerve is substantial. The risk of nerve injury can be decreased with meticulous operative technique, smaller incisions, and the avoidance of aggressive retraction.

  18. Acute Inflammation

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  19. Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle: Lichen simplex chronicus is also known as neurodermatitis. A minor itch may encourage scratching which increases the irritation, leading to more scratching. This ...

  20. Foot and ankle injuries in dance.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy J

    2006-11-01

    Although dancers develop overuse injuries common in other athletes, they are also susceptible to unique injuries. This article reviews common foot and ankle problems seen in dancers and provides some basic diagnosis and treatment strategies.

  1. Arthroscopic Taloplasty for an Anterolateral Snapping Ankle.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Anterior ankle snapping syndrome is rare. Snapping of the extensor digitorum longus due to attenuated inferior extensor retinaculum and snapping due to hypertrophied or low-lying peroneal tertius muscle have been reported. We reported a new mechanism of anterolateral snapping due to a hypertrophied talar head. Anterolateral snapping ankle can be revealed by active dorsiflexion and plantarflexion of the ankle with the foot inverted. Foot inversion will tension the inferior extensor retinaculum and uncover the dorsolateral prominence of the talar head. The dorsolateral prominence of the talar head will snap over the proximal edge of the inferior extensor retinaculum. This technical note reports the technique of arthroscopic contouring of the talar head via extra-articular ankle arthroscopy. We named this technique arthroscopic taloplasty.

  2. Posterior tibial tendon displacement behind the tibia and its interposition in an irreducible isolated ankle dislocation: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    ORTOLANI, ALESSANDRO; BEVONI, ROBERTO; RUSSO, ALESSANDRO; MARCACCI, MAURILIO; GIROLAMI, MAURO

    2016-01-01

    Isolated posteromedial ankle dislocation is a rare condition thanks to the highly congruent anatomical configuration of the ankle mortise, in which the medial and lateral malleoli greatly reduce the rotational movement of the talus, and the strength of the ligaments higher than the malleoli affords protection against fractures. However, other factors, like medial malleolus hypoplasia, laxity of the ligaments, peroneal muscle weakness and previous ankle sprains, could predispose to pure dislocation. In the absence of such factors, only a complex high-energy trauma, with a rotational component, can lead to this event. Irreducibility of an ankle dislocation, which is rarely encountered, can be due to soft tissue interposition. Dislocation of the posterior tibial tendon can be the cause of an irreducible talar dislocation; interposition of this tendon, found to have slid posteriorly to the distal tibia and then passed through the tibioperoneal syndesmosis, is reported in just a few cases of ankle fracture-dislocation. PMID:27900312

  3. The axis of rotation of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, A; Svensson, O K; Németh, G; Selvik, G

    1989-01-01

    The axis of the talo-crural joint was analysed by roentgen stereophotogrammetry in eight healthy volunteers. Examinations were performed at 10 degrees increments of flexion and pronation/supination of the foot as well as medial and lateral rotation of the leg. Results indicate that the talo-crural joint axis changes continuously throughout the range of movement. In dorsiflexion it tended to be oblique downward and laterally. In rotation of the leg, the axis took varying inclinations between horizontal and vertical. All axes in each subject lay close to the midpoint of a line between the tips of the malleoli. Our study indicates that the talo-crural joint axis may alter considerably during the arc of motion and differ significantly between individuals. This prompts caution in the use of hinge axes in orthoses and prostheses for the ankle.

  4. Complex ankle arthrodesis: Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Remy V; Haleem, Amgad M; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2015-01-01

    Complex ankle arthrodesis is defined as an ankle fusion that is at high risk of delayed and nonunion secondary to patient comorbidities and/or local ankle/hindfoot factors. Risk factors that contribute to defining this group of patients can be divided into systemic factors and local factors pertaining to co-existing ankle or hindfoot pathology. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of these risk factors and their association with patients’ outcomes after complex ankle fusions. Both external and internal fixations have demonstrated positive outcomes with regards to achieving stable fixation and minimizing infection. Recent innovations in the application of biophysical agents and devices have shown promising results as adjuncts for healing. Both osteoconductive and osteoinductive agents have been effectively utilized as biological adjuncts for bone healing with low complication rates. Devices such as pulsed electromagnetic field bone stimulators, internal direct current stimulators and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound bone stimulators have been associated with faster bone healing and improved outcomes scores when compared with controls. The aim of this review article is to present a comprehensive approach to the management of complex ankle fusions, including the use of biophysical adjuncts for healing and a proposed algorithm for their treatment. PMID:26396936

  5. Test-Retest Reliability of Sudden Ankle Inversion Measurements in Subjects With Healthy Ankle Joints

    PubMed Central

    Eechaute, Christophe; Vaes, Peter; Duquet, William; Van Gheluwe, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Context: Sudden ankle inversion tests have been used to investigate whether the onset of peroneal muscle activity is delayed in patients with chronically unstable ankle joints. Before interpreting test results of latency times in patients with chronic ankle instability and healthy subjects, the reliability of these measures must be first demonstrated. Objective: To investigate the test-retest reliability of variables measured during a sudden ankle inversion movement in standing subjects with healthy ankle joints. Design: Validation study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: 15 subjects with healthy ankle joints (30 ankles). Intervention(s): Subjects stood on an ankle inversion platform with both feet tightly fixed to independently moveable trapdoors. An unexpected sudden ankle inversion of 50° was imposed. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured latency and motor response times and electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle, along with the time and angular position of the first and second decelerating moments, the mean and maximum inversion speed, and the total inversion time. Correlation coefficients and standard error of measurements were calculated. Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.17 for the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle (standard error of measurement = 2.7 milliseconds) to 0.89 for the maximum inversion speed (standard error of measurement = 34.8 milliseconds). Conclusions: The reliability of the latency and motor response times of the peroneus longus muscle, the time of the first and second decelerating moments, and the mean and maximum inversion speed was acceptable in subjects with healthy ankle joints and supports the investigation of the reliability of these measures in subjects with chronic ankle instability. The lower reliability of the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle and the angular positions of both decelerating moments calls the use of these

  6. Clinical application of a modular ankle robot for stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Larry W.; Roy, Anindo; Goodman, Ronald N.; Rietschel, Jeremy; Barton, Joseph E.; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advances in our understanding of neuroplasticity and motor learning post-stroke are now being leveraged with the use of robotics technology to enhance physical rehabilitation strategies. Major advances have been made with upper extremity robotics, which have been tested for efficacy in multi-site trials across the subacute and chronic phases of stroke. In contrast, use of lower extremity robotics to promote locomotor re-learning has been more recent and presents unique challenges by virtue of the complex multi-segmental mechanics of gait. Objectives Here we review a programmatic effort to develop and apply the concept of joint-specific modular robotics to the paretic ankle as a means to improve underlying impairments in distal motor control that may have a significant impact on gait biomechanics and balance. Methods An impedance controlled ankle robot module (anklebot) is described as a platform to test the idea that a modular approach can be used to modify training and measure the time profile of treatment response. Results Pilot studies using seated visuomotor anklebot training with chronic patients are reviewed, along with results from initial efforts to evaluate the anklebot's utility as a clinical tool for assessing intrinsic ankle stiffness. The review includes a brief discussion of future directions for using the seated anklebot training in the earliest phases of sub-acute therapy, and to incorporate neurophysiological measures of cerebro-cortical activity as a means to reveal underlying mechanistic processes of motor learning and brain plasticity associated with robotic training. Conclusions Finally we conclude with an initial control systems strategy for utilizing the anklebot as a gait training tool that includes integrating an Internal Model-based adaptive controller to both accommodate individual deficit severities and adapt to changes in patient performance. PMID:23949045

  7. Articular Ankle Fracture Results in Increased Synovitis, Synovial Macrophage Infiltration, and Synovial Fluid Concentrations of Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Bridgette D.; Kimmerling, Kelly A.; Zura, Robert D.; Reilly, Rachel M.; Zlowodzki, Michal P.; Huebner, Janet L.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Guilak, Farshid; Olson, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The inflammatory response following an articular fracture is thought to play a role in the development of posttraumatic arthritis (PTA) but has not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to characterize the acute inflammatory response, both locally and systemically, in joint synovium, synovial fluid (SF), and serum following articular fracture of the ankle. We hypothesized that intraarticular fracture would alter the synovial environment and lead to increased local and systemic inflammation. Methods Synovial tissue biopsy specimens, SF samples, and serum samples were collected from patients with an acute articular ankle fracture (n = 6). Additional samples (normal, ankle osteoarthritis [OA], and knee OA [n = 6 per group]) were included for comparative analyses. Synovial tissue was assessed for synovitis and macrophage count. SF and serum were assessed for cytokines (interferon-γ [IFNγ], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, and tumor necrosis factor α) and chemokines (eotaxin, eotaxin 3, IFNγ-inducible 10-kd protein, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1], MCP-4, macrophage-derived chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and thymus and activation–regulated chemokine). Results Synovitis scores were significantly higher in ankle fracture tissue compared with normal ankle tissue (P = 0.007), and there was a trend toward an increased abundance of CD68+ macrophages in ankle fracture synovium compared with normal knee synovium (P = 0.06). The concentrations of all cytokines and chemokines were elevated in the SF of patients with ankle fracture compared with those in SF from OA patients with no history of trauma. Only the concentration of IL-6 was significantly increased in the serum of patients with ankle fracture compared with normal serum (P = 0.027). Conclusion Articular fracture of the ankle increased acute local inflammation, as indicated by increased synovitis, increased macrophage infiltration into

  8. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function. PMID:28265157

  9. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function.

  10. [Revision arthroplasty of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Hintermann, B; Barg, A; Knupp, M

    2011-11-01

    In the last 20 years total ankle replacement has become a viable alternative to arthrodesis for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle. Numerous ankle prosthesis designs have appeared on the market in the past and attracted by the encouraging intermediate results reported in the literature, many surgeons have started to perform this procedure. With increased availability on the market the indications for total ankle replacement have also increased in recent years. In particular, total ankle replacement may now be considered even in younger patients. Therefore, despite progress in total ankle arthroplasty the number of failures may increase. Up to now, arthrodesis was considered to be the gold standard for salvage of failed ankle prostheses. Because of extensive bone loss on the talar side, in most instances tibiocalcaneal fusion is the only reliable solution. An alternative to such extended hindfoot fusions would be revision arthroplasty. To date, however, there are no reported results of revision arthroplasty for salvage of a failed ankle replacement.Based on our experience prosthetic components with a flat undersurface are most likely to be able to find solid support on remaining bone stock. The first 83 cases (79 patients, 46 males, 33 females, average age 58.9 years, range 30.6-80.7 years) with a average follow-up of 5.4 years (range 2-11 years) showed excellent to good results in 69 cases (83%), a satisfactory result in 12 cases (15%) and a fair result in 2 cases (2%) and 47 patients (56%) were pain free. Primary loosening was noted in three cases and of these two cases were successfully revised by another total ankle replacement and in one case with arthrodesis. Another case with hematogenous infection was also revised by arthrodesis. At the last follow-up control two components were considered to be loose and the overall loosening rate was thus 6%.This series has proven that revision arthroplasty can be a promising option for patients with failed total

  11. The ankle meter: an instrument for evaluation of anterior talar drawer in ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Gunter

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to work out a clinical test which is possible to measure the anterior talar drawer (ATD) in patients after ankle sprain. The instrument for evaluation was called "ankle meter". The instrument consists of two plastic scales (heal scale and tibia scale). The instrument allows quantifying the results of the anterior drawing test. A total of 38 persons (16 men, 22 women) were available as control group. The persons were 28.8+/-10.1 years old. No proband had any ankle problems in his history. A total of 45 patients (25 males, 20 females) suffering from ankle sprain were included in the study. In these patients stress radiography (147.1 N) was performed to measure the ATD. In control group the clinical measured ATD was 1.7+/-1.3 mm. Measurement for detect the interobserver validity did not detect significant differences. The ATD of the joint after ankle sprain was significantly higher (8.9+/-4.3 mm). The difference between healthy and injured ankle in case of an ankle sprain was 7.4+/-4.2 mm. There was a significant correlation between clinical and radiological measured ATD (R=0.91). The results suggest that it is possible to measure the ATD exactly. The values of the clinical ATD measurement showed a good correlation with the results of stress radiography. Diligent clinical examination in combination with this special test are after this experiences sufficient to classify the severity of injury after ankle sprain.

  12. The effectiveness of the parachutist ankle brace in reducing ankle injuries in an airborne ranger battalion.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, J T; Creedon, J F; Pope, R W

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the parachutist ankle brace (PAB) decreases the number and severity of ankle injuries in an airborne Ranger battalion. A retrospective study was performed covering a 38-month period. A computer database was used to track all jump injuries with a diagnosis of ankle pain, sprain, or fracture. The frequency was calculated for ankle injuries per 1,000 jumps and the average length of medically restricted duty per ankle injury. A total of 13,782 static line parachute jumps were conducted during the study period. Without the PAB, 35 ankle injuries were seen (4.5/1,000 jumps), with 9 fractures and 316 days of medical restriction per 1,000 jumps. Using the PAB, 9 ankle injuries were seen (1.5/1,000 jumps), with 3 fractures and 71 days of medical restriction per 1,000 jumps. The correct use of the PAB appeared to significantly decrease the incidence of ankle injuries in this battalion.

  13. Effect of treadmill walking with ankle stretching orthosis on ankle flexibility and gait

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-ki; Kim, Si-hyun; Jeon, In-cheol; Ahn, Sun-hee; Kwon, Oh-yun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematics of the ankle in the lunge to estabilish effectiveness of an ankle stretching orthosis (ASO) on the ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) of individuals with limited dorsiflexion ROM. [Subjects and Methods] Forty ankles with decreased dorsiflexion ROM of 20 participants were evaluated in this study. After wearing the ASO, participants walked on a treadmill for 15 minutes. Participants walked on the treadmill at a self-selected comfortable speed. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM, maximum dorsiflexion ROM before heel-off, and time to heel-off during the stance phase of gait were measured before and after 15 minutes of treadmill walking with the ASO. The differences in all variables between before and after treadmill walking with ASO were analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] Ankle active and passive ROM, and dorsiflexion ROM during lunge increased significantly after treadmill walking with ASO. Treadmill walking with the ASO significantly increased the angle of maximal dorsiflexion before heel-off and time to heel-off during the stance phase. [Conclusion] The results of this study show that treadmill walking with the ASO effectively improved ankle flexibility and restored the normal gait pattern of the ankle joint by increasing dorsiflexion ROM, maximal angle of dorsiflexion, and time to heel-off in the stance phase. PMID:25995601

  14. Lower Extremity Biomechanics in Athletes With Ankle Instability After a 6-Week Integrated Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pi-Yin; Chen, Wen-Ling; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Lee, Heng-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Context: Plyometric exercise has been recommended to prevent lower limb injury, but its feasibility in and effects on those with functional ankle instability (FAI) are unclear. Objective: To investigate the effect of integrated plyometric and balance training in participants with FAI during a single-legged drop landing and single-legged standing position. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: University motion-analysis laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty athletes with FAI were divided into 3 groups: plyometric group (8 men, 2 women, age = 23.20 ± 2.82 years; 10 unstable ankles), plyometric-balance (integrated)–training group (8 men, 2 women, age = 23.80 ± 4.13 years; 10 unstable ankles), and control group (7 men, 3 women, age = 23.50 ± 3.00 years; 10 unstable ankles). Intervention(s): A 6-week plyometric-training program versus a 6-week integrated-training program. Main Outcome Measure(s): Postural sway during single-legged standing with eyes open and closed was measured before and after training. Kinematic data were recorded during medial and lateral single-legged drop landings after a 5-second single-legged stance. Results: Reduced postural sway in the medial-lateral direction and reduced sway area occurred in the plyometric- and integrated-training groups. Generally, the plyometric training and integrated training increased the maximum angles at the hip and knee in the sagittal plane, reduced the maximum angles at the hip and ankle in the frontal and transverse planes in the lateral drop landing, and reduced the time to stabilization for knee flexion in the medial drop landing. Conclusions: After 6 weeks of plyometric training or integrated training, individuals with FAI used a softer landing strategy during drop landings and decreased their postural sway during the single-legged stance. Plyometric training improved static and dynamic postural control and should be incorporated into rehabilitation programs for those with FAI

  15. TIBIOTARSAL COMPRESSION ARTHRODESIS USING A LATERAL LOCKING PLATE

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Michael J.; Nery, Caio; Baumfeld, Daniel; Jastifer, James

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Tibiotalar (TT) arthrodesis is still a very important option in the treatment of primary or post-traumatic arthritis of the ankle but persists the controversy regarding the optimal method for the fixation of the arthrodesis site. No matter the implant used, the goal is to obtain a solid, healthy, pain-free fusion. The purpose of the current study is to present the preliminary results of a novel laterally based tibiotalar compression arthrodesis system using a locked plate. Methods: Thirteen consecutive patients with tibiotalar arthritis were submitted to an arthrodesis using a new lateral plating system. The average age was 59.7 years (range 36~72); nine patients were male and four female. Using a cutting guide, the remaining articular surfaces of the tibia and talus were removed. A compression device was applied to avoid malalignment of the ankle and a precontoured lateral locking plate was used to achieve the joint fusion. Results: Both the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score and the VAS score improved with the surgery. All patients’ ankles fused by 6 months. In all patients we found a very good alignment in the sagittal, coronal and transverse planes. Conclusion: We believe that a combination of a bilateral compression, contoured bony cuts, and lateral locked plating offers a novel, accurate and useful technique for ankle arthrodesis. PMID:27047874

  16. Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Joyner, Patrick W.; Almekinders, Louis C.; Parekh, Selene G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a common problem encountered by athletes of all levels and ages. These injuries can be difficult to diagnose and may be initially evaluated by all levels of medical personnel. Clinical suspicion should be raised with certain history and physical examination findings. Evidence Acquisition: Scientific and review articles were searched through PubMed (1930-2012) with search terms including stress fractures and 1 of the following: foot ankle, medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, calcaneus, talus, metatarsal, cuboid, cuneiform, sesamoid, or athlete. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle can be divided into low and high risk based upon their propensity to heal without complication. A wide variety of nonoperative strategies are employed based on the duration of symptoms, type of fracture, and patient factors, such as activity type, desire to return to sport, and compliance. Operative management has proven superior in several high-risk types of stress fractures. Evidence on pharmacotherapy and physiologic therapy such as bone stimulators is evolving. Conclusion: A high index of suspicion for stress fractures is appropriate in many high-risk groups of athletes with lower extremity pain. Proper and timely work-up and treatment is successful in returning these athletes to sport in many cases. Low-risk stress fracture generally requires only activity modification while high-risk stress fracture necessitates more aggressive intervention. The specific treatment of these injuries varies with the location of the stress fracture and the goals of the patient. PMID:25364480

  17. The results of ankle arthrodesis with screws for end stage ankle arthrosis.

    PubMed

    Torudom, Yingyong

    2010-02-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the results of ankle arthrodesis with screws in patients with ankle arthrosis. The author studied 19 patients (20 feet) who had been treated by ankle arthrodesis with screws from 2003 to 2008. Ten patients were men (11 feet) and nine (9 feet) were women. Their mean age was 56 years (30 to 65), and the average duration of follow-up was four years (2 to 6). Two compression screws were used in all feet. Union was achieved in 19 of the 20 feet (95%). Average scores for pain and clinical condition are increase after operation. One re-operation was performed for nonunion. Author conclude that ankle arthrodesis with screws was effective treatment for ankle arthrosis.

  18. [Ankle joint arthritis--etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Uri, Ofir; Haim, Amir

    2008-11-01

    Ankle joint arthritis causes functional limitation and affects the quality of life many patients. It follows traumatic injuries, inflammatory joint arthritis, primary osteoarthritis, hemochromatosis and infections. Understanding the unique anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle is important for diagnosis and treatment of ankle joint pathology. The treatment of ankle joint arthritis has advanced considerably in recent years and it is still a surgical challenge. Total ankle replacement seems to be a promising form of treatment, even though current data does not demonstrate advantages over ankle joint arthrodesis.

  19. Arthroscopic Management of Complications Following Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    There is great potential of managing the complications of total ankle replacement arthroscopically and endoscopically, and these procedures can be summarized into 3 groups. Group 1 includes procedures of the ankle joint proper with close proximity to the articular components of the total ankle replacement. Group 2 includes procedures of the tibia and talus with close proximity to the nonarticular parts of the total ankle replacement. Group 3 includes procedures that are away from the total ankle replacement. However, these remain master arthroscopist procedures and should be performed by foot and ankle surgeons who perform them with regularity.

  20. [Chronic diseases of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Rand, T; Trattnig, S; Breitenseher, M; Kreuzer, S; Wagesreither, S; Imhof, H

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of chronic diseases of the ankle joint comprises a wide spectrum including chronic inflammatory processes and chronic degenerative, tumorous and neuropathic processes, as well as some specific syndromes based on chronic changes of the ankle joint. Of the inflammatory processes, chronic juvenile arthritis (JVC) is the most common disease. However, also Reiter disease, psoriasis or chronic monoarthritid diseases such as gout, as well as granulomatous diseases (tuberculosis, sarcoidosis) and fungal infections, may affect the ankle joint in a chronic course. Chronic degenerative changes are usually secondary due to abnormal positioning of the joint constituents or repetitive trauma. Neuropathic changes, as frequently seen in the course of diabetes, present with massive osseous destruction and malposition of the articular constituents. Chronic osseous as well as cartilaginous and synovial changes are seen in hemophilic patients. Chronic traumatic changes are represented by pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), and chondromatosis, both with a predilection for the ankle joint. Due to the possibilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diagnosis of chronic ankle changes includes chronic ligamentous, tendinous and soft tissue changes. With the use of MRI, specific syndromes can be defined which particularly affect the ankle joint in a chronic way, such as the os trigonum syndrome, the anterolateral impingement syndrome and the sinus tarsi syndrome. Nevertheless, plain film radiographs are still the basic element of any investigation. MRI, however, can be potentially used as a second investigation, saving an unnecessary cascade of investigations with ultrasound and CT. The latter investigations are used only with very specific indications, for instance CT for subtle bone structures and sonography for a limited investigation of tendons or evaluation of fluid. Particularly due to the possibilities of MRI and the development of special gradient-echo imaging

  1. Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion After Ankle Self-Stretching Using a Strap

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, In-cheol; Kwon, Oh-yun; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Hwang, Ui-jae

    2015-01-01

    Context  A variety of ankle self-stretching exercises have been recommended to improve ankle-dorsiflexion range of motion (DFROM) in individuals with limited ankle dorsiflexion. A strap can be applied to stabilize the talus and facilitate anterior glide of the distal tibia at the talocrural joint during ankle self-stretching exercises. Novel ankle self-stretching using a strap (SSS) may be a useful method of improving ankle DFROM. Objective  To compare the effects of 2 ankle-stretching techniques (static stretching versus SSS) on ankle DFROM. Design  Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting  University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants  Thirty-two participants with limited active dorsiflexion (<20°) while sitting (14 women and 18 men) were recruited. Main Outcome Measure(s)  The participants performed 2 ankle self-stretching techniques (static stretching and SSS) for 3 weeks. Active DFROM (ADFROM), passive DFROM (PDFROM), and the lunge angle were measured. An independent t test was used to compare the improvements in these values before and after the 2 stretching interventions. The level of statistical significance was set at α = .05. Results  Active DFROM and PDFROM were greater in both stretching groups after the 3-week interventions. However, ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle were greater in the SSS group than in the static-stretching group (P < .05). Conclusions  Ankle SSS is recommended to improve ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle in individuals with limited DFROM. PMID:26633750

  2. Guided Growth With Temporary Hemiepiphysiodesis to Treat Ankle Valgus in a Skeletally Immature Individual: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    LaPorta, Guido A; Susek, Mehgan M

    2016-01-01

    Guided growth is useful in correcting pediatric angular deformities. Ankle valgus is a coronal plane deformity and is often seen in skeletally immature patients with congenital or acquired lower extremity pathologic features. Temporary hemiepiphysiodesis with a percutaneous transphyseal medial malleolar screw is a surgical treatment capable of correcting the angular deformity and can offer effective correction. In the present case study, a 12-year-old male with dorsal-lateral peritalar subluxation and ankle valgus underwent a reconstructive procedure and temporary hemiepiphysiodesis with a percutaneous medial malleolar screw. After removal of the screw, reduction of his peritalar subluxation was achieved, improving his lateral-distal tibial angle from 81° preoperatively to 89° at the final follow-up examination. The patient returned to his preoperative sporting activities and ambulated comfortably and pain free in sneakers with orthotics. In conclusion, temporary hemiepiphysiodesis with a transphyseal medial malleolar screw is an effective treatment option for ankle valgus in a skeletally immature individual.

  3. Effectiveness of two modalities of physiotherapy in the treatment of haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle: a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Barriuso, R; Gómez-Conesa, A; López-Pina, J-A

    2014-01-01

    Although different techniques of physiotherapy have been described for the treatment of haemophilic arthropathy (HA) of ankle, hardly any studies have been applied manual therapy or educational physiotherapy and home exercises. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of manual therapy and educational physiotherapy in the treatment of HA of the ankle. Thirty-one patients with HA of the ankle with a mean age of 35.29 (SD: 12.877) years randomized to manual therapy group (n = 11), educational group (n = 10) and a control group (n = 10). The two physiotherapy programmes were one with manual therapy articular traction, passive stretching of the gastrocnemius muscles, and exercises for muscle strength and proprioception (MT group) and the other with educational sessions and home exercises (E group). The study lasted for 12 weeks. The treatment with manual therapy improved the gastrocnemius muscle circumference, and the pain of ankle (P < 0.05). Six months later, MT group still enjoyed improvement. In the educational group there were improvements, but not significant, in the measured variables. No patient had ankle haemarthrosis during the study. The treatment with manual therapy improved the circumference of gastrocnemius and lessened pain in the patients with haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle.

  4. [Variations in the calcaneo-fibular ligament (lig. calcaneofibulare). Application to the kinematics of the ankle].

    PubMed

    Trouilloud, P; Dia, A; Grammont, P; Gelle, M C; Autissier, J M

    1988-03-01

    The authors observe variations in the calcaneo-fibular ligament because this ligament controls two articulations, the talo-crural and the subtalar. This study is based on the dissection of the ankle of 20 specimens. The calcaneo-fibular ligament is reinforced by the ventral and lateral talo-calcaneus ligaments with variations. 3 types of disposition have been described. Type A: A lateral talo-calcaneal ligament reinforces the calcaneo-fibular ligament. These two ligaments are divergent on the proximal, medial, or distal part. Type B: There is an independent lateral talo-calcaneal ligament forward of the calcaneo-fibular ligament. Type C: A ventral talo-calcaneal ligament is observed, parallel to the interosseous ligament. The authors consider the consequences of variation in the lateral ligaments of the ankle for the functioning of the tibio-tarsal articulation, the subtalar articulation and the astragalo-scaphoid articulation in order to propose specific radiographic examination of the kinematics of the ankle.

  5. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  6. Effects of Tape and Exercise on Dynamic Ankle Inversion

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Mark D.; Sherwood, Stephen M.; Schulthies, Shane S.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of tape, with and without prewrap, on dynamic ankle inversion before and after exercise. Design and Setting: Doubly multivariate analyses of variance were used to compare the taping and exercise conditions. Subjects were randomly assigned to a fixed treatment order as determined by a balanced latin square. The independent variables were tape application (no tape, tape with prewrap, tape to skin) and exercise (before and after). The dependent variables were average inversion velocity, total inversion, maximum inversion velocity, and time to maximum inversion. Subjects: Thirty college-age male and female students (17 males, 13 females; mean age = 24.9 ± 4.3 years, range, 19 to 39 years) were tested. Subjects were excluded from the study if they exhibited a painful gait or painful range of motion or had a past history of ankle surgery or an ankle sprain within the past 4 weeks. Measurements: We collected data using electronic goniometers while subjects balanced on the right leg on an inversion platform tilted about the medial-lateral axis to produce 15° of plantar flexion. Sudden ankle inversion was induced by pulling the inversion platform support, allowing the platform support base to rotate 37°. Ten satisfactory trials were recorded on the inversion platform before and after a prescribed exercise bout. We calculated total inversion, time to maximum inversion, average inversion velocity, and maximum inversion velocity after sudden inversion. Results: We found no significant differences between taping to the skin and taping over prewrap for any of the variables measured. There were significant differences between both taping conditions and no-tape postexercise for average inversion velocity, maximum inversion, maximum inversion velocity, and time to maximum inversion. The total inversion mean for no-tape postexercise was 38.8° ± 6.3°, whereas the means for tape and skin and for tape and prewrap were 28.3° ± 4.6° and 29.1°

  7. Measurement of passive ankle stiffness in subjects with chronic hemiparesis using a novel ankle robot.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindo; Krebs, Hermano I; Bever, Christopher T; Forrester, Larry W; Macko, Richard F; Hogan, Neville

    2011-05-01

    Our objective in this study was to assess passive mechanical stiffness in the ankle of chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors and to compare it with those of healthy young and older (age-matched) individuals. Given the importance of the ankle during locomotion, an accurate estimate of passive ankle stiffness would be valuable for locomotor rehabilitation, potentially providing a measure of recovery and a quantitative basis to design treatment protocols. Using a novel ankle robot, we characterized passive ankle stiffness both in sagittal and in frontal planes by applying perturbations to the ankle joint over the entire range of motion with subjects in a relaxed state. We found that passive stiffness of the affected ankle joint was significantly higher in chronic stroke survivors than in healthy adults of a similar cohort, both in the sagittal as well as frontal plane of movement, in three out of four directions tested with indistinguishable stiffness values in plantarflexion direction. Our findings are comparable to the literature, thus indicating its plausibility, and, to our knowledge, report for the first time passive stiffness in the frontal plane for persons with chronic stroke and older healthy adults.

  8. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    PubMed

    van Dijk, C Niek; Reilingh, Mikel L; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J A

    2010-05-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone plate. The ankle joint has a high congruency. During loading, compressed cartilage forces its water into the microfractured subchondral bone, leading to a localized high increased flow and pressure of fluid in the subchondral bone. This will result in local osteolysis and can explain the slow development of a subchondral cyst. The pain does not arise from the cartilage lesion, but is most probably caused by repetitive high fluid pressure during walking, which results in stimulation of the highly innervated subchondral bone underneath the cartilage defect. Understanding the natural history of osteochondral defects could lead to the development of strategies for preventing progressive joint damage.

  9. VISCOSUPPLEMENTATION IN ANKLE OSTEOARTHRITIS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Faleiro, Thiago Batista; Schulz, Renata da Silva; Jambeiro, Jorge Eduardo de Schoucair; Tavares, Antero; Delmonte, Fernando Moreira; Daltro, Gildásio de Cerqueira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To evaluate the efficacy of viscosupplementation in patients with osteoarthritis of the ankle. A systematic review to evaluate the evidence in the literature on the use of viscosupplementation for osteoarthritis of the ankle. For this review, we considered blind randomized prospective studies involving the use of viscosupplementation for osteoarthritis of the ankle. A total of 1,961 articles were identified in various databases. After examining each of the articles, five articles were included in this review. Treatment with intraarticular hyaluronic acid is a safe treatment modality that significantly improves functional scores of patients, with no evidence of superiority in relation to other conservative treatments. Further clinical trials with larger numbers of patients are needed so that we can recommend its use and address unanswered questions. Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials. PMID:26997916

  10. VISCOSUPPLEMENTATION IN ANKLE OSTEOARTHRITIS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Faleiro, Thiago Batista; Schulz, Renata da Silva; Jambeiro, Jorge Eduardo de Schoucair; Tavares, Antero; Delmonte, Fernando Moreira; Daltro, Gildásio de Cerqueira

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of viscosupplementation in patients with osteoarthritis of the ankle. A systematic review to evaluate the evidence in the literature on the use of viscosupplementation for osteoarthritis of the ankle. For this review, we considered blind randomized prospective studies involving the use of viscosupplementation for osteoarthritis of the ankle. A total of 1,961 articles were identified in various databases. After examining each of the articles, five articles were included in this review. Treatment with intraarticular hyaluronic acid is a safe treatment modality that significantly improves functional scores of patients, with no evidence of superiority in relation to other conservative treatments. Further clinical trials with larger numbers of patients are needed so that we can recommend its use and address unanswered questions . Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials.

  11. Growth modulation with a medial malleolar screw for ankle valgus deformity

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Martin; Spiro, Alexander S; Breyer, Sandra; Vettorazzi, Eik; Ridderbusch, Karsten; Stücker, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Growth modulation with a medial malleolar screw is used to correct ankle valgus deformity in children with a wide spectrum of underlying etiologies. It is unclear whether the etiology of the deformity affects the angular correction rate with this procedure. Patients and methods 79 children (20 girls) with ankle valgus deformity had growth modulation by a medial malleolar screw (125 ankles). To be included, patients had to have undergone screw removal at the time of skeletal maturity or deformity correction, or a minimum follow-up of 18 months, and consistent radiographs preoperatively and at the time of screw removal and/or follow-up. The patients were assigned to 1 of 7 groups according to their underlying diagnoses. The lateral distal tibial angle (LDTA) was analyzed preoperatively, at screw removal, and at follow-up. Results Mean age at operation was 11.7 (7.4–16.5) years. The average lateral distal tibial angle normalized from 80° (67–85) preoperatively to 89° (73–97) at screw removal. The screws were removed after an average time of 18 (6–46) months, according to an average rate of correction of 0.65° (0.1–2.2) per month. No significant differences in the correction rate per month were found between the groups (p = 0.3). Interpretation Growth modulation with a medial malleolar screw is effective for the treatment of ankle valgus deformity in patients with a wide spectrum of underlying diagnoses. The individual etiology of the ankle valgus does not appear to affect the correction rate after growth modulation. Thus, the optimal timing of growth modulation mainly depends on the remaining individual growth and on the extent of the deformity. PMID:25909385

  12. Foot and Ankle Injuries in American Football.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Andrew R; Anderson, Robert B

    Physicians need to be aware of a variety of foot and ankle injuries that commonly occur in American football, including turf toe, Jones fractures, Lisfranc injuries, syndesmotic and deltoid disruption, and Achilles ruptures. These injuries are often complex and require early individual tailoring of treatment and rehabilitation protocols. Successful management and return to play requires early diagnosis, a thorough work-up, and prompt surgical intervention when warranted with meticulous attention to restoration of normal foot and ankle anatomy. Physicians should have a high suspicion for subtle injuries and variants that can occur via both contact and noncontact mechanisms.

  13. Dietary and viscosupplementation in ankle arthritis.

    PubMed

    Khosla, Shaun K; Baumhauer, Judith F

    2008-09-01

    Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are the most well-marketed dietary supplements directed toward managing symptoms associated with osteoarthritis. The presumption of their benefit in the ankle is based largely on promising results from their use in knee osteoarthritis. Likewise, viscosupplementation has proved to be efficacious in the management of osteoarthritis of the knee. Preliminary studies demonstrate a realization of this benefit in the ankle joint, but further research is required. So far, the literature has shown the dietary and viscosupplementation discussed in this article to be relatively safe for use.

  14. Collar height and heel counter-stiffness for ankle stability and athletic performance in basketball.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wu, Zitian; Lam, Wing-Kai

    2017-01-25

    This study examined the effects of collar height and heel counter-stiffness of basketball shoes on ankle stability during sidestep cutting and athletic performance. 15 university basketball players wore customized shoes with different collar heights (high and low) and heel counter-stiffness (regular, stiffer and stiffest) for this study. Ankle stability was evaluated in sidestep cutting while athletic performance evaluated in jumping and agility tasks. All variables were analysed using two-way repeated ANOVA. Results showed shorter time to peak ankle inversion for both high collar and stiff heel counter conditions (P < 0.05), while smaller initial ankle inversion angle, peak inversion velocity and total range of inversion for wearing high collar shoes (P < 0.05). No shoe differences were found for performance variables. These findings imply that the collar height might play a larger role in lateral stability than heel counter-stiffness, while both collar height and counter-stiffness have no effect on athletic performance.

  15. Ankle proprioception is not targeted by exercises on an unstable surface.

    PubMed

    Kiers, Henri; Brumagne, Simon; van Dieën, Jaap; van der Wees, Philip; Vanhees, Luc

    2012-04-01

    Laboratory study using a repeated measures design. The aim of this study was to determine if ankle proprioception is targeted in exercises on unstable surfaces. Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) has recurrence rates over 70%, which are believed to be due to a reduced accuracy of proprioceptive signals from the ankle. Proprioceptive exercises in rehabilitation of LAS mostly consist of balancing activities on an unstable surface. The methods include 100 healthy adults stood barefoot on a solid surface and a foam pad over a force plate, with occluded vision. Mechanical vibration was used to stimulate proprioceptive output of muscle spindles of triceps surae and lumbar paraspinal musculature. Each trial lasted for 60 s; vibration was applied from the 15th till the 30th second. Changes in mean velocity and mean position of the center of pressure (CoP) as a result of muscle vibration were calculated. Results show that on foam, the effect of triceps surae vibration on mean CoP velocity was significantly smaller than on a solid surface, while for paraspinal musculature vibration the effect was bigger on foam than on solid surface. Similar effects were seen for mean CoP displacement as outcome. Exercises on unstable surfaces appear not to target peripheral ankle proprioception. Exercises on an unstable surface may challenge the capacity of the central nervous system to shift the weighting of sources of proprioceptive signals on balance.

  16. Effectiveness of an outside-the-boot ankle brace in reducing parachuting related ankle injuries

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M; Sulsky, S; Amoroso, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the efficacy of an outside-the-boot parachute ankle brace (PAB) in reducing risk of ankle injury to army paratrooper trainees and to identify inadvertent risks associated with PAB use. Design: The authors compared hospitalization rates for ankle, musculoskeletal, and other traumatic injury among 223 172 soldiers trained 1985–2002 in time periods defined by presence/absence of PAB use protocols. Multiple logistic regression analysis estimated adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for injury outcomes, comparing pre and post brace periods to the brace protocol period. Setting: A research database consisting of training rosters from the US Army Airborne training facility (Fort Benning, GA) occupational, demographic, and hospitalization information. Main outcome measures: Injuries were considered training related if they occurred during a five week period starting with first scheduled static line parachute jump and a parachuting cause of injury code appeared in the hospital record. Results: Of 939 parachuting related hospitalizations during the defined risk period, 597 (63.6%) included an ankle injury diagnosis, 198 (21.1%) listed a musculoskeletal (non-ankle) injury, and 69 (7.3%) cited injuries to multiple body parts. Risk of ankle injury hospitalization was higher during both pre-brace (adjusted OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.92 to 2.95) and post-brace (adjusted OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.32) periods compared with the brace protocol period. Odds of musculoskeletal (non-ankle) injury or injury to multiple body parts did not change between the brace and post-brace periods. Conclusion: Use of a PAB during airborne training appears to reduce risk of ankle injury without increasing risk of other types of traumatic injury. PMID:15933409

  17. Failure modes of current total ankle replacement systems.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Michael J; Buechel, Frederick F

    2013-04-01

    Methodology for evaluation of total ankle replacements is described. Fusion and its problems are discussed as are those of total ankle joint replacement. Fusion is an imperfect solution because it reduces ankle functionality and has significant complications. Early fixed-bearing total ankles were long-term failures and abandoned. Currently available fixed-bearing ankles have proved inferior to fusion or are equivalent to earlier devices. Only mobile-bearing devices have been shown reasonably safe and effective. One such device, the STAR, has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration after a rigorous controlled clinical trial and is available for use in the United States.

  18. Malignant melanoma of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    John, K J; Hayes, D W; Green, D R; Dickerson, J

    2000-04-01

    Malignant melanoma is a serious and devastating skin disease that podiatrists may be called upon to treat. It is pertinent that delays in diagnosis and treatment of malignant melanoma be avoided. Some of the topics discussed in this article are causes, clinical features, classification, and treatment of malignant melanoma, focusing on the foot and ankle.

  19. Invariant ankle moment patterns when walking with and without a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2010-01-19

    To guide development of robotic lower limb exoskeletons, it is necessary to understand how humans adapt to powered assistance. The purposes of this study were to quantify joint moments while healthy subjects adapted to a robotic ankle exoskeleton and to determine if the period of motor adaptation is dependent on the magnitude of robotic assistance. The pneumatically powered ankle exoskeleton provided plantar flexor torque controlled by the wearer's soleus electromyography (EMG). Eleven naïve individuals completed two 30-min sessions walking on a split-belt instrumented treadmill at 1.25m/s while wearing the ankle exoskeleton. After two sessions of practice, subjects reduced their soleus EMG activation by approximately 36% and walked with total ankle moment patterns similar to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.98+/-0.02, THSD, p>0.05). They had substantially different ankle kinematic patterns compared to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.79+/-0.12, THSD, p<0.05). Not all of the subjects reached a steady-state gait pattern within the two sessions, in contrast to a previous study using a weaker robotic ankle exoskeleton (Gordon and Ferris, 2007). Our results strongly suggest that humans aim for similar joint moment patterns when walking with robotic assistance rather than similar kinematic patterns. In addition, greater robotic assistance provided during initial use results in a longer adaptation process than lesser robotic assistance.

  20. Ankle impingement syndromes: a review of etiology and related implications.

    PubMed

    Hess, Gregory William

    2011-10-01

    Ankle injuries are common occurrences in athletics involving and requiring extreme ranges of motion. Ankle sprains specifically occur with a 1 in 10,000 person rate in active individuals each day. If trauma is repetitive, the ankle structures have potential to experience secondary injury and dysfunction. Included in this category of dysfunction are both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes where disruption of the bony structures, joint capsule, ligaments, and tendons typically occurs. Ankle impingement is described as ankle pain that occurs during athletic activity, with recurrent, extreme dorsiflexion or plantar flexion with the joint under a load. Ankle impingements can be classified according to what structures become involved both anteriorly and posteriorly. Osseous impingement, soft tissue impingement, impingement of the distal fascicle of anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, and meniscoid lesions are all documented causes of ankle impingement. These changes tend to be brought about and exacerbated by extreme ranges of motion. Understanding various impingement types will better enable the clinician to prevent, identify, treat, and rehabilitate affected ankles. Acknowledging activities that predispose to ankle impingement syndrome will enhance prevention and recovery processes. Description of ankle impingement etiology and pathology is the objective of the current review.

  1. Factors Contributing to Chronic Ankle Instability: A Strength Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Thomas W.; Hartsell, Heather D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To examine the concept of dynamic ankle stability and closely critique the relevant research over the past 50+ years focusing on strength as it relates to those with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Data Sources: We reviewed the literature regarding the assessment of strength related to CAI. We searched MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science from 1950 through 2001 using the key words functional ankle instability, chronic ankle instability, strength, ankle stability, chronic ankle dysfunction, and isokinetics. Data Synthesis: An overview of dynamic stability in the ankle is established, followed by a comprehensive discussion involving the variables used to assess ankle strength. Additionally, a historical look at deficits in muscular stability leading to CAI is provided, and a compilation of numerous contemporary approaches examining strength as it relates to CAI is presented. Conclusions/Recommendations: Although strength is an important consideration during ankle rehabilitation, deficits in ankle strength are not highly correlated with CAI. More contemporary approaches involving the examination of reciprocal muscle-group ratios as a measure of strength have recently been investigated and offer an insightful, albeit different, avenue for future exploration. Evidence pertaining to the effects of strength training on those afflicted with CAI is lacking, including what, if any, implication strength training has on the various measures of ankle strength. PMID:12937561

  2. Dynamic Postural-Stability Deficits After Cryotherapy to the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Fullam, Karl; Caulfield, Brian; Coughlan, Garrett F.; McGroarty, Mark; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    Context  Decreased postural stability is a primary risk factor for lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. During athletic competitions, cryotherapy may be applied during short breaks in play or during half-time; however, its effects on postural stability remain unclear. Objective  To investigate the acute effects of a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application on dynamic postural stability. Design  Controlled laboratory study. Setting  University biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants  A total of 29 elite-level collegiate male field-sport athletes (age = 20.8 ± 1.12 years, height = 1.80 ± 0.06 m, mass = 81.89 ± 8.59 kg) participated. Intervention(s)  Participants were tested on the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test before and after a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application. Main Outcome Measure(s)  Normalized reach distances; sagittal-plane kinematics of the hip, knee, and ankle joints; and associated mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path during performance of the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test. Results  We observed a decrease in reach-distance scores for the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P < .05). No differences were observed in hip-, knee-, or ankle-joint sagittal-plane kinematics (P > .05). We noted a decrease in mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P < .05) in all reach directions. Conclusions  Dynamic postural stability was adversely affected immediately after cryotherapy to the ankle joint. PMID:26285088

  3. Complex Versus Simple Ankle Movement Training in Stroke Using Telerehabilitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huiqiong; Durfee, William K.; Nuckley, David J.; Rheude, Brandon S.; Severson, Amy E.; Skluzacek, Katie M.; Spindler, Kristen K.; Davey, Cynthia S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Telerehabilitation allows rehabilitative training to continue remotely after discharge from acute care and can include complex tasks known to create rich conditions for neural change. Objectives The purposes of this study were: (1) to explore the feasibility of using telerehabilitation to improve ankle dorsiflexion during the swing phase of gait in people with stroke and (2) to compare complex versus simple movements of the ankle in promoting behavioral change and brain reorganization. Design This study was a pilot randomized controlled trial. Setting Training was done in the participant's home. Testing was done in separate research labs involving functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and multi-camera gait analysis. Patients Sixteen participants with chronic stroke and impaired ankle dorsiflexion were assigned randomly to receive 4 weeks of telerehabilitation of the paretic ankle. Intervention Participants received either computerized complex movement training (track group) or simple movement training (move group). Measurements Behavioral changes were measured with the 10-m walk test and gait analysis using a motion capture system. Brain reorganization was measured with ankle tracking during fMRI. Results Dorsiflexion during gait was significantly larger in the track group compared with the move group. For fMRI, although the volume, percent volume, and intensity of cortical activation failed to show significant changes, the frequency count of the number of participants showing an increase versus a decrease in these values from pretest to posttest measurements was significantly different between the 2 groups, with the track group decreasing and the move group increasing. Limitations Limitations of this study were that no follow-up test was conducted and that a small sample size was used. Conclusions The results suggest that telerehabilitation, emphasizing complex task training with the paretic limb, is feasible and can be effective in promoting

  4. A new ankle foot orthosis for running.

    PubMed

    Bishop, David; Moore, Allan; Chandrashekar, Naveen

    2009-09-01

    Traumatic knee injuries in automobile accidents and sports often lead to damage of the peroneal nerve. A lack of control of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve due to this damage, results in the inability to dorsiflex and evert the foot and to extend the toes. This condition is commonly known as foot drop. Foot drop reduces the stability in the body while walking and running and may also cause injury due to lack of foot clearance during the swing phase of the gait. Traditionally, an ankle foot orthosis (AFO), comprised of a moulded sheet of plastic that conforms around the posterior calf and distally contains all or part of the calcaneous as well as the plantar foot, is used to treat foot drop. The intent of this orthosis is to dorsiflex the foot to provide clearance during the swing phase of walking and running. Traditional AFO results in increased pressures due to a decrease in dorsiflexion range of motion at the ankle and make the orthosis increasingly uncomfortable to wear. Several other existing designs of foot drop AFO suffer from similar inadequacies. To address these issues, a new AFO was developed. The device was successfully used by one person with foot drop without issues for more than one year. This new design conforms to the lower anterior shin and dorsum of the foot using dorsiassist Tamarack ankle joints to allow for greater plantar and dorsiflexion range of motion. While still limiting ankle inversion it does allow for more ankle eversion. This orthosis can be discretely worn inside shoes due to its smaller size, and can be worn for a longer period of time without discomfort.

  5. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  6. Functional Outcomes After Gunshot Wounds to the Foot and Ankle.

    PubMed

    Husain, Zeeshan S; Schmid, Stephen; Lombardo, Nicholas

    The peer-reviewed, clinical data focusing on foot and ankle gunshot wounds are limited. The present study aimed to evaluate functional outcomes in a case series according to the area of injury, articular involvement, and the presence of infection. From January 2003 through February 2011 (8 years), 37 patients treated at Sinai-Grace Hospital (Detroit, MI) for civilian gunshot wounds localized to the foot and/or ankle were reviewed. Of these, 27 (72.97%) met the inclusion criteria. All acute wounds were thoroughly irrigated in the emergency room (8 of 27, 29.63%) or operating room (19 of 27, 70.37%) within 1 hour of presentation. The injuries were categorized as either zone 1 or 2, if localized distally or proximally to the midtarsal joint, respectively. The Maryland Foot Score was recorded and compared based on the location, articular involvement, and infection status, using analysis of variance. The mean Maryland Foot Score in patients with zone 1 injuries was 89.3 (range 72 to 100) and in patients with zone 2 injures was 61.8 (range 13 to 97; p = .001). The mean Maryland Foot Score in patients with type A injuries was 93.1 (range 72 to 100) and in patients with type B injures was 69.2 (range 13 to 99; p = .001), regardless of location. Intraoperative cultures yielded Staphylococcus epidermidis (7 of 27, 25.93%) and Enterococcus cloacae (1 of 27, 3.7%). No cases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were found, although 9 cases (33.33%) involved shoe penetration. One third of the cases (9 of 27) yielded intra-articular pain, of which 4 (14.82%) required joint arthrodesis.

  7. Shank Muscle Strength Training Changes Foot Behaviour during a Sudden Ankle Supination

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Marco; Lescher, Stephanie; Gerhardt, Andreas; Lahner, Matthias; Felber, Stephan; Hennig, Ewald M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The peroneal muscles are the most effective lateral stabilisers whose tension braces the ankle joint complex against excessive supination. The purpose of this study was to identify the morphological and biomechanical effects of two machine-based shank muscle training methods. Methods Twenty-two healthy male recreationally active sports students performed ten weeks of single-set high resistance strength training with 3 training sessions per week. The subjects conducted subtalar pronator/supinator muscle training (ST) with the right leg by using a custom-made apparatus; the left foot muscles were exercised with machine-based talocrural plantar and dorsiflexor training (TT). Muscle strength (MVIC), muscle volume and foot biomechanics (rearfoot motion, ground reaction forces, muscle reaction times) during a sudden ankle supination were recorded before and after the intervention. Results Compared to TT, ST resulted in significantly higher pronator (14% vs. 8%, P<0.01) and supinator MVIC (25% vs. 12%, P<0.01). During sudden foot inversions, both ST and TT resulted in reduced supination velocity (-12%; P<0.01). The muscle reaction onset time was faster after the training in peroneus longus (PL) (P<0.01). Muscle volume of PL (P<0.01) and TA (P<0.01) increased significantly after both ST and TT. Conclusion After both ST and TT, the ankle joint complex is mechanically more stabilised against sudden supinations due to the muscle volume increase of PL and TA. As the reduced supination velocities indicate, the strength training effects are already present during free-fall. According to a sudden ankle supination in standing position, both machine-based dorsiflexor and pronator strength training is recommended for enhancing the mechanical stability of the ankle. PMID:26110847

  8. Acute exercise-induced bilateral thigh compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boland, Michael R; Heck, Chris

    2009-03-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is rare due to the space's ability to accommodate large volumes of fluid and, with the exception of the lateral septum, its thin compliant linings. This article describes a case of bilateral exercise-induced severe compartment syndrome treated with anterior and posterior fasciotomies. A 29-year-old man was admitted to intensive care with myoglobinuria. His left thigh was evaluated 18 hours later for compartment syndrome. The patient reported that 14 hours prior to initial presentation, he had participated in a 1-hour session of vigorous basketball. He gradually developed bilateral moderately severe thigh pain and tea-colored urine. Physical examination revealed pain secondary to passive stretch of both knees at 20 degrees flexion, plus firm anterior and posterior compartments to palpation. A handheld pressure monitor revealed the following compartment pressures: left anterior 80 mm Hg; left posterior 75 mm Hg; right anterior 45 mm Hg; and right posterior 50 mm Hg. Bilateral emergent anterior and posterior compartment fasciotomies were performed. The patient developed a significant severe distal motor and sensory neurological deficit on the left side, which recovered to 3/5 motor strength and protective sensation. At 6-month follow-up, he ambulated with the assistance of a left ankle foot orthosis. Acute severe compartment syndrome can occur following vigorous exercise. We recommend fasciotomies after exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome rather than initial observation because of the severity of morbidity associated with undertreated compartment syndrome.

  9. Ankle injury manipulation before or after X-ray--does it influence success?

    PubMed

    Hastie, G R; Divecha, H; Javed, S; Zubairy, A

    2014-03-01

    Many acute, deformed ankle injuries are manipulated in the Emergency Department (ED) before X-rays are taken to confirm the nature of the injury. This often occurs in the absence of neurovascular or skin compromise without consideration of other possible injuries such as talar, subtalar or calcaneal injuries. We believe that an inappropriate manipulation of an unknown injury pattern may place the patient at increased risk. A balance needs to be struck between making the correct diagnosis and preventing any further neurovascular or skin compromise. We prospectively reviewed 197 patients admitted to the Royal Blackburn Hospital with acute ankle injuries. Their ED notes were reviewed, specifically assessing whether a manipulation was performed; if so, was it performed before X-rays and the documented reasons. A total of 90 ankle fractures were manipulated and 31 of these were performed before X-ray. One manipulation was performed for vascular compromise, one for nerve symptoms, three for critical skin and 25 for undocumented reasons. Outcomes (re-manipulation, delay to surgery and need for open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF)) were compared between injuries manipulated before or after X-ray. Re-manipulation was found to be significant (44% before X-ray vs. 18% after X-ray; chi-squared test: p=0.03; relative risk (RR)=2.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15-6.44). Delay to surgery and need for ORIF were not statistically different. We conclude that performing ankle injury X-rays before an attempt at manipulation, in the absence of neurovascular deficit or critical skin, may constitute best practice as it provides a better assessment of fracture configuration, guides initial reduction and significantly lowers the risk of re-manipulation and the potential risks associated with sedation without delaying surgery.

  10. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  11. Effect of experimentally reduced distal sensation on postural response to hip abductor/ankle evertor muscle vibration.

    PubMed

    Glasser, S; Collings, R; Paton, J; Marsden, J

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed whether postural responses induced by vibratory perturbations of the hip abductors and ankle evertors, were modified when distal tactile sensation was experimentally reduced through cooling. Sixteen healthy subjects were investigated pre and post cooling. Subjects stood with their eyes closed with a stance width of 4 cm. A 2s vibratory stimulus was applied to the left or right hip abductor or ankle evertor muscle. The order of the site and side of the stimulation was randomised. The postural response to hip abductor and ankle evertor vibration was recorded using 3D motion analysis (Codamotion, Leicestershire). Medio-lateral centre of pressure motion was simultaneously recorded during quiet standing via a force plate (Kistler, UK). Pre-cooling people responded to unilateral ankle vibration with an ipsilateral translation and tilt of the pelvis, and an ipsilateral tilt of the trunk. People responded to unilateral hip vibration with a contralateral translation and tilt of the pelvis, and an ipsilateral tilt of the trunk. Following an experimental reduction in distal tactile sensation there was a significant reduction in the amplitude of pelvic tilt in response to ankle vibration (F(6.2)=P<0.05) and a significant increase in amplitude of pelvic tilt in response to hip vibration (F(5.2)=P<0.05). This suggests that the sensitivity to artificial stimulation of hip proprioception increases with distal cooling, possibly indicating a change in the gain/weighting placed upon sensory information from the hips.

  12. Safety profile of sural nerve in posterolateral approach to the ankle joint: MRI study.

    PubMed

    Ellapparadja, Pregash; Husami, Yaya; McLeod, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The posterolateral approach to ankle joint is well suited for ORIF of posterior malleolar fractures. There are no major neurovascular structures endangering this approach other than the sural nerve. The sural nerve is often used as an autologous peripheral nerve graft and provides sensation to the lateral aspect of the foot. The aim of this paper is to measure the precise distance of the sural nerve from surrounding soft tissue structures so as to enable safe placement of skin incision in posterolateral approach. This is a retrospective image review study involving 64 MRI scans. All measurements were made from Axial T1 slices. The key findings of the paper is the safety window for the sural nerve from the lateral border of tendoachilles (TA) is 7 mm, 1.3 cm and 2 cm at 3 cm above ankle joint, at the ankle joint and at the distal tip of fibula respectively. Our study demonstrates the close relationship of the nerve in relation to TA and fibula in terms of exact measurements. The safety margins established in this study should enable the surgeon in preventing endangerment of the sural nerve encountered in this approach.

  13. Functional evaluation of the 10-year outcome after modified Evans repair for chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, D; Becker, H P; Sterk, J; Gerngross, H; Claes, L

    1997-12-01

    The Evans tenodesis is an operative treatment for chronic ankle instability with good short-term results. The disadvantage of impaired hind foot kinematics and restricted motion has been described, and only few reports of long-term results can be found. No techniques have been used to assess the outcome objectively. We wanted to determine whether a modified Evans procedure led to a satisfactory clinical and functional outcome. Nineteen patients were available at a 10-year follow-up. The clinical examination included a detailed questionnaire and stress radiographs. Foot function was evaluated with plantar pressure distribution measurements during walking and peroneal reaction time measurements elicited on a rapidly tilting platform (recorded with surface electromyography). High subjective patient satisfaction was contrasted with a high rate of residual instability, pain, and swelling. The radiographs showed an increased number of exostoses. The gait analysis revealed reduced peak pressures under the lateral heel and increased values under the longitudinal arch. The reaction times of the peroneal muscles were shorter on the operated side (significant: peroneus longus). The persistent clinical problems as well as the functional changes indicate that the disturbed ankle joint kinematics permanently alter foot function and may subsequently support the development of arthrosis. Therefore, the Evans procedure should only be applied if anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments is not feasible.

  14. Treatment of anterolateral impingements of the ankle joint by arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Al-Husseiny Moustafa

    2007-09-01

    Impingement syndromes of the ankle joint are among the most common intraarticular ankle lesions. Soft tissue impingement lesions of the ankle usually occur as a result of synovial, or capsular irritation secondary to traumatic injuries, usually ankle sprains, leading to chronic ankle pain. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate arthroscopic debridement of an anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle. During the period between October 2000 and February 2004, 23 patients with residual complaints after an ankle sprain were diagnosed as anterolateral impingement of the ankle, and were treated by arthroscopic debridement. At a minimum of 6 months follow up, patients were asked to complete an American orthopaedic foot and ankle society (AOFAS) ankle and hind foot score. The average follow-up was 25 months (range 12-38). The average pre-operative patient assessed AOFAS score was 34 (range 4-57). At the end of follow-up the mean AOFAS score was 89 (range 60-100). In terms of patient satisfaction 22 patients said they would accept the same arthroscopic procedure again for the same complaints. At the end of follow-up, 7 patients had excellent results, and 14 patients had good results while two patients had fair results. We believe that arthroscopic debridement of the anterolateral impingement soft tissues are a good, and effective method of treatment.

  15. External tibial torsion and the effectiveness of the solid ankle-foot orthoses.

    PubMed

    Vankoski, S J; Michaud, S; Dias, L

    2000-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the influence of external tibial torsion on the effectiveness of the ankle-foot orthoses (AFO) in children with lumbosacral myelomeningocele. Forty patients with normal tibial rotation and 18 patients with excessive external tibial torsion were evaluated with three-dimensional gait analysis at their comfortable walking speed. The group with normal tibial rotation showed significantly greater knee extension and lower mean extension moment compared with the group with external tibial torsion (p < 0.05). The posteriorly and laterally deviated ground-reaction force relative to the knee-flexion axis compromises the ability of this force to facilitate knee extension. Patients with torsional magnitudes >20 degrees demand close inspection as candidates for derotation osteotomy. The AFO will continue to stabilize the ankle-foot complex, but improved knee motion, knee-extensor activity, and ultimately walking efficiency may be compromised.

  16. Pediatric Ankle Fractures: Concepts and Treatment Principles

    PubMed Central

    Su, Alvin W.; Larson, A. Noelle

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Current clinical concepts are reviewed regarding the epidemiology, anatomy, evaluation and treatment of pediatric ankle fractures. Correct diagnosis and management relies on appropriate exam, imaging, and knowledge of fracture patterns specific to children. Treatment is guided by patient history, physical examination, plain film radiographs and, in some instances, CT. Treatment goals are to restore acceptable limb alignment, physeal anatomy, and joint congruency. For high risk physeal fractures, patients should be monitored for growth disturbance as needed until skeletal maturity. PMID:26589088

  17. [Ankle joint prosthesis for bone defects].

    PubMed

    Lampert, C

    2011-11-01

    Large defects of the talus, i.e. due to tumors, large areas of osteolysis in total ankle replacement (TAR) and posttraumatic talus body necrosis are difficult to manage. The gold standard in these circumstances is still tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis with all the negative aspects of a completely rigid hindfoot. We started 10 years ago to replace the talus by a custom-made, all cobalt-chrome implant (laser sintering). The first patient with a giant cell tumor did very well but the following patients showed all subsidence of the metal talus into the tibia due to missing bony edges. Therefore, we constructed a custom-made talus (mirrored from the healthy side) and combined it with a well functioning total ankle prosthesis (Hintegra). So far we have implanted this custom-made implant into 3 patients: the first had a chondrosarcoma of the talus (1 year follow-up), the second had massive osteolysis/necrosis of unknown origin (6 months follow-up) and the third massive osteolysis following a correct TAR (2 months follow-up). The results are very encouraging as all of the patients are practically pain free and have a good range of movement (ROM): D-P flexion 15°-0-20° but less motion in the lower ankle joint: ROM P-S 5°-0-5°. No subsidence was detected in the tibia or the calcaneus. The custom-made talus combined with the Hintegra total ankle replacement will probably be an interesting alternative to a tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis in selected cases with massive defects of the talus.

  18. Effects of using an unstable inclined board on active and passive ankle range of motion in patients with ankle stiffness.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The present study assessed the effects of using an unstable inclined board on the active and passive ankle range of motion in patients with ankle stiffness. [Subjects] The study included 10 young female patients with ankle stiffness. [Methods] The patients were divided into the following two groups: a group that performed ankle dorsiflexion stretching exercises using a wooden inclined board and a group that performed stretching exercises using an air-cushioned inclined board (unstable inclined board). Active and passive ankle dorsiflexion angles were measured bilaterally using a goniometer. [Results] Both inclined boards significantly increased active and passive ankle dorsiflexion. After performing ankle stretching exercises, active dorsiflexion significantly increased the unstable inclined board compared to that using the wooden inclined board. However, the passive dorsiflexion angles did not differ significantly between the two groups after ankle stretching exercises. [Conclusion] The use of an unstable inclined board might stimulate activation of the ankle dorsiflexors in addition to stretching muscle or tissue. Active ankle dorsiflexion was more effectively improved with stretching exercises using an unstable inclined board than with exercises using a wooden inclined board.

  19. Forces predicted at the ankle during running.

    PubMed

    Burdett, R G

    1982-01-01

    A biomechanical model of the ankle joint was developed and was used to predict the forces at the ankle during the stance phase of running. Measurements from five cadavers were averaged to obtain insertion points and directions of pull of equivalent tendons with respect to the assumed center of the ankle joint. A minimum joint force solution was obtained by assuming that only two equivalent muscle groups could exert force at one time. Three subjects ran at 4.47 m/s across a force platform that recorded the external forces and moments acting on the foot. Cinematography was used to measure the foot and leg positions during stance. Peak resultant joint forces ranging from 9.0 to 13.3 times body weight and peak Achilles tendon forces ranging from 5.3 to 10.0 times body weight were predicted. Small variations in some cases resulted in large differences in predicted forces. The highest tendon forces predicted exceeded those reported to cause damage to cadaver tendons in other studies.

  20. Orthopedic rehabilitation using the "Rutgers ankle" interface.

    PubMed

    Girone, M; Burdea, G; Bouzit, M; Popescu, V; Deutsch, J E

    2000-01-01

    A novel ankle rehabilitation device is being developed for home use, allowing remote monitoring by therapists. The system will allow patients to perform a variety of exercises while interacting with a virtual environment (VE). These game-like VEs created with WorldToolKit run on a host PC that controls the movement and output forces of the device via an RS232 connection. Patients will develop strength, flexibility, coordination, and balance as they interact with the VEs. The device will also perform diagnostic functions, measuring the ankle's range of motion, force exertion capabilities and coordination. The host PC transparently records patient progress for remote evaluation by therapists via our existing telerehabilitation system. The "Rutgers Ankle" Orthopedic Rehabilitation Interface uses double-acting pneumatic cylinders, linear potentiometers, and a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) force sensor. The controller contains a Pentium single-board computer and pneumatic control valves. Based on the Stewart platform, the device can move and supply forces and torques in 6 DOFs. A proof-of-concept trial conducted at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) provided therapist and patient feedback. The system measured the range of motion and maximum force output of a group of four patients (male and female). Future medical trials are required to establish clinical efficacy in rehabilitation.

  1. Posterior malleolar fractures of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, J; Rammelt, S; Tuček, M; Naňka, O

    2015-12-01

    Despite an increasing awareness of injuries to PM in ankle fracture-dislocations, there are still many open questions. The mere presence of a posterior fragment leads to significantly poorer outcomes. Adequate diagnosis, classification and treatment require preoperative CT examination, preferably with 3D reconstructions. The indication for surgical treatment is made individually on the basis of comprehensive assessment of the three-dimensional outline of the PM fracture and all associated injuries to the ankle including syndesmotic instability. Anatomic fixation of the avulsed posterior tibiofibular ligament will contribute to syndesmotic stability and restore the integrity of the incisura tibiae thus facilitating anatomic reduction of the distal fibula. A necessary prerequisite is mastering of posterolateral and posteromedial approaches and the technique of direct reduction and internal fixation. Further clinical studies with higher numbers of patients treated by similar methods and evaluation of pre- and postoperative CT scans will be necessary to determine reliable prognostic factors associated with certain types of PM fractures and associated injuries to the ankle.

  2. Talar Osteochondroma Fracture Presenting as Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Ercin, Ersin; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Avsar, Serdar

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondromas are the most common benign bone tumors. They are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. When symptomatic, the symptoms are usually due to its location and size. Fracture of an osteochondroma presenting as posterior ankle impingement is a rare condition. We describe a 22-year-old man with solitary exostosis who presented with a posterior ankle mass and posterior ankle impingement with 2 years of follow-up. Surgical intervention was the treatment of choice in this patient, and histologic examination revealed a benign osteochondroma. Osteochondromas found in the posterior aspect of the talus can be complicated by fracture due to persistent motion of the ankle. Talar osteochondroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement causes. Posterior talar osteochondromas, especially when a stalk is present, should be treated surgically before it is more complicated by a fracture and posterior ankle impingement.

  3. [Advances on biomechanics and kinematics of sprain of ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprains are orthopedic clinical common disease, accounting for joint ligament sprain of the first place. If treatment is not timely or appropriate, the joint pain and instability maybe develop, and even bone arthritis maybe develop. The mechanism of injury of ankle joint, anatomical basis has been fully study at present, and the diagnostic problem is very clear. Along with the development of science and technology, biological modeling and three-dimensional finite element, three-dimensional motion capture system,digital technology study, electromyographic signal study were used for the basic research of sprain of ankle. Biomechanical and kinematic study of ankle sprain has received adequate attention, combined with the mechanism research of ankle sprain,and to explore the the biomechanics and kinematics research progress of the sprain of ankle joint.

  4. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES – IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas; Tang, Lars; Zebis, Mette; Nielsen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important to characterize different balance exercises based on level of difficulty and sensori-motor training stimulus. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate frontal-plane ankle kinematics and associated peroneal muscle activity during single-legged balance on stable surface (floor) and three commonly used balance devices (Airex®, BOSU® Ball and wobble board). Design Descriptive exploratory laboratory study. Methods Nineteen healthy subjects performed single-legged balance with eyes open on an Airex® mat, BOSU® Ball, wobble board, and floor (reference condition). Ankle kinematics were measured using reflective markers and 3-dimensional recordings and expressed as inversion-eversion range of motion variability, peak velocity of inversion and number of inversion-eversion direction changes. Peroneus longus EMG activity was averaged and normalized to maximal activity during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and in addition amplitude probability distribution function (APDF) between 90 and 10% was calculated as a measure of muscle activation variability. Results Balancing on BOSU® Ball and wobble board generally resulted in increased ankle kinematic and muscle activity variables, compared to the other surfaces. BOSU® Ball was the most challenging in terms of inversion-eversion variability while wobble board was associated with a higher number of inversion-eversion direction changes. No differences in average muscle activation level were found between these two surfaces, but the BOSU® Ball did show a more variable activation pattern in terms of APDF. Conclusion The results showed large kinematic variability among different balance training devices and

  5. Design, modelling and simulation aspects of an ankle rehabilitation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racu, C. M.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    Ankle injuries are amongst the most common injuries of the lower limb. Besides initial treatment, rehabilitation of the patients plays a crucial role for future activities and proper functionality of the foot. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy, using simple equipment like elastic bands and rollers, requiring intensive efforts of therapists and patients. Thus, the need of robotic devices emerges. In this paper, the design concept and some modelling and simulation aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device are presented.

  6. Assessment and management of patients with ankle injuries.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennie

    2014-08-19

    Foot and ankle injuries are common and can have a significant effect on an individual's daily activities. Nurses have an important role in the assessment, management, ongoing care and support of patients with ankle injuries. An understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the ankle enables nurses to identify significant injuries, which may result in serious complications, and communicate effectively with the multidisciplinary team to improve patient care and outcomes.

  7. Ankle arthritis: review of diagnosis and operative management.

    PubMed

    Grunfeld, Robert; Aydogan, Umur; Juliano, Paul

    2014-03-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic options for ankle arthritis are reviewed. The current standard of care for nonoperative options include the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injections, orthotics, and ankle braces. Other modalities lack high-quality research studies to delineate their appropriateness and effectiveness. The gold standard for operative intervention in end-stage degenerative arthritis remains arthrodesis, but evidence for the superiority in functional outcomes of total ankle arthroplasty is increasing. The next few years will enable more informed decisions and, with more prospective high-quality studies, the most appropriate patient population for total ankle arthroplasty can be identified.

  8. Multivariable static ankle mechanical impedance with relaxed muscles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Ho, Patrick; Rastgaar, Mohammad A; Krebs, Hermano I; Hogan, Neville

    2011-07-07

    Quantitative characterization of ankle mechanical impedance is important to understand how the ankle supports lower-extremity functions during interaction with the environment. This paper reports a novel procedure to characterize static multivariable ankle mechanical impedance. An experimental protocol using a wearable therapeutic robot, Anklebot, enabled reliable measurement of torque and angle data in multiple degrees of freedom simultaneously, a combination of inversion-eversion and dorsiflexion-plantarflexion. The measured multivariable torque-angle relation was represented as a vector field, and approximated using a method based on thin-plate spline smoothing with generalized cross validation. The vector field enabled assessment of several important characteristics of static ankle mechanical impedance, which are not available from prior single degree of freedom studies: the directional variation of ankle mechanical impedance, the extent to which the ankle behaves as a spring, and evidence of uniquely neural contributions. The method was validated by testing a simple physical "mock-up" consisting of passive elements. Experiments with young unimpaired subjects quantified the behavior of the maximally relaxed human ankle, showing that ankle mechanical impedance is spring-like but strongly direction-dependent, being weakest in inversion. Remarkably, the analysis was sufficiently sensitive to detect a subtle but statistically significant deviation from spring-like behavior if subjects were not fully relaxed. This method may provide new insight about the function of the ankle, both unimpaired and after biomechanical or neurological injury.

  9. Physiotherapy Treatment in Patients with Hemophilia and Chronic Ankle Arthropathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Barriuso, Rubén; Gómez-Conesa, Antonia; López-Pina, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle causes pain and deterioration in gait, causing disability. Although some physiotherapy modalities are effective in the management of acute bleeding, the results are unknown in chronic arthropathy. Our objective was to determine the most effective physiotherapy procedures for treating the haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle and to assess the methodological quality of the studies. A systematic review was carried out in the Cochrane Database, PubMed, MEDLINE, ISI Web of Knowledge, PEDro, TESEO, and specialized journals (Haemophilia and Haematologica). It included articles with at least one group undergoing any kind of physiotherapy treatment and with pretest and posttest evaluation, published before April 2013. An analysis of variables was performed and assessed the methodological quality of studies. Five studies met the criteria for inclusion. Hydrotherapy treatments, strength training and balance strength, balance training, and sports therapy, have improved range of movement, pain, balance, and subjective physical performance. The proposed methodological analysis was not possible due to the low quality of the studies. Although the results are positive, they lack rigorous evidence on the effects of treatments. Studies are needed to establish the efficacy of the various forms of physiotherapy in the haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle. PMID:23997955

  10. Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Correia, S. I.; Pereira, H.; Silva-Correia, J.; Van Dijk, C. N.; Espregueira-Mendes, J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Reis, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has caused a revolution in present and future trends of medicine and surgery. In different tissues, advanced TERM approaches bring new therapeutic possibilities in general population as well as in young patients and high-level athletes, improving restoration of biological functions and rehabilitation. The mainstream components required to obtain a functional regeneration of tissues may include biodegradable scaffolds, drugs or growth factors and different cell types (either autologous or heterologous) that can be cultured in bioreactor systems (in vitro) prior to implantation into the patient. Particularly in the ankle, which is subject to many different injuries (e.g. acute, chronic, traumatic and degenerative), there is still no definitive and feasible answer to ‘conventional’ methods. This review aims to provide current concepts of TERM applications to ankle injuries under preclinical and/or clinical research applied to skin, tendon, bone and cartilage problems. A particular attention has been given to biomaterial design and scaffold processing with potential use in osteochondral ankle lesions. PMID:24352667

  11. The acute effects of a pulse-containing meal on glycaemic responses and measures of satiety and satiation within and at a later meal.

    PubMed

    Mollard, R C; Zykus, A; Luhovyy, B L; Nunez, M F; Wong, C L; Anderson, G H

    2012-08-01

    Pulses are low glycaemic foods; however, their effect on satiation is unknown. The objective was to determine the effects of an ad libitum pulse meal on food intake (FI), appetite and blood glucose (BG) before and after a test meal (4 h later) and on FI at the test meal. Males (n 24, 22·8 kg/m2) received one of four treatments or control. The pulse treatments contained pasta and tomato sauce and 44 % of energy from: (1) chickpeas, (2) lentils, (3) navy beans or (4) yellow peas. The control was pasta and tomato sauce (pasta and sauce). FI (satiation) was measured at the treatment meal (0-20 min) and at an ad libitum pizza meal 4 h later. BG and appetite were measured from 0 to 340 min. At the treatment meal, lentils led to lower FI compared to chickpeas and pasta and sauce, whereas navy beans led to lower FI compared to chickpeas. Also, lentils led to lower cumulative FI compared to pasta and sauce. All pulses led to lower BG peak and cumulative area under the curve (AUC; 0-340 min); however, only chickpeas, lentils and navy beans reduced pre-pizza meal BG AUC (0-260 min) relative to pasta and sauce. Chickpeas led to lower post-pizza meal BG AUC (260-340 min) compared to navy beans and yellow peas. Consumption of pulses in a high-glycaemic meal contributes to earlier satiation, lower BG following the meal and after a later meal, but these effects are specific to pulse type and cannot be explained by their glycaemic properties alone.

  12. 10-year survival of total ankle arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose There is an ongoing need to review large series of total ankle replacements (TARs) for monitoring of changes in practice and their outcome. 4 national registries, including the Swedish Ankle Register, have previously reported their 5-year results. We now present an extended series with a longer follow-up, and with a 10-year survival analysis. Patients and methods Records of uncemented 3-component TARs were retrospectively reviewed, determining risk factors such as age, sex, and diagnosis. Prosthetic survival rates were calculated with exchange or removal of components as endpoint—excluding incidental exchange of the polyethylene meniscus. Results Of the 780 prostheses implanted since 1993, 168 (22%) had been revised by June 15, 2010. The overall survival rate fell from 0.81 (95% CI: 0.79–0.83) at 5 years to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67–0.71) at 10 years. The survival rate was higher, although not statistically significantly so, during the latter part of the period investigated. Excluding the STAR prosthesis, the survival rate for all the remaining designs was 0.78 at 10 years. Women below the age of 60 with osteoarthritis were at a higher risk of revision, but age did not influence the outcome in men or women with rheumatoid arthritis. Revisions due to technical mistakes at the index surgery and instability were undertaken earlier than revisions for other reasons. Interpretation The results have slowly improved during the 18-year period investigated. However, we do not believe that the survival rates of ankle replacements in the near future will approach those of hip and knee replacements—even though improved instrumentation and design of the prostheses, together with better patient selection, will presumably give better results. PMID:22066551

  13. A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-10

    reduced since it was subject to abrasion from the concrete in the harness shed, asphalt on the loading ramp, and dirt on the drop zone. b. DJ...strap was also directly under the heel and subject to abrasion from concrete in the harness shed, asphalt on the loading ramp, and dirt on the drop...airborne injuries), airborne students who did not wear the brace were 1.90 times more likely to experience an ankle sprain, 1.47 times more likely to

  14. Normal Variants: Accessory Muscles About the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yvonne

    2017-02-01

    Accessory muscles around the ankle are commonly encountered as incidental findings on cross-sectional imaging. Mostly asymptomatic, accessory muscles sometimes mimic mass lesions. They have been implicated as the cause of tarsal tunnel syndrome, impingement of surrounding structures, and chronic pain. Distinguishing these muscles can be challenging, because some travel along a similar path. This article describes these accessory muscles in detail, including their relationships to the aponeurosis of the lower leg. An imaging algorithm is proposed to aid in identification of these muscles, providing a valuable tool in diagnostic accuracy and subsequent patient management.

  15. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  16. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    apl.uw.edu/dasaro LONG-TERM GOALS I seek to understand the processes controlling lateral mixing in the ocean, particularly at the submesoscale ...APPROACH During AESOP, Lee and D’Asaro pioneered an innovative approach to measuring submesoscale structure in strong fronts. An adaptive measurement...injection of potential vorticity and scalars is predicted to create an intense ‘ submesoscale soup’ of high small-scale variance. The combination of small

  17. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-08

    to mesoscale forcing. APPROACH Figure 1: MVP system deployed from stern of R/V Endeavor in Sargasso Sea . 1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for...integrative efforts with other sea -going investigators and numerical modelers. The Lateral Mixing Experiment project was an ideal opportunity to...2011 I also participated in the sea -going part of this project, taking my group on the R/V Endeavor in June 2011. Our role was to sample around the

  18. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    ocean as it responds to mesoscale forcing. APPROACH Figure 1: MVP system deployed from stern of R/V Endeavor in Sargasso Sea . My approach for...therefore requires integrative efforts with other sea -going investigators and numerical modelers. The Lateral Mixing Experiment project was an ideal...also participated in the sea -going part of this project, taking my group on the R/V Endeavor in June 2011. Our role was to sample around the center of

  19. Adaptive sports ankle prosthetics. Interview by Sarah A. Curran.

    PubMed

    Lyle, David K

    2012-09-01

    Participating in sport at all levels is gaining a dedicated following and this is also apparent in individuals with an amputation. Currently, there is a wide variety of ankle prostheses available which attempt to provide function, control, and comfort, as well as good aesthetic appeal. Participation in sport, however, increases the demands placed upon ankle prostheses. This can compromise function and performance, and constrain the opportunities of participation in various outdoor and water sports. In acknowledging this limitation and the need to develop more versatile ankle prostheses, this article introduces the evolution of a prototype ankle prosthesis referred to as "Adaptive Sports Ankle." The ankle prosthesis, which is compatible with any foot pyramid adapter, offers the same range of motion as the normal human ankle joint and is made up of components that are chemical and corrosion resistant. These design features that are specifically created to accommodate below-the-knee amputees provide an ideal prosthesis for those wishing to lead an active lifestyle and participate in aquatic (i.e. swimming, surfing, and scuba diving), snowboarding, and equestrian activities. Although it is acknowledged that there is a need to establish research on the Adaptive Sports Ankle, its introduction to the market will enhance and expand opportunities of those individuals with a lower limb amputation to lead an active and healthy lifestyle.

  20. How to Strengthen Your Ankle After a Sprain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the band with your hand and gently push your ankle down as far as you can and then back to the starting ... with your foot pointing down and pull your ankle up as far as you can. Return to the ...

  1. Review on design and control aspects of ankle rehabilitation robots.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Q

    2015-03-01

    Ankle rehabilitation robots can play an important role in improving outcomes of the rehabilitation treatment by assisting therapists and patients in number of ways. Consequently, few robot designs have been proposed by researchers which fall under either of the two categories, namely, wearable robots or platform-based robots. This paper presents a review of both kinds of ankle robots along with a brief analysis of their design, actuation and control approaches. While reviewing these designs it was observed that most of them are undesirably inspired by industrial robot designs. Taking note of the design concerns of current ankle robots, few improvements in the ankle robot designs have also been suggested. Conventional position control or force control approaches, being used in the existing ankle robots, have been reviewed. Apparently, opportunities of improvement also exist in the actuation as well as control of ankle robots. Subsequently, a discussion on most recent research in the development of novel actuators and advanced controllers based on appropriate physical and cognitive human-robot interaction has also been included in this review. Implications for Rehabilitation Ankle joint functions are restricted/impaired as a consequence of stroke or injury during sports or otherwise. Robots can help in reinstating functions faster and can also work as tool for recording rehabilitation data useful for further analysis. Evolution of ankle robots with respect to their design and control aspects has been discussed in the present paper and a novel design with futuristic control approach has been proposed.

  2. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the Smaller Toes How To... Foot Health Foot Injury Footwear News Videos Find a Surgeon Información en ... all ages. They perform reconstructive procedures, treat sports injuries, and manage and treat trauma of the foot and ankle. Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons work ...

  3. Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Ayuso-Casado, Blanca; Tamaral-Costa, Beatriz; Sánchez-Milá, Zacarías; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effects of combined trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) and proprioceptive/strengthening exercises to proprioceptive/strengthening exercises on pain and function in ankle instability. Methods. Twenty-seven (44% female, mean age: 33 ± 3 years) individuals with unilateral ankle instability were randomly assigned to an experimental group who received proprioceptive/strengthening exercises combined with TrP-DN into the lateral peroneus muscle and a comparison group receiving the same proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program alone. Outcome included function assessed with the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) and ankle pain intensity assessed with a numerical pain rate scale (NPRS). They were captured at baseline and 1-month follow-up after the intervention. Results. The ANOVAs found significant Group ∗ Time Interactions for both subscales of the FAAM (ADL: F = 8.211; P = 0.008; SPORTS: F = 13.943; P < 0.001) and for pain (F = 44.420; P < 0.001): patients receiving TrP-DN plus proprioceptive/strengthening exercises experienced greater improvements in function and pain than those receiving the exercise program alone. Between-groups effect sizes were large in all outcomes (SMD > 2.1) in favor of the TrP-DN group. Conclusions. This study provides evidence that the inclusion of TrP-DN within the lateral peroneus muscle into a proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program resulted in better outcomes in pain and function 1 month after the therapy in ankle instability. PMID:26064172

  4. Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Ayuso-Casado, Blanca; Tamaral-Costa, Beatriz; Sánchez-Milá, Zacarías; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effects of combined trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) and proprioceptive/strengthening exercises to proprioceptive/strengthening exercises on pain and function in ankle instability. Methods. Twenty-seven (44% female, mean age: 33 ± 3 years) individuals with unilateral ankle instability were randomly assigned to an experimental group who received proprioceptive/strengthening exercises combined with TrP-DN into the lateral peroneus muscle and a comparison group receiving the same proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program alone. Outcome included function assessed with the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) and ankle pain intensity assessed with a numerical pain rate scale (NPRS). They were captured at baseline and 1-month follow-up after the intervention. Results. The ANOVAs found significant Group ∗ Time Interactions for both subscales of the FAAM (ADL: F = 8.211; P = 0.008; SPORTS: F = 13.943; P < 0.001) and for pain (F = 44.420; P < 0.001): patients receiving TrP-DN plus proprioceptive/strengthening exercises experienced greater improvements in function and pain than those receiving the exercise program alone. Between-groups effect sizes were large in all outcomes (SMD > 2.1) in favor of the TrP-DN group. Conclusions. This study provides evidence that the inclusion of TrP-DN within the lateral peroneus muscle into a proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program resulted in better outcomes in pain and function 1 month after the therapy in ankle instability.

  5. Management of acute spontaneous thoracic spinal epidural hematoma causing paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Alić, Fahrudin; Bečulić, Hakija; Jusić, Aldin; Skomorac, Rasim; Moranjkić, Mirza; Hrvat, Lejla; Tandir, Lejla

    2017-02-01

    Aim To emphasize the importance of early recognition, diagnostic processing and emergent surgical treatment of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). Methods A 39-year-old female presented with sudden onset of severe pain between the shoulder blades followed by paraparesis and alerted sensibility in the lower extremities. An hour later she developed paraplegia with sensory deficits below ThIV level, absence of patellar reflex, ankle jerk reflex and sphincter dysfunction. Results Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated acute extensive epidural mass of thoracic spinal segments (ThI-ThIII). The patient underwent emergent decompressive laminectomy ThI-ThIII with epidural hematoma evacuation within 24 hours of symptoms onset. After the surgical treatment, because of suspicion on spinal arteriovenous malformation, complete diagnostic evaluation with spinal angiography was done and no form of vascular malformation was found. Idiopathic SSEH was diagnosed. Two months later the patient reached complete neurological improvement. Conclusion The SSEH is a rare condition that should be kept in mind in patients presenting with neurological deficit and a sudden onset of back pain like it was in our case. For early diagnosis, immediate MRI is essential. Prompt surgical decompression such as laminectomy is an absolute surgical indication widely accepted for patients with progressive neurological deficit. The SSEH should be considered as one of the important differential diagnoses in patients who have developed acute myelopathy.

  6. Functional Design in Rehabilitation: Modular Mechanisms for Ankle Complex

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting an innovative ankle rehabilitation device based on a parallel mechanism. A functional analysis and design are described to obtain a device able to guarantee ankle movement while patient's body remains stationary. Human ankle is a challenging context where a series of joints are highly integrated. The proposed rehabilitation device permits a patient with walking defects to improve his or her gait. The research focuses on plantar-flexion-dorsiflexion movement. The robust design starts from an accurate modelling of ankle movements during walking, assessing motion data from healthy individuals and patients. The kinematics analysis and functional evaluations lead the study and development of the articulated system. In particular, results of simulations support the effectiveness of the current design. A 3D prototype is presented highlighting that the ankle motion is successfully demonstrated. PMID:27524881

  7. Finite element analysis of a composite artificial ankle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Leigh Ann; Johnston, Lawrence; Denniston, Charles; Czekalski, Blaise E.

    1993-01-01

    Ultra-light carbon fiber composite materials are being utilized in artificial limbs with increasing frequency in recent years. Dr. Arthur Copes, an orthotist from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has developed a graphite expoxy composite material artificial ankle (Copes/Bionic Ankle) that is intended to be used by amputees who require the most advanced above-and-below-the-knee prosthetic devices. The Copes/Bionic Ankle is designed to reproduce the function of the natural ankle joint by allowing the composite material to act as a spring mechanism without the use of metal mechanical parts. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has agreed to participate in the design effort by providing the structural analysis of the artificial ankle design.

  8. Total ankle replacement – surgical treatment and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting. PMID:27407223

  9. A new snowboard injury caused by "FLOW" bindings: a complete deltoid ligament and anterior talofibular ankle ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Haverkamp, Daniel; Hoornenborg, Daniel; Maas, Mario; Kerkhoffs, Gino

    2014-05-01

    We present a case of a snowboard injury that caused a combination of a complete deltoid and anterior talofibular ligament rupture, without bony or syndesmotic injury. Initial surgical repair for both ligaments was performed. We describe the etiology of this injury to demonstrate the cause and existence of medial and lateral ankle ligament rupture without osseous and syndesmotic involvement and to create awareness of these types of injuries.

  10. Terminal hemimelia of the lower extremity: absent lateral ray and a normal fibula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Kwang; Chung, Moon Sang; Lee, Sang Ki

    2007-01-01

    Congenital lateral ray deficiency is considered to be a manifestation of fibular hemimelia. However, we have noted patients with absent lateral ray but stable knee and ankle joints, and named this condition terminal hemimelia of the lower extremity. This study was undertaken to further define this group of patients and to compare these patients with fibular hemimelia patients. Four boys and one girl of mean age six years two months were in the terminal hemimelic group and four boys and three girls of mean age eight years seven months in the fibular hemimelic group at the final evaluation. Clinical features commonly observed in the fibular hemimelia such as knee valgus, knee instability, tibial bowing, ball and socket ankle, ankle instability, tarsal coalition, leg length inequality were compared between both groups. Terminal hemimelia of the lower extremity was the same as fibular hemimelia in clinical features below the ankle joint. However, terminal hemimela was found to be milder than fibular hemimelia in terms of limb shortening. The clinical features above the ankle joint were different between both groups. Knees and ankles were stable, and gait disturbance were rarely noticed in patients with terminal hemimelia of the lower extremity. PMID:17558505

  11. Anatomical variations of the anterior talofibular ligament of the human ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    MILNER, C. E.; SOAMES, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Compared with other joints, the ligaments of the ankle have not been studied in great detail; consequently relatively little literature exists. The positions of the 3 major bands of the lateral collateral ligament are well known and documented (Schafer et al. 1915; Sarrafian, 1983; McMinn, 1994; Palastanga et al. 1994; Williams et al. 1995). The detailed anatomy of the ligaments is, however, relatively complex with variations of the major bands and several minor additional bands being reported (Sarrafian, 1993; Burks & Morgan, 1994; Rosenberg et al. 1995). PMID:9419003

  12. Preoperative gait characterization of patients with ankle arthrosis.

    PubMed

    Khazzam, Michael; Long, Jason T; Marks, Richard M; Harris, Gerald F

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematic changes that occur about the foot and ankle during gait in patients with degenerative joint disease (DJD). By comparing a normal adult population with what was found in the DJD population we determined how the motion of theses groups differed, thereby characterizing how this pathology affects foot and ankle motion. A 15-camera Vicon Motion Analysis System was used in conjunction with weight bearing radiographs to obtain three-dimensional motion of the foot and ankle during ambulation. The study was comprised of 34 patients and 35 ankles diagnosed with DJD (19 men and 15 women) of the ankle and 25 patients with normal ankles (13 men and 12 women). Dynamic foot and ankle motion was analyzed using the four-segment Milwaukee Foot Model (MFM). The data from this model resulted in three-dimensional (3D) kinematic parameters in the sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes as well as spatial-temporal parameters. Patient health status was evaluated using the SF-36 Health Survey and American Orthopaedics Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scores. The DJD group showed significant differences (p<0.001) as compared to normals with prolonged stance time, shortened stride length, reduced cadence and a walking speed which was only 66.96% of normal. Overall, kinematic data in the DJD cohort showed significant differences (p<0.001) in all planes of motion for tibial, hindfoot and forefoot motion as compared to normals. The average preoperative AOFAS hindfoot score was 26. DJD of the ankle results in decreased range of motion during gait. This decreased range of motion may be related to several factors including bony deformity, muscle weakness, and attempts to decrease the pain associated with weight bearing. To date there has not been a study which describes the effect of this disease process on motion of the foot and ankle. These findings may prove to be useful in the pre-operative assessment of these patients.

  13. The foot and ankle of Australopithecus sediba.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Bernhard; DeSilva, Jeremy M; Kidd, Robert S; Carlson, Kristian J; Churchill, Steven E; Berger, Lee R

    2011-09-09

    A well-preserved and articulated partial foot and ankle of Australopithecus sediba, including an associated complete adult distal tibia, talus, and calcaneus, have been discovered at the Malapa site, South Africa, and reported in direct association with the female paratype Malapa Hominin 2. These fossils reveal a mosaic of primitive and derived features that are distinct from those seen in other hominins. The ankle (talocrural) joint is mostly humanlike in form and inferred function, and there is some evidence for a humanlike arch and Achilles tendon. However, Au. sediba is apelike in possessing a more gracile calcaneal body and a more robust medial malleolus than expected. These observations suggest, if present models of foot function are correct, that Au. sediba may have practiced a unique form of bipedalism and some degree of arboreality. Given the combination of features in the Au. sediba foot, as well as comparisons between Au. sediba and older hominins, homoplasy is implied in the acquisition of bipedal adaptations in the hominin foot.

  14. Biomechanics of the Ankle-Foot System during Stair Ambulation: Implications for Design of Advanced Ankle-Foot Prostheses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-15

    A.H., 2007. Effect of ankle–foot orthosis on roll-over shape in adults with hemiplegia. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development 44 (1), 11...20. Gates, D.H., 2004. Characterizing Ankle Function During Stair Ascent, Descent, And Level Walking For Ankle Prosthesis And Orthosis Design. M.S

  15. Are there any relationships among ankle proprioception acuity, pre-landing ankle muscle responses, and landing impact in man?

    PubMed

    Fu, Siu Ngor; Hui-Chan, Christina Wan Ying

    2007-05-01

    Proprioceptive input has been suggested to contribute to the pre-landing muscle responses associated with drop-landing, but its precise role has yet to be delineated. This study set out to examine the relationships among ankle proprioception, pre-landing muscle responses, and landing impact on drop-landing in healthy man. Fifteen healthy male basketball players aged 18 to 26 participated in this study. Passive ankle joint repositioning errors were used to examine ankle joint proprioception. Pre-landing EMG responses in the ankle muscles and the impact force on landing were recorded while the players performed self-initiated drops from a height of 30 cm. Results demonstrated that averaged ankle repositioning errors were significantly correlated with the co-contraction indexes between left tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius muscles (TA/MG CoI) (r=0.67, p=0.006), and showed a trend towards a relationship with the right TA/MG CoI (r=0.47, p=0.079). TA/MG CoI from both ankles were further related to the magnitude of the total impact force on landing (r=0.54 and 0.53, respectively; p<0.05). We concluded that male basketball players with less accurate ankle joint sense adopted greater co-contraction of ankle dorsiflexors and platarflexors, which was in turn associated with greater impact force at the moment of landing.

  16. Arthroscopic Release of Lateral Half of the Talocalcaneonavicular Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Arthrofibrosis of the talocalcaneonavicular joint can follow trauma or surgery of the joint. Arthroscopic release of the lateral half of the talocalcaneonavicular joint is indicated if the painful restriction of hindfoot inversion together with tenderness of the lateral side of the joint that is not controlled with conservative treatment. This procedure is contraindicated in other causes of painful stiffness including post-traumatic arthritis, osteonecrosis, and malunion. This technique includes arthroscopic release of the lateral side of the anterior subtalar joint and the talonavicular joint. This is a technically demanding technique and should be reserved for the experienced foot and ankle arthroscopists.

  17. Riluzole But Not Melatonin Ameliorates Acute Motor Neuron Degeneration and Moderately Inhibits SOD1-Mediated Excitotoxicity Induced Disrupted Mitochondrial Ca2+ Signaling in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Manoj Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Selective motoneurons (MNs) degeneration in the brain stem, hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs), and the spinal cord resulting in patients paralysis and eventual death are prominent features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previous studies have suggested that mitochondrial respiratory impairment, low Ca2+ buffering and homeostasis and excitotoxicity are the pathological phenotypes found in mice, and cell culture models of familial ALS (fALS) linked with Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation. In our study, we aimed to understand the impact of riluzole and melatonin on excitotoxicity, neuronal protection and Ca2+ signaling in individual HMNs ex vivo in symptomatic adult ALS mouse brain stem slice preparations and in WT and SOD1-G93A transfected SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line using fluorescence microscopy, calcium imaging with high speed charged coupled device camera, together with immunohistochemistry, cell survival assay and histology. In our experiments, riluzole but not melatonin ameliorates MNs degeneration and moderately inhibit excitotoxicity and cell death in SH-SY5YWT or SH-SY5YG93A cell lines induced by complex IV blocker sodium azide. In brain stem slice preparations, riluzole significantly inhibit HMNs cell death induced by inhibiting the mitochondrial electron transport chain by Na-azide. In the HMNs of brainstem slice prepared from adult (14–15 weeks) WT, and corresponding symptomatic SOD1G93A mice, we measured the effect of riluzole and melatonin on [Ca2+]i using fura-2 AM ratiometric calcium imaging in individual MNs. Riluzole caused a significant decrease in [Ca2+]i transients and reversibly inhibited [Ca2+]i transients in Fura-2 AM loaded HMNs exposed to Na-azide in adult symptomatic SOD1G93A mice. On the contrary, melatonin failed to show similar effects in the HMNs of WT and SOD1G93A mice. Intrinsic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence, an indicator of mitochondrial metabolism and health in MNs, showed enhanced

  18. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  19. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Rouse, Elliott J; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the "push off" region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane.

  20. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the “push off” region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane. PMID:27766187

  1. Bone alterations are associated with ankle osteoarthritis joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yukio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kamimura, Mikio; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is largely unknown. We analyzed 24 ankle OA of 21 patients diagnosed by plain radiographs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ankle joint pain disappeared in 22 out of 24 joints by conservative treatment. MRI bone signal changes in and around the ankle joints were observed in 22 of 24 joints. Bone signal changes along the joint line were seen in 10 of 11 joints as a Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade of II to IV. Such signal changes were witnessed in only 4 of 13 joints with KL grade 0 or I. In the talocrural joint, bone alterations occurred in both tibia and talus bones through the joint line in cases of KL grade III or IV, while focal bone alterations were present in the talus only in KL grade I or II cases. Sixteen of 24 joints exhibited intraosseous bone signal changes, which tended to correspond to joint pain of any ankle OA stage. Our results suggest that bone alterations around the ankle joint might be one of the etiologies of OA and associated with ankle joint pain. PMID:26776564

  2. Registry data trends of total ankle replacement use.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty registry data are meaningful when evaluating the outcomes of total joint replacement, because they provide unbiased objective information regarding survivorship and incidence of use. Critical evaluation of the registry data information will benefit the surgeon, patient, and industry. However, the implementation and acceptance of registry data for total ankle replacement has lagged behind that of hip and knee implant arthroplasty. Currently, several countries have national joint arthroplasty registries, with only some procuring information for total ankle replacement. We performed an electronic search to identify publications and worldwide registry databanks with pertinent information specific to total ankle replacement to determine the type of prostheses used and usage trends over time. We identified worldwide registry data from 33 countries, with details pertinent to total ankle replacement identified in only 6 countries. The obtained information was arbitrarily stratified into 3 distinct periods: 2000 to 2006, 2007 to 2010, and 2011. Within these study periods, the data from 13 total ankle replacement systems involving 3,980 ankles were identified. The vast majority (97%) of the reported ankle replacements were 3-component, mobile-bearing, uncemented prostheses. Three usage trends were identified: initial robust embracement followed by abrupt disuse, minimal use, and initial embracement followed by sustained growth in implantation. Before the widespread acceptance of new total ankle replacements, the United States should scrutinize and learn from the international registry data and develop its own national joint registry that would include total ankle replacement. Caution against the adoption of newly released prostheses, especially those without readily available revision components, is recommended.

  3. Agility to INBONE: anterior and posterior approaches to the difficult revision total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    DeVries, J George; Scott, Ryan T; Berlet, Gregory C; Hyer, Christopher F; Lee, Thomas H; DeOrio, James K

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement is now acknowledged as a viable alternative to ankle arthrodesis for end-stage ankle arthritis. The authors present a series of 14 patients who were converted from the Agility total ankle replacement to an INBONE total ankle replacement. This report is unique in that anterior and posterior approaches are discussed and detailed. Although the authors present successful conversion of the Agility total ankle replacement to an INBONE total ankle replacement, the difficulty of this procedure is demonstrated by the high complication rate and 2 early failures.

  4. Static ankle impedance in stroke and multiple sclerosis: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Patterson, Tara; Ahn, Jooeun; Klenk, Daniel; Lo, Albert; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of ankle mechanical impedance is critical for understanding lower extremity function in persons with neurological disorders. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of employing an ankle robot and multivariable analysis to determine static ankle impedance in 4 patients: 1 with multiple sclerosis and 3 with stroke. We employed a scalar based vector field approximation method which was successful in identifying young healthy subjects' ankle impedance. It enabled clear interpretation of spatial ankle impedance structure and intermuscular feedback at the ankle for both affected and unaffected legs. Measured impedance of two patients was comparable to healthy young subjects, while the other two patients had significantly different static ankle impedance properties.

  5. Outcome of unilateral ankle arthrodesis and total ankle replacement in terms of bilateral gait mechanics.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Swati; Rouhani, Hossein; Assal, Mathieu; Aminian, Kamiar; Crevoisier, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies assessed the outcome of ankle arthrodesis (AA) and total ankle replacement (TAR) surgeries; however, the extent of postoperative recovery towards bilateral gait mechanics (BGM) is unknown. We evaluated the outcome of the two surgeries at least 2 years post rehabilitation, focusing on BGM. 36 participants, including 12 AA patients, 12 TAR patients, and 12 controls were included. Gait assessment over 50 m distance was performed utilizing pressure insoles and 3D inertial sensors, following which an intraindividual comparison was performed. Most spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters in the TAR group were indicative of good gait symmetry, while the AA group presented significant differences. Plantar pressure symmetry among the AA group was also significantly distorted. Abnormality in biomechanical behavior of the AA unoperated, contralateral foot was observed. In summary, our results indicate an altered BGM in AA patients, whereas a relatively fully recovered BGM is observed in TAR patients, despite the quantitative differences in several parameters when compared to a healthy population. Our study supports a biomechanical assessment and rehabilitation of both operated and unoperated sides after major surgeries for ankle osteoarthrosis.

  6. Use of a trabecular metal implant in ankle arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement is complicated and delayed union, nonunion, and shortening of the leg often occur—especially with large bone defects. We investigated the use of a trabecular metal implant and a retrograde intramedullary nail to obtain fusion. Patients and methods 13 patients with a migrated or loose total ankle implant underwent arthrodesis with the use of a retrograde intramedullary nail through a trabecular metal Tibial Cone. The mean follow-up time was 1.4 (0.6–3.4) years. Results At the last examination, 7 patients were pain-free, while 5 had some residual pain but were satisfied with the procedure. 1 patient was dissatisfied and experienced pain and swelling when walking. The implant-bone interfaces showed no radiographic zones or gaps in any patient, indicating union. Interpretation The method is a new way of simplifying and overcoming some of the problems of performing arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement. PMID:21067435

  7. Control of torque direction by spinal pathways at the cat ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Nichols, T R; Lawrence, J H; Bonasera, S J

    1993-01-01

    To study the biomechanics of the calcaneal tendon's complex insertion onto the calcaneus, we measured torque-time trajectories exerted by the triceps surae and tibialis anterior muscles in eight unanesthetized decerebrate cats using a multi-axis force-moment sensor placed at the ankle joint. The ankle was constrained to an angle of 110 degrees plantarflexion. Muscles were activated using crossed-extension (XER), flexion (FWR), and caudal cutaneous sural nerve (SNR) reflexes. Torque contributions of other muscles activated by these reflexes were eliminated by denervation or tenotomy. In two animals, miniature pressure transducers were implanted among tendon fibers from the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle that insert straight into the calcaneus or among tendon fibers from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) that cross over and insert on the lateral aspect of calcaneus. Reflexively evoked torques had the following directions: FWR, dorsiflexion and adduction; SNR, plantarflexion and abduction; and XER, plantarflexion and modest abduction or adduction. The proportion of abduction torque to plantarflexion torque was always greater for SNR than XER; this difference was about 50% of the magnitude of abduction torque generated by tetanic stimulation of the peronei. During SNR, pressures were higher in regions of the calcaneal tendon originating from MG than regions originating from LG. Similarly, pressures within the MG portion of the calcaneal tendon were higher during SNR than during XER, although these two reflexes produced matched ankle plantarflexion forces. Selective tenotomies and electromyographic recordings further demonstrated that MG generated most of the torque in response to SNR, while soleus, LG, and MG all generated torques in response to XER.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Supramalleolar osteotomy for ankle valgus in myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Abraham, E; Lubicky, J P; Songer, M N; Millar, E A

    1996-01-01

    Fifty-five supramalleolar osteotomies were performed in 35 patients for progressive hindfoot valgus in myelomeningocele. All patients were ambulatory. The most common motor level of innervation was L3 in 42 limbs. The average age at surgery was 12 years. The average follow-up was 8 years. Preoperatively, all patients experienced progressive difficulty with brace use, and anteroposterior weight-bearing ankle radiographs showed a valgus tilt of the talotibial angle (TTA) of > or = 10 degrees with an average of 18 degrees. The average postoperative correction of TTA was 17 degrees. The results were graded as follows: excellent, 42 limbs; good, eight limbs; fair, three limbs; and poor, two limbs. The fair and poor limb results were the result of loss of correction or nonunion. The best results were seen when the TTA was corrected to 5 degrees of varus.

  9. Diabetic charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle with osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    One of the most devastating foot and/or ankle complications in the diabetic population with peripheral neuropathy is the presence of Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN). In recent years, diabetic limb salvage has been attempted more frequently as opposed to major lower extremity amputation for CN of the foot and ankle with ulceration and/or deep infection. Treatment strategies for osteomyelitis in the diabetic population have evolved. This article reviews some of the most common surgical strategies recommended for the diabetic patient with CN of the foot and/or ankle and concomitant osteomyelitis.

  10. Use of talectomy in modern foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Thomas N; Myerson, Mark S

    2004-12-01

    Talectomy is a procedure that is undertaken rarely in modern orthopedic surgery; however, it has been performed for many years. Talectomy has been used most commonly in pediatric orthopedics with some degree of success in severe clubfoot deformity, arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, myelomeningocele, tuberculosis, and tumors. In adults, talectomy has been used in salvage procedures that involve nonunion of ankle fusions, failed total ankle arthroplasty, inflammatory arthropathy, neuroarthropathy, failed talar prostheses, failed pantalar fusions, adult neglected clubfoot, posttraumatic avascular necrosis talus, and deformities that are due to sciatic nerve palsy and compartment syndrome. This article consider what place talectomy has in modern adult foot and ankle surgery.

  11. Ankle-foot orthosis function in low-level myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Hullin, M G; Robb, J E; Loudon, I R

    1992-01-01

    Six children with low-level myelomeningocele underwent gait analysis. All showed excessive ankle dorsiflexion and knee flexion when walking barefoot. A rigid thermoplastic ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) improved gait by preventing ankle dorsiflexion and reducing knee flexion. Biomechanically, the AFO caused a reduction in external knee moment by aligning the knee with the ground reaction force. Small changes in the foot-shank angle of the orthosis had profound effects on knee mechanics. Knee hyperextension could be controlled by a rocker sole. Kinetic gait analysis permits understanding of the biomechanical effects of orthoses.

  12. [High complication rate after surgical treatment of ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Bjørslev, Naja; Ebskov, Lars; Lind, Marianne; Mersø, Camilla

    2014-08-04

    The purpose of this study was to determine the quality and re-operation rate of the surgical treatment of ankle fractures at a large university hospital. X-rays and patient records of 137 patients surgically treated for ankle fractures were analyzed for: 1) correct classification according to Lauge-Hansen, 2) if congruity of the ankle joint was achieved, 3) selection and placement of the hardware, and 4) the surgeon's level of education. Totally 32 of 137 did not receive an optimal treatment, 11 were re-operated. There was no clear correlation between incorrect operation and the surgeon's level of education.

  13. Seasonality of Ankle Swelling: Population Symptom Reporting Using Google Trends.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangwei; Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Kolber, Michael; Flook, Nigel; Sternberg, Harvey; Garrison, Scott

    2016-07-01

    In our experience, complaints of ankle swelling are more common in summer, typically from patients with no obvious cardiovascular disease. Surprisingly, this observation has never been reported. To objectively establish this phenomenon, we sought evidence of seasonality in the public's Internet searches for ankle swelling. Our data, obtained from Google Trends, consisted of all related Google searches in the United States from January 4, 2004, to January 26, 2016. Consistent with our expectations and confirmed by similar data for Australia, Internet searches for information on ankle swelling are highly seasonal (highest in midsummer), with seasonality explaining 86% of search volume variability.

  14. Optimal management of ankle syndesmosis injuries

    PubMed Central

    Porter, David A; Jaggers, Ryan R; Barnes, Adam Fitzgerald; Rund, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Syndesmosis injuries occur when there is a disruption of the distal attachment of the tibia and fibula. These injuries occur commonly (up to 18% of ankle sprains), and the incidence increases in the setting of athletic activity. Recognition of these injuries is key to preventing long-term morbidity. Diagnosis and treatment of these injuries requires a thorough understanding of the normal anatomy and the role it plays in the stability of the ankle. A complete history and physical examination is of paramount importance. Patients usually experience an external rotation mechanism of injury. Key physical exam features include detailed documentation about areas of focal tenderness (syndesmosis and deltoid) and provocative maneuvers such as the external rotation stress test. Imaging workup in all cases should consist of radiographs with the physiologic stress of weight bearing. If these images are inconclusive, then further imaging with external rotation stress testing or magnetic resonance imaging are warranted. Nonoperative treatment is appropriate for stable injuries. Unstable injuries should be treated operatively. This consists of stabilizing the syndesmosis with either trans-syndesmotic screw or tightrope fixation. In the setting of a concomitant Weber B or C fracture, the fibula is anatomically reduced and stabilized with a standard plate and screw construct. Proximal fibular fractures, as seen in the Maisonneuve fracture pattern, are not repaired operatively. Recent interest is moving toward repair of the deltoid ligament, which may provide increased stability, especially in rehabilitation protocols that involve early weight bearing. Rehabilitation is focused on allowing patients to return to their pre-injury activities as quickly and safely as possible. Protocols initially focus on controlling swelling and recovery from surgery. The protocols then progress to restoration of motion, early protected weight bearing, restoration of strength, and eventually a

  15. Effects of hip and head position on ankle range of motion, ankle passive torque, and passive gastrocnemius tension.

    PubMed

    Andrade, R J; Lacourpaille, L; Freitas, S R; McNair, P J; Nordez, A

    2016-01-01

    Ankle joint range of motion (ROM) is notably influenced by the position of the hip joint. However, this result remains unexplained. Thus, the aim of this study was to test if the ankle passive torque and gastrocnemius muscle tension are affected by the hip and the head positions. The torque and the muscle shear elastic modulus (measured by elastography to estimate muscle tension) were collected in nine participants during passive ankle dorsiflexions performed in four conditions (by combining hip flexion at 90 or 150°, and head flexed or neutral). Ankle maximum dorsiflexion angle significantly decreased by flexing the hip from 150 to 90° (P < 0.001; mean difference 17.7 ± 2.5°), but no effect of the head position was observed (P > 0.05). Maximal passive torque and shear elastic modulus were higher with the hip flexed at 90° (P < 0.001). During submaximal ROM, no effects of the head and hip positioning (P > 0.05) were found for both torque and shear elastic modulus at a given common ankle angle among conditions. Shifts in maximal ankle angle due to hip angle manipulation are not related neither to changes in passive torque nor tension of the gastrocnemius. Further studies should be addressed to better understand the functional role of peripheral nerves and fasciae in the ankle ROM limits.

  16. Ankle control and strength training for children with cerebral palsy using the Rutgers Ankle CP: a case study.

    PubMed

    Cioi, Daniel; Kale, Angad; Burdea, Grigore; Engsberg, Jack; Janes, William; Ross, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study described here was to develop and feasibility test the Rutgers Ankle CP, aimed at ankle strengthening and improved control for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The system was an upgrade in hardware (new foot attachment, new robot controller) and software (new games and programming language) of the earlier Rutgers Ankle in order to permit training of children with CP. The new Rutgers Ankle CP was used to train ankle strength and motor control in a 7 year old boy with CP during 36 rehabilitation sessions (12 weeks, 3 times/week). Assessments for impairment, function and quality of life were taken before and after training. Results indicated improvements in both strength and motor control. Gait function improved substantially in ankle kinematics, speed and endurance. Overall function (GMFM) indicated improvements that were typical of other ankle strength training programs. Quality of life increased beyond what would be considered a minimal clinical important difference. While these results are only for a single participant, they are very encouraging toward improving the function and quality of life of children with cerebral palsy. Further research with a larger number of participants is planned.

  17. SPECIFIC AND CROSS-OVER EFFECTS OF FOAM ROLLING ON ANKLE DORSIFLEXION RANGE OF MOTION

    PubMed Central

    Beardsley, Chris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Flexibility is an important physical quality. Self-myofascial release (SMFR) methods such as foam rolling (FR) increase flexibility acutely but how long such increases in range of motion (ROM) last is unclear. Static stretching (SS) also increases flexibility acutely and produces a cross-over effect to contralateral limbs. FR may also produce a cross-over effect to contralateral limbs but this has not yet been identified. Purpose To explore the potential cross-over effect of SMFR by investigating the effects of a FR treatment on the ipsilateral limb of 3 bouts of 30 seconds on changes in ipsilateral and contralateral ankle DF ROM and to assess the time-course of those effects up to 20 minutes post-treatment. Methods A within- and between-subject design was carried out in a convenience sample of 26 subjects, allocated into FR (n=13) and control (CON, n=13) groups. Ankle DF ROM was recorded at baseline with the in-line weight-bearing lunge test for both ipsilateral and contralateral legs and at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 minutes following either a two-minute seated rest (CON) or 3 3 30 seconds of FR of the plantar flexors of the dominant leg (FR). Repeated measures ANOVA was used to examine differences in ankle DF ROM. Results No significant between-group effect was seen following the intervention. However, a significant within-group effect (p<0.05) in the FR group was seen between baseline and all post-treatment time-points (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes). Significant within-group effects (p<0.05) were also seen in the ipsilateral leg between baseline and at all post-treatment time-points, and in the contralateral leg up to 10 minutes post-treatment, indicating the presence of a cross-over effect. Conclusions FR improves ankle DF ROM for at least 20 minutes in the ipsilateral limb and up to 10 minutes in the contralateral limb, indicating that FR produces a cross-over effect into the contralateral limb. The mechanism producing these cross-over effects is

  18. Contributions of feed-forward and feedback strategies at the human ankle during control of unstable loads

    PubMed Central

    Dhaher, Yasin Y.; Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    The nervous system can regulate the mechanical properties of the human ankle through feed-forward mechanisms such as co-contraction and rapid feedback mechanisms such as stretch reflexes. Though each of these strategies may contribute to joint stability, it is unclear how their relative contribution varies when ankle stability is threatened. We addressed this question by characterizing co-contraction and stretch reflexes during balance of an inverted pendulum simulated by a rotary motor configured as an admittance servo. The stability of this haptic environment was manipulated by varying the stiffness of a virtual spring supporting the pendulum. We hypothesized that co-contraction and stretch reflex amplitude would increase as the stability of the haptic load attached to the ankle was reduced. Electromyographic activity in soleus, medial and lateral gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior was used to characterize co-contraction patterns and stretch reflex amplitude as subjects stabilized the haptic load. Our results revealed that co-contraction was heightened as stability was reduced, but that the resulting joint stiffness was not sufficient to fully counteract the imposed instability. Reflex amplitude, in comparison, was attenuated as load stability was reduced, contrary to results from upper limb studies using similar paradigms. Together these findings suggest that the nervous system utilizes feed-forward co-contraction rather than rapid involuntary feedback to increase ankle stability during simple balance tasks. Furthermore, since the stiffness generated through co-contraction was not sufficient to fully balance the haptic load, our results suggest an important role for slower, volitional feedback in the control of ankle stability during balancing tasks. PMID:22169978

  19. Evidence for a Time-Invariant Phase Variable in Human Ankle Control

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Robert D.; Rouse, Elliott J.; Hargrove, Levi J.; Sensinger, Jonathon W.

    2014-01-01

    Human locomotion is a rhythmic task in which patterns of muscle activity are modulated by state-dependent feedback to accommodate perturbations. Two popular theories have been proposed for the underlying embodiment of phase in the human pattern generator: a time-dependent internal representation or a time-invariant feedback representation (i.e., reflex mechanisms). In either case the neuromuscular system must update or represent the phase of locomotor patterns based on the system state, which can include measurements of hundreds of variables. However, a much simpler representation of phase has emerged in recent designs for legged robots, which control joint patterns as functions of a single monotonic mechanical variable, termed a phase variable. We propose that human joint patterns may similarly depend on a physical phase variable, specifically the heel-to-toe movement of the Center of Pressure under the foot. We found that when the ankle is unexpectedly rotated to a position it would have encountered later in the step, the Center of Pressure also shifts forward to the corresponding later position, and the remaining portion of the gait pattern ensues. This phase shift suggests that the progression of the stance ankle is controlled by a biomechanical phase variable, motivating future investigations of phase variables in human locomotor control. PMID:24558485

  20. Acute injuries in orienteerers.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M; Nylund, T; Taimela, S

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the type and severeity of acute injuries occurring in Finnish orienteerers in 1987 to 1991. The study is based on the orienteering license insurance records accounting for 2189 orienteering injuries during 69268 person-years of exposure in active orienteerers. Of these orienteerers, 73.0% were male; 73.5% (N = 1608) of all injuries occurred in males, so the injury rate was similar in males and females. The rate was highest in orienteerers 20 to 24 years of age and lowest in children. Injuries occurred most commonly during May to September (78.9% or all injuries), the months which include the orienteering competition season, and were more common during competitions (59.8%) than during training. A high number of the injuries occurred during weekends (58.9% of injuries) including 68.1% of all competition injuries and 44.9% of all training injuries. The lower limbs were involved in 1611 (73.6%) of cases, the ankle (28.7%) and the knee (23.2%) being the two most common injury locations. Sprains, strains and contusions were the most common injuries. Wounds were proportionally more common in males than in females while ankle sprains were more common in females. Fractures, seven open and 94 closed, accounted for 4.6% of injuries; they were most common in the hand/wrist/forearm (N = 44) and ankle (N = 16), and were more frequent during competition (62.3%) than during training. The most important areas for preventive measures seem to be the ankle and the knee.

  1. Ankle Arthrodesis Using an Anterior Titanium Dual Locked Plating Construct.

    PubMed

    Flint, Wesley W; Hirose, Christopher B; Coughlin, Michael J

    Ankle arthrodesis is currently the reference standard treatment for end-stage tibiotalar arthrosis. The fusion rates have varied in the published data from 59% to 100%. We reviewed 60 cases of consecutive anterior ankle arthrodesis using an anterior dual locked plating construct with respect to the fusion rate, time to fusion, pain relief, and complications. The patients were followed up for a mean of 1.1 years (range 16 weeks to 4 years). We found that our fusion rate was 97% for ankles not requiring structural allograft. The mean interval to fusion was 11.7 weeks, excluding those with a structural allograft. The mean visual analog scale pain scores decreased from 7 preoperatively to 2 at the final follow-up visit. Anterior ankle arthrodesis with dual locked plating provides excellent results with respect to the fusion rate with a low complication rate.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of sports injuries of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Morrison, William B

    2003-04-01

    Basic sports-related injuries of the ankle include ligament tear, tendon degeneration and tear, bone bruise, fracture, impingement, osteochondral defect, and plantar fasciitis. This article discusses the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of these injuries.

  3. Posteromedial dislocation of the ankle without fracture or diastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L C; Love, M B

    1993-02-01

    This case report describes a patient with posteromedial dislocation of the ankle without fracture and without disruption of the tibiofibular syndesmosis. The pathogenesis of this uncommon lesion is discussed.

  4. Ultrasound-guided intervention in the ankle and foot

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Gina M; Watura, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In this comprehensive review, we discuss the main interventions performed in the foot and ankle for Achilles tendinopathy, Morton's neuromas and Plantar fasciitis as well as techniques for intra-articular and peritendinous injections. We present the different imaging techniques and injectable agents that can be used in clinical practice, trying to help the reader decide the most appropriate way of managing the patient with a problem in the ankle and foot. PMID:26537692

  5. Antibiotic-loaded cement beads for Charcot ankle osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    The concomitant presence of osteomyelitis and diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle places those patients affected at increased risk for limb loss. Antibiotic-loaded cement has been reported to be useful in the treatment of deep soft tissue and joint infections. The authors present an overview of this adjunctive treatment modality and present a case report using antibiotic-loaded cement beads in staged reconstruction for Charcot ankle osteomyelitis.

  6. Supramalleolar osteotomy for realignment of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Noman A; Herzenberg, John E; Lamm, Bradley M

    2012-10-01

    Ankle replacement systems have not been as reliable as hip replacements in providing long-term relief of pain, increased motion, and return to full activity. Supramalleolar Osteotomy is an extraarticular procedure that realigns the mechanical axis, thereby restoring ankle function. The literature discussing knee arthritis has shown that realignment osteotomies of the tibia improve function and prolong total knee replacement surgery. The success of the procedure is predicated on understanding the patient's clinical and radiographic presentation and proper preoperative assessment and planning.

  7. Dissociated lower limb muscle involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Lee, Michael; Bae, Jong Seok; Mioshi, Eneida; Lin, Cindy S-Y; Pfluger, Casey M; Henderson, Robert D; Vucic, Steve; Swash, Michael; Burke, David; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2015-06-01

    It has been suggested that corticomotoneuronal drive to ankle dorsiflexors is greater than to ankle plantar flexor muscles, despite the finding that plantar flexors are no less active than TA during walking and standing. The present study was undertaken to determine whether there was differential involvement of distal lower limb muscles in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms of selective muscle involvement. Prospective studies were undertaken in 52 ALS patients, including clinical assessment, disease staging (revised ALS functional rating scale), Medical Research Council sum score, and a scale of upper motor neurone (UMN) dysfunction. Motor unit number estimates (MUNE) and compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) from ankle dorsiflexors and plantar flexors were used to provide objective measures. A novel 'split leg index' was calculated as follows: SLI = CMAPDF ÷ CMAPPF. In ALS, there was significantly greater reduction of MUNE and CMAP amplitude recorded from plantar flexors when compared to dorsiflexors, suggesting preferential involvement of plantar flexor muscles, underpinning a 'split leg' appearance. The SLI correlated with clinical plantar flexor strength (R= -0.56, p < 0.001). In no patient did the SLI suggest preferential dorsiflexor involvement. In subgroup analyses, mean SLI was greatest in lower limb-onset ALS. In conclusion, the present study has established dissociated involvement of muscles acting around the ankle in ALS. We suggest this reflects underlying differences in cortical, descending or local spinal modulation of these muscles.

  8. Normal Anatomy and Compression Areas of Nerves of the Foot and Ankle: US and MR Imaging with Anatomic Correlation.

    PubMed

    De Maeseneer, Michel; Madani, Hardi; Lenchik, Leon; Kalume Brigido, Monica; Shahabpour, Maryam; Marcelis, Stefaan; de Mey, Johan; Scafoglieri, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the nerves of the foot and ankle is complex, and familiarity with the normal anatomy and course of these nerves as well as common anatomic variants is essential for correct identification at imaging. Ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging allow visualization of these nerves and may facilitate diagnosis of various compression syndromes, such as "jogger's heel," Baxter neuropathy, and Morton neuroma. It may be difficult to distinguish the nerves from adjacent vasculature at MR imaging, and US can help in differentiation. The authors review the normal anatomy and common variants of the nerves of the foot and ankle, with use of dissected specimens and correlative US and MR imaging findings. In addition, the authors illustrate proper probe positioning, which is essential for visualizing the nerves at US. The authors' discussion focuses on the superficial and deep peroneal, sural, saphenous, tibial, medial and lateral plantar, medial and inferior calcaneal, common digital, and medial proper plantar digital nerves.

  9. Gait generation for powered Hip-Ankle-Linkage-Orthosis.

    PubMed

    Jaeryoung Lee; Mizumoto, Ryota; Obinata, Goro; Genda, Eiichi; Stefanov, Dimitar; Aoki, Hirofumi; Yanling Pei

    2015-08-01

    A hip-knee-ankle-foot orthotic system called `HALO'(Hip and Ankle Linked Orthosis) for paraplegic walking has been developed in our previous study. Each ankle joint of the HALO system is linked with a medial single joint via a wire which allows both feet of the orthosis to stay always parallel to the floor during walking and assists swinging the leg. The tests of the HALO system demonstrated that it allows smoother walking and easy don/doff. In order to improve further the characteristics of the previous design, we started a new project called pHALO aiming at further reducing of the energy expenditure during walking. As a difference from the previous solution where ankle joints were restrained, the new solution will incorporate two actuators to control the ankle joints angles. As an intermediate step from the development of the pHALO system, in this study we added to the existing system a feedback PI controller to control the ankle joint angle of the right foot in the push-off phase and conducted an experiment to evaluate the effect of the new design on the walking patterns and energy efficiency. The results showed longer stride length, faster gait speed, smaller variation of the CoG, and less energy consumption.

  10. The effect of lateral banking on the kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremity during lateral cutting movements.

    PubMed

    Wannop, John W; Graf, Eveline S; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2014-02-01

    There are many aspects of cutting movements that can limit performance, however, the implementation of lateral banking may reduce some of these limitations. Banking could provide a protective mechanism, placing the foot and ankle in orientations that keep them out of dangerous positions. This study sought to determine the effect of two banking angles on the kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremity during two athletic maneuvers. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected on 10 recreational athletes performing v-cuts and side shuffle movements on different banked surfaces (0°, 10°, 20°). Each sample surface was rigidly attached to the force platform. Joint moments were calculated and compared between conditions using a repeated measures ANOVA. Banking had a pronounced effect on the ankle joint. As banking increased, the amount of joint loading in the transverse and frontal planes decreased likely leading to a reduction in injury risk. Also an increase in knee joint loading in the frontal plane was seen during the 20° bank during the v-cut. Conversely loading in the sagittal plane at the ankle joint increased with banking and coupled with a reorientation of the ground reaction vector may facilitate a performance increase. The current study indicates that the 10° bank may be the optimal bank, in that it decreases ankle joint loading, as well as increases specific performance variables while not increasing frontal plane knee joint loading. If banking could be incorporated in footwear it may be able to provide a protective mechanism for athletes.

  11. Ankle mechanics during sidestep cutting implicates need for 2-degrees of freedom powered ankle-foot prostheses.

    PubMed

    Ficanha, Evandro M; Rastgaar, Mohammad; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-01

    The ankle joint of currently available powered prostheses is capable of controlling one degree of freedom (DOF), focusing on improved mobility in the sagittal plane. To increase agility, the requirements of turning in prosthesis design need to be considered. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were studied during sidestep cutting and straight walking. There were no significant differences between the ankle sagittal plane mechanics when comparing sidestep cutting and straight walking; however, significant differences were observed in ankle frontal plane mechanics. During straight walking, the inversion-eversion (IE) angles were smaller than with sidestep cutting. The ankle that initiated the sidestep cutting showed progressively increasing inversion from 2 to 13 degrees while the following contralateral step showed progressively decreasing inversion from 8 to -4 degrees during normal walking speed. The changes in IE kinematics were the most significant during sidestep cutting compared with straight walking. The IE moments of the step that initiated the sidestep cutting were always in eversion, acting as a braking moment opposing the inverting motion. This suggests that an ankle-foot prosthesis with active DOFs in the sagittal and frontal planes will increase the agility of gait for patients with limb loss.

  12. Biomechanics of the ankle-foot system during stair ambulation: implications for design of advanced ankle-foot prostheses.

    PubMed

    Sinitski, Emily H; Hansen, Andrew H; Wilken, Jason M

    2012-02-02

    Unilateral lower limb prosthesis users display temporal, kinematic, and kinetic asymmetries between limbs while ascending and descending stairs. These asymmetries are due, in part, to the inability of current prosthetic devices to effectively mimic normal ankle function. The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive set of biomechanical data for able-bodied and unilateral transtibial amputee (TTA) ankle-foot systems for level-ground (LG), stair ascent (SA), and stair descent (SD), and to characterize deviations from normal performance associated with prosthesis use. Ankle joint kinematics, kinetics, torque-angle curves, and effective shapes were calculated for twelve able-bodied individuals and twelve individuals with TTA. The data from this study demonstrated the prosthetic limb can more effectively mimic the range of motion and power output of a normal ankle-foot during LG compared to SA and SD. There were larger differences between the prosthetic and able-bodied limbs during SA and SD, most evident in the torque-angle curves and effective shapes. These data can be used by persons designing ankle-foot prostheses and provide comparative data for assessment of future ankle-foot prosthesis designs.

  13. Quantitative analysis of human ankle characteristics at different gait phases and speeds for utilizing in ankle-foot prosthetic design

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ankle characteristics vary in terms of gait phase and speed change. This study aimed to quantify the components of ankle characteristics, including quasi-stiffness and work in different gait phases and at various speeds. Methods The kinetic and kinematic data of 20 healthy participants were collected during normal gait at four speeds. Stance moment-angle curves were divided into three sub-phases including controlled plantarflexion, controlled dorsiflexion and powered plantarflexion. The slope of the moment-angle curves was quantified as quasi-stiffness. The area under the curves was defined as work. Results The lowest quasi-stiffness was observed in the controlled plantarflexion. The fitted line to moment-angle curves showed R2 > 0.8 at controlled dorsiflexion and powered plantarflexion. Quasi-stiffness was significantly different at different speeds (P = 0.00). In the controlled dorsiflexion, the ankle absorbed energy; by comparison, energy was generated in the powered plantarflexion. A negative work value was recorded at slower speeds and a positive value was observed at faster speeds. Ankle peak powers were increased with walking speed (P = 0.00). Conclusions Our findings suggested that the quasi-stiffness and work of the ankle joint can be regulated at different phases and speeds. These findings may be clinically applicable in the design and development of ankle prosthetic devices that can naturally replicate human walking at various gait speeds. PMID:24568175

  14. Extraarticular Supramalleolar Osteotomy for Managing Varus Ankle Osteoarthritis, Alternatives for Osteotomy: How and Why?

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Chun

    2016-03-01

    The supramalleolar osteotomy has been reported to be a joint preserving surgery with good clinical outcome for asymmetric ankle osteoarthritis, especially varus ankle osteoarthritis. Conventional supramalleolar osteotomy of the tibia and fibula creates angulation and translation of the ankle joint without changing the width of the ankle mortise. Distal tibial oblique osteotomy improved the preoperative clinical and radiological parameters; however, mean talar tilt angle did not decrease. Assessment of the ankle arthritis in sagittal, axial, and coronal planes may be helpful to achieve a decrease of the talar tilt in ankle osteoarthritis.

  15. The medial malleolus osteoligamentous complex and its role in ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Davidovitch, Roy I; Egol, Kenneth A

    2009-01-01

    Ankle stability in ankle fractures is dependent on multiple factors. The medial malleolus and the associated deltoid ligament provide for ankle stability on the medial side. Over the years, the relative importance of this medial malleolar osteoligamentous complex (MMOLC) has been debated. This review will describe the evolution of ankle fracture surgery from the perspective of the contribution of the MMOLC to re-establishing ankle stability. Also discussed are the surgical and nonsurgical treatment options, various presentations of medial sided injuries in ankle fractures, and, finally, current recommendations for fixation.

  16. Pilot study of the cortical correlates and clinical effects of passive ankle mobilisation in children with upper motorneuron lesions.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Lorenzo; Molteni, Erika; Beretta, Elena; Vassena, Elena; Strazzer, Sandra; Pittaccio, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Upper motoreuron lesions (UML) affects people of all ages and conditions and is a major cause of disability in the young. Whereas active exercise is recognised as paramount to restore the lost motor functions, passive mobilisation of the affected limbs is regarded as a means to safeguard muscular tissue properties during a period of disuse and lack of voluntary control, which often characterises the acute and sub-acute phases. The purpose of the present work is to study the cortical reactivity in UML patients who are treated for two weeks with a robotic passive ankle mobiliser, and the clinical effects of this treatment. The rationale is that, if passive mobilisation can affect positively the functional reorganisation at a cortical level, it could be proposed as a suitable tool to maintain afferentation and guide central nervous remapping, thus bridging the period of time when active exercise is impossible due to acute paresis. Preliminary results on 7 patients (aged 15.35±4.36) showed that this therapy is very well tolerated and suggest that its application could specifically improve ankle PROM and plantarflexor muscle length. EEG data showed improved desynchronisation in at least one frequency band in 3 patients of the study, thus confirming the effects of passive mobilisation on the cortical re-organisation of some patients having UML.

  17. Range of Motion of the Ankle According to Pushing Force, Gender and Knee Position

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Hee; Lee, Hyunkeun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the difference of range of motion (ROM) of ankle according to pushing force, gender and knee position. Methods One hundred and twenty-eight healthy adults (55 men, 73 women) between the ages of 20 and 51, were included in the study. One examiner measured the passive range of motion (PROM) of ankle by Dualer IQ Inclinometers and Commander Muscle Testing. ROM of ankle dorsiflexion (DF) and plantarflexion (PF) according to change of pushing force and knee position were measured at prone position. Results There was significant correlation between ROM and pushing force, the more pushing force leads the more ROM at ankle DF and ankle PF. Knee flexion of 90° position showed low PF angle and high ankle DF angle, as compared to the at neutral position of knee joint. ROM of ankle DF for female was greater than for male, with no significant difference. ROM of ankle PF for female was greater than male regardless of the pushing force. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the relationship between pushing force and ROM of ankle joint. There was significant correlation between ROM of ankle and pushing force. ROM of ankle PF for female estimated greater than male regardless of the pushing force and the number of measurement. The ROM of the ankle is measured differently according to the knee joint position. Pushing force, gender and knee joint position are required to be considered when measuring the ROM of ankle joint. PMID:27152277

  18. Total ankle replacement--evolution of the technology and future applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, John J; Sheskier, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty was developed to reduce pain and retain motion of the ankle joint in patients with osteoarthritis much like its total hip and knee counterparts. Orthopaedic surgeons are well equipped to evaluate and treat patients with end-stage hip or knee arthritis; however, the management of patients with ankle arthritis represents a challenge to both general orthopaedic surgeons and to the foot and ankle surgeons to whom these patients are often referred. Although techniques for both hip and knee arthroplasty have evolved to provide long-term pain relief and functional improvement, neither ankle arthrodesis nor arthroplasty has demonstrated comparably favorable outcomes in long-term follow-up studies. Early ankle arthroplasty designs with highly constrained cemented components were abandoned due to unacceptably high failure rates and complications. While arthrodesis is still considered the "gold standard" for treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis, progression of adjacent joint arthrosis and diminished gait efficiency has led to a resurgence of interest in ankle arthroplasty. Long-term outcome studies for total ankle replacement found excellent or good results in 82% of patients who received a newer generation ankle device compared with 72% if undergoing ankle fusion. Continued long-term follow-up studies are necessary, but total ankle arthroplasty has become a viable option for surgical treatment of ankle arthritis.

  19. Ankle arthrodesis: A systematic approach and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Youichi; Hannon, Charles P; Seow, Dexter; Kennedy, John G

    2016-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is a common treatment used for patients with end-stage ankle arthritis (ESAA). The surgical goal of ankle arthrodesis is to obtain bony union between the tibia and talus with adequate alignment [slight valgus (0°-5°)], neutral dorsiflexion, and slight external rotation positions) in order to provide a pain-free plantigrade foot for weightbearing activities. There are many variations in operative technique including deferring approaches (open or arthroscopic) and differing fixation methods (internal or external fixation). Each technique has its advantage and disadvantages. Success of ankle arthrodesis can be dependent on several factors, including patient selection, surgeons’ skills, patient comorbidities, operative care, etc. However, from our experience, the majority of ESAA patients obtain successful clinical outcomes. This review aims to outline the indications and goals of arthrodesis for treatment of ESAA and discuss both open and arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis. A systematic step by step operative technique guide is presented for both the arthroscopic and open approaches including a postoperative protocol. We review the current evidence supporting each approach. The review finishes with a report of the most recent evidence of outcomes after both approaches and concerns regarding the development of hindfoot arthritis. PMID:27900266

  20. Ankle arthrodesis: A systematic approach and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Youichi; Hannon, Charles P; Seow, Dexter; Kennedy, John G

    2016-11-18

    Ankle arthrodesis is a common treatment used for patients with end-stage ankle arthritis (ESAA). The surgical goal of ankle arthrodesis is to obtain bony union between the tibia and talus with adequate alignment [slight valgus (0°-5°)], neutral dorsiflexion, and slight external rotation positions) in order to provide a pain-free plantigrade foot for weightbearing activities. There are many variations in operative technique including deferring approaches (open or arthroscopic) and differing fixation methods (internal or external fixation). Each technique has its advantage and disadvantages. Success of ankle arthrodesis can be dependent on several factors, including patient selection, surgeons' skills, patient comorbidities, operative care, etc. However, from our experience, the majority of ESAA patients obtain successful clinical outcomes. This review aims to outline the indications and goals of arthrodesis for treatment of ESAA and discuss both open and arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis. A systematic step by step operative technique guide is presented for both the arthroscopic and open approaches including a postoperative protocol. We review the current evidence supporting each approach. The review finishes with a report of the most recent evidence of outcomes after both approaches and concerns regarding the development of hindfoot arthritis.

  1. Adaptation to walking with an exoskeleton that assists ankle extension.

    PubMed

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate adaptation to walking with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons with kinematic control that assisted ankle extension during push-off. We hypothesized that subjects would show a neuromotor and metabolic adaptation during a 24min walking trial with a powered exoskeleton. Nine female subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.36±0.04ms(-1) during 24min with a powered exoskeleton and 4min with an unpowered exoskeleton. Subjects showed a metabolic adaptation after 18.5±5.0min, followed by an adapted period. Metabolic cost, electromyography and kinematics were compared between the unpowered condition, the beginning of the adaptation and the adapted period. In the beginning of the adaptation (4min), a reduction in metabolic cost of 9% was found compared to the unpowered condition. This reduction was accompanied by reduced muscular activity in the plantarflexor muscles, as the powered exoskeleton delivered part of the necessary ankle extension moment. During the adaptation this metabolic reduction further increased to 16%, notwithstanding a constant exoskeleton assistance. This increased reduction is the result of a neuromotor adaptation in which subjects adapt to walking with the exoskeleton, thereby reducing muscular activity in all leg muscles. Because of the fast adaptation and the significant reductions in metabolic cost we want to highlight the potential of an ankle-foot exoskeleton with kinematic control that assists ankle extension during push-off.

  2. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim TM; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino MMJ

    2015-01-01

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available. PMID:26716090

  3. Ankle injury mechanisms: lessons learned from cadaveric studies.

    PubMed

    Funk, James R

    2011-04-01

    The biomechanics of ankle injury have been studied extensively, primarily through mechanical testing of human cadavers. Cadaveric testing is an invaluable methodology in biomechanics, because the magnitude and direction of the loading can be measured precisely and correlated with the resulting injury pattern. Clinical and epidemiological studies provide useful descriptions of injury patterns that occur in the real world, but their retrospective nature precludes a definitive analysis of the forces that caused the injury. Understanding the mechanism of ankle injuries is essential for developing countermeasures to prevent injury and for reconstructing injurious events. Knowledge of an injury's mechanism can also suggest potential associated injuries, which is helpful in diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this review is to summarize the published research on ankle injury mechanisms with an emphasis on biomechanical experiments on human cadavers. Injury patterns are described based on the principal axis of force or torque producing the injury in conjunction with off-axis forces and out-of-plane foot positions. A mechanistic description of ankle injuries is complicated by the fact that the same mechanism can sometimes produce different injuries and the same injury can sometimes be caused by multiple mechanisms. Nonetheless, a framework for relating injury mechanisms and injury patterns is a valuable tool in the understanding, prevention, and treatment of ankle injuries.

  4. Total ankle arthroplasty with severe preoperative varus deformity.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Andrew E; Powell, Brian D; Santrock, Robert D

    2015-04-01

    Advancements in total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) over the past several decades have led to improved patient outcomes and implant survivorship. Despite these innovations, many implant manufacturers still consider a preoperative coronal plane deformity greater than 10° a relative contraindication to TAA. Without proper intraoperative alignment, these implants may experience abnormal wear and hardware failure. Correcting these deformities, often through the use of soft tissue procedures and/or osteotomies, not only increases the difficulty of a case, but also the intraoperative time and radiation exposure. The authors report a case in which a 54-year-old man with a severe right ankle varus deformity of 29° underwent successful TAA using the INBONE II Prophecy total ankle system (Wright Medical Technology, Inc, Memphis, Tennessee) and additional soft tissue reconstruction. Intraoperatively, the patient's coronal deformity was corrected to 1.8°. At 8 months postoperatively, the patient ambulated without restriction and had substantial improvement in validated patient outcome scores, specifically the Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Foot and Ankle Module and the Short Form Health Survey-12 This unique report documents the first time that this particular implant, with an exclusive preoperative computed tomography-derived patient-specific guide, has been used effectively for a severe preoperative varus deformity greater than 20° without the need for an osteotomy. Future studies should be directed toward the prospective evaluation of different total ankle implant systems and their outcomes with severe coronal plane deformity, specifically computed tomography-derived patient-specific guided implants.

  5. [Arthrodesis versus total joint replacement of the ankle].

    PubMed

    Mittlmeier, T

    2013-06-01

    In general, for the treatment of end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint arthrodesis is considered to be the gold standard based on its versatility and eligibility for numerous indications. Nowadays, total ankle arthroplasty represents a viable alternative to ankle arthrodesis taking into account distinct premises as both procedures provide a calculable reduction of the preoperative pain level and a comparable functional gain. Furthermore, current 10-year-survival rates of total ankle replacement are reported to range between 76 % and 89 %. Revision rates of up to 10 % for both techniques have been reported with manifest differences within the respective spectrum of complications. Due to the fact that more than two thirds of patients suffer from post-traumatic osteoarthritis with a relatively low average of age concomitant malalignment, soft tissue damage or instability may frequently occur. A restoration of anatomic axes and an adequate centering of the talus under the tibia appear to be crucial for the outcome as well as an adequate soft tissue balancing, in particular in total ankle replacement. Thus, the selection of the correct indication and the right choice of treatment on the basis of complete preoperative diagnostics considering necessary additive surgical measures are of paramount importance for the final outcome.

  6. Is Hardware Removal Recommended after Ankle Fracture Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hong-Geun; Kim, Jin-Il; Park, Jae-Yong; Park, Jong-Tae; Eom, Joon-Sang

    2016-01-01

    The indications and clinical necessity for routine hardware removal after treating ankle or distal tibia fracture with open reduction and internal fixation are disputed even when hardware-related pain is insignificant. Thus, we determined the clinical effects of routine hardware removal irrespective of the degree of hardware-related pain, especially in the perspective of patients' daily activities. This study was conducted on 80 consecutive cases (78 patients) treated by surgery and hardware removal after bony union. There were 56 ankle and 24 distal tibia fractures. The hardware-related pain, ankle joint stiffness, discomfort on ambulation, and patient satisfaction were evaluated before and at least 6 months after hardware removal. Pain score before hardware removal was 3.4 (range 0 to 6) and decreased to 1.3 (range 0 to 6) after removal. 58 (72.5%) patients experienced improved ankle stiffness and 65 (81.3%) less discomfort while walking on uneven ground and 63 (80.8%) patients were satisfied with hardware removal. These results suggest that routine hardware removal after ankle or distal tibia fracture could ameliorate hardware-related pain and improves daily activities and patient satisfaction even when the hardware-related pain is minimal. PMID:27819005

  7. Estimation of ground reaction force and zero moment point on a powered ankle-foot prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C; Herr, Hugh; Farrell, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The ground reaction force (GRF) and the zero moment point (ZMP) are important parameters for the advancement of biomimetic control of robotic lower-limb prosthetic devices. In this document a method to estimate GRF and ZMP on a motorized ankle-foot prosthesis (MIT Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis) is presented. The method proposed is based on the analysis of data collected from a sensory system embedded in the prosthetic device using a custom designed wearable computing unit. In order to evaluate the performance of the estimation methods described, standing and walking clinical studies were conducted on a transtibial amputee. The results were statistically compared to standard analysis methodologies employed in a gait laboratory. The average RMS error and correlation factor were calculated for all experimental sessions. By using a static analysis procedure, the estimation of the vertical component of GRF had an averaged correlation coefficient higher than 0.94. The estimated ZMP location had a distance error of less than 1 cm, equal to 4% of the anterior-posterior foot length or 12% of the medio-lateral foot width.

  8. Simulations of foot stability during gait characteristic of ankle dorsiflexor weakness in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Gefen, A

    2001-12-01

    Falls are common among the elderly and often cause injuries. They most frequently occut during walking and are associated with the chronic deterioration in neuromuscular and sensory systems, as well as with ankle dorsiflexor muscular weakness and lowered endurance of these muscles to fatigue. In the present study, a three-dimensional (3-D) finite element model of the structure of the foot was utilized to determine the effects of ankle dorsiflexor muscle weakness on the structural stability of the foot and, consequently, on the risk of falls during gait. The medial-lateral tendency of instability of the foot during gait in such conditions of weakness was analyzed by means of this model to identify the most important muscles used in controlling foot stability in affected individuals. The values of the eccentricity of the center of pressure under the heel during foot placement were used to indicate the degree of foot stability. The computational analysis indicated that it is the tibialis anterior muscle's weakness that dramatically decreases foot stability. Clinical investigation is now needed to correlate the significance of tibialis anterior muscle weakness with other known risk factors affecting the tendency to falls among the elderly, e.g., deterioration of sensory abilities. Rehabilitation practitioners and physical therapists may apply the present analytic approach to evaluate the stability of a foot before treatment and compare the predicted with the actual therapeutic results in terms of optimization of foot-ground pressure.

  9. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  10. Ankle Bracing, Fatigue, and Time to Stabilization in Collegiate Volleyball Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Megan Y; Gribble, Phillip A; Frye, Jamie L

    2008-01-01

    Context: Fatigue has been shown to disrupt dynamic stability in healthy volunteers. It is not known if wearing prophylactic ankle supports can improve dynamic stability in fatigued athletes. Objective: To determine the type of ankle brace that may be more effective at providing dynamic stability after a jump-landing task during normal and fatigued conditions. Design: Two separate repeated-measures analyses of variance with 2 within-subjects factors (condition and time) were performed for each dependent variable. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy female collegiate volleyball athletes participated (age  =  19.5 ± 1.27 years, height  =  179.07 ± 7.6 cm, mass  =  69.86 ± 5.42 kg). Intervention(s): Athletes participated in 3 separate testing sessions, applying a different bracing condition at each session: no brace (NB), Swede-O Universal lace-up ankle brace (AB), and Active Ankle brace (AA). Three trials of a jump-landing task were performed under each condition before and after induced functional fatigue. The jump-landing task consisted of a single-leg landing onto a force plate from a height equivalent to 50% of each participant's maximal jump height and from a starting position 70 cm from the center of the force plate. Main Outcome Measure(s): Time to stabilization in the anterior-posterior (APTTS) and medial-lateral (MLTTS) directions. Results: For APTTS, a condition-by-time interaction existed (F2,18  =  5.55, P  =  .013). For the AA condition, Tukey post hoc testing revealed faster pretest (2.734 ± 0.331 seconds) APTTS than posttest (3.817 ± 0.263 seconds). Post hoc testing also revealed that the AB condition provided faster APTTS (2.492 ± 0.271 seconds) than AA (3.817 ± 0.263 seconds) and NB (3.341 ± 0.339 seconds) conditions during posttesting. No statistically significant findings were associated with MLTTS. Conclusions: Fatigue increased APTTS for the AA condition. Because the

  11. Comparison of Knee and Ankle Dynamometry between NASA's X1 Exoskeleton and Biodex System 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, K. L.; Newby, N. J.; Hackney, K. J.; DeWitt, J. K.; Beck, C. E.; Rovekamp, R. N.; Rea, R. L.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2014-01-01

    Pre- and post-flight dynamometry is performed on International Space Station crewmembers to characterize microgravity-induced strength changes. Strength is not assessed in flight due to hardware limitations and there is poor understanding of the time course of in-flight changes. PURPOSE: To assess the reliability of a prototype dynamometer, the X1 Exoskeleton (EXO) and its agreement with a Biodex System 4 (BIO). METHODS: Eight subjects (4 M/4 F) completed 2 counterbalanced testing sessions of knee extension/flexion (KE/KF), 1 with BIO and 1 with EXO, with repeated measures within each session in normal gravity. Test-retest reliability (test 1 and 2) and device agreement (BIO vs. EXO) were evaluated. Later, to assess device agreement for ankle plantarflexion (PF), 10 subjects (4 M/6 F) completed 3 test conditions (BIO, EXO, and BIOEXO); BIOEXO was a hybrid condition comprised of the Biodex dynamometer motor and the X1 footplate and ankle frame. Ankle comparisons were: BIO vs. BIOEXO (footplate differences), BIOEXO vs. EXO (motor differences), and BIO vs. EXO (all differences). Reliability for KE/KF was determined by intraclass correlation (ICC). Device agreement was assessed with: 1) repeated measures ANOVA, 2) a measure of concordance (rho), and 3) average difference. RESULTS: ICCs for KE/KF were 0.99 for BIO and 0.96 to 0.99 for EXO. Agreement was high for KE (concordance: 0.86 to 0.95; average differences: -7 to +9 Nm) and low to moderate for KF (concordance: 0.64 to 0.78; average differences: -4 to -29 Nm, P<0.05). BIO vs. BIOEXO PF concordance ranged from 0.89 to 0.92 and mean differences ranged from -9 to +3 Nm (BIO < BIOEXO). BIOEXO vs. EXO PF concordance ranged from 0.73 to 0.80 while mean differences were -18 to -36 Nm (BIOEXO < EXO, P<0.05). PF concordance for BIO vs. EXO was slightly lower (0.61 to 0.84) and mean differences were greater (-27 to -33 Nm; BIO < EXO, P<0.05). CONCLUSION: BIO and EXO were similarly reliable for KE and KF. KE measures produced

  12. Alterations in evertor/invertor muscle activation and center of pressure trajectory in participants with functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, J Ty; Coglianese, Mark; Glasgow, Philip; Reese, Shane; Seeley, Matthew K

    2012-04-01

    Participants with ankle instability demonstrate more foot inversion during the stance phase of gait than able-bodied subjects. Invertor excitation, coupled with evertor inhibition may contribute to this potentially injurious position. The purpose of this experiment was to examine evertor/invertor muscle activation and foot COP trajectory during walking in participants with functional ankle instability (FI). Twelve subjects were identified with FI and matched to healthy controls. Tibialis anterior (TA) and peroneus longus (PL) electromyography (EMG), as well as COP, were recorded during walking. Functional analyses were used to detect differences between FI and control subjects with respect to normalized EMG and COP trajectory during walking. Relative to matched controls, COP trajectory was more laterally deviated in the FI group from 20% to 90% of the stance phase. TA activation was greater in the FI group from 15% to 30% and 45% to 70% of stance. PL activation was greater in the FI group at initial heel contact and toe off and trended lower from 20% to 40% of stance in the FI group. Altered motor strategies appear to contribute to COP deviations in FI participants and may increase the susceptibility to repeated ankle inversion injury.

  13. 78 FR 68908 - Agency Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB... Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Rennie, Enterprise Records... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Ankle Conditions Disability...

  14. 78 FR 34708 - Proposed Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... Control No. 2900--NEW (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. During... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-2. OMB Control Number: 2900--NEW...

  15. Assessment of AK (Above Knee) Prosthesis with Different Ankle Assembly Using GRF Pattern in Stance Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Sung-Jae; Bae, Ha-Suk

    In this study, ground reaction force (GRF), absolute symmetry index (ASI) and coefficient of variation (CV) of fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assemblies were investigated by biomechanical evaluation of above knee amputees. In the experiments, 37 normal male volunteers, two male and two female Above Knee (AK) amputees GRF data were tested with fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assembly. A gait analysis was carried out to derive the ratio of GRF to weight as the percentage of total stance phase for ten points. The results showed that fixed-axis ankle assembly was superior to other two ankle assemblies for forwarding and braking forces. Multi-axis ankle was relatively superior to other two ankle assemblies for gait balancing and movement of the mass center. Single-axis ankle was relatively superior to the other two ankle assemblies for CV and ASI of GRF.

  16. Modeling and stress analyses of a normal foot-ankle and a prosthetic foot-ankle complex.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Mustafa; Sayman, Onur; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a relatively new concept and is becoming more popular for treatment of ankle arthritis and fractures. Because of the high costs and difficulties of experimental studies, the developments of TAR prostheses are progressing very slowly. For this reason, the medical imaging techniques such as CT, and MR have become more and more useful. The finite element method (FEM) is a widely used technique to estimate the mechanical behaviors of materials and structures in engineering applications. FEM has also been increasingly applied to biomechanical analyses of human bones, tissues and organs, thanks to the development of both the computing capabilities and the medical imaging techniques. 3-D finite element models of the human foot and ankle from reconstruction of MR and CT images have been investigated by some authors. In this study, data of geometries (used in modeling) of a normal and a prosthetic foot and ankle were obtained from a 3D reconstruction of CT images. The segmentation software, MIMICS was used to generate the 3D images of the bony structures, soft tissues and components of prosthesis of normal and prosthetic ankle-foot complex. Except the spaces between the adjacent surface of the phalanges fused, metatarsals, cuneiforms, cuboid, navicular, talus and calcaneus bones, soft tissues and components of prosthesis were independently developed to form foot and ankle complex. SOLIDWORKS program was used to form the boundary surfaces of all model components and then the solid models were obtained from these boundary surfaces. Finite element analyses software, ABAQUS was used to perform the numerical stress analyses of these models for balanced standing position. Plantar pressure and von Mises stress distributions of the normal and prosthetic ankles were compared with each other. There was a peak pressure increase at the 4th metatarsal, first metatarsal and talus bones and a decrease at the intermediate cuneiform and calcaneus bones, in

  17. Distally based perforator sural flaps for foot and ankle reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shi-Min; Li, Xiao-Hua; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Distally based perforator sural flaps from the posterolateral or posteromedial lower leg aspect are initially a neurofasciocutaneous flap that can be transferred reversely to the foot and ankle region with no need to harvest and sacrifice the deep major artery. These flaps are supplied by a perforating artery issued from the deep peroneal artery or the posterior tibial artery, and the chain-linked adipofascial neurovascular axis around the sural/saphenous nerve. It is a versatile and reliable technique for soft-tissue reconstruction of the heel and ankle region with 180-degrees rotation. In this paper, we present its developing history, vascular basis, surgical techniques including flap design and elevation, flap variations in pedicle and component, surgical indications, and illustrative case reports with different perforating vessels as pivot points for foot and ankle coverage. PMID:25893175

  18. Salto Talaris fixed-bearing total ankle replacement system.

    PubMed

    Rush, Shannon M; Todd, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement is an anatomically designed fixed bearing prosthesis available in the United States based on the successful design of the mobile-bearing Salto prosthesis available outside the United States. The original mobile-bearing design was modified and the mobile-bearing was transferred to the precision instrumentation at the trial phase evaluation. Instrumentation and technique allow the surgeon to determine the functional joint axis before final implantation. The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement design blends minimal bone resection and optimizes surface area, cortical contact, and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene conformity. The authors present an overview of the Salto Talaris total ankle replacement surgical technique and pearls for successful application.

  19. Depth of ankle inversion and discrimination of foot positions.

    PubMed

    Symes, Michael; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger

    2010-10-01

    Ankle inversion injuries are common, yet little is known about the error associated with different positions as inversion depth increases. In this study, absolute judgments made without feedback were used to measure discrimination of different extents of ankle inversion which arose from active movements made to physical stops by 20 self-reported right side-dominant participants. Testing was conducted over three sets of five inversion depths that were within a range of 1.4 degrees and centered around mean depths of 8,11, and 14 degrees. Discrimination of ankle inversion movements decreased linearly with depths of movement further into inversion, both within and across the sets of inversion depths. Thus, error in assessing movement position increased with inversion depth. Inversion movements that were made with the left foot were significantly better discriminated at all depths than those made with the right foot.

  20. Fixation orientation in ankle fractures with syndesmosis injury.

    PubMed

    Nimick, Craig J; Collman, David R; Lagaay, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Accurate reduction of the syndesmosis has been shown to be an important prognostic factor for functional outcome in ankle injuries that disrupt the syndesmosis. The purpose of the present case series was to assess the fixation orientation and the position of the fibula within the tibial incisura after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures with syndesmosis injury. Computed tomography was used to assess the accuracy of the reduction. Twelve patients were included in the present case series. A ratio representing the relationship between the tibia and fibula and the orientation of the syndesmotic fixation was measured preoperatively and postoperatively and compared with the uninjured contralateral ankle, representing the patient's normal anatomy. The measurements were accomplished electronically to one tenth of 1 mm using Stentor Intelligent Informatics, I-site, version 3.3.1 (Phillips Electronics; Andover, MA). Posteriorly oriented syndesmotic fixation caused posterior translation of the fibula with respect to the tibia and anteriorly oriented syndesmotic fixation caused anterior translation.

  1. Engineering considerations in the design of an ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Kempson, G E; Freeman, M A; Tuke, M A

    1975-05-01

    A prothesis has been designed to replace the articulating surfaces of the human ankle joint. The prothesis is in two parts, each forming a segment of a right circular cylinder with a single axis of rotation. The concave tibial component is manufactured from ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and the talar component is manufactured from medical grade stainless steel. It is likely, however, that the talar component will be commercially manufactured from cobalt chrome alloy (Vitallium or Vinertia). The two components are secured to the cancellous bone by polymethylmethacrylate bone cement and laboratory tests have indicated that the bond should be strong enough to withstand the loads encountered at the ankle joint in vivo. The tests have also shown that the stability and strength of the ankle are not seriously reduced by implantation of the prosthesis. Laboratory wear tests and clinical experience over the last two years encourage optimism over the long term performance of the prothesis.

  2. Altered Knee and Ankle Kinematics During Squatting in Those With Limited Weight-Bearing–Lunge Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Karli E.; Begalle, Rebecca L.; Frank, Barnett S.; Zinder, Steven M.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ankle-dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) may influence movement variables that are known to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading, such as knee valgus and knee flexion. To our knowledge, researchers have not studied individuals with limited or normal ankle DF-ROM to investigate the relationship between those factors and the lower extremity movement patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To determine, using 2 different measurement techniques, whether knee- and ankle-joint kinematics differ between participants with limited and normal ankle DF-ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active adults (20 with limited ankle DF-ROM, 20 with normal ankle DF-ROM). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle DF-ROM was assessed using 2 techniques: (1) nonweight-bearing ankle DF-ROM with the knee straight, and (2) weight-bearing lunge (WBL). Knee flexion, knee valgus-varus, knee internal-external rotation, and ankle DF displacements were assessed during the overhead-squat, single-legged squat, and jump-landing tasks. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were performed to determine whether differences in knee- and ankle-joint kinematics existed between the normal and limited groups for each assessment. Results: We observed no differences between the normal and limited groups when classifying groups based on nonweight-bearing passive-ankle DF-ROM. However, individuals with greater ankle DF-ROM during the WBL displayed greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement and peak knee flexion during the overhead-squat and single-legged squat tasks. In addition, those individuals also demonstrated greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Conclusions: Greater ankle DF-ROM assessed during the WBL was associated with greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement during both squatting tasks as well as greater knee-varus displacement during

  3. Perineural fibrosis of superficial peroneal nerve complicating ankle sprain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Acus, R W; Flanagan, J P

    1991-02-01

    The peroneal nerve is susceptible to traction injury during inversion ankle sprains. Previously, these traction lesions have been identified only at the fibular neck and popliteal fossa level. This report illustrates a previously unreported condition of perineural fibrosis of the superficial peroneal nerve at the level of the ankle following an inversion ankle sprain. Perineural fibrosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent pain after ankle sprain.

  4. Effect of an Ankle Compression Garment on Fatigue and Performance.

    PubMed

    Šambaher, Nemanja; Aboodarda, Saied J; Silvey, Dustin B; Button, Duane C; Behm, David G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an ankle compression garment (CG) on muscle performance and physiological variables associated with recovery from fatigue. Fifteen participants took part in a randomized crossover study design with 2 experimental conditions (ankle CG and control). The dependent variables skin temperature, evoked muscle contractile properties, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force, electromyography (EMG), drop jump performance (20, 35, and 50 cm box heights), continuous drop jump (30 cm), time to fatigue (TTF), and blood lactate concentration were measured pre- and post-warm-up and postfatigue. Compared with control condition, ankle CG condition had significantly reduced half-relaxation times (p = 0.043) and higher skin temperatures at post-warm-up and post-fatigue protocol (p < 0.001, Δ3.2 and Δ4%, respectively). Participants also exhibited significantly lower ground reaction forces (GRFs) for 50-cm drop jumps (p = 0.044, Δ9.9%) with ankle CG at post-warm-up. There were no significant differences between conditions for muscle contractile properties, MVC force or EMG, jump height, take-off velocity, contact time, and jumping TTF. Independent of group, there was a threefold increase in blood lactate (p < 0.01) from pre-warm-up to post-fatigue and a significant decrease in MVC force (p = 0.048, Δ8.1%) from post-warm-up to postfatigue. Results suggest that ankle CG increased and maintained skin temperature during recovery, decreased twitch half-relaxation times, and reduced GRF from a 50-cm drop height. However, ankle CG did not improve other performance measures, aid in recovery, or affect blood lactate clearance.

  5. Relationship between two proprioceptive measures and stiffness at the ankle.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Carrie L; Arnold, Brent L; Zinder, Steven M; Granata, Kevin; Gansneder, Bruce M

    2004-06-01

    Previous research has investigated the role of proprioception and stiffness in the control of joint stability. However, to date, no research has been done on the relationship between proprioception and stiffness. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between force sense, joint reposition sense, and stiffness at the ankle. A heterogeneous sample was obtained for this study; 20 of the 40 participants had a history of ankle sprains, and 13 of the 20 had been diagnosed by a physician (two mild ankle sprains, seven moderate sprains, four severe sprains). All subjects were asymptomatic and active at the time of the study. Active joint reposition sense was measured using a custom-built ankle goniometer, force sense was measured unilaterally and contralaterally with a load cell, and ankle muscle stiffness was measured via transient oscillation using a custom-built inversion-eversion cradle. We found no significant correlations between stiffness and joint reposition sense, with values of r ranging from 0.01 to 0.21. Significant correlations were found between stiffness and force sense. Specifically, contralateral force sense reproduction was significantly correlated to stiffness in the injured or "involved" ankle (r's ranging from 0.47 to 0.65; P< or =0.008). Whether the decreased ability to appropriately sense force (increased error) sends information to the central nervous system to increase muscle stiffness in response to an unexpected loss of stability, or whether these two phenomena function independently and both change concurrently as a result of injury to the system requires further investigation.

  6. Lower-limb amputee ankle and hip kinetic response to an imposed error in mediolateral foot placement.

    PubMed

    Segal, Ava D; Shofer, Jane B; Klute, Glenn K

    2015-11-26

    Maintaining balance while walking is challenging for lower limb amputees. The effect of prosthetic foot stiffness on recovery kinetics from an error in foot placement may inform prescription practice and lead to new interventions designed to improve balance. Ten unilateral transtibial amputees were fit with two prosthetic feet with different stiffness properties in random order. After a 3-week acclimation period, they returned to the lab for testing before switching feet. Twelve non-amputees also participated in a single data collection. While walking on an instrumented treadmill, we imposed a repeatable, unexpected medial or lateral disturbance in foot placement by releasing a burst of air at the ankle just before heel strike. Three-dimensional motion capture, ground reaction force and center of pressure (COP) data were collected for two steps prior, the disturbed step and three steps after the disturbance. During undisturbed walking, coronal ankle impulse was lower by 42% for amputees wearing a stiff compared to a compliant foot (p=0.017); however, across steps, both prosthetic recovery patterns were similar compared to the sound limb and non-amputees. Peak coronal hip moment was 15-20% lower for both foot types during undisturbed walking (p<0.001), with less change in response to the medial disturbance (p<0.001) compared to the sound limb and non-amputees. Amputee prosthetic COP excursion was unaffected by the disturbance (2.4% change) compared to the sound limb (59% change; p<0.001) and non-amputees (55% change; p<0.001). These findings imply that a prosthetic foot-ankle system able to contribute to ankle kinetics may improve walking balance among amputees.

  7. Neuromuscular problems in foot and ankle: evaluation and workup.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kenneth J; Ryu, Jessica H

    2014-03-01

    It is essential to determine the functional goals of the patient during the workup and treatment planning stages of neuromuscular disorders involving the foot and ankle. Accurate diagnosis, and informed discussion of treatment options, must be in the context of the patient's disease, cognition, comorbidities, functional attributes, and family environment. A thorough history and physical examination aid in appropriate diagnostic workup and optimal orthopedic management of each patient. In this article, general considerations in the workup of suspected neuromuscular disorders and issues pertinent to specific congenital and acquired neuromuscular disorders affecting foot and ankle function are reviewed.

  8. Bosworth fracture-dislocation of the ankle: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Ching Sing; Tan, Gek Meng Jeffrey

    2013-08-01

    Bosworth fracture-dislocation of the ankle is a rare injury in which the proximal fibular fragment is entrapped behind the tibia. Closed reduction is extremely difficult to achieve. Early open reduction and internal fixation enables a better outcome by minimising soft-tissue damage. We report on a 36-year-old man who underwent open reduction and internal fixation for a Bosworth fracture-dislocation of the ankle complicated by severe soft-tissue swelling and an impending risk of skin necrosis after failed closed reduction.

  9. Triceps surae contracture: implications for foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Abdulmassih, Sami; Phisitkul, Phinit; Femino, John E; Amendola, Annunziato

    2013-07-01

    Restricted ankle dorsiflexion secondary to contracture of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex is frequently encountered in patients with foot and ankle pain and is well documented in the literature. During gait, decreased dorsiflexion shifts weight-bearing pressures from the heel to the forefoot, which may result in or exacerbate one of several pathologic conditions. Modest success has been achieved with nonsurgical management of triceps surae contracture, including splinting and stretching exercises. Surgical lengthening of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex at multiple levels has been described, and early clinical results have been promising. Additional research is required to further elucidate the long-term outcomes of various lengthening techniques.

  10. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  5. Effects of focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static balance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Min; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Application of cryotherapy over an injured joint has been shown to improve muscle function, yet it is unknown how ankle cryotherapy affects postural control. Our purpose was to determine the effects of a 20-min focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static stance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Fifteen young subjects with CAI (9 males, 6 females) and 15 healthy gender-matched controls participated. All subjects underwent two intervention sessions on different days in which they had a 1.5L plastic bag filled with either crushed ice (active treatment) or candy corn (sham) applied to the ankle. Unipedal stance with eyes closed for 10s were assessed with a forceplate before and after each intervention. Center of pressure (COP) data were used to compute 10 specific dependent measures including velocity, area, standard deviation (SD), and percent range of COP excursions, and mean and SD of time-to-boundary (TTB) minima in the anterior-posterior (AP) and mediolateral directions. For each measure a three-way (Group-Intervention-Time) repeated ANOVAs found no significant interactions and main effects involving intervention (all Ps > 0.05). There were group main effects found for mean velocity (F(1,28) = 6.46, P = .017), area (F(1,28) = 12.83, P = .001), and mean of TTB minima in the AP direction (F(1,28) = 5.19, P = .031) indicating that the CAI group demonstrated greater postural instability compared to the healthy group. Postural control of unipedal stance was not significantly altered following focal ankle joint cooling in groups both with and without CAI. Ankle joint cryotherapy was neither beneficial nor harmful to single leg balance.

  6. Severe open ankle sprain (SOAS): a lesion presenting as a penetrating soft tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, Marc; Vincent-Mansour, César; Guidon, Julie; Asselineau, Alain; Ducharnes, Gildas; Molina, Véronique

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective case study was to describe the incidence and clinical features of severe open ankle sprain (SOAS), defined as a tear of the lateral or medial collateral ligaments with an associated transverse tear of the skin over the corresponding malleolus. To this end, we reviewed the medical records of patients with SOAS managed between January 2005 and January 2009, using the databases of 3 different orthopedic trauma centers. Our review revealed 9 patients with SOAS, 7 (77.77%) of which involved the lateral ligaments and 2 (22.22%) of which involved the medial ligaments. The median age was 32 (range 21 to 45) years, and the injury occurred as a result of a motor vehicle accident in 6 (66.67%) patients, and as a result of a fall from a height in 3 (33.33%) patients. Two tendons were damaged in 2 (22.22%) patients, the deep fibular nerve (deep peroneal nerve) in 2 (22.22%) patients, and the anterior tibial artery in 1 (11.11%) patient. The only abnormality on plain radiographs was pneumarthrosis, which was present in 5 (55.56%) patients. The incidence of SOAS is rare, accounting for 0.002% (9/438,000) of all trauma cases and 0.22% (9/4142) of all cases of ankle trauma. The diagnosis was confirmed by intraoperative stress-maneuvers in all 9 patients. In conclusion, SOAS should be suspected in patients who present with a traumatic skin wound over the malleolus.

  7. International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics Community (i-FAB): past, present and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Nester, Christopher J; Leardini, Alberto; Cavanagh, Peter R; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Burns, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    The International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics Community (i-FAB) is an international collaborative activity which will have an important impact on the foot and ankle biomechanics community. It was launched on July 2nd 2007 at the foot and ankle session of the International Society of Biomechanics (ISB) meeting in Taipei, Taiwan. i-FAB is driven by the desire to improve our understanding of foot and ankle biomechanics as it applies to health, disease, and the design, development and evaluation of foot and ankle surgery, and interventions such as footwear, insoles and surfaces. PMID:19531239

  8. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least nine training sessions for three neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood.

  9. Epidemiologic study of ankle fractures in a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sakaki, Marcos Hideyo; Matsumura, Bruno Akio Rodrigues; Dotta, Thiago De Angelis Guerra; Pontin, Pedro Augusto; dos Santos, Alexandre Leme Godoy; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the epidemiology of ankle fractures surgically treated at the Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo. METHODS: Medical records of patients admitted with foot and ankle fractures between 2006 and 2011 were revised. Seventy three ankle fractures that underwent surgical treatment were identified. The parameters analyzed included age, gender, injured side, AO and Gustilo & Anderson classification, associated injuries, exposure, need to urgent treatment, time to definitive treatment and early post-operative complications. Study design: retrospective epidemiological study. RESULTS: Male gender was predominant among subjects and the mean age was 27.5 years old. Thirty nine fractures resulted from traffic accidents and type B fracture according to AO classification was the most common. Twenty one were open fractures and 22 patients had associated injuries. The average time to definitive treatment was 6.5 days. Early post-operative complications were found in 21.3% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Ankle fractures treated in a tertiary hospital of a large city in Brazil affect young people victims of high-energy accidents and present significant rates of associated injuries and post-operative complications. Level of Evidence IV, Cases Series. PMID:24868187

  10. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  11. Complications of open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Leyes, Manuel; Torres, Raúl; Guillén, Pedro

    2003-03-01

    This article discusses the complications after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. Complications are classified as perioperative (malreduction, inadequate fixation, and intra-articular penetration of hardware), early postoperative (wound edge dehiscence, necrosis, infection and compartment syndrome), and late (stiffness, distal tibiofibular synostosis, degenerative osteoarthritis, and hardware related complications). Emphasis is placed on preventive measures to avoid such complications.

  12. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2010-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years.

  13. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P.; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least 9 training sessions for 3 neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood. PMID:25769168

  14. Risk Factors for Thromboembolic Events After Surgery for Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Basques, Bryce A; Miller, Christopher P; Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Bohl, Daniel D; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a retrospective national-cohort study to determine the incidence of and independent risk factors for venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of ankle fractures. Using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database, we identified patients who underwent ORIF for ankle fracture between 2005 and 2012. VTE was defined as the occurrence of a deep vein thrombosis or a pulmonary embolism within the first 30 postoperative days. Of the 4412 ankle fracture patients who met the inclusion criteria, 33 (0.8%) had a VTE. Multivariate analysis revealed that body mass index (BMI) of 30 to 35 kg/m2 (odds ratio [OR], 4.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-21.72; P = .044), BMI of 35 kg/m2 or higher (OR, 4.71; 95% CI, 1.03-21.68; P = .046), heart disease (OR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.20-8.97; P = .020), and dependent functional status (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.11-6.04; P = .028) were independently associated with occurrence of VTE after ankle fracture ORIF. Patients with higher BMI and patients with heart disease or dependent functional status may be considered for VTE prophylaxis.

  15. Mycotic Septic Arthritis of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Adam; Matthews, Scott; Wilson, Alister

    Septic arthritis is a debilitating acute orthopedic emergency. Unfortunately, the diagnosis can be delayed or missed in immunocompromised patients with diabetes mellitus, and the result can be catastrophic. These patients are also at risk for atypical infections, including mycotic subtypes, which are more insidious than their more aggressive, more common Staphylococcus counterparts. The result is increased morbidity. In this article, we report a case of Candida albicans septic arthritis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. Her case highlights the complexities of this specific disease entity. With early diagnosis, treatment is multimodal, involving surgical débridement and prolonged antifungal therapy.

  16. Combined total ankle replacement and modified bridle tendon transfer for end-stage ankle joint arthrosis with paralytic dropfoot: report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Bibbo, Christopher; Baronofsky, Hyim J; Jaffe, Leland

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, total ankle replacement has become a reasonable option for many patients with end-stage ankle arthrosis. In order to be successful, total ankle replacement requires a relatively balanced alignment of the foot in relation to the leg. Such alignment is traditionally achieved surgically by means of stabilization of the hindfoot in conjunction with relocation osteotomy of the calcaneus and/or tibia. In this report, we describe the unconventional combination of total ankle replacement in an adult patient with concomitant paralysis that was addressed by means of tendon transfer.

  17. The lateralization of symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P; Fleminger, J J

    1981-03-01

    An awareness of symptoms being lateralized was established in almost half of a series of 60 acutely ll schizophrenics and is reported in a further series of 16 patients with this disorder. Case illustrations are given. The symptoms most commonly showing this phenomenon were hypochondriacal delusions and hallucinations, usually of an auditory kind. Possible mechanisms underlying the phenomenon are discussed. Some evidence was found for a difference between the sexes in the direction of lateralization symptoms.

  18. [Arthrodesis and endoprostheses of the ankle joint: indications, techniques and pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Wirth, S H; Klammer, G; Espinosa, N

    2013-09-01

    If adequate conservative measures for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis have failed, surgery may be taken into consideration. After exorbitant failure rates in the beginning of total ankle replacement, nowadays this kind of treatment has regained lot of interest and has become a viable alternative to ankle fusion. The correct indication and a precise explanation of the surgical procedure, outcomes and potential complications provide a solid base for future success.Currently, there is no doubt that total ankle replacement has become an important player in the treatment of symptomatic and debilitating end-stage ankle arthritis. With increasing number of patients who undergo total ankle replacement the experience with this kind of procedure increases too. As a consequence several surgeons have started to stretch indications favoring total ankle replacement. However, it must be mentioned here, despite progress in terms of improved anatomical and biomechanical understanding of the hindfoot and improved surgical techniques and instruments, total ankle replacement and ankle fusion remain challenging and difficult procedures. We provide a review article including an overview of the relevant techniques. This article should serve as rough guide for surgeons and help in decision-making regarding total ankle replacement and ankle fusion.

  19. Is there a relation between AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score and SF-36 in evaluation of Achilles ruptures treated by percutaneous technique?

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Francesco; Calderazzi, Filippo; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The percutaneous technique of Achilles tendon repair seems to offer satisfactory clinical and functional results, although these results have been evaluated mainly using objective rating scales. Recently, some "subjective" rating scales have been combined to evaluate the results of various surgical treatments. The purpose of the present study was to compare the results of a percutaneous Achilles tendon repair evaluated objectively using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score and subjectively using the Medical Outcomes Study, short-form, 36-item questionnaire (SF-36) questionnaire. A total of 17 consecutive patients were treated for acute Achilles tendon rupture using the modified percutaneous Ma and Griffith technique. We reviewed all patients with a follow-up of 24 to 64 months (mean 45.5). At the final follow-up visit, the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score of each patient was compared with each 1 of the 8 domains of the SF-36 questionnaire, using the parametric Pearson correlation coefficient and the equivalent nonparametric Spearman rho correlation coefficient. The relation between the objective (AOFAS) and subjective (SF-36) results showed a significant correlation (Pearson's correlation coefficient) between the physical functioning (r = 0.597, p = .011) and bodily pain (r = 0.663, p = .004) SF-36 domains, and a nonstatistically significant correlation with the other SF-36 domains. Very similar results were found using the nonparametric Spearman rho correlation coefficient. These results suggest that regarding pain and function, the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score and SF-36 provide complementary information; therefore, we believe that the SF-36 questionnaire should be used with the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score for a more complete evaluation of the outcome.

  20. Reflex ankle stiffness is inversely correlated with natural body sway.

    PubMed

    Julien, Brianna L; Bendrups, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to determine whether effective ankle stiffness (EAS), measured during slow unperceived perturbations of stance, is related to natural anterior-posterior body sway. Because the perturbations are not perceived, any neural component of the response to perturbation is assumed to be "reflex", in the broad sense of an involuntary response to a stimulus. Subjects stood on a force platform for three 10-min trials. EAS was obtained from the average slope (Δτ/Δα) of the relation between ankle torque (τ) and ankle angle (α), recorded during repeated perturbations delivered at the waist by a weak spring. EAS was normalised using the subject's "load stiffness" (LS), calculated from mass (m) and height (h) above the ankle joint (m·g·h). Sway was obtained from fluctuations in ankle angle prior to perturbation. Variation in EAS and sway between subjects provided spread of data for correlation. There were no significant changes in EAS or sway across trials. All subjects had higher EAS than LS and mean EAS (1124 N m/rad) was significantly greater (p<0.01) than mean LS (531 N m/rad). There was a strong significant inverse correlation between mean sway and mean normalised EAS (r=-0.68, p=0.03). We conclude that the body, in response to slow unperceived perturbations, simulates an inverted pendulum with a stiffness of about twice LS and that EAS is largely generated by neural modulation of postural muscles. The inverse correlation between EAS and body sway suggests that the reflex mechanisms responding to perturbation also influence the extent of natural sway.

  1. Bilateral neuromuscular plasticity from unilateral training of the ankle dorsiflexors.

    PubMed

    Dragert, Katie; Zehr, E Paul

    2011-01-01

    Training a muscle group in one limb yields strength gains bilaterally-the so-called cross-education effect. However, to date there has been little study of the targeted application of this phenomenon in a manner relevant to clinical rehabilitation. For example, it may be applicable post-stroke, where hemiparesis leads to ankle flexor weakness. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of high-intensity unilateral dorsiflexion resistance training on agonist (tibialis anterior, TA) and antagonist (plantarflexor soleus, SOL) muscular strength and H-reflex excitability in the trained and untrained limbs. Ankle flexor and extensor torque, as well as SOL and TA H-reflexes evoked during low-level contraction, were measured before and after 5 weeks of dorsiflexion training (n = 19). As a result of the intervention, dorsiflexor maximal voluntary isometric contraction force (MVIC) significantly increased (P < 0.05) in both the trained and untrained limbs by 14.7 and 8.4%, respectively. No changes in plantarflexor MVIC force were observed in either limb. Significant changes in H-reflex excitability threshold were also detected: H(@thresh) significantly increased in the trained TA and SOL; and H(@max) decreased in both SOL muscles. These findings reveal that muscular crossed effects can be obtained in the ankle dorsiflexor muscles and provide novel information on agonist and antagonist spinal adaptations that accompany unilateral training. It is possible that the ability to strengthen the ankle dorsiflexors bilaterally could be applied in post-stroke rehabilitation, where ankle flexor weakness could be counteracted via dorsiflexor training in the less-affected limb.

  2. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  3. Does the lateral intercondylar ridge disappear in ACL deficient patients?

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Morse, Kenneth R; Lesniak, Bryson P; Kropf, Eric J; Tranovich, Michael J; van Dijk, C Niek; Fu, Freddie H

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in the presence of the lateral intercondylar ridge and the lateral bifurcate ridge between patients with sub-acute and chronic ACL injuries. We hypothesized that the ridges would be present less often with chronic ACL deficiency. Twenty-five patients with a chronic ACL injury were matched for age and gender to 25 patients with a sub-acute ACL injury. The lateral intercondylar ridge and lateral bifurcate ridge were scored as either present, absent, or indeterminate due to insufficient visualization by three blinded observers. The kappa for the three observers was .61 for the lateral intercondylar ridge and .58 for the lateral bifurcate ridge. The lateral intercondylar ridge was present in 88% of the sub-acute patients and 88% of the chronic patients. The lateral bifurcate ridge was present in 48% of the sub-acute and 48% of the chronic patients. This matched-pairs case-control study was unable to show a difference in the presence of the femoral bony ridges between patients with acute and chronic ACL injuries. The authors would suggest looking for the ridges as a landmark of the native ACL insertion site during ACL reconstruction in both acute and chronic ACL injuries.

  4. Effect of the 6-minute walk test on plantar loading and capability to produce ankle plantar flexion forces.

    PubMed

    Vie, Bruno; Griffon, Patricia; Bijoux, Audrey; Cadiere, Julie; Weber, Jean Paul; Jammes, Yves

    2016-09-01

    The six-minute walk test (6MWT) is used to evaluate the ambulatory capacity of patients suffering from respiratory disorders, obesity or neuromuscular diseases. Our primary aim was to evaluate the effects of the 6MWT on the postural sway and the ankle plantar flexion forces in healthy subjects. We measured the ankle plantar flexion forces and the plantar contact area before and after a 6MWT in normal weight and overweight subjects with no history of respiratory, cardiac, and neuromuscular disorders. A post-6MWT sensation of bodily fatigue was evaluated by Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) and Pichot fatigue scales. A computerized pedobarographic platform was used to collect the mean plantar contact area, the changes of the center of pressure (CoP) surface and its medial and lateral deviations. In a limited number of subjects, the reproducibility of all the measurements was explored. In both groups, the 6MWT elicited a sensation of bodily fatigue. It also significantly reduced the ankle plantar flexion forces, and increased both the mean plantar contact area and the CoP surface, the changes being not apparent after 10min. The post-6MWT lateral CoP deviations were accentuated in normal weight subjects, while an increase in medial CoP deviations occurred in overweight ones. The 6MWT-induced changes in the plantar flexion force and pedobarographic variables were reproducible. Because this study clearly showed some post-6MWT alterations of the subjects' posture sway of our subjects, we questioned the possible mechanisms occurring that could explain the altered muscle force and the transient destabilization of posture after the 6MWT.

  5. Immediate coronal plane kinetic effects of novel lateral-offset sole shoes and lateral-wedge insole shoes in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jong Woo; Park, Hae Soo; Na, Choon Kyun; Park, Jong Woong; Hong, Jungwha; Lee, Soon Hyuck

    2013-02-01

    To investigate kinetic differences in the coronal plane between healthy individuals wearing shoes with lateral-offset soles and shoes with lateral-wedge insoles while walking, hip abduction, knee adduction, and ankle abduction moments were estimated using a 3-dimensional motion analysis system under 3 different conditions: wearing conventional shoes (control), wearing lateral-offset sole shoes (condition A), and wearing lateral-wedge insole shoes (condition B). Forty-eight healthy individuals (24 men and 24 women) were tested. Condition A resulted in a significantly reduced peak knee adduction moment compared with the control (condition A=0.316 Nm/kg; control=0.380 Nm/kg; P=.006). The peak knee adduction moment of condition B was also lower than that of the control (condition B=0.299 Nm/kg; P=.002); however, the peak knee adduction moment was not significantly different between conditions A and B (P=.386). Condition B resulted in an increased mean ankle abduction moment in the stance phase compared with the control and condition A (control=0.007 Nm/kg; condition A=0.013 Nm/kg; condition B=0.023 Nm/kg) (control vs condition A, P=.051; control vs condition B, P<.001; condition A vs condition B, P=.002). The hip abduction moments were not significantly different between the control and condition A, control and condition B, or conditions A and B. Wearing lateral-offset sole shoes reduces the peak knee adduction moment and exerts less influence on ankle moment than does wearing lateral-wedge insole shoes. Neither lateral-offset sole shoes nor lateral-wedge insole shoes induce kinetic changes in the coronal plane of the hip.

  6. Three-dimensional computer graphics-based ankle morphometry with computerized tomography for total ankle replacement design and positioning.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chien-Chung; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Leardini, Alberto; Lu, Tung-Wu; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2014-05-01

    Morphometry of the bones of the ankle joint is important for the design of joint replacements and their surgical implantations. However, very little three-dimensional (3D) data are available and not a single study has addressed the Chinese population. Fifty-eight fresh frozen Chinese cadaveric ankle specimens, 26 females, and 32 males, were CT-scanned in the neutral position and their 3D computer graphics-based models were reconstructed. The 3D morphology of the distal tibia/fibula segment and the full talus was analyzed by measuring 31 parameters, defining the relevant dimensions, areas, and volumes from the models. The measurements were compared statistically between sexes and with previously reported data from Caucasian subjects. The results showed that, within a general similarity of ankle morphology between the current Chinese and previous Caucasian subjects groups, there were significant differences in 9 out of the 31 parameters analyzed. From a quantitative comparison with available prostheses designed for the Caucasian population, few of these designs have both tibial and talar components suitable in dimension for the Chinese population. The current data will be helpful for the sizing, design, and surgical positioning of ankle replacements and for surgical instruments, especially for the Chinese population.

  7. Measurement of the passive stiffness of ankle joint in 3 DOF using stewart platform type ankle foot device.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kenta; Yonezawa, Teru; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Takemura, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a method to measure the passive stiffness of an ankle joint in three degrees of freedom (DOF) under two motion speeds (1 Hz and 5 degree/s) using a developed Stewart platform-type device. The developed device can reproduce input motions of the foot in 6 DOF by controlling six pneumatic linear motion actuators. We used the device to measure the passive stiffness of an ankle joint undergoing three kinds of motion, namely dorsi-plantar flexion, inversion-eversion, and adduction-abduction. The measured values of the passive stiffness of the ankle joint in dorsiflexion that we obtained agreed well with that obtained in a previous study, indicating that the developed device is useful for measuring the passive stiffness of ankle joint. In addition, the developed device can be used to measure the stiffness in inversion-eversion and adduction-abduction motions as well, parameters that have never been measured. The results we obtained demonstrated certain interesting features as we varied both the direction and pace of motion (e.g., there were significant differences in the stiffness not only between adduction and abduction during the faster pace, but also between these and the other motions).

  8. Are lateral compartment osteophytes a predictor for lateral cartilage damage in varus osteoarthritic knees?: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    PubMed

    Faschingbauer, M; Renner, L; Waldstein, W; Boettner, F

    2015-12-01

    We studied whether the presence of lateral osteophytes on plain radiographs was a predictor for the quality of cartilage in the lateral compartment of patients with varus osteoarthritic of the knee (Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 to 3). The baseline MRIs of 344 patients from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) who had varus osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee on hip-knee-ankle radiographs were reviewed. Patients were categorised using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) osteophyte grading system into 174 patients with grade 0 (no osteophytes), 128 grade 1 (mild osteophytes), 28 grade 2 (moderate osteophytes) and 14 grade 3 (severe osteophytes) in the lateral compartment (tibia). All patients had Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or 3 arthritis of the medial compartment. The thickness and volume of the lateral cartilage and the percentage of full-thickness cartilage defects in the lateral compartment was analysed. There was no difference in the cartilage thickness or cartilage volume between knees with osteophyte grades 0 to 3. The percentage of full-thickness cartilage defects on the tibial side increased from < 2% for grade 0 and 1 to 10% for grade 3. The lateral compartment cartilage volume and thickness is not influenced by the presence of lateral compartment osteophytes in patients with varus OA of the knee. Large lateral compartment osteophytes (grade 3) increase the likelihood of full-thickness cartilage defects in the lateral compartment.

  9. Ankle Instability Effects on Joint Position Sense When Stepping Across the Active Movement Extent Discrimination Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Witchalls, Jeremy; Waddington, Gordon; Blanch, Peter; Adams, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Context Individuals with and without functional ankle instability have been tested for deficits in lower limb proprioception with varied results. Objective To determine whether a new protocol for testing participants' joint position sense during stepping is reliable and can detect differences between participants with unstable and stable ankles. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting University clinical laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Sample of convenience involving 21 young adult university students and staff. Ankle stability was categorized by score on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool; 13 had functional ankle instability, 8 had healthy ankles. Intervention(s) Test-retest of ankle joint position sense when stepping onto and across the Active Movement Extent Discrimination Apparatus twice, separated by an interim test, standing still on the apparatus and moving only 1 ankle into inversion. Main Outcome Measure(s) Difference in scores between groups with stable and unstable ankles and between test repeats. Results Participants with unstable ankles were worse at differentiating between inversion angles underfoot in both testing protocols. On repeated testing with the stepping protocol, performance of the group with unstable ankles was improved (Cohen d = 1.06, P = .006), whereas scores in the stable ankle group did not change in the second test (Cohen d = 0.04, P = .899). Despite this improvement, the unstable group remained worse at differentiating inversion angles on the stepping retest (Cohen d = 0.99, P = .020). Conclusions The deficits on proprioceptive tests shown by individuals with functional ankle instability improved with repeated exposure to the test situation. The learning effect may be the result of systematic exposure to ankle-angle variation that led to movement-specific learning or increased confidence when stepping across the apparatus. PMID:23182010

  10. Entrapment Neuropathies of the Foot and Ankle.

    PubMed

    Ferkel, Eric; Davis, William Hodges; Ellington, John Kent

    2015-10-01

    Posterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is the result of compression of the posterior tibial nerve. Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome (entrapment of the deep peroneal nerve) typically presents with pain radiating to the first dorsal web space. Distal tarsal tunnel syndrome results from entrapment of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve and is often misdiagnosed initially as plantar fasciitis. Medial plantar nerve compression is seen most often in running athletes, typically with pain radiating to the medial arch. Morton neuroma is often seen in athletes who place their metatarsal arches repetitively in excessive hyperextension.

  11. Medium Term Follow-up of Achilles Tendon Lengthening in the Treatment of Ankle Equinus in Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Frederick R; Albright, Jay C; Dolan, Lori

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The optimal treatment for equinus of the ankle in ambulatory patients with cerebral palsy is not known. This study assessed the medium term follow-up results of treatment of spastic ankle equinus deformity in cerebral palsy using Hoke or coronal Z-lengthening of the Achilles tendon. It was hypothesized that the use of Achilles tendon lengthening (TAL) as a treatment for spastic ankle equinus during gait results in a high rate of over-weakening of the triceps surae resulting in crouch gait. We also investigated patient characteristics that could identify which patients are at risk for crouch gait due to triceps surae weakening from Achilles tendon lengthening. Materials and Methods: Seventy-nine patients (114 procedures) who had undergone Achilles lengthening were retrospectively reviewed to determine how many patients developed crouch gait with dorsiflexion of the ankle throughout stance phase requiring anterior-floor-reaction bracing. The following patient characteristics were evaluated: age at surgery, geographic type of cerebral palsy, length of follow-up, need for anterior-floor-reaction bracing, length of time after surgery when brace was prescribed, age at time of need for bracing, side of surgery, technique used, additional procedures performed at time of TAL, previous or later procedures performed, and walking ability. Results: The average age at the time of TAL was 7 years and 3 months, and the average follow-up was seven years. The geographic type of cerebral palsy greatly affected the outcome. None of the twenty-three hemiplegic patients required bracing. Fourteen of 34 (41%) patients with spastic diplegia and seven of fourteen (50%) patients with spastic quadriplegia required bracing. There was no significant difference in outcome between the Hoke and the Z-lengthening procedures. Patients who underwent more procedures and bilateral procedures were more likely to require anterior-floor-reaction bracing. Conclusions: Achilles tendon

  12. Italian translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the "American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society's (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale".

    PubMed

    Leigheb, Massimiliano; Janicka, Paulina; Andorno, Silvano; Marcuzzi, Augusto; Magnani, Corrado; Grassi, Federico

    2016-05-06

    Background and Aim of the workAnkle and hindfoot injuries are common and may lead to functional impairment, disability, exclusion from occupational and daily activities. It's necessary a standardized method for assessing treatment outcomes in people with same condition and disease.American-Orthopaedics-Foot-and-Ankle-Society's-Ankle-Hindfoot-Evaluation-Scale (AOFAS-AHES) is specific to estimate clinical problems of the ankle-hindfoot.Outcome evaluation scales should be translated and culturally adapted into the language of the investigated patient.Our purpose was to translate and culturally adapt into Italian AOFAS-AHES, and to check its reproducibility and validity.MethodsAn Italian translation of the AOFAS-scale was retranslated into English by a native English and compared to the original to define a second correct Italian-version, that was submitted to 50 randomized patients operated at their ankle or hindfoot with a minimum follow-up of 6 months for cultural adaptation, and to 10 healthcare professionals to check comprehension of the medical part.To check intra and inter-observer reproducibility each patient underwent 2 interviews by interviewer-A and 1 by B. ShortForm(SF)-36-questionnaire for quality of life and Visual-Analogue-Scale (VAS) for pain were also compared for validation. The Pearson's-Correlation-Coefficient and the Intra-Class-Correlation coefficient were calculated to check inter and intra-observer reproducibility for validation.ResultsCultural adaptation revealed to be good. We obtained a good correlation of the inter and intra-observer reproducibility. Further validation of the Italian-AOFAS-AHES was obtained comparing AOFAS results to SF-36.ConclusionsItalian translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the AOFAS-AHES has been performed successfully and could be useful to improve assistance quality in care practice.

  13. The effect of changing plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis on ankle and knee joint angles and moments while walking in patients post stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Singer, Madeline L.; Orendurff, Michael S.; Gao, Fan; Daly, Wayne K.; Foreman, K. Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background The adjustment of plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis is considered important in patients post stroke, but the evidence is still limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of changing the plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis on ankle and knee joint angles and moments in patients post stroke. Methods Gait analysis was performed on 10 subjects post stroke under four different plantarflexion resistive moment conditions using a newly designed articulated ankle-foot orthosis. Data were recorded using a Bertec split-belt instrumented treadmill in a 3-dimensional motion analysis laboratory. Findings The ankle and knee sagittal joint angles and moments were significantly affected by the amount of plantarflexion resistive moment of the ankle-foot orthosis. Increasing the plantarflexion resistive moment of the ankle-foot orthosis induced significant decreases both in the peak ankle plantarflexion angle (P<0.01) and the peak knee extension angle (P<0.05). Also, the increase induced significant increases in the internal dorsiflexion moment of the ankle joint (P<0.01) and significantly decreased the internal flexion moment of the knee joint (P<0.01). Interpretation These results suggest an important link between the kinematic/kinetic parameters of the lower-limb joints and the plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis. A future study should be performed to clarify their relationship further so that the practitioners may be able to use these parameters as objective data to determine an optimal plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis for improved orthotic care in individual patients. PMID:26149007

  14. The senses of active and passive forces at the human ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2015-07-01

    The traditional view of the neural basis for the sense of muscle force is that it is generated at least in part within the brain. Recently it has been proposed that force sensations do not arise entirely centrally and that there is a contribution from peripheral receptors within the contracting muscle. Evidence comes from experiments on thumb flexor and elbow flexor muscles. Here we have studied the sense of force in plantar flexor muscles of the human ankle, looking for further evidence for such a mechanism. The active angle-torque curve was measured for muscles of both legs, and for each muscle, ankle angles were identified on the ascending and descending limbs of the curve where active forces were similar. In a plantar flexion force matching task, subjects were asked to match the force in one foot, generated on the ascending limb of the curve, with force in the other foot, generated on the descending limb. It was hypothesised that despite active forces being similar, the sensation generated in the more stretched muscle should be greater because of the contribution from its peripheral stretch receptors, leading to an overestimation of the force in the stretched muscle. It was found that provided that the comparison was between active forces, there was no difference in the forces generated by the two legs, supporting the central hypothesis for the sense of force. When total forces were matched, including a component of passive force due to muscle stretch, subjects seemed to ignore the passive component. Yet subjects had an acute sense of passive force, provided that the muscles remained relaxed. It was concluded that subjects had two senses, a sense of active force, generated centrally, and a sense of passive force, or perhaps muscle stretch, generated within the muscle itself.

  15. Lateral subtalar dislocation: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Veltman, Ewout S; Steller, Ernst JA; Wittich, Philippe; Keizer, Jort

    2016-01-01

    A case of complicated lateral subtalar dislocation is presented and the literature concerning this injury is reviewed. Subtalar joint dislocations are rare and often the result of a high-energy trauma. Complications include avascular necrosis of the talus, infection, posttraumatic osteoarthritis requiring arthrodesis and chronic subtalar instability. Negative prognostic factors include lateral and complicated dislocations, total talar extrusions, and associated fractures. A literature search was performed to identify studies describing outcome after lateral subtalar joint dislocation. Eight studies including fifty patients could be included, thirty out of 50 patients suffered a complicated injury. Mean follow-up was fifty-five months. Ankle function was reported as good in all patients with closed lateral subtalar dislocation. Thirteen out of thirty patients with complicated lateral subtalar joint dislocation developed a complication. Avascular necrosis was present in nine patients with complicated injury. Four patients with complicated lateral subtalar dislocation suffered deep infection requiring treatment with antibiotics. In case of uncomplicated lateral subtalar joint dislocation, excellent functional outcome after closed reduction and immobilization can be expected. In case of complicated lateral subtalar joint dislocation immediate reduction, wound debridement and if necessary (external) stabilisation are critical. Up to fifty percent of patients suffering complicated injury are at risk of developing complications such as avascular talar necrosis and infection. PMID:27672576

  16. A Novel Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Treatment for Recovery of Ankle Dorsiflexion in Chronic Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Jayme S.; Chae, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of improving active ankle dorsiflexion with contralaterally controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation (CCNMES). Design CCNMES dorsiflexes the paretic ankle with a stimulation intensity that is directly proportional to the degree of voluntary dorsiflexion of the unimpaired contralateral ankle, which is detected by an instrumented sock. Three subjects with chronic (>6-mo poststroke) dorsiflexor paresis participated in a 6-wk CCNMES treatment, which consisted of self-administering CCNMES-assisted ankle dorsiflexion exercises at home daily and practicing an ankle motor control task in the research laboratory twice a week. Results For subjects 1 and 2, respectively, maximum voluntary ankle dorsiflexion increased by 13 and 17 degrees, ankle movement tracking error decreased by ~57% and 57%, and lower limb Fugl-Meyer score (maximum score is 34) increased by 4 and 5 points. Subject 3 had no appreciable improvement in these measures. Both subjects 1 and 2 maintained their performance in ankle movement tracking through the 3-mo follow-up; subject 2 also maintained the gains in maximum ankle dorsiflexion and Fugl-Meyer score. Conclusions These results suggest that CCNMES may have a positive effect on ankle motor impairment in some stroke survivors. Further investigation of the effect of CCNMES on gait is warranted. PMID:20531158

  17. Isokinetic testing of evertor and invertor muscles in patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    David, Pascal; Halimi, Mohamad; Mora, Isabelle; Doutrellot, Pierre-Louis; Petitjean, Michel

    2013-12-01

    Ankle sprains are among the most common sport-related injuries and can lead to chronic ankle instability. Impaired sensorimotor function of the ankle musculature is often suggested as a cause. The current study sought to assess and compare the isokinetic performance and electromyographic patterns of evertor and invertor muscles in patients with chronic ankle instability and in a control group. Twelve patients with chronic ankle instability and twelve healthy subjects were included. Isokinetic eccentric and concentric testing at various angular velocities was performed for eversion and inversion movements. The corresponding myoelectric activities of the fibularis longus and tibialis anterior muscles were quantified from surface electromyographic recordings by computing average root mean square values. Patients had lower myoelectric activity of the evertor and invertor muscles than controls did; this difference could account for the eccentric weakness associated with ankle instability. Functional strength ratios revealed a dynamic strength imbalance in unstable ankle patients and that may contribute to recurrent injury. Our findings suggest that rehabilitation programs for unstable ankle patients must be focused on the motor control of eccentric contractions of the ankle evertors and invertors, to boost these muscles' contribution to ankle stabilization.

  18. Synergistic Co-activation Increases the Extent of Mechanical Interaction between Rat Ankle Plantar-Flexors

    PubMed Central

    Tijs, Chris; van Dieën, Jaap H.; Baan, Guus C.; Maas, Huub

    2016-01-01

    Force transmission between rat ankle plantar-flexors has been found for physiological muscle lengths and relative positions, but only with all muscles maximally activated. The aims of this study were to assess intermuscular mechanical interactions between ankle plantar-flexors during (i) fully passive conditions, (ii) excitation of soleus (SO), (iii) excitation of lateral gastrocnemius (LG), and (iv) during co-activation of SO, and LG (SO&LG). We assessed effects of proximal lengthening of LG and plantaris (PL) muscles (i.e., simulating knee extension) on forces exerted at the distal SO tendon (FSO) and on the force difference between the proximal and distal LG+PL tendons (ΔFLG+PL) of the rat. LG+PL lengthening increased FSO to a larger extent (p = 0.017) during LG excitation (0.0026 N/mm) than during fully passive conditions (0.0009 N/mm). Changes in FSO in response to LG+PL lengthening were lower (p = 0.002) during SO only excitation (0.0056 N/mm) than during SO&LG excitation (0.0101 N/mm). LG+PL lengthening changed ΔFLG+PL to a larger extent (p = 0.007) during SO excitation (0.0211 N/mm) than during fully passive conditions (0.0157 N/mm). In contrast, changes in ΔFLG+PL in response to LG+PL lengthening during LG excitation (0.0331 N/mm) were similar (p = 0.161) to that during SO&LG excitation (0.0370 N/mm). In all conditions, changes of FSO were lower than those of ΔFLG+PL. This indicates that muscle forces were transmitted not only between LG+PL and SO, but also between LG+PL and other surrounding structures. In addition, epimuscular myofascial force transmission between rat ankle plantar-flexors was enhanced by muscle activation. However, the magnitude of this interaction was limited. PMID:27708589

  19. The influence of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ki-sik; Park, Kyungyeon; Choi, Bo-ram

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 university students with no history of ankle sprain. They descended stairs while wearing the medio-lateral unstable sole or with bare feet. Electromyography was used to record the activity of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscles and paired t-tests were used to assess statistical significance. [Results] The medio-lateral unstable sole group showed increased tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscle activation compared to the barefoot group. [Conclusion] Medio-lateral unstable sole can be used with exercises to prevent further ankle damage by activating both the inversion and eversion muscles. PMID:27630412

  20. [Resorbable rods and screws for fixation of ankle fractures. A randomized clinical prospective study].

    PubMed

    Springer, M A; van Binsbergen, E A; Patka, P; Bakker, F C; Haarman, H J

    1998-05-01

    A prospective randomized clinical trial was performed to evaluate the use of self-reinforced absorbable composites (Biofix) in the fixation of ankle fractures. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that fixation with Biofix rods and screws is as good as the standard A.O. fixation. The benefits of Biofix rods and screws are: a reduction in costs since no secondary operation is needed, prevention of stress-shielding and thereby diminishing the risk of bone porosity. Patients aged between 16 and 75 years old with closed, non-comminuted fractures of the lateral and/or medial malleolus and dislocation of the fracture fragments greater than 2 mm were included in the study. 22 patients were treated with Biofix rods and screws and the control group of 19 patients with a standard technique. After 3, 6 and 12 months, rontgenograms were taken. At the same time functional results were evaluated following the criteria of Olerud and Molander. Two patients were withdrawn from the trial for non-medical reasons. 22 patients (12 from the Biofix group, 10 from the AO group) operated two or more years ago were contacted to see if any complications had occurred since they were last seen. In 4 cases a Biofix screw broke down just beneath the head during insertion. This did not result in an insufficient fixation of the fracture. There were no early post-operative complications. The functional and rontgenological results in both groups were equal. In three cases a sterile sinus developed at the site of screw insertion. Biofix rods and screws, made of polylactic acid, are a good alternative for the fixation of fractures of the ankle. The use of resorbable fracture fixation material has the advantage that a second operation to remove osteosynthesis material is not necessary. The long term results are good. There is, however, a possibility of development of tissue reaction to the resorbable material.

  1. Modulation of anticipatory postural adjustments of gait using a portable powered ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Matthew N; MacKinnon, Colum D; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2013-06-01

    Prior to taking a step, properly coordinated anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) are generated to control posture and balance as the body is propelled forward. External cues (audio, visual, somatosensory) have been shown to facilitate gait initiation by improving the magnitude and timing of APAs in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the efficacy of these cueing strategies has been limited by their inability to produce the forces required to generate an appropriate APA. To date, mechanical cueing paradigms have been relatively underexplored. Using healthy young adults, we investigated the use of a portable powered ankle-foot orthosis (PPAFO) to provide a modest torque at the ankle as a mechanical cue to initiate gait. Subjects were instructed to initiate gait in five test conditions: (1) self-initiated in running shoes [baseline-shoe], (2) self-initiated trial in unpowered passive PPAFO [baseline-passive], (3) with acoustic go-cue in passive PPAFO [acoustic-passive], (4) acoustic go-cue and simultaneous mechanical assist from powered PPAFO [acoustic-assist], and (5) mechanical assist cue only [assist]. APA characteristics were quantified using ground reaction force (GRF), center of pressure (COP), and electromyography (EMG) data. Mechanical cueing significantly increased medial-lateral COP and GRF peak amplitude, and decreased GRF time to peak amplitude, COP and GRF onset times, and time to toe off. Mechanical cueing conditions also demonstrated consistent bimodal EMG behaviors across all subjects. Overall, these data suggest that the mechanical assist from the PPAFO can significantly improve APA timing parameters and increase APA force production in healthy young adults.

  2. Foot and ankle reconstruction: an experience on the use of 14 different flaps in 226 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue-Liang; Wang, Yi; He, Xiao-Qing; Zhu, Min; Li, Fu-Bin; Xu, Yong-Qing

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this report was to present our experience on the use of different flaps for soft tissue reconstruction of the foot and ankle. From 2007 to 2012, the soft tissue defects of traumatic injuries of the foot and ankle were reconstructed using 14 different flaps in 226 cases (162 male and 64 female). There were 62 pedicled flaps and 164 free flaps used in reconstruction. The pedicled flaps included sural flap, saphenous flap, dorsal pedal neurocutaneous flap, pedicled peroneal artery perforator flap, pedicled tibial artery perforator flap, and medial plantar flap. The free flaps were latissimus musculocutaneous flap, anterolateral thigh musculocutaneous flap, groin flap, lateral arm flap, anterolateral thigh perforator flap, peroneal artery perforator flap, thoracdorsal artery perforator flap, medial arm perforator flap. The sensory nerve coaptation was not performed for all of flaps. One hundred and ninety-four cases were combined with open fractures. One hundred and sixty-two cases had tendon. Among 164 free flaps, 8 flaps were completely lost, in which the defects were managed by the secondary procedures. Among the 57 flaps for plantar foot coverage (25 pedicled flaps and 32 free flaps), ulcers were developed in 5 pedicled flaps and 6 free flaps after weight bearing, and infection was found in 14 flaps. The donor site complications were seen in 3 cases with the free anterolateral thigh perforator flap transfer. All of limbs were preserved and the patients regained walking and daily activities. All of patients except for one regained protective sensation from 3 to 12 months postoperatively. Our experience showed that the sural flap and saphenous flap could be good options for the coverage of the defects at malleolus, dorsal hindfoot and midfoot. Plantar foot, forefoot and large size defects could be reconstructed with free anterolateral thigh perforator flap. For the infected wounds with dead spce, the free latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap remained to

  3. The effects of gastrocnemius-soleus muscle forces on ankle biomechanics during triple arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, S; Rouhi, G; Rasmussen, J

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a finite element model of the ankle, taking into account the effects of muscle forces, determined by a musculoskeletal analysis, to investigate the contact stress distribution in the tibio-talar joint in patients with triple arthrodesis and in normal subjects. Forces of major ankle muscles were simulated and corresponded well with the trend of their EMG signals. These forces were applied to the finite element model to obtain stress distributions for patients with triple arthrodesis and normal subjects in three stages of the gait cycle, i.e. heel strike, midstance, and heel rise. The results demonstrated that the stress distribution patterns of the tibio-talar joint in patients with triple arthrodesis differ from those of normal subjects in investigated gait cycle stages. The mean and standard deviations for maximum stresses in the tibo-talar joint in the stance phase for patients and normal subjects were 9.398e7 ± 1.75e7 and 7.372e7 ± 4.43e6 Pa, respectively. The maximum von Mises stresses of the tibio-talar joint for all subjects in the stance phase found to be on the lateral side of the inferior surface of the joint. The results also indicate that, in patients with triple arthrodesis, increasing gastrocnemius-soleus muscle force reduces the stress on the medial malleolus compared with normal subjects. Most of stresses in this area are between 45 and 109 kPa, and will decrease to almost 32 kPa in patients after increasing of 40% in gastrocnemius-soleus muscle force.

  4. [Lateral retinacular release].

    PubMed

    Verdonk, P; Bonte, F; Verdonk, R

    2008-09-01

    This overview of numerous studies discusses, based on short-term and long-term results, which diagnoses are indications for lateral retinacular release. No significant differences in outcome between arthroscopic and open lateral release could be documented. Isolated lateral release offers a good success rate for treating a stable patella with excessive lateral pressure. In patellar instability, the results are less favorable in long-term follow-up evaluation. Hyperlaxity with hypermobility of the patella is an absolute contraindication. Lateral release provides only temporary benefit for patellofemoral osteoarthritis. Proximal and/or distal realignment of the extensor mechanism gives better results than isolated lateral release.

  5. Running with a powered knee and ankle prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Amanda H; Lawson, Brian E; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a running control architecture for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that enables a transfemoral amputee to run with a biomechanically appropriate running gait and to intentionally transition between a walking and running gait. The control architecture consists firstly of a coordination level controller, which provides gait biomechanics representative of healthy running, and secondly of a gait selection controller that enables the user to intentionally transition between a running and walking gait. The running control architecture was implemented on a transfemoral prosthesis with powered knee and ankle joints, and the efficacy of the controller was assessed in a series of running trials with a transfemoral amputee subject. Specifically, treadmill trials were conducted to assess the extent to which the coordination controller provided a biomechanically appropriate running gait. Separate trials were conducted to assess the ability of the user to consistently and reliably transition between walking and running gaits.

  6. Fractures and Soft Tissue Injuries of the Feet and Ankle

    PubMed Central

    English, Edward

    1985-01-01

    An accurate clinical diagnosis of foot and ankle pain can be made by a history, physical examination and routine X-rays of the affected part. Each problem has a specific treatment; however, fractures and dislocations around the foot and ankle can be thought of in an organized fashion by proper physical examination and then the appropriate treatment. Fractures and soft tissue injuries can be treated rationally by understanding the mechanism of injury and the possibility of subsequent deformity. This article classifies specific injuries as a group and indicates a treatment program for each problem. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7aFig. 7bFig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:21274230

  7. The natural history of osteochondral lesions in the ankle.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, C Niek; Reilingh, Mikel L; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J A

    2010-01-01

    Most osteochondral lesions (defects) of the talar dome are caused by trauma, which may be a single event or repeated, less intense events (microtrauma). A lesion may heal, remain asymptomatic, or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing, prolonged joint swelling, and the formation of subchondral bone cysts. During loading, compression of the cartilage forces water into the microfractured subchondral bone. The increased flow and pressure of fluid in the subchondral bone can cause osteolysis and the slow development of a subchondral cyst. The pain does not arise from the cartilage lesion but most likely is caused by repetitive high fluid pressure during walking and a concomitant decrease in pH produced by osteoclasts, which sensitize the highly innervated subchondral bone. Prevention of further degeneration depends on several factors, including the repair of the subchondral bone plate and the correct alignment of the ankle joint.

  8. SIRT2 regulates nuclear envelope reassembly through ANKLE2 deacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Tanja; Kukolj, Eva; Brachner, Andreas; Beltzung, Etienne; Bruno, Melania; Kostrhon, Sebastian; Opravil, Susanne; Hudecz, Otto; Mechtler, Karl; Warren, Graham

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is an NAD-dependent deacetylase known to regulate microtubule dynamics and cell cycle progression. SIRT2 has also been implicated in the pathology of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and progeria. Here, we show that SIRT2 depletion or overexpression causes nuclear envelope reassembly defects. We link this phenotype to the recently identified regulator of nuclear envelope reassembly ANKLE2. ANKLE2 acetylation at K302 and phosphorylation at S662 are dynamically regulated throughout the cell cycle by SIRT2 and are essential for normal nuclear envelope reassembly. The function of SIRT2 therefore extends beyond the regulation of microtubules to include the regulation of nuclear envelope dynamics. PMID:27875273

  9. Ankle Arthritis: You Can't Always Replace It.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brandon J; Gonzalez, Tyler; Smith, Jeremy T; Chiodo, Christopher P; Bluman, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    End-stage arthritis of the tibiotalar joint is disabling and causes substantial functional impairment. Most often it is the residual effect of a previous traumatic injury. Nonsurgical treatment of end-stage arthritis of the ankle includes bracing, shoe-wear modifications, and selective joint injections. For patients who fail to respond to nonsurgical modalities, the two primary treatment options are arthroplasty and arthrodesis. Each has its proponents. Although no ideal treatment of ankle arthritis exists, high-quality studies can help guide treatment in patients of varying demographics. Inherent risks are linked with each treatment option, but those of greatest concern are early implant loosening that requires revision following arthroplasty and the acceleration of adjacent joint degeneration associated with arthrodesis.

  10. Percutaneous techniques for tendon transfers in the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Panchbhavi, Vinod Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are useful for replacing a dysfunctional or diseased tendon or for restoring muscle imbalance. The tendon to be transferred is harvested as distal as is necessary to provide adequate length for rerouting and attachment at the different site. The harvesting of tendon itself can be attained using an open surgical approach or minimally invasive percutaneous techniques that limit surgical exposure. This article describes percutaneous techniques for tendon transfer procedures used to address foot and ankle disorders.

  11. Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index in a Thai Population

    PubMed Central

    Yingchoncharoen, Teerapat; Sritara, Piyamitr

    2017-01-01

    Arterial stiffness as measured by the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is a widely available method in Thailand. Data from a large cross-sectional study revealed a significant correlation of CAVI and the presence of coronary artery disease as detected from 64-slice coronary computed tomography arteriography. Futhermore, CAVI was shown to predict long-term cardiovascular events in the patients with intermediate cardiovascular risk.

  12. Can an Ankle-Foot Orthosis Change Hearts and Minds?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Can an Ankle-Foot Orthosis Change Hearts and Minds? Jeanne C. Patzkowski, MD,1 Ryan V. Blanck, CPO,2 Johnny G. Owens, MPT,3 Jason M. Wilken, PhD, MPT...continued functional deficits. Inspired by these patients, efforts at this institution began to provide them with a more dynamic orthosis . Utilizing...techniques and technology resulting from cerebral palsy, stroke, and amputation research, the Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeletal Orthosis was created. To

  13. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2015-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years. PMID:27022527

  14. Autologous Bone Graft in Foot and Ankle Surgery.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher P; Chiodo, Christopher P

    2016-12-01

    Bone graft is a common adjunct procedure in orthopedic surgery used for fusions, fracture repair, and the reconstruction of skeletal defects in the foot and ankle. Autologous graft, or autograft, involves the transport of bone from a donor site to another location in the same patient. It is considered by many to be the gold standard of bone grafting, as it is provides all biologic factors required for functional graft. Further, autograft is 100% histocompatible with no risk of disease transmission.

  15. Surgical efficacy of the ankle tourniquet for forefoot surgery.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rachel K; Cleave, Elizabeth S; Rambani, Rohit

    2014-12-01

    For precise, safe and proficient procedures haemostasis is critical. For forefoot surgery, the customary thigh tourniquet is commonly accepted for this role as the additional muscle mass and minimal bony prominences in the thigh avert neuromuscular and skin injury. However, for patients with pathophysiological issues that may be exacerbated by a thigh tourniquet, application of an ankle tourniquet may decrease the risks and increase cuff tolerance as the volume of ischaemic tissue is reduced.

  16. Reaction time in ankle movements: a diffusion model analysis

    PubMed Central

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Reaction time (RT) is one of the most commonly used measures of neurological function and dysfunction. Despite the extensive studies on it, no study has ever examined the RT in the ankle. Twenty-two subjects were recruited to perform simple, 2- and 4-choice RT tasks by visually guiding a cursor inside a rectangular target with their ankle. RT did not change with spatial accuracy constraints imposed by different target widths in the direction of the movement. RT increased as a linear function of potential target stimuli, as would be predicted by Hick–Hyman law. Although the slopes of the regressions were similar, the intercept in dorsal–plantar (DP) direction was significantly smaller than the intercept in inversion–eversion (IE) direction. To explain this difference, we used a hierarchical Bayesian estimation of the Ratcliff's (Psychol Rev 85:59, 1978) diffusion model parameters and divided processing time into cognitive components. The model gave a good account of RTs, their distribution and accuracy values, and hence provided a testimony that the non-decision processing time (overlap of posterior distributions between DP and IE < 0.045), the boundary separation (overlap of the posterior distributions < 0.1) and the evidence accumulation rate (overlap of the posterior distributions < 0.01) components of the RT accounted for the intercept difference between DP and IE. The model also proposed that there was no systematic change in non-decision processing time or drift rate when spatial accuracy constraints were altered. The results were in agreement with the memory drum hypothesis and could be further justified neurophysiologically by the larger innervation of the muscles controlling DP movements. This study might contribute to assessing deficits in sensorimotor control of the ankle and enlighten a possible target for correction in the framework of our on-going effort to develop robotic therapeutic interventions to the ankle of children with cerebral palsy

  17. The painful total ankle arthroplasty: a diagnostic and treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, E; Myerson, M S

    2017-01-01

    The last decade has seen a considerable increase in the use of in total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) to treat patients with end-stage arthritis of the knee. However, the longevity of the implants is still far from that of total knee and hip arthroplasties. The aim of this review is to outline a diagnostic and treatment algorithm for the painful TAA to be used when considering revision surgery. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:5-11.

  18. Population based epidemiology of ankle sprains attending accident and emergency units in the West Midlands of England, and a survey of UK practice for severe ankle sprains

    PubMed Central

    Bridgman, S; Clement, D; Downing, A; Walley, G; Phair, I; Maffulli, N

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the incidence of ankle sprains and severe ankle sprains attending accident and emergency (A&E) units; to describe current practice for severe ankle sprains in A&E units in the United Kingdom. Methods: Crude age and sex specific incidence rates were calculated for four health districts from cases ascertained from data on seven A&E clinical information systems. Case records of patients with ankle sprains at an A&E unit in another health district were audited and the proportion of severe ankle sprains calculated. UK A&E units were surveyed about their usual treatment of patients with severe ankle sprains. Results: The estimate of the crude incidence rate of ankle sprains was a minimum of 52.7 per 10 000, rising to 60.9 (95% CI 59.4 to 62.4) when figures were adjusted for the proportion of patients without a diagnostic code (13.7%). There were important age-sex differences with unadjusted rates observed from 127.8 per 10 000 (CI 115.5 to 140.0) in girls aged 10–14 years to 8.2 (CI 4.2 to 12.3) in men aged 70–74 years. As 14% of ankle sprains attending A&E were classed as severe, this would equate to 42 000 severe ankle sprains per year in the UK. In the UK wide survey, there was a response rate of 79% (211 of 266). Among the responders, Tubigrip was used routinely in 55%, below knee casts in 3%, and braces in 2%. Boots were not used routinely in any unit. Conclusion: While there is considerable variation in severe ankle sprain management in UK A&E units, most are treated with the minimal mechanical support of Tubigrip. PMID:14623833

  19. Foot and ankle surgery: considerations for the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel K; Mulder, Gerit D

    2009-01-01

    The growing number of lower-extremity abnormalities that are seen in inpatient and outpatient settings has paralleled the increased number of elderly in the population. Foot and ankle deformities, disorders, and arthritis, which are not manifested until late in life, have become more common as more individuals attain longer lifespans. Although conservative therapies are a priority when addressing the geriatric population, surgical options may be overlooked secondary to a misunderstanding of their ability to overcome perioperative management. Advanced minimally invasive surgical procedures for the foot and ankle have decreased the complications associated with foot surgery, making surgical intervention a viable option for many of the elderly. The newer procedures do not, however, minimize strict perioperative management, including pharmacological and nutritional assessment, and cardiopulmonary precautions. Outpatient surgical intervention may effectively address many ongoing problems associated with pain, decreased ambulation, and decreased quality of life. Current techniques in joint reconstruction in the forefoot and midfoot allow weight bearing from the day of surgery. Most hindfoot and ankle surgeries now permit minimal bone resection and incision through arthroscopy, resulting in improved muscle and tendon repair and early weight bearing. The changes in surgical approaches for the geriatric foot have permitted more effective and rapid intervention in problems affecting ambulation and quality of life in our aged population.

  20. Biomechanical changes at the ankle joint after stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Thilmann, A F; Fellows, S J; Ross, H F

    1991-01-01

    The resistance of the relaxed ankle to slow displacement over the joint movement range was measured on both sides of a group of hemiparetic stroke patients, in whom spasticity had been established for at least one year and who showed no clinical signs of contractures. The ankle joints of the age-matched normal subjects were flexible over most of the movement range, showing dramatically increasing stiffness only when the foot was dorsiflexed beyond 70 degrees, with a neutral range between 90-100 degrees, and a less dramatic increase in stiffness during plantarflexion. Hemiparetic patients showed identical curves to the normal subjects on the "healthy" side, ipsilateral to the causative cerebral lesion, but were significantly stiffer in dorsiflexion on the contralateral side, without change in the minimum stiffness range or during plantarflexion. Therefore significant changes in passive biomechanical properties occur at the affected ankle of hemiparetic subjects, predominantly as the result of a loss of compliance in the Achilles tendon, although an increase in the passive stiffness of the triceps surae may also occur. The contribution of these changes to the locomotor disability of hemiparetic patients is discussed. PMID:2019838

  1. Epidemiological study of foot and ankle injuries in recreational sports

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Alexandre de Paiva; Lara, Luiz Carlos Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This is a retrospective study showing the incidence, type and extent of injuries occurring in the foot and/or ankle as a result of recreational sports practice. METHODS: We treated 131 patients, of which 123 were male and 8 female, with a history of trauma and pain in the foot and/or ankle after the practicing recreational sports. The average age of the male patients was 24.53 years. The evaluation was done through a research protocol, which contained the variables age, sex, diagnosis, and type of recreational sport. RESULTS: The sports were classified according to the American Medical Association, which divides them into contact and non-contact sports. 82.4% of the sample practiced contact sports, while 17.6% practiced sports classified as non-contact. CONCLUSIONS: The sprained ankle was the most frequent type of injury, especially those of grade I and II. Soccer was the sport responsible for the highest incidence of injuries and among its various forms the indoor soccer presented the highest frequency of injuries (35%). In the non-contact sports, the highest incidence was found in running. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453628

  2. Effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Mehmet Gürhan; Rutbİl, Hİlal; Akpinar, Ercan; Yildirim, Alİ; Karakaya, İlkİm Çitak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance. [Subjects and Methods] In this randomized-controlled, single-blind study, 59 university students (35 females, 24 males) were randomized into study (n=29) and control (n=30) groups. The study group received a foot and ankle proprioceptive exercise program including stretching, strengthening (plantar and dorsi-flexors, invertor and evertor muscles), and balance board exercises, each with 10 repetitions per session, 5 days a week, for a total of 10 sessions. The control group did not receive any intervention. Static body balance was evaluated by a kinesthetic ability trainer, which showed the balance index scores under both single foot and both feet conditions. This evaluation was repeated at the end of two weeks for both groups. [Results] Outcome measures of the groups were similar at the baseline. Balance index scores of both groups improved at the end of two weeks, and the study group had significantly lower index scores than those of the control group, indicating better balance. [Conclusion] Ankle proprioceptive training had positive effects on static body balance parameters in healthy individuals, and it is worth investigating the effects of this type of training in patients with balance disorders. PMID:26644697

  3. New Technology in Imaging Cartilage of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Markus M; Mlynarik, Vladimir; Zbýň, Štefan; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Apprich, Sebastian; Windhager, Reinhard; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of osteochondral lesions, as well as osteoarthritis of the ankle joint following osteochondritis dissecans and trauma, has been reappraised in recent years. Consequently, an increasing number of surgical interventions using different cartilage repair techniques is performed in the ankle joint, which has resulted in a growing demand for repetitive and objective assessment of cartilage tissue and its repair. While morphological imaging does enable monitoring of macroscopic changes with increasing precision, it fails to provide information about the ultrastructural composition of cartilage. The significance of molecular changes in cartilage matrix composition, however, is increasingly recognized, as it is assumed that macroscopic cartilage degeneration is preceded by a loss in glycosaminoglycans and a disorganization of the collagen network. Recent advances in biochemical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have yielded sequences sensitive to these changes, thus providing invaluable insight into both early cartilage degeneration and maturation of repair tissue, on a molecular level. The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive overview of these techniques, including water and collagen-sensitive T2/T2* mapping, as well as glycosaminoglycan-sensitive sequences such as delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage dGEMRIC, and sodium imaging, and describe their applications for the ankle joint.

  4. Operative treatment for ganglion cysts of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae Hoon; Choy, Won-Sik; Kim, Ha-Yong

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyzed the clinical results of surgical excision for symptomatic or recurrent ganglion cysts of the foot and ankle, and tried to elucidate the prognostic factors. Fifty-three cases of ganglions in the foot and ankle were followed for more than 24 months after excision. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.7 years. As a preceding treatment, 17 cases received a mean of 1.3 aspirations, and 16 cases recurred after a mean of 1.7 operations. The cyst was most common in the dorsum of the foot and ankle, where 35 cases were found. Thirty cases originated from the tendon sheath, 19 cases from the joint, and 4 cases from others. Preoperative mean AOFAS foot scores were low in the cysts associated with the tarsal tunnel syndrome, and in the cysts of the plantar aspect of the first toe. Postoperative mean AOFAS foot scores were significantly increased in the preceding 2 groups. There were 3 (5.7%) cases of recurrence, all of which originated from the tendon sheath. In the case of ganglion cysts originating from the tendon sheath, careful attention should be paid to locate satellite masses to avoid recurrence.

  5. Experimental and computational analysis of composite ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dequan; He, Tao; Dailey, Michael; Smith, Kirk E; Silva, Matthew J; Sinacore, David R; Mueller, Michael J; Hastings, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber (CF) ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) can improve gait by increasing ankle plantar-flexor power and improving plantar-flexor ankle joint moment and energy efficiency compared with posterior leaf spring AFOs made of thermoplastic. However, fabricating a CF AFO to optimize the performance of the individual user may require multiple AFOs and expensive fabrication costs. Finite element analysis (FEA) models were developed to predict the mechanical behavior of AFOs in this study. Three AFOs, two made of CF composite material and one made of thermoplastic material, were fabricated and then mechanically tested to produce force-displacement data. The FEA models were validated by comparing model predictions with mechanical testing data performed under the same loading and boundary conditions. The actual mechanical testing demonstrated that CF performs better than thermoplastic. The simulation results showed that FEA models produced accurate predictions for both types of orthoses. The relative error of the energy return ratio predicted by the CF AFO FEA model developed in this study is less than 3%. We conclude that highly accurate FEA models will allow orthotists to improve CF AFO fabrication without wasting resources (time and money) on trial and error fabrications that are expensive and do not consistently improve AFO and user performance.

  6. Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)

    MedlinePlus

    .org Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis) Page ( 1 ) Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondyliti s, is a painful condition of the elbow caused by overuse. Not surprisingly, playing tennis or other racquet sports can cause ...

  7. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a-my-o-TROE-fik LAT-ur-ul skluh-ROE-sis), or ALS, is a progressive nervous system (neurological) disease that ...

  8. Gradual reduction of chronic fracture dislocation of the ankle using ilizarov/taylor spatial frame.

    PubMed

    Tellisi, Nazzar; Deland, Jonathan T; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2011-02-01

    With the advances in trauma care, chronic fracture dislocation of the ankle is not a condition commonly seen in modern clinical practice. When encountered, it can be difficult to preserve the ankle joint. We present a case of a 65-year-old female, with a chronic fracture dislocation of the ankle. The ankle joint was subluxated with posterior translation of the talus, displacement of the posterior malleolus fragment, and a distal fibula fracture. A minimally traumatic approach was devised to treat this complex fracture dislocation which included gradual reduction of the ankle with a Taylor spatial frame, followed by stabilization with internal fixation and removal of the frame. Bony union and restoration of the ankle joint congruency was achieved.

  9. Finger movement improves ankle control for gait initiation in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, K; Kamata, N; Iwata, A; Minamida, F; Abe, K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of finger movement on ankle control for gait initiation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD patients). The subjects were 13 PD patients and 6 age-matched healthy adults. The subjects moved fingers before or after gait initiation, or initiated gait without finger movement. Ankle joint movement in the stance leg was recorded to estimate the duration of ankle dorsiflexion (DIF duration), which reflects the degree of disturbance in ankle control for gait initiation in PD patients. In the PD patients with prolonged D/F duration, finger movement that preceded gait initiation shortened the D/F duration, but in the PD patients without prolonged D/F duration and in healthy subjects, the effect was not found. Accordingly, finger movement that precedes gait initiation improves ankle control for gait initiation in PD patients who suffer disturbance in ankle control for gait initiation.

  10. The Ankle Injury Management (AIM) trial: a pragmatic, multicentre, equivalence randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation comparing close contact casting with open surgical reduction and internal fixation in the treatment of unstable ankle fractures in patients aged over 60 years.

    PubMed Central

    Keene, David J; Mistry, Dipesh; Nam, Julian; Tutton, Elizabeth; Handley, Robert; Morgan, Lesley; Roberts, Emma; Gray, Bridget; Briggs, Andrew; Lall, Ranjit; Chesser, Tim Js; Pallister, Ian; Lamb, Sarah E; Willett, Keith

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Close contact casting (CCC) may offer an alternative to open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) surgery for unstable ankle fractures in older adults. OBJECTIVES We aimed to (1) determine if CCC for unstable ankle fractures in adults aged over 60 years resulted in equivalent clinical outcome compared with ORIF, (2) estimate cost-effectiveness to the NHS and society and (3) explore participant experiences. DESIGN A pragmatic, multicentre, equivalence randomised controlled trial incorporating health economic evaluation and qualitative study. SETTING Trauma and orthopaedic departments of 24 NHS hospitals. PARTICIPANTS Adults aged over 60 years with unstable ankle fracture. Those with serious limb or concomitant disease or substantial cognitive impairment were excluded. INTERVENTIONS CCC was conducted under anaesthetic in theatre by surgeons who attended training. ORIF was as per local practice. Participants were randomised in 1 : 1 allocation via remote telephone randomisation. Sequence generation was by random block size, with stratification by centre and fracture pattern. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Follow-up was conducted at 6 weeks and, by blinded outcome assessors, at 6 months after randomisation. The primary outcome was the Olerud-Molander Ankle Score (OMAS), a patient-reported assessment of ankle function, at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were quality of life (as measured by the European Quality of Life 5-Dimensions, Short Form questionnaire-12 items), pain, ankle range of motion and mobility (as measured by the timed up and go test), patient satisfaction and radiological measures. In accordance with equivalence trial US Food and Drug Administration guidance, primary analysis was per protocol. RESULTS We recruited 620 participants, 95 from the pilot and 525 from the multicentre phase, between June 2010 and November 2013. The majority of participants, 579 out of 620 (93%), received the allocated treatment; 52 out of 275 (19%) who received CCC later

  11. Evaluating the Reliability and Reproducibility of the AO and Lauge-Hansen Classification Systems for Ankle Injuries.

    PubMed

    Yin, Meng-Chen; Yuan, Xue-Fei; Ma, Jun-Ming; Xia, Ye; Wang, Tao; Xu, Xiao-Li; Yan, Yin-Jie; Xu, Jin-Hai; Ye, Jie; Tong, Zheng-Yi; Feng, Yan-Qi; Wang, Hong-Bo; Wu, Xue-Qun; Mo, Wen

    2015-07-01

    Ankle injuries are responsible for more than 5 million emergency department visits each year. The AO and Lauge-Hansen classification systems are widely used in the clinical diagnosis of ankle injuries. This study aimed to analyze the intraobserver reliability and interobserver reproducibility of the AO and Lauge-Hansen classification systems. In addition, the authors explored the differences among physicians' classification responses and evaluated the clinical value for diagnosis. Fifty-six patients with an ankle injury with complete clinical and radiologic data were enrolled. The definition of injury type, the index score typing methods, and the specific study criteria were explained in detail. Five observers, who were orthopedic surgeons, determined the classifications according to both the AO and Lauge-Hansen systems. The classification was repeated 1 month later. Cronbach's alpha and Cohen's kappa test were used to determine interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility. The physicians conducted 560 classifications (56 cases × 5 physicians × 2 times per patient). Average inter- and intraobserver kappa values for the AO system were 0.708 and 0.608, respectively. Average inter- and intraobserver kappa values for the Lauge-Hansen system were 0.402 and 0.398, respectively. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 96.7% for the AO system and 76.0% for the Lauge-Hansen system. The Lauge-Hansen classification system is a comprehensive yet cumbersome system. Comparatively, the AO classification system is easier to understand. This study shows that the AO classification system has more reliability and reproducibility, and thus has more value in clinical practice, than the Lauge-Hansen classification system.

  12. Lateral flow strip assay

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Robin R; Benett, William J; Coleman, Matthew A; Pearson, Francesca S; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  13. Use of circular external fixation for combined subtalar joint fusion and ankle distraction.

    PubMed

    Zgonis, Thomas; Stapleton, John J; Roukis, Thomas S

    2008-10-01

    The authors discuss a novel technique not previously published that incorporates a subtalar joint arthrodesis with an ankle joint arthrodiastasis as an alternative to a tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis. Young and active patients who experience refractory pain and stiffness to the rearfoot and ankle secondary to combined severe subtalar and ankle arthrosis are suitable candidates for this surgical procedure. This new approach is based on sound principles in the treatment of severe arthrosis affecting the ankle and subtalar joint. The authors are currently prospectively reviewing their surgical experience with this procedure and believe that it provides an alternative option for the patient, with potentially promising long-term results.

  14. Design and characterization of a biologically inspired quasi-passive prosthetic ankle-foot.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Luke M; Lai, Cara H; Rouse, Elliott J

    2014-01-01

    By design, commonly worn energy storage and release (ESR) prosthetic feet cannot provide biologically realistic ankle joint torque and angle profiles during walking. Additionally, their anthropomorphic, cantilever architecture causes their mechanical stiffness to decrease throughout the stance phase of walking, opposing the known trend of the biological ankle. In this study, the design of a quasi-passive pneumatic ankle-foot prosthesis is detailed that is able to replicate the biological ankle's torque and angle profiles during walking. The prosthetic ankle is comprised of a pneumatic piston, bending spring and solenoid valve. The mechanical properties of the pneumatic ankle prosthesis are characterized using a materials testing machine and the properties are compared to those from a common, passive ESR prosthetic foot. The characterization spanned a range of ankle equilibrium pressures and testing locations beneath the foot, analogous to the location of center of pressure within the stance phase of walking. The pneumatic ankle prosthesis was shown to provide biologically appropriate trends and magnitudes of torque, angle and stiffness behavior, when compared to the passive ESR prosthetic foot. Future work will focus on the development of a control system for the quasi-passive device and clinical testing of the pneumatic ankle to demonstrate efficacy.

  15. Basketball shoe height and the maximal muscular resistance to applied ankle inversion and eversion moments.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, R A; Ashton-Miller, J A; Kothari, S U; Wojtys, E M

    1995-01-01

    To determine if the height of a basketball shoe alters the maximal inversion and eversion moment that can be actively resisted by the ankle in the frontal plane, we tested 20 healthy, young adult men with no recent ankle injuries. Subjects underwent unipedal functional ankle strength testing under weightbearing conditions at 0 degrees, 16 degrees, and 32 degrees of ankle plantar flexion using a specially designed testing apparatus. Testing was performed with the subject wearing either a low- or a three quarter-top basketball shoe. Shoe height did not significantly affect an individual's ability to actively resist an eversion moment at any angle of ankle plantar flexion. However, tests at 0 degrees of ankle plantar flexion demonstrated that the three quarter-top basketball shoe we tested significantly increased the maximal resistance to an inversion moment by 29.4%. At 16 degrees of ankle plantar flexion, inversion resistance was also significantly improved by 20.4%. These results show that athletic shoe height can significantly increase the active resistance to an inversion moment in moderate ankle plantar flexion. The findings apply to a neutral foot position in the frontal plane, an orientation equivalent to the early phase of a potential ankle sprain.

  16. Consensus in chronic ankle instability: aetiology, assessment, surgical indications and place for arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guillo, S; Bauer, T; Lee, J W; Takao, M; Kong, S W; Stone, J W; Mangone, P G; Molloy, A; Perera, A; Pearce, C J; Michels, F; Tourné, Y; Ghorbani, A; Calder, J

    2013-12-01

    Ankle sprains are the most common injuries sustained during sports activities. Most ankle sprains recover fully with non-operative treatment but 20-30% develop chronic ankle instability. Predicting which patients who sustain an ankle sprain will develop instability is difficult. This paper summarises a consensus on identifying which patients may require surgery, the optimal surgical intervention along with treatment of concomitant pathology given the evidence available today. It also discusses the role of arthroscopic treatment and the anatomical basis for individual procedures.

  17. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking.

    PubMed

    Koehler-McNicholas, Sara R; Nickel, Eric A; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data were collected on seven subjects with a transtibial amputation walking on an instrumented treadmill set at various slopes. Overall, this study was unable to find significant differences in the torque at the distal end of the prosthetic socket between an ankle-foot prosthesis with a hydraulic range-of-motion and other related ankle-foot prosthesis designs (rigid ankle, multiaxial ankle) during the single-support phase of walking. In addition, socket comfort and perceived exertion were not significantly different for any of the ankle-foot prostheses tested in this study. These results suggest the need for further work to determine if more advanced designs (e.g., those with microprocessor control of hydraulic features, powered ankle-foot designs) can provide more biomimetic function to prosthesis users.

  18. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Eric A.; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data were collected on seven subjects with a transtibial amputation walking on an instrumented treadmill set at various slopes. Overall, this study was unable to find significant differences in the torque at the distal end of the prosthetic socket between an ankle-foot prosthesis with a hydraulic range-of-motion and other related ankle-foot prosthesis designs (rigid ankle, multiaxial ankle) during the single-support phase of walking. In addition, socket comfort and perceived exertion were not significantly different for any of the ankle-foot prostheses tested in this study. These results suggest the need for further work to determine if more advanced designs (e.g., those with microprocessor control of hydraulic features, powered ankle-foot designs) can provide more biomimetic function to prosthesis users. PMID:28278172

  19. Total ankle replacement using HINTEGRA, an unconstrained, three-component system: surgical technique and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Barg, Alexej; Knupp, Markus; Henninger, Heath B; Zwicky, Lukas; Hintermann, Beat

    2012-12-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) has become a valuable treatment option in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. One popular 3-component system, the HINTEGRA TAR, is an unconstrained system that provides inversion-eversion stability. More natural biomechanics of the replaced ankle may be expected when anatomic considerations drive prosthesis design. The HINTEGRA prosthesis includes 2 anatomically contoured metal components and a polyethylene insert, providing axial rotation and physiologic flexion-extension mobility. This article describes the HINTEGRA TAR design and surgical technique. Use of the prosthesis for complex hindfoot reconstruction in patients with an osteoarthritic, varus, or valgus ankle deformity is described.

  20. Techniques for managing varus and valgus malalignment during total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Jin; Yoon, Hang Seob; Lee, Jin Woo

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate goal of primary total ankle replacement is to provide a well-balanced soft-tissue envelope around a well-aligned, well-fixated implant. Some surgeons have emphasized that good outcomes in total ankle replacement are more dependent on ligament balancing, along with the procedure itself, than the extent of preoperative coronal deformity in the ankle. Thus, it is imperative that the surgeon be familiar with additional procedures to address the varus, valgus, and other associated deformities commonly encountered in primary total ankle replacement.