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Sample records for acute leukemia cell

  1. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Targeting of leukemia-initiating cells in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with peculiar molecular, phenotypic and clinical features and unique therapeutic response to specific treatments. The disease is characterized by a single, pathognomonic molecular event, consisting of the translocation t(15;17) which gives rise to the PML/retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) hybrid protein. The development of this leukemia is mainly related to the fusion oncoprotein PML/RARα, acting as an altered RAR mediating abnormal signalling and repression of myeloid differentiation, with consequent accumulation of undifferentiated promyelocytes. The prognosis of APL has dramatically been improved with the introduction in therapy of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO). The main effect of these two drugs is linked to the targeting of either RAR moiety of the PML/RARα molecule and induction of cell differentiation (ATRA) or of the PML moiety of the fusion protein and induction of leukemic cell apoptosis, including leukemic progenitors (mostly induced by ATO). These two drugs exhibited excellent synergism and determine a very high rate of durable remissions in low/intermediate-risk APLs, when administered in the absence of any chemotherapeutic drug. The strong synergism and the marked clinical efficacy of these two agents when administered together seem to be related to their capacity to induce PML/RARα degradation and complete eradication of leukemia stem cells. PMID:27358876

  3. Does hematopoietic stem cell transplantation benefit infants with acute leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Sison, Edward Allan R.; Brown, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). She has completed induction therapy and is currently in first complete remission (CR1). You are asked by your resident if hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) would benefit infants with acute leukemia. PMID:24319238

  4. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  5. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  6. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  9. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  10. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Investigating CD99 Expression in Leukemia Propagating Cells in Childhood T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Charlotte V.; Diamanti, Paraskevi; Moppett, John P.; Blair, Allison

    2016-01-01

    A significant number of children with T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) fail to respond to therapy and experience early relapse. CD99 has been shown to be overexpressed on T-ALL cells and is considered to be a reliable detector of the disease. However, the relevance of CD99 overexpression in ALL has not been investigated in a functional context. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional capacity of CD99+ cells in childhood ALL and determine the suitability of CD99 as a therapeutic target. Flow cytometric analyses confirmed higher expression of CD99 in ALL blasts (81.5±22.7%) compared to normal hemopoietic stem cells (27.5±21.9%) and T cells (3.1±5.2%, P≤0.004). When ALL cells were sorted and assessed in functional assays, all 4 subpopulations (CD34+/CD99+, CD34+/CD99-, CD34-/CD99+ and CD34-/CD99-) could proliferate in vitro and establish leukemia in NSG mice. Leukemia propagating cell frequencies ranged from 1 in 300 to 1 in 7.4x104 but were highest in the CD34+/CD99- subpopulation. In addition, all four subpopulations had self-renewal ability in secondary NSG mice. Cells in each subpopulation contained patient specific TCR rearrangements and karyotypic changes that were preserved with passage through serial NSG transplants. Despite high levels of CD99 antigen on the majority of blast cells, leukemia initiating capacity in vivo was not restricted to cells that express this protein. Consequently, targeting CD99 alone would not eliminate all T-ALL cells with the ability to maintain the disease. The challenge remains to develop therapeutic strategies that can eliminate all leukemia cells with self-renewal capacity in vivo. PMID:27764235

  12. Tacrolimus and Methotrexate With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Young Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-23

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  15. Acute myeloid leukemia cells polarize macrophages towards a leukemia supporting state in a Growth factor independence 1 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Al-Matary, Yahya S.; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Opalka, Bertram; Hönes, Judith M.; Lams, Robert F.; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Schütte, Judith; Köster, Renata; Lennartz, Klaus; Schroeder, Thomas; Haas, Rainer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    The growth of malignant cells is not only driven by cell-intrinsic factors, but also by the surrounding stroma. Monocytes/Macrophages play an important role in the onset and progression of solid cancers. However, little is known about their role in the development of acute myeloid leukemia, a malignant disease characterized by an aberrant development of the myeloid compartment of the hematopoietic system. It is also unclear which factors are responsible for changing the status of macrophage polarization, thus supporting the growth of malignant cells instead of inhibiting it. We report herein that acute myeloid leukemia leads to the invasion of acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages into the bone marrow and spleen of leukemic patients and mice. In different leukemic mouse models, these macrophages support the in vitro expansion of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines better than macrophages from non-leukemic mice. The grade of macrophage infiltration correlates in vivo with the survival of the mice. We found that the transcriptional repressor Growth factor independence 1 is crucial in the process of macrophage polarization, since its absence impedes macrophage polarization towards a leukemia supporting state and favors an anti-tumor state both in vitro and in vivo. These results not only suggest that acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages play an important role in the progression of acute myeloid leukemia, but also implicate Growth factor independence 1 as a pivotal factor in macrophage polarization. These data may provide new insights and opportunities for novel therapies for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27390361

  16. Novel biological insights in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Durinck, Kaat; Goossens, Steven; Peirs, Sofie; Wallaert, Annelynn; Van Loocke, Wouter; Matthijssens, Filip; Pieters, Tim; Milani, Gloria; Lammens, Tim; Rondou, Pieter; Van Roy, Nadine; De Moerloose, Barbara; Benoit, Yves; Haigh, Jody; Speleman, Frank; Poppe, Bruce; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter

    2015-08-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive type of blood cancer that accounts for about 15% of pediatric and 25% of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases. It is considered as a paradigm for the multistep nature of cancer initiation and progression. Genetic and epigenetic reprogramming events, which transform T-cell precursors into malignant T-ALL lymphoblasts, have been extensively characterized over the past decade. Despite our comprehensive understanding of the genomic landscape of human T-ALL, leukemia patients are still treated by high-dose multiagent chemotherapy, potentially followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Even with such aggressive treatment regimens, which are often associated with considerable acute and long-term side effects, about 15% of pediatric and 40% of adult T-ALL patients still relapse, owing to acquired therapy resistance, and present with very dismal survival perspectives. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms by which residual T-ALL tumor cells survive chemotherapy and act as a reservoir for leukemic progression and hematologic relapse remain poorly understood. Nevertheless, it is expected that enhanced molecular understanding of T-ALL disease biology will ultimately facilitate a targeted therapy driven approach that can reduce chemotherapy-associated toxicities and improve survival of refractory T-ALL patients through personalized salvage therapy. In this review, we summarize recent biological insights into the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL and speculate how the genetic landscape of T-ALL could trigger the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of human T-ALL. PMID:26123366

  17. PHF6 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Palomero, Teresa; Khiabanian, Hossein; Van der Meulen, Joni; Castillo, Mireia; Van Roy, Nadine; De Moerloose, Barbara; Philippé, Jan; González-García, Sara; Toribio, María L; Taghon, Tom; Zuurbier, Linda; Cauwelier, Barbara; Harrison, Christine J; Schwab, Claire; Pisecker, Markus; Strehl, Sabine; Langerak, Anton W; Gecz, Jozef; Sonneveld, Edwin; Pieters, Rob; Paietta, Elisabeth; Rowe, Jacob M; Wiernik, Peter H; Benoit, Yves; Soulier, Jean; Poppe, Bruce; Yao, Xiaopan; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Meijerink, Jules; Rabadan, Raul; Speleman, Frank; Ferrando, Adolfo

    2010-04-01

    Tumor suppressor genes on the X chromosome may skew the gender distribution of specific types of cancer. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with an increased incidence in males. In this study, we report the identification of inactivating mutations and deletions in the X-linked plant homeodomain finger 6 (PHF6) gene in 16% of pediatric and 38% of adult primary T-ALL samples. Notably, PHF6 mutations are almost exclusively found in T-ALL samples from male subjects. Mutational loss of PHF6 is importantly associated with leukemias driven by aberrant expression of the homeobox transcription factor oncogenes TLX1 and TLX3. Overall, these results identify PHF6 as a new X-linked tumor suppressor in T-ALL and point to a strong genetic interaction between PHF6 loss and aberrant expression of TLX transcription factors in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  18. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Complicated by Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Tsunemine, Hiroko; Umeda, Ryosuke; Nohda, Yasuhiro; Sakane, Emiko; Akasaka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kiminari; Izumi, Mayuko; Tsuji, Goh; Kodaka, Taiichi; Itoh, Tomoo; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), a type of systemic arteritis, is rare in Japan. We herein report a case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) complicated by GCA that manifested during chemotherapy for AML. A 77-year-old woman with severe back pain was diagnosed with AML. She achieved complete remission with the resolution of her back pain following induction chemotherapy. However, she developed a headache and fever after consolidation chemotherapy. A diagnosis of GCA was made based on a biopsy of the temporal artery and arterial imaging. GCA should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis in AML patients complicated with a headache and fever of unknown origin. PMID:26831026

  19. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Ovarian reserve in women treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia with chemotherapy, but not stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Brooke V; Missmer, Stacey; Correia, Katharine F; Wadleigh, Martha; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. It is well known that chemotherapy regimens may have a negative effect on ovarian reserve, leading to amenorrhea or premature ovarian failure. There are little data regarding the effects of leukemia chemotherapy on ovarian reserve, specifically in women who received the chemotherapy as adults and are having regular menstrual periods. Our primary objective was to determine if premenopausal women with a history of chemotherapy for leukemia, without subsequent stem cell transplantation, have decreased ovarian reserve. Materials and Methods. We measured ovarian reserve in five women who had been treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and compared them to age-matched control women without a history of chemotherapy. Results. There appeared to be a trend towards lower antimullerian hormone and antral follicle counts and higher follicle-stimulating hormone levels in the leukemia group. Conclusion. Our results indicate that chemotherapy for AML or ALL without stem cell transplantation may compromise ovarian reserve. Although our results should be confirmed by a larger study, oncologists, infertility specialists, and patients should be aware of the potential risks to ovarian function and should be counseled on options for fertility preservation.

  1. Ovarian Reserve in Women Treated for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia or Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Chemotherapy, but Not Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Brooke V.; Missmer, Stacey; Correia, Katharine F.; Wadleigh, Martha; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. It is well known that chemotherapy regimens may have a negative effect on ovarian reserve, leading to amenorrhea or premature ovarian failure. There are little data regarding the effects of leukemia chemotherapy on ovarian reserve, specifically in women who received the chemotherapy as adults and are having regular menstrual periods. Our primary objective was to determine if premenopausal women with a history of chemotherapy for leukemia, without subsequent stem cell transplantation, have decreased ovarian reserve. Materials and Methods. We measured ovarian reserve in five women who had been treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and compared them to age-matched control women without a history of chemotherapy. Results. There appeared to be a trend towards lower antimullerian hormone and antral follicle counts and higher follicle-stimulating hormone levels in the leukemia group. Conclusion. Our results indicate that chemotherapy for AML or ALL without stem cell transplantation may compromise ovarian reserve. Although our results should be confirmed by a larger study, oncologists, infertility specialists, and patients should be aware of the potential risks to ovarian function and should be counseled on options for fertility preservation. PMID:23050166

  2. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Stem Cell Hierarchy and Clonal Evolution in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Fabian; Wojcik, Bartosch; Rieger, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by a remarkable intertumoral, intratumoral, and cellular heterogeneity that might be explained by the cancer stem cell (CSC) and/or the clonal evolution models. CSCs have the ability to generate all different cells of a tumor and to reinitiate the disease after remission. In the clonal evolution model, a consecutive accumulation of mutations starting in a single cell results in competitive growth of subclones with divergent fitness in either a linear or a branching succession. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a highly malignant cancer of the lymphoid system in the bone marrow with a dismal prognosis after relapse. However, stabile phenotypes and functional data of CSCs in ALL, the so-called leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), are highly controversial and the question remains whether there is evidence for their existence. This review discusses the concepts of CSCs and clonal evolution in respect to LICs mainly in B-ALL and sheds light onto the technical controversies in LIC isolation and evaluation. These aspects are important for the development of strategies to eradicate cells with LIC capacity. Common properties of LICs within different subclones need to be defined for future ALL diagnostics, treatment, and disease monitoring to improve the patients' outcome in ALL. PMID:26236346

  4. Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Hemophagocytosis by Leukemic Blasts in T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: An Unusual Finding.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Aradhana; Chandra, Dinesh; Kakkar, Naveen; Das, Sheila; John, M Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Hemophagocytosis shows engulfment of hematopoietic cells by histiocytes and is a property generally associated with cells of the histiocytic lineage. It can be familial or is seen in a wide spectrum of acquired disorders. Hemophagocytosis by leukemic blasts is an uncommon phenomenon and has been reported mainly in acute myeloid leukemia. Its association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia is rare. We present a case of hemophagocytosis by blasts in the bone marrow in a 11 year old boy with T cell-acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27408348

  7. Hemophagocytosis by Leukemic Blasts in T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: An Unusual Finding.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Aradhana; Chandra, Dinesh; Kakkar, Naveen; Das, Sheila; John, M Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Hemophagocytosis shows engulfment of hematopoietic cells by histiocytes and is a property generally associated with cells of the histiocytic lineage. It can be familial or is seen in a wide spectrum of acquired disorders. Hemophagocytosis by leukemic blasts is an uncommon phenomenon and has been reported mainly in acute myeloid leukemia. Its association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia is rare. We present a case of hemophagocytosis by blasts in the bone marrow in a 11 year old boy with T cell-acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  8. Epigenetics in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Peirs, Sofie; Van der Meulen, Joni; Van de Walle, Inge; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank; Poppe, Bruce; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Normal T-cell development is a strictly regulated process in which hematopoietic progenitor cells migrate from the bone marrow to the thymus and differentiate from early T-cell progenitors toward mature and functional T cells. During this maturation process, cooperation between a variety of oncogenes and tumor suppressors can drive immature thymocytes into uncontrolled clonal expansion and cause T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Despite improved insights in T-ALL disease biology and comprehensive characterization of its genetic landscape, clinical care remained largely similar over the past decades and still consists of high-dose multi-agent chemotherapy potentially followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Even with such aggressive treatment regimens, which are often associated with considerable side effects, clinical outcome is still extremely poor in a significant subset of T-ALL patients as a result of therapy resistance or hematological relapses. Recent genetic studies have identified recurrent somatic alterations in genes involved in DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications in T-ALL, suggesting that epigenetic homeostasis is critically required in restraining tumor development in the T-cell lineage. In this review, we provide an overview of the epigenetic regulators that could be implicated in T-ALL disease biology and speculate how the epigenetic landscape of T-ALL could trigger the development of epigenetic-based therapies to further improve the treatment of human T-ALL. PMID:25510271

  9. Heterogeneity of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sabbath, K D; Ball, E D; Larcom, P; Davis, R B; Griffin, J D

    1985-02-01

    The expression of differentiation-associated surface antigens by the clonogenic leukemic cells from 20 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was studied with a panel of seven cytotoxic monoclonal antibodies (anti-Ia, -MY9, -PM-81, -AML-2-23, -Mol, -Mo2, and -MY3). The surface antigen phenotypes of the clonogenic cells were compared with the phenotypes of the whole leukemic cell population, and with the phenotypes of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. In each case the clonogenic leukemic cells were found within a distinct subpopulation that was less "differentiated" than the total cell population. Clonogenic leukemic cells from different patients could be divided into three phenotype groups. In the first group (7 of 20 cases), the clonogenic cells expressed surface antigens characteristic of the normal multipotent colony-forming cell (Ia, MY9). These cases tended to have "undifferentiated" (FAB M1) morphology, and the total cell population generally lacked expression of "late" monocyte antigens such as MY3 and Mo2. A second group (seven cases) of clonogenic cells expressed surface antigens characteristic of an "early" (day 14) colony-forming unit granulocyte-monocyte (CFU-GM), and a third group (six cases) was characteristic of a "late" (day 7) CFU-GM. The cases in these latter two groups tended to have myelomonocytic (FAB M4) morphology and to express monocyte surface antigens. These results suggest that the clonogenic cells are a distinct subpopulation in all cases of AML, and may be derived from normal hematopoietic progenitor cells at multiple points in the differentiation pathway. The results further support the possibility that selected monoclonal antibodies have the potential to purge leukemic clonogenic cells from bone marrow in some AML patients without eliminating critical normal progenitor cells.

  10. Laboratory Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  11. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. Biology and Clinical Relevance of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Andreas; Chan, Steven M; Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2015-07-01

    Evidence for the cancer stem cell model was first demonstrated in xenotransplanted blood and bone marrow samples from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) almost two decades ago, supporting the concept that a rare clonal and mutated leukemic stem cell (LSC) population is sufficient to drive leukemic growth. The inability to eliminate LSCs with conventional therapies is thought to be the primary cause of disease relapse in AML patients, and as such, novel therapies with the ability to target this population are required to improve patient outcomes. An important step towards this goal is the identification of common immunophenotypic surface markers and biological properties that distinguish LSCs from normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) across AML patients. This work has resulted in the development of a large number of potential LSC-selective therapies that target cell surface molecules, intracellular signaling pathways, and the bone marrow microenvironment. Here, we will review the basic biology, immunophenotypic detection, and clinical relevance of LSCs, as well as emerging biological and small-molecule strategies that either directly target LSCs or indirectly target these cells through modulation of their microenvironment.

  13. Flow cytometric analysis of cell-surface and intracellular antigens in the diagnosis of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Aguilera, R; Romero-Guzman, L; Lopez-Santiago, N; Burbano-Ceron, L; Camacho-Del Monte, O; Nieto-Martinez, S

    2001-10-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of flow cytometric detection of intracellular antigens (Ags) in establishing proper lineage affiliation and its contribution to the diagnosis of acute leukemia, we studied 100 consecutive patients in whom acute leukemia was diagnosed between January 1997 and July 1998. Immunological classification was assessed using a three-line panel of monoclonal antibodies for phenotypic characterization of leukemic blast cells as proposed at the First Latin American Consensus Conference for Flow Cytometric Immunophenotyping of Leukemia. We found 74 cases of B-cell lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), seven cases of T-cell ALL, and 19 cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study cytoplasmic (cy) CD79a, cyCD22, cyCD3, and cyMPO were highly sensitive, specific B, T, and myeloid markers that were expressed in virtually all cases of B and T cell ALL and in all subtypes of AML. Applied in combination with immunophenotyping this knowledge led to improvement in diagnostic precision and refinement of immunological classification, ensuring the selection of the most appropriate therapy for the patients studied. In conclusion, intracellular Ags detection was of utmost importance in establishing correct lineage affiliation in cases lacking expression of B, T, or myeloid surface Ags or disclosing equivocal or ambiguous immunophenotypic features and in identifying biphenotypic acute leukemia. In combination with FAB morphology and immunophenotyping, we were able to reliably classify all patients with acute leukemia in this study.

  14. B Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Presenting as a Bile Duct Stricture Diagnosed With Cholangioscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Michael J.; Jiang, Liuyan; Lukens, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Indeterminate biliary strictures represent a diagnostic challenge requiring further work-up, which encompasses a variety of diagnostic modalities. We report a very rare case of B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia presenting as a biliary stricture following remission of acute myeloid leukemia, which was initially treated with allogenic stem cell transplant. After multiple diagnostic modalities were implemented with no success, the use of cholangioscopy-guided biopsies was the key for the final diagnosis.

  15. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Most types of cancers are assigned numbered ... ALL are now named as follows: B-cell ALL Early pre-B ALL (also called pro-B ...

  16. Targeting leukemia stem cells in vivo with antagomiR-126 nanoparticles in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dorrance, A M; Neviani, P; Ferenchak, G J; Huang, X; Nicolet, D; Maharry, K S; Ozer, H G; Hoellarbauer, P; Khalife, J; Hill, E B; Yadav, M; Bolon, B N; Lee, R J; Lee, L J; Croce, C M; Garzon, R; Caligiuri, M A; Bloomfield, C D; Marcucci, G

    2015-11-01

    Current treatments for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are designed to target rapidly dividing blast populations with limited success in eradicating the functionally distinct leukemia stem cell (LSC) population, which is postulated to be responsible for disease resistance and relapse. We have previously reported high miR-126 expression levels to be associated with a LSC-gene expression profile. Therefore, we hypothesized that miR-126 contributes to 'stemness' and is a viable target for eliminating the LSC in AML. Here we first validate the clinical relevance of miR-126 expression in AML by showing that higher expression of this microRNA (miR) is associated with worse outcome in a large cohort of older (⩾60 years) cytogenetically normal AML patients treated with conventional chemotherapy. We then show that miR-126 overexpression characterizes AML LSC-enriched cell subpopulations and contributes to LSC long-term maintenance and self-renewal. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of therapeutic targeting of miR-126 in LSCs with novel targeting nanoparticles containing antagomiR-126 resulting in in vivo reduction of LSCs likely by depletion of the quiescent cell subpopulation. Our findings suggest that by targeting a single miR, that is, miR-126, it is possible to interfere with LSC activity, thereby opening potentially novel therapeutic approaches to treat AML patients.

  17. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Cornelia; Teichler, Sabine; Millahn, Axel; Stiewe, Thorsten; Krause, Michael; Stabla, Kathleen; Ross, Petra; Huynh, Minh; Illmer, Thomas; Mernberger, Marco; Barckhausen, Christina; Neubauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML), generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1) in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC) driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16) and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:25901794

  19. Metabolism of arsenic trioxide in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Khaleghian, Ali; Ghaffari, Seyed H; Ahmadian, Shahin; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2014-10-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) effectively induces complete clinical and molecular remissions in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients and triggers apoptosis in APL cells. The effect induced by As2O3 is also associated with extensive genomic-wide epigenetic changes with large-scale alterations in DNA methylation. We investigated the As2O3 metabolism in association with factors involved in the production of its methylated metabolites in APL-derived cell line, NB4. We used high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique to detect As2O3 metabolites in NB4 cells. The effects of As2O3 on glutathione level, S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) levels were investigated. Also, we studied the expression levels of arsenic methyltransferase (AS3MT) and DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b) by real-time PCR. Our results show that after As2O3 entry into the cell, it was converted into methylated metabolites, mono-methylarsenic (MMA) and dimethylarsenic (DMA). The glutathione (GSH) production was increased in parallel with the methylated metabolites formations. As2O3 treatment inhibited DNMTs (DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b) in dose- and time-dependent manners. The SAH levels in As2O3-treated cells were increased; however, the SAM level was not affected. The present study shows that APL cell is capable of metabolizing As2O3. The continuous formation of intracellular methylated metabolites, the inhibition of DNMTs expression levels and the increase of SAH level by As2O3 biotransformation would probably affect the DNMTs-methylated DNA methylation in a manner related to the extent of DNA hypomethylation. Production of intracellular methylated metabolites and epigenetic changes of DNA methylation during As2O3 metabolism may contribute to the therapeutic effect of As2O3 in APL. PMID:24819152

  20. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or T-cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-02

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia, Acute Leukemia in Remission, or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-16

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  2. The Notch driven long non-coding RNA repertoire in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Durinck, Kaat; Wallaert, Annelynn; Van de Walle, Inge; Van Loocke, Wouter; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Vanhauwaert, Suzanne; Geerdens, Ellen; Benoit, Yves; Van Roy, Nadine; Poppe, Bruce; Soulier, Jean; Cools, Jan; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo; Rondou, Pieter; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Genetic studies in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have uncovered a remarkable complexity of oncogenic and loss-of-function mutations. Amongst this plethora of genetic changes, NOTCH1 activating mutations stand out as the most frequently occurring genetic defect, identified in more than 50% of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, supporting a role as an essential driver for this gene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia oncogenesis. In this study, we aimed to establish a comprehensive compendium of the long non-coding RNA transcriptome under control of Notch signaling. For this purpose, we measured the transcriptional response of all protein coding genes and long non-coding RNAs upon pharmacological Notch inhibition in the human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line CUTLL1 using RNA-sequencing. Similar Notch dependent profiles were established for normal human CD34(+) thymic T-cell progenitors exposed to Notch signaling activity in vivo. In addition, we generated long non-coding RNA expression profiles (array data) from ex vivo isolated Notch active CD34(+) and Notch inactive CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes and from a primary cohort of 15 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with known NOTCH1 mutation status. Integration of these expression datasets with publicly available Notch1 ChIP-sequencing data resulted in the identification of long non-coding RNAs directly regulated by Notch activity in normal and malignant T cells. Given the central role of Notch in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia oncogenesis, these data pave the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies that target hyperactive Notch signaling in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  3. Circulating endothelial cells and their progenitors in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Asmaa Mohammed; Aly, Sanaa Shaker; Altayeb, Hanan Ahmed; Ali, Arwa Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematological malignancy characterized by the accumulation of immature myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Studies are required to investigate the prognostic and predictive value of surrogate biomarkers. Given the importance of angiogenesis in oncology in terms of pathogenesis as well as being a target for treatment, circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are promising candidates to serve as such markers. The aim of the present study was to quantify CECs and EPCs in patients with AML at initial diagnosis and following induction chemotherapy, and to correlate these findings with the response to treatment in AML patients. The present study included 40 patients with de novo AML and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. CECs and EPCs were evaluated by flow cytometry at initial diagnosis and after induction chemotherapy (3+7 protocol for AML other than M3 and all-trans-retinoic acid plus anthracycline for M3 disease). CECs and EPCs were significantly higher in AML patients at diagnosis and after induction chemotherapy than in controls. After induction chemotherapy, CECs and EPCs were significantly decreased compared with the levels at initial diagnosis. Patients who achieved complete response (n=28) had lower initial CEC and EPC levels compared with patients who did not respond to treatment. These results suggest that CEC levels are higher in AML patients and may correlate with disease status and treatment response. Further investigations are required to better determine the predictive value and implication of these cells in AML management. PMID:27602121

  4. Targeting acute myeloid leukemia stem cells: a review and principles for the development of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Pollyea, Daniel A; Gutman, Jonathan A; Gore, Lia; Smith, Clayton A; Jordan, Craig T

    2014-08-01

    Despite an increasingly rich understanding of its pathogenesis, acute myeloid leukemia remains a disease with poor outcomes, overwhelmingly due to disease relapse. In recent years, work to characterize the leukemia stem cell population, the disease compartment most difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and most responsible for relapse, has been undertaken. This, in conjunction with advances in drug development that have allowed for increasingly targeted therapies to be engineered, raises the hope that we are entering an era in which the leukemia stem cell population can be eliminated, resulting in therapeutic cures for acute myeloid leukemia patients. For these therapies to become available, they must be tested in the setting of clinical trials. A long-established clinical trials infrastructure has been employed to shepherd new therapies from proof-of-concept to approval. However, due to the unique features of leukemia stem cells, drugs that are designed to specifically eliminate this population may not be adequately tested when applied to this model. Therefore, in this review article, we seek to identify the relevant features of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells for clinical trialists, discuss potential strategies to target leukemia stem cells, and propose a set of guidelines outlining the necessary elements of clinical trials to allow for the successful testing of stem cell-directed therapies.

  5. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  7. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Giovanni F; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Foà, Robin

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL(+) blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL(+) blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL(+), are worth pursuing further.

  11. S1312, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-14

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

  12. [Infant acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Brethon, Benoît; Cavé, Hélène; Fahd, Mony; Baruchel, André

    2016-03-01

    If acute leukemia is the most frequent cancer in childhood (33%), it remains a very rare diagnosis in infants less than one year old, e.g. less than 5% of cases. At this age, the frequency of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (almost all of B-lineage) is quite similar to the one of myeloblastic forms (AML). Infant leukemia frequently presents with high hyperleucocytosis, major tumoral burden and numerous extra-hematological features, especially in central nervous system and skin. Whatever the lineage, the leukemic cell is often very immature cytologically and immunologically. Rearrangements of the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene, located on band 11q23, are the hallmark of these immature leukemias and confer a particular resistance to conventional approaches, corticosteroids and chemotherapy. The immaturity of infants less than 1-year-old is associated to a decrease of the tolerable dose-intensity of some drugs (anthracyclines, alkylating agents) or asks questions about some procedures like radiotherapy or high dose conditioning regimen, responsible of inacceptable acute and late toxicities. The high level of severe infectious diseases and other high-grade side effects limits also the capacity to cure these infants. The survival of infants less than 1-year-old with AML is only 50% but similar to older children. On the other hand, survival of those with ALL is the same, then quite limited comparing the 80% survival in children over one year. Allogeneic stem cell transplantations are indicated in high-risk subgroups of infant ALL (age below 6 months, high hyperleucocytosis >300.10(9)/L, MLL-rearrangement, initial poor prednisone response). However, morbidity and mortality remain very important and these approaches cannot be extended to all cases. During the neonatal period, the dismal prognosis linked to the high number of primary failures or very early relapses and uncertainties about the late toxicities question physicians about ethics. It is an emergency to

  13. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. [Ribonuclease binase induces death in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Burnysheva, K M; Petrushanko, I Yu; Spirin, P V; Prassolov, V S; Makarov, A A; Mitkevich, V A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial ribonuclease binase is a potential anticancer agent. In the present study, we have determined the toxic effect of binase towards cell lines of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat and CEMss. We have shown that binase induces apoptosis in these cells. At the same time, binase does not cause toxic effects in leukocytes of healthy donors, which suggests that binase activity towards leukemic cells is selective. We have found that the treatment of cancer cells with binase leads to a reduction in reactive oxygen species and transcription factor NFκB levels, and demonstrated that these effects are a common feature of the action of RNases on cancer cells.

  16. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Targeting leukemia stem cells: which pathways drive self-renewal activity in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, M.; Hoofd, C.; Weng, A.P.; Giambra, V.

    2016-01-01

    T-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (t-all) is a malignancy of white blood cells, characterized by an uncontrolled accumulation of T-cell progenitors. During leukemic progression, immature T cells grow abnormally and crowd into the bone marrow, preventing it from making normal blood cells and spilling out into the bloodstream. Recent studies suggest that only discrete cell populations that possess the ability to recreate the entire tumour might be responsible for the initiation and propagation of t-all. Those unique cells are commonly called “cancer stem cells” or, in the case of hematopoietic malignancies, “leukemia stem cells” (lscs). Like normal hematopoietic stem cells, lscs are thought to be capable of self-renewal, during which, by asymmetrical division, they give rise to an identical copy of themselves as well as to a daughter cell that is no longer capable of self-renewal activity and represents a more “differentiated” progeny. Here, we review the main pathways of self-renewal activity in lscs, focusing on their involvement in the maintenance and development of t-all. New stem cell–directed therapies and lsc-targeted agents are also discussed. PMID:26966402

  18. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Edwin C.; Durie, Brian G. M.; Garewal, Harinder S.

    1987-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia frequently associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Data on 11 patients with APL treated at our institution were analyzed and compared with those of 147 published cases. Most had a bleeding diathesis at presentation and evidence of DIC eventually developed in all. Seven patients (64%) showed the t(15;17)(q22;q21) karyotype or a similar translocation. Using a chemotherapy induction regimen containing an anthracycline, complete remission, requiring a total of 14 courses of treatment, was achieved in six patients (55%). The median duration of response and median survival for complete responders were 10 and 15 months, respectively. Three patients (27%) died of bleeding complications during induction therapy. The tritiated-thymidine labeling index of leukemia cells predicted which patients would achieve a complete remission. Review of six studies of 147 patients with APL from the past 12 years supports the use of a chemotherapy induction regimen containing anthracycline or amsacrine and heparin for the treatment of DIC. PMID:3472414

  19. Induction of apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by isolated fractions from strawberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strawberries contain phytochemicals that have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. We investigated the ability of isolated fractions from strawberry extracts to induce apoptotic cell death in three pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) lines, including SEM and RS4;11 cell lines derived fr...

  20. Role of CXCR4-mediated bone marrow colonization in CNS infiltration by T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jost, Tanja Rezzonico; Borga, Chiara; Radaelli, Enrico; Romagnani, Andrea; Perruzza, Lisa; Omodho, Lorna; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Indraccolo, Stefano; Thelen, Marcus; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Infiltration of the central nervous system is a severe trait of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 significantly ameliorates T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in murine models of the disease; however, signaling by CXC chemokine receptor 4 is important in limiting the divagation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells out of the perivascular space into the central nervous system parenchyma. Therefore, Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 potentially may untangle T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from retention outside the brain. Here, we show that leukemic lymphoblasts massively infiltrate cranial bone marrow, with diffusion to the meninges without invasion of the brain parenchyma, in mice that underwent xenotransplantation with human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells or that developed leukemia from transformed hematopoietic progenitors. We tested the hypothesis that T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia neuropathology results from meningeal infiltration through CXC chemokine receptor 4-mediated bone marrow colonization. Inhibition of leukemia engraftment in the bone marrow by pharmacologic CXC chemokine receptor 4 antagonism significantly ameliorated neuropathologic aspects of the disease. Genetic deletion of CXCR4 in murine hematopoietic progenitors abrogated leukemogenesis induced by constitutively active Notch1, whereas lack of CCR6 and CCR7, which have been shown to be involved in T cell and leukemia extravasation into the central nervous system, respectively, did not influence T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development. We hypothesize that lymphoblastic meningeal infiltration as a result of bone marrow colonization is responsible for the degenerative alterations of the neuroparenchyma as well as the alteration of cerebrospinal fluid drainage in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts. Therefore, CXC chemokine receptor 4 may constitute a pharmacologic target for T cell acute lymphoblastic

  1. CXCL12-producing vascular endothelial niches control acute T cell leukemia maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Lauren A.; Tikhonova, Anastasia N.; Hu, Hai; Trimarchi, Thomas; King, Bryan; Gong, Yixiao; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Tsirigos, Aris; Littman, Dan R.; Ferrando, Adolfo; Morrison, Sean J.; Fooksman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The role of the microenvironment in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), or any acute leukemia, is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that T-ALL cells are in direct, stable contact with CXCL12-producing bone marrow stroma. Cxcl12 deletion from vascular endothelial, but not perivascular, cells impeded tumor growth, suggesting a vascular niche for T-ALL. Moreover, genetic targeting of CXCR4 in murine T-ALL after disease onset led to rapid, sustained disease remission, and CXCR4 antagonism suppressed human T-ALL in primary xenografts. Loss of CXCR4 targeted key T-ALL regulators, including the MYC pathway, and decreased leukemia initiating cell activity in vivo. Our data identify a T-ALL niche, and suggest targeting CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling as a powerful therapeutic approach for T-ALL. PMID:26058075

  2. Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement for Predicting Treatment Outcome in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  4. The establishment of a cell line from an acute megakaryoblastic leukemia with evidence of emperipolesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, C.Y.; Pabello, P.; Skinnider, L.F.

    1994-09-01

    Acute megakaryoblstic leukemia is uncommon and comprises about 5% of acute non-lymphoid leukemia in the Franco-American-British (FAB) classification. Cell lines from such leukemias are relatively rare with only 6 reported in the literature. We have established a cell line from a case of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia arising in a 2-year-old child. Surface marker studies of the cells confirm their megakaryoblastic nature with 54.1% of the cells being CD61-positive. The cells have a doubling time of 72 hours. Morphologically they appear blast-like with Wright Giemsa stain and electron microscopy and some have small cytoplasmic blebs. Emperipolesis of one blast into another large one is occasionally seen and review of the original bone marrow specimen also showed emperipolesis of neutrophils into the megakaryoblasts (emperipolesis is a phenomenon in which a cell, usually a lymphocyte or neutrophil, enters another cell, moves about and leaves without undergoing phagocytosis). Karyotyping of the cells showed 45,XX + marker chromosome. The marker chromosome is apparently chromosome 16 with a small segment of a chromosome translocated to the terminal portion of chromosome 16. The origin of the translocated material will be elucidated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This cell line may be useful in studying factors that contribute to the phenomenon of emperipolesis.

  5. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients With Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma

  6. Acute myelogenous leukemia cells with the MLL-ELL translocation convert morphologically and functionally into adherent myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Haruko; Mizutani-Noguchi, Mitsuho; Shirasaki, Ryosuke

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow-myofibroblasts, a major component of bone marrow-stroma, are reported to originate from hematopoietic stem cells. We show in this paper that non-adherent leukemia blasts can change into myofibroblasts. When myeloblasts from two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with a fusion product comprising mixed lineage leukemia and RNA polymerase II elongation factor, were cultured long term, their morphology changed to that of myofibroblasts with similar molecular characteristics to the parental myeloblasts. The original leukemia blasts, when cultured on the leukemia blast-derived myofibroblasts, grew extensively. Leukemia blasts can create their own microenvironment for proliferation.

  7. Cytogenetically aberrant cells in the stem cell compartment (CD34+lin-) in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, B; George, T I; Kavanau, K; Avet-Loiseau, H; Moore, D; Willman, C L; Slovak, M L; Atwater, S; Head, D R; Pallavicini, M G

    1995-08-01

    Leukemia may be viewed as a clonal expansion of blast cells; however, the role of primitive cells and/or stem cells in disease etiology and progression is unclear. We investigated stem cell involvement in leukemia using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), immunofluorescence labeling of hematopoietic subpopulations, and flow cytometric analysis/sorting to discriminate and quantify cytogenetically aberrant stem cells in 12 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and three myelodysplastic (MDS) specimens. Flow cytometric analysis and sorting were used to discriminate and collect a primitive subpopulation enriched in stem cells expressing CD34+ and lacking CD33 and CD38 (CD34+lin-). A subpopulation containing progenitors and differentiating myeloid cells expressed CD34, CD33, and CD38 (CD34+lin+). Nine specimens contained less than 10% CD34+ cells and, thus, were considered to be CD34- leukemias. Mature lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid subpopulations were sorted on the basis of antigen-linked immunofluorescence. Cytogenetically aberrant cells in sorted subpopulations were identified using FISH with enumerator probes selected on the basis of diagnosis karyotype. Cytogenetically aberrant CD34+lin- cells were present at frequencies between 9% and 99% in all specimens. CD34+lin- cytogenetically aberrant cells comprised between 0.05% and 11.9% of the marrow/blood specimens. Cytogenetically aberrant CD34+lin+ cells constituted 0.01% tp 56% of the marrow/blood population. These data demonstrate that aberrant cells are present in primitive CD34+ stem cell compartments, even in CD34- leukemias. Stem cell involvement was confirmed further by sorting lymphoid and erythroid subpopulations from eight specimens in which the predominant leukemic population lacked lymphoid/erythroid differentiation markers. In these specimens, as well as in multiple lineages, suggests involvement of a cell(s) with multilineage capabilities. The ability of aberrant CD34+lin- stem cells to contribute to

  8. Expression of HOX genes in acute leukemia cell lines with and without MLL translocations.

    PubMed

    Quentmeier, Hilmar; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Macleod, Roderick A F; Reinhardt, Julia; Zaborski, Margarete; Drexler, Hans G

    2004-03-01

    In primary cells from acute leukemia patients, expression of the genes MEIS1, HOXA5, HOXA7 and HOXA9 has been reported to be correlated with the occurrence of MLL translocations. It was our aim to find out whether MLL mutant (MLLmu) and MLL wild-type (MLLwt) acute leukemia-derived cell lines might likewise be discriminated on the basis of HOX gene expression. Southern blot analysis, performed to verify the MLL status of the cells, showed that NOMO-1 was the only cell line not tested previously carrying a rearranged MLL gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that this cell line exhibited a reciprocal t(9;11)(q23;p22). Sequencing of RT-PCR products thereof identified unique MLL exon 10/AF-9 exon 5 fusion transcripts. We divided the acute leukemia-derived cell lines (n = 37) according to the results of Southern blot analysis into MLLmu (n = 19) and MLLwt (n = 18). Expression of HOX genes was then analyzed by applying reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Northern and Western blot analyses. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines expressed the HOX genes significantly more often than acute lymphoblastic (ALL) cell lines. In ALL, cells with MLL translocations expressed the genes 4 times more often than MLLwt cells. Most distinct was the correlation between MLL status and MEIS1 expression in ALL-derived cell lines: 8/8 MLLmu but 0/10 MLLwt cell lines expressed MEIS1. Northern and Western blot analysis confirmed that also HOXA9 and FLT3 were significantly more often and stronger expressed in MLLmu than in MLLwt ALL cell lines. These results suggest that MLL aberrations may regulate MEIS1 and HOXA9 gene expression in ALL-derived cell lines, while AML-derived cell lines express these genes independently of the MLL status. PMID:15160920

  9. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  10. Lapatinib induces autophagic cell death and differentiation in acute myeloblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Fang, Li-Wen; Su, Wen-Chi; Hsu, Wen-Yi; Yang, Kai-Chien; Huang, Huey-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Lapatinib is an oral-form dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB/Her) superfamily members with anticancer activity. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanism of action of lapatinib on several human leukemia cells lines, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. We found that lapatinib inhibited the growth of human AML U937, HL-60, NB4, CML KU812, MEG-01, and ALL Jurkat T cells. Among these leukemia cell lines, lapatinib induced apoptosis in HL-60, NB4, and Jurkat cells, but induced nonapoptotic cell death in U937, K562, and MEG-01 cells. Moreover, lapatinib treatment caused autophagic cell death as shown by positive acridine orange staining, the massive formation of vacuoles as seen by electronic microscopy, and the upregulation of LC3-II, ATG5, and ATG7 in AML U937 cells. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine and knockdown of ATG5, ATG7, and Beclin-1 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) partially rescued lapatinib-induced cell death. In addition, the induction of phagocytosis and ROS production as well as the upregulation of surface markers CD14 and CD68 was detected in lapatinib-treated U937 cells, suggesting the induction of macrophagic differentiation in AML U937 cells by lapatinib. We also noted the synergistic effects of the use of lapatinib and cytotoxic drugs in U937 leukemia cells. These results indicate that lapatinib may have potential for development as a novel antileukemia agent. PMID:27499639

  11. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). PMID:27000734

  12. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  13. Thrombosis and acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Solís, Erick

    2012-04-01

    Thrombosis is a common complication in patients with acute leukemia. While the presence of central venous lines, concomitant steroids, the use of Escherichia coli asparaginase and hereditary thrombophilic abnormalities are known risk factors for thrombosis in children, information on the pathogenesis, risk factors, and clinical outcome of thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still scarce. Expert consensus and guidelines regarding leukemia-specific risk factors, thrombosis prevention, and treatment strategies, as well as optimal type of central venous catheter in acute leukemia patients are required. It is likely that each subtype of acute leukemia represents a different setting for the development of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. This is perhaps due to a combination of different disease-specific pathogenic mechanisms of thrombosis, including the type of chemotherapy protocol chosen, the underlying patients health, associated risk factors, as well as the biology of the disease itself. The risk of thrombosis may also vary according to ethnicity and prevalence of hereditary risk factors for thrombosis; thus, it is advisable for Latin American, Asian, and African countries to report on their specific patient population. PMID:22507812

  14. Antileukemic Effect of Tualang Honey on Acute and Chronic Leukemia Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Nik Man, Nik Muhd Khuzaimi; Hassan, Rosline; Ang, Cheng Yong; Abdullah, Abu Dzarr; Mohd Radzi, Muhammad Amiro Rasheeq; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Complementary medicine using natural product as antitumor is on the rise. Much research has been performed on Tualang Honey and it was shown to have therapeutic potential in wound healing, and antimicrobial activity and be antiproliferative against several cancer models such as human osteosarcoma (HOS), human breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231), and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines. To date, there was limited study on antileukemic properties of Tualang (Koompassia excelsa) Honey. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antileukemic effect of Tualang Honey on acute and chronic leukemia cell lines. Leukemia cell lines (K562 and MV4-11) and human mononuclear cell isolated from peripheral blood were grown in RPM1 1640 culture medium. The cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of Tualang Honey. After incubation, the evaluation of viability and apoptosis was performed. The morphological changes of leukemia cells were the presence of cytoplasmic blebs followed by apoptotic bodies and round shape of cells. IC50 against K562 and MV4-11 was determined. Tualang Honey gave 53.9% and 50.6% apoptosis activity on K562 and MV4-11, respectively, while on human mononuclear cell it was 37.4%. Tualang Honey has the apoptosis-inducing ability for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (K562 and MV4-11) cell lines.

  15. Antileukemic Effect of Tualang Honey on Acute and Chronic Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Nik Man, Nik Muhd Khuzaimi; Hassan, Rosline; Ang, Cheng Yong; Abdullah, Abu Dzarr; Mohd Radzi, Muhammad Amiro Rasheeq; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Complementary medicine using natural product as antitumor is on the rise. Much research has been performed on Tualang Honey and it was shown to have therapeutic potential in wound healing, and antimicrobial activity and be antiproliferative against several cancer models such as human osteosarcoma (HOS), human breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231), and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines. To date, there was limited study on antileukemic properties of Tualang (Koompassia excelsa) Honey. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antileukemic effect of Tualang Honey on acute and chronic leukemia cell lines. Leukemia cell lines (K562 and MV4-11) and human mononuclear cell isolated from peripheral blood were grown in RPM1 1640 culture medium. The cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of Tualang Honey. After incubation, the evaluation of viability and apoptosis was performed. The morphological changes of leukemia cells were the presence of cytoplasmic blebs followed by apoptotic bodies and round shape of cells. IC50 against K562 and MV4-11 was determined. Tualang Honey gave 53.9% and 50.6% apoptosis activity on K562 and MV4-11, respectively, while on human mononuclear cell it was 37.4%. Tualang Honey has the apoptosis-inducing ability for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (K562 and MV4-11) cell lines. PMID:26613081

  16. Antileukemic Effect of Tualang Honey on Acute and Chronic Leukemia Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Nik Man, Nik Muhd Khuzaimi; Hassan, Rosline; Ang, Cheng Yong; Abdullah, Abu Dzarr; Mohd Radzi, Muhammad Amiro Rasheeq; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Complementary medicine using natural product as antitumor is on the rise. Much research has been performed on Tualang Honey and it was shown to have therapeutic potential in wound healing, and antimicrobial activity and be antiproliferative against several cancer models such as human osteosarcoma (HOS), human breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231), and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines. To date, there was limited study on antileukemic properties of Tualang (Koompassia excelsa) Honey. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antileukemic effect of Tualang Honey on acute and chronic leukemia cell lines. Leukemia cell lines (K562 and MV4-11) and human mononuclear cell isolated from peripheral blood were grown in RPM1 1640 culture medium. The cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of Tualang Honey. After incubation, the evaluation of viability and apoptosis was performed. The morphological changes of leukemia cells were the presence of cytoplasmic blebs followed by apoptotic bodies and round shape of cells. IC50 against K562 and MV4-11 was determined. Tualang Honey gave 53.9% and 50.6% apoptosis activity on K562 and MV4-11, respectively, while on human mononuclear cell it was 37.4%. Tualang Honey has the apoptosis-inducing ability for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (K562 and MV4-11) cell lines. PMID:26613081

  17. Role of caspase-10 in the death of acute leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenjian; Dong, Aishu; Pan, Xiahui; Lin, Xiaoji; Lin, Ying; He, Muqing; Zhu, Baoling; Jin, Liming; Yao, Rongxing

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy can protect cells from stress, but can also induce cancer cell death. Caspase-10 is now considered to be a factor that is associated with autophagy in cancer. The present study therefore investigated whether caspase-10 affects autophagy in acute leukemia cells. The rates of survival vs. apoptosis in acute leukemia HL-60 and Jurkat cells treated with drugs were tested using cell viability assays and flow cytometry, and the levels of caspase-3 and −10 were tested by western blotting. In HL-60 cells that were treated with chemotherapy drugs combined with a caspase-10 inhibitor, the rate of survival decreased significantly compared with HL-60 cells treated with chemotherapy drugs alone. In contrast, the rate of survival of Jurkat cells treated with chemotherapy drugs combined with the caspase-10 inhibitor increased significantly compared with Jurkat cells treated with chemotherapy drugs alone. The results of the flow cytometry and western blotting showed that the changes in the survival rate may be caused by a change in the amount of apoptosis occurring in the Jurkat cells treated with chemotherapy drugs combined with the caspase-10 inhibitor. However, in HL-60 cells undergoing this combination treatment, the change in the survival rate was not caused by a change in the rate of apoptosis. When HL-60 cells were treated with the chemotherapy drugs combined with the caspase-10 inhibitor and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine, the survival rate increased, whereas the rate of apoptosis did not change. These results show that caspase-10 may be associated with autophagy in acute myeloid leukemia cells, but not in acute lymphatic leukemia cells. PMID:27446483

  18. Transcription factor RUNX1 promotes survival of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Goyama, Susumu; Schibler, Janet; Cunningham, Lea; Zhang, Yue; Rao, Yalan; Nishimoto, Nahoko; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Olsson, Andre; Wunderlich, Mark; Link, Kevin A.; Mizukawa, Benjamin; Grimes, H. Leighton; Kurokawa, Mineo; Liu, P. Paul; Huang, Gang; Mulloy, James C.

    2013-01-01

    RUNX1 is generally considered a tumor suppressor in myeloid neoplasms. Inactivating RUNX1 mutations have frequently been found in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no somatic RUNX1 alteration was found in AMLs with leukemogenic fusion proteins, such as core-binding factor (CBF) leukemia and MLL fusion leukemia, raising the possibility that RUNX1 could actually promote the growth of these leukemia cells. Using normal human cord blood cells and those expressing leukemogenic fusion proteins, we discovered a dual role of RUNX1 in myeloid leukemogenesis. RUNX1 overexpression inhibited the growth of normal cord blood cells by inducing myeloid differentiation, whereas a certain level of RUNX1 activity was required for the growth of AML1-ETO and MLL-AF9 cells. Using a mouse genetic model, we also showed that the combined loss of Runx1/Cbfb inhibited leukemia development induced by MLL-AF9. RUNX2 could compensate for the loss of RUNX1. The survival effect of RUNX1 was mediated by BCL2 in MLL fusion leukemia. Our study unveiled an unexpected prosurvival role for RUNX1 in myeloid leukemogenesis. Inhibiting RUNX1 activity rather than enhancing it could be a promising therapeutic strategy for AMLs with leukemogenic fusion proteins. PMID:23979164

  19. Polydatin Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Growth of Acute Monocytic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunmei; Luo, Yuan; Lu, Jie; Wang, Yingchao; Sheng, Guangyao

    2016-04-01

    Polydatin (PD), a component isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum, has various activities such as inhibiting platelet aggregation, lowering level of blood lipid, reducing lipid peroxidation, and so on. However, the antitumor activity of PD has been poorly reported. In the present study, effect of PD on cell proliferation was evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8, and cell cycle and apoptosis were investigated by flow cytometry. Meanwhile, the protein expression level of Bc1-2, Bax, cyclin A, cyclin B, and cyclin D1, which associated with apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by Western blotting. Results show that PD could effectively inhibit the growth, arrest cells in S phase, and induce apoptosis of acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1; meanwhile, expression of cyclin D1 and Bc1-2 decreased significantly, and expression of Bax and cyclin A increased notably. All results suggest that PD maybe a potential therapeutic strategy for acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:26616494

  20. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  2. Duplication of the MYB oncogene in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lahortiga, Idoya; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Graux, Carlos; Cauwelier, Barbara; Lambert, Frederic; Mentens, Nicole; Beverloo, H Berna; Pieters, Rob; Speleman, Frank; Odero, Maria D; Bauters, Marijke; Froyen, Guy; Marynen, Peter; Vandenberghe, Peter; Wlodarska, Iwona; Meijerink, Jules P P; Cools, Jan

    2007-05-01

    We identified a duplication of the MYB oncogene in 8.4% of individuals with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and in five T-ALL cell lines. The duplication is associated with a threefold increase in MYB expression, and knockdown of MYB expression initiates T cell differentiation. Our results identify duplication of MYB as an oncogenic event and suggest that MYB could be a therapeutic target in human T-ALL.

  3. Metabolic effects of acute thiamine depletion are reversed by rapamycin in breast and leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuqian; Miriyala, Sumitra; Keaton, Mignon A; Jordan, Craig T; Wiedl, Christina; Clair, Daret K St; Moscow, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Thiamine-dependent enzymes (TDEs) control metabolic pathways that are frequently altered in cancer and therefore present cancer-relevant targets. We have previously shown that the recombinant enzyme thiaminase cleaves and depletes intracellular thiamine, has growth inhibitory activity against leukemia and breast cancer cell lines, and that its growth inhibitory effects were reversed in leukemia cell lines by rapamycin. Now, we first show further evidence of thiaminase therapeutic potential by demonstrating its activity against breast and leukemia xenografts, and against a primary leukemia xenograft. We therefore further explored the metabolic effects of thiaminase in combination with rapamycin in leukemia and breast cell lines. Thiaminase decreased oxygen consumption rate and increased extracellular acidification rate, consistent with the inhibitory effect of acute thiamine depletion on the activity of the TDEs pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes; these effects were reversed by rapamycin. Metabolomic studies demonstrated intracellular thiamine depletion and the presence of the thiazole cleavage product in thiaminase-treated cells, providing validation of the experimental procedures. Accumulation of ribose and ribulose in both cell lines support the thiaminase-mediated suppression of the TDE transketolase. Interestingly, thiaminase suppression of another TDE, branched chain amino ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH), showed very different patterns in the two cell lines: in RS4 leukemia cells it led to an increase in BCKDH substrates, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cells it led to a decrease in BCKDH products. Immunoblot analyses showed corresponding differences in expression of BCKDH pathway enzymes, and partial protection of thiaminase growth inhibition by gabapentin indicated that BCKDH inhibition may be a mechanism of thiaminase-mediated toxicity. Surprisingly, most of thiaminase-mediated metabolomic effects were also reversed by rapamycin

  4. Transcription factor networks in B-cell differentiation link development to acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Rajesh; Prasad, Mahadesh A J; Ungerbäck, Jonas; Sigvardsson, Mikael

    2015-07-01

    B-lymphocyte development in the bone marrow is controlled by the coordinated action of transcription factors creating regulatory networks ensuring activation of the B-lymphoid program and silencing of alternative cell fates. This process is tightly connected to malignant transformation because B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells display a pronounced block in differentiation resulting in the expansion of immature progenitor cells. Over the last few years, high-resolution analysis of genetic changes in leukemia has revealed that several key regulators of normal B-cell development, including IKZF1, TCF3, EBF1, and PAX5, are genetically altered in a large portion of the human B-lineage acute leukemias. This opens the possibility of directly linking the disrupted development as well as aberrant gene expression patterns in leukemic cells to molecular functions of defined transcription factors in normal cell differentiation. This review article focuses on the roles of transcription factors in early B-cell development and their involvement in the formation of human leukemia.

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a low number of platelets. A white blood cell count ( WBC ) can be high, low, or normal. Bone ... and overall health How high your white blood cell count was Certain genetic changes in the leukemia cells ...

  6. Stroma-supported culture in childhood B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells predicts treatment outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, M; Manabe, A; Pui, C H; Behm, F G; Raimondi, S C; Hancock, M L; Mahmoud, H; Crist, W M; Campana, D

    1996-01-01

    We developed a stroma cell culture system that suppresses apoptosis of malignant cells from cases of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. By multiparameter flow cytometric measurements of cell recovery after culture on stromal layers, we assessed the growth potential of 70 cases of newly diagnosed B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia and related the findings of treatment outcome in a single program of chemotherapy. The numbers of leukemic cells recovered after 7 d of culture ranged from < 1 to 292% (median, 91%). The basis of poor cell recoveries from stromal layers appeared to be a propensity of the lymphoblasts to undergo apoptosis. The probability of event-free survival at 4 yr of follow-up was 50 +/- 9% (SE) among patients with higher cell recoveries ( > 91%), and 94 +/- 6% among those with reduced cell recoveries (+/- 91%; P = 0.0003). The prognostic value of leukemic cell recovery after culture exceeded estimates for all other recognized high-risk features and remained the most significant after adjustment with all competing covariates. Thus, the survival ability of leukemic cells on bone marrow-derived stromal layers reflects aggressiveness of the disease and is a powerful, independent predictor of treatment outcome in children with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:8609232

  7. Characterization of miRNomes in Acute and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qian; Yang, Yadong; Wang, Hai; Li, Jie; Wang, Shaobin; Li, Yanming; Yang, Yaran; Cai, Kan; Ruan, Xiuyan; Yan, Jiangwei; Hu, Songnian; Fang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid leukemias are highly diverse diseases and have been shown to be associated with microRNA (miRNA) expression aberrations. The present study involved an in-depth miRNome analysis of two human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, HL-60 and THP-1, and one human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell line, K562, via massively parallel signature sequencing. mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines that were established previously in our lab facilitated an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression patterns. miRNA expression profiling followed by differential expression analysis and target prediction suggested numerous miRNA signatures in AML and CML cell lines. Some miRNAs may act as either tumor suppressors or oncomiRs in AML and CML by targeting key genes in AML and CML pathways. Expression patterns of cell type-specific miRNAs could partially reflect the characteristics of K562, HL-60 and THP-1 cell lines, such as actin filament-based processes, responsiveness to stimulus and phagocytic activity. miRNAs may also regulate myeloid differentiation, since they usually suppress differentiation regulators. Our study provides a resource to further investigate the employment of miRNAs in human leukemia subtyping, leukemogenesis and myeloid development. In addition, the distinctive miRNA signatures may be potential candidates for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of myeloid leukemias. PMID:24755403

  8. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  9. Bone marrow niche-mediated survival of leukemia stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia: Yin and Yang

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Sheng; Carter, Bing Z.; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by the accumulation of circulating immature blasts that exhibit uncontrolled growth, lack the ability to undergo normal differentiation, and have decreased sensitivity to apoptosis. Accumulating evidence shows the bone marrow (BM) niche is critical to the maintenance and retention of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), including leukemia stem cells (LSC), and an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that crosstalk between LSC and the stromal cells associated with this niche greatly influences leukemia initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Undeniably, stromal cells in the BM niche provide a sanctuary in which LSC can acquire a drug-resistant phenotype and thereby evade chemotherapy-induced death. Yin and Yang, the ancient Chinese philosophical concept, vividly portrays the intricate and dynamic interactions between LSC and the BM niche. In fact, LSC-induced microenvironmental reprogramming contributes significantly to leukemogenesis. Thus, identifying the critical signaling pathways involved in these interactions will contribute to target optimization and combinatorial drug treatment strategies to overcome acquired drug resistance and prevent relapse following therapy. In this review, we describe some of the critical signaling pathways mediating BM niche-LSC interaction, including SDF1/CXCL12, Wnt/β-catenin, VCAM/VLA-4/NF-κB, CD44, and hypoxia as a newly-recognized physical determinant of resistance, and outline therapeutic strategies for overcoming these resistance factors. PMID:27458532

  10. Bone marrow niche-mediated survival of leukemia stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia: Yin and Yang.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong-Sheng; Carter, Bing Z; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by the accumulation of circulating immature blasts that exhibit uncontrolled growth, lack the ability to undergo normal differentiation, and have decreased sensitivity to apoptosis. Accumulating evidence shows the bone marrow (BM) niche is critical to the maintenance and retention of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), including leukemia stem cells (LSC), and an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that crosstalk between LSC and the stromal cells associated with this niche greatly influences leukemia initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Undeniably, stromal cells in the BM niche provide a sanctuary in which LSC can acquire a drug-resistant phenotype and thereby evade chemotherapy-induced death. Yin and Yang, the ancient Chinese philosophical concept, vividly portrays the intricate and dynamic interactions between LSC and the BM niche. In fact, LSC-induced microenvironmental reprogramming contributes significantly to leukemogenesis. Thus, identifying the critical signaling pathways involved in these interactions will contribute to target optimization and combinatorial drug treatment strategies to overcome acquired drug resistance and prevent relapse following therapy. In this review, we describe some of the critical signaling pathways mediating BM niche-LSC interaction, including SDF1/CXCL12, Wnt/β-catenin, VCAM/VLA-4/NF-κB, CD44, and hypoxia as a newly-recognized physical determinant of resistance, and outline therapeutic strategies for overcoming these resistance factors. PMID:27458532

  11. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kum Ja; Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; Tulpule, Sunil; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug warnings and toxicity management. PMID:27601914

  12. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kum Ja; Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; Tulpule, Sunil; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug warnings and toxicity management.

  13. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kum Ja; Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; Tulpule, Sunil; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug warnings and toxicity management. PMID:27601914

  14. Clonal evolution enhances leukemia propagating cell frequency in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia through Akt/mTORC1 pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Jessica S.; Liu, Sali; Wilder, Jayme L.; Dobrinski, Kimberly P.; Lobbardi, Riadh; Moore, Finola E.; Martinez, Sarah A.; Chen, Eleanor Y.; Lee, Charles; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Clonal evolution and intratumoral heterogeneity drive cancer progression through unknown molecular mechanisms. To address this issue, functional differences between single T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) clones were assessed using a zebrafish transgenic model. Functional variation was observed within individual clones, with a minority of clones enhancing growth rate and leukemia propagating potential with time. Akt pathway activation was acquired in a subset of these evolved clones, which increased the number of leukemia propagating cells through activating mTORC1, elevated growth rate likely by stabilizing the Myc protein, and rendered cells resistant to dexamethasone, which was reversed by combined treatment with an Akt inhibitor. Thus, T-ALL clones spontaneously and continuously evolve to drive leukemia progression even in the absence of therapy-induced selection. PMID:24613413

  15. [Key molecular mechanisms associated with cell malignant transformation in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Orlova, N N; Lebedev, T D; Spirin, P V; Prassolov, V S

    2016-01-01

    Cancer, along with cardiovascular disorders, is one of the most important problems of healthcare. Pathologies of the hematopoietic system are the most prevalent in patients under 30 years of age, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is widespread and difficult to treat. The review considers the mechanisms that play a significant role in AML cell malignant transformation and shows the contributions of certain genes to both remission and resistance of AML cells to various treatments.

  16. Mobilization of CD34+CD38- hematopoietic stem cells after priming in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Plesa, Adriana; Chelghoum, Youcef; Mattei, Eve; Labussière, Hélène; Elhamri, Mohamed; Cannas, Giovanna; Morisset, Stéphane; Tagoug, Inès; Michallet, Mauricette; Dumontet, Charles; Thomas, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the different CD34+ cell subsets after priming by chemotherapy granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (± G-CSF) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. METHODS: Peripheral blood and bone marrow samples were harvested in 8 acute myeloid leukemia patients during and after induction chemotherapy. The CD34/CD38 cell profile was analyzed by multi-parameter flow cytometry. Adhesion profile was made using CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) (CD184), VLA-4 (CD49d/CD29) and CD47. RESULTS: Chemotherapy ± G-CSF mobilized immature cells (CD34+CD38− population), while the more mature cells (CD34+CD38low and CD34+CD38+ populations) decreased progressively after treatment. Circulating CD34+ cells tended to be more sensitive to chemotherapy after priming with G-CSF. CD34+ cell mobilization was correlated with a gradual increase in CXCR4 and CD47 expression, suggesting a role in cell protection and the capacity of homing back to the marrow. CONCLUSION: Chemotherapy ± G-CSF mobilizes into the circulation CD34+ bone marrow cells, of which, the immature CD34+CD38– cell population. Further manipulations of these interactions may be a means with which to control the trafficking of leukemia stem cells to improve patients’ outcomes. PMID:24179607

  17. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Munker, Reinhold; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Hai Lin; de Lima, Marcos; Khoury, Hanna J; Gale, Robert Peter; Maziarz, Richard T; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Weisdorf, Daniel; Saber, Wael

    2016-06-01

    Acute biphenotypic leukemias or mixed phenotype acute leukemias (MPAL) are rare and considered high risk. The optimal treatment and the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) are unclear. Most prior case series include only modest numbers of patients who underwent transplantation. We analyzed the outcome of 95 carefully characterized alloHCT patients with MPAL reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1996 and 2012. The median age was 20 years (range, 1 to 68). Among the 95 patients, 78 were in first complete remission (CR1) and 17 were in second complete remission (CR2). Three-year overall survival (OS) of 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 57 to 76), leukemia-free survival of 56% (95% CI, 46 to 66), relapse incidence of 29% (95% CI, 20 to 38), and nonrelapse mortality of 15% (95% CI, 9 to 23) were encouraging. OS was best in younger patients (<20 years), but no significant differences were observed between those 20 to 40 years of age and those who were 40 years or older. A matched-pair analysis showed similar outcomes comparing MPAL cases to 375 acute myelogenous leukemia or 359 acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases. MPAL patients had more acute and a trend for more chronic graft-versus-host disease. No difference was observed between patients who underwent transplantation in CR1 versus those who underwent transplantation in CR2. AlloHCT is a promising treatment option for pediatric and adult patients with MPAL with encouraging long-term survival. PMID:26903380

  18. Clonal analysis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with "cytogenetically independent" cell populations.

    PubMed Central

    Pui, C H; Raskind, W H; Kitchingman, G R; Raimondi, S C; Behm, F G; Murphy, S B; Crist, W M; Fialkow, P J; Williams, D L

    1989-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is generally regarded as a clonal disease in which a single abnormal progenitor cell gives rise to neoplastic progeny. Five of 463 cases of childhood ALL with adequately banded leukemic cells were found to have two cytogenetically independent cell populations. In addition, two of the four cases tested had more than two rearranged immunoglobulin genes and (or) T cell receptor genes. To investigate the clonality of these unusual leukemias, we examined the neoplastic cells for X-linked markers extrinsic to the disease. Leukemic cells from each of the three patients heterozygous for an X-linked, restriction fragment length polymorphism showed a single active parental allele, suggesting that both apparently independent cell populations developed from a common progenitor. These cases provide evidence that leukemogenesis involves a multistep process of mutation and suggest that karyotypic abnormalities may be a late event of malignant transformation. Images PMID:2566623

  19. IGFBP7 induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia cells and synergizes with chemotherapy in suppression of leukemia cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, H JMP; de Leeuw, D C; Roemer, M GM; Denkers, F; Pouwels, W; Rutten, A; Celie, P H; Ossenkoppele, G J; Schuurhuis, G J; Smit, L

    2014-01-01

    Despite high remission rates after chemotherapy, only 30–40% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients survive 5 years after diagnosis. This extremely poor prognosis of AML is mainly caused by treatment failure due to chemotherapy resistance. Chemotherapy resistance can be caused by various features including activation of alternative signaling pathways, evasion of cell death or activation of receptor tyrosine kinases such as the insulin growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R). Here we have studied the role of the insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-7 (IGFBP7), a tumor suppressor and part of the IGF-1R axis, in AML. We report that IGFBP7 sensitizes AML cells to chemotherapy-induced cell death. Moreover, overexpression of IGFBP7 as well as addition of recombinant human IGFBP7 is able to reduce the survival of AML cells by the induction of a G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This effect is mainly independent from IGF-1R activation, activated Akt and activated Erk. Importantly, AML patients with high IGFBP7 expression have a better outcome than patients with low IGFBP7 expression, indicating a positive role for IGFBP7 in treatment and outcome of AML. Together, this suggests that the combination of IGFBP7 and chemotherapy might potentially overcome conventional AML drug resistance and thus might improve AML patient survival. PMID:24967962

  20. Prophylaxis and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Runzhe; Campbell, Jos L; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    Relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia remains a major cause of death in patients following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Several factors may affect the concurrence and outcome of relapse, which include graft-versus-host disease, minimal residual disease or intrinsic factors of the disease, and transplantation characteristics. The mainstay of relapse prevention and treatment is donor leukocyte infusions, targeted therapies, second transplantation, and other novel therapies. In this review, we mainly focus on addressing the impact of graft-versus-host disease on relapse and the prophylaxis and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapse following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We also make recommendations for critical strategies to prevent relapse after transplantation and challenges that must be addressed to ensure success. PMID:25709473

  1. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  2. SPARC promotes leukemic cell growth and predicts acute myeloid leukemia outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alachkar, Houda; Santhanam, Ramasamy; Maharry, Kati; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Huang, Xiaomeng; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mendler, Jason H.; Benito, Juliana M.; Hickey, Christopher; Neviani, Paolo; Dorrance, Adrienne M.; Anghelina, Mirela; Khalife, Jihane; Tarighat, Somayeh S.; Volinia, Stefano; Whitman, Susan P.; Paschka, Peter; Hoellerbauer, Pia; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Han, Lina; Bolon, Brad N.; Blum, William; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Carroll, Andrew J.; Perrotti, Danilo; Andreeff, Michael; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Konopleva, Marina; Garzon, Ramiro; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Marcucci, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (osteonectin) (SPARC) gene, which encodes a matricellular protein that participates in normal tissue remodeling, is associated with a variety of diseases including cancer, but the contribution of SPARC to malignant growth remains controversial. We previously reported that SPARC was among the most upregulated genes in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients with gene-expression profiles predictive of unfavorable outcome, such as mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2-R172) and overexpression of the oncogenes brain and acute leukemia, cytoplasmic (BAALC) and v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (ERG). In contrast, SPARC was downregulated in CN-AML patients harboring mutations in nucleophosmin (NPM1) that are associated with favorable prognosis. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that SPARC expression is clinically relevant in AML. Here, we found that SPARC overexpression is associated with adverse outcome in CN-AML patients and promotes aggressive leukemia growth in murine models of AML. In leukemia cells, SPARC expression was mediated by the SP1/NF-κB transactivation complex. Furthermore, secreted SPARC activated the integrin-linked kinase/AKT (ILK/AKT) pathway, likely via integrin interaction, and subsequent β-catenin signaling, which is involved in leukemia cell self-renewal. Pharmacologic inhibition of the SP1/NF-κB complex resulted in SPARC downregulation and leukemia growth inhibition. Together, our data indicate that evaluation of SPARC expression has prognosticative value and SPARC is a potential therapeutic target for AML. PMID:24590286

  3. AZD1775 sensitizes T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to cytarabine by promoting apoptosis over DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Ford, James B; Baturin, Dmitry; Burleson, Tamara M; Van Linden, Annemie A; Kim, Yong-Mi; Porter, Christopher C

    2015-09-29

    While some children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have excellent prognoses, the prognosis for adults and children with T cell ALL is more guarded. Treatment for T-ALL is heavily dependent upon antimetabolite chemotherapeutics, including cytarabine. Targeted inhibition of WEE1 with AZD1775 has emerged as a strategy to sensitize cancer cells to cytarabine and other chemotherapeutics. We sought to determine if this strategy would be effective for T-ALL with clinically relevant anti-leukemia agents. We found that AZD1775 sensitizes T-ALL cells to several traditional anti-leukemia agents, acting synergistically with cytarabine by enhancing DNA damage and apoptosis. In addition to increased phosphorylation of H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX), AZD1775 led to increased phosphorylation of H2AX at tyrosine 142, a signaling event associated with promotion of apoptosis over DNA repair. In a xenograft model of T-ALL, the addition of AZD1775 to cytarabine slowed leukemia progression and prolonged survival. Inhibition of WEE1 with AZD1775 sensitizes T-ALL to several anti-leukemia agents, particularly cytarabine and that mechanistically, AZD1775 promotes apoptosis over DNA repair in cells treated with cytarabine. These data support the development of clinical trials including AZD1775 in combination with conventional chemotherapy for acute leukemia. PMID:26334102

  4. Segmentation and Classification of Bone Marrow Cells Images Using Contextual Information for Medical Diagnosis of Acute Leukemias.

    PubMed

    Reta, Carolina; Altamirano, Leopoldo; Gonzalez, Jesus A; Diaz-Hernandez, Raquel; Peregrina, Hayde; Olmos, Ivan; Alonso, Jose E; Lobato, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Morphological identification of acute leukemia is a powerful tool used by hematologists to determine the family of such a disease. In some cases, experienced physicians are even able to determine the leukemia subtype of the sample. However, the identification process may have error rates up to 40% (when classifying acute leukemia subtypes) depending on the physician's experience and the sample quality. This problem raises the need to create automatic tools that provide hematologists with a second opinion during the classification process. Our research presents a contextual analysis methodology for the detection of acute leukemia subtypes from bone marrow cells images. We propose a cells separation algorithm to break up overlapped regions. In this phase, we achieved an average accuracy of 95% in the evaluation of the segmentation process. In a second phase, we extract descriptive features to the nucleus and cytoplasm obtained in the segmentation phase in order to classify leukemia families and subtypes. We finally created a decision algorithm that provides an automatic diagnosis for a patient. In our experiments, we achieved an overall accuracy of 92% in the supervised classification of acute leukemia families, 84% for the lymphoblastic subtypes, and 92% for the myeloblastic subtypes. Finally, we achieved accuracies of 95% in the diagnosis of leukemia families and 90% in the diagnosis of leukemia subtypes.

  5. Segmentation and Classification of Bone Marrow Cells Images Using Contextual Information for Medical Diagnosis of Acute Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Reta, Carolina; Altamirano, Leopoldo; Gonzalez, Jesus A.; Diaz-Hernandez, Raquel; Peregrina, Hayde; Olmos, Ivan; Alonso, Jose E.; Lobato, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Morphological identification of acute leukemia is a powerful tool used by hematologists to determine the family of such a disease. In some cases, experienced physicians are even able to determine the leukemia subtype of the sample. However, the identification process may have error rates up to 40% (when classifying acute leukemia subtypes) depending on the physician’s experience and the sample quality. This problem raises the need to create automatic tools that provide hematologists with a second opinion during the classification process. Our research presents a contextual analysis methodology for the detection of acute leukemia subtypes from bone marrow cells images. We propose a cells separation algorithm to break up overlapped regions. In this phase, we achieved an average accuracy of 95% in the evaluation of the segmentation process. In a second phase, we extract descriptive features to the nucleus and cytoplasm obtained in the segmentation phase in order to classify leukemia families and subtypes. We finally created a decision algorithm that provides an automatic diagnosis for a patient. In our experiments, we achieved an overall accuracy of 92% in the supervised classification of acute leukemia families, 84% for the lymphoblastic subtypes, and 92% for the myeloblastic subtypes. Finally, we achieved accuracies of 95% in the diagnosis of leukemia families and 90% in the diagnosis of leukemia subtypes. PMID:26107374

  6. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J.; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M.; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I.; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass.

  7. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J.; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M.; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I.; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass. PMID:27642531

  8. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Facenda-Lorenzo, María; Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called "sanctuaries," are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass. PMID:27642531

  9. MicroRNA-128-3p is a novel oncomiR targeting PHF6 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mets, Evelien; Van Peer, Gert; Van der Meulen, Joni; Boice, Michael; Taghon, Tom; Goossens, Steven; Mestdagh, Pieter; Benoit, Yves; De Moerloose, Barbara; Van Roy, Nadine; Poppe, Bruce; Vandesompele, Jo; Wendel, Hans-Guido; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Rondou, Pieter

    2014-08-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arises from the leukemic transformation of developing thymocytes and results from cooperative genetic lesions. Inactivation of the PHF6 gene is frequently observed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, suggesting an important tumor suppressive role for PHF6 in the pathobiology of this leukemia. Although the precise function of PHF6 is still unknown, this gene is most likely involved in chromatin regulation, a strongly emerging theme in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this context, our previous description of a cooperative microRNA regulatory network controlling several well-known T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia tumor suppressor genes, including PHF6, is of great importance. Given the high frequency of PHF6 lesions in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the integration of PHF6 in this microRNA regulatory network, we aimed to identify novel oncogenic microRNAs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia which suppress PHF6. To this end, we performed an unbiased PHF6 3'UTR-microRNA library screen and combined the results with microRNA profiling data of samples from patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and normal thymocyte subsets. We selected miR-128-3p as a candidate PHF6-targeting, oncogenic microRNA and demonstrated regulation of PHF6 expression upon modulation of this microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. In vivo evidence of an oncogenic role of this microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia was obtained through accelerated leukemia onset in a NOTCH1-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia mouse model upon miR-128-3p over-expression. We conclude that miR-128-3p is a strong novel candidate oncogenic microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia which targets the PHF6 tumor suppressor gene.

  10. Sensitization of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells for LCL161-induced cell death by targeting redox homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haß, Christina; Belz, Katharina; Schoeneberger, Hannah; Fulda, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Disturbed redox homeostasis with both elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and antioxidant defense mechanisms has been reported in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We therefore hypothesized that inhibition of pathways responsible for ROS detoxification renders ALL cells more susceptible for cell death. Here, we report that pharmacological inhibitors of key pathways for the elimination of ROS, i.e. Erastin, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and Auranofin, sensitize ALL cells for cell death upon treatment with the Smac mimetic LCL161 that antagonizes Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Erastin, BSO or Auranofin significantly increase LCL161-induced cell death and also act in concert with LCL161 to profoundly suppress long-term clonogenic survival in several ALL cell lines. Erastin or BSO cooperates with LCL161 to stimulate ROS production and lipid peroxidation prior to cell death. ROS production and lipid peroxidation are required for this cotreatment-induced cell death, since ROS scavengers or pharmacological inhibition of lipid peroxidation provides significant protection against cell death. These results emphasize that inhibition of antioxidant defense mechanisms can serve as a potent approach to prime ALL cells for LCL161-induced cell death.

  11. Comparison of genetic and clinical aspects in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes all with more than 50% of bone marrow erythropoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Bacher, Ulrike; Haferlach, Claudia; Alpermann, Tamara; Kern, Wolfgang; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization separates acute erythroid leukemia (erythropoiesis in ≥50% of nucleated bone marrow cells; ≥20% myeloblasts of non-erythroid cells) from other entities with increased erythropoiesis – acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes (≥20% myeloblasts of all nucleated cells) or myelodysplastic syndromes – and subdivides acute erythroid leukemia into erythroleukemia and pure erythroid leukemia subtypes. We aimed to investigate the biological/genetic justification for the different categories of myeloid malignancies with increased erythropoiesis (≥50% of bone marrow cells). Design and Methods We investigated 212 patients (aged 18.5–88.4 years) with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes characterized by 50% or more erythropoiesis: 108 had acute myeloid leukemia (77 with acute erythroid leukemia, corresponding to erythroid/myeloid erythroleukemia, 7 with pure erythroid leukemia, 24 with acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes) and 104 had myelodysplastic syndromes. Morphological and chromosome banding analyses were performed in all cases; subsets of cases were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and immunophenotyping. Results Unfavorable karyotypes were more frequent in patients with acute myeloid leukemia than in those with myelodysplastic syndromes (42.6% versus 13.5%; P<0.0001), but their frequency did not differ significantly between patients with acute erythroid leukemia (39.0%), pure erythroid leukemia (57.1%), and acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes (50.0%). The incidence of molecular mutations did not differ significantly between the different categories. The 2-year overall survival rate was better for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes than for those with acute myeloid leukemia (P<0.0001), without significant differences across the different acute leukemia subtypes. The 2-year overall survival rate was worse in patients with

  12. Phosphatidylserine index as a marker of the procoagulant phenotype of acute myelogenous leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Recht, Olivia; Gruber, András; Levine, Ross L.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are at risk for thrombotic complications. Risk to develop thrombosis is closely tied to leukemia subtype, and studies have shown an association between leukocytosis and thrombosis in AML M3. We evaluated the relative roles of cell count and the surface expression of tissue factor (TF) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in the procoagulant phenotype of AML cell lines. The TF-positive AML M3 cell lines, NB4 and HL60, and AML M2 cell line, AML14, exhibited both extrinsic tenase and prothrombinase activity in a purified system and promoted experimental thrombus formation. In contrast, the TF-negative AML cell line, HEL, exhibited only prothrombinase activity and did not affect the rate of occlusive thrombus formation. In plasma, NB4, HL60 and AML14 shortened clotting times in a cell-count, PS- and TF-dependent manner. Exposure of cultured NB4, HL60, and AML14 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent daunorubicin increased their extrinsic tenase activity and PS expression. Clot initiation time inversely correlated with logarithm of PS index, defined as the product of multiplying leukocyte count with cell surface PS exposure. We propose that leukemia cell PS index may serve as a biomarker for procoagulant activity.

  13. Gene Signature of High White Blood Cell Count in B-Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dombkowski, Alan A.; Caldwell, J. Timothy; Chu, Roland; Xavier, Ana C.; Thummel, Ryan; Neely, Melody; Matherly, Larry H.; Ge, Yubin; Taub, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we sought to identify genetic factors associated with the presenting white blood cell (WBC) count in B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BP-ALL). Using ETV6-RUNX1-positive BP-ALL patient samples, a homogeneous subtype, we identified 16 differentially expressed genes based on the presenting WBC count (< 50,000/cumm vs > 50,000). We further confirmed that IL1R1, BCAR3, KCNH2, PIR, and ZDHHC23 were differentially expressed in a larger cohort of ETV6-RUNX1-negative BP-ALL patient samples. Statistical analysis demonstrated that expression levels of these genes could accurately categorize high and low WBC count subjects using two independent patient sets, representing positive and negative ETV6-RUNX1 cases. Further studies in leukemia cell line models will better delineate the role of these genes in regulating the white blood cell count and potentially identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:27536776

  14. Hyperoside enhances the suppressive effects of arsenic trioxide on acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Fang-Bing; Li, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhu, Jun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoside (Hyp) is the chief component of some Chinese herbs which has anticancer effect and the present study is to identify whether it could enhance the anti leukemic properties of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We provide evidence on the concomitant treatment of HL-60 human AML cells with hyperoside potentiates As2O3-dependent induction of apoptosis. The activation of caspase-9, Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD), p-BAD, p27 was assessed by Western blot. Results showed that hyperoside inhibited BAD from phosphorylating, reactivated caspase-9, and increased p27 levels. Importantly, hyperoside demonstrated its induction of autophagy effect by upregulation of LC-II in HL-60 AML cell line. Taken together, hyperoside may serve as a great candidate of concomitant treatment for leukemia; these effects were probably related to induction of autophagy and enhancing apoptosis-inducing action of As2O3. PMID:26629016

  15. Gene Signature of High White Blood Cell Count in B-Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Holly; Rubenstein, Mara; Dombkowski, Alan A; Caldwell, J Timothy; Chu, Roland; Xavier, Ana C; Thummel, Ryan; Neely, Melody; Matherly, Larry H; Ge, Yubin; Taub, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    In this study we sought to identify genetic factors associated with the presenting white blood cell (WBC) count in B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BP-ALL). Using ETV6-RUNX1-positive BP-ALL patient samples, a homogeneous subtype, we identified 16 differentially expressed genes based on the presenting WBC count (< 50,000/cumm vs > 50,000). We further confirmed that IL1R1, BCAR3, KCNH2, PIR, and ZDHHC23 were differentially expressed in a larger cohort of ETV6-RUNX1-negative BP-ALL patient samples. Statistical analysis demonstrated that expression levels of these genes could accurately categorize high and low WBC count subjects using two independent patient sets, representing positive and negative ETV6-RUNX1 cases. Further studies in leukemia cell line models will better delineate the role of these genes in regulating the white blood cell count and potentially identify new therapeutic targets.

  16. Autocrine motility factor receptor promotes the proliferation of human acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YINGCHAO; MA, LINA; WANG, CHUNMEI; SHENG, GUANGYAO; FENG, LEI; YIN, CHUYUN

    2015-01-01

    The aberrant activation of autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR) has been implicated in several types of human cancer. The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of AMFR on the regulation of proliferation in an acute monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1. THP-1 cells were transfected with AMFR-targeted small interfering (si)RNA and a plasmid encoding a truncated AMFR, AMFR-C, (pcDNA3.1-AMFR-C). The mRNA and protein levels of AMFR and the downstream targets, rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 2 (ROCK2), cyclin D1, and B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2, were measured using reverse transcription-quantitatibe polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses. The effects on cell cycle and apoptosis were investigated using flow cytometry. The present study successfully established the knockdown of AMFR and expression of AMFR-C in the THP-1 cells. Downregulation of AMFR induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, and increased apoptosis of the THP-1 cells (all P<0.05). The AMFR siRNA increased the percentage of early apoptotic cells between 3.88±1.43 and 19.58±4.29% (P<0.05). The expression levels of ROCK2, cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 were reduced by the downregulation of AMFR and enhanced by overexpression of AMFR-C. In conclusion, AMFR appears to be crucial for the proliferation of the THP-1 acute monocytic leukemia cell line. Therefore, AMFR may represent a potential target for the treatment of acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:26136223

  17. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Fucoidan Suppresses the Growth of Human Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Atashrazm, Farzaneh; Lowenthal, Ray M; Woods, Gregory M; Holloway, Adele F; Karpiniec, Samuel S; Dickinson, Joanne L

    2016-03-01

    Fucoidan, a natural component of seaweeds, is reported to have immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. The mechanisms underpinning these activities remain poorly understood. In this study, the cytotoxicity and anti-tumor activities of fucoidan were investigated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The human AML cell lines NB4, KG1a, HL60, and K562 were treated with fucoidan and cell cycle, cell proliferation, and expression of apoptotic pathways molecules were analyzed. Fucoidan suppressed the proliferation and induced apoptosis through the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways in the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell lines NB4 and HL60, but not in KG1a and K562 cells. In NB4 cells, apoptosis was caspase-dependent as it was significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor. P21/WAF1/CIP1 was significantly up-regulated leading to cell cycle arrest. Fucoidan decreased the activation of ERK1/2 and down-regulated the activation of AKT through hypo-phosphorylation of Thr(308) residue but not Ser(473). In vivo, a xenograft model using the NB4 cells was employed. Mice were fed with fucoidan and tumor growth was measured following inoculation with NB4 cells. Subsequently, splenic natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity was also examined. Oral doses of fucoidan significantly delayed tumor growth in the xenograft model and increased cytolytic activity of NK cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the selective inhibitory effect of fucoidan on APL cells and its protective effect against APL development in mice warrant further investigation of fucoidan as a useful agent in treatment of certain types of leukemia.

  20. ORP4L is essential for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wenbin; Yi, Qing; Xu, Bing; Li, Shiqian; Wang, Tong; Liu, Fupei; Zhu, Biying; Hoffmann, Peter R.; Ji, Guangju; Lei, Pingsheng; Li, Guoping; Li, Jiwei; Li, Jian; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Yan, Daoguang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are reprogrammed in cancer to support cell survival. Here, we report that T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells are characterized by increased oxidative phosphorylation and robust ATP production. We demonstrate that ORP4L is expressed in T-ALL but not normal T-cells and its abundance is proportional to cellular ATP. ORP4L acts as an adaptor/scaffold assembling CD3ɛ, Gαq/11 and PLCβ3 into a complex that activates PLCβ3. PLCβ3 catalyzes IP3 production in T-ALL as opposed to PLCγ1 in normal T-cells. Up-regulation of ORP4L thus results in a switch in the enzyme responsible for IP3-induced endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release and oxidative phosphorylation. ORP4L knockdown results in suboptimal bioenergetics, cell death and abrogation of T-ALL engraftment in vivo. In summary, we uncovered a signalling pathway operating specifically in T-ALL cells in which ORP4L mediates G protein-coupled ligand-induced PLCβ3 activation, resulting in an increase of mitochondrial respiration for cell survival. Targeting ORP4L might represent a promising approach for T-ALL treatment. PMID:27581363

  1. Cytoplasmic proliferating cell nuclear antigen connects glycolysis and cell survival in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ohayon, Delphine; De Chiara, Alessia; Chapuis, Nicolas; Candalh, Céline; Mocek, Julie; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Haddaoui, Lamya; Ifrah, Norbert; Hermine, Olivier; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Frachet, Philippe; Bouscary, Didier; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a scaffolding protein involved in DNA replication, has been described as a key element in survival of mature neutrophil granulocytes, which are non-proliferating cells. Herein, we demonstrated an active export of PCNA involved in cell survival and chemotherapy resistance. Notably, daunorubicin-resistant HL-60 cells (HL-60R) have a prominent cytosolic PCNA localization due to increased nuclear export compared to daunorubicin-sensitive HL-60 cells (HL-60S). By interacting with nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a protein involved in NAD biosynthesis, PCNA coordinates glycolysis and survival, especially in HL-60R cells. These cells showed a dramatic increase in intracellular NAD+ concentration as well as glycolysis including increased expression and activity of hexokinase 1 and increased lactate production. Furthermore, this functional activity of cytoplasmic PCNA was also demonstrated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our data uncover a novel pathway of nuclear export of PCNA that drives cell survival by increasing metabolism flux. PMID:27759041

  2. ORP4L is essential for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell survival.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wenbin; Yi, Qing; Xu, Bing; Li, Shiqian; Wang, Tong; Liu, Fupei; Zhu, Biying; Hoffmann, Peter R; Ji, Guangju; Lei, Pingsheng; Li, Guoping; Li, Jiwei; Li, Jian; Olkkonen, Vesa M; Yan, Daoguang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are reprogrammed in cancer to support cell survival. Here, we report that T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells are characterized by increased oxidative phosphorylation and robust ATP production. We demonstrate that ORP4L is expressed in T-ALL but not normal T-cells and its abundance is proportional to cellular ATP. ORP4L acts as an adaptor/scaffold assembling CD3ɛ, Gαq/11 and PLCβ3 into a complex that activates PLCβ3. PLCβ3 catalyzes IP3 production in T-ALL as opposed to PLCγ1 in normal T-cells. Up-regulation of ORP4L thus results in a switch in the enzyme responsible for IP3-induced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release and oxidative phosphorylation. ORP4L knockdown results in suboptimal bioenergetics, cell death and abrogation of T-ALL engraftment in vivo. In summary, we uncovered a signalling pathway operating specifically in T-ALL cells in which ORP4L mediates G protein-coupled ligand-induced PLCβ3 activation, resulting in an increase of mitochondrial respiration for cell survival. Targeting ORP4L might represent a promising approach for T-ALL treatment. PMID:27581363

  3. Blinatumomab: Bridging the Gap in Adult Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Folan, Stephanie A; Rexwinkle, Amber; Autry, Jane; Bryan, Jeffrey C

    2016-08-01

    Adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse after frontline therapy have extremely poor outcomes despite advances in chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Blinatumomab is a first-in-class bispecific T-cell engager that links T cells to tumor cells leading to T-cell activation and tumor cell lysis. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration approved blinatumomab for treatment of relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In a phase II trial, blinatumomab produced response rates of 43%, and 40% of patients achieving a complete remission proceeded to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Early use of blinatumomab was complicated with adverse effects, including cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. Management strategies, including dexamethasone premedication and 2-step dose escalation during the first cycle of blinatumomab, have decreased the incidence and severity of these adverse effects. Blinatumomab currently is being studied for other B-cell malignancies and has the potential to benefit many patients with CD19+ malignancies in the future. PMID:27521320

  4. Cell Cycle-Dependent Mechanisms Underlie Vincristine-Induced Death of Primary Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Anisha; Hittelman, Walter N; Chambers, Timothy C

    2016-06-15

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTA), such as the taxanes and vinca alkaloids, are used to treat a variety of cancers due to their ability to perturb microtubule dynamics. In cell culture, MTAs exert their anticancer effects primarily by causing mitotic arrest and cell death. However, accumulating indirect evidence suggests that MTAs may exert their cytotoxicity in human tumors by interfering with interphase microtubules. In this study, we sought to develop and characterize an experimental system in which to test the hypothesis that MTAs induce cell death during interphase. Primary adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with vincristine only weakly exhibited colocalization between mitotic and apoptotic markers and major characteristics of mitotic death, such as an increase in cells with 4N DNA content before the appearance of cells with <2N DNA content, suggesting a mixed response. Therefore, we separated ALL cells into distinct phases of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation, labeled cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and then treated each population with vincristine. Cells isolated during G1 underwent cell death without evidence of EdU uptake, indicating that the cytotoxic effects of vincristine took place during G1 Conversely, cells isolated during S or G2-M phases underwent death following mitotic arrest. Thus, vincristine induces distinct death programs in primary ALL cells depending on cell-cycle phase, and cells in G1 are particularly susceptible to perturbation of interphase microtubules. Primary ALL cells may therefore provide a powerful model system in which to study the multimodal mechanisms underlying MTA-induced cell death. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3553-61. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197148

  5. Cell Cycle-Dependent Mechanisms Underlie Vincristine-Induced Death of Primary Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Anisha; Hittelman, Walter N; Chambers, Timothy C

    2016-06-15

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTA), such as the taxanes and vinca alkaloids, are used to treat a variety of cancers due to their ability to perturb microtubule dynamics. In cell culture, MTAs exert their anticancer effects primarily by causing mitotic arrest and cell death. However, accumulating indirect evidence suggests that MTAs may exert their cytotoxicity in human tumors by interfering with interphase microtubules. In this study, we sought to develop and characterize an experimental system in which to test the hypothesis that MTAs induce cell death during interphase. Primary adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with vincristine only weakly exhibited colocalization between mitotic and apoptotic markers and major characteristics of mitotic death, such as an increase in cells with 4N DNA content before the appearance of cells with <2N DNA content, suggesting a mixed response. Therefore, we separated ALL cells into distinct phases of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation, labeled cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and then treated each population with vincristine. Cells isolated during G1 underwent cell death without evidence of EdU uptake, indicating that the cytotoxic effects of vincristine took place during G1 Conversely, cells isolated during S or G2-M phases underwent death following mitotic arrest. Thus, vincristine induces distinct death programs in primary ALL cells depending on cell-cycle phase, and cells in G1 are particularly susceptible to perturbation of interphase microtubules. Primary ALL cells may therefore provide a powerful model system in which to study the multimodal mechanisms underlying MTA-induced cell death. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3553-61. ©2016 AACR.

  6. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  7. Regulation of vitamin D receptor expression by retinoic acid receptor alpha in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Marchwicka, Aleksandra; Cebrat, Małgorzata; Łaszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Śnieżewski, Łukasz; Brown, Geoffrey; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by an accumulation of malignant immature myeloid precursors. A very promising way to treat AML is differentiation therapy using either all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), or the use of both these differentiation-inducing agents. However, the effect of combination treatment varies in different AML cell lines, and this is due to ATRA either down- or up-regulating transcription of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the cells examined. The mechanism of transcriptional regulation of VDR in response to ATRA has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) is responsible for regulating VDR transcription in AML cells. We have shown that a VDR transcriptional variant, originating in exon 1a, is regulated by RARα agonists in AML cells. Moreover, in cells with a high basal level of RARα protein, the VDR gene is transcriptionally repressed as long as RARα agonist is absent. In these cells down-regulation of the level of RARα leads to increased expression of VDR. We consider that our findings provide a mechanistic background to explain the different outcomes from treating AML cell lines with a combination of ATRA and 1,25D. PMID:26969398

  8. B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and stromal cells communicate through Galectin-3

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Fei; Joo, Eun Ji; Tarighat, Somayeh S.; Schiffer, Isabelle; Paz, Helicia; Fabbri, Muller; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2015-01-01

    The molecular interactions between B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) cells and stromal cells in the bone marrow that provide microenvironmentally-mediated protection against therapeutic drugs are not well-defined. Galectin-3 (Lgals3) is a multifunctional galactose-binding lectin with reported location in the nucleus, cytoplasm and extracellular space in different cell types. We previously reported that ALL cells co-cultured with stroma contain high levels of Galectin-3. We here establish that, in contrast to more mature B-lineage cancers, Galectin-3 detected in and on the ALL cells originates from stromal cells, which express it on their surface, secrete it as soluble protein and also in exosomes. Soluble and stromal-bound Galectin-3 is internalized by ALL cells, transported to the nucleus and stimulates transcription of endogenous LGALS3 mRNA. When human and mouse ALL cells develop tolerance to different drugs while in contact with protective stromal cells, Galectin-3 protein levels are consistently increased. This correlates with induction of Galectin-3 transcription in the ALL cells. Thus Galectin-3 sourced from stroma becomes supplemented by endogenous Galectin-3 production in the pre-B ALL cells that are under continuous stress from drug treatment. Our data suggest that stromal Galectin-3 may protect ALL cells through auto-induction of Galectin-3 mRNA and tonic NFκB pathway activation. Since endogenously synthesized Galectin-3 protects pre-B ALL cells against drug treatment, we identify Galectin-3 as one possible target to counteract the protective effects of stroma. PMID:25869099

  9. Selective BCL-2 Inhibition by ABT-199 Causes On Target Cell Death in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Rongqing; Hogdal, Leah J.; Benito, Juliana M; Bucci, Donna; Han, Lina; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Debose, LaKeisha; Mu, Hong; Döhner, Hartmut; Gaidzik, Verena I.; Galinsky, Ilene; Golfman, Leonard S.; Haferlach, Torsten; Harutyunyan, Karine G.; Hu, Jianhua; Leverson, Joel D; Marcucci, Guido; Müschen, Markus; Newman, Rachel; Park, Eugene; Ruvolo, Peter P.; Ruvolo, Vivian; Ryan, Jeremy; Schindela, Sonja; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick; Stone, Richard M.; Kantarjian, Hagop; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina; Letai, Anthony G.

    2014-01-01

    B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) prevents commitment to programmed cell death at the mitochondrion. It remains a challenge to identify those tumors that are best treated by inhibition of BCL-2. Here we demonstrate that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, primary patient samples, and murine primary xenografts are very sensitive to treatment with the selective BCL-2 antagonist ABT-199. In primary patient cells, the median IC50 was approximately 10 nM, and cell death occurred within 2 h. Our ex vivo sensitivity results compare favorably with those observed for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a disease for which ABT-199 has demonstrated consistent activity in clinical trials. Moreover, mitochondrial studies using BH3 profiling demonstrate activity at the mitochondrion that correlates well with cytotoxicity, supporting an on target mitochondrial mechanism of action. Our protein and BH3 profiling studies provide promising tools that can be tested as predictive biomarkers in any clinical trial of ABT-199 in AML. PMID:24346116

  10. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea. PMID:27695173

  12. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea.

  13. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 define subgroups of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    La Starza, Roberta; Barba, Gianluca; Demeyer, Sofie; Pierini, Valentina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gianfelici, Valentina; Schwab, Claire; Matteucci, Caterina; Vicente, Carmen; Cools, Jan; Messina, Monica; Crescenzi, Barbara; Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin; Basso, Giuseppe; Harrison, Christine J.; Mecucci, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 were detected in 23/200 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Genomic studies identified two types of deletions: interstitial and terminal. Interstitial 5q deletions, found in five cases, were present in both adults and children with a female predominance (chi-square, P=0.012). Interestingly, these cases resembled immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing significant down-regulation of five out of the ten top differentially expressed genes in this leukemia group, including TCF7 which maps within the 5q31 common deleted region. Mutations of genes known to be associated with immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, i.e. WT1, ETV6, JAK1, JAK3, and RUNX1, were present, while CDKN2A/B deletions/mutations were never detected. All patients had relapsed/resistant disease and blasts showed an early differentiation arrest with expression of myeloid markers. Terminal 5q deletions, found in 18 of patients, were more prevalent in adults (chi-square, P=0.010) and defined a subgroup of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by 130 up- and 197 down-regulated genes. Down-regulated genes included TRIM41, ZFP62, MAPK9, MGAT1, and CNOT6, all mapping within the 1.4 Mb common deleted region at 5q35.3. Of interest, besides CNOT6 down-regulation, these cases also showed low BTG1 expression and a high incidence of CNOT3 mutations, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with terminal 5q deletions. In conclusion, interstitial and terminal 5q deletions are recurrent genomic losses identifying distinct subtypes of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27151989

  15. Plumbagin exerts an immunosuppressive effect on human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kyoung Jun; Lee, Yura; Kim, Soon Ae; Kim, Jiyeon

    2016-04-22

    Of the hematological disorders typified by poor prognoses and survival rates, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is one of the most commonly diagnosed. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents, the treatment options for this cancer remain limited. In this manuscript, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of plumbagin, mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and inhibition of NF-κB signaling; the human T-ALL MOLT-4 cell line was used as our experimental system. Plumbagin is a natural, plant derived compound, which exerts an anti-proliferative activity against many types of human cancer. Our experiments confirm that plumbagin induces a caspase-dependent apoptosis of MOLT-4 cells, with no significant cytotoxicity seen for normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Plumbagin also inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65, and the transcription of NF-κB target genes. Our results now show that plumbagin is a potent inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and suppressor of T-ALL cell proliferation. PMID:27018383

  16. Preclinical activity of the novel B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 inhibitor PTC-209 in acute myeloid leukemia: Implications for leukemia therapy.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yuki; Maeda, Aya; Chachad, Dhruv; Ishizawa, Jo; Qiu, Yi Hua; Kornblau, Steven M; Kimura, Shinya; Andreeff, Michael; Kojima, Kensuke

    2015-12-01

    Curing patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a therapeutic challenge. The polycomb complex protein B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI-1) is required for the self-renewal and maintenance of leukemia stem cells. We investigated the prognostic significance of BMI-1 in AML and the effects of a novel small molecule selective inhibitor of BMI-1, PTC-209. BMI-1 protein expression was determined in 511 newly diagnosed AML patients together with 207 other proteins using reverse-phase protein array technology. Patients with unfavorable cytogenetics according to Southwest Oncology Group criteria had higher levels of BMI-1 compared to those with favorable (P = 0.0006) or intermediate cytogenetics (P = 0.0061), and patients with higher levels of BMI-1 had worse overall survival (55.3 weeks vs. 42.8 weeks, P = 0.046). Treatment with PTC-209 reduced protein level of BMI-1 and its downstream target mono-ubiquitinated histone H2A and triggered several molecular events consistent with the induction of apoptosis, this is, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 cleavage, BAX activation, and phosphatidylserine externalization. PTC-209 induced apoptosis in patient-derived CD34(+)CD38(low/-) AML cells and, less prominently, in CD34(-) differentiated AML cells. BMI-1 reduction by PTC-209 directly correlated with apoptosis induction in CD34(+) primary AML cells (r = 0.71, P = 0.022). However, basal BMI-1 expression was not a determinant of AML sensitivity. BMI-1 inhibition, which targets a primitive AML cell population, might offer a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26450753

  17. Novel Cryptic Rearrangements in Adult B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Involving the MLL Gene

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Moneeb A. K.; Grygalewicz, Beata; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Rincic, Martina; Rittscher, Katharina; Melo, Joana B.; Carreira, Isabel M.; Meyer, Britta; Marzena, Watek

    2015-01-01

    MLL (mixed-lineage-leukemia) gene rearrangements are typical for acute leukemia and are associated with an aggressive course of disease, with a worse outcome than comparable case, and thus require intensified treatment. Here we describe a 69-year-old female with adult B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) with hyperleukocytosis and immunophenotype CD10- and CD19+ with cryptic MLL rearrangements. G-banding at the time of diagnosis showed a normal karyotype: 46,XX. Molecular cytogenetics using multitude multicolor banding (mMCB) revealed a complex rearrangement of the two copies of chromosome 11. However, a locus-specific probe additionally identified that the MLL gene at 11q23.3 was disrupted, and that the 5′ region was inserted into the chromosomal sub-band 4q21; thus the aberration involved three chromosomes and five break events. Unfortunately, the patient died six months after the initial diagnosis from serious infections and severe complications. Overall, the present findings confirm that, by far not all MLL aberrations are seen by routine chromosome banding techniques and that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) should be regarded as standard tool to access MLL rearrangements in patients with BCP-ALL. PMID:25699572

  18. Novel Cryptic Rearrangements in Adult B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Involving the MLL Gene.

    PubMed

    Othman, Moneeb A K; Grygalewicz, Beata; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Rincic, Martina; Rittscher, Katharina; Melo, Joana B; Carreira, Isabel M; Meyer, Britta; Marzena, Watek; Liehr, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    MLL (mixed-lineage-leukemia) gene rearrangements are typical for acute leukemia and are associated with an aggressive course of disease, with a worse outcome than comparable case, and thus require intensified treatment. Here we describe a 69-year-old female with adult B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) with hyperleukocytosis and immunophenotype CD10- and CD19+ with cryptic MLL rearrangements. G-banding at the time of diagnosis showed a normal karyotype: 46,XX. Molecular cytogenetics using multitude multicolor banding (mMCB) revealed a complex rearrangement of the two copies of chromosome 11. However, a locus-specific probe additionally identified that the MLL gene at 11q23.3 was disrupted, and that the 5' region was inserted into the chromosomal sub-band 4q21; thus the aberration involved three chromosomes and five break events. Unfortunately, the patient died six months after the initial diagnosis from serious infections and severe complications. Overall, the present findings confirm that, by far not all MLL aberrations are seen by routine chromosome banding techniques and that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) should be regarded as standard tool to access MLL rearrangements in patients with BCP-ALL. PMID:25699572

  19. Underground Adaptation to a Hostile Environment: Acute Myeloid Leukemia vs. Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dulphy, Nicolas; Chrétien, Anne-Sophie; Khaznadar, Zena; Fauriat, Cyril; Nanbakhsh, Arash; Caignard, Anne; Chouaib, Salem; Olive, Daniel; Toubert, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies which incidence increases with age. The disease affects the differentiation of hematopoietic stem or precursor cells in the bone marrow and can be related to abnormal cytogenetic and/or specific mutational patterns. AML blasts can be sensitive to natural killer (NK) cell antitumor response. However, NK cells are frequently defective in AML patients leading to tumor escape. NK cell defects affect not only the expression of the activating NK receptors, including the natural cytotoxicity receptors, the NK group 2, member D, and the DNAX accessory molecule-1, but also cytotoxicity and IFN-γ release. Such perturbations in NK cell physiology could be related to the adaptation of the AML to the immune pressure and more generally to patient’s clinical features. Various mechanisms are potentially involved in the inhibition of NK-cell functions in AML, including defects in the normal lymphopoiesis, reduced expression of activating receptors through cell-to-cell contacts, and production of immunosuppressive soluble agents by leukemic blasts. Therefore, the continuous cross-talk between AML and NK cells participates to the leukemia immune escape and eventually to patient’s relapse. Methods to restore or stimulate NK cells seem to be attractive strategies to treat patients once the complete remission is achieved. Moreover, our capacity in stimulating the NK cell functions could lead to the development of preemptive strategies to eliminate leukemia-initiating cells before the emergence of the disease in elderly individuals presenting preleukemic mutations in hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:27014273

  20. Renal Calculi: An Unusual Presentation of T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Daly, Gemma F; Barnard, Edward B G; Thoreson, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome is a rare initial presentation of hematologic malignancy in children that typically presents with complications of electrolyte derangement, specifically hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hyperuricemia. We report a case of a 5-year-old boy who presented to the emergency department with gross hematuria, abdominal pain, and vomiting and was ultimately diagnosed with uric acid nephrolithiasis and acute renal failure secondary to spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome in the setting of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Tumor lysis syndrome is considered an oncologic emergency, and in this case, the child required urgent treatment with potassium-binding agents, rasburicase, and hemodialysis. This case demonstrates that occult hematologic malignancy should be suspected in cases of nephrolithiasis and acute renal failure when found in conjunction with hyperuricemia despite a normal complete blood count at the time of presentation. PMID:26644483

  1. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Genetic heterogeneity of RPMI-8402, a T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    PubMed Central

    STOCZYNSKA-FIDELUS, EWELINA; PIASKOWSKI, SYLWESTER; PAWLOWSKA, ROZA; SZYBKA, MALGORZATA; PECIAK, JOANNA; HULAS-BIGOSZEWSKA, KRYSTYNA; WINIECKA-KLIMEK, MARTA; RIESKE, PIOTR

    2016-01-01

    Thorough examination of genetic heterogeneity of cell lines is uncommon. In order to address this issue, the present study analyzed the genetic heterogeneity of RPMI-8402, a T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell line. For this purpose, traditional techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry were used, in addition to more advanced techniques, including cell sorting, Sanger sequencing and massive parallel sequencing. The results indicated that the RPMI-8402 cell line consists of several genetically different cell subpopulations. Furthermore, massive parallel sequencing of RPMI-8402 provided insight into the evolution of T-ALL carcinogenesis, since this cell line exhibited the genetic heterogeneity typical of T-ALL. Therefore, the use of cell lines for drug testing in future studies may aid the progress of anticancer drug research. PMID:26870252

  3. T315 Decreases Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Viability through a Combination of Apoptosis Induction and Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chang-Fang; Weng, Jing-Ru; Jadhav, Appaso; Wu, Chia-Yung; Sargeant, Aaron M.; Bai, Li-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    T315, an integrin-linked kinase (ILK) inhibitor, has been shown to suppress the proliferation of breast cancer, stomach cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Here we demonstrate that T315 decreases cell viability of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines (HL-60 and THP-1) and primary leukemia cells from AML patients in a dose-responsive manner. Normal human bone marrow cells are less sensitive than leukemia cells to T315. T315 down regulates protein kinase B (Akt) and p-Akt and induces caspase activation, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage, apoptosis and autophagy through an ILK-independent manner. Interestingly, pretreatment with autophagy inhibitors rescues cells from apoptosis and concomitant PARP cleavage, which implicates a key role of autophagic cell death in T315-mediated cytotoxicity. T315 also demonstrates efficacy in vivo, suppressing the growth of THP-1 xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice when administered intraperitoneally. This study shows that autophagic cell death and apoptosis cooperatively contribute to the anticancer activity of T315 in AML cells. In conclusion, the complementary roles of apoptotic and autophagic cell death should be considered in the future assessment of the translational value of T315 in AML therapy. PMID:27537872

  4. T315 Decreases Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Viability through a Combination of Apoptosis Induction and Autophagic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chang-Fang; Weng, Jing-Ru; Jadhav, Appaso; Wu, Chia-Yung; Sargeant, Aaron M; Bai, Li-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    T315, an integrin-linked kinase (ILK) inhibitor, has been shown to suppress the proliferation of breast cancer, stomach cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Here we demonstrate that T315 decreases cell viability of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines (HL-60 and THP-1) and primary leukemia cells from AML patients in a dose-responsive manner. Normal human bone marrow cells are less sensitive than leukemia cells to T315. T315 down regulates protein kinase B (Akt) and p-Akt and induces caspase activation, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage, apoptosis and autophagy through an ILK-independent manner. Interestingly, pretreatment with autophagy inhibitors rescues cells from apoptosis and concomitant PARP cleavage, which implicates a key role of autophagic cell death in T315-mediated cytotoxicity. T315 also demonstrates efficacy in vivo, suppressing the growth of THP-1 xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice when administered intraperitoneally. This study shows that autophagic cell death and apoptosis cooperatively contribute to the anticancer activity of T315 in AML cells. In conclusion, the complementary roles of apoptotic and autophagic cell death should be considered in the future assessment of the translational value of T315 in AML therapy. PMID:27537872

  5. Acute Leukemias in Children

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Mohan K. R.

    1979-01-01

    With combination chemotherapy approximately 50% of children with lymphoblastic leukemia survive for five or more years and it is now realistic to hope for a cure. Development of sophisticated cytochemical and immunological techniques have enabled us to recognize the factors that predispose to treatment failures. The survival in acute non-lymphocytic leukemia continues to be poor despite the introduction of several innovative treatment regimens. Current research is focused on the manipulation of the host-tumor immune response to eradicate the disease by treatment modalities such as immunotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Since the treatment regimens are becoming more complex, the initial diagnosis and treatment is best carried out at centres specialized in the management of childhood malignancies. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:21297755

  6. The cell biology of disease: Acute promyelocytic leukemia, arsenic, and PML bodies.

    PubMed

    de Thé, Hugues; Le Bras, Morgane; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2012-07-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by a chromosomal translocation whose product, the PML/retinoic acid (RA) receptor α (RARA) fusion protein, affects both nuclear receptor signaling and PML body assembly. Dissection of APL pathogenesis has led to the rediscovery of PML bodies and revealed their role in cell senescence, disease pathogenesis, and responsiveness to treatment. APL is remarkable because of the fortuitous identification of two clinically effective therapies, RA and arsenic, both of which degrade PML/RARA oncoprotein and, together, cure APL. Analysis of arsenic-induced PML or PML/RARA degradation has implicated oxidative stress in the biogenesis of nuclear bodies and SUMO in their degradation.

  7. Function of Ikaros as a tumor suppressor in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kastner, Philippe; Dupuis, Arnaud; Gaub, Marie-Pierre; Herbrecht, Raoul; Lutz, Patrick; Chan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The Ikaros transcription factor is crucial for many aspects of hematopoiesis. Loss of function mutations in IKZF1, the gene encoding Ikaros, have been implicated in adult and pediatric B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). These mutations result in haploinsufficiency of the Ikaros gene in approximately half of the cases. The remaining cases contain more severe or compound mutations that lead to the generation of dominant-negative proteins or complete loss of function. All IKZF1 mutations are associated with a poor prognosis. Here we review the current genetic, clinical and mechanistic evidence for the role of Ikaros as a tumor suppressor in B-ALL. PMID:23358883

  8. [Effect of decitabine on immune regulation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Jin; Zheng, Hui-Fei; Fu, Zheng-Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Based on the representative articles in recent years, the different mechanisms of decitabine on immune regulation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are summarized. Decitabine improves the expression of WT1 gene to stimulate specific cytotoxic T cells which can enhance graft versus leukemia effect (GVL) and improve the expression of FOXP3 gene to stimulate regulatory T cells so as to inhibit the acute graft versus host disease (GVHD). Through the above-mentimed mechanisms, decitabine can improve both therapeutic effect and quality of life in the patients with AML after allogeneic HSCT.

  9. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Reduced Intensity Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With De Novo or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Maritoclax induces apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells with elevated Mcl-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kenichiro; Liu, Qiang; Gowda, Krishne; Barth, Brian M; Claxton, David; Amin, Shantu; Loughran Jr, Thomas P; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the deadliest leukemias for which there is an urgent and unmet need for the development of novel treatment strategies. Multiple drug resistance mechanisms mediate poor drug response and relapse in patients, and a selective Mcl-1 inhibitor has been speculated to be a promising agent in the treatment of AML. Here, we describe that maritoclax, a small molecule Mcl-1 inhibitor, induces Mcl-1 proteasomal degradation without transcriptional downregulation. Maritoclax killed AML cell lines and primary cells with elevated Mcl-1 levels through selective Mcl-1 downregulation, and synergized with ABT-737 to overcome Mcl-1-mediated ABT-737 resistance. Maritoclax was more effective than daunorubicin at inducing leukemic cell death when co-cultured with HS-5 bone marrow stroma cells, while being less toxic than daunorubicin against HS-5 stroma cells, primary mouse bone marrow cells, and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Moreover, maritoclax administration at 20 mg/kg/d intraperitoneally caused significant U937 tumor shrinkage, as well as 36% tumors remission rate in athymic nude mice, without apparent toxicity to healthy tissue or circulating blood cells. In summary, our studies suggest that maritoclax belongs to a novel class of Mcl-1 inhibitors that has the potential to be developed for the treatment of AML. PMID:24842334

  13. Novel dynamin 2 mutations in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Zheng; Li, Min; Zhao, Gang; Xiao, Lichan; Gu, Yan; Zhou, Xilian; Yu, Michael D.; Li, Jianyong; Dovat, Sinisa; Song, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Genetic mutations on signaling pathways are found in patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and act as markers of high-risk leukemia. Mutations in dynamin 2 (DNM2) have been reported in T-ALL, particularly in early T-cell precursor-ALL. In the present study, DNM2 mutations were screened by sequencing DNM2 exons obtained by polymerase chain reaction amplification and gel purification in adult T-ALL patients. A total of 4 novel DNM2 mutations were identified in adult T-ALL patients, with a mutation rate of 9.5%, and the DNM2 mutations were found to co-exist with NOTCH1 and PHD finger protein 6, and were also associated with high-risk leukemia. A high rate of silent mutation was also found in the patients, but no significant association was found between the silent mutations and patients' clinical features. The present findings suggested the DNM2 mutations may be involved in the oncogenesis of T-ALL.

  14. Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adult acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission - a review from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Sengsayadeth, Salyka; Savani, Bipin N.; Blaise, Didier; Malard, Florent; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common indication for an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. The introduction of reduced intensity conditioning has expanded the recipient pool for transplantation, which has importantly made transplant an option for the more commonly affected older age groups. Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplantation is currently the standard of care for patients with intermediate or high-risk acute myeloid leukemia and is now most often employed in older patients and those with medical comorbidities. Despite being curative for a significant proportion of patients, post-transplant relapse remains a challenge in the reduced intensity conditioning setting. Herein we discuss the studies that demonstrate the feasibility of reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplants, compare the outcomes of reduced intensity conditioning versus chemotherapy and conventional myeloablative conditioning regimens, describe the optimal donor and stem cell source, and consider the impact of post-remission consolidation, comorbidities, center experience, and more intensive (reduced toxicity conditioning) regimens on outcomes. Additionally, we discuss the need for further prospective studies to optimize transplant outcomes. PMID:26130513

  15. Arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase has activity against primary acute myeloid leukemia cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miraki-Moud, Farideh; Ghazaly, Essam; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Hodby, Katharine A; Clear, Andrew; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Liapis, Konstantinos; Grantham, Marianne; Sohrabi, Fareeda; Cavenagh, Jamie; Bomalaski, John S; Gribben, John G; Szlosarek, Peter W; Bonnet, Dominique; Taussig, David C

    2015-06-25

    The strategy of enzymatic degradation of amino acids to deprive malignant cells of important nutrients is an established component of induction therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we show that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells from most patients with AML are deficient in a critical enzyme required for arginine synthesis, argininosuccinate synthetase-1 (ASS1). Thus, these ASS1-deficient AML cells are dependent on importing extracellular arginine. We therefore investigated the effect of plasma arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) against primary AMLs in a xenograft model and in vitro. ADI-PEG 20 alone induced responses in 19 of 38 AMLs in vitro and 3 of 6 AMLs in vivo, leading to caspase activation in sensitive AMLs. ADI-PEG 20-resistant AMLs showed higher relative expression of ASS1 than sensitive AMLs. This suggests that the resistant AMLs survive by producing arginine through this metabolic pathway and ASS1 expression could be used as a biomarker for response. Sensitive AMLs showed more avid uptake of arginine from the extracellular environment consistent with their auxotrophy for arginine. The combination of ADI-PEG 20 and cytarabine chemotherapy was more effective than either treatment alone resulting in responses in 6 of 6 AMLs tested in vivo. Our data show that arginine deprivation is a reasonable strategy in AML that paves the way for clinical trials. PMID:25896651

  16. Bone Marrow Cells in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Create a Proinflammatory Microenvironment Influencing Normal Hematopoietic Differentiation Fates

    PubMed Central

    Vilchis-Ordoñez, Armando; Contreras-Quiroz, Adriana; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Reyes-López, Alfonso; Quintela-Nuñez del Prado, Henry Martin; Venegas-Vázquez, Jorge; Mayani, Hector; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; López-Martínez, Briceida; Pelayo, Rosana

    2015-01-01

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is a serious public health problem in the pediatric population worldwide, contributing to 85% of deaths from childhood cancers. Understanding the biology of the disease is crucial for its clinical management and the development of therapeutic strategies. In line with that observed in other malignancies, chronic inflammation may contribute to a tumor microenvironment resulting in the damage of normal processes, concomitant to development and maintenance of neoplastic cells. We report here that hematopoietic cells from bone marrow B-ALL have the ability to produce proinflammatory and growth factors, including TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, and GM-CSF that stimulate proliferation and differentiation of normal stem and progenitor cells. Our findings suggest an apparently distinct CD13+CD33+ population of leukemic cells contributing to a proinflammatory microenvironment that may be detrimental to long-term normal hematopoiesis within B-ALL bone marrow. PMID:26090405

  17. The Sequence of Cyclophosphamide and Myeloablative Total Body Irradiation in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Holter-Chakrabarty, Jennifer L; Pierson, Namali; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Artz, Andrew S; Baron, Frédéric; Bredeson, Christopher N; Dvorak, Christopher C; Epstein, Robert B; Lazarus, Hillard M; Olsson, Richard F; Selby, George B; Williams, Kirsten M; Cooke, Kenneth R; Pasquini, Marcelo C; McCarthy, Philip L

    2015-07-01

    Limited clinical data are available to assess whether the sequencing of cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI) changes outcomes. We evaluated the sequence in 1769 (CyTBI, n = 948; TBICy, n = 821) recipients of related or unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation who received TBI (1200 to 1500 cGY) for acute leukemia from 2003 to 2010. The 2 cohorts were comparable for median age, performance score, type of leukemia, first complete remission, Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, HLA-matched siblings, stem cell source, antithymocyte globulin use, TBI dose, and type of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. The sequence of TBI did not significantly affect transplantation-related mortality (24% versus 23% at 3 years, P = .67; relative risk, 1.01; P = .91), leukemia relapse (27% versus 29% at 3 years, P = .34; relative risk, .89, P = .18), leukemia-free survival (49% versus 48% at 3 years, P = .27; relative risk, .93; P = .29), chronic GVHD (45% versus 47% at 1 year, P = .39; relative risk, .9; P = .11), or overall survival (53% versus 52% at 3 years, P = .62; relative risk, .96; P = .57) for CyTBI and TBICy, respectively. Corresponding cumulative incidences of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome were 4% and 6% at 100 days (P = .08), respectively. This study demonstrates that the sequence of Cy and TBI does not impact transplantation outcomes and complications in patients with acute leukemia undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation with myeloablative conditioning.

  18. The Sequence of Cyclophosphamide and Myeloablative Total Body Irradiation in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Holter-Chakrabarty, Jennifer L; Pierson, Namali; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Artz, Andrew S; Baron, Frédéric; Bredeson, Christopher N; Dvorak, Christopher C; Epstein, Robert B; Lazarus, Hillard M; Olsson, Richard F; Selby, George B; Williams, Kirsten M; Cooke, Kenneth R; Pasquini, Marcelo C; McCarthy, Philip L

    2015-07-01

    Limited clinical data are available to assess whether the sequencing of cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI) changes outcomes. We evaluated the sequence in 1769 (CyTBI, n = 948; TBICy, n = 821) recipients of related or unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation who received TBI (1200 to 1500 cGY) for acute leukemia from 2003 to 2010. The 2 cohorts were comparable for median age, performance score, type of leukemia, first complete remission, Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, HLA-matched siblings, stem cell source, antithymocyte globulin use, TBI dose, and type of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. The sequence of TBI did not significantly affect transplantation-related mortality (24% versus 23% at 3 years, P = .67; relative risk, 1.01; P = .91), leukemia relapse (27% versus 29% at 3 years, P = .34; relative risk, .89, P = .18), leukemia-free survival (49% versus 48% at 3 years, P = .27; relative risk, .93; P = .29), chronic GVHD (45% versus 47% at 1 year, P = .39; relative risk, .9; P = .11), or overall survival (53% versus 52% at 3 years, P = .62; relative risk, .96; P = .57) for CyTBI and TBICy, respectively. Corresponding cumulative incidences of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome were 4% and 6% at 100 days (P = .08), respectively. This study demonstrates that the sequence of Cy and TBI does not impact transplantation outcomes and complications in patients with acute leukemia undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation with myeloablative conditioning. PMID:25840335

  19. Dynamics of cytotoxic T cell subsets during immunotherapy predicts outcome in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Frida Ewald; Rydström, Anna; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Riise, Rebecca; Aurelius, Johan; Anderson, Harald; Brune, Mats; Foà, Robin; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B.; Martner, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Preventing relapse after chemotherapy remains a challenge in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eighty-four non-transplanted AML patients in first complete remission received relapse-preventive immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride and low-dose interleukin-2 in an international phase IV trial (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT01347996). Blood samples were drawn during cycles of immunotherapy and analyzed for CD8+ (cytotoxic) T cell phenotypes in blood. During the first cycle of therapy, a re-distribution of cytotoxic T cells was observed comprising a reduction of T effector memory cells and a concomitant increase of T effector cells. The dynamics of T cell subtypes during immunotherapy prognosticated relapse and survival, in particular among older patients and remained significantly predictive of clinical outcome after correction for potential confounders. Presence of CD8+ T cells with specificity for leukemia-associated antigens identified patients with low relapse risk. Our results point to novel aspects of T cell-mediated immunosurveillance in AML and provide conceivable biomarkers in relapse-preventive immunotherapy. PMID:26863635

  20. Successful outcome of Langerhans cell histiocytosis complicated by therapy-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Khalid A; Alshehri, Abdulrahman; Al-Zahrani, Hazza A; Al-Mohareb, Fahad I; Maghfoor, Irfan; Ajarim, Dahish

    2008-01-01

    Background Various therapeutic options are available for the management of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. However, treatment administered to control this disease may be complicated by acute leukemia. Case presentation A 34 years old male was diagnosed to have Langerhans cell histiocytosis in March 1999. Unfortunately, the cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy given to control the repeated relapses and exacerbations of the primary disease predisposed him to therapy-induced myelodysplastic syndrome which transformed into acute myeloid leukemia. After achieving complete remission of his leukemia, the patient received an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The allograft was complicated by chronic graft versus host disease that was controlled by various immunosuppressive agents and extracorporal photophoresis. Conclusion Management of complicated cases of histiocytosis requires various therapeutic modalities and a multidisciplinary approach. Having complications of therapy eg myelodysplasia or acute leukemia make the outcome more dismal and the management options limited to aggressive forms of treatment. High dose chemotherapy followed by an allograft may be a curative option not only for therapy-related myelodysplasia/acute leukemia, but also for frequently relapsing and poorly controlled Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PMID:18710527

  1. IGK with conserved IGKV/IGKJ repertoire is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia and promotes leukemic cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoping; He, Zhiqiao; Hu, Fanlei; Chen, Lei; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that immunoglobulin heavy chain genes were expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells. In this study, we further demonstrated that rearranged Ig κ light chain was also frequently expressed in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines (6/6), primary myeloblasts from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (17/18), and mature monocytes (11/12) and neutrophils (3/12) from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, but not or only rarely expressed in mature neutrophils (0/8) or monocytes (1/8) from healthy individuals. Interestingly, myeloblasts and mature monocytes/neutrophils shared several restricted IGKV and IGKJ gene usages but with different expression frequency. Surprisingly, almost all of the acute myeloid leukemia-derived IGKV showed somatic hypermutation; in contrast, mature myeloid cells-derived IGKV rarely had somatic hypermutation. More importantly, although IGK expression appeared not to affect cell proliferation, reduced IGK expression led to a decrease in cell migration in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines HL-60 and NB4, whereas increased IGK expression promoted their motility. In summary, IGK is expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, and is involved in cell migration. These results suggest that myeloid cells-derived IgK may have a role in leukemogenesis and may serve as a novel tumor marker for monitoring minimal residual disease and developing target therapy. PMID:26429876

  2. Molecular analysis of the apoptotic effects of BPA in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bontempo, Paola; Mita, Luigi; Doto, Antonella; Miceli, Marco; Nebbioso, Angela; Lepore, Ilaria; Franci, GianLuigi; Menafra, Roberta; Carafa, Vincenzo; Conte, Mariarosaria; De Bellis, Floriana; Manzo, Fabio; Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Benedetti, Rosaria; D'Amato, Loredana; Marino, Maria; Bolli, Alessandro; Del Pozzo, Giovanna; Diano, Nadia; Portaccio, Marianna; Mita, Gustavo D; Vietri, Maria Teresa; Cioffi, Michele; Nola, Ernesto; Dell'Aversana, Carmela; Sica, Vincenzo; Molinari, Anna Maria; Altucci, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Background: BPA (bisphenol A or 2,2-bis(4-hydroxy-phenol)propane) is present in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, which can be used in impact-resistant safety equipment and baby bottles, as protective coatings inside metal food containers, and as composites and sealants in dentistry. Recently, attention has focused on the estrogen-like and carcinogenic adverse effects of BPA. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity of this compound. Methods: Cell cycle, apoptosis and differentiation analyses; western blots. Results: BPA is able to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in three different acute myeloid leukemias. Although some granulocytic differentiation concomitantly occurred in NB4 cells upon BPA treatment, the major action was the induction of apoptosis. BPA mediated apoptosis was caspase dependent and occurred by activation of extrinsic and intrinsic cell death pathways modulating both FAS and TRAIL and by inducing BAD phosphorylation in NB4 cells. Finally, also non genomic actions such as the early decrease of both ERK and AKT phosphorylation were induced by BPA thus indicating that a complex intersection of regulations occur for the apoptotic action of BPA. Conclusion: BPA is able to induce apoptosis in leukemia cells via caspase activation and involvement of both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis. PMID:19538739

  3. Hispidulin induces mitochondrial apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells by targeting extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui; Liu, Yongji; Li, Kan; Wu, Tianhui; Peng, Jianjun; Jing, Fanbo

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a heterogeneous group of hematological neoplasms with marked heterogeneity in response to both standard therapy and survival. Hispidulin, a flavonoid compound that is anactive ingredient in the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Salvia plebeia R. Br, has recently been reported to have anantitumor effect against solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hispidulin on the human leukemia cell line in vitro and the underlying mechanisms of its actions on these cells. Our results showed that hispidulin inhibits AML cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and induces cell apoptosis throughan intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Our results also revealed that hispidulin treatment significantly inhibits extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) expression in both tested AML cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, and that the overexpression of EMMPRIN protein markedly attenuates hispidulin-induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, our results strongly indicated that the modulating effect of hispidulin on EMMPRIN is correlated with its inhibitory effect on both the Akt and STAT3 signaling pathways. PMID:27158398

  4. UTX inhibition as selective epigenetic therapy against TAL1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Benyoucef, Aissa; Palii, Carmen G.; Wang, Chaochen; Porter, Christopher J.; Chu, Alphonse; Dai, Fengtao; Tremblay, Véronique; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Singh, Kulwant; Huang, Suming; Pflumio, Francoise; Hébert, Josée; Couture, Jean-Francois; Perkins, Theodore J.; Ge, Kai; Dilworth, F. Jeffrey; Brand, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a heterogeneous group of hematological tumors composed of distinct subtypes that vary in their genetic abnormalities, gene expression signatures, and prognoses. However, it remains unclear whether T-ALL subtypes differ at the functional level, and, as such, T-ALL treatments are uniformly applied across subtypes, leading to variable responses between patients. Here we reveal the existence of a subtype-specific epigenetic vulnerability in T-ALL by which a particular subgroup of T-ALL characterized by expression of the oncogenic transcription factor TAL1 is uniquely sensitive to variations in the dosage and activity of the histone 3 Lys27 (H3K27) demethylase UTX/KDM6A. Specifically, we identify UTX as a coactivator of TAL1 and show that it acts as a major regulator of the TAL1 leukemic gene expression program. Furthermore, we demonstrate that UTX, previously described as a tumor suppressor in T-ALL, is in fact a pro-oncogenic cofactor essential for leukemia maintenance in TAL1-positive (but not TAL1-negative) T-ALL. Exploiting this subtype-specific epigenetic vulnerability, we propose a novel therapeutic approach based on UTX inhibition through in vivo administration of an H3K27 demethylase inhibitor that efficiently kills TAL1-positive primary human leukemia. These findings provide the first opportunity to develop personalized epigenetic therapy for T-ALL patients. PMID:26944678

  5. Molecular Targeting of the Oncoprotein PLK1 in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia: RO3280, a Novel PLK1 Inhibitor, Induces Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na-Na; Li, Zhi-Heng; Zhao, He; Tao, Yan-Fang; Xu, Li-Xiao; Lu, Jun; Cao, Lan; Du, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Li-Chao; Zhao, Wen-Li; Xiao, Pei-Fang; Fang, Fang; Su, Guang-Hao; Li, Yan-Hong; Li, Gang; Li, Yi-Ping; Xu, Yun-Yun; Zhou, Hui-Ting; Wu, Yi; Jin, Mei-Fang; Liu, Lin; Ni, Jian; Wang, Jian; Hu, Shao-Yan; Zhu, Xue-Ming; Feng, Xing; Pan, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is highly expressed in many cancers and therefore a biomarker of transformation and potential target for the development of cancer-specific small molecule drugs. RO3280 was recently identified as a novel PLK1 inhibitor; however its therapeutic effects in leukemia treatment are still unknown. We found that the PLK1 protein was highly expressed in leukemia cell lines as well as 73.3% (11/15) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples. PLK1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in AML samples compared with control samples (82.95 ± 110.28 vs. 6.36 ± 6.35; p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that shorter survival time correlated with high tumor PLK1 expression (p = 0.002). The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of RO3280 for acute leukemia cells was between 74 and 797 nM. The IC50 of RO3280 in primary acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and AML cells was between 35.49 and 110.76 nM and 52.80 and 147.50 nM, respectively. RO3280 induced apoptosis and cell cycle disorder in leukemia cells. RO3280 treatment regulated several apoptosis-associated genes. The regulation of DCC, CDKN1A, BTK, and SOCS2 was verified by western blot. These results provide insights into the potential use of RO3280 for AML therapy; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be determined. PMID:25574601

  6. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Recognition of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells in Microscopic Images Using K-Means Clustering and Support Vector Machine Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Morteza Moradi; Kermani, Saeed; Talebi, Ardeshir; Oghli, Mostafa Ghelich

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common form of pediatric cancer which is categorized into three L1, L2, and L3 and could be detected through screening of blood and bone marrow smears by pathologists. Due to being time-consuming and tediousness of the procedure, a computer-based system is acquired for convenient detection of Acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Microscopic images are acquired from blood and bone marrow smears of patients with Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, cells nuclei are segmented by k-means algorithm. Then geometric and statistical features are extracted from nuclei and finally these cells are classified to cancerous and noncancerous cells by means of support vector machine classifier with 10-fold cross validation. These cells are also classified into their sub-types by multi-Support vector machine classifier. Classifier is evaluated by these parameters: Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy which values for cancerous and noncancerous cells 98%, 95%, and 97%, respectively. These parameters are also used for evaluation of cell sub-types which values in mean 84.3%, 97.3%, and 95.6%, respectively. The results show that proposed algorithm could achieve an acceptable performance for the diagnosis of Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and its sub-types and can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists. PMID:25709941

  8. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T.; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-01-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials. PMID:27247754

  10. GPR56 identifies primary human acute myeloid leukemia cells with high repopulating potential in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Caroline; Bergeron, Anne; Lavallée, Vincent-Philippe; Yeh, Jonathan; Gendron, Patrick; Norddahl, Gudmundur L; Krosl, Jana; Boivin, Isabel; Deneault, Eric; Simard, Jessica; Imren, Suzan; Boucher, Geneviève; Eppert, Kolja; Herold, Tobias; Bohlander, Stefan K; Humphries, Keith; Lemieux, Sébastien; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy; Barabé, Frédéric

    2016-04-21

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous hematologic malignancy, which is initiated and driven by a rare fraction of leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Despite the difficulties of identifying a common LSC phenotype, there is increasing evidence that high expression of stem cell gene signatures is associated with poor clinical outcome. Identification of functionally distinct subpopulations in this disease is therefore crucial to dissecting the molecular machinery underlying LSC self-renewal. Here, we combined next-generation sequencing technology with in vivo assessment of LSC frequencies and identified the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor 56 (GPR56) as a novel and stable marker for human LSCs for the majority of AML samples. High GPR56 expression was significantly associated with high-risk genetic subgroups and poor outcome. Analysis of GPR56 in combination with CD34 expression revealed engraftment potential of GPR56(+)cells in both the CD34(-)and CD34(+)fractions, thus defining a novel LSC compartment independent of the CD34(+)CD38(-)LSC phenotype. PMID:26834243

  11. Recurrent DUX4 fusions in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia of adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Takahiko; Tsuzuki, Shinobu; Kawazu, Masahito; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Kojima, Shinya; Ueno, Toshihide; Imoto, Naoto; Kohsaka, Shinji; Kunita, Akiko; Doi, Koichiro; Sakura, Toru; Yujiri, Toshiaki; Kondo, Eisei; Fujimaki, Katsumichi; Ueda, Yasunori; Aoyama, Yasutaka; Ohtake, Shigeki; Takita, Junko; Sai, Eirin; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Kurokawa, Mineo; Morishita, Shinichi; Fukayama, Masashi; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Naoe, Tomoki; Mano, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    The oncogenic mechanisms underlying acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adolescents and young adults (AYA; 15-39 years old) remain largely elusive. Here we have searched for new oncogenes in AYA-ALL by performing RNA-seq analysis of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative AYA-ALL specimens (n = 73) with the use of a next-generation sequencer. Interestingly, insertion of D4Z4 repeats containing the DUX4 gene into the IGH locus was frequently identified in B cell AYA-ALL, leading to a high level of expression of DUX4 protein with an aberrant C terminus. A transplantation assay in mice demonstrated that expression of DUX4-IGH in pro-B cells was capable of generating B cell leukemia in vivo. DUX4 fusions were preferentially detected in the AYA generation. Our data thus show that DUX4 can become an oncogenic driver as a result of somatic chromosomal rearrangements and that AYA-ALL may be a clinical entity distinct from ALL at other ages. PMID:27019113

  12. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-06-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials.

  13. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2005-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

  14. Combined staurosporine and retinoic acid induces differentiation in retinoic acid resistant acute promyelocytic leukemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-zheng; Sheng, Yan; Cai, Xun

    2014-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) resistance has been a critical problem in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) relapsed patients. In ATRA resistant APL cell lines NB4-R1 and NB4-R2, the combination of staurosporine and ATRA synergized to trigger differentiation accompanied by significantly enhanced protein level of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein ε (C/EBPε) and C/EBPβ as well as the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Furthermore, attenuation of the MEK activation blocked not only the differentiation but also the increased protein level of C/EBPε and C/EBPβ. Taken together, we concluded that the combination of ATRA and staurosporine could overcome differentiation block via MEK/ERK signaling pathway in ATRA-resistant APL cell lines. PMID:24769642

  15. Leydig-cell function in children after direct testicular irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Brauner, R.; Czernichow, P.; Cramer, P.; Schaison, G.; Rappaport, R.

    1983-07-07

    To assess the effect of testicular irradiation on testicular endocrine function, we studied 12 boys with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had been treated with direct testicular irradiation 10 months to 8 1/2 years earlier. Insufficient Leydig-cell function, manifested by a low response of plasma testosterone to chorionic gonadotropin or an increased basal level of plasma luteinizing hormone (or both), was observed in 10 patients, 7 of whom were pubertal. Two of these patients had a compensated testicular endocrine insufficiency with only high plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone. Testosterone secretion was severely impaired in three pubertal boys studied more than four years after testicular irradiation. A diminished testicular volume indicating tubular atrophy was found in all pubertal patients, including three who had not received cyclophosphamide or cytarabine. These data indicate that testosterone insufficiency is a frequent complication of testicular irradiation, although some patients continue to have Leydig-cell activity for several years after therapy.

  16. HOXA/PBX3 knockdown impairs growth and sensitizes cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia cells to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Glenda J.; Liberante, Fabio G.; Kettyle, Laura M; O’Hagan, Kathleen A.; Finnegan, Damian P. J.; Bullinger, Lars; Geerts, Dirk; McMullin, Mary Frances; Lappin, Terry R. J.; Mills, Ken I.; Thompson, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The cytogenetically normal subtype of acute myeloid leukemia is associated with an intermediate risk which complicates therapeutic options. Lower overall HOX/TALE expression appears to correlate with more favorable prognosis/better response to treatment in some leukemias and solid cancer. The functional significance of the associated gene expression and response to chemotherapy is not known. Three independent microarray datasets obtained from large cohorts of patients along with quantitative polymerase chain reaction validation were used to identify a four-gene HOXA/TALE signature capable of prognostic stratification. Biochemical analysis was used to identify interactions between the four encoded proteins and targeted knockdown used to examine the functional importance of sustained expression of the signature in leukemia maintenance and response to chemotherapy. An 11 HOXA/TALE code identified in an intermediate-risk group of patients (n=315) compared to a group with a favorable risk (n=105) was reduced to a four-gene signature of HOXA6, HOXA9, PBX3 and MEIS1 by iterative analysis of independent platforms. This signature maintained the favorable/intermediate risk partition and where applicable, correlated with overall survival in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. We further showed that cell growth and function are dependent on maintained levels of these core genes and that direct targeting of HOXA/PBX3 sensitizes cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia cells to standard chemotherapy. Together the data support a key role for HOXA/TALE in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia and demonstrate that targeting of clinically significant HOXA/PBX3 elements may provide therapeutic benefit to patients with this subtype of leukemia. PMID:23539541

  17. Induction with azacytidine followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a Jehovah's Witness with acute monocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Garelius, Hege; Grund, Sofia; Stockelberg, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We have used a hypomethylating agent instead of conventional chemotherapy to induce remission in a young Jehovah's Witness with acute monocytic leukemia to avoid severe myelosuppression and blood product support. The treatment was consolidated with reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation. This could be an alternative when transfusions must be avoided. PMID:25984306

  18. Induction with azacytidine followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a Jehovah's Witness with acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Garelius, Hege; Grund, Sofia; Stockelberg, Dick

    2015-05-01

    We have used a hypomethylating agent instead of conventional chemotherapy to induce remission in a young Jehovah's Witness with acute monocytic leukemia to avoid severe myelosuppression and blood product support. The treatment was consolidated with reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation. This could be an alternative when transfusions must be avoided. PMID:25984306

  19. Radiolabeled BC8 Antibody, Busulfan, Cyclophosphamide Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in First Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  20. Extracellular DNA traps released by acute promyelocytic leukemia cells through autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ma, R; Li, T; Cao, M; Si, Y; Wu, X; Zhao, L; Yao, Z; Zhang, Y; Fang, S; Deng, R; Novakovic, V A; Bi, Y; Kou, J; Yu, B; Yang, S; Wang, J; Zhou, J; Shi, J

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells exhibit disrupted regulation of cell death and differentiation, and therefore the fate of these leukemic cells is unclear. Here, we provide the first evidence that a small percentage of APL cells undergo a novel cell death pathway by releasing extracellular DNA traps (ETs) in untreated patients. Both APL and NB4 cells stimulated with APL serum had nuclear budding of vesicles filled with chromatin that leaked to the extracellular space when nuclear and cell membranes ruptured. Using immunofluorescence, we found that NB4 cells undergoing ETosis extruded lattice-like structures with a DNA-histone backbone. During all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced cell differentiation, a subset of NB4 cells underwent ETosis at days 1 and 3 of treatment. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were significantly elevated at 3 days, and combined treatment with TNF-α and IL-6 stimulated NB4 cells to release ETs. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or by small interfering RNA against Atg7 attenuated LC3 autophagy formation and significantly decreased ET generation. Our results identify a previously unrecognized mechanism for death in promyelocytes and suggest that ATRA may accelerate ET release through increased cytokines and autophagosome formation. Targeting this cellular death pathway in addition to conventional chemotherapy may provide new therapeutic modalities for APL. PMID:27362801

  1. Characterization of a set of tumor suppressor microRNAs in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, Viraj R; Mavrakis, Konstantinos J; Van der Meulen, Joni; Boice, Michael; Wolfe, Andrew L; Carty, Mark; Mohan, Prathibha; Rondou, Pieter; Socci, Nicholas D; Benoit, Yves; Taghon, Tom; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Leslie, Christina S; Speleman, Frank; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2014-11-18

    The posttranscriptional control of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs) is highly redundant, and compensatory effects limit the consequences of the inactivation of individual miRNAs. This implies that only a few miRNAs can function as effective tumor suppressors. It is also the basis of our strategy to define functionally relevant miRNA target genes that are not under redundant control by other miRNAs. We identified a functionally interconnected group of miRNAs that exhibited a reduced abundance in leukemia cells from patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). To pinpoint relevant target genes, we applied a machine learning approach to eliminate genes that were subject to redundant miRNA-mediated control and to identify those genes that were exclusively targeted by tumor-suppressive miRNAs. This strategy revealed the convergence of a small group of tumor suppressor miRNAs on the Myb oncogene, as well as their effects on HBP1, which encodes a transcription factor. The expression of both genes was increased in T-ALL patient samples, and each gene promoted the progression of T-ALL in mice. Hence, our systematic analysis of tumor suppressor miRNA action identified a widespread mechanism of oncogene activation in T-ALL.

  2. Tal-1 induces T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia accelerated by casein kinase IIalpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kelliher, M A; Seldin, D C; Leder, P

    1996-01-01

    Ectopic activation of the TAL-1 gene in T lymphocytes occurs in the majority of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), yet experiments to date have failed to demonstrate a direct transforming capability for tal-1. The tal-1 gene product is a serine phosphoprotein and basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor known to regulate embryonic hematopoiesis. We have established a transgenic mouse model in which tal-1 mis-expression in the thymus results in the development of clonal T cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Thus, overexpression of tal-1 alone can be transforming, verifying its pathogenic role in human T-ALL. In addition, leukemogenesis is accelerated dramatically by transgenic co-expression of tal-1 and the catalytic subunit of casein kinase IIalpha (CKIIalpha), a serine/threonine protein kinase known to modulate the activity of other bHLH transcription factors. Although tal-1 is a substrate for CKII, the synergy of the tal-1 and CKIIalpha transgenes appears to be indirect, perhaps mediated through the E protein heterodimeric partners of tal-1. These studies prove that dysregulated tal-1 is oncogenic, providing a direct molecular explanation for the malignancies associated with TAL-1 activation in human T-ALL. Images PMID:8895560

  3. Genetic Inactivation of the PRC2 Complex in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ntziachristos, Panagiotis; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Nedjic, Jelena; Trimarchi, Thomas; Flaherty, Maria Sol; Ferres-Marco, Dolors; da Ros, Vanina; Tang, Zuojian; Siegle, Jasmin; Asp, Patrik; Hadler, Michael; Rigo, Isaura; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Patel, Jay; Huynh, Tien; Utro, Filippo; Poglio, Sandrine; Samon, Jeremy B.; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M.; Rabadan, Raul; Levine, Ross L.; Brown, Stuart; Pflumio, Francoise; Dominguez, Maria; Ferrando, Adolfo; Aifantis, Iannis

    2011-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an immature hematopoietic malignancy driven mainly by oncogenic activation of NOTCH1 signaling1. In this study we report the presence of loss-of-function mutations and deletions of EZH2 and SUZ12 genes, encoding critical components of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) complex2,3, in 25% of T-ALLs. To further study the role of the PRC2 complex in T-ALL, we used NOTCH1-induced animal models of the disease, as well as human T-ALL samples, and combined locus-specific and global analysis of NOTCH1-driven epigenetic changes. These studies demonstrated that activation of NOTCH1 specifically induces loss of the repressive mark lysine-27 tri-methylation of histone 3 (H3K27me3)4 by antagonizing the activity of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) complex. These studies demonstrate a tumor suppressor role for the PRC2 complex in human leukemia and suggest a hitherto unrecognized dynamic interplay between oncogenic NOTCH1 and PRC2 function for the regulation of gene expression and cell transformation. PMID:22237151

  4. Characterization of a set of tumor suppressor microRNAs in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, Viraj R; Mavrakis, Konstantinos J; Van der Meulen, Joni; Boice, Michael; Wolfe, Andrew L; Carty, Mark; Mohan, Prathibha; Rondou, Pieter; Socci, Nicholas D; Benoit, Yves; Taghon, Tom; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Leslie, Christina S; Speleman, Frank; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2014-11-18

    The posttranscriptional control of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs) is highly redundant, and compensatory effects limit the consequences of the inactivation of individual miRNAs. This implies that only a few miRNAs can function as effective tumor suppressors. It is also the basis of our strategy to define functionally relevant miRNA target genes that are not under redundant control by other miRNAs. We identified a functionally interconnected group of miRNAs that exhibited a reduced abundance in leukemia cells from patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). To pinpoint relevant target genes, we applied a machine learning approach to eliminate genes that were subject to redundant miRNA-mediated control and to identify those genes that were exclusively targeted by tumor-suppressive miRNAs. This strategy revealed the convergence of a small group of tumor suppressor miRNAs on the Myb oncogene, as well as their effects on HBP1, which encodes a transcription factor. The expression of both genes was increased in T-ALL patient samples, and each gene promoted the progression of T-ALL in mice. Hence, our systematic analysis of tumor suppressor miRNA action identified a widespread mechanism of oncogene activation in T-ALL. PMID:25406379

  5. Select microtubule inhibitors increase lysosome acidity and promote lysosomal disruption in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Dannie; Gebbia, Marinella; Prabha, Swayam; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Wang, Xiaoming; Hurren, Rose; Sukhai, Mahadeo A; Cho, Eunice E; Manolson, Morris F; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffrey; Minden, Mark D; Al-Awar, Rima; Aman, Ahmed; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-07-01

    To identify new biological vulnerabilities in acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a library of natural products for compounds cytotoxic to TEX leukemia cells. This screen identified the novel small molecule Deoxysappanone B 7,4' dimethyl ether (Deox B 7,4), which possessed nanomolar anti-leukemic activity. To determine the anti-leukemic mechanism of action of Deox B 7,4, we conducted a genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identified enrichment of genes related to mitotic cell cycle as well as vacuolar acidification, therefore pointing to microtubules and vacuolar (V)-ATPase as potential drug targets. Further investigations into the mechanisms of action of Deox B 7,4 and a related analogue revealed that these compounds were reversible microtubule inhibitors that bound near the colchicine site. In addition, Deox B 7,4 and its analogue increased lysosomal V-ATPase activity and lysosome acidity. The effects on microtubules and lysosomes were functionally important for the anti-leukemic effects of these drugs. The lysosomal effects were characteristic of select microtubule inhibitors as only the Deox compounds and nocodazole, but not colchicine, vinca alkaloids or paclitaxel, altered lysosome acidity and induced lysosomal disruption. Thus, our data highlight a new mechanism of action of select microtubule inhibitors on lysosomal function. PMID:25832785

  6. Signaling thresholds and negative B cell selection in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhengshan; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Buchner, Maike; Geng, Huimin; Lee, Jae Woong; Klemm, Lars; Titz, Björn; Graeber, Thomas G.; Park, Eugene; Tan, Ying Xim; Satterthwaite, Anne; Paietta, Elisabeth; Hunger, Stephen P.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Melnick, Ari; Loh, Mignon L.; Jung, Jae U.; Coligan, John E.; Bolland, Silvia; Mak, Tak W.; Limnander, Andre; Jumaa, Hassan; Reth, Michael; Weiss, Arthur; Lowell, Clifford A.; Müschen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    B cells are selected for an intermediate level of B cell receptor (BCR) signaling strength: Attenuation below minimum (e.g. non-functional BCR)1 or hyperactivation above maximum (e.g. self-reactive BCR)2–3 thresholds of signaling strength causes negative selection. In ~25% of cases, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells carry the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase (Ph+), which mimics constitutively active pre-BCR signaling4,5. Current therapy approaches are largely focused on the development of more potent tyrosine kinase inhibitors to suppress oncogenic signaling below a minimum threshold for survival6. Here, we tested the hypothesis that targeted hyperactivation above a maximum threshold will engage a deletional checkpoint for removal of self-reactive B cells and selectively kill ALL cells. Testing various components of proximal pre-BCR signaling, we found that an incremental increase of Syk tyrosine kinase activity was required and sufficient to induce cell death. Hyperactive Syk was functionally equivalent to acute activation of a self-reactive BCR on ALL cells. Despite oncogenic transformation, this basic mechanism of negative selection was still functional in ALL cells. Unlike normal pre-B cells, patient-derived ALL cells express the inhibitory receptors PECAM1, CD300A and LAIR1 at high levels. Genetic studies revealed that Pecam1, Cd300a and Lair1 are critical to calibrate oncogenic signaling strength through recruitment of the inhibitory phosphatases Ptpn67 and Inpp5d8. Using a novel small molecule inhibitor of INPP5D9, we demonstrated that pharmacological hyperactivation of SYK and engagement of negative B cell selection represents a promising new strategy to overcome drug-resistance in human ALL. PMID:25799995

  7. Notch signalling drives bone marrow stromal cell-mediated chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kamga, Paul Takam; Bassi, Giulio; Cassaro, Adriana; Midolo, Martina; Di Trapani, Mariano; Gatti, Alessandro; Carusone, Roberta; Resci, Federica; Perbellini, Omar; Gottardi, Michele; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Kamdje, Armel Hervé Nwabo; Ambrosetti, Achille; Krampera, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Both preclinical and clinical investigations suggest that Notch signalling is critical for the development of many cancers and for their response to chemotherapy. We previously showed that Notch inhibition abrogates stromal-induced chemoresistance in lymphoid neoplasms. However, the role of Notch in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its contribution to the crosstalk between leukemia cells and bone marrow stromal cells remain controversial. Thus, we evaluated the role of the Notch pathway in the proliferation, survival and chemoresistance of AML cells in co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from both healthy donors (hBM-MSCs) and AML patients (hBM-MSCs*). As compared to hBM-MSCs, hBM-MSCs* showed higher level of Notch1, Jagged1 as well as the main Notch target gene HES1. Notably, hBM-MSCs* induced expression and activation of Notch signalling in AML cells, supporting AML proliferation and being more efficientin inducing AML chemoresistance than hBM-MSCs*. Pharmacological inhibition of Notch using combinations of Notch receptor-blocking antibodies or gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), in presence of chemotherapeutic agents, significant lowered the supportive effect of hBM-MSCs and hBM-MSCs* towards AML cells, by activating apoptotic cascade and reducing protein level of STAT3, AKT and NF-κB. These results suggest that Notch signalling inhibition, by overcoming the stromal-mediated promotion of chemoresistance,may represent a potential therapeutic targetnot only for lymphoid neoplasms, but also for AML. PMID:26967055

  8. MN1–Fli1 oncofusion transforms murine hematopoietic progenitor cells into acute megakaryoblastic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Wenge, D V; Felipe-Fumero, E; Angenendt, L; Schliemann, C; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, L H; Thiede, C; Ehninger, G; Berdel, W E; Arteaga, M-F; Mikesch, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Long-term outcome of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) patients without Down's syndrome remains poor. Founding mutations and chimeric oncogenes characterize various AMKL subtypes. However, for around one third of all cases the underlying mechanisms of AMKL leukemogenesis are still largely unknown. Recently, an in-frame fusion of meningeoma 1–friend leukemia virus integration 1 (MN1–Fli1) gene was detected in a child with AMKL. We intended to investigate the potential role of this oncofusion in leukemogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. Strikingly, expression of MN1–Fli1 in murine hematopoietic progenitor cells was sufficient to induce leukemic transformation generating immature myeloid cells with cytomorphology and expression of surface markers typical for AMKL. Systematic structure function analyses revealed FLS and 3′ETS domains of Fli1 as decisive domains for the AMKL phenotype. Our data highlight an important role of MN1–Fli1 in AMKL leukemogenesis and provide a basis for research assessing the value of this oncofusion as a future diagnostic marker and/or therapeutic target in AMKL patients. PMID:26690545

  9. Cytotoxic activity to acute myeloid leukemia cells by Antp-TPR hybrid peptide targeting Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Tomohisa; Kawamoto, Megumi; Kohno, Masayuki; Kawakami, Koji

    2012-07-01

    We previously reported that Antp-TPR hybrid peptide inhibited the interaction of Hsp90 with TPR2A and had selective cytotoxic activity discriminating between normal and cancer cells to induce cancer cell death. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of Antp-TPR peptide toward acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. It was demonstrated that Antp-TPR peptide induced AML cell death in cell lines such as U937, K562, THP-1, and HL-60 via activation of caspases 3 and 7, and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. Conversely, Antp-TPR peptide did not reduce the viability of normal cells including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), although both geldanamycin and 17-AAG, small-molecule inhibitors of Hsp90, mediated cytotoxicity to these normal cells at low concentrations. In addition, mutation analysis of TPR peptide demonstrated that the highly conserved amino acids Lys and Arg were critical to the cytotoxic activity. These results indicated that Antp-TPR hybrid peptide would provide potent and selective therapeutic options in the treatment of AML.

  10. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 on B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Iijima, Kazutoshi; Tomita, Osamu; Taguchi, Tomoko; Miharu, Masashi; Kobayashi, Kenichiro; Okita, Hajime; Saito, Masahiro; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is known to be a major growth factor with effects on various cell types, including hematopoietic cells, as well as neoplasms, and is regulated by IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). In this study, we investigated the effects of IGF-1 on B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cells. When the expression of IGF-1R in clinical samples of BCP-ALL was examined, five of thirty-two cases showed IGF-1R expression, whereas IGF-1R was expressed in most BCP-ALL cell lines. We observed that IGF-1 enhanced the proliferation of BCP-ALL cell lines that can be partially inhibited by IGFBP-1, -3, and -4, but not other IGFBPs. IGF-1 also partially inhibited dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, but not apoptosis mediated by VP-16 and irradiation. Interestingly, the proliferative effect of IGF-1 was partially blocked by inhibitors of MAPK and AKT, whereas the inhibition of dexamethasone-induced apoptosis was completely blocked by both inhibitors. Our data indicate that IGF-1 is involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis regulation in BCP-ALL cells. Since some BCP-ALL cases express IGF-1R, it appears to be a plausible target for prognostic evaluation and may represent a new therapeutic strategy.

  11. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  12. Repetitive genomic elements and overall DNA methylation changes in acute myeloid and childhood B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Bujko, Mateusz; Musialik, Ewa; Olbromski, Rafał; Przestrzelska, Marta; Libura, Marta; Pastwińska, Anna; Juszczyński, Przemysław; Zwierzchowski, Lech; Baranowski, Paweł; Siedlecki, Janusz Aleksander

    2014-07-01

    Aberrant epigenetic regulation is a hallmark of neoplastic cells. Increased DNA methylation of individual genes' promoter regions and decreases in overall DNA methylation level are both generally observed in cancer. In solid tumors, this global DNA hypomethylation is related to reduced methylation of repeated DNA elements (REs) and contributes to genome instability. The aim of the present study was to assess methylation level of LINE-1 and ALU REs and total 5-methylcytosine (5metC) content in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 58), childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 32), as the most frequent acute leukemias in two age categories and in normal adult bone marrow and children's blood samples. DNA pyrosequencing and ELISA assays were used, respectively. Global DNA hypomethylation was not observed in leukemia patients. Results revealed higher DNA methylation of LINE-1 in AML and ALL samples compared to corresponding normal controls. Elevated methylation of ALU and overall 5metC level were also observed in B-cell ALL patients. Differences of REs and global DNA methylation between AML cytogenetic-risk groups were observed, with the lowest methylation levels in intermediate-risk/cytogenetically normal patients. B-cell ALL is characterized by the highest DNA methylation level compared to AML and controls and overall DNA methylation is correlated with leukocyte count.

  13. G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest and Tumor Selective Apoptosis of Acute Leukemia Cells by a Promising Benzophenone Thiosemicarbazone Compound

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Maia; Gomez, Natalia; Remes Lenicov, Federico; Echeverría, Emiliana; Shayo, Carina; Moglioni, Albertina; Fernández, Natalia; Davio, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Anti-mitotic therapies have been considered a hallmark in strategies against abnormally proliferating cells. Focusing on the extensively studied family of thiosemicarbazone (TSC) compounds, we have previously identified 4,4’-dimethoxybenzophenone thiosemicarbazone (T44Bf) as a promising pharmacological compound in a panel of human leukemia cell lines (HL60, U937, KG1a and Jurkat). Present findings indicate that T44Bf-mediated antiproliferative effects are associated with a reversible chronic mitotic arrest caused by defects in chromosome alignment, followed by induced programmed cell death. Furthermore, T44Bf selectively induces apoptosis in leukemia cell lines when compared to normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The underlying mechanism of action involves the activation of the mitochondria signaling pathway, with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and sustained phosphorylation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL as well as increased Bcl-2 (enhanced phosphorylated fraction) and pro-apoptotic protein Bad levels. In addition, ERK signaling pathway activation was found to be a requisite for T44Bf apoptotic activity. Our findings further describe a novel activity for a benzophenone thiosemicarbazone and propose T44Bf as a promising anti-mitotic prototype to develop chemotherapeutic agents to treat acute leukemia malignancies. PMID:26360247

  14. G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest and Tumor Selective Apoptosis of Acute Leukemia Cells by a Promising Benzophenone Thiosemicarbazone Compound.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Maia; Gomez, Natalia; Remes Lenicov, Federico; Echeverría, Emiliana; Shayo, Carina; Moglioni, Albertina; Fernández, Natalia; Davio, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Anti-mitotic therapies have been considered a hallmark in strategies against abnormally proliferating cells. Focusing on the extensively studied family of thiosemicarbazone (TSC) compounds, we have previously identified 4,4'-dimethoxybenzophenone thiosemicarbazone (T44Bf) as a promising pharmacological compound in a panel of human leukemia cell lines (HL60, U937, KG1a and Jurkat). Present findings indicate that T44Bf-mediated antiproliferative effects are associated with a reversible chronic mitotic arrest caused by defects in chromosome alignment, followed by induced programmed cell death. Furthermore, T44Bf selectively induces apoptosis in leukemia cell lines when compared to normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The underlying mechanism of action involves the activation of the mitochondria signaling pathway, with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and sustained phosphorylation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL as well as increased Bcl-2 (enhanced phosphorylated fraction) and pro-apoptotic protein Bad levels. In addition, ERK signaling pathway activation was found to be a requisite for T44Bf apoptotic activity. Our findings further describe a novel activity for a benzophenone thiosemicarbazone and propose T44Bf as a promising anti-mitotic prototype to develop chemotherapeutic agents to treat acute leukemia malignancies. PMID:26360247

  15. Stromal cell-mediated mitochondrial redox adaptation regulates drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jizhong; Masurekar, Ashish; Johnson, Suzanne; Chakraborty, Sohini; Griffiths, John; Smith, Duncan; Alexander, Seema; Dempsey, Clare; Parker, Catriona; Harrison, Stephanie; Li, Yaoyong; Miller, Crispin; Di, Yujun; Ghosh, Zhumur; Krishnan, Shekhar; Saha, Vaskar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high cure rates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), relapsed ALL remains a significant clinical problem. Genetic heterogeneity does not adequately explain variations in response to therapy. The chemoprotective tumor microenvironment may additionally contribute to disease recurrence. This study identifies metabolic reprogramming of leukemic cells by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as a putative mechanism of drug resistance. In a BMSC-extracellular matrix culture model, BMSC produced chemoprotective soluble factors and facilitated the emergence of a reversible multidrug resistant phenotype in ALL cells. BMSC environment induced a mitochondrial calcium influx leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in ALL cells. In response to this oxidative stress, drug resistant cells underwent a redox adaptation process, characterized by a decrease in ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential with an upregulation of antioxidant production and MCL-1 expression. Similar expanded subpopulations of low ROS expressing and drug resistant cells were identified in pre-treatment bone marrow samples from ALL patients with slower response to therapy. This suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment induces a redox adaptation in ALL subclones that protects against cytotoxic stress and potentially gives rise to minimal residual disease. Targeting metabolic remodeling by inhibiting antioxidant production and antiapoptosis was able to overcome drug resistance. Thus metabolic plasticity in leukemic cell response to environmental factors contributes to chemoresistance and disease recurrence. Adjunctive strategies targeting such processes have the potential to overcome therapeutic failure in ALL. PMID:26474278

  16. MUC1-C oncoprotein promotes FLT3 receptor activation in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suiyang; Yin, Li; Stroopinsky, Dina; Rajabi, Hasan; Puissant, Alexandre; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Avigan, David; Kharbanda, Surender; Kufe, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Blasts from approximately one-third of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) harbor activating mutations in the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) receptor tyrosine kinase that confer a poor prognosis. The Mucin 1-C-terminal subunit (MUC1-C) oncoprotein is aberrantly expressed in AML blasts and stem cells; however, there is no known interaction between MUC1-C and FLT3. The present studies demonstrate that MUC1-C associates with wild-type and mutant FLT3 in AML cells. Targeting MUC1-C with the cell-penetrating peptide inhibitor GO-203 disrupts MUC1-C/FLT3 complexes and downregulates FLT3 activation. GO-203 treatment of AML cells was also associated with inhibition of the FLT3 downstream effectors AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and STAT5. The results further show that AML cells with FLT3-activating mutations and resistant to the FLT3 inhibitor midostaurin/PKC412 are sensitive to GO-203–induced growth arrest and death. Moreover, GO-203 increases sensitivity of mutant FLT3 AML cells to FLT3 inhibitor treatment. These results indicate that MUC1-C contributes to FLT3 activation in AML cells and that targeting MUC1-C inhibits the FLT3 signaling pathway. Our findings support the development of MUC1-C inhibitors alone and in combination with agents that target FLT3 for the treatment of wild-type and mutant FLT3 AML. PMID:24282218

  17. (Lymph)angiogenic influences on hematopoietic cells in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yoon; Kim, Hee-Je

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of (lymph)angiogenic cytokines on hematopoietic cells involved in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis occurs in pathophysiological conditions but not in healthy adults. AML is closely associated with the vasculature system, and the interplay between lymphangiogenic cytokines maintains leukemic blast survival in the bone marrow (BM). Once AML is induced, proangiogenic cytokines function as angiogenic or lymphangiogenic factors and affect hematopoietic cells, including BM-derived immune cells. Simultaneously, the representative cytokines, VEGFs and their receptors are expressed on AML blasts in vascular and osteoblast niches in both the BM and the peripheral circulation. After exposure to (lymph)angiogenic cytokines in leukemogenesis and infiltration, immune cell phenotypes and functions are affected. These dynamic behaviors in the BM reflect the clinical features of AML. In this review, we note the importance of lymphangiogenic factors and their receptors in hematopoietic cells in AML. Understanding the functional characterization of (lymph)angiogenic factors in the BM niche in AML will also be helpful in interrupting the engraftment of leukemic stem cells and for enhancing immune cell function by modulating the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25412683

  18. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  19. Discrimination and classification of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managò, Stefano; Valente, Carmen; Mirabelli, Peppino; De Luca, Anna Chiara

    2015-05-01

    Currently, a combination of technologies is typically required to identify and classify leukemia cells. These methods often lack the specificity and sensitivity necessary for early and accurate diagnosis. Here, we demonstrate the use of Raman spectroscopy to identify normal B cells, collected from healthy patients, and three ALL cell lines (RS4;11, REH and MN60 at different differentiation level, respectively). Raman markers associated with DNA and protein vibrational modes have been identified that exhibit excellent discriminating power for leukemia cell identification. Principal Component Analysis was finally used to confirm the significance of these markers for identify leukemia cells and classifying the data. The obtained results indicate a sorting accuracy of 96% between the three leukemia cell lines.

  20. Evolution of acute myelogenous leukemia stem cell properties after treatment and progression.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tzu-Chieh; LaMere, Mark; Stevens, Brett M; Ashton, John M; Myers, Jason R; O'Dwyer, Kristen M; Liesveld, Jane L; Mendler, Jason H; Guzman, Monica; Morrissette, Jennifer D; Zhao, Jianhua; Wang, Eunice S; Wetzler, Meir; Jordan, Craig T; Becker, Michael W

    2016-09-29

    Most cancers evolve over time as patients initially responsive to therapy acquire resistance to the same drugs at relapse. Cancer stem cells have been postulated to represent a therapy-refractory reservoir for relapse, but formal proof of this model is lacking. We prospectively characterized leukemia stem cell populations (LSCs) from a well-defined cohort of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) at diagnosis and relapse to assess the effect of the disease course on these critical populations. Leukemic samples were collected from patients with newly diagnosed AML before therapy and after relapse, and LSC frequency was assessed by limiting dilution analyses. LSC populations were identified using fluorescent-labeled cell sorting and transplantation into immunodeficient NOD/SCID/interleukin 2 receptor γ chain null mice. The surface antigen expression profiles of pretherapy and postrelapse LSCs were determined for published LSC markers. We demonstrate a 9- to 90-fold increase in LSC frequency between diagnosis and relapse. LSC activity at relapse was identified in populations of leukemic blasts that did not demonstrate this activity before treatment and relapse. In addition, we describe genetic instability and exceptional phenotypic changes that accompany the evolution of these new LSC populations. This study is the first to characterize the evolution of LSCs in vivo after chemotherapy, identifying a dramatic change in the physiology of primitive AML cells when the disease progresses. Taken together, these findings provide a new frame of reference by which to evaluate candidate AML therapies in which both disease control and the induction of more advanced forms of disease should be considered. PMID:27421961

  1. Evolution of acute myelogenous leukemia stem cell properties after treatment and progression.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tzu-Chieh; LaMere, Mark; Stevens, Brett M; Ashton, John M; Myers, Jason R; O'Dwyer, Kristen M; Liesveld, Jane L; Mendler, Jason H; Guzman, Monica; Morrissette, Jennifer D; Zhao, Jianhua; Wang, Eunice S; Wetzler, Meir; Jordan, Craig T; Becker, Michael W

    2016-09-29

    Most cancers evolve over time as patients initially responsive to therapy acquire resistance to the same drugs at relapse. Cancer stem cells have been postulated to represent a therapy-refractory reservoir for relapse, but formal proof of this model is lacking. We prospectively characterized leukemia stem cell populations (LSCs) from a well-defined cohort of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) at diagnosis and relapse to assess the effect of the disease course on these critical populations. Leukemic samples were collected from patients with newly diagnosed AML before therapy and after relapse, and LSC frequency was assessed by limiting dilution analyses. LSC populations were identified using fluorescent-labeled cell sorting and transplantation into immunodeficient NOD/SCID/interleukin 2 receptor γ chain null mice. The surface antigen expression profiles of pretherapy and postrelapse LSCs were determined for published LSC markers. We demonstrate a 9- to 90-fold increase in LSC frequency between diagnosis and relapse. LSC activity at relapse was identified in populations of leukemic blasts that did not demonstrate this activity before treatment and relapse. In addition, we describe genetic instability and exceptional phenotypic changes that accompany the evolution of these new LSC populations. This study is the first to characterize the evolution of LSCs in vivo after chemotherapy, identifying a dramatic change in the physiology of primitive AML cells when the disease progresses. Taken together, these findings provide a new frame of reference by which to evaluate candidate AML therapies in which both disease control and the induction of more advanced forms of disease should be considered.

  2. [New Retinoid SX-116 Induces Apoptosis of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Line NB4

    PubMed

    Yao, Yi-Yun; Sun, Guan-Lin; Guo, Zong-Ru; Wu, Wei-Li; Wang, Yun; Su, Hui

    2001-03-01

    In this research, the effect of novel retinoid SX-116 on acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line NB4 was studied in vitro. Cell proliferation, cell morphological characters, flow cytometry, DNA electrophoresis and RT-PCR were observational parameters. The results showed that treated with SX-116 at 10(-6) mol/L, the growth and survival of NB4 cells were markedly inhibited, morphological changes of apoptosis, including membrane blebbing, chromosome condensation and fragmentation of nuclei were observed in NB4 cells after 24 hours exposure of SX-116. Further studies showed "DNA ladder" in genomic DNA electrophoresis, as well as a typical apoptotic peak below G(1) phase presented in flow cytometry. The expression of apoptosis - related gene bcl-2 and p53 were examined. The level of bcl-2 mRNA was downregulated by 6-hour treatment of SX-116, while the gene restored to the normal level by following 12-, 24- and 48-hour exposure. However, p53 mRNA was unchanged during the treatment. The results demonstrated that SX-116 could induce apoptosis of NB4 cells while the mechanism remains to be studied.

  3. TYK2-STAT1-BCL2 Pathway Dependence in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sanda, Takaomi; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ngo, Vu N.; Glover, Jason; Chang, Bill H.; Yost, Arla; Ma, Wenxue; Fleischman, Angela G.; Zhou, Wenjun; Yang, Yandan; Kleppe, Maria; Ahn, Yebin; Tatarek, Jessica; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Levine, Ross L.; Moriggl, Richard; Müller, Mathias; Gray, Nathanael S.; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.; Weng, Andrew P.; Staudt, Louis M.; Druker, Brian J.; Look, A. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Targeted molecular therapy has yielded remarkable outcomes in certain cancers, but specific therapeutic targets remain elusive for many others. As a result of two independent RNA interference (RNAi) screens, we identified pathway dependence on a member of the JAK tyrosine kinase family, TYK2, and its downstream effector STAT1 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Gene knockdown experiments consistently demonstrated TYK2 dependence in both T-ALL primary specimens and cell lines, and a small-molecule inhibitor of JAK kinase activity induced T-ALL cell death. Activation of this TYK2-STAT1 pathway i n T-ALL cell lines occurs by gain-of-function TYK2 mutations or activation of IL-10 receptor signaling, and this pathway mediates T-ALL cell survival through upregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2. These findings indicate that in many T-ALL cases, the leukemic cells are dependent upon the TYK2-STAT1-BCL2 pathway for continued survival, supporting the development of molecular therapies targeting TYK2 and other components of this pathway. PMID:23471820

  4. Blinatumomab for the Treatment of Philadelphia Chromosome-Negative, Precursor B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wolach, Ofir; Stone, Richard M

    2015-10-01

    Blinatumomab is a CD19/CD3 bispescific antibody designed to redirect T cells toward malignant B cells and induce their lysis. It recently gained accelerated approval by the FDA for the treatment of relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (RR-ALL). In the phase II trial that served as the basis for approval, blinatumomab demonstrated significant single-agent activity and induced remission [complete remission (CR) and CR with incomplete recovery of peripheral blood counts (CRh)] in 43% of 189 adult patients with RR-ALL; the majority of responders (82%) also attained negative minimal residual disease (MRD(-)) status that did not generally translate into long-term remissions in most cases. Additional studies show that blinatumomab can induce high response rates associated with lasting remissions in patients in first remission treated for MRD positivity, suggesting a role for blinatumomab in the upfront, MRD-positive setting. Blinatumomab infusion follows a predictable immunopharmacologic profile, including early cytokine release that can be associated with a clinical syndrome, T-cell expansion, and B-cell depletion. Neurologic toxicities represent a unique toxicity that shares similarities with adverse effects of other T-cell engaging therapies. Further studies are needed to clarify the optimal disease setting and timing for blinatumomab therapy. Additional insights into the pathogenesis, risk factors, and prevention of neurologic toxicities as well as a better understanding of the clinical consequences and biologic pathways that are associated with drug resistance are needed. PMID:26283683

  5. Emetine induces chemosensitivity and reduces clonogenicity of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Cornet-Masana, Josep Maria; Moreno-Martínez, Daniel; Lara-Castillo, María Carmen; Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Etxabe, Amaia; Tesi, Niccolò; Pratcorona, Marta; Esteve, Jordi; Risueño, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an hematologic neoplasia characterized by the accumulation of transformed immature myeloid cells in bone marrow. Although the response rate to induction therapy is high, survival rate 5-year after diagnosis is still low, highlighting the necessity of new novel agents. To identify agents with the capability to abolish the self-renewal capacity of AML blasts, an in silico screening was performed to search for small molecules that induce terminal differentiation. Emetine, a hit compound, was validated for its anti-leukemic effect in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Emetine, a second-line anti-protozoa drug, differentially reduced cell viability and clonogenic capacity of AML primary patient samples, sparing healthy blood cells. Emetine treatment markedly reduced AML burden in bone marrow of xenotransplanted mice and decreased self-renewal capacity of the remaining engrafted AML cells. Emetine also synergized with commonly used chemotherapeutic agents such as ara-C. At a molecular level, emetine treatment was followed by a reduction in HIF-1α protein levels. This study validated the anti-leukemiceffect of emetine in AML cell lines, a group of diverse AML primary samples, and in a human AML-transplanted murine model, sparing healthy blood cells. The selective anti-leukemic effect of emetine together with the safety of the dose range required to exert this effect support the development of this agent in clinical practice. PMID:26992240

  6. Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Storb, Rainer; Storer, Barry E.; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Lange, Thoralf; Shizuru, Judith A.; Langston, Amelia A.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Bruno, Benedetto; Petersen, Finn B.; Maris, Michael B.; Agura, Edward; Yeager, Andrew; Bethge, Wolfgang; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Maloney, David G.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after high-dose conditioning regimens imposes prohibitively high risks of morbidity and mortality for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are older or have comorbid conditions. Here, we examined outcomes after nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT in such patients. Patients and Methods Two hundred seventy-four patients (median age, 60 years) with de novo or secondary AML underwent allogeneic HCT from related (n = 118) or unrelated donors (n = 156) after conditioning with 2 Gy of total-body irradiation (TBI) with or without fludarabine. A calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil were used for postgrafting immunosuppression. Results With a median follow-up of 38 months in surviving patients, the estimated overall survival at 5 years was 33%. The estimated 5-year relapse/progression and nonrelapse mortality rates were 42% and 26%, respectively. The cumulative incidences of grades 2, 3, and 4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were 38%, 9%, and 5%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD at 5 years was 44%. Patients in first and second complete remission had better survival rates than patients with more advanced disease (37% and 34% v 18%, respectively). Patients with HLA-matched related or unrelated donors had similar survivals. Unfavorable cytogenetic risk status was associated with increased relapse and subsequent mortality. Chronic GVHD was associated with lower relapse risk. Conclusion Allogeneic HCT from related or unrelated donors after conditioning with low-dose TBI and fludarabine, relying almost exclusively on graft-versus-leukemia effects, can result in long-term remissions in older or medically infirm patients with AML. PMID:20439626

  7. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. DNA Methylation Analysis of Bone Marrow Cells at Diagnosis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and at Remission

    PubMed Central

    Nordlund, Jessica; Milani, Lili; Lundmark, Anders; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2012-01-01

    To detect genes with CpG sites that display methylation patterns that are characteristic of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells, we compared the methylation patterns of cells taken at diagnosis from 20 patients with pediatric ALL to the methylation patterns in mononuclear cells from bone marrow of the same patients during remission and in non-leukemic control cells from bone marrow or blood. Using a custom-designed assay, we measured the methylation levels of 1,320 CpG sites in regulatory regions of 413 genes that were analyzed because they display allele-specific gene expression (ASE) in ALL cells. The rationale for our selection of CpG sites was that ASE could be the result of allele-specific methylation in the promoter regions of the genes. We found that the ALL cells had methylation profiles that allowed distinction between ALL cells and control cells. Using stringent criteria for calling differential methylation, we identified 28 CpG sites in 24 genes with recurrent differences in their methylation levels between ALL cells and control cells. Twenty of the differentially methylated genes were hypermethylated in the ALL cells, and as many as nine of them (AMICA1, CPNE7, CR1, DBC1, EYA4, LGALS8, RYR3, UQCRFS1, WDR35) have functions in cell signaling and/or apoptosis. The methylation levels of a subset of the genes were consistent with an inverse relationship with the mRNA expression levels in a large number of ALL cells from published data sets, supporting a potential biological effect of the methylation signatures and their application for diagnostic purposes. PMID:22493696

  12. Regulation of cancer stem cell properties by CD9 in human B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Hiroto; Wilson Xu, C.; Naito, Motohiko; Nishida, Hiroko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Ghani, Farhana Ishrat; Iwata, Satoshi; Inukai, Takeshi; Sugita, Kanji; Morimoto, Chikao

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} We performed more detailed analysis of CD9 function for CSC properties in B-ALL. {yields} Leukemogenic fusion/Src family proteins were markedly regulated in the CD9{sup +} cells. {yields} Proliferation of B-ALL cells was inhibited by anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody. {yields} Knockdown of CD9 by RNAi remarkably reduced the leukemogenic potential. {yields} CD9-knockdown affected the expression and phosphorylation of Src family and USP22. -- Abstract: Although the prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved considerably in recent years, some of the cases still exhibit therapy-resistant. We have previously reported that CD9 was expressed heterogeneously in B-ALL cell lines and CD9{sup +} cells exhibited an asymmetric cell division with greater tumorigenic potential than CD9{sup -} cells. CD9{sup +} cells were also serially transplantable in immunodeficient mice, indicating that CD9{sup +} cell possess self-renewal capacity. In the current study, we performed more detailed analysis of CD9 function for the cancer stem cell (CSC) properties. In patient sample, CD9 was expressed in the most cases of B-ALL cells with significant correlation of CD34-expression. Gene expression analysis revealed that leukemogenic fusion proteins and Src family proteins were significantly regulated in the CD9{sup +} population. Moreover, CD9{sup +} cells exhibited drug-resistance, but proliferation of bulk cells was inhibited by anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody. Knockdown of CD9 remarkably reduced the leukemogenic potential. Furthermore, gene ablation of CD9 affected the expression and tyrosine-phosphorylation of Src family proteins and reduced the expression of histone-deubiquitinase USP22. Taken together, our results suggest that CD9 links to several signaling pathways and epigenetic modification for regulating the CSC properties of B-ALL.

  13. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Veliparib and Topotecan With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, High-Risk Myelodysplasia, or Aggressive Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative, BCR-ABL1 Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  15. Activity of the type II JAK2 inhibitor CHZ868 in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Li, Loretta S.; Kopp, Nadja; Montero, Joan; Chapuy, Bjoern; Yoda, Akinori; Christie, Amanda L.; Liu, Huiyun; Christodoulou, Alexandra; van Bodegom, Diederik; van der Zwet, Jordy; Layer, Jacob V.; Tivey, Trevor; Lane, Andrew A.; Ryan, Jeremy A.; Ng, Samuel Y.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Stone, Richard M.; Steensma, David; Wadleigh, Martha; Harris, Marian; Mandon, Emeline; Ebel, Nicolas; Andraos, Rita; Romanet, Vincent; Dölemeyer, Arno; Sterker, Dario; Zender, Michael; Rodig, Scott J.; Murakami, Masato; Hofmann, Francesco; Kuo, Frank; Eck, Michael J.; Silverman, Lewis B.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Letai, Anthony; Baffert, Fabienne; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Radimerski, Thomas; Gaul, Christoph; Weinstock, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A variety of cancers depend on JAK2 signaling, including the high-risk subset of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALLs) with CRLF2 rearrangements. Type I JAK2 inhibitors induce paradoxical JAK2 hyperphosphorylation in these leukemias and have limited activity. To improve the efficacy of JAK2 inhibition in B-ALL, we developed the type II inhibitor CHZ868, which stabilizes JAK2 in an inactive conformation. CHZ868 potently suppressed the growth of CRLF2-rearranged human B-ALL cells, abrogated JAK2 signaling, and improved survival in mice with human or murine B-ALL. CHZ868 and dexamethasone synergistically induced apoptosis in JAK2-dependent B-ALLs and further improved in vivo survival compared to CHZ868 alone. These data support the testing of type II JAK2 inhibition in patients with JAK2-dependent leukemias and other disorders. PMID:26175414

  16. Tetramethylpyrazine inhibits the proliferation of acute lymphocytic leukemia cell lines via decrease in GSK-3β.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Xu, You-Hua; Yang, Gui-Cun; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) has been proven to be an anticancer agent in many studies. However, its effectiveness in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its molecular mechanisms are still unclear. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of TMP against Jurkat and SUP-B15 ALL cell lines and to investigate the possible detailed mechanism of action of TMP. A Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was employed to examine the proliferation of Jurkat and SUP-B15 cells. Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the cell cycle distribution and apoptotic rate. The expression of total glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), cox-2, survivin, bcl-2 and p27 RNA and protein levels was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot assay, respectively. Additionally, western blot analysis was used to determine the whole-cell and nuclear protein levels of GSK-3β downstream transcription factors, NF-κB (p65) and c-myc. TMP inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat and SUP-B15 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with IC₅₀ values of 120 and 200 µg/ml, respectively at 48 h. TMP induced the apoptosis of Jurkat and SUP-B15 cells and synergistically blocked cell cycle progression at the G0/G1 phase. Cells treated with TMP exhibited significantly attenuated GSK-3β, NF-κB (p65) and c-myc expression, followed by downregulation of bcl-2, cox-2 and survivin and an upregulation of p27. The results showed that TMP induced apoptosis and caused cell cycle arrest in Jurkat and SUP-B15 cells through the downregulation of GSK-3β, which may have further prevented the induced translocation of NF-κB and c-myc from the cytoplasm to the nucleus.

  17. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharide exerts anti-tumor activity via MAPK pathways in HL-60 acute leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guohua; Yang, Lei; Zhuang, Yun; Qian, Xifeng; Shen, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in vivo of a polysaccharide obtained from Ganoderma lucidum on HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia cells, and focused on its targeting effect on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. It was found by the methods such as western blot and flow cytometry (FCM), that G. lucidum polysaccharide (GLP) blocked the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/MAPK signaling pathway, simultaneously activated p38 and JNK MAPK pathways, and therefore regulated their downstream genes and proteins, including p53, c-myc, c-fos, c-jun, Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and cyclin D1. As a result, cycle arrest and apoptosis of HL-60 cells were induced. Therefore, GLP exerted anti-tumor activity via MAPK pathways in HL-60 acute leukemia cells.

  19. Cooperative antiproliferative and differentiation-enhancing activity of medicinal plant extracts in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhamanbayeva, Gulzhan T; Aralbayeva, Araylim N; Murzakhmetova, Maira K; Tuleukhanov, Sultan T; Danilenko, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematopoietic malignancy with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) berries, dog rose (Rosa canina) rosehips, and garden sage (Salvia officinalis) and oregano (Origanum vulgare) aerial parts are widely used in traditional medicine and exhibit antitumor effects in preclinical models. However, these plants remain scarcely tested for antileukemic activity. Here, we show that their water-ethanol leaf extracts reduced the growth and viability of AML cells and, at non-cytotoxic doses, potentiated cell differentiation induced by a low concentration of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, the hormonal form of vitamin D, in a cell type-dependent manner. The latter effect was accompanied by upregulation of the vitamin D receptor protein components and its transcriptional activity. Furthermore, at minimally effective doses the extracts cooperated with one another to produce marked cytostatic effects associated with a partial S-phase arrest and a modest induction of apoptosis. In contrast, these combinations only slightly affected the growth and viability of proliferating normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, the extracts strongly inhibited microsomal lipid peroxidation and protected normal erythrocytes against hypoosmotic shock. Our results suggest that further exploration of the enhanced antileukemic effects of the combinations tested here may lead to the development of alternative therapeutic and preventive approaches against AML. PMID:27470342

  20. Altered neutrophil immunophenotypes in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Elen; Bacelar, Thiago S.; Ciudad, Juana; Ribeiro, Maria Cecília M.; Garcia, Daniela R.N.; Sedek, Lukasz; Maia, Simone F.; Aranha, Daniel B.; Machado, Indyara C.; Ikeda, Arissa; Baglioli, Bianca F.; Lopez-Duarte, Nathalia; Teixeira, Lisandra A. C.; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Silva, Maria Luiza M.; Land, Marcelo G.P.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of evidences suggest a genetic predisposition in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that might favor the occurrence of the driver genetic alterations. Such genetic background might also translate into phenotypic alterations of residual hematopoietic cells. Whether such phenotypic alterations are present in bone marrow (BM) cells from childhood B-cell precursor (BCP)-ALL remains to be investigated. Here we analyzed the immunophenotypic profile of BM and peripheral blood (PB) maturing/matured neutrophils from 118 children with BCP-ALL and their relationship with the features of the disease. Our results showed altered neutrophil phenotypes in most (77%) BCP-ALL cases. The most frequently altered marker was CD10 (53%), followed by CD33 (34%), CD13 (15%), CD15/CD65 (10%) and CD123 (7%). Of note, patients with altered neutrophil phenotypes had younger age (p = 0.03) and lower percentages of BM maturing neutrophils (p = 0.004) together with greater BM lymphocyte (p = 0.04), and mature B-cell (p = 0.03) counts. No significant association was found between an altered neutrophil phenotype and other disease features. These findings point out the potential existence of an altered residual hematopoiesis in most childhood BCP-ALL cases. PMID:27028865

  1. CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Teachey, David T.; Porter, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains difficult to treat, with minimal improvement in outcomes seen in more than 2 decades despite advances in upfront therapy and improved survival for de novo ALL. Adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has emerged as a powerful targeted immunotherapy, showing striking responses in highly refractory populations. Complete remission (CR) rates as high as 90% have been reported in children and adults with relapsed and refractory ALL treated with CAR-modified T cells targeting the B-cell–specific antigen CD19. Distinct CAR designs across several studies have produced similar promising CR rates, an encouraging finding. Even more encouraging are durable remissions observed in some patients without additional therapy. Duration of remission and CAR-modified T-cell persistence require further study and more mature follow-up, but emerging data suggest these factors may distinguish CAR designs. Supraphysiologic T-cell proliferation, a hallmark of this therapy, contributes to both efficacy and the most notable toxicity, cytokine release syndrome (CRS), posing a unique challenge for toxicity management. This review will discuss the current landscape of CD19 CAR clinical trials, CRS pathophysiology and management, and remaining challenges. PMID:25999455

  2. Valproic Acid Synergistically Enhances The Cytotoxicity of Clofarabine in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chengzhi; Edwards, Holly; LoGrasso, Salvatore B.; Buck, Steven A.; Matherly, Larry H.; Taub, Jeffrey W.; Ge, Yubin

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a major therapeutic challenge in pediatric oncology even with intensified cytarabine (ara-C)-based chemotherapy. Therefore, new therapies are urgently needed to improve treatment outcome of this deadly disease. In this study, we evaluated antileukemic interactions between clofarabine (a second-generation purine nucleoside analog) and valproic acid (VPA, a FDA-approved agent for treating epilepsy in both children and adult and a histone deacetylase inhibitor), in pediatric AML. Methodology In vitro clofarabine and VPA cytotoxicities of the pediatric AML cell lines and diagnostic blasts were measured by using MTT assays. The effects of clofarabine and VPA on apoptosis and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were determined by flow cytometry analysis and Western blotting, respectively. Active form of Bax was measured by Western blotting post immunoprecipitation. Results We demonstrated synergistic antileukemic activities between clofarabine and VPA in both pediatric AML cell lines and diagnostic blasts sensitive to VPA. In contrast, antagonism between the two agents could be detected in AML cells resistant to VPA. Clofarabine and VPA cooperate in inducing DNA DSBs, accompanied by Bax activation and apoptosis in pediatric AML cells. Conclusion Our results document synergistic antileukemic activities of combined VPA and clofarabine in pediatric AML and suggest that this combination could be an alternative treatment option for the disease. PMID:22488775

  3. Effects of recombinant human GM-CSF on proliferation of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J D; Young, D; Herrmann, F; Wiper, D; Wagner, K; Sabbath, K D

    1986-05-01

    Proliferation of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) cells in vitro is limited in most cases to a small subset of blasts that have several properties of stem cells. These leukemic colony-forming cells (AML-CFU) generally require addition of exogenous growth factors for proliferation in agar or methylcellulose. These factors can be supplied by media conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated normal leukocytes or by CSF-secreting tumor cell lines. However, the exact factor or factors required for stimulation of AML-CFU growth have not been defined. We compared the AML-CFU stimulatory activity of a human recombinant GM-CSF with that of GCT-CM, Mo-CM, and the PHA-leukocyte feeder system in 15 cases of AML. In each of the 12 cases that required exogenous growth factors for maximum AML-CFU growth, recombinant GM-CSF could replace either GM-CSF or Mo-CM, and could partially replace the PHA-leukocyte feeder system. These results indicate that this GM-CSF is a growth promoter of AML-CFU in these culture systems.

  4. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  5. [Inhibitory effect of PD98059 on MAPK signaling pathway in acute lymphocytic leukemia cells].

    PubMed

    Li, Qian-Yu; Wei, Xu-Dong; Chen, Lin; Yin, Qing-Song

    2013-12-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the effect of blocking Ras/Erk signaling pathway on expression of important transcription factor c-fos, c-jun and TAK1 gene in primary acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) cells. The best effective concentration and effect time of PD98059 were screened; the expression levels of c-fos, c-jun and TAK1 in primary cultured cells of normal persons, primary cultured ALL cells and primary cultured ALL cells treated by PD98059 were detected by SYBR GreenI real-time quantitative-PCR. The results showed that before treatment by PD98059 the expression levels of c-fos and TAK1 mRNA were significantly up-regulated in primary cultured ALL cells as compared with primary cultured cells of normal persons (P = 0.014 and P = 0.017 respectively). After treatment by PD98059, the expression levels of c-fos, c-jun mRNA decreased in all 7 serum samples, while expression of TAK1 was down-regulated in 5 samples, and up-regulated in 2 samples. After treatment with PD98059, there was no statistical difference of c-fos, c-jun and TAK1 expression levels in primary cultured ALL cells and primary cultured normal cells. It is concluded that the c-fos and TAK1 activity of primary cultured ALL cells increases, and blocking the Ras/Erk signaling pathway of ALL cells can lead to obvious decrease of important transcription factors c-fos, c-jun, TAK1 genes expression.

  6. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  7. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  8. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  9. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monoclonal antibodies to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia Targeted therapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia In recent years, new ... These drugs are often referred to as targeted therapy. Some of these drugs can be useful in ...

  10. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  11. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  13. Progress in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kadia, Tapan M; Ravandi, Farhad; O'Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2015-03-01

    Significant progress has been made in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady gains in clinical research and a renaissance of genomics in leukemia have led to improved outcomes. The recognition of tremendous heterogeneity in AML has allowed individualized treatments of specific disease entities within the context of patient age, cytogenetics, and mutational analysis. The following is a comprehensive review of the current state of AML therapy and a roadmap of our approach to these distinct disease entities. PMID:25441110

  14. NK Cell Genotype and Phenotype at Diagnosis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Correlate to Post-induction Residual Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Erin M.; Jeha, Sima; Kang, Guolian; Cheng, Cheng; Rooney, Barbara; Holladay, Martha; Bari, Rafijul; Schell, Sarah; Tuggle, MaCal; Pui, Ching-Hon; Leung, Wing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Not all natural killer (NK) cells are equally cytotoxic against leukemia because of differences in receptor gene content and surface expression. We correlated NK cell genotype and phenotype at diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with minimal residual disease (MRD) after induction chemotherapy. Experimental Design The NK cells and leukemia blasts of 244 patients were analyzed at diagnosis by killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) typing and immunophenotyping. The results were correlated statistically to post-induction MRD status. Results The odds of being MRD positive in patients with KIR telomeric (Tel)-A/B genotype was 2.85 times the odds in those with Tel-A/A genotype (p=0.035). MRD positive patients were more likely to have KIR2DL5A (p=0.006) and expressed less activating receptor NKp46 and FASL on their NK cells (p=0.0074 and p=0.029, respectively). The odds of being MRD positive increased by 2.01-fold for every percentage increase in NK cells expressing KIR2DL1 in the presence of HLA-C2 ligand (p=0.034). The quantity of granzyme B inhibitor PI-9 in the leukemia blasts was greater in patients who were MRD positive (p=0.038). Collectively, five NK cell-related factors (Tel-B associated KIR2DL5A, NKp46, FASL, Granzyme B, and PI-9) are strongly associated with MRD positivity at the end of induction with 100% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Conclusions Our data support the hypothesis that NK cells with a strong effector phenotype in the setting of decreased leukemia resistance are associated with better leukemia control. PMID:25281696

  15. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. "Haploidentical expert" centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes ("haploidentical regular", "haploidentical expert" and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; P<10(-5)) centers. Relapse incidence for haploidentical transplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program. PMID:25637051

  16. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. "Haploidentical expert" centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes ("haploidentical regular", "haploidentical expert" and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; P<10(-5)) centers. Relapse incidence for haploidentical transplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program.

  17. A novel 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugate induces apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Altenburg, Jeffrey D.; Harvey, Kevin A.; McCray, Sharon; Xu, Zhidong; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} 2,6-Diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugates (DIP-DHA) inhibits the proliferation of T-cell leukemic cell lines. {yields} DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. {yields} DIP-DHA significantly downregulated CXCR4 surface expression. -- Abstract: We have previously characterized the effects of 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide (DIP-DHA) conjugates and their analogs on the proliferation and progression of breast cancer cell lines. For this study, we investigated the effects of the DIP-DHA conjugate on 2 representative T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines: CEM and Jurkat. Treatment of both cell lines with DIP-DHA resulted in significantly greater inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis than that of parent compounds, 2,6-diisopropylphenol (DIP) or docosahexaenoate (DHA). Treatment of the cells with DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis in both cell lines was reversed in the presence of a caspase family inhibitor. Treatment with DIP-DHA reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. These observations suggest that the effects are driven by intrinsic apoptotic pathways. DIP-DHA treatment also downregulated surface CXCR4 expression, an important chemokine receptor involved in cancer metastasis that is highly expressed in both CEM and Jurkat cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the DIP-DHA conjugate exhibits significantly more potent effects on CEM and Jurkat cells than that of DIP or DHA alone. These conjugates have potential use for treatment of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  18. CD123 redirected multiple virus-specific T cells for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Liu, Xin; Wang, Xingbing; Sun, Zimin; Song, Xiao-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been increasingly used as a curative treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, relapse rates after HSCT in complete remission (CR) are reported between 30% and 70%. In addition, numerous studies suggested that secondary viral infection from a variety of viruses including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), adenovirus (Adv), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) are among the most common causes of death post-HSCT. Currently, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based T cells have been developed to treat AML in clinical studies, while virus-specific cytotoxic T cells (VST) have been proven to be able to effectively prevent or treat viral infection after HSCT. Thus it would be desirable to develop T cells with the ability of simultaneously targeting AML relapse and viral infection. In this article, we now describe the generation of VST cells that are engineered to express CAR for a specific AML cell-surface antigen CD123 (CD123-CAR-VST). Using Dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with EBV, Adv, and CMV peptides as sources of viral antigens, we generated VST from A2 donor peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC). VST were then transduced with retroviral vector encoding CD123-CAR to generate CD123-CAR-VST. We demonstrated that CD123-CAR-VST recognized EBV, Adv, and CMV epitopes and had HLA-restricted virus-specific cytotoxic effector function against EBV target. In addition, CD123-CAR-VST retained the specificity against CD123-positive AML cell lines such as MOLM13 and THP-1 in vitro. Thus our results suggested that CD123-CAR-VST might be a valuable candidate to simultaneously prevent or treat relapse and viral infection in AML HSCT recipients. PMID:26740053

  19. CD90 and CD110 correlate with cancer stem cell potentials in human T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Hiroto; Nishida, Hiroko; Iwata, Satoshi; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2009-05-29

    Although cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently identified in myeloid leukemia, published data on lymphoid malignancy have been sparse. T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is characterized by the abnormal proliferation of T-cell precursors and is generally aggressive. As CD34 is the only positive-selection marker for CSCs in T-ALL, we performed extensive analysis of CD markers in T-ALL cell lines. We found that some of the tested lines consisted of heterogeneous populations of cells with various levels of surface marker expression. In particular, a small subpopulation of CD90 (Thy-1) and CD110 (c-Mpl) were shown to correlate with stem cell properties both in vitro and in transplantation experiments. As these markers are expressed on hematopoietic stem cells, our results suggest that stem cell-like population are enriched in CD90+/CD110+ fraction and they are useful positive-selection markers for the isolation of CSCs in some cases of T-ALL.

  20. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Increased PRAME-Specific CTL Killing of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells by Either a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Chidamide Alone or Combined Treatment with Decitabine

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yushi; Zhou, Jihao; Wang, Lixin; Gao, Xiaoning; Ning, Qiaoyang; Jiang, Mengmeng; Wang, Jia; Wang, Lili; Yu, Li

    2013-01-01

    As one of the best known cancer testis antigens, PRAME is overexpressed exclusively in germ line tissues such as the testis as well as in a variety of solid and hematological malignant cells including acute myeloid leukemia. Therefore, PRAME has been recognized as a promising target for both active and adoptive anti-leukemia immunotherapy. However, in most patients with PRAME-expressing acute myeloid leukemia, PRAME antigen-specific CD8+ CTL response are either undetectable or too weak to exert immune surveillance presumably due to the inadequate PRAME antigen expression and PRAME-specific antigen presentation by leukemia cells. In this study, we observed remarkably increased PRAME mRNA expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia cells after treatment with a novel subtype-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor chidamide in vitro. PRAME expression was further enhanced in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines after combined treatment with chidamide and DNA demethylating agent decitabine. Pre-treatment of an HLA-A0201+ acute myeloid leukemia cell line THP-1 with chidamide and/or decitabine increased sensitivity to purified CTLs that recognize PRAME100–108 or PRAME300–309 peptide presented by HLA-A0201. Chidamide-induced epigenetic upregulation of CD86 also contributed to increased cytotoxicity of PRAME antigen-specific CTLs. Our data thus provide a new line of evidence that epigenetic upregulation of cancer testis antigens by a subtype-selective HDAC inhibitor or in combination with hypomethylating agent increases CTL cytotoxicity and may represent a new opportunity in future design of treatment strategy targeting specifically PRAME-expressing acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:23940586

  2. Heterogeneity in mechanisms of emergent resistance in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Babasaheb D; Samuels, Amy L; Wells, Julia E; Sutton, Rosemary; Venn, Nicola C; Bendak, Katerina; Anderson, Denise; Marshall, Glenn M; Cole, Catherine H; Beesley, Alex H; Kees, Ursula R; Lock, Richard B

    2016-08-11

    Relapse in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem and is thought to be associated with clonal selection during treatment. In this study we used an established pre-clinical model of induction therapy to increase our understanding of the effect of engraftment and chemotherapy on clonal selection and acquisition of drug resistance in vivo. Immune-deficient mice were engrafted with patient diagnostic specimens and exposed to a repeated combination therapy consisting of vincristine, dexamethasone, L-asparaginase and daunorubicin. Any re-emergence of disease following therapy was shown to be associated with resistance to dexamethasone, no resistance was observed to the other three drugs. Immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements closely matched those in respective diagnosis and relapse patient specimens, highlighting that these clonal markers do not fully reflect the biological changes associated with drug resistance. Gene expression profiling revealed the significant underlying heterogeneity of dexamethasone-resistant xenografts. Alterations were observed in a large number of biological pathways, yet no dominant signature was common to all lines. These findings indicate that the biological changes associated with T-ALL relapse and resistance are stochastic and highly individual, and underline the importance of using sophisticated molecular techniques or single cell analyses in developing personalized approaches to therapy. PMID:27623214

  3. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant for acute myeloid leukemia: Current state in 2013 and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kanate, Abraham S; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a heterogeneous group of high-grade myeloid neoplasms of the elderly with variable outcomes. Though remission-induction is an important first step in the management of AML, additional treatment strategies are essential to ensure long-term disease-free survival. Recent pivotal advances in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of AML have allowed for a risk-adapted approach in its management based on relapse-risk. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents an effective therapeutic strategy in AML providing the possibility of cure with potent graft-versus-leukemia reactions, with a demonstrable survival advantage in younger patients with intermediate- or poor-risk cytogenetics. Herein we review the published data regarding the role of allo-HCT in adults with AML. We searched MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE/Ovid. In addition, we searched reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings and ongoing trial databases. We discuss the role of allo-HCT in AML patients stratified by cytogenetic- and molecular-risk in first complete remission, as well as allo-HCT as an option in relapsed/refractory AML. Besides the conventional sibling and unrelated donor allografts, we review the available data and recent advances for alternative donor sources such as haploidentical grafts and umbilical cord blood. We also discuss conditioning regimens, including reduced intensity conditioning which has broadened the applicability of allo-HCT. Finally we explore recent advances and future possibilities and directions of allo-HCT in AML. Practical therapeutic recommendations have been made where possible based on available data and expert opinion. PMID:24772235

  5. Red blood cell transfusion triggers in acute leukemia: a randomized pilot study

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E.; Williams, Katherine; Zahurak, Marianna; Hand, Wesley; Stephens, R. Scott; King, Karen E.; Frank, Steven M.; Ness, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion thresholds have yet to be examined in large randomized trials in hematologic malignancies. This pilot study in acute leukemia uses a restrictive compared to a liberal transfusion strategy. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS A randomized (2:1) study was conducted of restrictive (LOW) hemoglobin (Hb) trigger (7 g/dL) compared to higher (HIGH) Hb trigger (8 g/dL). The primary outcome was feasibility of conducting a larger trial. The four requirements for success required that more than 50% of the eligible patients could be consented, more than 75% of the patients randomized to the LOW arm tolerated the transfusion trigger, fewer than 15% of patients crossed over from the LOW arm to the HIGH arm, and no indication for the need to pause the study for safety concerns. Secondary outcomes included fatigue, bleeding, and RBCs and platelets transfused. RESULTS Ninety patients were consented and randomly assigned to LOW to HIGH. The four criteria for the primary objective of feasibility were met. When the number of units transfused was compared, adjusting for baseline Hb, the LOW arm was transfused on average 8.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.9–9.1) units/patient while the HIGH arm received 11.7 (95% CI, 10.1–13.2) units (p = 0.0003). There was no significant difference in bleeding events or neutropenic fevers between study arms. CONCLUSION This study establishes feasibility for trial of Hb thresholds in leukemia through demonstration of success in all primary outcome metrics and a favorable safety profile. This population requires further study to evaluate the equivalence of liberal and restrictive transfusion thresholds in this unique clinical setting. PMID:27198129

  6. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  7. MiR-146b negatively regulates migration and delays progression of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Nádia C.; Fragoso, Rita; Carvalho, Tânia; Enguita, Francisco J.; Barata, João T.

    2016-01-01

    Previous results indicated that miR-146b-5p is downregulated by TAL1, a transcription factor critical for early hematopoiesis that is frequently overexpressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) where it has an oncogenic role. Here, we confirmed that miR-146b-5p expression is lower in TAL1-positive patient samples than in other T-ALL cases. Furthermore, leukemia T-cells display decreased levels of miR-146b-5p as compared to normal T-cells, thymocytes and other hematopoietic progenitors. MiR-146b-5p silencing enhances the in vitro migration and invasion of T-ALL cells, associated with increased levels of filamentous actin and chemokinesis. In vivo, miR-146b overexpression in a TAL1-positive cell line extends mouse survival in a xenotransplant model of human T-ALL. In contrast, knockdown of miR-146b-5p results in leukemia acceleration and decreased mouse overall survival, paralleled by faster tumor infiltration of the central nervous system. Our results suggest that miR-146b-5p is a functionally relevant microRNA gene in the context of T-ALL, whose negative regulation by TAL1 and possibly other oncogenes contributes to disease progression by modulating leukemia cell motility and disease aggressiveness. PMID:27550837

  8. Comparison of outcomes after unrelated cord blood and unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation in adults with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, A; Labopin, M; Sanz, G; Piemontese, S; Arcese, W; Bacigalupo, A; Blaise, D; Bosi, A; Huang, H; Karakasis, D; Koc, Y; Michallet, M; Picardi, A; Sanz, J; Santarone, S; Sengelov, H; Sierra, J; Vincent, L; Volt, F; Nagler, A; Gluckman, E; Ciceri, F; Rocha, V; Mohty, M

    2015-09-01

    Outcomes after unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation (Haplo) and after unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) are encouraging and have become alternative options to treat patients with high-risk acute leukemia without human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched donor. We compared outcomes after UCBT and Haplo in adults with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Median follow-up was 24 months. Analysis was performed separately for patients with AML, n=918 (Haplo=360, UCBT=558) and ALL, n=528 (Haplo=158 and UCBT=370). UCBT was associated with delayed engraftment and higher graft failure in both AML and ALL recipients. In multivariate analysis, UCBT was associated with lower incidence of chronic graft-vs-host disease both in the AML group (hazard ratio (HR)=0.63, P=0.008) and in the ALL group (HR=0.58, P=0.01). Not statistically significant differences were observed between Haplo and UCBT for relapse incidence (HR=0.95, P=0.76 for AML and HR=0.82, P=0.31 for ALL), non-relapse mortality (HR=1.16, P=0.47 for AML and HR=1.23, P=0.23 for ALL) and leukemia-free survival (HR 0.78, P=0.78 for AML and HR=1.00, P=0.84 for ALL). There were no statistically differences on main outcomes after unmanipulated Haplo and UCBT, and both approaches are valid for acute leukemia patients lacking a HLA matched donor. Both strategies expand the donor pool for patients in need.

  9. Complete Remission of Acute Myeloid Leukemia following Cisplatin Based Concurrent Therapy with Radiation for Squamous Cell Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harpaul S.; Higgins, Kristin A.; Saba, Nabil F.; Kota, Vamsi K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a myeloid disorder with several established treatment regimens depending on patient and leukemic factors. Cisplatin is known to have strong leukemogenic potential and is rarely used even as salvage therapy in relapsed or refractory AML. We present a patient simultaneously diagnosed with AML and squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, who was found to be in complete remission from AML following treatment with cisplatin based chemoradiotherapy for his laryngeal cancer. PMID:27127664

  10. Characteristics of A20 gene polymorphisms in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lihua; Zhang, Fan; Shen, Qi; Chen, Shaohua; Wang, Xu; Wang, Liang; Yang, Lijian; Wu, Xiuli; Huang, Suming; Schmidt, Christian A; Li, Yangqiu

    2014-12-01

    A20 is a repressor of NF-κB and was recently shown to be frequently inactivated by deletions or mutations in several types of lymphomas including T-cell lymphoma. Little is known about the characteristics of A20 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). In this study, we analyzed A20 polymorphisms and characterized their features in 11 cases with T-ALL, 30 samples from healthy Chinese individuals, and 3 cells lines including CCRF-CEM, Molt-4, and Toledo cells. Two frequent A20 polymorphisms were found: a CCT deletion at position 12384 and a nucleotide exchange (A to C) at position 13751 (rs2307859 and rs661561). The homozygous form (CC) of rs661561 was detected in all 10 cases with detectable T-ALL, while only 80% (24/30) of the healthy controls had this genotype. We found one T-ALL case without the above frequent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in which a T to G mutation at position 12486 was found, which results in an amino acid exchange (Phe127Cys; rs2230926). Similar results were found in Molt-4 cells, which lack the frequent SNPs but have a heterozygous polymorphism at position 13749 (C > T) (rs5029948). Interestingly, the T-ALL case with the Phe127Cys mutation and Molt-4 cells demonstrated a high A20 copy number as measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification with three primer sets that cover different regions of the A20 gene, corresponding to a high A20 and low NF-κB expression level. In conclusion, we characterized the features of A20 polymorphisms in T-ALL, and found that a low frequency A20 mutation, which was thought to be involved in malignant T-ALL development, might function differently in T cell lymphomas.

  11. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... be found for ALL. The following factors may play a role in the development of all types of leukemia: Certain chromosome problems Exposure to radiation, including x-rays before birth Past treatment with chemotherapy drugs ...

  12. Outcome of B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Brazilian Children: Immunophenotypical, Hematological, and Clinical Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cézar, Rodrigo S; Cerqueira, Bruno A V; da Paz, Silvana de Souza; Barbosa, Cynara G; de Moura Neto, José P; Barreto, José H de S; Goncalves, Marilda de S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical, hematological, and immunophenotypic characteristics of Brazilian children with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) to identify prognostic biomarkers of the disease. Thirty-three children newly diagnosed with B-ALL were followed between March 2004 and December 2009. Information about the demographic profile, diagnosis, immunophenotype, clinical manifestations, and disease outcome were gathered from the patients' medical records. Of the 33 patients with B-ALL, 18 were male and 15 female. Eighteen patients were classified as high risk; 13 as low risk, and 2 as true low risk. The frequencies of cluster of differentiation (CD)10, CD19, and CD20 antigens were 69.7%, 81.8%, and 18.2%, respectively. Six patients (18.2%) had aberrant expression of myeloid antigens. At diagnosis, patients immunopositive for CD20 had elevated white blood cell counts (P = 0.018) and lower platelet counts (P = 0.017). The 6-year overall survival was 67.5%± 3.47%. Our results demonstrate the distinct immunophenotypic and prognostic characteristics of patients with B-ALL, which can be related to the Brazilian racial admixture. Consequently, these results will most likely aid in the selection of additional prognostic markers and their use in monitoring the clinical manifestations and treatment response among B-ALL patients. PMID:26056790

  13. Regulatory T cells-derived IL-35 promotes the growth of adult acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qianshan; Pan, Ying; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Li, Qing; Wang, Jia; Tao, Lili; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-11-15

    Tumor immune escape mechanism mediated by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IL-35, as a novel inhibitory cytokine, is produced by Tregs specially and regulates functions of Tregs in murine. However, IL-35 expression of Tregs in human is still disputed, and its role in AML is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that IL-35 was expressed highly in peripheral blood plasma of adult patients with AML and significantly correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy. Tregs-derived from adult AML patients produced IL-35 in a stimulation-dependent manner. IL-35 promoted AML blasts immune escape by expanding Tregs and inhibiting CD4+CD25-effector T cells (Teffs). Furthermore, IL-35 directly promoted the proliferation of AML blasts and reduced the apoptosis of AML blasts. Together, our study demonstrates that IL-35-derived from Tregs promotes the growth of adult AML blasts, suggesting that IL-35 has an important role in the pathogenesis of AML.

  14. Role of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lussana, Federico; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease, due to the expression of different biological and clinical risk factors, for which allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is an effective consolidation therapy. The non-relapse mortality of alloHSCT remains significantly higher compared with that of conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, one of the main challenges in the care of ALL is to establish a more precise prognostic definition to select patients who could take advantage from an alloHSCT. Currently, the use of minimal residual disease following induction and early consolidation therapy has improved the prognostic accuracy in defining ALL risk class. In Philadelphia-positive ALL, the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors pre and post alloHSCT appears to improve outcomes significantly and, in the absence of specially designed clinical trials, alloHSCT remains the most effective post-remission therapy. Nowadays, alloHSCT can be performed according to various modalities encompassing the use of different conditioning regimens, as well as distinct donors and stem cell source, with a significant accessibility to transplant. PMID:25408851

  15. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678. PMID:25587040

  16. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678.

  17. Curcumin Induces Apoptosis in Pre-B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cell Lines Via PARP-1 Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Deepshikha; Singh, Sunita; Narayan, Gopeshwar

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenolic compound isolated from the rhizomes of an herbaceous perennial plant, Curcuma longa, is known to possess anticancerous activity. However, the mechanism of apoptosis induction in cancers differs. In this study, we have (1) investigated the anticancerous activity of curcumin on REH and RS4;11 leukemia cells and (2) studied the chemo-sensitizing potential of curcumin for doxorubicin, a drug presently used for leukemia treatment. It was found that curcumin induced a dose dependent decrease in cell viability because of apoptosis induction as visualized by annexin V-FITC/ PI staining. Curcumin-induced apoptosis of leukemia cells was mediated by PARP-1 cleavage. An increased level of caspase-3, apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), cleaved PARP-1 and decreased level of Bcl2 was observed in leukemia cells after 24h of curcumin treatment. In addition, curcumin at doses lower than the IC50 value significantly enhanced doxorubicin induced cell death. Therefore, we conclude that curcumin induces apoptosis in leukemia cells via PARP-1 mediated caspase-3 dependent pathway and further may act as a potential chemo-sensitizing agent for doxorubicin. Our study highlights the chemo-preventive and chemo-sensitizing role of curcumin. PMID:27644631

  18. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without total body irradiation for pediatric acute leukemia: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yanshun; Qin, Maoquan; Wang, Bin; Li, Sidan; Zhu, Guanghua; Zhou, Xuan; Yang, Jun; Wang, Kai; Lin, Wei; Zheng, Huyong

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a promising method for therapy of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. However, less availability of matched donors limited its wide application. Recently, haploidentical HSCT has become a great resource. Here, we have retrospectively reported our experience of 20 pediatric patients with acute leukemia who underwent haploidentical HSCT without total body irradiation (TBI) myeloablative regimen in our center from November 2007 to June 2014. All the patients attained successful HSCT engraftment in terms of myeloid and platelet recovery. Thirteen patients developed grade I–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (a-GVHD). The incidence of grade I–II a-GVHD, grade III–IV a-GVHD, and chronic GVHD (c-GVHD) was 45%, 20%, and 25%, respectively. The mean myeloid and platelet recovery time was 13.20±2.41 and 19.10±8.37 days. The median follow-up time was 43.95±29.26 months. During the follow-up, three patients died. The overall survival (OS) rate was 85%. The present study indicated that haploidentical HSCT without TBI myeloablative regimen significantly improved the OS rate of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. PMID:27217774

  19. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  20. Autologous is Superior to Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in Second Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Jennifer L. Holter; Rubinger, Morel; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Wang, Hai-Lin; Grigg, Andrew; Selby, George B.; Szer, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jacob M.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify favored choice of transplantation in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission. PATIENTS We studied 294 acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients receiving allogeneic (n=232) or autologous (62) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in second complete remission (CR2) reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2006 including pre-HCT PML/RAR∝ status in 155 (49% of allogeneic and 66% of autologous). METHODS Patient characteristics and transplant characteristics including treatment related mortality, overall survival, and disease free survival were collected and analyzed for both univariate and multivariate outcomes. RESULTS With median follow-up of 115 (allogeneic) and 72 months (autologous), 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) favored autologous 63% (49-75%) compared to allogeneic 50% (44-57%) (p=0.10) and overall survival (OS) 75% (63-85%) vs. 54% (48-61%) (p=.002) Multivariate analysis showed significantly worse DFS after allogeneic HCT (HR=1.88, 95% CI=1.16-3.06, p=0.011) and age >40 years (HR=2.30, 95% CI 1.44-3.67, p=0.0005). OS was significantly worse after allogeneic HCT (HR=2.66, 95%CI 1.52-4.65, p=0.0006; age >40 (HR=3.29, 95% CI 1.95-5.54, p<0.001) and CR1<12 months (HR=1.56 95% CI 1.07-2.26, p=0.021). Positive pre-HCT PML-RAR∝ status in 17/114 allogeneic and 6/41 autologous transplants did not influence relapse, treatment failure or survival in either group. The survival advantage for autografting was attributable to increased 3 years TRM: allogeneic 30%; autologous 2%, and GVHD. CONCLUSION We conclude that autologous HCT yields superior overall survival for APL in CR2. Long term DFS in autologous recipients, even with MRD+ grafts remains an important subject for further study. PMID:24691221

  1. An early thymic precursor phenotype predicts outcome exclusively in HOXA-overexpressing adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Group for Research in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia study

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Jonathan; Marchand, Tony; Touzart, Aurore; Cieslak, Agata; Trinquand, Amélie; Sutton, Laurent; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Hamel, Jean-François; Asnafi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression studies have consistently identified a HOXA-overexpressing cluster of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, but it is unclear whether these constitute a homogeneous clinical entity, and the biological consequences of HOXA overexpression have not been systematically examined. We characterized the biology and outcome of 55 HOXA-positive cases among 209 patients with adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia uniformly treated during the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003 and -2005 studies. HOXA-positive patients had markedly higher rates of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype (40.8% versus 14.5%, P=0.0004), chemoresistance (59.3% versus 40.8%, P=0.026) and positivity for minimal residual disease (48.5% versus 23.5%, P=0.01) than the HOXA-negative group. These differences were due to particularly high frequencies of chemoresistant early thymic precursor-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia in HOXA-positive cases harboring fusion oncoproteins that transactivate HOXA. Strikingly, the presence of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype was associated with marked outcome differences within the HOXA-positive group (5-year overall survival 31.2% in HOXA-positive early thymic precursor versus 66.7% in HOXA-positive non-early thymic precursor, P=0.03), but not in HOXA-negative cases (5-year overall survival 74.2% in HOXA-negative early thymic precursor versus 57.2% in HOXA-negative non-early thymic precursor, P=0.44). Multivariate analysis further revealed that HOXA positivity independently affected event-free survival (P=0.053) and relapse risk (P=0.039) of chemoresistant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These results show that the underlying mechanism of HOXA deregulation dictates the clinico-biological phenotype, and that the negative prognosis of early thymic precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia is exclusive to HOXA-positive patients, suggesting that early treatment intensification is currently

  2. microRNAs regulate TAL1 expression in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Nádia C.; Melão, Alice; Póvoa, Vanda; Sarmento, Leonor; de Cedrón, Marta Gómez; Malumbres, Marcos; Enguita, Francisco J.; Barata, João T.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor TAL1 is a proto-oncogene whose aberrant expression in committed T-cell precursors is associated with the development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). The mechanisms leading to aberrant activation of TAL1 in T-ALL patients who lack chromosomal rearrangements involving the TAL1 locus remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that TAL1 levels decrease during normal T-cell development at least in part due to miRNA-dependent silencing, in which case TAL1 over-expression in some T-ALL cases could be the consequence of deregulated miRNA expression. By performing computational prediction of miRNAs that bind to the human TAL1 mRNA we compiled a list of miRNAs that are candidates to regulate TAL1. Using a luciferase reporter system and mutagenesis assays we confirmed the miRNA-TAL1 mRNA interactions and selected candidate miRNAs: miR-101, miR-520d-5p, miR-140-5p, miR-448 and miR-485-5p. Over-expression of these microRNAs in different T-ALL cell lines consistently resulted in the down-regulation of TAL1 protein. In accordance, inhibition of miR-101 and miR-520d-5p promoted TAL1 protein expression. Importantly, we found that miR-101, miR-140-5p, miR-448 and miR-485-5p were down-regulated in T-ALL patient specimens and T-ALL cell lines. Our results show for the first time the existence of epigenetic regulation of TAL1 by specific miRNAs which may contribute, at least in part, to the ectopic expression of TAL1 in some T-ALL cases. PMID:26882564

  3. SB225002 Induces Cell Death and Cell Cycle Arrest in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells through the Activation of GLIPR1.

    PubMed

    de Vasconcellos, Jaíra Ferreira; Laranjeira, Angelo Brunelli Albertoni; Leal, Paulo C; Bhasin, Manoj K; Zenatti, Priscila Pini; Nunes, Ricardo J; Yunes, Rosendo A; Nowill, Alexandre E; Libermann, Towia A; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Yunes, José Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent childhood malignancy. In the effort to find new anti-leukemic agents, we evaluated the small drug SB225002 (N-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-N'-(2-bromophenyl)urea). Although initially described as a selective antagonist of CXCR2, later studies have identified other cellular targets for SB225002, with potential medicinal use in cancer. We found that SB225002 has a significant pro-apoptotic effect against both B- and T-ALL cell lines. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that treatment with SB225002 induces G2-M cell cycle arrest. Transcriptional profiling revealed that SB225002-mediated apoptosis triggered a transcriptional program typical of tubulin binding agents. Network analysis revealed the activation of genes linked to the JUN and p53 pathways and inhibition of genes linked to the TNF pathway. Early cellular effects activated by SB225002 included the up-regulation of GLIPR1, a p53-target gene shown to have pro-apoptotic activities in prostate and bladder cancer. Silencing of GLIPR1 in B- and T-ALL cell lines resulted in increased resistance to SB225002. Although SB225002 promoted ROS increase in ALL cells, antioxidant N-Acetyl Cysteine pre-treatment only modestly attenuated cell death, implying that the pro-apoptotic effects of SB225002 are not exclusively mediated by ROS. Moreover, GLIPR1 silencing resulted in increased ROS levels both in untreated and SB225002-treated cells. In conclusion, SB225002 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in different B- and T-ALL cell lines. Inhibition of tubulin function with concurrent activation of the p53 pathway, in particular, its downstream target GLIPR1, seems to underlie the anti-leukemic effect of SB225002.

  4. SB225002 Induces Cell Death and Cell Cycle Arrest in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells through the Activation of GLIPR1

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Paulo C.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Zenatti, Priscila Pini; Nunes, Ricardo J.; Yunes, Rosendo A.; Nowill, Alexandre E.; Libermann, Towia A.; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Yunes, José Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent childhood malignancy. In the effort to find new anti-leukemic agents, we evaluated the small drug SB225002 (N-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-N’-(2-bromophenyl)urea). Although initially described as a selective antagonist of CXCR2, later studies have identified other cellular targets for SB225002, with potential medicinal use in cancer. We found that SB225002 has a significant pro-apoptotic effect against both B- and T-ALL cell lines. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that treatment with SB225002 induces G2-M cell cycle arrest. Transcriptional profiling revealed that SB225002-mediated apoptosis triggered a transcriptional program typical of tubulin binding agents. Network analysis revealed the activation of genes linked to the JUN and p53 pathways and inhibition of genes linked to the TNF pathway. Early cellular effects activated by SB225002 included the up-regulation of GLIPR1, a p53-target gene shown to have pro-apoptotic activities in prostate and bladder cancer. Silencing of GLIPR1 in B- and T-ALL cell lines resulted in increased resistance to SB225002. Although SB225002 promoted ROS increase in ALL cells, antioxidant N-Acetyl Cysteine pre-treatment only modestly attenuated cell death, implying that the pro-apoptotic effects of SB225002 are not exclusively mediated by ROS. Moreover, GLIPR1 silencing resulted in increased ROS levels both in untreated and SB225002-treated cells. In conclusion, SB225002 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in different B- and T-ALL cell lines. Inhibition of tubulin function with concurrent activation of the p53 pathway, in particular, its downstream target GLIPR1, seems to underlie the anti-leukemic effect of SB225002. PMID:26302043

  5. Targeting of folate receptor β on acute myeloid leukemia blasts with chimeric antigen receptor–expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Rachel C.; Poussin, Mathilde; Kalota, Anna; Feng, Yang; Low, Philip S.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2015-01-01

    T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) can produce dramatic results in lymphocytic leukemia patients; however, therapeutic strategies for myeloid leukemia remain limited. Folate receptor β (FRβ) is a myeloid-lineage antigen expressed on 70% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of the first CARs specific for human FRβ (m909) in vitro and in vivo. m909 CAR T cells exhibited selective activation and lytic function against engineered C30-FRβ as well as endogenous FRβ+ AML cell lines in vitro. In mouse models of human AML, m909 CAR T cells mediated the regression of engrafted FRβ+ THP1 AML in vivo. In addition, we demonstrated that treatment of AML with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) enhanced FRβ expression, resulting in improved immune recognition by m909 CAR T cells. Because many cell surface markers are shared between AML blasts and healthy hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs), we evaluated FRβ expression and recognition of HSCs by CAR T cells. m909 CAR T cells were not toxic against healthy human CD34+ HSCs in vitro. Our results indicate that FRβ is a promising target for CAR T-cell therapy of AML, which may be augmented by combination with ATRA. PMID:25887778

  6. MicroRNA-101 regulates T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia progression and chemotherapeutic sensitivity by targeting Notch1

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Lu; Zhang, Wanggang; Lei, Bo; He, Aili; Ye, Lianhong; Li, Xingzhou; Dong, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miR)-101 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia progression and chemoresistance. Furthermore, a novel target gene of miR-101 was identified. Here, we confirmed that miR-101 was significantly downregulated in the blood samples of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) compared with the healthy controls, as determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTqPCR) analysis. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that miR-101 significantly repressed the proliferation and invasion, and induced potent apoptosis in Jurkat cells, as determined by CCK-8, flow cytometer and cell invasion assays. Luciferase assay confirmed that Notch1 was a target gene of miR-101, and western blotting showed that miR-101 suppressed the expression of Notch1 at the protein level. Moreover, functional restoration assays revealed that Notch1 mediates the effects of miR-101 on Jurkat cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion. miR-101 enhanced the sensitivity of Jurkat cells to the chemotherapeutic agent adriamycin. Taken together, our results show for the first time that miR-101 acts as a tumor suppressor in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and it could enhance chemotherapeutic sensitivity. Furthermore, Notch1 was identified to be a novel target of miR-101. This study indicates that miR-101 may represent a potential therapeutic target for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia intervention. PMID:27666896

  7. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Risk Assessment before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) most commonly affects patients older than 60 years. Outcomes of treatment of older AML patients have been poor. The advent of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens made allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) an available treatment option with curative intent for older AML patients. Because older patients are often excluded from clinical trials, little is known about the stratification of their risks before allogeneic HCT. While recent studies of RIC and allogeneic HCT have shown little impact of age on outcomes, other variables such as the recipient health status and the AML disease status and chromosomal aberrations have proven to be of prognostic significance. Here, we review recent studies of allogeneic HCT for older patients with AML with detailed evaluation of risk factors for relapse as well as non-relapse mortality. We have integrated the currently available information on transplant risks into a five-category risk-benefit system that could aid in the decision-making in this patient population. PMID:24083472

  9. Clonal evolution of preleukemic hematopoietic stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Stephen M; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Milsom, Michael D; Levine, Ross L; Majeti, Ravindra

    2015-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive blood cancer that results from an abnormal expansion of uncontrollably proliferating myeloid progenitors that have lost the capacity to differentiate. AML encompasses many genetically distinct subtypes that predominantly develop de novo. However, AML can also arise from premalignant myeloid conditions, such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), or develop as the result of exposure to genotoxic agents used to treat unrelated malignancies. Although numerous distinct cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities associated with AML were discovered prior to the turn of the millennium, recent advances in whole genome sequencing and global genomic approaches have resulted in an explosion of newly identified molecular abnormalities. However, even with these advances, our understanding of how these mutations contribute to the etiology, pathogenesis, and therapeutic responses of AML remains largely unknown. Recently the International Society for Experimental Hematology (ISEH) hosted a webinar entitled "Clonal Evolution of Pre-Leukemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) in AML" in which two AML mavens, Ross Levine, MD, and Ravindra Majeti, MD, PhD, discussed some of their recent, groundbreaking studies that have shed light on how many of these newly identified mutations contribute to leukemogenesis and therapy resistance in AML. Here, we provide a brief overview of this webinar and discuss the basic scientific and clinical implications of the data presented.

  10. Segmentation of White Blood Cell from Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Images Using Dual-Threshold Method.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhu, Rui; Mi, Lei; Cao, Yihui; Yao, Di

    2016-01-01

    We propose a dual-threshold method based on a strategic combination of RGB and HSV color space for white blood cell (WBC) segmentation. The proposed method consists of three main parts: preprocessing, threshold segmentation, and postprocessing. In the preprocessing part, we get two images for further processing: one contrast-stretched gray image and one H component image from transformed HSV color space. In the threshold segmentation part, a dual-threshold method is proposed for improving the conventional single-threshold approaches and a golden section search method is used for determining the optimal thresholds. For the postprocessing part, mathematical morphology and median filtering are utilized to denoise and remove incomplete WBCs. The proposed method was tested in segmenting the lymphoblasts on a public Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) image dataset. The results show that the performance of the proposed method is better than single-threshold approach independently performed in RGB and HSV color space and the overall single WBC segmentation accuracy reaches 97.85%, showing a good prospect in subsequent lymphoblast classification and ALL diagnosis. PMID:27313659

  11. Differential microRNA expression in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiuli; Li, Dong; Shi, Qing; Hou, Huaishui; Sun, Nianzheng; Shen, Baijun

    2009-01-01

    MiRNAs play important roles in the development of both hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. The analysis of differential microRNA expression profiles may be a powerful tool to allow us insight on the mechanisms of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B-ALL). The present study provides an informative profile of the expression of miRNAs in pre-B-ALL using two independent and quantitative methods: miRNA chip and qRT-PCR of mature miRNA from 40 newly diagnosed pre-B-ALL children. Additionally, putative hematopoiesis-specific target genes were analyzed with informatics technique. Both approaches showed that miR-222, miR-339, and miR-142-3p were dramatically overexpressed in pre-B-ALL patients, and downregulation of hsa-miR-451 and hsa-miR-373* was confirmed. The results of this study offer a comprehensive and quantitative profile of miRNA expression in pre-B-ALL and their healthy counterpart, suggesting that miRNAs could play a primary role in the disease itself.

  12. Antitumor activity of ethanol extract from Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves towards human acute myeloid leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhamanbaeva, G T; Murzakhmetova, M K; Tuleukhanov, S T; Danilenko, M P

    2014-12-01

    We studied the effects of ethanol extract from Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves on the growth and differentiation of human acute myeloid leukemia cells (KG-1a, HL60, and U937). The extract of Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves inhibited cell growth depending on the cell strain and extract dose. In a high concentration (100 μg/ml), the extract also exhibited a cytotoxic effect on HL60 cells. Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves extract did not affect cell differentiation and did not modify the differentiating effect of calcitriol, active vitamin D metabolite. Inhibition of cell proliferation was paralleled by paradoxical accumulation of phase S cells (synthetic phase) with a reciprocal decrease in the count of G1 cells (presynthetic phase). The extract in a concentration of 100 μg/ml induced the appearance of cells with a subdiploid DNA content (sub-G1 phase cells), which indicated induction of apoptosis. The antiproliferative effect of Hippophae rhamnoides L. extract on acute myeloid leukemia cells was at least partially determined by activation of the S phase checkpoint, which probably led to deceleration of the cell cycle and apoptosis induction. PMID:25432283

  13. Clinical activity of azacitidine in patients who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Charles; Labopin, Myriam; Robin, Marie; Finke, Juergen; Chevallier, Patrice; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bourhis, Jean Henri; Sengelov, Henrik; Blaise, Didier; Luft, Thomas; Hallek, Michael; Kröger, Nicolaus; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Disease relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, yet treatment options for such patients remain extremely limited. Azacitidine is an important new therapy in high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia but its role in patients who relapse post allograft has not been defined. We studied the tolerability and activity of azacitidine in 181 patients who relapsed after an allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (n=116) or myelodysplastic syndromes (n=65). Sixty-nine patients received additional donor lymphocyte infusions. Forty-six of 157 (25%) assessable patients responded to azacitidine therapy: 24 (15%) achieved a complete remission and 22 a partial remission. Response rates were higher in patients transplanted in complete remission (P=0.04) and those transplanted for myelodysplastic syndromes (P=0.023). In patients who achieved a complete remission, the 2-year overall survival was 48% versus 12% for the whole population. Overall survival was determined by time to relapse post transplant more than six months (P=0.001) and percentage of blasts in the bone marrow at time of relapse (P=0.01). The concurrent administration of donor lymphocyte infusion did not improve either response rates or overall survival in patients treated with azacitidine. An azacitidine relapse prognostic score was developed which predicted 2-year overall survival ranging from 3%–37% (P=0.00001). We conclude that azacitidine represents an important new therapy in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies to confirm optimal treatment options in this challenging patient population are required. PMID:27081178

  14. Clinical activity of azacitidine in patients who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Charles; Labopin, Myriam; Robin, Marie; Finke, Juergen; Chevallier, Patrice; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bourhis, Jean Henri; Sengelov, Henrik; Blaise, Didier; Luft, Thomas; Hallek, Michael; Kröger, Nicolaus; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-07-01

    Disease relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, yet treatment options for such patients remain extremely limited. Azacitidine is an important new therapy in high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia but its role in patients who relapse post allograft has not been defined. We studied the tolerability and activity of azacitidine in 181 patients who relapsed after an allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (n=116) or myelodysplastic syndromes (n=65). Sixty-nine patients received additional donor lymphocyte infusions. Forty-six of 157 (25%) assessable patients responded to azacitidine therapy: 24 (15%) achieved a complete remission and 22 a partial remission. Response rates were higher in patients transplanted in complete remission (P=0.04) and those transplanted for myelodysplastic syndromes (P=0.023). In patients who achieved a complete remission, the 2-year overall survival was 48% versus 12% for the whole population. Overall survival was determined by time to relapse post transplant more than six months (P=0.001) and percentage of blasts in the bone marrow at time of relapse (P=0.01). The concurrent administration of donor lymphocyte infusion did not improve either response rates or overall survival in patients treated with azacitidine. An azacitidine relapse prognostic score was developed which predicted 2-year overall survival ranging from 3%-37% (P=0.00001). We conclude that azacitidine represents an important new therapy in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies to confirm optimal treatment options in this challenging patient population are required. PMID:27081178

  15. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  16. Ph+/VE-cadherin+ identifies a stem cell like population of acute lymphoblastic leukemia sustained by bone marrow niche cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; O'Leary, Heather; Fortney, James; Gibson, Laura F

    2007-11-01

    Although leukemic stem cells (LSCs) show a symbiotic relationship with bone marrow microenvironmental niches, the mechanism by which the marrow microenvironment contributes to self-renewal and proliferation of LSCs remains elusive. In the present study, we identified a unique subpopulation of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells coexpressing markers of endothelial cells (including VE-cadherin, PECAM-1, and Flk-1) and committed B-lineage progenitors. After long-term coculture with bone marrow stromal cells, tumor cells formed hematopoietic colonies and cords, expressed early stem- cell markers, and showed endothelial sprouting. Gene expression profiles of LSCs were altered in the presence of stromal cell contact. Stromal cell contact promoted leukemic cell VE-cadherin expression, stabilized beta-catenin, and up-regulated Bcr-abl fusion gene expression. Our study indicates that these specific tumor cells are uniquely positioned to respond to microenvironment-derived self-renewing and proliferative cues. Ph(+)/VE-cadherin(+) tumor subpopulation circumvents the requirement of exogenous Wnt signaling for self-renewal through stromal cell support of leukemic cell VE-cadherin expression and up-regulated Bcr-abl tyrosine kinase activity. These data suggest that strategies targeting signals in the marrow microenvironment that amplify the Bcr-abl/VE-cadherin/beta-catenin axis may have utility in sensitizing drug-resistant leukemic stem cells. PMID:17638851

  17. Apparent expansion of CD34+ cells during the evolution of myelodysplastic syndromes to acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Span, L F; Dar, S E; Shetty, V; Mundle, S D; Broady-Robinson, L; Alvi, S; Raymakers, R A; de Witte, T; Raza, A

    1998-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are highly proliferative bone marrow (BM) disorders where the primary lesion presumably affects a CD34+ early progenitor or stem cell. We investigated the proliferative characteristics of CD34+ cells of 33 untreated MDS patients (19 RA, 5 RARS, 7 RAEB, 2 RAEBt) and five patients with acute myeloid leukemia after MDS (sAML). All patients received a 1-h infusion of the thymidine analogue iodoor bromodeoxyuridine intravenously before a BM aspirate and biopsy was taken. A double-labeling immunohistochemistry technique by monoclonal anti-CD34 (QBend/10) and anti-IUdR/BrdU antibodies was developed and performed. By this technique we recognised CD34+ and CD34- cells actively engaged in DNA synthesis or not. As MDS evolves a significant increase occurred in the percentage of CD34+ cells of all myeloid cells (mean value: RA/RARS 1.67%; RAEB(t) 8.68%; sAML 23.83%) as well as in the percentage of proliferating CD34+ cells of all myeloid cells (RA/RARS 0.19%; RAEB(t) 0.43%; and sAML 3.30%). This was associated with a decreasing trend in the overall myeloid labeling index (LI: RA/RARS 25.8%, RAEB(t) 24.6% and sAML 21.5%). This decrease in overall myeloid LI is due to an exponential increase in the proportion of CD34+ cells of the proliferating compartment during MDS evolution (RA/RARS 0.35%, RAEB(t) 1.44% and sAML 11.98% of all S-phase cells). These CD34+ cells appeared to proliferate more slowly than their more mature CD34 negative counterparts, since we found a progressive increment in the mean total cell cycling time (Tc) of all myeloid cells during MDS progression (RA/RARS 39.8, RAEB(t) 45.2 and sAML 65.8 h). This study showed that during MDS evolution to sAML the CD34+ compartment develops a growth advantage leading to apparent expansion.

  18. Aberrant TAL1 activation is mediated by an interchromosomal interaction in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, B; Kang, Y; Cui, K; Litt, M; Riberio, M S J; Deng, C; Salz, T; Casada, S; Fu, X; Qiu, Y; Zhao, K; Huang, S

    2014-02-01

    Long-range chromatin interactions control metazoan gene transcription. However, the involvement of intra- and interchromosomal interactions in development and oncogenesis remains unclear. TAL1/SCL is a critical transcription factor required for the development of all hematopoietic lineages; yet, aberrant TAL1 transcription often occurs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we report that oncogenic TAL1 expression is regulated by different intra- and interchromosomal loops in normal hematopoietic and leukemic cells, respectively. These intra- and interchromosomal loops alter the cell-type-specific enhancers that interact with the TAL1 promoter. We show that human SET1 (hSET1)-mediated H3K4 methylations promote a long-range chromatin loop, which brings the +51 enhancer in close proximity to TAL1 promoter 1 in erythroid cells. The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) facilitates this long-range enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in erythroid cells while blocking the same enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in human T-cell leukemia. In human T-ALL, a T-cell-specific transcription factor c-Maf-mediated interchromosomal interaction brings the TAL1 promoter into close proximity with a T-cell-specific regulatory element located on chromosome 16, activating aberrant TAL1 oncogene expression. Thus, our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism involving changes in three-dimensional chromatin interactions that activate the TAL1 oncogene in human T-cell leukemia. PMID:23698277

  19. [Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia Following Etoposide Based Chemotherapy in Germ Cell Tumor].

    PubMed

    Okumura, Yoshinaga; Oae, Masashi; Shiraishi, Yusuke; Soda, Takeshi; Kanamaru, Hiroshi; Arima, Nobuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    A 27-year-old man visited our hospital with painless swelling of the left scrotum. Hematologic studies showed the following levels of lactate dehydrogenase, 3,171 IU/l ; alpha-fetoprotein, 2.2 ng/ml ; and β- human chorionic gonadotropin, 0.4 ng/ml, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a mass of 10×8 ×4 cm in the left testis, and that of 3.5×3.0×5.0 cm in the left renal hilar lymph node, without any other metastasis. Left high inguinal orchiectomy was performed, and histopathological examination revealed mixed form with seminoma and teratoma. He was diagnosed to have a left germ cell tumor with left renal hilar lymph node metastases, pT1, N3, M0, stage II C, indicating poor prognosis with IGCCC. The patient received four cycles of chemotherapy, COMPE regimen (CDDP, VCR, MTX, PEP, VP-16 [etoposide]). After lactate dehydrogenase, alpha-fetoprotein, and β -human chorionic gonadotropin all normalized, retroperitoneal lymph node dissection was performed. Histopathological examination revealed only a mature teratoma. Two and half years later, hematologic studies showed blast transformation. Bone marrow biopsy revealed acute myeloblastic lymphoma (M2). The patient received one cycle of AraC and daunorubicin, one cycle of high dose AraC, and three cycles of AraC and mitoxantrone. After chemotherapy, he has maintained a disease-free status for 11 years. In this case, etoposide, a topoisomerase II inhibitor, was the presumed cause of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia. After administering chemotherapeutic agents especially etoposide, it is important to check blood count periodically for a long time. PMID:27320120

  20. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-17

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  1. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  2. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. BET inhibitor OTX015 targets BRD2 and BRD4 and decreases c-MYC in acute leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Berrou, Jeannig; Dupont, Mélanie; Bertrand, Sibyl; Masse, Aline; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Itzykson, Raphaël; Delord, Marc; Riveiro, Maria E.; Herait, Patrice; Baruchel, André; Dombret, Hervé; Gardin, Claude

    2015-01-01

    The bromodomain (BRD) and extraterminal (BET) proteins including BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4 have been identified as key targets for leukemia maintenance. A novel oral inhibitor of BRD2/3/4, the thienotriazolodiazepine compound OTX015, suitable for human use, is available. Here we report its biological effects in AML and ALL cell lines and leukemic samples. Exposure to OTX015 lead to cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis at submicromolar concentrations in acute leukemia cell lines and patient-derived leukemic cells, as described with the canonical JQ1 BET inhibitor. Treatment with JQ1 and OTX15 induces similar gene expression profiles in sensitive cell lines, including a c-MYC decrease and an HEXIM1 increase. OTX015 exposure also induced a strong decrease of BRD2, BRD4 and c-MYC and increase of HEXIM1 proteins, while BRD3 expression was unchanged. c-MYC, BRD2, BRD3, BRD4 and HEXIM1 mRNA levels did not correlate however with viability following exposure to OTX015. Sequential combinations of OTX015 with other epigenetic modifying drugs, panobinostat and azacitidine have a synergic effect on growth of the KASUMI cell line. Our results indicate that OTX015 and JQ1 have similar biological effects in leukemic cells, supporting OTX015 evaluation in a Phase Ib trial in relapsed/refractory leukemia patients. PMID:25989842

  4. Erk negative feedback control enables pre-B cell transformation and represents a therapeutic target in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Caeser, Rebecca; Buchner, Maike; Park, Eugen; Swaminathan, Srividya; Hurtz, Christian; Geng, Huimin; Chan, Lai N; Klemm, Lars; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Qiu, Yi Hua; Zhang, Nianxiang; Coombes, Kevin R.; Paietta, Elisabeth; Molkentin, Jeffery; Koeffler, H Phillip; Willman, Cheryl L; Hunger, Stephen P.; Melnick, Ari; Kornblau, Steven M.; Müschen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Summary Studying mechanisms of malignant transformation of human pre-B cells, we found that acute activation of oncogenes induced immediate cell death in the vast majority of cells. Few surviving pre-B cell clones had acquired permissiveness to oncogenic signaling by strong activation of negative feedback regulation of Erk signaling. Studying negative feedback regulation of Erk in genetic experiments at three different levels, we found that Spry2, Dusp6 and Etv5 were essential for oncogenic transformation in mouse models for pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Interestingly, a small molecule inhibitor of DUSP6 selectively induced cell death in patient-derived pre-B ALL cells and overcame conventional mechanisms of drug-resistance. PMID:26073130

  5. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow exhibit aberrant cytogenetics and cytokine elaboration.

    PubMed

    Huang, J C; Basu, S K; Zhao, X; Chien, S; Fang, M; Oehler, V G; Appelbaum, F R; Becker, P S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play a fundamental role in the BM microenvironment (BME) and abnormalities of these cells may contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to characterize the cytokine and gene expression profile, immunophenotype and cytogenetics of BM-MSCs from AML patients compared to normal BM-MSCs from healthy donors. AML BM-MSCs showed decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels compared to normal BM-MSCs. AML BM-MSCs expressed similar β1 integrin, CD44, CD73, CD90 and E-cadherin compared to normal BM-MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal aberrations in AML BM-MSCs, some overlapping with and others distinct from their corresponding AML blasts. No significant difference in gene expression was detected between AML BM-MSCs compared to normal BM-MSCs; however, comparing the differences between AML and MSCs from AML patients with the differences between normal hematopoietic cells and normal MSCs by Ingenuity pathway analysis showed key distinctions of the AML setting: (1) upstream gene regulation by transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor, tissue transglutaminase 2, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4; (2) integrin and interleukin 8 signaling as overrepresented canonical pathways; and (3) upregulation of transcription factors FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog. Thus, phenotypic abnormalities of AML BM-MSCs highlight a dysfunctional BME that may impact AML survival and proliferation. PMID:25860293

  6. The Sequence of Cyclophosphamide and Myeloablative Total Body Irradiation in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Holter-Chakrabarty, Jennifer L.; Pierson, Namali; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Artz, Andrew S.; Baron, Frédéric; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Epstein, Robert B.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Olsson, Richard F.; Selby, George B.; Williams, Kirsten M.; Cooke, Kenneth R.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; McCarthy, Philip L.

    2015-01-01

    Limited clinical data are available to assess whether the sequencing of cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI) changes outcomes. We evaluated the sequence in 1769 (CyTBI N=948, TBICy N=821) recipients of related or unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) who received TBI (1200-1500cGY) for acute leukemia from 2003 to 2010. The two cohorts were comparable for median age, performance score, type of leukemia, first complete remission, Ph+ ALL, HLA matched siblings, stem cell source, anti-thymocyte globulin use, TBI dose, and type of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. The sequence of TBI did not significantly affect TRM (24% vs. 23% at 3y, p=0.67; relative risk [RR] 1.01, p=0.91), leukemia relapse (27% vs. 29% at 3y, p=0.34; RR 0.89, p=0.18), leukemia-free survival (49% vs. 48% at3y, p=0.27; RR 0.93, p=0.29), chronic GVHD (45% vs. 47% at 1y, p=0.39; RR 0.9, p=0.11) or overall survival (53% vs. 52% at 3y, p=0.62; RR 0.96, p=0.57) for CyTBI and TBICy respectively. Corresponding cumulative incidences of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome were 4% and 6% at 100 days (p=0.08). This study demonstrates that the sequence of Cy and TBI does not impact transplant outcomes and complications in patients with acute leukemia undergoing HCT with myeloablative conditioning. PMID:25840335

  7. The effect of aqueous cinnamon extract on the apoptotic process in acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells

    PubMed Central

    Assadollahi, Vahideh; Parivar, Kazem; Roudbari, Nasim Hayati; Khalatbary, Ali Reza; Motamedi, Masoumeh; Ezatpour, Behrouz; Dashti, Gholam Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is an acute leukemia diagnosed by translocation of chromosomes 15 and 17 [T (15,17)] and aggregation of neoplastic promyelocytes which are incapable of being converted into mature cells. Today, many tend to use medicinal herbs in studies and clinical applications for treatment of cancers. Cinnamon with scientific name “cinnamomumzelanicum” is a shrub of Laurales order, lauraceae family with cinnamomum genus. It is a medicinal shrub with anti-proliferation effect on tumor cells. This study was conducted to determine the effects of aqueous cinnamon extract on HL-60 cells as a model for APL. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro experimental study, HL-60 cell line was cultured under the influence of cinnamon extract's concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 2 mg/ml in with intervals of 24, 48, and 72 h. Growth inhibition and toxic effects of cinnamon extract were evaluated through tetrazolium salt reduction. The effect of this herb on the cell cycle was studied by flow cytometry. The Hoechst stain was used to detect apoptotic cell nuclei. Results: Cinnamon extract inhibited the growth of HL-60 cells as correlated with concentration and time. After 72 h of treating HL-60 cells with 0.01 mg/l cinnamon extract, the growth of cells was inhibited by 90.1%. Cinnamon extract stopped the cell cycle in G1 phase and the Hoechst staining verified the apoptotic process in those cells. Conclusion: Considering the inhibitory property of cinnamon extract, we recommend it as a single drug or besides other medications for treating promyelocytic leukemia. PMID:23977653

  8. Loss of DNAM-1 ligand expression by acute myeloid leukemia cells renders them resistant to NK cell killing.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Conor J; Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Darcy, Phillip K; Oliaro, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with poor natural killer (NK) cell function through aberrant expression of NK-cell-activating receptors and their ligands on tumor cells. These alterations are thought to promote formation of inhibitory NK-target cell synapses, in which killer cell degranulation is attenuated. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be effective in treating AML, through restoration of NK cell lytic activity. Similarly, agents that augment NK-cell-activating signals within the immunological synapse may provide some therapeutic benefit. However, the receptor-ligand interactions that critically dictate NK cell function in AML remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that CD112/CD155 expression is required for DNAM-1-dependent killing of AML cells. Indeed, the low, or absent, expression of CD112/CD155 on multiple AML cell lines resulted in failure to stimulate optimal NK cell function. Importantly, isolated clones with low CD112/155 expression were resistant to NK cell killing while those expressing abundant levels of CD112/155 were highly susceptible. Attenuated NK cell killing in the absence of CD112/CD155 originated from decreased NK-target cell conjugation. Furthermore, we reveal by time-lapse microscopy, a significant increase in NK cell 'failed killing' in the absence of DNAM-1 ligands. Consequently, NK cells preferentially lysed ligand-expressing cells within heterogeneous populations, driving clonal selection of CD112/CD155-negative blasts upon NK cell attack. Taken together, we identify reduced CD155 expression as a major NK cell escape mechanism in AML and an opportunity for targeted immunotherapy. PMID:27622064

  9. NUP214-ABL1-mediated cell proliferation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is dependent on the LCK kinase and various interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    De Keersmaecker, Kim; Porcu, Michaël; Cox, Luk; Girardi, Tiziana; Vandepoel, Roel; de Beeck, Joyce Op; Gielen, Olga; Mentens, Nicole; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Hantschel, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The NUP214-ABL1 fusion protein is a constitutively active protein tyrosine kinase that is found in 6% of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and that promotes proliferation and survival of T-lymphoblasts. Although NUP214-ABL1 is sensitive to ABL1 kinase inhibitors, development of resistance to these compounds is a major clinical problem, underlining the need for additional drug targets in the sparsely studied NUP214-ABL1 signaling network. In this work, we identify and validate the SRC family kinase LCK as a protein whose activity is absolutely required for the proliferation and survival of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells that depend on NUP214-ABL1 activity. These findings underscore the potential of SRC kinase inhibitors and of the dual ABL1/SRC kinase inhibitors dasatinib and bosutinib for the treatment of NUP214-ABL1-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In addition, we used mass spectrometry to identify protein interaction partners of NUP214-ABL1. Our results strongly support that the signaling network of NUP214-ABL1 is distinct from that previously reported for BCR-ABL1. Moreover, we found that three NUP214-ABL1-interacting proteins, MAD2L1, NUP155, and SMC4, are strictly required for the proliferation and survival of NUP214-ABL1-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In conclusion, this work identifies LCK, MAD2L1, NUP155 and SMC4 as four new potential drug targets in NUP214-ABL1-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:23872305

  10. Revisiting the biology of infant t(4;11)/MLL-AF4+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Bueno, Clara; Prieto, Cristina; Acha, Pamela; Stam, Ronald W; Marschalek, Rolf; Menéndez, Pablo

    2015-12-17

    Infant B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) accounts for 10% of childhood ALL. The genetic hallmark of most infant B-ALL is chromosomal rearrangements of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. Despite improvement in the clinical management and survival (∼85-90%) of childhood B-ALL, the outcome of infants with MLL-rearranged (MLL-r) B-ALL remains dismal, with overall survival <35%. Among MLL-r infant B-ALL, t(4;11)+ patients harboring the fusion MLL-AF4 (MA4) display a particularly poor prognosis and a pro-B/mixed phenotype. Studies in monozygotic twins and archived blood spots have provided compelling evidence of a single cell of prenatal origin as the target for MA4 fusion, explaining the brief leukemia latency. Despite its aggressiveness and short latency, current progress on its etiology, pathogenesis, and cellular origin is limited as evidenced by the lack of mouse/human models recapitulating the disease phenotype/latency. We propose this is because infant cancer is from an etiologic and pathogenesis standpoint distinct from adult cancer and should be seen as a developmental disease. This is supported by whole-genome sequencing studies suggesting that opposite to the view of cancer as a "multiple-and-sequential-hit" model, t(4;11) alone might be sufficient to spawn leukemia. The stable genome of these patients suggests that, in infant developmental cancer, one "big-hit" might be sufficient for overt disease and supports a key contribution of epigenetics and a prenatal cell of origin during a critical developmental window of stem cell vulnerability in the leukemia pathogenesis. Here, we revisit the biology of t(4;11)+ infant B-ALL with an emphasis on its origin, genetics, and disease models. PMID:26463423

  11. Revisiting the biology of infant t(4;11)/MLL-AF4+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Bueno, Clara; Prieto, Cristina; Acha, Pamela; Stam, Ronald W; Marschalek, Rolf; Menéndez, Pablo

    2015-12-17

    Infant B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) accounts for 10% of childhood ALL. The genetic hallmark of most infant B-ALL is chromosomal rearrangements of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. Despite improvement in the clinical management and survival (∼85-90%) of childhood B-ALL, the outcome of infants with MLL-rearranged (MLL-r) B-ALL remains dismal, with overall survival <35%. Among MLL-r infant B-ALL, t(4;11)+ patients harboring the fusion MLL-AF4 (MA4) display a particularly poor prognosis and a pro-B/mixed phenotype. Studies in monozygotic twins and archived blood spots have provided compelling evidence of a single cell of prenatal origin as the target for MA4 fusion, explaining the brief leukemia latency. Despite its aggressiveness and short latency, current progress on its etiology, pathogenesis, and cellular origin is limited as evidenced by the lack of mouse/human models recapitulating the disease phenotype/latency. We propose this is because infant cancer is from an etiologic and pathogenesis standpoint distinct from adult cancer and should be seen as a developmental disease. This is supported by whole-genome sequencing studies suggesting that opposite to the view of cancer as a "multiple-and-sequential-hit" model, t(4;11) alone might be sufficient to spawn leukemia. The stable genome of these patients suggests that, in infant developmental cancer, one "big-hit" might be sufficient for overt disease and supports a key contribution of epigenetics and a prenatal cell of origin during a critical developmental window of stem cell vulnerability in the leukemia pathogenesis. Here, we revisit the biology of t(4;11)+ infant B-ALL with an emphasis on its origin, genetics, and disease models.

  12. Revisiting the biology of infant t(4;11)/MLL-AF4+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Clara; Prieto, Cristina; Acha, Pamela; Stam, Ronald W.; Marschalek, Rolf; Menéndez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Infant B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) accounts for 10% of childhood ALL. The genetic hallmark of most infant B-ALL is chromosomal rearrangements of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. Despite improvement in the clinical management and survival (∼85-90%) of childhood B-ALL, the outcome of infants with MLL-rearranged (MLL-r) B-ALL remains dismal, with overall survival <35%. Among MLL-r infant B-ALL, t(4;11)+ patients harboring the fusion MLL-AF4 (MA4) display a particularly poor prognosis and a pro-B/mixed phenotype. Studies in monozygotic twins and archived blood spots have provided compelling evidence of a single cell of prenatal origin as the target for MA4 fusion, explaining the brief leukemia latency. Despite its aggressiveness and short latency, current progress on its etiology, pathogenesis, and cellular origin is limited as evidenced by the lack of mouse/human models recapitulating the disease phenotype/latency. We propose this is because infant cancer is from an etiologic and pathogenesis standpoint distinct from adult cancer and should be seen as a developmental disease. This is supported by whole-genome sequencing studies suggesting that opposite to the view of cancer as a “multiple-and-sequential-hit” model, t(4;11) alone might be sufficient to spawn leukemia. The stable genome of these patients suggests that, in infant developmental cancer, one “big-hit” might be sufficient for overt disease and supports a key contribution of epigenetics and a prenatal cell of origin during a critical developmental window of stem cell vulnerability in the leukemia pathogenesis. Here, we revisit the biology of t(4;11)+ infant B-ALL with an emphasis on its origin, genetics, and disease models. PMID:26463423

  13. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  14. Targeting MTHFD2 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pikman, Yana; Puissant, Alexandre; Alexe, Gabriela; Furman, Andrew; Chen, Liying M; Frumm, Stacey M; Ross, Linda; Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F; Lewis, Caroline A; Ramos, Azucena; Gould, Joshua; Stone, Richard M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Galinsky, Ilene; Clish, Clary B; Kung, Andrew L; Hemann, Michael T; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Banerji, Versha; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2016-06-27

    Drugs targeting metabolism have formed the backbone of therapy for some cancers. We sought to identify new such targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The one-carbon folate pathway, specifically methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase 2 (MTHFD2), emerged as a top candidate in our analyses. MTHFD2 is the most differentially expressed metabolic enzyme in cancer versus normal cells. Knockdown of MTHFD2 in AML cells decreased growth, induced differentiation, and impaired colony formation in primary AML blasts. In human xenograft and MLL-AF9 mouse leukemia models, MTHFD2 suppression decreased leukemia burden and prolonged survival. Based upon primary patient AML data and functional genomic screening, we determined that FLT3-ITD is a biomarker of response to MTHFD2 suppression. Mechanistically, MYC regulates the expression of MTHFD2, and MTHFD2 knockdown suppresses the TCA cycle. This study supports the therapeutic targeting of MTHFD2 in AML. PMID:27325891

  15. Traumatic stress in acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodin, Gary; Yuen, Dora; Mischitelle, Ashley; Minden, Mark D; Brandwein, Joseph; Schimmer, Aaron; Marmar, Charles; Gagliese, Lucia; Lo, Christopher; Rydall, Anne; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acute leukemia is a condition with an acute onset that is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. However, the psychological impact of this life-threatening condition and its intensive treatment has not been systematically examined. In the present study, we investigate the prevalence and correlates of post-traumatic stress symptoms in this population. Methods Patients with acute myeloid, lymphocytic, and promyelocytic leukemia who were newly diagnosed, recently relapsed, or treatment failures were recruited at a comprehensive cancer center in Toronto, Canada. Participants completed the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, CARES Medical Interaction Subscale, and other psychosocial measures. A multivariate regression analysis was used to assess independent predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Results Of the 205 participants, 58% were male, mean age was 50.1 ± 15.4 years, 86% were recently diagnosed, and 94% were receiving active treatment. The mean Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire score was 30.2 ± 22.5, with 27 of 200 (14%) patients meeting criteria for acute stress disorder and 36 (18%) for subsyndromal acute stress disorder. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were associated with more physical symptoms, physical symptom distress, attachment anxiety, and perceived difficulty communicating with health-care providers, and poorer spiritual well-being (all p <0.05). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that clinically significant symptoms of traumatic stress are common in acute leukemia and are linked to the degree of physical suffering, to satisfaction with relationships with health-care providers, and with individual psychological characteristics. Longitudinal study is needed to determine the natural history, but these findings suggest that intervention may be indicated to alleviate or prevent traumatic stress in this population. PMID:22081505

  16. RepSox slows decay of CD34+ acute myeloid leukemia cells and decreases T cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 expression.

    PubMed

    Jajosky, Audrey N; Coad, James E; Vos, Jeffrey A; Martin, Karen H; Senft, Jamie R; Wenger, Sharon L; Gibson, Laura F

    2014-07-01

    Despite initial response to therapy, most acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients relapse. To eliminate relapse-causing leukemic stem/progenitor cells (LPCs), patient-specific immune therapies may be required. In vitro cellular engineering may require increasing the "stemness" or immunogenicity of tumor cells and activating or restoring cancer-impaired immune-effector and antigen-presenting cells. Leukapheresis samples provide the cells needed to engineer therapies: LPCs to be targeted, normal hematopoietic stem cells to be spared, and cancer-impaired immune cells to be repaired and activated. This study sought to advance development of LPC-targeted therapies by exploring nongenetic ways to slow the decay and to increase the immunogenicity of primary CD34(+) AML cells. CD34(+) AML cells generally displayed more colony-forming and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity than CD34(-) AML cells. Along with exposure to bone marrow stromal cells and low (1%-5%) oxygen, culture with RepSox (a reprogramming tool and inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β receptor 1) consistently slowed decline of CD34(+) AML and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cells. RepSox-treated AML cells displayed higher CD34, CXCL12, and MYC mRNA levels than dimethyl sulfoxide-treated controls. RepSox also accelerated loss of T cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3), an immune checkpoint receptor that impairs antitumor immunity, from the surface of AML and MDS cells. Our results suggest RepSox may reduce Tim-3 expression by inhibiting transforming growth factor-β signaling and slow decay of CD34(+) AML cells by increasing CXCL12 and MYC, two factors that inhibit AML cell differentiation. By prolonging survival of CD34(+) AML cells and reducing Tim-3, RepSox may promote in vitro immune cell activation and advance development of LPC-targeted therapies.

  17. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. [PML-RARα and p21 are key factors for maintaining acute promyelocytic leukemia stem cells survival].

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Li, Jun-Min

    2011-10-01

    Tumor stem/progenitor cells are the cells with the characteristics of self-renewal, differentiating to all the other cell populations within tumor, which are also regarded as the source of tumor relapse, drug-resistance and metastasis. As a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents the target of therapy due to the good response of the oncogenic protein PML-RARα to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO). This review summarizes the latest research results of APL as follows: (1) there probably are two APL stem/progenitor cell populations within APL, and self-renewal and survival of APL stem/progenitor cells highly depend on PML-RARα expression, cell cycle inhibitor p21, self-renewal associated molecules and chemokines; and (2) ATRA and ATO eradicate APL stem/progenitor cells mainly by PML-RARα degradation, FOXO3A activation and the inhibition of self-renewal-associated signaling pathway of sonic hedgehog. These findings are helpful to improve other tumor therapy.

  20. Nitric oxide is the key mediator of death induced by fisetin in human acute monocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ash, Dipankar; Subramanian, Manikandan; Surolia, Avadhesha; Shaha, Chandrima

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to be effective in cancer chemoprevention and therefore drugs that help generate NO would be preferable for combination chemotherapy or solo use. This study shows a new evidence of NO as a mediator of acute leukemia cell death induced by fisetin, a promising chemotherapeutic agent. Fisetin was able to kill THP-1 cells in vivo resulting in tumor shrinkage in the mouse xenograft model. Death induction in vitro was mediated by an increase in NO resulting in double strand DNA breaks and the activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Double strand DNA breaks could be reduced if NO inhibitor was present during fisetin treatment. Fisetin also inhibited the downstream components of the mTORC1 pathway through downregulation of levels of p70 S6 kinase and inducing hypo-phosphorylation of S6 Ri P kinase, eIF4B and eEF2K. NO inhibition restored phosphorylation of downstream effectors of mTORC1 and rescued cells from death. Fisetin induced Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels and abrogation of Ca(2+) influx reduced caspase activation and cell death. NO increase and increased Ca(2+) were independent phenomenon. It was inferred that apoptotic death of acute monocytic leukemia cells was induced by fisetin through increased generation of NO and elevated Ca(2+) entry activating the caspase dependent apoptotic pathways. Therefore, manipulation of NO production could be viewed as a potential strategy to increase efficacy of chemotherapy in acute monocytic leukemia.

  1. New Strategies in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Leukemogenesis and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gojo, Ivana; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have unraveled the complexity of leukemogenesis and provided the opportunity to design more personalized and pathophysiology-targeted therapeutic strategies. Despite the use of intensive chemotherapy, relapse remains the most common cause for therapeutic failure in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The interactions between leukemia stem cells (LSC) and marrow microenvironment appear to be critical in promoting therapeutic resistance through progressive acquisition of genetic and epigenetic changes within leukemia cells and immune evasion, resulting in leukemia cell survival. With advances in genomic sequencing efforts, epigenetic and phenotypic characterization, personalized therapeutic strategies aimed at critical leukemia survival mechanisms may be feasible in the near future. Here, we review select novel approaches to therapy of AML such as targeting LSC, altering leukemia/marrow microenvironment interactions, inhibiting DNA repair or cell cycle checkpoints, and augmenting immune-based anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25324141

  2. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia: Similar outcomes regardless of donor type

    PubMed Central

    Warlick, Erica D.; de Latour, Regis Peffault; Shanley, Ryan; Robin, Marie; Bejanyan, Nelli; Xhaard, Alienor; Brunstein, Claudio; de Fontbrune, Flore Sicre; Ustun, Celalettin; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Socie, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    The use of alternative donor transplants is increasing as the transplant eligible population ages and sibling donors are less available. We evaluated the impact of donor source on transplant outcomes for adults with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning transplant. Between January 2000 and December 2010, 414 consecutive adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia in remission received myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplant from either a matched related donor (n=187), unrelated donor (n=76), or umbilical cord blood donor (n=151) at the University of Minnesota or Hôpital St. Louis in Paris. We noted similar 6 year overall survival across donor types: matched related donor 47% (95% CI, 39–54%), umbilical cord blood 36% (95% CI, 28–44%), matched unrelated donor 54% (95% CI, 40–66%), mismatched unrelated donor 51% (95% CI, 28–70%) (p=0.11). Survival differed based on conditioning intensity and age with 6 year survival of 57% (95% CI 47–65%), 39% (95% CI, 28–49%), 23% (95% CI, 6–47%), 47% (95% CI, 36–57%) and 28% (95% CI, 17–41%) for myeloablative age 18–39, myeloablative age 40+, or reduced intensity conditioning ages 18–39, 40–56, and 57–74 respectively (p< 0.01). Relapse was increased with reduced intensity conditioning and lowest in younger patients receiving myeloablative conditioning (HR 1.0 versus 2.5 or above for all RIC age cohorts), p<0.01. Transplant related mortality was similar across donor types. In summary, our data support the use of alternative donors as a graft source with MA or RIC for patients with acute myeloid leukemia when a sibling donor is unavailable. PMID:25452032

  3. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Estey, Elihu

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of the elderly and the numbers of these patients are increasing. Patients ≥60 years of age continue to have poor prognosis. Preliminary results suggest benefit from reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in selected patients 60-80 years of age. However, although patients in this age range comprise >50% of those with AML, they currently constitute only 17% of those offered HCT. In the absence of prospective randomized studies comparing HCT and chemotherapy, the decision to recommend HCT rests on retrospective analyses of the risks of relapse and nonrelapse mortality after each approach. There is strong evidence that pre-HCT comorbidities can predict HCT-related morbidity and mortality. Age alone does not appear predictive and, particularly if the risk of relapse with chemotherapy is high, should not be the sole basis for deciding against HCT. Use of geriatric assessment tools, inflammatory biomarkers, and genetic polymorphism data may further aid in predicting nonrelapse mortality after HCT. Disease status and pretreatment cytogenetics with FLT3-TID, NPM-1, and CEBP-α status are the main factors predicting relapse and these are likely to be supplemented by incorporation of other molecular markers and the level of minimal residual disease after chemotherapy. HLA-matched related and unrelated donor grafts seem preferable to those from other donor sources. Donor age is of no clear significance. Models combining comorbidities with AML risk factors are useful in risk assessment before HCT. In this chapter, we integrated information on AML-specific, HCT-specific, and patient-specific risk factors into a risk-adapted approach to guide decisions about HCT versus no HCT.

  4. Infection Rates among Acute Leukemia Patients Receiving Alternative Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen; Woo Ahn, Kwang; Chen, Min; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Ahmed, Ibrahim; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Antin, Joseph; Bhatt, Ami S; Boeckh, Michael; Chen, George; Dandoy, Christopher; George, Biju; Laughlin, Mary J; Lazarus, Hillard M; MacMillan, Margaret L; Margolis, David A; Marks, David I; Norkin, Maxim; Rosenthal, Joseph; Saad, Ayman; Savani, Bipin; Schouten, Harry C; Storek, Jan; Szabolcs, Paul; Ustun, Celalettin; Verneris, Michael R; Waller, Edmund K; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Williams, Kirsten M; Wingard, John R; Wirk, Baldeep; Wolfs, Tom; Young, Jo-Anne H; Auletta, Jeffrey; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lindemans, Caroline; Riches, Marcie L

    2016-09-01

    Alternative graft sources (umbilical cord blood [UCB], matched unrelated donors [MUD], or mismatched unrelated donors [MMUD]) enable patients without a matched sibling donor to receive potentially curative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Retrospective studies demonstrate comparable outcomes among different graft sources. However, the risk and types of infections have not been compared among graft sources. Such information may influence the choice of a particular graft source. We compared the incidence of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in 1781 adults with acute leukemia who received alternative donor HCT (UCB, n= 568; MUD, n = 930; MMUD, n = 283) between 2008 and 2011. The incidences of bacterial infection at 1 year were 72%, 59%, and 65% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. Incidences of viral infection at 1 year were 68%, 45%, and 53% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. In multivariable analysis, bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were more common after either UCB or MMUD than after MUD (P < .0001). Bacterial and viral but not fungal infections were more common after UCB than MMUD (P = .0009 and <.0001, respectively). The presence of viral infection was not associated with an increased mortality. Overall survival (OS) was comparable among UCB and MMUD patients with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 90% but was inferior for UCB for patients with KPS < 90%. Bacterial and fungal infections were associated with poorer OS. Future strategies focusing on infection prevention and treatment are indicated to improve HCT outcomes.

  5. T-cell receptor excision circle levels after allogeneic stem cell transplantation are predictive of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uzunel, Mehmet; Sairafi, Darius; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas; Uhlin, Michael

    2014-07-15

    In this retrospective study, 209 patients with malignant disease were analyzed for levels of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) for the first 24 months after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. CD3(+) cells were separated by direct antibody-coupled magnetic beads, followed by DNA extraction according to a standard protocol. The δRec-ψJα signal joint TREC was measured with real-time quantitative PCR. Patients were grouped based on malignant disease: chronic myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphatic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients were further subdivided based on TREC levels below (low-TREC) or above (high-TREC) median at each time point. TREC levels were then correlated to relapse incidence and relapse-free survival (RFS). For patients with AML, low TREC levels 2 months post-transplantation were correlated to high relapse incidence at 5 years (P<0.05). In patients with chronic leukemia, high TREC levels were correlated with improved RFS (P<0.05). For patients with MDS, high TREC levels at 9 months post-transplantation were associated with higher RFS at 5 years (P<0.02) and lower relapse incidence (P<0.02). This study shows the potential use of TREC measurement in blood to predict relapse in patients with AML and MDS after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24617310

  6. Targeted sequencing identifies associations between IL7R-JAK mutations and epigenetic modulators in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Carmen; Schwab, Claire; Broux, Michaël; Geerdens, Ellen; Degryse, Sandrine; Demeyer, Sofie; Lahortiga, Idoya; Elliott, Alannah; Chilton, Lucy; La Starza, Roberta; Mecucci, Cristina; Vandenberghe, Peter; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Moorman, Anthony V; Soulier, Jean; Harrison, Christine J; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cools, Jan

    2015-10-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is caused by the accumulation of multiple oncogenic lesions, including chromosomal rearrangements and mutations. To determine the frequency and co-occurrence of mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed targeted re-sequencing of 115 genes across 155 diagnostic samples (44 adult and 111 childhood cases). NOTCH1 and CDKN2A/B were mutated/deleted in more than half of the cases, while an additional 37 genes were mutated/deleted in 4% to 20% of cases. We found that IL7R-JAK pathway genes were mutated in 27.7% of cases, with JAK3 mutations being the most frequent event in this group. Copy number variations were also detected, including deletions of CREBBP or CTCF and duplication of MYB. FLT3 mutations were rare, but a novel extracellular mutation in FLT3 was detected and confirmed to be transforming. Furthermore, we identified complex patterns of pairwise associations, including a significant association between mutations in IL7R-JAK genes and epigenetic regulators (WT1, PRC2, PHF6). Our analyses showed that IL7R-JAK genetic lesions did not confer adverse prognosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases enrolled in the UK ALL2003 trial. Overall, these results identify interconnections between the T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome and disease biology, and suggest a potential clinical application for JAK inhibitors in a significant proportion of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  7. A Subset of Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Has Leukemia Cells Characterized by Chemokine Responsiveness and Altered Expression of Transcriptional as well as Angiogenic Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Annette K.; Reikvam, Håkon; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive and heterogeneous bone marrow malignancy, the only curative treatment being intensive chemotherapy eventually in combination with allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Both the AML and their neighboring stromal cells show constitutive chemokine release, but chemokines seem to function as regulators of AML cell proliferation only for a subset of patients. Chemokine targeting is therefore considered not only for immunosuppression in allotransplanted patients but also as a possible antileukemic strategy in combination with intensive chemotherapy or as part of disease-stabilizing treatment at least for the subset of patients with chemokine-responsive AML cells. In this study, we characterized more in detail the leukemia cell phenotype of the chemokine-responsive patients. We investigated primary AML cells derived from 79 unselected patients. Standardized in vitro suspension cultures were used to investigate AML cell proliferation, and global gene expression profiles were compared for chemokine responders and non-responders identified through the proliferation assays. CCL28-induced growth modulation was used as marker of chemokine responsiveness, and 38 patients were then classified as chemokine-responsive. The effects of exogenous CCL28 (growth inhibition/enhancement/no effect) thus differed among patients and was also dependent on the presence of exogenous hematopoietic growth factors as well as constitutive AML cell cytokine release. The effect of CCR1 inhibition in the presence of chemokine-secreting mesenchymal stem cells also differed among patients. Chemokine-responsive AML cells showed altered expression of genes important for (i) epigenetic transcriptional regulation, particularly lysine acetylation; (ii) helicase activity, especially DExD/H RNA helicases; and (iii) angioregulatory proteins important for integrin binding. Thus, chemokine responsiveness is part of a complex AML cell phenotype with regard to

  8. RNA sequencing unravels the genetics of refractory/relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Prognostic and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Gianfelici, Valentina; Chiaretti, Sabina; Demeyer, Sofie; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Messina, Monica; La Starza, Roberta; Peragine, Nadia; Paoloni, Francesca; Geerdens, Ellen; Pierini, Valentina; Elia, Loredana; Mancini, Marco; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Apicella, Valerio; Gaidano, Gianluca; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Mecucci, Cristina; Guarini, Anna; Cools, Jan; Foà, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Despite therapeutic improvements, a sizable number of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia still have a poor outcome. To unravel the genomic background associated with refractoriness, we evaluated the transcriptome of 19 cases of refractory/early relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (discovery cohort) by performing RNA-sequencing on diagnostic material. The incidence and prognostic impact of the most frequently mutated pathways were validated by Sanger sequencing on genomic DNA from diagnostic samples of an independent cohort of 49 cases (validation cohort), including refractory, relapsed and responsive cases. Combined gene expression and fusion transcript analyses in the discovery cohort revealed the presence of known oncogenes and identified novel rearrangements inducing overexpression, as well as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutation analysis identified JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN as the most commonly disrupted pathways in patients with chemorefractory disease or early relapse, frequently in association with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. The analysis on the validation cohort documented a significantly higher risk of relapse, inferior overall survival, disease-free survival and event-free survival in patients with JAK/STAT or RAS/PTEN alterations. Conversely, a significantly better survival was observed in patients harboring only NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations: this favorable prognostic effect was abrogated by the presence of concomitant mutations. Preliminary in vitro assays on primary cells demonstrated sensitivity to specific inhibitors. These data document the negative prognostic impact of JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest the potential clinical application of JAK and PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in patients harboring mutations in these pathways. PMID:27151993

  9. RNA sequencing unravels the genetics of refractory/relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Prognostic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Gianfelici, Valentina; Chiaretti, Sabina; Demeyer, Sofie; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Messina, Monica; La Starza, Roberta; Peragine, Nadia; Paoloni, Francesca; Geerdens, Ellen; Pierini, Valentina; Elia, Loredana; Mancini, Marco; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Apicella, Valerio; Gaidano, Gianluca; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Mecucci, Cristina; Guarini, Anna; Cools, Jan; Foà, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Despite therapeutic improvements, a sizable number of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia still have a poor outcome. To unravel the genomic background associated with refractoriness, we evaluated the transcriptome of 19 cases of refractory/early relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (discovery cohort) by performing RNA-sequencing on diagnostic material. The incidence and prognostic impact of the most frequently mutated pathways were validated by Sanger sequencing on genomic DNA from diagnostic samples of an independent cohort of 49 cases (validation cohort), including refractory, relapsed and responsive cases. Combined gene expression and fusion transcript analyses in the discovery cohort revealed the presence of known oncogenes and identified novel rearrangements inducing overexpression, as well as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutation analysis identified JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN as the most commonly disrupted pathways in patients with chemorefractory disease or early relapse, frequently in association with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. The analysis on the validation cohort documented a significantly higher risk of relapse, inferior overall survival, disease-free survival and event-free survival in patients with JAK/STAT or RAS/PTEN alterations. Conversely, a significantly better survival was observed in patients harboring only NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations: this favorable prognostic effect was abrogated by the presence of concomitant mutations. Preliminary in vitro assays on primary cells demonstrated sensitivity to specific inhibitors. These data document the negative prognostic impact of JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest the potential clinical application of JAK and PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in patients harboring mutations in these pathways.

  10. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Genomic characterization of acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Chiaretti, Sabina; Gianfelici, Valentina; Ceglie, Giulia; Foà, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, hematologic malignancies have been extensively evaluated due to the introduction of powerful technologies, such as conventional karyotyping, FISH analysis, gene and microRNA expression profiling, array comparative genomic hybridization and SNP arrays, and next-generation sequencing (including whole-exome sequencing and RNA-seq). These analyses have allowed for the refinement of the mechanisms underlying the leukemic transformation in several oncohematologic disorders and, more importantly, they have permitted the definition of novel prognostic algorithms aimed at stratifying patients at the onset of disease and, consequently, treating them in the most appropriate manner. Furthermore, the identification of specific molecular markers is opening the door to targeted and personalized medicine. The most important findings on novel acquisitions in the context of acute lymphoblastic leukemia of both B and T lineage and de novo acute myeloid leukemia are described in this review.

  12. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Sheard, Michael A.; Ghent, Matthew V.; Cabral, Daniel J.; Lee, Joanne C.; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Ji, Lingyun; Wu, Samuel Q.; Kang, Min H.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent.

  13. Establishment and characterization of a new erythropoietin-dependent acute myeloid leukemia cell line, AS-E2.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Y; Kuriyama, K; Higuchi, M; Tsushima, H; Sohda, H; Imai, N; Saito, M; Kondo, T; Tomonaga, M

    1997-11-01

    We have established an erythropoietin-dependent human leukemia cell line, AS-E2, from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia. These cells have many characteristics of late erythroid progenitor cells, they are positive for CD36, Glycophorin A, and CD71 but negative for CD41, and positive for benzidine and PAS staining. These cells express GATA-1 and have low affinity erythropoietin (EPO) receptor on their surface. Interestingly, AS-E2 cells are strictly dependent on EPO for their growth and survival; other cytokines including GM-CSF, stem cell factor, or IL-3 cannot support the growth of this cell line. These features are similar to late erythroid lineage cells, like normal BFU-E or CFU-E, and we have demonstrated that EPO stimulation induces the tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in AS-E2 cells including the EPO receptor and JAK2 kinase. This new cell line is a useful reagent to study biological and molecular events during the late stages of erythropoiesis, and to understand transforming events in human erythroid cells.

  14. TPEN Induces Apoptosis Independently of Zinc Chelator Activity in a Model of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ex Vivo Acute Leukemia Cells through Oxidative Stress and Mitochondria Caspase-3- and AIF-Dependent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mendivil-Perez, Miguel; Velez-Pardo, Carlos; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene

    2012-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is still an incurable disease with resistance to therapy developing in the majority of patients. We investigated the effect of TPEN, an intracellular zinc chelator, in Jurkat and in ex vivo acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells resistant to chemotherapy. Changes of nuclei morphology, reactive oxygen species generation, presence of hypodiploid cells, phosphatidylserine translocation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, immunohistochemical identification of cell death signalling molecules, and pharmacological inhibition were assayed to detect the apoptotic cell death pathways. We found that TPEN induces apoptosis in both types of cells by a molecular oxidative stress pathway involving O2•− > H2O2 ≫ NF-κB (JNK/c-Jun) >p53> loss ΔΨm> caspase-3, AIF > chromatin condensation/DNA fragmentation. Interestingly, TPEN induced apoptosis independently of glucose; leukemic cells are therefore devoid of survival capacity by metabolic resistance to treatment. Most importantly, TPEN cytotoxic effect can eventually be regulated by the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine and zinc ions. Our data suggest that TPEN can be used as a potential therapeutic prooxidant agent against refractory leukemia. These data contribute to understanding the importance of oxidative stress in the treatment of ALL. PMID:23320127

  15. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Apoptotic induction in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines treated with a protein kinase Cβ inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Saba, Nakhle S; Levy, Laura S

    2011-05-01

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) in adults exhibits a 5-year disease-free survival rate of only 25-40% after currently available treatment. Protein kinase Cβ (PKCβ) is under active consideration as a rational therapeutic target in several B-cell malignancies, but studies of its possible utility in B-ALL are lacking. Expression of PKCβ1 and PKCβ2 isoforms was demonstrated in five B-ALL cell lines characterized by distinctive chromosomal translocations, and sensitivity to PKCβ-selective inhibition was examined. Inhibitor treatment resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in viability in all cell lines, although pro-B ALL with t(4;11)(q21;q23) was most sensitive. Apoptotic induction was evident after 24-48 h of treatment, and an inhibition of cell cycle progression was detected in one cell line. Treatment resulted in a rapid induction of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, indicating caspase-3-mediated apoptosis, and a rapid reduction in phosphorylation of AKT and its downstream target glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). These results indicate that PKCβ targeting should be considered as a potential treatment option in B-ALL.

  17. Efficacy and Toxicity Management of 19-28z CAR T Cell Therapy in B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Davila, Marco L.; Riviere, Isabelle; Wang, Xiuyan; Bartido, Shirley; Park, Jae; Curran, Kevin; Chung, Stephen S.; Stefanski, Jolanta; Borquez-Ojeda, Oriana; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; He, Qing; Fink, Mitsu; Shinglot, Himaly; Youssif, Maher; Satter, Mark; Wang, Yongzeng; Hosey, James; Quintanilla, Hilda; Halton, Elizabeth; Bernal, Yvette; Bouhassira, Diana C. G.; Arcila, Maria E.; Gonen, Mithat; Roboz, Gail J.; Maslak, Peter; Douer, Dan; Frattini, Mark G.; Giralt, Sergio; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2015-01-01

    We report on 16 patients with relapsed or refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) that we treated with autologous T cells expressing the 19-28z chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific to the CD19 antigen. The overall complete response rate was 88%, which allowed us to transition most of these patients to a standard-of-care allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT). This therapy was as effective in high-risk patients with Philadelphia chromosome–positive (Ph+) disease as in those with relapsed disease after previous allo-SCT. Through systematic analysis of clinical data and serum cytokine levels over the first 21 days after T cell infusion, we have defined diagnostic criteria for a severe cytokine release syndrome (sCRS), with the goal of better identifying the subset of patients who will likely require therapeutic intervention with corticosteroids or interleukin-6 receptor blockade to curb the sCRS. Additionally, we found that serum C-reactive protein, a readily available laboratory study, can serve as a reliable indicator for the severity of the CRS. Together, our data provide strong support for conducting a multicenter phase 2 study to further evaluate 19-28z CAR T cells in B-ALL and a road map for patient management at centers now contemplating the use of CAR T cell therapy. PMID:24553386

  18. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  20. Potential antileukemic effect of gamma delta T cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Duval, M; Yotnda, P; Bensussan, A; Oudhiri, N; Guidal, C; Rohrlich, P; Boumsell, L; Grandchamp, B; Vilmer, E

    1995-05-01

    The immune response to leukemia is poorly understood. We postulated that nonmalignant T lymphocytes remaining within bone marrow from children with newly diagnosed ALL could be involved in this immune response. T lymphocytes which expressed gamma delta TCR comprised less than 1% of ALL marrow cells. A preferential outgrowth of gamma delta T cells within the CD3 population was observed when marrow cells were cultured with IL-2 alone or with stimulating feeder cells. These results, obtained in a series of 14 patients with precursor B-ALL, were significantly different when compared with expansions from normal marrow cells. In one patient, the clones established from the expanded population displayed different patterns of cytotoxicity against tumoral targets of the B cell lineage. Some clones expressing the TCR V delta 1 segment showed cytotoxic activity against a cell line derived from a pre-B ALL without activity against a LAK-sensitive B cell line. Using PCR amplification, one such clone was detected at high frequency, in the primary expansion of ALL marrow cells. These results suggest a prior activation in vivo of some gamma delta T cells by leukemic cells and provide some evidence on the role of these subsets in the immune response to leukemia.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  2. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Successful collection of peripheral blood stem cells from an infant with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using the Haemonetics V50.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N; Katoh, S; Kudoh, T; Yohtoh, Y; Chiba, S

    1992-12-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) were collected using the Haemonetics V50 from an 8 month old infant weighing 7.8 kg suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the first complete remission. Leukapheresis was performed according to an exchange transfusion procedure by the two arm method using only a single lumen Broviac catheter. No problem occurred in the patient during this procedure except for a reduction (by half) of the initial platelet count. This method enables one to collect PBSC very safely, even from infants, in a manner that is painless for patients.

  4. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Vosaroxin and Infusional Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Myeloid Sarcoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  6. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  7. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration.

    PubMed

    Sheard, Michael A; Ghent, Matthew V; Cabral, Daniel J; Lee, Joanne C; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Ji, Lingyun; Wu, Samuel Q; Kang, Min H; Sposto, Richard; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Reynolds, C Patrick

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo.

  9. Maintenance Therapy with Decitabine after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Iskra; Choi, Jaebok; Fiala, Mark A; Gao, Feng; Holt, Matthew; Cashen, Amanda F; Vij, Ravi; Abboud, Camille N; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E; Jacoby, Meghan A; Uy, Geoffrey L; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2015-10-01

    Decitabine is a hypomethylating agent that irreversibly inhibits DNA methyltransferase I, inducing leukemic differentiation and re-expression of epigenetically silenced putative tumor antigens. We assessed safety and efficacy of decitabine maintenance after allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Decitabine maintenance may help eradicate minimal residual disease, decrease the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and facilitate a graft-versus-leukemia effect by enhancing the effect of T regulatory lymphocytes. Patients with AML/MDS in complete remission (CR) after allotransplantation started decitabine between day +50 and +100. We investigated 4 decitabine doses in cohorts of 4 patients: 5, 7.5, 10, and 15 mg/m(2)/day × 5 days every 6 weeks, for a maximum 8 cycles. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the maximum dose at which ≤ 25% of people experience dose-limiting toxicities during the first cycle of treatment. Twenty-four patients were enrolled and 22 were evaluable. All 4 dose levels were completed and no MTD was reached. Overall, decitabine maintenance was well tolerated. Grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicities were experienced by 75% of patients, including all patients treated at the highest dose level. Nine patients completed all 8 cycles and 8 of them remain in CR. Nine patients died from relapse (n = 4), infectious complications (n = 3), and GVHD (n = 2). Most occurrences of acute GVHD were mild and resolved without interruption of treatment; 1 patient died of acute gut GVHD. Decitabine maintenance did not clearly impact the rate of chronic GVHD. Although there was a trend of increased FOXP3 expression, results were not statistically significant. In conclusion, decitabine maintenance is associated with acceptable toxicities when given in the post-allotransplantation setting. Although the MTD was not reached, the dose of 10 mg/m(2) for 5 days every 6 weeks appeared to be the

  10. Combination Chemotherapy and Rituximab in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; L3 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma

  11. Novel activating JAK2 mutation in a patient with Down syndrome and B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Malinge, Sebastien; Ben-Abdelali, Raouf; Settegrana, Catherine; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Debre, Marianne; Beldjord, Kheira; Macintyre, Elizabeth A; Villeval, Jean-Luc; Vainchenker, William; Berger, Roland; Bernard, Olivier A; Delabesse, Eric; Penard-Lacronique, Virginie

    2007-03-01

    Activation of tyrosine kinase genes is a frequent event in human hematologic malignancies. Because gene activation could be associated with gene dysregulation, we attempted to screen for activating gene mutation based on high-level gene expression. We focused our study on the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) gene in 90 cases of acute leukemia. This strategy led to the identification of a novel JAK2-acquired mutation in a patient with Down syndrome (DS) with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). This mutation involves a 5-amino acid deletion within the JH2 pseudokinase domain (JAK2DeltaIREED). Expression of JAK2DeltaIREED in Ba/F3 cells induced constitutive activation of the JAK-STAT pathway and growth factor-independent cell proliferation. These results highlight the JAK2 pseudokinase domain as an oncogenic hot spot and indicate that activation of the JAK-STAT pathway may contribute to lymphoid malignancies and hematologic disorders observed in children with DS.

  12. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  13. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Oridonin induces NPM mutant protein translocation and apoptosis in NPM1c+ acute myeloid leukemia cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei-fei; Yi, Sha; Wen, Lu; He, Jing; Yang, Li-jing; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Ben-ping; Cui, Guo-hui; Chen, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Skewed cytoplasmic accumulation of NPM mutant protein (NPM1c+) is close related to leukemia pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether oridonin, a diterpenoid isolated from the Chinese traditional medicine Rabdosia rubescens, was able to interfere with NPM1c+ protein trafficking and induce apoptosis in NPM1c+ acute myeloid leukemia cells in vitro. Methods: OCI-AML3 cell line harboring a NPM1 gene mutation was examined. Cell growth was detected by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining. The expression and subcellular localization of relevant proteins were detected by Western blot and immunofluorescent staining. The mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR. Results: Oridonin (2–12 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the viability of OCI-AML3 cells (the IC50 value was 3.27±0.23 μmol/L at 24 h). Moreover, oridonin induced OCI-AML3 cell apoptosis accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and nuclear translocation of NPM1c+ protein. Oridonin did not change the expression of Crm1 (the export receptor for nuclear export signal-containing proteins), but induced nuclear translocation of Crm1. Oridonin markedly increased the expression of nucleoporin98 (Nup98), which had an important role in Crm1-mediated nuclear protein export, and induced nuclear accumulation of Nup98. Furthermore, oridonin markedly increased the expression of p14arf and p53. Conclusion: In NPM1c+ leukemia cells, oridonin induces NPM1c+ protein translocation into the nucleus possibly via nuclear accumulation of Crm1; the compound markedly increases p53 and p14arf expression, which may contribute to cell apoptosis. PMID:24902788

  15. High levels of the adhesion molecule CD44 on leukemic cells generate acute myeloid leukemia relapse after withdrawal of the initial transforming event.

    PubMed

    Quéré, R; Andradottir, S; Brun, A C M; Zubarev, R A; Karlsson, G; Olsson, K; Magnusson, M; Cammenga, J; Karlsson, S

    2011-03-01

    Multiple genetic hits are detected in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To investigate this further, we developed a tetracycline-inducible mouse model of AML, in which the initial transforming event, overexpression of HOXA10, can be eliminated. Continuous overexpression of HOXA10 is required to generate AML in primary recipient mice, but is not essential for maintenance of the leukemia. Transplantation of AML to secondary recipients showed that in established leukemias, ∼80% of the leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) in bone marrow stopped proliferating upon withdrawal of HOXA10 overexpression. However, the population of LICs in primary recipients is heterogeneous, as ∼20% of the LICs induce leukemia in secondary recipients despite elimination of HOXA10-induced overexpression. Intrinsic genetic activation of several proto-oncogenes was observed in leukemic cells resistant to inactivation of the initial transformation event. Interestingly, high levels of the adhesion molecule CD44 on leukemic cells are essential to generate leukemia after removal of the primary event. This suggests that extrinsic niche-dependent factors are also involved in the host-dependent outgrowth of leukemias after withdrawal of HOXA10 overexpression event that initiates the leukemia.

  16. Hyperfractionation versus single dose irradiation in human acute lymphocytic leukemia cells: application to TBI for marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shank, B

    1993-04-01

    A major purpose of total body irradiation (TBI) for bone marrow transplantation in leukemia patients is to help eradicate all leukemia cells; the ideal regimen has not yet been determined. To answer basic questions regarding leukemic cell survival kinetics, a human acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell line (Reh), with the common ALL antigen (CALLA-positive), has been used to assess in vitro the efficacy of one widely used hyperfractionated TBI (HTBI) regimen versus single dose TBI (SDTBI). The regimen studied in this model was 1.2-1.25 Gy/fraction, 3 fractions/day, 5 h apart each day, for 5 days (11-12 fractions) for a total dose of 13.2-15.0 Gy. It was found that: (i) cell survival was consistent with the linear-quadratic model for early responding tissues (alpha/beta = 7.0 Gy). (ii) The change in shape of the 'effective' cell survival curve for three fractions/day was consistent with the hypothesis that there was complete repair between fractions. (iii) Cell regrowth between fractions was minimal (< or = 5%). (iv) Division delay between fractions (2.9 h/Gy) could explain the small contribution to the survival curve of regrowth between fractions. (v) For a full HTBI course to 15 Gy, cell survival was predicted to be approximately 5 x 10(-5), compared with approximately 10(-3) for a low dose rate (0.04-0.07 Gy/min) SDTBI to 10 Gy; the latter projected from the initial slope of the high dose rate, single dose survival curve. PMID:8327730

  17. microRNA-204 inhibits cell proliferation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia by down-regulating SOX4

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jun-Jie; Liang, Bo; Zhan, Xin-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small non-coding RNAs that play important roles in the pathogenesis of human diseases by negatively regulating gene expression. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of miR-204 on cell proliferation migration and invasion in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). Method: miR-204 expression was determined in bone marrow samples from 32 leukemia patients and 32 healthy controls by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The effect of miR-204 on cell proliferation was evaluated by CCK8 assay, cell migration and invasion were evaluated by transwell migration and invasion assays, In addition, the regulation of SOX4 by miR-204 was evaluated by luciferase reporter assay and western blot. Results: our results revealed that miR-204 was low expressed in T-ALL. Cell proliferation assay showed that the cell proliferation ability was inhibited by miR-204 mimics. Moreover, migration and invasion assay suggested that overexpression of miR-204 could significantly suppressed the migration and invasion ability of T-ALL cells. Luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-204 directly bound to the 3’ untranslated region of SOX4, and western blot suggested that miR-204 inhibited the expression of SOX4 at the protein levels. Conclusions: Our findings indicated that miR-204 negatively regulates SOX4 and inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of T-ALL cell lines. Thus, miR-204 might represent a potential therapeutic target for T-ALL intervention. PMID:26464665

  18. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood-forming tissue ( bone marrow ). In normal bone marrow, hematopoietic ... 7186-203. Review. Citation on PubMed de Thé H, Chen Z. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia: novel insights into ...

  19. Role of natural killer cell subsets and natural cytotoxicity receptors for the outcome of immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Martner, Anna; Rydström, Anna; Riise, Rebecca E; Aurelius, Johan; Anderson, Harald; Brune, Mats; Foà, Robin; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B

    2016-01-01

    In a phase IV trial, 84 patients (age 18–79) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR) received cycles of immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose human recombinant interleukin 2 (IL-2) for 18 months to prevent leukemic relapse. During cycles, the treatment resulted in expansion of CD56bright (CD3−/16−/56bright) and CD16+ (CD3−/16+/56+) natural killer (NK) cells in the blood along with increased NK cell expression of the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) NKp30 and NKp46. Multivariate analyses correcting for age and risk group demonstrated that high CD56bright NK cell counts and high expression of NKp30 or NKp46 on CD16+ NK cells independently predicted leukemia-free survival (LFS) and overall survival (OS). Our results suggest that the dynamics of NK cell subsets and their NCR expression may determine the efficiency of relapse-preventive immunotherapy in AML. PMID:26942055

  20. Induction of autophagy-dependent necroptosis is required for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to overcome glucocorticoid resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bonapace, Laura; Bornhauser, Beat C.; Schmitz, Maike; Cario, Gunnar; Ziegler, Urs; Niggli, Felix K.; Schäfer, Beat W.; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In vivo resistance to first-line chemotherapy, including to glucocorticoids, is a strong predictor of poor outcome in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Modulation of cell death regulators represents an attractive strategy for subverting such drug resistance. Here we report complete resensitization of multidrug-resistant childhood ALL cells to glucocorticoids and other cytotoxic agents with subcytotoxic concentrations of obatoclax, a putative antagonist of BCL-2 family members. The reversal of glucocorticoid resistance occurred through rapid activation of autophagy-dependent necroptosis, which bypassed the block in mitochondrial apoptosis. This effect was associated with dissociation of the autophagy inducer beclin-1 from the antiapoptotic BCL-2 family member myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (MCL-1) and with a marked decrease in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. Consistent with a protective role for mTOR in glucocorticoid resistance in childhood ALL, combination of rapamycin with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone triggered autophagy-dependent cell death, with characteristic features of necroptosis. Execution of cell death, but not induction of autophagy, was strictly dependent on expression of receptor-interacting protein (RIP-1) kinase and cylindromatosis (turban tumor syndrome) (CYLD), two key regulators of necroptosis. Accordingly, both inhibition of RIP-1 and interference with CYLD restored glucocorticoid resistance completely. Together with evidence for a chemosensitizing activity of obatoclax in vivo, our data provide a compelling rationale for clinical translation of this pharmacological approach into treatments for patients with refractory ALL. PMID:20200450

  1. Characterization of the genome-wide TLX1 binding profile in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Durinck, K; Van Loocke, W; Van der Meulen, J; Van de Walle, I; Ongenaert, M; Rondou, P; Wallaert, A; de Bock, C E; Van Roy, N; Poppe, B; Cools, J; Soulier, J; Taghon, T; Speleman, F; Van Vlierberghe, P

    2015-12-01

    The TLX1 transcription factor is critically involved in the multi-step pathogenesis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and often cooperates with NOTCH1 activation during malignant T-cell transformation. However, the exact molecular mechanism by which these T-cell specific oncogenes cooperate during transformation remains to be established. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing to establish the genome-wide binding pattern of TLX1 in human T-ALL. This integrative genomics approach showed that ectopic TLX1 expression drives repression of T cell-specific enhancers and mediates an unexpected transcriptional antagonism with NOTCH1 at critical target genes, including IL7R and NOTCH3. These phenomena coordinately trigger a TLX1-driven pre-leukemic phenotype in human thymic precursor cells, reminiscent of the thymus regression observed in murine TLX1 tumor models, and create a strong genetic pressure for acquiring activating NOTCH1 mutations as a prerequisite for full leukemic transformation. In conclusion, our results uncover a functional antagonism between cooperative oncogenes during the earliest phases of tumor development and provide novel insights in the multi-step pathogenesis of TLX1-driven human leukemia. PMID:26108691

  2. High affinity and covalent-binding microtubule stabilizing agents show activity in chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Benet; Calvo-Vidal, M. Nieves; Ambati, Srikanth; Jordi, Michel; Kahn, Alissa; Díaz, J. Fernando; Fang, Weishuo; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Cerchietti, Leandro; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is frequently due to the persistence of a cell population resistant to chemotherapy through different mechanisms, in which drug efflux via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, specifically P-glycoprotein, is one of the most recognized. However, disappointing results from clinical trials employing inhibitors for these transporters have demonstrated the need to adopt different strategies. We hypothesized that microtubule targeting compounds presenting high affinity or covalent binding could overcome the effect of ABC transporters. We therefore evaluated the activity of the high-affinity paclitaxel analog CTX-40 as well as the covalent binder zampanolide (ZMP) in AML cells. Both molecules were active in chemosensitive as well as in chemoresistant cell lines overexpressing P-glycoprotein. Moreover, ZMP or CTX-40 in combination with daunorubicin showed synergistic killing without increased in vitro hematopoietic toxicity. In a primary AML sample, we further demonstrated that ZMP and CTX-40 are active in progenitor and differentiated leukemia cell populations. In sum, our data indicate that high affinity and covalent-binding anti-microtubule agents are active in AML cells otherwise chemotherapy resistant. PMID:26277539

  3. An anti–PR1/HLA-A2 T-cell receptor–like antibody mediates complement-dependent cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sergeeva, Anna; Alatrash, Gheath; He, Hong; Ruisaard, Kathryn; Lu, Sijie; Wygant, James; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Ma, Qing; Li, Dan; St John, Lisa; Clise-Dwyer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    PR1 (VLQELNVTV) is a human leukocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2)–restricted leukemia-associated peptide from proteinase 3 (P3) and neutrophil elastase (NE) that is recognized by PR1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes that contribute to cytogenetic remission of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We report a novel T-cell receptor (TCR)–like immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) antibody (8F4) with high specific binding affinity (dissociation constant [KD] = 9.9nM) for a combined epitope of the PR1/HLA-A2 complex. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy of 8F4-labeled cells showed significantly higher PR1/HLA-A2 expression on AML blasts compared with normal leukocytes (P = .046). 8F4 mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of AML blasts and Lin−CD34+CD38− leukemia stem cells (LSCs) but not normal leukocytes (P < .005). Although PR1 expression was similar on LSCs and hematopoietic stem cells, 8F4 inhibited AML progenitor cell growth, but not normal colony-forming units from healthy donors (P < .05). This study shows that 8F4, a novel TCR-like antibody, binds to a conformational epitope of the PR1/HLA-A2 complex on the cell surface and mediates specific lysis of AML, including LSCs. Therefore, this antibody warrants further study as a novel approach to targeting leukemia-initiating cells in patients with AML. PMID:21296998

  4. LMO2 expression reflects the different stages of blast maturation and genetic features in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and predicts clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Malumbres, Raquel; Fresquet, Vicente; Roman-Gomez, Jose; Bobadilla, Miriam; Robles, Eloy F.; Altobelli, Giovanna G.; Calasanz, M.ª José; Smeland, Erlend B.; Aznar, Maria Angela; Agirre, Xabier; Martin-Palanco, Vanesa; Prosper, Felipe; Lossos, Izidore S.; Martinez-Climent, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    Background LMO2 is highly expressed at the most immature stages of lymphopoiesis. In T-lymphocytes, aberrant LMO2 expression beyond those stages leads to T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, while in B cells LMO2 is also expressed in germinal center lymphocytes and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, where it predicts better clinical outcome. The implication of LMO2 in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia must still be explored. Design and Methods We measured LMO2 expression by real time RT-PCR in 247 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient samples with cytogenetic data (144 of them also with survival and immunophenotypical data) and in normal hematopoietic and lymphoid cells. Results B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases expressed variable levels of LMO2 depending on immunophenotypical and cytogenetic features. Thus, the most immature subtype, pro-B cells, displayed three-fold higher LMO2 expression than pre-B cells, common-CD10+ or mature subtypes. Additionally, cases with TEL-AML1 or MLL rearrangements exhibited two-fold higher LMO2 expression compared to cases with BCR-ABL rearrangements or hyperdyploid karyotype. Clinically, high LMO2 expression correlated with better overall survival in adult patients (5-year survival rate 64.8% (42.5%–87.1%) vs. 25.8% (10.9%–40.7%), P= 0.001) and constituted a favorable independent prognostic factor in B-ALL with normal karyotype: 5-year survival rate 80.3% (66.4%–94.2%) vs. 63.0% (46.1%–79.9%) (P= 0.043). Conclusions Our data indicate that LMO2 expression depends on the molecular features and the differentiation stage of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, assessment of LMO2 expression in adult patients with a normal karyotype, a group which lacks molecular prognostic factors, could be of clinical relevance. PMID:21459790

  5. Murine B-1 B Cell Progenitors Initiate B-Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With Features of High Risk Disease1

    PubMed Central

    Montecino-Rodriguez, Encarnacion; Li, Katy; Fice, Michael; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    B-1 and B-2 B cells derive from distinct progenitors that emerge in overlapping waves of development. The number of murine B-1 progenitors peaks during fetal development while B-2 B cell production predominates in adult bone marrow. Many genetic mutations that underlie B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) occur in the fetus, at which time B-1 progenitor numbers are high. However, whether B-ALL can initiate in B-1 progenitors is unknown. We now report that BCR-ABL transformed murine B-1 progenitors can be B-ALL cells of origin and demonstrate that they initiate disease more rapidly than oncogene expressing B-2 progenitors. We further demonstrate that B-1 progenitors exhibit relative resistance to apoptosis and undergo significant growth following oncogene expression and propose that these properties underlie the accelerated kinetics with which they initiate leukemia. These results provide a developmental perspective on the origin of B-ALL and indicate B cell lineage as a factor influencing disease progression. PMID:24752443

  6. Allium compounds, dipropyl and dimethyl thiosulfinates as antiproliferative and differentiating agents of human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Merhi, Faten; Auger, Jacques; Rendu, Francine; Bauvois, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies support the premise that Allium vegetables may lower the risk of cancers. The beneficial effects appear related to the organosulfur products generated upon processing of Allium. Leukemia cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) display high proliferative capacity and have a reduced capacity of undergoing apoptosis and maturation. Whether the sulfur-containing molecules thiosulfinates (TS), diallyl TS (All2TS), dipropyl TS (Pr2TS) and dimethyl TS (Me2TS), are able to exert chemopreventative activity against AML is presently unknown. The present study was an evaluation of proliferation, cytotoxicity, differentiation and secretion of AML cell lines (U937, NB4, HL-60, MonoMac-6) in response to treatment with these TS and their related sulfides (diallylsulfide, diallyl disulfide, dipropyl disulfide, dimethyl disulfide). As assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, gelatin zymogaphy and RT-PCR, we showed that Pr2TS and Me2TS, but not All2TS and sulfides, 1) inhibited cell proliferation in dose- and time-dependent manner and this process was neither due to cytotoxicity nor apoptosis, 2) induced macrophage maturation, and 3) inhibited the levels of secreted MMP-9 (protein and activity) and TNF-α protein, without altering mRNA levels. By establishing for the first time that Pr2TS and Me2TS affect proliferation, differentiation and secretion of leukemic cell lines, this study provides the opportunity to explore the potential efficiency of these molecules in AML. PMID:19707466

  7. High Disease-Free Survival with Enhanced Protection against Relapse after Double-Unit Cord Blood Transplantation When Compared with T Cell-Depleted Unrelated Donor Transplantation in Patients with Acute Leukemia and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Doris M; Hilden, Patrick; Devlin, Sean M; Maloy, Molly; Lubin, Marissa; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Dahi, Parastoo; Hsu, Katharine; Jakubowski, Ann A; Kernan, Nancy A; Koehne, Guenther; O'Reilly, Richard J; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Sauter, Craig; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Tamari, Roni; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Young, James W; Giralt, Sergio; Barker, Juliet N

    2015-11-01

    Double-unit cord blood (DCB) grafts are a rapidly available stem cell source for adults with high-risk leukemias. However, how disease-free survival (DFS) after DCB transplantation (DCBT) compares to that of unrelated donor transplantation (URDT) is not fully established. We analyzed 166 allograft recipients (66 8/8 HLA-matched URDT, 45 7/8 HLA-matched URDT, and 55 DCBT) ages 16 to 60 years with high-risk acute leukemia or chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). URDT and DCBT recipients were similar except DCBT recipients were more likely to have lower weight and non-European ancestry and to receive intermediate-intensity conditioning. All URDT recipients received a CD34(+) cell-selected (T cell-depleted) graft. Overall, differences between the 3-year transplantation-related mortality were not significant (8/8 URDT, 18%; 7/8 URDT, 39%; and DCBT, 24%; P = .108), whereas the 3-year relapse risk was decreased after DCBT (8/8 URDT, 23%; 7/8 URDT, 20%; and DCBT 9%, P = .037). Three-year DFS was 57% in 8/8 URDT, 41% in 7/8 URDT, and 68% in DCBT recipients (P = .068), and the 3-year DFS in DCBT recipients was higher than that of 7/8 URDT recipients (P = .021). In multivariate analysis in acute leukemia patients, factors adversely associated with DFS were female gender (hazard ratio [HR], 1.68; P = .031), diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (HR, 2.09; P = .004), and 7/8 T cell-depleted URDT (HR, 1.91; P = .037). High DFS can be achieved in adults with acute leukemia and CML with low relapse rates after DCBT. Our findings support performing DCBT in adults in preference to HLA-mismatched T cell-depleted URDT and suggest DCBT is a readily available alternative to T cell-depleted 8/8 URDT, especially in patients requiring urgent transplantation.

  8. Donor selection for natural killer cell receptor genes leads to superior survival after unrelated transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Sarah; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Klein, John P.; Wang, Tao; Le, Chap T.; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Geraghty, Daniel; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Michael D.; Ladner, Martha; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Parham, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes form a diverse, immunogenetic system. Group A and B KIR haplotypes have distinctive centromeric (Cen) and telomeric (Tel) gene-content motifs. Aiming to develop a donor selection strategy to improve transplant outcome, we compared the contribution of these motifs to the clinical benefit conferred by B haplotype donors. We KIR genotyped donors from 1409 unrelated transplants for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML; n = 1086) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; n = 323). Donor KIR genotype influenced transplantation outcome for AML but not ALL. Compared with A haplotype motifs, centromeric and telomeric B motifs both contributed to relapse protection and improved survival, but Cen-B homozygosity had the strongest independent effect. With Cen-B/B homozygous donors the cumulative incidence of relapse was 15.4% compared with 36.5% for Cen-A/A donors (relative risk of relapse 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.57; P < .001). Overall, significantly reduced relapse was achieved with donors having 2 or more B gene-content motifs (relative risk 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.48-0.86; P = .003) for both HLA-matched and mismatched transplants. KIR genotyping of several best HLA-matched potential unrelated donors should substantially increase the frequency of transplants by using grafts with favorable KIR gene content. Adopting this practice could result in superior disease-free survival for patients with AML. PMID:20581313

  9. Cotreatment with Smac mimetics and demethylating agents induces both apoptotic and necroptotic cell death pathways in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gerges, Steve; Rohde, Katharina; Fulda, Simone

    2016-05-28

    Treatment resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is often caused by defects in programmed cell death, e.g. by overexpression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Here, we report that small-molecule Smac mimetics (i.e. BV6, LCL161, birinapant) that neutralize x-linked IAP (XIAP), cellular IAP (cIAP)1 and cIAP2 cooperate with demethylating agents (i.e. 5-azacytidine (5AC) or 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC)) to induce cell death in ALL cells. Molecular studies reveal that induction of cell death is preceded by BV6-mediated depletion of cIAP1 protein and involves tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α autocrine/paracrine signaling, since the TNFα-blocking antibody Enbrel significantly reduces BV6/5AC-induced cell death. While BV6/5AC cotreatment induces caspase-3 activation, the broad-range caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD.fmk) only partly rescues ALL cells from BV6/5AC-induced cell death. This indicates that BV6/5AC cotreatment engages non-apoptotic cell death upon caspase inhibition. Indeed, genetic silencing of key components of necroptosis such as Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP)3 or mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) in parallel with administration of zVAD.fmk provides a significantly better protection against BV6/5AC-induced cell death compared to the use of zVAD.fmk alone. Similarly, concomitant administration of pharmacological inhibitors of necroptosis (i.e. necrostatin-1s, GSK'872, dabrafenib, NSA) together with zVAD.fmk is superior in rescuing cells from BV6/5AC-induced cell death compared to the use of zVAD.fmk alone. These findings demonstrate that in ALL cells BV6/5AC-induced cell death is mediated via both apoptotic and necroptotic pathways. Importantly, BV6/5AC cotreatment triggers necroptosis in ALL cells that are resistant to apoptosis due to caspase inhibition. This opens new perspectives to overcome apoptosis resistance with important implications for the development of new treatment strategies

  10. Defining Molecular Phenotypes of Mesenchymal and hematopoietic Stem Cells derived from Peripheral blood of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia patients for regenerative stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Potdar, Pd; Subedi, Rp

    2011-01-01

    Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) is a clonal myeloid disorder affecting all age groups, characterized by accumulation of immature blast cells in bone marrow and in peripheral blood. Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation is a present treatment for cure of ALL patients, which is very expensive, invasive process and may have possibility of transplantation of malignant stem cells to patients. In the present study, we hypothesized to isolate large number of normal Mesenchymal & Hematopoietic stem cells from peripheral blood of ALL patients, which will be further characterized for their normal phenotypes by using specific molecular stem cell markers. This is the first study, which defines the existing phenotypes of isolated MSCs and HSCs from peripheral blood of ALL patients. We have established three cell lines in which two were Mesenchymal stem cells designated as MSCALL and MSCnsALL and one was suspension cell line designated as HSCALL. The HSCALL cell line was developed from the lymphocyte like cells secreted by MSCALL cells. Our study also showed that MSCALL from peripheral blood of ALL patient secreted hematopoietic stem cells in vitro culture. We have characterized all three-cell lines by 14 specific stem cell molecular markers. It was found that both MSC cell lines expressed CD105, CD13, and CD73 with mixed expression of CD34 and CD45 at early passage whereas, HSCALL cell line expressed prominent feature of hematopoietic stem cells such as CD34 and CD45 with mild expression of CD105 and CD13. All three-cell lines expressed LIF, OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, IL6, and DAPK. These cells mildly expressed COX2 and did not express BCR-ABL. Overall it was shown that isolated MSCs and HSCs can be use as a model system to study the mechanism of leukemia at stem cell level and their use in stem cell regeneration therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia.

  11. Busulfan and melphalan as conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Nadjanara Dorna; Dulley, Frederico Luiz; Saboya, Rosaura; Amigo Filho, José Ulysses; Coracin, Fabio Luiz; Chamone, Dalton de Alencar Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Background Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with HLA-identical donors has been established for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia patients for over 30 years with a cure rate of 50% to 60%. Objectives To analyze the overall survival of patients and identify factors that influence the outcomes of this type of transplant in patients in 1st complete remission who received a busulfan and melphalan combination as conditioning regimen. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients with acute myeloid leukemia were enrolled between 2003 and 2008. The median age was 34 years old (Range: 16 - 57 years). All patients received cyclosporine and methotrexate for prophylaxis against graft-versus-host disease. Median neutrophil engraftment time was 16 days (Range: 7 - 22 days) and 17 days (Range: 7 - 46 days) for platelets. Sinusoidal obstructive syndrome was observed in three patients, seven had grade II acute graft-versus-host disease and one extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease. Results The overall survival by the Kaplan-Meier method was 48% after 36 months with a plateau at 36 months after transplantation. Intensive consolidation with high-dose arabinoside resulted in an improved survival (p-value = 0.0001), as did grade II acute graft-versus-host disease (p-value = 0.0377) and mild chronic graft-versus-host disease (p-value < 0.0001). Thirteen patients died, five due to infection within 100 days of transplant, two due to hemorrhages, one to infection and graftversus-host disease and three relapses followed by renal failure (one) and infection (two). The cause of death could not be determined for two patients. Conclusion The busulfan and melphalan conditioning regimen is as good as other conditioning regimens providing an excellent survival rate. PMID:23049292

  12. Connexin expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells: Identification of patient subsets based on protein and global gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    REIKVAM, HÅKON; RYNINGEN, ANITA; SÆTERDAL, LARS RUNE; NEPSTAD, INA; FOSS, BRYNJAR; BRUSERUD, ØYSTEIN

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells support both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Τhis support is mediated through the local cytokine network and by direct cell-cell interactions mediated via adhesion molecules and the formation of gap junctions by connexins. Previous studies on connexins in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have mainly focused on the investigation of leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we therefore investigated the expression of various connexins at the protein (i.e., cell surface expression) and mRNA level in primary human AML cells. The cell surface expression of the connexins, Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45, varied considerably between patients, and detectable levels were observed only for subsets of patients. On the whole, Cx43 and Cx45 showed the highest cell surface expression. Connexin expression was dependent on AML cell differentiation, but showed no association with cytogenetic abnormalities or mutations of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) or nucleophosmin (NPM)‑1 genes. By contrast, only Cx45 showed a significant variation between patients at the mRNA level. A high Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon-γ], whereas a low Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of protein functions (i.e., ligase activity, protein folding and catabolism). There was no significant correlation observed between the connexin mRNA and protein levels. Thus, differences in connexin expression can be used to subclassify AML patients. Differences in connexin cell surface expression profiles are not reflected at the mRNA level and have to be directly examined, whereas variations in Cx45 mRNA expression are associated with differences in cell signaling and the regulation of protein functions. PMID:25529637

  13. Novel and Emerging Drugs for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stein, E.M.; Tallman, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a challenging disease to treat with the majority of patients dying from their illness. While overall survival has been markedly prolonged in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), survival in younger adults with other subtypes of AML has only modestly improved over the last twenty years. Physicians who treat AML eagerly await drugs like Imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, Cladribine for hairy cell leukemia, and Rituximab for non-Hodgkin Lymphoma which have had an important impact on improving outcome. Recent research efforts have focused on refining traditional chemotherapeutic agents to make them more active in AML, targeting specific genetic mutations in myeloid leukemia cells, and utilizing novel agents such as Lenalidomide that have shown activity in other hematologic malignancies. Here, we focus on reviewing the recent literature on agents that may assume a role in clinical practice for patients with AML over the next five years. PMID:22483153

  14. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia? What should you ask your doctor about acute lymphocytic leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... answer many of your questions. What kind of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) do I have? Do I have any ...

  15. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphocytic leukemia? What are the key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in the United States for 2016 (including ...

  16. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  17. Agents for refractory/relapsed acute lymphocytic leukemia in adults.

    PubMed

    Qian, L-R; Fu, W; Shen, J-L

    2014-01-01

    Although treatment results for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have improved considerably in the past decades, treating adult patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is still difficult. Adults with refractory/relapsed acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) processed to death rapidly associated with chemotherapy resistance, high mortality by reinduction, etc. Only 20% to 30% of those patients acquired complete remission (CR). Those patients are always of short duration unless an allogeneic stem cell transplant is feasible. Median survival is only ranging from 2 to 12 months. Therapeutic strategy on relapsed/refractory acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is always a major therapeutic challenge bothering hematological researchers. Novel agents and unique therapeutic strategies have been developed in recent years. This review focuses on major clinical advances in the agents for refractory/relapsed ALL.

  18. [Curative effect of decitabine combined with cytokine-induced killer cells in two elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Hong-Li; Lu, Xue-Chun; Guo, Bo; Cai, Li-Li; Han, Wei-Dong; Wang, Yao; Fan, Hui; Li, Su-Xia; Liu, Yang; Yang, Yang; Zhai, Bing; Ran, Hai-Hong; Lin, Jie; Zhang, Feng

    2013-02-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of low methylation drug decitabine combined with autologous cytokine induced killer cells (CIK) to treat the elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Two AML patients aged over 80 years old were diagnosed and treated in our department from 2006 to 2012; both company with MDS history, and one case was M4-type, another case was M6-type according to FAB classification. The changes in lymphocyte subsets, hematologic response, transfusion frequency, leukemic gene expression, obtaining CR or PR, quality of life and survival time of the patients with different treatment regimen (decitabine alone; CIK alone; decitabine combined with CIK) were systematically observed. The results showed that therapy of decitabine combined with CIK cells could reduce bone marrow suppression extent, decrease the frequency and volume of blood transfusion, and prolong the duration of partial remission, compared with the single use of CIK cell infusion and single use of decitabine treatment. Meanwhile, the kinds of expressed genes associated with leukemia decreased and the survival time was prolonged obviously. The patients' life quality significantly improved. It is concluded that decitabine combined with CIK for treatment of elderly patients with AML is safe and effective.

  19. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Heltemes-Harris, Lynn M.; Larson, Jon D.; Starr, Timothy K.; Hubbard, Gregory K.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Largaespada, David A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    STAT5 activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) to mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b–CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the JAK/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, ERK and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways play in B-ALL. PMID:26500062

  20. Piperlongumine inhibits the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines irrespective of glucocorticoid resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seong-Su; Han, Sangwoo; Kamberos, Natalie L.

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • PL inhibits the proliferation of B-ALL cell lines irrespective of GC-resistance. • PL selectively kills B-ALL cells by increasing ROS, but not normal counterpart. • PL does not sensitize majority of B-ALL cells to DEX. • PL represses the network of constitutively activated TFs and modulates their target genes. • PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for GC-resistant B-ALL. - Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), a pepper plant alkaloid from Piper longum, has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. PL selectively kills both solid and hematologic cancer cells, but not normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the effect of PL on the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), including glucocorticoid (GC)-resistant B-ALL. Regardless of GC-resistance, PL inhibited the proliferation of all B-ALL cell lines, but not normal B cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis via elevation of ROS. Interestingly, PL did not sensitize most of B-ALL cell lines to dexamethasone (DEX). Only UoC-B1 exhibited a weak synergistic effect between PL and DEX. All B-ALL cell lines tested exhibited constitutive activation of multiple transcription factors (TFs), including AP-1, MYC, NF-κB, SP1, STAT1, STAT3, STAT6 and YY1. Treatment of the B-ALL cells with PL significantly downregulated these TFs and modulated their target genes. While activation of AURKB, BIRC5, E2F1, and MYB mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by PL, but SOX4 and XBP levels were increased by PL. Intriguingly, PL also increased the expression of p21 in B-ALL cells through a p53-independent mechanism. Given that these TFs and their target genes play critical roles in a variety of hematological malignancies, our findings provide a strong preclinical rationale for considering PL as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including B-ALL and GC-resistant B-ALL.

  1. Connexin expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells: identification of patient subsets based on protein and global gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Reikvam, Håkon; Ryningen, Anita; Sæterdal, Lars Rune; Nepstad, Ina; Foss, Brynjar; Bruserud, Øystein

    2015-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells support both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Τhis support is mediated through the local cytokine network and by direct cell‑cell interactions mediated via adhesion molecules and the formation of gap junctions by connexins. Previous studies on connexins in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have mainly focused on the investigation of leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we therefore investigated the expression of various connexins at the protein (i.e., cell surface expression) and mRNA level in primary human AML cells. The cell surface expression of the connexins, Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45, varied considerably between patients, and detectable levels were observed only for subsets of patients. On the whole, Cx43 and Cx45 showed the highest cell surface expression. Connexin expression was dependent on AML cell differentiation, but showed no association with cytogenetic abnormalities or mutations of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) or nucleophosmin (NPM)‑1 genes. By contrast, only Cx45 showed a significant variation between patients at the mRNA level. A high Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of the mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)‑17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon‑γ], whereas a low Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of protein functions (i.e., ligase activity, protein folding and catabolism). There was no significant correlation observed between the connexin mRNA and protein levels. Thus, differences in connexin expression can be used to subclassify AML patients. Differences in connexin cell surface expression profiles are not reflected at the mRNA level and have to be directly examined, whereas variations in Cx45 mRNA expression are associated with differences in cell signaling and the regulation of protein functions.

  2. Selective AKR1C3 Inhibitors Potentiate Chemotherapeutic Activity in Multiple Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Verma, Kshitij; Zang, Tianzhu; Gupta, Nehal; Penning, Trevor M; Trippier, Paul C

    2016-08-11

    We report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of potent and selective inhibitors of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3), an important enzyme in the regulatory pathway controlling proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in myeloid cells. Combination treatment with the nontoxic AKR1C3 inhibitors and etoposide or daunorubicin in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines, elicits a potent adjuvant effect, potentiating the cytotoxicity of etoposide by up to 6.25-fold and the cytotoxicity of daunorubicin by >10-fold. The results validate AKR1C3 inhibition as a common adjuvant target across multiple AML subtypes. These compounds in coadministration with chemotherapeutics in clinical use enhance therapeutic index and may avail chemotherapy as a treatment option to the pediatric and geriatric population currently unable to tolerate the side effects of cancer drug regimens. PMID:27563402

  3. Resveratrol given intraperitoneally does not inhibit growth of high-risk t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in NOD/SCID mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of the phytochemical resveratrol as a preventive agent against the growth of t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was evaluated in NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J mice engrafted with the human t(4;11) ALL line SEM. SEM cells were injected into the tail vein and engraftment was monitored by ...

  4. [Acute monoblastic leukemia with tetrasomy 8].

    PubMed

    Kameoka, Junichi; Horiuchi, Takahiro; Miyamura, Koichi; Miura, Ikuo; Okuda, Mitsutaka; Nomura, Jun; Hirokawa, Makoto; Sawada, Kenichi; Sasaki, Takeshi

    2006-08-01

    Tetrasomy 8 is a rare chromosomal abnormality in acute leukemia, and it has recently been considered as a poor prognostic factor. A 20-year-old woman was admitted because of purpura on the upper and lower limbs in February 2002. On admission, her leukocyte count was 6.5 x 10(9)/l with 66% of blasts, the hemoglobin level was 11.2 g/dl, and the platelet count was 101 x 10(9)/l. The bone marrow aspirate contained 85.6% of peroxidase-negative, alpha-naphthyl-butyrate esterase-positive, and CD4+ CD56+ blast cells. Karyotypic analysis of the bone marrow cells showed 48, XY, + 8, + 8[17]/47, XY, +8[3]. The patient was diagnosed as having AML (M5a), and treatment with daunorubicin (70 mg x 5 days) and cytosine arabinoside (150 mg x 7 days) resulted in a complete remission. She relapsed four months later, however, with an extramedullary tumor in T12. Remission could not be achieved, and the patient underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from her HLA-identical mother. Her clinical course was almost uneventful except for a phlegmon in the right leg, but on day 49 a relapse occurred, and she died of acute renal failure on day 73. This case strongly illustrates the characteristic of tetrasomy 8 as a poor prognostic factor in acute leukemia. PMID:16986717

  5. Cytotoxic effects of tetracycline analogues (doxycycline, minocycline and COL-3) in acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Hairong; Fares, Mona; Maguire, Kim R; Sidén, Ake; Potácová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Tetracycline analogues (TCNAs) have been shown to inhibit matrix metalloproteinases and to induce apoptosis in several cancer cell types. In the present study, the cytotoxic effects of TCNAs doxycycline (DOXY), minocycline (MINO) and chemically modified tetracycline-3 (COL-3) were investigated in the human acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cell line. Cells were incubated with TCNAs in final concentrations of 0.5-100 µg/ml for 24 h. Viability of the leukemic cells was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner using resazurin assay. The estimated IC50s were 9.2 µg/ml for DOXY, 9.9 µg/ml for MINO and 1.3 µg/ml for COL-3. All three TCNAs induced potent cytotoxic effects and cell death. Apoptosis, which was assessed by morphological changes and annexin V positivity, was concentration- and time-dependent following incubation with any one of the drugs. TCNAs induced DNA double strand breaks soon after treatment commenced as detected by γH2AX and western blot. The loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), caspase activation and cleavage of PARP and Bcl-2 were observed; however, the sequence of events differed among the drugs. Pancaspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK improved survival of TCNAs-treated cells and decreased TCNAs-induced apoptosis. In summary, we demonstrated that TCNAs had a cytotoxic effect on the HL-60 leukemic cell line. Apoptosis was induced via mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent pathways in HL-60 cells by all three TCNAs. COL-3 exerted the strongest anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in concentrations that have been achieved in human plasma in reported clinical trials. These results indicate that there is a therapeutic potential of TCNAs in leukemia.

  6. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. NF-kappaB-inhibited acute myeloid leukemia cells are rescued from apoptosis by heme oxygenase-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, Stuart A; Bowles, Kristian M; Raninga, Prahlad; MacEwan, David J

    2010-04-01

    Despite high basal NF-kappaB activity in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, inhibiting NF-kappaB in these cells has little or no effect on inducing apoptosis. We previously showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) underlies this resistance of AML to tumor necrosis factor-induced apoptosis. Here, we describe a mechanism by which HO-1 is a silent antiapoptotic factor only revealed when NF-kappaB is inhibited, thus providing a secondary antiapoptotic mechanism to ensure AML cell survival and chemoresistance. We show that inhibition of NF-kappaB increased HO-1 expression in primary AML cells compared with that of nonmalignant cells. In addition, we observed this suppressed HO-1 level in AML cells compared with CD34(+) nonmalignant control cells. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and small interfering RNA knockdown, we showed that the NF-kappaB subunits p50 and p65 control this suppression of HO-1 in AML cells. Finally, we showed that inhibition of HO-1 and NF-kappaB in combination significantly induced apoptosis in AML cells but not in noncancerous control cells. Thus, NF-kappaB inhibition combined with HO-1 inhibition potentially provides a novel therapeutic approach to treat chemotherapy-resistant forms of AML.

  8. Suppression of NRF2-ARE activity sensitizes chemotherapeutic agent-induced cytotoxicity in human acute monocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Wang, Huihui; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Dong, Jian; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Peng, Shuangqing; Li, Jin; Carmichael, Paul L; Nelson, Bud; Clewell, Rebecca; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E; Pi, Jingbo

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a master regulator of the antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent transcription, plays a pivotal role in chemical detoxification in normal and tumor cells. Consistent with previous findings that NRF2-ARE contributes to chemotherapeutic resistance of cancer cells, we found that stable knockdown of NRF2 by lentiviral shRNA in human acute monocytic leukemia (AML) THP-1 cells enhanced the cytotoxicity of several chemotherapeutic agents, including arsenic trioxide (As2O3), etoposide and doxorubicin. Using an ARE-luciferase reporter expressed in several human and mouse cells, we identified a set of compounds, including isonicotinic acid amides, isoniazid and ethionamide, that inhibited NRF2-ARE activity. Treatment of THP-1 cells with ethionamide, for instance, significantly reduced mRNA expression of multiple ARE-driven genes under either basal or As2O3-challenged conditions. As determined by cell viability and cell cycle, suppression of NRF2-ARE by ethionamide also significantly enhanced susceptibility of THP-1 and U937 cells to As2O3-induced cytotoxicity. In THP-1 cells, the sensitizing effect of ethionamide on As2O3-induced cytotoxicity was highly dependent on NRF2. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that ethionamide suppresses NRF2-ARE signaling and disrupts the transcriptional network of the antioxidant response in AML cells, leading to sensitization to chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. Specificity of Heteroantisera to Human Acute Leukemia-Associated Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Michael A.; Ramachandar, K.; Taub, Robert N.

    1974-01-01

    Antisera have been raised to human leukemic blast cells from individual patients in mice rendered tolerant with cyclophosphamide to remission leukocytes from the same individual. 10 antisera were raised against acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells and 5 antisera were raised against acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Antisera to AML cells were absorbed with ALL cells, and antisera to ALL cells were absorbed with AML cells. Unabsorbed and absorbed antisera as well as antisera raised in nontolerant mice were tested for cytotoxicity against various cells of a panel containing myeloblasts from 35 patients with AML, lymphoblasts from 7 patients with ALL, myeloblasts from 7 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in blast crisis, peripheral blood leukocytes from 12 patients with acute leukemia in remission and 30 nonleukemic patients, and nucleated bone marrow cells from 10 nonleukemic patients. Unabsorbed antisera to AML or ALL cells raised in tolerant mice were highly cytotoxic to leukemic blasts cells but significantly less cytotoxic to remission and control cells. Antisera to AML cells absorbed with ALL cells retained measurable cytotoxicity against AML cells but were not cytotoxic to ALL cells or control cells. Similarly, antisera to ALL cells absorbed with AML cells retained significant cytotoxicity only to ALL cells. Control antisera raised in nontolerant mice were cytotoxic to all cells tested. Although species specific, histocompatibility, differentiation, maturation, and cell cycle-associated antigens may be responsible in part for the cytotoxic activity of the unabsorbed antisera, the absorbed antisera are probably detecting antigens specific for their leukemic cell type. PMID:4140196

  10. Eltrombopag Olamine in Improving Platelet Recovery in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Dasatinib, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. ADCY7 supports development of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunling; Xie, Jingjing; Lu, Zhigang; Chen, Chen; Li, Yancun; Zhan, Renhui; Fang, Yi; Hu, Xuemei; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common adult acute leukemia. Despite treatment, the majority of the AML patients relapse within 5 years. In silico analysis of several available databases of AML patients showed that the expression of adenylate cyclase 7 (ADCY7) significantly inversely correlates with the overall survival of AML patients. To determine whether ADCY7 supports AML development, we employed an shRNA-encoding lentivirus system to inhibit adcy7 expression in human AML cells including U937, MV4-11, and THP-1 cells. The ADCY7 deficiency resulted in decreased cell growth, elvated apoptosis, and lower c-Myc expression of these leukemia cells. This indicates that G protein-coupled receptor signaling contributes to AML pathogenesis. Our study suggests that inhibition of ADCY7 may be novel strategy for treating leukemia. PMID:26220344

  13. Targeted sequencing identifies associations between IL7R-JAK mutations and epigenetic modulators in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Carmen; Schwab, Claire; Broux, Michaël; Geerdens, Ellen; Degryse, Sandrine; Demeyer, Sofie; Lahortiga, Idoya; Elliott, Alannah; Chilton, Lucy; La Starza, Roberta; Mecucci, Cristina; Vandenberghe, Peter; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Moorman, Anthony V.; Soulier, Jean; Harrison, Christine J.; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cools, Jan

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is caused by the accumulation of multiple oncogenic lesions, including chromosomal rearrangements and mutations. To determine the frequency and co-occurrence of mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed targeted re-sequencing of 115 genes across 155 diagnostic samples (44 adult and 111 childhood cases). NOTCH1 and CDKN2A/B were mutated/deleted in more than half of the cases, while an additional 37 genes were mutated/deleted in 4% to 20% of cases. We found that IL7R-JAK pathway genes were mutated in 27.7% of cases, with JAK3 mutations being the most frequent event in this group. Copy number variations were also detected, including deletions of CREBBP or CTCF and duplication of MYB. FLT3 mutations were rare, but a novel extracellular mutation in FLT3 was detected and confirmed to be transforming. Furthermore, we identified complex patterns of pairwise associations, including a significant association between mutations in IL7R-JAK genes and epigenetic regulators (WT1, PRC2, PHF6). Our analyses showed that IL7R-JAK genetic lesions did not confer adverse prognosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases enrolled in the UK ALL2003 trial. Overall, these results identify interconnections between the T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome and disease biology, and suggest a potential clinical application for JAK inhibitors in a significant proportion of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26206799

  14. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Paul; Sangster, Cheryl; Lindsay, Scott; Vogelnest, Larry

    2014-12-01

    A captive, 31-yr-old, intact male pygmy hippopotamus presented with nonspecific signs of weight loss, inappetence, diarrhea, and lethargy. After 5 wk of diagnostic investigation and symptomatic treatment, an acute leukemic process with concurrent polycystic kidney disease was suspected. The animal's condition continued to deteriorate prompting euthanasia. Necropsy, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical examination confirmed acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia and polycystic kidneys. Acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia has not previously been documented in this species; however, polycystic kidney disease has been reported. This case report adds to the increasing number of pygmy hippopotamuses diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease and describes acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia, a previously unreported disease of this species.

  15. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Paul; Sangster, Cheryl; Lindsay, Scott; Vogelnest, Larry

    2014-12-01

    A captive, 31-yr-old, intact male pygmy hippopotamus presented with nonspecific signs of weight loss, inappetence, diarrhea, and lethargy. After 5 wk of diagnostic investigation and symptomatic treatment, an acute leukemic process with concurrent polycystic kidney disease was suspected. The animal's condition continued to deteriorate prompting euthanasia. Necropsy, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical examination confirmed acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia and polycystic kidneys. Acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia has not previously been documented in this species; however, polycystic kidney disease has been reported. This case report adds to the increasing number of pygmy hippopotamuses diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease and describes acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia, a previously unreported disease of this species. PMID:25632680

  16. The relevance of PTEN-AKT in relation to NOTCH1-directed treatment strategies in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rui D; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P P

    2016-09-01

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) negatively regulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT signaling and is often inactivated by mutations (including deletions) in a variety of cancer types, including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we review mutation-associated mechanisms that inactivate PTEN together with other molecular mechanisms that activate AKT and contribute to T-cell leukemogenesis. In addition, we discuss how Pten mutations in mouse models affect the efficacy of gamma-secretase inhibitors to block NOTCH1 signaling through activation of AKT. Based on these models and on observations in primary diagnostic samples from patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we speculate that PTEN-deficient cells employ an intrinsic homeostatic mechanism in which PI3K-AKT signaling is dampened over time. As a result of this reduced PI3K-AKT signaling, the level of AKT activation may be insufficient to compensate for NOTCH1 inhibition, resulting in responsiveness to gamma-secretase inhibitors. On the other hand, de novo acquired PTEN-inactivating events in NOTCH1-dependent leukemia could result in temporary, strong activation of PI3K-AKT signaling, increased glycolysis and glutaminolysis, and consequently gamma-secretase inhibitor resistance. Due to the central role of PTEN-AKT signaling and in the resistance to NOTCH1 inhibition, AKT inhibitors may be a promising addition to current treatment protocols for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27582570

  17. The relevance of PTEN-AKT in relation to NOTCH1-directed treatment strategies in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Rui D.; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P.P.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) negatively regulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT signaling and is often inactivated by mutations (including deletions) in a variety of cancer types, including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we review mutation-associated mechanisms that inactivate PTEN together with other molecular mechanisms that activate AKT and contribute to T-cell leukemogenesis. In addition, we discuss how Pten mutations in mouse models affect the efficacy of gamma-secretase inhibitors to block NOTCH1 signaling through activation of AKT. Based on these models and on observations in primary diagnostic samples from patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we speculate that PTEN-deficient cells employ an intrinsic homeostatic mechanism in which PI3K-AKT signaling is dampened over time. As a result of this reduced PI3K-AKT signaling, the level of AKT activation may be insufficient to compensate for NOTCH1 inhibition, resulting in responsiveness to gamma-secretase inhibitors. On the other hand, de novo acquired PTEN-inactivating events in NOTCH1-dependent leukemia could result in temporary, strong activation of PI3K-AKT signaling, increased glycolysis and glutaminolysis, and consequently gamma-secretase inhibitor resistance. Due to the central role of PTEN-AKT signaling and in the resistance to NOTCH1 inhibition, AKT inhibitors may be a promising addition to current treatment protocols for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27582570

  18. New and emerging prognostic and predictive genetic biomarkers in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Anthony V

    2016-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease at the genetic level. Chromosomal abnormalities are used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers to provide subtype, outcome and drug response information. t(12;21)/ETV6-RUNX1 and high hyper-diploidy are good-risk prognostic biomarkers whereas KMT2A(MLL) translocations, t(17;19)/TCF3-HLF, haploidy or low hypodiploidy are high-risk biomarkers. t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1 patients require targeted treatment (imatinib/dasatinib), whereas iAMP21 patients achieve better outcomes when treated intensively. High-risk genetic biomarkers are four times more prevalent in adults compared to children. The application of genomic technologies to cases without an established abnormality (B-other) reveals copy number alterations which can be used either individually or in combination as prognostic biomarkers. Transcriptome sequencing studies have identified a network of fusion genes involving kinase genes -ABL1,ABL2,PDGFRB,CSF1R,CRLF2,JAK2 and EPOR in-vitro and in-vivo studies along with emerging clinical observations indicate that patients with a kinase-activating aberration may respond to treatment with small molecular inhibitors like imatinib/dasatinib and ruxolitinib. Further work is required to determine the true frequency of these abnormalities across the age spectrum and the optimal way to incorporate such inhibitors into protocols. In conclusion, genetic biomarkers are playing an increasingly important role in the management of patients with ALL. PMID:27033238

  19. New and emerging prognostic and predictive genetic biomarkers in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Moorman, Anthony V.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease at the genetic level. Chromosomal abnormalities are used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers to provide subtype, outcome and drug response information. t(12;21)/ETV6-RUNX1 and high hyper-diploidy are good-risk prognostic biomarkers whereas KMT2A (MLL) translocations, t(17;19)/TCF3-HLF, haploidy or low hypodiploidy are high-risk biomarkers. t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1 patients require targeted treatment (imatinib/dasatinib), whereas iAMP21 patients achieve better outcomes when treated intensively. High-risk genetic biomarkers are four times more prevalent in adults compared to children. The application of genomic technologies to cases without an established abnormality (B-other) reveals copy number alterations which can be used either individually or in combination as prognostic biomarkers. Transcriptome sequencing studies have identified a network of fusion genes involving kinase genes - ABL1, ABL2, PDGFRB, CSF1R, CRLF2, JAK2 and EPOR. In vitro and in vivo studies along with emerging clinical observations indicate that patients with a kinase-activating aberration may respond to treatment with small molecular inhibitors like imatinib/dasatinib and ruxolitinib. Further work is required to determine the true frequency of these abnormalities across the age spectrum and the optimal way to incorporate such inhibitors into protocols. In conclusion, genetic biomarkers are playing an increasingly important role in the management of patients with ALL. PMID:27033238

  20. Induction of complete and molecular remissions in acute myeloid leukemia by Wilms’ tumor 1 antigen-targeted dendritic cell vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.; Van de Velde, Ann; Van Driessche, Ann; Cools, Nathalie; Anguille, Sébastien; Ladell, Kristin; Gostick, Emma; Vermeulen, Katrien; Pieters, Katrien; Nijs, Griet; Stein, Barbara; Smits, Evelien L.; Schroyens, Wilfried A.; Gadisseur, Alain P.; Vrelust, Inge; Jorens, Philippe G.; Goossens, Herman; de Vries, I. Jolanda; Price, David A.; Oji, Yusuke; Oka, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Haruo; Berneman, Zwi N.

    2010-01-01

    Active immunization using tumor antigen-loaded dendritic cells holds promise for the adjuvant treatment of cancer to eradicate or control residual disease, but so far, most dendritic cell trials have been performed in end-stage cancer patients with high tumor loads. Here, in a phase I/II trial, we investigated the effect of autologous dendritic cell vaccination in 10 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The Wilms’ tumor 1 protein (WT1), a nearly universal tumor antigen, was chosen as an immunotherapeutic target because of its established role in leukemogenesis and superior immunogenic characteristics. Two patients in partial remission after chemotherapy were brought into complete remission after intradermal administration of full-length WT1 mRNA-electroporated dendritic cells. In these two patients and three other patients who were in complete remission, the AML-associated tumor marker returned to normal after dendritic cell vaccination, compatible with the induction of molecular remission. Clinical responses were correlated with vaccine-associated increases in WT1-specific CD8+ T cell frequencies, as detected by peptide/HLA-A*0201 tetramer staining, and elevated levels of activated natural killer cells postvaccination. Furthermore, vaccinated patients showed increased levels of WT1-specific IFN-γ–producing CD8+ T cells and features of general immune activation. These data support the further development of vaccination with WT1 mRNA-loaded dendritic cells as a postremission treatment to prevent full relapse in AML patients. PMID:20631300

  1. Crucial role of the Rap G protein signal in Notch activation and leukemogenicity of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Doi, Keiko; Imai, Takahiko; Kressler, Christopher; Yagita, Hideo; Agata, Yasutoshi; Vooijs, Marc; Hamazaki, Yoko; Inoue, Joe; Minato, Nagahiro

    2015-01-23

    The Rap G protein signal regulates Notch activation in early thymic progenitor cells, and deregulated Rap activation (Rap(high)) results in the development of Notch-dependent T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). We demonstrate that the Rap signal is required for the proliferation and leukemogenesis of established Notch-dependent T-ALL cell lines. Attenuation of the Rap signal by the expression of a dominant-negative Rap1A17 or Rap1GAP, Sipa1, in a T-ALL cell line resulted in the reduced Notch processing at site 2 due to impaired maturation of Adam10. Inhibition of the Rap1 prenylation with a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor abrogated its membrane-anchoring to Golgi-network and caused reduced proprotein convertase activity required for Adam10 maturation. Exogenous expression of a mature form of Adam10 overcame the Sipa1-induced inhibition of T-ALL cell proliferation. T-ALL cell lines expressed Notch ligands in a Notch-signal dependent manner, which contributed to the cell-autonomous Notch activation. Although the initial thymic blast cells barely expressed Notch ligands during the T-ALL development from Rap(high) hematopoietic progenitors in vivo, the ligands were clearly expressed in the T-ALL cells invading extrathymic vital organs. These results reveal a crucial role of the Rap signal in the Notch-dependent T-ALL development and the progression.

  2. T-cell receptor gamma/delta expressing acute leukemia emerging from sideroblastic anemia: morphological, immunological, and cytogenetic features.

    PubMed

    Meckenstock, G; Fonatsch, C; Heyll, A; Schneider, E M; Kögler, G; Söhngen, D; Aul, C; Schneider, W

    1992-01-01

    Striking numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities (-Y, +8, i(7q), del (10)(q24), and del (11)(q21)) were detected by cytogenetic analysis in a patient's bone marrow with morphological features of both acute lymphoblastic leukemia and myelodysplastic disorder. Surface marker analysis characterized blast cells to be CD2+ CD7+ CD3+ CD4- CD8- expressing gamma/delta-T-cell receptor antigen and coexpressing CD11b and CD16. Exhibiting an identical phenotype as the leukemic cells, a prominent gamma/delta-TCR+ lymphocyte population was found in the bone marrow as well as in the peripheral blood. Cells of the latter compartment coexpressed CD56 and HLA-DR antigens and exhibited nonspecific cytotoxic activity. In the bone marrow cells NSCA could be induced after stimulation with interleukin 2 in vitro. Morphological, immunological, and cytogenetic findings suggest that gamma/delta-T-ALL emerged from a myelodysplastic disorder after sequential steps of malignant transformation. Leukemic cells with "mixed lineage" character may provide evidence for a common progenitor cell in the bone marrow. Assuming that the leukemic cells represent the malignant counterpart of normal CD3+ gamma/delta-TCR+ cells the results may contribute to our understanding of the origin and differentiation as well as the possible steps of malignant transformation of a gamma/delta-TCR+ lymphocyte population.

  3. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent.

  4. CAR-pNK Cell Immunotherapy in CD7 Positive Leukemia and Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-11

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma; T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, NOS; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type; Enteropathy-type Intestinal T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma

  5. Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-20

    Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

  6. Gambogic acid induces growth inhibition and differentiation via upregulation of p21waf1/cip1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Hui, Hui; Li, Zheng; Wang, Hong-Mei; You, Qi-Dong; Lu, Na

    2014-10-01

    Gambogic acid (GA) is the major active ingredient of gamboges, a brownish to orange resin product from Garcinia hanburyi tree in Southeast Asia. This compound exhibits anti-cancer effect on solid tumors. In this study, we investigated the effects of GA on the growth and differentiation of acute myeloid leukemia cells by growth-inhibition detection, morphological changes observation, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, and the expression of the relative cell-surface differentiation markers. The results showed that GA could inhibit cell growth and promote differentiation in U937 and HL-60 cells. In addition, GA upregulated the expression of p21waf1/cip1 in the two cell lines. Finally, downregulating the p21waf1/cip1 expression with small interfering RNA partially blocked GA-induced cell growth inhibition and differentiation. These results of this study revealed that GA may be used as one of the investigational drugs for acute myeloid leukemia.

  7. [Extramedullary relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the mastoid after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a case report].

    PubMed

    Dong, Fangru; Wang, Na; Liu, Ruli

    2016-01-01

    Extramedullary relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the mastoid after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is rare. In this paper, we describe such an uncommon case of extramedullary relapse of ALL in the mastoid. The patient, who had been diagnosed as having ALL and underwent an allo-HSCT from his matched sibling donor. Eight months after allo-HSCT, he presented with ear-ache, tinnitus. The middle ear mastoid CT revealed otomastoiditis. The patient underwent operation. After pathological examination, the definited diagnosis was made that the patient was extramedullary relapse of ALL in the mastoid. We should pay more attention to the patients with hemopathy, which can help to improve early diagnosis. PMID:27197463

  8. High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)–rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  9. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  10. Expansion of polyclonal B-cell precursors in bone marrow from children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Duval, M; Fenneteau, O; Cave, H; Gobillot, C; Rohrlich, P; Guidal, C; Lescoeur, B; Legac, S; Schlegel, N; Sterkers, G; Vilmer, E

    1997-06-01

    In a series of 12 patients (mean age: 3 years at diagnosis) receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, bone marrow examinations performed during hematopoietic recovery following treatment-induced agranulocytosis or completion of maintenance treatment showed at least 15% of non malignant immature cells which were sometimes hardly distinguishable from leukemic cells. No comparable data was observed in patients treated with G-CSF. The cytological features of these cells as well as their immunophenotyping were defined. Results showed that the majority of cells expressed HLA-DR, CD19, CD10 and cytoplasmic IgM but not the CD34 markers. This predominant and homogeneous pre-B cell population which likely represents the expansion of a minor population detectable in normal bone marrow is phenotypically indistinguishable from leukemic cells. The pattern of IgH gene rearrangements studied by PCR amplification of the CDRIII region showed that these cells were polyclonal. Except in one patient, minimal residual disease was not detected using probes specific for IgH or TCR gene rearrangement of the malignant clone. In children during the hematopoietic recovery after chemotherapy, immature marrow cells in great numbers, even with an highly homogeneous immunophenotype identical to the malignant clone's, are not sufficient for the diagnosis of relapse.

  11. Baicalein suppresses the proliferation of acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by inhibiting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoping; Liu, Shengcai; Chen, Jiarui; He, Li; Meng, Xiangyu; Liu, Shangqin

    2016-10-01

    Although the response rates of chemotherapy in patients with acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) have improved significantly, the outcome of these patients is still poor. Previous studies suggested that baicalein could inhibit the growth of several cancers, while its effect on T-ALL cells remains unclear. We used Jurkat cells as an in vitro model of T-ALL. Cell counting kit-8 assay and cytometric analysis with Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining were used to investigate the proliferation and apoptosis of Jurkat cells treated with increasing concentration of baicalein for indicated time. RT-PCR and western blotting was used to test the expression of Wnt/β-catenin associated genes and proteins. In cell viability assay, baicalein could inhibit the proliferation of Jurkat cells both in dose- and time-dependent manners. In cell apoptosis assay, baicalein could stimulate apoptosis of Jurkat cells both in dose- and time-dependent manners. Moreover, we demonstrated that baicalein could down-regulated the mRNA and protein levels of β-catenin and its widely accepted downstream targets (c-Myc, cyclin D1, and Axin2) in dose-dependent manners. These results proved that baicalein might be a potential choice for the treatment of T-ALL.

  12. The extracts of Japanese willow tree species are effective forapoptotic desperation or differentiation of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kounosuke; Nomura, Yuji; Sawajiri, Masahiko; Mohapatra, Pravat K.; El-Shemy, Hany A.; Nguyen, Nguyen T.; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo; Maeda, Teruo; Saneoka, Hirofumi; Fujita, Shohei; Fujita, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Background: The antileukemic activity of hot water extract of plant parts of some Japanese willow tree species grown at different levels of nitrogen were examined. Materials and Methods: Water extracts of willow leaves were prepared for this studies in different level of nitrogen nutrition. Results: The extracts obtained from the leaves and stem exhibited anti-leukemic activities prominently. The crude hot water extracts of the young growing parts including apex, matured leaves and stem, killed the blasts of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, (HL60 and NB4) after 48h incubation, however, such desperation was far less in the root extract. Similar to the plant parts, response of extracts obtained from different willow species was not identical; the proportion of dead cells relative to whole cells of the culture medium ranged from 21% to 93% among the species. Leaf extracts obtained from the responsive willow species decreased the live cell percentage and increased the dead cell percentage at higher level of nitrogen nutrition. The mode of desperation of leaf extract treated AML cells in such species appeared to be cell apoptosis as shown by binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) -labeled Annexin V. Conclusion: Differentiation of alive AML cells continued unabated and apoptosis was poor when extract of an unresponsive species added to the culture medium. PMID:24914277

  13. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, unlike acute erythroid leukemia, predicts an unfavorable outcome after allogeneic HSCT.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Ken; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Eto, Tetsuya; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Uchida, Naoyuki; Kanamori, Heiwa; Fukuda, Takahiro; Miyamura, Koichi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Taguchi, Jun; Mori, Takehiko; Iwato, Koji; Morishima, Yasuo; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Takami, Akiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Acute erythroid leukemia (FAB-M6) and acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (FAB-M7) exhibit closely related properties in cells regarding morphology and the gene expression profile. Although allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is considered the mainstay of the treatment for both subtypes of leukemia due to their refractoriness to chemotherapy and high rates of relapse, it remains unclear whether allo-HSCT is curative in such cases due to their scarcity. We retrospectively examined the impact of allo-HSCT in 382 patients with M6 and 108 patients with M7 using nationwide HSCT data and found the overall survival (OS) and relapse rates of the M6 patients to be significantly better than those of the M7 patients after adjusting for confounding factors and statistically comparable with those of the patients with M0/M1/M2/M4/M5 disease. Consequently, the factors of age, gender, performance status, karyotype, disease status at HSCT and development of graft-vs.-host disease predicted the OS for the M6 patients, while the performance status and disease status at HSCT were predictive of the OS for the M7 patients. These findings substantiate the importance of distinguishing between M6 and M7 in the HSCT setting and suggest that unknown mechanisms influence the HSCT outcomes of these closely related subtypes of leukemia. PMID:27244257

  14. Nanomedicine approaches in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Andra-Sorina; Nagy-Simon, Timea; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Boca, Sanda; Astilean, Simion

    2016-09-28

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the malignancy with the highest incidence amongst children (26% of all cancer cases), being surpassed only by the cancers of the brain and of the nervous system. The most recent research on ALL is focusing on new molecular therapies, like targeting specific biological structures in key points in the cell cycle, or using selective inhibitors for transmembranary proteins involved in cell signalling, and even aiming cell surface receptors with specifically designed antibodies for active targeting. Nanomedicine approaches, especially by the use of nanoparticle-based compounds for the delivery of drugs, cancer diagnosis or therapeutics may represent new and modern ways in the near future anti-cancer therapies. This review offers an overview on the recent role of nanomedicine in the detection and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia as resulting from a thorough literature survey. A short introduction on the basics of ALL is presented followed by the description of the conventional methods used in the ALL detection and treatment. We follow our discussion by introducing some of the general nano-strategies used for cancer detection and treatment. The detailed role of organic and inorganic nanoparticles in ALL applications is further presented, with a special focus on gold nanoparticle-based nanocarriers of antileukemic drugs. PMID:27460684

  15. Nanomedicine approaches in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Andra-Sorina; Nagy-Simon, Timea; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Boca, Sanda; Astilean, Simion

    2016-09-28

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the malignancy with the highest incidence amongst children (26% of all cancer cases), being surpassed only by the cancers of the brain and of the nervous system. The most recent research on ALL is focusing on new molecular therapies, like targeting specific biological structures in key points in the cell cycle, or using selective inhibitors for transmembranary proteins involved in cell signalling, and even aiming cell surface receptors with specifically designed antibodies for active targeting. Nanomedicine approaches, especially by the use of nanoparticle-based compounds for the delivery of drugs, cancer diagnosis or therapeutics may represent new and modern ways in the near future anti-cancer therapies. This review offers an overview on the recent role of nanomedicine in the detection and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia as resulting from a thorough literature survey. A short introduction on the basics of ALL is presented followed by the description of the conventional methods used in the ALL detection and treatment. We follow our discussion by introducing some of the general nano-strategies used for cancer detection and treatment. The detailed role of organic and inorganic nanoparticles in ALL applications is further presented, with a special focus on gold nanoparticle-based nanocarriers of antileukemic drugs.

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  17. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  18. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  19. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  20. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  2. Immunophenotypic and functional characterization of ex vivo expanded natural killer cells for clinical use in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Peragine, Nadia; Torelli, Giovanni F; Mariglia, Paola; Pauselli, Simona; Vitale, Antonella; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin

    2015-02-01

    The management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients has witnessed profound changes in recent years. Nonetheless, most patients tend to relapse, underlining the need for new therapeutic approaches. The anti-leukemic potential of natural killer (NK) cells has over the years raised considerable interest. In this study, we developed an efficient method for the expansion and activation of NK cells isolated from healthy donors and ALL patients for clinical use. NK cell products were derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 35 healthy donors and 4 B-lineage ALL by immunomagnetic CD3 T cell depletion followed by CD56 cell enrichment. Isolated NK cells were expanded and stimulated in serum-free medium supplemented with irradiated autologous feeder cells and autologous plasma in the presence of clinical grade interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-15 for 14 days. Healthy donor NK cells expanded on average 34.9 ± 10.4 fold and were represented, after expansion, by a highly pure population of CD3(-)CD56(+) cells showing a significant upregulation of natural cytotoxicity receptors, activating receptors and maturation markers. These expanded effectors showed cytolytic activity against K562 cells and, most importantly, against primary adult B-lineage ALL blasts. NK cells could be efficiently isolated and expanded-on average 39.5 ± 20.3 fold-also from primary B-lineage ALL samples of patients in complete remission. The expanded NK cells from these patients showed a significantly increased expression of the NKG2D- and DNAM1-activating receptors and were cytotoxic against K562 cells. These data provide the basis for developing new immunotherapeutic strategies for the management of ALL patients.

  3. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Stage II-IV T-Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-02

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. [Expression of ICAM-1 (CD54) in pediatric tumor and acute leukemia and its clinic significance in immunotherapy with CIK cell].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xi-Lin; Li, Yang; Wang, Lin; Wei, Jing; Ma, Lei; Shen, Xi-Ming

    2012-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression of ICAM-1 (CD54) in pediatric tumor and acute leukemia (AL), so as to understand the distribution of ICAM-1 and its clinical significance. The expression of ICAM-1 in tissues of 46 pediatric tumor patients were detected by immunohistochemistry, and in bone marrow cells of 60 pediatric acute leukemia (AL) patients were detected by flow cytometry. 46 pediatric tumor patients included 10 lymphoma, 3 hepatoblastoma, 6 neuroblastoma, 2 rhabdomyosarcoma, 6 Ewing's bone sarcoma, 2 fibrosarcoma, 5 primitive neuroectodermal tumor, 11 nephroblastoma and 1 osteosarcoma. 60 AL pediatric patients included 20 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patients and 40 acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) patients containing 20 M1, M2, M3 patients and 20 M4, M5. The results indicated that expression of ICAM-1 was more positive in all 3 hepatoblastoma cases, which represent a higher positive rate than that in lymphoma, neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma of bone and osteosarcoma. However, no expression of ICAM-1 was observed in fibrosarcoma, nephroblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor patients. On the other hand, the expression rate of ICAM-1 was 55 in ALL, 65 in ANLL M1, M2, M3, and 50 in ANLL M4, M5. It is concluded that the expression of ICAM-1 in pediatric tumor and AL has variability. The ICAM-1 positive expression is observed in hepatoblastoma and ANLL M1, M2, M3 patients, whereas it is undetectable in fibrosarcoma, nephroblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor patients.

  5. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  6. New mouse model of acute adult T-cell leukemia generated by transplantation of AKT, BCLxL, and HBZ-transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Kasugai, Yumiko; Yoshida, Noriaki; Ohshima, Koichi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Seto, Masao; Tsuzuki, Shinobu

    2016-08-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) carriers. Although the HTLV-1-encoded HBZ gene is critically involved, HBZ alone is insufficient and additional, cooperative "hits" are required for the development of ATL. Candidate cooperative hits are being defined, but methods to rapidly explore their roles in ATL development in collaboration with HBZ are lacking. Here, we present a new mouse model of acute type ATL that can be generated rapidly by transplanting in vitro-induced T cells that have been retrovirally transduced with HBZ and two cooperative genes, BCLxL and AKT, into mice. Co-transduction of HBZ and BCLxL/AKT allowed these T cells to grow in vitro in the absence of cytokines (Flt3-ligand and interleukin-7), which did not occur with any two-gene combination. Although transplanted T cells were a mixture of cells transduced with different combinations of the genes, tumors that developed in mice were composed of HBZ/BCLxL/AKT triply transduced T cells, showing the synergistic effect of the three genes. The genetic/epigenetic landscape of ATL has only recently been elucidated, and the roles of additional "hits" in ATL pathogenesis remain to be explored. Our model provides a versatile tool to examine the roles of these hits, in collaboration with HBZ, in the development of acute ATL. PMID:27223899

  7. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. Potential roles of microRNA-29a in the molecular pathophysiology of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lucila H; Schiavinato, Josiane L; Fráguas, Mariane S; Lucena-Araujo, Antonio R; Haddad, Rodrigo; Araújo, Amélia G; Dalmazzo, Leandro F; Rego, Eduardo M; Covas, Dimas T; Zago, Marco A; Panepucci, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence has shown that deregulated expression of members of the microRNA-29 (miR-29) family may play a critical role in human cancer, including hematological malignancies. However, the roles of miR-29 in the molecular pathophysiology of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) has not been investigated. Here, we show that lower levels of miR-29a were significantly associated with higher blast counts in the bone marrow and with increased disease-free survival in T-ALL patients. Furthermore, miR-29a levels are extremely reduced in T-ALL cells compared to normal T cells. Microarray analysis following introduction of synthetic miR-29a mimics into Jurkat cells revealed the downregulation of several predicted targets (CDK6, PXDN, MCL1, PIK3R1, and CXXC6), including targets with roles in active and passive DNA demethylation (such as DNMT3a, DNMT3b, and members of the TET family and TDG). Restoring miR-29a levels in Jurkat and Molt-4 T-ALL cells led to the demethylation of many genes commonly methylated in T-ALL. Overall, our results suggest that reduced miR-29a levels may contribute to the altered epigenetic status of T-ALL, highlighting its relevance in the physiopathology of this disease.

  9. The application of CD73 in minimal residual disease monitoring using flow cytometry in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Gao, Li; Li, Yan; Li, Zhen-Ling; Gong, Ming; Huang, Fan-Zhou; Chen, Yan-Rong; Zhang, Chun-Xia; Gao, Ya-Yue; Ma, Yi-Gai

    2016-05-01

    The expression of CD73 by flow cytometry (FC) in bone marrow (BM) specimens of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with or without minimal residual disease (MRD) was studied, and its advantages were evaluated using the MRD assay. This study also detected the expression profile of CD73 in hematogones and mature B cells in BM specimens of 18 healthy donors. Results showed that the mean value of CD73 expression in MRD-positive B cells was 6-fold greater than that in the MRD negative ones. Also, 41.82% MRD-positive B-ALL cases expressed high CD73 and the sensitivity of CD73-based MRD detection reached 10(-4). Since the expression of CD73 increases with the maturation of normal B cells, it is better to mix it with CD34, CD10 and CD20 in one tube to prevent the disturbance of mature B cells. CD73 is recommended as an optional MRD marker for B-ALL patients by using FC.

  10. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation in patients with refractory acute leukemia: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Oyekunle, A A; Kröger, N; Zabelina, T; Ayuk, F; Schieder, H; Renges, H; Fehse, N; Waschke, O; Fehse, B; Kabisch, H; Zander, A R

    2006-01-01

    We examined retrospectively 44 patients with refractory acute leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia (AML)/acute lymphoblastic leukemia=25/19) who underwent allogeneic transplantation at our center between 11/1990 and 04/2004. The median leukemic blasts was 25% and age 28 years (range, 3-56). Twenty-one patients had untreated relapse, 13 failed reinduction, eight in partial remission and two aplastic. Conditioning was myeloablative using cyclophosphamide, busulfan, total-body irradiation and etoposide (Bu/Cy/VP, n=22; TBI/Cy/VP, n=17; others, n=5) followed by marrow or peripheral blood transplant (n=23/21) from unrelated or related donors (n=28/16). All patients had graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis with cyclosporin and methotrexate. One patient experienced late graft failure. Severe acute-GVHD and chronic-GVHD appeared in eight and 14 patients, respectively. Thirteen patients (30%) remain alive after a median of 25.3 months (range, 2.4-134.1); with 31 deaths, mostly from relapse (n=15) and infections (n=12). Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) at 5 years was 28 and 26%, respectively. OS and PFS were significantly better with blasts < or =20% and time to transplant < or =1 year while transplant-related mortality was less with the use of TBI. We conclude that patients with refractory leukemia can benefit from allogeneic BMT, especially with < or =20% marrow blast.

  12. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric; Palmer, Joycelynne; Stein, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  13. Pathogenetic, Clinical, and Prognostic Features of Adult t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL-AF4 Positive B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Marchesi, F.; Girardi, K.; Avvisati, G.

    2011-01-01

    Translocation t(4;11)(q21;q23) leading to formation of MLL-AF4 fusion gene is found in about 10% of newly diagnosed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adult patients. Patients expressing this chromosomal aberration present typical biological, immunophenotypic, and clinical features. This form of leukemia is universally recognized as high-risk leukemia and treatment intensification with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in first complete remission (CR) could be a valid option to improve prognosis, but data obtained from the literature are controversial. In this review, we briefly describe pathogenetic, clinical, and prognostic characteristics of adult t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL-AF4 positive ALL and provide a review of the clinical outcome reported by the most important cooperative groups worldwide. PMID:22190943

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel 2-Amino-Chromene-Nitriles that Target Bcl-2 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Chakrabhavi D.; Madan, Vikas; Kanojia, Deepika; Shobith, Rangappa; Nanjundaswamy, Shivananju; Mason, Daniel J.; Bender, Andreas; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2014-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 is a well-known and attractive therapeutic target for cancer. In the present study the solution-phase T3P-DMSO mediated efficient synthesis of 2-amino-chromene-3-carbonitriles from alcohols, malanonitrile and phenols is reported. These novel 2-amino-chromene-3-carbonitriles showed cytotoxicity in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines. Compound 4g was found to be the most bioactive, decreasing growth and increasing apoptosis of AML cells. Moreover, compound 4g (at a concentration of 5 µM) increased the G2/M and sub-G1 (apoptosis) phases of AML cells. The AML cells treated with compound 4g exhibited decreased levels of Bcl-2 and increased levels of caspase-9. In silico molecular interaction analysis showed that compound 4g shared a similar global binding motif with navitoclax (another small molecule that binds Bcl-2), however compound 4g occupies a smaller volume within the P2 hot spot of Bcl-2. The intermolecular π-stacking interaction, direct electrostatic interactions, and docking energy predicted for 4g in complex with Bcl-2 suggest a strong affinity of the complex, rendering 4g as a promising Bcl-2 inhibitor for evaluation as a new anticancer agent. PMID:25268519

  15. PI3K inhibition synergizes with glucocorticoids but antagonizes with methotrexate in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, André Bortolini; Laranjeira, Angelo Brunelli Albertoni; Rodrigues, Gisele Olinto Libanio; Leal, Paulo César; Cardoso, Bruno António; Barata, João Taborda; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brandalise, Sílvia Regina; Yunes, José Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The PI3K pathway is frequently hyperactivated in primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Activation of the PI3K pathway has been suggested as one mechanism of glucocorticoid resistance in T-ALL, and patients harboring mutations in the PI3K negative regulator PTEN may be at increased risk of induction failure and relapse. By gene expression microarray analysis of T-ALL cells treated with the PI3K inhibitor AS605240, we identified Myc as a prominent downstream target of the PI3K pathway. A significant association was found between the AS605240 gene expression signature and that of glucocorticoid resistance and relapse in T-ALL. AS605240 showed anti-leukemic activity and strong synergism with glucocorticoids both in vitro and in a NOD/SCID xenograft model of T-ALL. In contrast, PI3K inhibition showed antagonism with methotrexate and daunorubicin, drugs that preferentially target dividing cells. This antagonistic interaction, however, could be circumvented by the use of correct drug scheduling schemes. Our data indicate the potential benefits and difficulties for the incorporation of PI3K inhibitors in T-ALL therapy. PMID:25869207

  16. Combined treatment with fenretinide and indomethacin induces AIF-mediated, non-classical cell death in human acute T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hojka-Osinska, Anna; Ziolo, Ewa; Rapak, Andrzej

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The combination of fenretinide and indomethacin induces a high level of cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptotic pathway is caspase-independent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Jurkat cells undergo AIF-mediated cell death. -- Abstract: Currently used cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy have a similar mechanism of action and low specificity. Applied simultaneously, they show an additive effect with strong side effects. Clinical trials with the use of different agents in cancer therapy show that the use of these compounds alone is not very effective in fighting cancer. An alternative solution could be to apply a combination of these agents, because their combination has a synergistic effect on some cancer cells. Therefore, in our investigations we examined the effects of a synthetic retinoid-fenretinide when combined with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-indomethacin on the process of apoptosis in the acute human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. We demonstrate that treatment with the combination of the tested compounds induces the death of cells, that is peculiar and combines features of apoptosis as well as non-apoptotic cell death. In detail we observed, cell membrane permeabilization, phosphatydylserine exposure, no oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation, no caspase-3 activation, but apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation. Taken together these results indicate, that Jurkat cells after treatment with a combination of fenretinide and indomethacin undergo AIF-mediated programmed cell death.

  17. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Barajas-Diego, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    The latest scientific findings in the field of cancer research are redefining our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of the disease, moving the emphasis toward the study of the mechanisms underlying the alteration of the normal processes of cellular differentiation. The concepts best exemplifying this new vision are those of cancer stem cells and tumoral reprogramming. The study of the biology of acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs) has provided seminal experimental evidence supporting these new points of view. Furthermore, in the case of B cells, it has been shown that all the stages of their normal development show a tremendous degree of plasticity, allowing them to be reprogrammed to other cellular types, either normal or leukemic. Here we revise the most recent discoveries in the fields of B-cell developmental plasticity and B-ALL research and discuss their interrelationships and their implications for our understanding of the biology of the disease. PMID:22031225

  18. Regulation of B cell linker protein transcription by PU.1 and Spi-B in murine B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li S; Sokalski, Kristen M; Hotke, Kathryn; Christie, Darah A; Zarnett, Oren; Piskorz, Jan; Thillainadesan, Gobi; Torchia, Joseph; DeKoter, Rodney P

    2012-10-01

    B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is frequently associated with mutations or chromosomal translocations of genes encoding transcription factors. Conditional deletion of genes encoding the E26-transformation-specific transcription factors, PU.1 and Spi-B, in B cells (ΔPB mice) leads to B-ALL in mice at 100% incidence rate and with a median survival of 21 wk. We hypothesized that PU.1 and Spi-B may redundantly activate transcription of genes encoding tumor suppressors in the B cell lineage. Characterization of aging ΔPB mice showed that leukemia cells expressing IL-7R were found in enlarged thymuses. IL-7R-expressing B-ALL cells grew in culture in response to IL-7 and could be maintained as cell lines. Cultured ΔPB cells expressed reduced levels of B cell linker protein (BLNK), a known tumor suppressor gene, compared with controls. The Blnk promoter contained a predicted PU.1 and/or Spi-B binding site that was required for promoter activity and occupied by PU.1 and/or Spi-B as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Restoration of BLNK expression in cultured ΔPB cells opposed IL-7-dependent proliferation and induced early apoptosis. We conclude that the tumor suppressor BLNK is a target of transcriptional activation by PU.1 and Spi-B in the B cell lineage.

  19. A reliable Raman-spectroscopy-based approach for diagnosis, classification and follow-up of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managò, Stefano; Valente, Carmen; Mirabelli, Peppino; Circolo, Diego; Basile, Filomena; Corda, Daniela; de Luca, Anna Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia type B (B-ALL) is a neoplastic disorder that shows high mortality rates due to immature lymphocyte B-cell proliferation. B-ALL diagnosis requires identification and classification of the leukemia cells. Here, we demonstrate the use of Raman spectroscopy to discriminate normal lymphocytic B-cells from three different B-leukemia transformed cell lines (i.e., RS4;11, REH, MN60 cells) based on their biochemical features. In combination with immunofluorescence and Western blotting, we show that these Raman markers reflect the relative changes in the potential biological markers from cell surface antigens, cytoplasmic proteins, and DNA content and correlate with the lymphoblastic B-cell maturation/differentiation stages. Our study demonstrates the potential of this technique for classification of B-leukemia cells into the different differentiation/maturation stages, as well as for the identification of key biochemical changes under chemotherapeutic treatments. Finally, preliminary results from clinical samples indicate high consistency of, and potential applications for, this Raman spectroscopy approach.

  20. A reliable Raman-spectroscopy-based approach for diagnosis, classification and follow-up of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Managò, Stefano; Valente, Carmen; Mirabelli, Peppino; Circolo, Diego; Basile, Filomena; Corda, Daniela; De Luca, Anna Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia type B (B-ALL) is a neoplastic disorder that shows high mortality rates due to immature lymphocyte B-cell proliferation. B-ALL diagnosis requires identification and classification of the leukemia cells. Here, we demonstrate the use of Raman spectroscopy to discriminate normal lymphocytic B-cells from three different B-leukemia transformed cell lines (i.e., RS4;11, REH, MN60 cells) based on their biochemical features. In combination with immunofluorescence and Western blotting, we show that these Raman markers reflect the relative changes in the potential biological markers from cell surface antigens, cytoplasmic proteins, and DNA content and correlate with the lymphoblastic B-cell maturation/differentiation stages. Our study demonstrates the potential of this technique for classification of B-leukemia cells into the different differentiation/maturation stages, as well as for the identification of key biochemical changes under chemotherapeutic treatments. Finally, preliminary results from clinical samples indicate high consistency of, and potential applications for, this Raman spectroscopy approach. PMID:27089853

  1. A reliable Raman-spectroscopy-based approach for diagnosis, classification and follow-up of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Managò, Stefano; Valente, Carmen; Mirabelli, Peppino; Circolo, Diego; Basile, Filomena; Corda, Daniela; De Luca, Anna Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia type B (B-ALL) is a neoplastic disorder that shows high mortality rates due to immature lymphocyte B-cell proliferation. B-ALL diagnosis requires identification and classification of the leukemia cells. Here, we demonstrate the use of Raman spectroscopy to discriminate normal lymphocytic B-cells from three different B-leukemia transformed cell lines (i.e., RS4;11, REH, MN60 cells) based on their biochemical features. In combination with immunofluorescence and Western blotting, we show that these Raman markers reflect the relative changes in the potential biological markers from cell surface antigens, cytoplasmic proteins, and DNA content and correlate with the lymphoblastic B-cell maturation/differentiation stages. Our study demonstrates the potential of this technique for classification of B-leukemia cells into the different differentiation/maturation stages, as well as for the identification of key biochemical changes under chemotherapeutic treatments. Finally, preliminary results from clinical samples indicate high consistency of, and potential applications for, this Raman spectroscopy approach. PMID:27089853

  2. Cancer procoagulant in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Alessio, M G; Falanga, A; Consonni, R; Bassan, R; Minetti, B; Donati, M B; Barbui, T

    1990-08-01

    In a previous study we characterized cancer procoagulant (CP), a 68 kd cysteine proteinase which directly activates coagulation factor X in various subtypes (from M1 to M5) of acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL). The aim of this study was to determine whether CP is also expressed by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Blasts from 25 ALL patients were extracted and tested for their procoagulant properties. 16 samples (64%) shortened the recalcification time of normal human plasma, and 9 (36%) did not. 8 of the 16 active samples showed properties compatible with CP, i.e. independence from factor VII in triggering blood coagulation and sensitivity to cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Selected samples also cross-reacted with a polyclonal antibody raised against purified CP. The specific activity of CP in ALL extracts was significantly lower than in most ANLL types previously studied (all but M4). These finding indicate that CP can be a property of the lymphoid phenotype although its expression may be lower than in the myeloid phenotype.

  3. A murine model of acute myeloid leukemia with Evi1 overexpression and autocrine stimulation by an intracellular form of GM-CSF in DA-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Maria E; Simonson, Oscar E; Oprea, Iulian I; Moreno, Pedro M D; Silva-Lara, Maria F; Mohamed, Abdalla J; Christensson, Birger; Gahrton, Gösta; Dilber, M Sirac; Smith, C I Edvard; Arteaga, H Jose

    2016-01-01

    The poor treatment response of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) overexpressing high-risk oncogenes such as EVI1, demands specific animal models for new treatment evaluations. Evi1 is a common site of activating integrations in murine leukemia virus (MLV)-induced AML and in retroviral and lentiviral gene-modified HCS. Still, a model of overt AML induced by Evi1 has not been generated. Cell lines from MLV-induced AML are growth factor-dependent and non-transplantable. Hence, for the leukemia maintenance in the infected animals, a growth factor source such as chronic immune response has been suggested. We have investigated whether these leukemias are transplantable if provided with growth factors. We show that the Evi1(+)DA-3 cells modified to express an intracellular form of GM-CSF, acquired growth factor independence and transplantability and caused an overt leukemia in syngeneic hosts, without increasing serum GM-CSF levels. We propose this as a general approach for modeling different forms of high-risk human AML using similar cell lines.

  4. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Hydrocortisone in culture protects the blast cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia from the lethal effects of cytosine arabinoside

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.S.; Wang, C.; Minkin, S.; Minden, M.D.; McCulloch, E.A. )

    1991-07-01

    The blast cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) respond to many of the same regulatory mechanisms that control normal hemopoiesis. These include the growth factors that bind to membrane receptors and steroid hormones or vitamins that have intracellular receptors. The authors report the effects in culture of the steroid glucocorticoid hydrocortisone on freshly explanted AML blasts from patients and on two continuous AML cell lines. Only small changes in clonogenic cell numbers in suspension cultures were seen in the presence of hydrocortisone. The most striking effect of the hormone was on the sensitivity of blasts cells to cytosine arabinoside (ara-C). In contrast to the response of AML blast cells to retinoic acid, a ligand for intracellular steroid receptors that sensitizes some blast populations to ara-C, hydrocortisone reduced the toxic effects of the drug. The protective action of hydrocortisone was not mediated through the cell cycle since exposure of blasts to hydrocortisone did not affect the percentage of cells in DNA synthesis as measured with the tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) suicide technique. The hydrocortisone effect could be demonstrated using a pulse (20 min) exposure protocol. Blasts pulsed with increasing specific activities of 3HTdR showed the usual response pattern with an initial loss in plating efficiency to about 50% of control, followed by a plateau, regardless of whether the cells had been exposed to hydrocortisone. Control blasts exposed to increasing ara-C concentrations gave very similar dose-response curves; in striking contrast, blast cells cultured in hydrocortisone, then pulsed with ara-C did not lose colony-forming ability even though the same population was sensitive to 3HTdR.

  8. Icariside II Induces Apoptosis in U937 Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells: Role of Inactivation of STAT3-Related Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Jung, Ji Hoon; Koh, Wonil; Kim, Jung Hyo; Kim, Dae Keun; Chen, Chang-Yan; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to determine anti-cancer effect of Icariside II purified from the root of Epimedium koreanum Nakai on human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell line U937. Methodology/Principal Findings Icariside II blocked the growth U937 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In this anti-proliferation process, this herb compound rendered the cells susceptible to apoptosis, manifested by enhanced accumulation of sub-G1 cell population and increased the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells. Icariside II was able to activate caspase-3 and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in a time-dependent manner. Concurrently, the anti-apoptotic proteins, such as bcl-xL and survivin in U937 cells, were downregulated by Icariside II. In addition, Icariside II could inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation and function and subsequently suppress the activation of Janus activated kinase 2 (JAK2), the upstream activators of STAT3, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Icariside II also enhanced the expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) SH2 domain-containing phosphatase (SHP)-1, and the addition of sodium pervanadate (a PTP inhibitor) prevented Icariside II-induced apoptosis as well as STAT3 inactivation in STAT3 positive U937 cells. Furthermore, silencing SHP-1 using its specific siRNA significantly blocked STAT3 inactivation and apoptosis induced by Icariside II in U937 cells. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrated that via targeting STAT3-related signaling, Icariside II sensitizes U937 cells to apoptosis and perhaps serves as a potent chemotherapeutic agent for AML. PMID:22493659

  9. CD19-targeted T cells rapidly induce molecular remissions in adults with chemotherapy-refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Brentjens, Renier; Davila, Marco L; Riviere, Isabelle; Park, Jae; Wang, Xiuyan; Cowell, Lindsay G; Bartido, Shirley; Stefanski, Jolanta; Taylor, Clare; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Borquez-Ojeda, Oriana; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; He, Qing; Bernal, Yvette; Rijo, Ivelise V; Hedvat, Cyrus; Kobos, Rachel; Curran, Kevin; Steinherz, Peter; Jurcic, Joseph; Rosenblat, Todd; Maslak, Peter; Frattini, Mark; Sadelain, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Adults with relapsed B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a dismal prognosis. Only those patients able to achieve a second remission with no minimal residual disease (MRD−) have a hope for long-term survival in the context of a subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We have treated 5 relapsed B-ALL subjects with autologous T cells expressing a CD19-specific CD28/CD3ζ second generation dual-signaling chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) termed 19-28z. All patients with persistent morphological disease or MRD+ disease upon T cell infusion demonstrated rapid tumor eradication and achieved MRD-negative complete remissions as assessed by deep sequencing PCR. Therapy was well tolerated although significant cytokine elevations, specifically observed in those patients with morphologic evidence of disease at the time of treatment, required lymphotoxic steroid therapy to ameliorate cytokine-mediated toxicities. Significantly, cytokine elevations directly correlated to tumor burden at the time of CAR modified T cell infusions. Tumor cells from one patient with relapsed disease after CAR modified T cell therapy, ineligible for additional allo-HSCT therapy, exhibited persistent expression of CD19 and sensitivity to autologous 19-28z T cell mediated cytotoxicity suggesting potential clinical benefit of additional CAR modified T cell infusions. These results demonstrate the marked anti-tumor efficacy of 19-28z CAR modified T cells in patients with relapsed/refractory B-ALL and the reliability of this novel therapy to induce profound molecular remissions, an ideal bridge to potentially curative therapy with subsequent allo-HSCT. PMID:23515080

  10. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) associated with minimal residual disease (MRD) detection in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Li, Yi; Zhang, Zhi-fen; Ju, Ying; Li, Li; Zhang, Bing-chang; Liu, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are thought to help provide a cellular microenvironments in many solid tumors, in which transformed cells proliferate, acquire new mutations, and evade host immunosurveillance. In the present study, we found that MDSCs (CD33 + CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg)) in bone marrow were significantly increased in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. MDSCs levels in newly diagnosed AML patients correlated well with extramedullary infiltration and plasma D-dimer levels. Remission rates in the MDSCs > 1500 group and MDSCs < 1500 group were 72.73 and 81.25 %, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two groups. MDSC levels in the complete remission group were significantly decreased after chemotherapy, while in the partial remission and non-remission groups, there were no significant differences. The level of MDSCs in the high minimal residual disease (MRD) group was significantly higher than that in the middle and low MRD groups. High levels of Wilms' Tumor-1 (WT-1) protein were strongly correlated with higher bone marrow MDSC levels. In conclusion, we report here a population of immunosuppressive monocytes in the bone marrow of patients with AML characterized by the CD33(high)CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg) phenotype. These cells appear to impact the clinical course and prognosis of AML. This data may provide potentially important targets for novel therapies.

  18. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. The Superiority of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Over Chemotherapy Alone in the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Huang, Sai; Zhu, Cheng-Ying; Gao, Li; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Lv, Na; Jing, Yu; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements always had a very poor prognosis. In this study, we report the incidence of MLL rearrangements in AML patients using gene analysis, as well as the clinical significance and prognostic features of these rearrangements. Material/Methods This retrospective study took place from April 2008 to November 2011 in the People’s Liberation Army General Hospital. A total 433 AML patients were screened by multiple nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the incidence of the 11 MLL gene rearrangements. There were 68 cases of MLL gene rearrangements, for a positive rate of 15.7%. A total of 24 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT), and 34 patients received at least 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten patients were lost to follow-up. Results The median follow-up was 29 months. The complete remission (CR) rate was 85.4%. The overall survival (OS) was 57.4±5.9 months for the Allo-HSCT group and 21.0±2.1 months for the chemotherapy group. The Allo-HSCT group had superior survival compared with the chemotherapy group (5-year OS: 59±17% vs. 13±8%, P<0.01; 5-year disease-free survival [DFS]: 65±10% vs. 40±16%, P>0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that transplantation, platelets >50×109/L at onset, and CR are associated with a better OS in MLL rearranged AML patients. Patients with thrombocytopenia and extramedullary involvement were prone to relapse. Conclusions Our results suggest that Allo-HSCT is superior to chemotherapy alone for treating MLL rearranged AML patients. Patients treated with Allo-HSCT have a better prognosis and a longer survival. CR is an independent prognostic factor for OS, and extramedullary involvement is an independent prognostic factor for DFS. MLL rearranged AML patients with thrombocytopenia at onset <50×109 had very bad OS and DFS. PMID:27373985

  20. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells affect the cell cycle arrest effect of genotoxic agents on acute lymphocytic leukemia cells via p21 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiran; Hu, Kaimin; Hu, Yongxian; Liu, Lizhen; Wang, Binsheng; Huang, He

    2014-09-01

    The effect of bone marrow microenvironment on the cell cycle of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. In this study, we found that in normal condition, bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) had no significant effect on the cell cycle and apoptosis of ALL; in the condition when the cell cycle of ALL was blocked by genotoxic agents, BM-MSCs could increase the S-phase cell ratio and decrease the G2/M phase ratio of ALL. Besides, BM-MSCs could protect ALL cells from drug-induced apoptosis. Then, we proved that BM-MSCs affect the cell cycle arrest effect of genotoxic agents on ALL cells via p21 down-regulation. Moreover, our results indicated that activation of Wnt/β-catenin and Erk pathways might be involved in the BM-MSC-induced down-regulation of p21 in ALL cells. Targeting microenvironment-related signaling pathway may therefore be a potential novel approach for ALL therapy.

  1. Establishment of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis profiles of the human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line NB4.

    PubMed

    He, Pengcheng; Liu, Yanfeng; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaoning; Wang, Huaiyu; Xi, Jieying; Wei, Kaihua; Wang, Hongli; Zhao, Jing

    2012-09-01

    To explore optimum conditions for establishing a two‑dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) map of the human acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell line NB4 and to analyze its protein profiles, we extracted total proteins from NB4 cells using cell disruption, liquid nitrogen freeze-thawing and fracturing by ultrasound, and quantified the extracted protein samples using Bradford's method. 2-DE was applied to separate the proteins, which were silver-stained in the gel. Well‑separated protein spots were selected from the gel using the ImageMaster™ 2D Platinum analysis system. Moreover, the effects of various protein sample sizes (140, 160 and 180 µg) on the 2-DE maps of the NB4 cells were determined and compared. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and database searching were used to identify the proteins. When the quantity of loading proteins was 160 µg, clear, well-resolved, reproducible 2-DE proteomic profiles of the NB4 cells were obtained. The average number of protein spots in 3 gels was 1160±51 with an average matching rate of 81%. A total of 10 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and database queries, certain proteins were products of oncogenes and others were involved in cell cycle regulation and signal transduction. In summary, 2-DE profiles of the proteome of NB4 cells were established and certain proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and PMF which lay the foundation of further proteomic research of NB4 cells. These data should be useful for establishing a human APL proteome database. PMID:22736039

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus-positive T-cell Lymphoproliferative Disease Following Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yui, Shunsuke; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Imadome, Ken-ichi; Arai, Ayako; Takahashi, Mikiko; Ohashi, Ryuji; Tamai, Hayato; Moriya, Keiichi; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Shimizu, Akira; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of the extremely rare condition Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) which occurred after umbilical cord blood transplantation. A 25-year-old Japanese man underwent cord blood transplantation from a male human leukocyte antigen 4/6-matched donor due to acute myeloid leukemia with trisomy 8. Bone marrow examination on day 30 showed chimerism with at least 90% donor cells and complete hematological response. Chronic symptoms of graft-versus-host disease appeared only on the skin and were successfully treated with cyclosporine alone. Three years later, however, the patient experienced repeated cold-like symptoms and was hospitalized with liver dysfunction. A high fever developed and was followed by significant edema of the right side of the face. The EBV DNA copy number in whole peripheral blood was 2×10(4)/mL. Liver biopsy showed invasion of EBV-infected CD8-positive T cells. Southern blotting analysis of the whole peripheral blood showed that the T-cell receptor Cβ1 rearrangement was positive. On the basis of these results, EBV-positive T-cell LPD was diagnosed and treated with prednisolone, cyclosporine, and etoposide, followed by cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone. However, the patient died of cardiac function failure, pneumonia, and pulmonary hemorrhage, all of unidentified cause. Most cases of EBV-related LPD after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation consist of EBV-positive B-cell LPD, and, to our knowledge, de novo EBV-positive T-cell LPD subsequent to transplantation has not been previously reported. PMID:26960588

  3. CD2-positive B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia with an early switch to the monocytic lineage.

    PubMed

    Slamova, L; Starkova, J; Fronkova, E; Zaliova, M; Reznickova, L; van Delft, F W; Vodickova, E; Volejnikova, J; Zemanova, Z; Polgarova, K; Cario, G; Figueroa, M; Kalina, T; Fiser, K; Bourquin, J P; Bornhauser, B; Dworzak, M; Zuna, J; Trka, J; Stary, J; Hrusak, O; Mejstrikova, E

    2014-03-01

    Switches from the lymphoid to myeloid lineage during B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) treatment are considered rare and thus far have been detected in MLL-rearranged leukemia. Here, we describe a novel BCP-ALL subset, switching BCP-ALL or swALL, which demonstrated monocytosis early during treatment. Despite their monocytic phenotype, 'monocytoids' share immunoreceptor gene rearrangements with leukemic B lymphoblasts. All swALLs demonstrated BCP-ALL with CD2 positivity and no MLL alterations, and the proportion of swALLs cases among BCP-ALLs was unexpectedly high (4%). The upregulation of CEBPα and demethylation of the CEBPA gene were significant in blasts at diagnosis, prior to the time when most of the switching occurs. Intermediate stages between CD14(neg)CD19(pos)CD34(pos) B lymphoblasts and CD14(pos)CD19(neg)CD34(neg) 'monocytoids' were detected, and changes in the expression of PAX5, PU1, M-CSFR, GM-CSFR and other genes accompanied the switch. Alterations in the Ikaros and ERG genes were more frequent in swALL patients; however, both were altered in only a minority of swALLs. Moreover, switching could be recapitulated in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Although children with swALL respond slowly to initial therapy, risk-based ALL therapy appears the treatment of choice for swALL. SwALL shows that transdifferentiating into monocytic lineage is specifically associated with CEBPα changes and CD2 expression. PMID:24270736

  4. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Ex Vivo T Cell Depleted versus Unmodified Allografts in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas D.; de Lima, Marcos; Saliba, Rima M.; Maloy, Molly; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo R.; Chen, Julianne; Rondon, Gabriela; Chiattone, Alexander; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Boulad, Farid; Kernan, Nancy A.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Champlin, Richard E.; Giralt, Sergio; Andersson, Borje S.; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively compare the clinical outcomes after transplantation of T cell depleted (TCD) and unmodified allografts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1). Patients and methods Patients received TCD grafts at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC, N=115) between 2001 and 2010 using the following preparative regimens: Hyperfractionated total body irradiation (HFTBI) /thiotepa /fludarabine; HFTBI /thiotepa /cyclophosphamide; i.v. busulfan/melphalan/fludarabine. T cell depletion was performed by one of two immunomagnetic CD34+ cell selection methods for peripheral blood grafts or by soybean lectin agglutination followed by sRBC-rosette depletion for bone marrow grafts. No additional graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis was administered. Patients received unmodified grafts at MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC, N=181) after conditioning with busulfan /fludarabine and GVHD prophylaxis with tacrolimus /mini-methotrexate. Patients with unrelated or HLA-mismatched donors received anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) at both centers with some recipients of matched related donor TCD transplants also receiving ATG depending upon the preparative regimen. Results TCD graft recipients were more likely to be older, receive a mismatched transplant, and have peripheral blood used as the graft source. The incidences of grade 2-4 acute GVHD and chronic GVHD were significantly lower in the TCD graft group (5% vs. 18% and 13% vs. 53%). Three-year relapse-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 58% and 57% in recipients of TCD grafts, and 60% and 66% in recipients of unmodified grafts (P=NS). Conclusion Survival and RFS are similar after TCD and conventional transplants from related/unrelated donors in patients with AML in CR1 but TCD significantly reduces GVHD. PMID:23467126

  6. Aurora A kinase expression is increased in leukemia stem cells, and a selective Aurora A kinase inhibitor enhances Ara-C-induced apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Jeong; Jang, Ji Eun; Cheong, June-Won; Eom, Ju-In; Jeung, Hoi-Kyung; Kim, Yundeok; Hwang, Doh Yu

    2012-01-01

    Background The overexpression of Aurora A kinase (AurA) has been reported in various malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the expression of AurA and the effects of AurA inhibition in cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood. We investigated the expression and inhibition of AurA in AML stem cells (CD34+/CD38-). Methods Expression of AurA was investigated in cell lines (NB4 and KG1) that express high levels of CD34 and low levels of CD38. Primary AML cells were harvested from 8 patients. The expression of AurA and cell death induced by inhibition of AurA were analyzed in CD34+/CD38- cells. Results AurA was shown to be overexpressed in both primary AML cells and leukemia stem cells (LSCs) compared to normal hematopoietic stem cells. Inhibition of AurA plus cytarabine treatment in LSCs resulted in increased cytotoxicity compared to cytarabine treatment alone. Additional stimulation with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) increased the cell death caused by AurA inhibition plus cytarabine treatment. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report describing increased expression of AurA in LSCs. Our results suggest that selective AurA inhibition may be used to reduce LSCs, and this reduction may be enhanced by stimulation with G-CSF. Further exploration of relationship between nuclear factor kappa-B and AurA inhibition and the potential of AurA inhibition for use in leukemia treatment is needed. PMID:23071472

  7. The Functional Role of PRC2 in Early T-cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ETP-ALL) - Mechanisms and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Bernt, Kathrin M; Hunger, Stephen P; Neff, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Early T-Cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL) is a relatively newly identified subset of T-lineage ALL. There are conflicting results regarding prognosis, and the genetic basis of this condition is variable. Here, we summarize the current status of the field and discuss the role of mutations in the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 frequently identified in ETP-ALL patients. PMID:27242978

  8. The Functional Role of PRC2 in Early T-cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ETP-ALL) – Mechanisms and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Bernt, Kathrin M.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Neff, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Early T-Cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL) is a relatively newly identified subset of T-lineage ALL. There are conflicting results regarding prognosis, and the genetic basis of this condition is variable. Here, we summarize the current status of the field and discuss the role of mutations in the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 frequently identified in ETP-ALL patients. PMID:27242978

  9. Risk Factors, Pattern and Clinical Outcome of Acute Graft Versus Host Disease in Acute Leukemia Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Alok; Punatar, Sachin; Gawande, Jayant; Mathew, Libin; Bagal, Bhausaheb; Kannan, Sadhana; Khattry, Navin

    2015-12-01

    We sought to determine risk factors, pattern and outcome of acute graft versus host disease (aGVHD) in seventy-seven acute leukemia patients who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant at our centre from January 2008 to March 2013. GVHD prophylaxis with cyclosporine-methotrexate or cyclosporine-mycophenolate mofetil was used. Patients were divided in 2 groups, grade II-IV aGVHD (group A) and grade 0-I aGVHD (group B). Incidence of any grade and grade II-IV aGVHD was 44 and 18 %, respectively. The most common site of aGVHD was gastro-intestinal tract (65 %) followed by skin (35 %). Higher total nucleated cell (TNC) dose infused was associated with increased incidence of grade II-IV aGVHD. Incidence of relapse and incidence of slippage of chimerism was 21 and 36 % in group A while 37 and 27 % in group B respectively. Transplant related mortality (TRM) was 21 % in group A and 13 % in group B. Probability of OS and RFS at 4 years was 63 and 34 % in group A compared with 40 and 38 % in group B, respectively. We conclude that higher TNC dose infused is a risk factor for grade II-IV aGVHD with gut being the commonest site. Grade II-IV aGVHD did not have a significant impact on incidence of relapse, TRM and OS.

  10. Cytotoxic T cell response against the chimeric ETV6-AML1 protein in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yotnda, P; Garcia, F; Peuchmaur, M; Grandchamp, B; Duval, M; Lemonnier, F; Vilmer, E; Langlade-Demoyen, P

    1998-07-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are potent effector cells that could provide long term antitumor immunity if induced by appropriate vaccines. CTL recognize 8-14 amino acid-long peptides processed intracellularly and presented by MHC class I molecules. A well-characterized example of a potential tumor antigen in childhood pre-B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) results from the chromosomal translocation 12;21 leading to the fusion of the ETV6 and AML1 genes. This translocation is observed in > 25% of ALL-patients. In this study, we have examined whether the chimeric ETV6-AML1 protein could serve as a tumor specific antigen for CTL in HLA-A2.1 individuals. We have identified a nonapeptide (RIAECILGM), encoded by the fusion region of the ETV6-AML1 protein, that binds to HLA-A2.1 molecules and induces specific primary CTL in peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors. These CTL specifically lysed HLA-A2.1 tumor cells endogeneously expressing the ETV6-AML fusion protein. CTL with similar functional capacities were found with high frequencies and cloned from one patient's bone marrow indicating that ETV6-AML1-specific anti-ALL CTL are, at least in some patients, spontaneously stimulated and might participate to host antileukemia defense.

  11. Cytotoxic T cell response against the chimeric ETV6-AML1 protein in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Yotnda, P; Garcia, F; Peuchmaur, M; Grandchamp, B; Duval, M; Lemonnier, F; Vilmer, E; Langlade-Demoyen, P

    1998-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are potent effector cells that could provide long term antitumor immunity if induced by appropriate vaccines. CTL recognize 8-14 amino acid-long peptides processed intracellularly and presented by MHC class I molecules. A well-characterized example of a potential tumor antigen in childhood pre-B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) results from the chromosomal translocation 12;21 leading to the fusion of the ETV6 and AML1 genes. This translocation is observed in > 25% of ALL-patients. In this study, we have examined whether the chimeric ETV6-AML1 protein could serve as a tumor specific antigen for CTL in HLA-A2.1 individuals. We have identified a nonapeptide (RIAECILGM), encoded by the fusion region of the ETV6-AML1 protein, that binds to HLA-A2.1 molecules and induces specific primary CTL in peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors. These CTL specifically lysed HLA-A2.1 tumor cells endogeneously expressing the ETV6-AML fusion protein. CTL with similar functional capacities were found with high frequencies and cloned from one patient's bone marrow indicating that ETV6-AML1-specific anti-ALL CTL are, at least in some patients, spontaneously stimulated and might participate to host antileukemia defense. PMID:9664088

  12. Reduced intensity conditioning followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for adult patients with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Anthony S.; Palmer, Joycelynne M.; O'Donnell, Margaret R.; Kogut, Neil M.; Spielberger, Ricardo T.; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Tsai, Ni-Chun; Senitzer, David; Snyder, David S.; Thomas, Sandra H.; J.Forman, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with high-risk features has a poor prognosis in adults despite aggressive chemotherapy. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) is a lower toxicity alternative for high-risk patients requiring hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), however it has not been widely used for ALL. We conducted a retrospective study of 24 high-risk adult ALL patients who received an RIC regimen of fludarabine/melphalan prior to allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant between 6/14/02 and 6/15/07 at City of Hope. Indications for the RIC regimen were: 1) age 50 or older (42%), 2) compromised organ function (54%), or 3) recipient of a previous HCT (37.5%). Patients had a median age of 47.5 years and the median follow-up was 28.5 months for living patients. Both overall survival and disease-free survival at two years was 61.5%. Relapse incidence was 21.1% and non-relapse mortality was 21.5% at two years. cGVHD developed in 86% of evaluable patients. In this series, no significant correlations were made between outcomes and patient age, presence of Philadelphia chromosome, relatedness of donor source or prior HCT. These high survival rates for high-risk ALL patients following RIC HCT may offer a promising option for patients not eligible for a standard myeloablative transplant. PMID:19822300

  13. Outcome of childhood relapsed or refractory mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Anoop, Parameswaran; Sankpal, Sushama; Stiller, Charles; Tewari, Sanjay; Lancaster, Donna L; Khabra, Komel; Taj, Mary M

    2012-10-01

    Patients with childhood relapsed and refractory mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) are rare and have a dismal prognosis. The previous UK national analysis of 26 children over a 7-year period prior to 1996 had highlighted the poor outcome, with only three survivors. This 10-year multicenter study evaluated recent data, since 2000. Of 33 children, nine survived (27.3%), with a median follow-up of 4.3 years. On exclusion of six children treated with palliative intent, the survival was one-third (nine of 27; 33.3%). All patients with primary refractory disease (n = 7) and all except one with early relapse (n = 11) died. Administration of four doses of 375 mg/m(2) of rituximab was associated with a longer survival (p = 0.006). Response to reinduction (p < 0.001) and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (auto-HSCT) (p = 0.003) were significant on multivariate analysis. Patients with a time to relapse of at least 6 months are potentially curable and must be offered intensive treatment with salvage chemotherapy, rituximab and auto-HSCT. PMID:22448922

  14. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for acute myeloid leukemia What’s new in acute myeloid leukemia research and treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  15. Effects of valproic acid and pioglitazone on cell cycle progression and proliferation of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells

    PubMed Central

    Jazi, Marie Saghaeian; Mohammadi, Saeed; Yazdani, Yaghoub; Sedighi, Sima; Memarian, Ali; Aghaei, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematologic malignant tumor. Administration of chemical compounds influencing apoptosis and T cell development has been discussed as promising novel therapeutic strategies. Valproic acid (VPA) as a recently emerged anti-neoplastic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and pioglitazone (PGZ) as a high-affinity peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) agonist have been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in different studies. Here, we aimed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in anti-proliferative effects of these compounds on human Jurkat cells. Materials and Methods: Treated cells were evaluated for cell cycle progression and apoptosis using flowcytometry and MTT viability assay. Real-time RT-PCR was carried out to measure the alterations in key genes associated with cell death and cell cycle arrest. Results: Our findings illustrated that both VPA and PGZ can inhibit Jurkat E6.1 cells in vitro after 24 hr; however, PGZ 400 μM presents the most anti-proliferative effect. Interestingly, treated cells have been arrested in G2/M with deregulated cell division cycle 25A (Cdc25A) phosphatase and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B or p27) expression. Expression of cyclin D1 gene was inhibited when DNA synthesis entry was declined. Cell cycle deregulation in PGZ and VPA-exposed cells generated an increase in the proportion of aneuploid cell population, which has not reported before. Conclusion: These findings define that anti-proliferative effects of PGZ and VPA on Jurkat cell line are mediated by cell cycle deregulation. Thus, we suggest PGZ and VPA may relieve potential therapeutic application against apoptosis-resistant malignancies.

  16. Effects of valproic acid and pioglitazone on cell cycle progression and proliferation of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells

    PubMed Central

    Jazi, Marie Saghaeian; Mohammadi, Saeed; Yazdani, Yaghoub; Sedighi, Sima; Memarian, Ali; Aghaei, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematologic malignant tumor. Administration of chemical compounds influencing apoptosis and T cell development has been discussed as promising novel therapeutic strategies. Valproic acid (VPA) as a recently emerged anti-neoplastic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and pioglitazone (PGZ) as a high-affinity peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) agonist have been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in different studies. Here, we aimed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in anti-proliferative effects of these compounds on human Jurkat cells. Materials and Methods: Treated cells were evaluated for cell cycle progression and apoptosis using flowcytometry and MTT viability assay. Real-time RT-PCR was carried out to measure the alterations in key genes associated with cell death and cell cycle arrest. Results: Our findings illustrated that both VPA and PGZ can inhibit Jurkat E6.1 cells in vitro after 24 hr; however, PGZ 400 μM presents the most anti-proliferative effect. Interestingly, treated cells have been arrested in G2/M with deregulated cell division cycle 25A (Cdc25A) phosphatase and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B or p27) expression. Expression of cyclin D1 gene was inhibited when DNA synthesis entry was declined. Cell cycle deregulation in PGZ and VPA-exposed cells generated an increase in the proportion of aneuploid cell population, which has not reported before. Conclusion: These findings define that anti-proliferative effects of PGZ and VPA on Jurkat cell line are mediated by cell cycle deregulation. Thus, we suggest PGZ and VPA may relieve potential therapeutic application against apoptosis-resistant malignancies. PMID:27635203

  17. MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE IN ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well established; studies in adult patients also support its prognostic value. Hence, results of MRD studies can be used to select treatment intensity and duration, and estimate the optimal timing for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Practical issues in the implementation of MRD assays in clinical studies include determining the most informative time point to study MRD, the levels of MRD that will trigger changes in treatment intensity, as well as the relative cost and informative power of different methodologies. The identification of new markers of leukemia and the use of increasingly refined assays should further facilitate routine monitoring of MRD and help clarifying the cellular and biologic features of leukemic cells that resist chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:19100372

  18. Impact of cytomegalovirus reactivation on relapse and survival in patients with acute leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Lee, Seok; Kim, Hee-Je; Jeon, Young-Woo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Lee, Dong-Gun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Min, Woo-Sung; Lee, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-reactivation is associated with graft-vs-leukemia (GVL) effect by stimulating natural-killer or T-cells, which showed leukemia relapse prevention after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We enrolled patients with acute myeloid leukemia (n = 197) and acute lymphoid leukemia (n = 192) who underwent allogeneic-HSCT in first remission. We measured RQ-PCR weekly to detect CMV-reactivation and preemptively used ganciclovir (GCV) when the titer increased twice consecutively, but GCV was sometimes delayed in patients without significant graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) by reducing immunosuppressive agents. In the entire group, CMV-reactivation showed poor overall survival (OS). To evaluate subsequent effects of CMV-reactivation, we excluded early relapse and deaths within 100 days, during which most of the CMV-reactivation occurred. Untreated CMV-reactivated group (n = 173) showed superior OS (83.8% vs. 61.7% vs. 74.0%, p < 0.001) with lower relapse rate (10.1% vs 22.1% vs. 25.5%, p = 0.004) compared to GCV-treated CMV-reactivated group (n = 122) and CMV-undetected group (n = 42). After excluding chronic GVHD, untreated CMV-reactivated group still showed lower relapse rate (9.4% vs. 24.1% vs. 30.2%, p = 0.006). Multivariate analysis showed adverse-risk karyotype and patients in other than untreated CMV-reactivated group were independent factors for relapse prediction. Our data showed possible GVL effect of CMV-reactivation and minimizing antiviral therapy may benefit for relapse prevention in acute leukemia. PMID:26883100

  19. Medullary allotransplant in acute myeloblastic leukemia in a child.

    PubMed

    Buga Corbu, V; Glűck, A; Arion, C

    2014-09-15

    Although acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) is more resistant to chemotherapy than acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), significant progresses have been achieved over the last 20 years with an improvement in the long-term survival up to 50-60%. This may be attributed to the intensification of chemotherapy, including the increased use of stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) in well-defined subgroups. Allo-HSCT represents an extremely effective alternative in pediatric AML treatment panel, but its efficiency is limited both by the toxic effects and by the difficulty of finding a matched HLA donor.

  20. Medullary allotransplant in acute myeloblastic leukemia in a child

    PubMed Central

    Buga Corbu, V; Glűck, R; Arion, C

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) is more resistant to chemotherapy than acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), significant progresses have been achieved over the last 20 years with an improvement in the long-term survival up to 50-60%. This may be attributed to the intensification of chemotherapy, including the increased use of stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) in well-defined subgroups. Allo-HSCT represents an extremely effective alternative in pediatric AML treatment panel, but its efficiency is limited both by the toxic effects and by the difficulty of finding a matched HLA donor. PMID:25408774

  1. The role of matched sibling donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation in pediatric high-risk acute myeloid leukemia: results from the AML-BFM 98 study

    PubMed Central

    Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Reinhardt, Dirk; Zimmermann, Martin; Kremens, Bernhard; Vormoor, Josef; Dworzak, Michael; Creutzig, Ursula; Klingebiel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in post-remission management of children with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia remains controversial. In the multi-center AML-BFM 98 study we prospectively evaluated the impact of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in children with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission. Design and Methods HLA-typed patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia, who achieved first complete remission (n=247), were included in this analysis. All patients received double induction and consolidation. Based on the availability of a matched-sibling donor, patients were allocated by genetic chance to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (n=61) or chemotherapy-only (i.e. intensification and maintenance therapy; n=186). The main analysis was done on an intention-to-treat basis according to this allocation. Results Intention-to-treat analysis did not show a significantly different 5-year disease-free survival (49±6% versus 45±4%, Plog rank=0.44) or overall survival (68±6% versus 57±4%, Plog rank=0.17) between the matched-sibling donor and no-matched-sibling donor groups, whereas late adverse effects occurred more frequently after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (72.5% versus 31.8%, PFischer<0.01). These results were confirmed by as-treated analysis corrected for the time until transplantation (5-year overall survival: 72±8% versus 60±4%, PMantel-Byar 0.21). Subgroup analysis demonstrated improved survival rates for patients with 11q23 aberrations allocated to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (5-year overall survival: 94±6% versus 52±7%, Plog-rank=0.01; n=18 versus 49) in contrast to patients without 11q23 aberrations (5-year overall survival: 58±8% versus 55±5%, Plog-rank=0.66). Conclusions Our analyses defined a genetic subgroup of children with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia who benefited from allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the prospective multi-center AML-BFM 98 study. For

  2. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  3. Dietary resveratrol does not delay engraftment, sensitize to vincristine, or inhibit growth of high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in NOD/SCID mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with translocation t(4;11) is a high-risk leukemia found in 60-85% of infants with ALL and is often refractory to conventional chemotherapeutics after relapse. Although resveratrol is able to kill high-risk leukemia in vitro, this agent has not been evaluated agai...

  4. Telomerase inhibition by non-nucleosidic compound BIBR1532 causes rapid cell death in pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bashash, Davood; Ghaffari, Seyed H; Mirzaee, Rooholah; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2013-03-01

    Since unlimited proliferative potential has been identified as a major and, to date, therapeutically unexploited phenotypic hallmark of cancer, telomere maintenance mechanisms have been proposed as potential targets for new anticancer interventions. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of BIBR1532, the lead compound of non-nucleosidic inhibition of telomerase, on pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. BIBR1532 caused rapid cell death in Nalm-6 cells probably through transcriptional suppression of survivin-mediated c-Myc and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, our results also suggest that induced p73, up-regulated Bax/Bcl-2 molecular ratio and subsequent activation of caspase-3 may contribute to a direct short-term cytotoxic effect of high doses of BIBR1532, independent of long-term substantial telomere erosion-mediated cell cycle arrest.

  5. Context-selective death of acute myeloid leukemia cells triggered by the novel hybrid retinoid-HDAC inhibitor MC2392.

    PubMed

    De Bellis, Floriana; Carafa, Vincenzo; Conte, Mariarosaria; Rotili, Dante; Petraglia, Francesca; Matarese, Filomena; Françoijs, Kees-Jan; Ablain, Julien; Valente, Sergio; Castellano, Rèmy; Goubard, Armelle; Collette, Yves; Mandoli, Amit; Martens, Joost H A; de Thé, Hugues; Nebbioso, Angela; Mai, Antonello; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Altucci, Lucia

    2014-04-15

    HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are widely used in the clinic to sensitize tumorigenic cells for treatment with other anticancer compounds. The major drawback of HDACi is the broad inhibition of the plethora of HDAC-containing complexes. In acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), repression by the PML-RARα oncofusion protein is mediated by an HDAC-containing complex that can be dissociated by pharmacologic doses of all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) inducing differentiation and cell death at the expense of side effects and recurrence. We hypothesized that the context-specific close physical proximity of a retinoid and HDACi-binding protein in the repressive PML-RARα-HDAC complex may permit selective targeting by a hybrid molecule of ATRA with a 2-aminoanilide tail of the HDAC inhibitor MS-275, yielding MC2392. We show that MC2392 elicits weak ATRA and essentially no HDACi activity in vitro or in vivo. Genome-wide epigenetic analyses revealed that in NB4 cells expressing PML-RARα, MC2392 induces changes in H3 acetylation at a small subset of PML-RARα-binding sites. RNA-seq reveals that MC2392 alters expression of a number of stress-responsive and apoptotic genes. Concordantly, MC2392 induced rapid and massive, caspase-8-dependent cell death accompanied by RIP1 induction and ROS production. Solid and leukemic tumors are not affected by MC2392, but expression of PML-RARα conveys efficient MC2392-induced cell death. Our data suggest a model in which MC2392 binds to the RARα moiety and selectively inhibits the HDACs resident in the repressive complex responsible for the transcriptional impairment in APLs. Our findings provide proof-of-principle of the concept of a context-dependent targeted therapy.

  6. A t(4;11)(q21;p15) in a case of T-cell lymphoma and a case of acute myelogenous