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Sample records for acute leukemia including

  1. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children. In: Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: ... et al. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults. In: Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: ...

  3. Phase 2 study of the JAK kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib in patients with refractory leukemias, including postmyeloproliferative neoplasm acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Eghtedar, Alireza; Verstovsek, Srdan; Estrov, Zeev; Burger, Jan; Cortes, Jorge; Bivins, Carol; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Borthakur, Gautam; George, Solly; Scherle, Peggy A.; Newton, Robert C.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a phase 2 study of ruxolitinib in patients with relapsed/refractory leukemias. Patients with acceptable performance status (0-2), adequate organ function, and no active infection, received ruxolitinib 25 mg orally twice a day for 4 weeks (1 cycle). Response was assessed after every 2 cycles of treatment, and patients who completed 2 cycles were allowed to continue treatment until disease progression. Dose escalation to 50 mg twice daily was permitted in patients demonstrating a benefit. Thirty-eight patients, with a median age of 69 years (range, 45-88), were treated. The median number of prior therapies was 2 (range, 1-6). Twelve patients had JAK2V617F mutation. Patients received a median of 2 cycles of therapy (range, 1-22). Three of 18 patients with postmyeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) showed a significant response; 2 achieved complete remission (CR) and one achieved a CR with insufficient recovery of blood counts (CRi). The responding patients with palpable spleens also had significant reductions in spleen size. Overall, ruxolitinib was very well tolerated with only 4 patients having grade 3 or higher toxicity. Ruxolitinib has modest antileukemic activity as a single agent, particularly in patients with post-MPN AML. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00674479. PMID:22422826

  4. Phase 2 study of the JAK kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib in patients with refractory leukemias, including postmyeloproliferative neoplasm acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Eghtedar, Alireza; Verstovsek, Srdan; Estrov, Zeev; Burger, Jan; Cortes, Jorge; Bivins, Carol; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Borthakur, Gautam; George, Solly; Scherle, Peggy A; Newton, Robert C; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Ravandi, Farhad

    2012-05-17

    We conducted a phase 2 study of ruxolitinib in patients with relapsed/refractory leukemias. Patients with acceptable performance status (0-2), adequate organ function, and no active infection, received ruxolitinib 25 mg orally twice a day for 4 weeks (1 cycle). Response was assessed after every 2 cycles of treatment, and patients who completed 2 cycles were allowed to continue treatment until disease progression. Dose escalation to 50 mg twice daily was permitted in patients demonstrating a benefit. Thirty-eight patients, with a median age of 69 years (range, 45-88), were treated. The median number of prior therapies was 2 (range, 1-6). Twelve patients had JAK2V617F mutation. Patients received a median of 2 cycles of therapy (range, 1-22). Three of 18 patients with postmyeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) showed a significant response; 2 achieved complete remission (CR) and one achieved a CR with insufficient recovery of blood counts (CRi). The responding patients with palpable spleens also had significant reductions in spleen size. Overall, ruxolitinib was very well tolerated with only 4 patients having grade 3 or higher toxicity. Ruxolitinib has modest antileukemic activity as a single agent, particularly in patients with post-MPN AML. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00674479.

  5. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Treating Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia In recent years, new drugs that target specific ... Typical Treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  6. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  7. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (AML) About Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What’s New in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  9. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  10. [Atypical onset of therapy-related acute promyelocytic leukemia after combined modality therapy including (89)Sr for metastatic breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Utsu, Yoshikazu; Aotsuka, Nobuyuki; Masuda, Shinichi; Matsuura, Yasuhiro; Wakita, Hisashi

    2013-08-01

    A 51-year-old woman diagnosed as having left breast cancer with axillary lymph node and liver metastases seven years earlier was seen in our office because of severe pancytopenia. She had received chemotherapy including several cycles of doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide and docetaxel followed by hormone therapy containing leuprorelin and tamoxifen over four years. For management of bone pain due to metastasis, she had also undergone stereotaxic radiation therapy of the neck one and a half years earlier and unsealed internal radiation therapy with (89)Sr injection five months prior to the current presentation, Subsequently, myelosuppression progressively worsened and she finally required a blood transfusion. Although bone marrow examination showed severe hypoplasia, but neither blastic nor dysplastic, a test for PML-RARA fluorescence in situ hybridization was positive. After administration of all-trans retinoic acid, hematogenesis improved within three weeks. Neither disseminated intravascular coagulation nor retinoic acid syndrome was observed during the course of her illness. This is the first report describing acute promyelocytic leukemia after administration of (89)Sr, to our knowledge, and with an atypical onset and progression. As the number of cancer survivors increases due to improvements in medical intervention, clinicians must take more notice of special characteristics of therapy-related leukemia modified by previous treatments.

  11. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  12. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  13. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mieloide aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  14. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  16. Association between CYP1A1 Ile462Val Variation and Acute Leukemia Risk: Meta-Analyses Including 2164 Cases and 4160 Controls

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Wenlei; Zhang, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Qiu, Zhiqun; Chen, Zhengtang

    2012-01-01

    Background Previously, CYP1A1 Ile462Val polymorphism has been indicated to be a risk factor for several malignancies. Increasing reports have focused on the association of CYP1A1 Ile462Val polymorphisms with susceptibility to acute leukemia and have generated controversial results. The goal of the present study was to derive a more precise estimation of the relationship. Methods Relevant literature has been rigorously searched and screened. Eligible studies were identified for the period up to Apr 2012. Meta-analyses evaluating the association of CYP1A1 Ile462Val variation with acute leukemia were carried out. Subgroup analyses on ethnicity, clinical types and source of controls were further performed. Results A total of thirteen publications including fourteen case-control studies with 2164 cases and 4160 controls were selected for analysis. The overall data indicated a significant association of CYP1A1 Ile462Val polymorphism with acute leukemia risk (Val/Val vs Ile/Ile OR = 1.49; 95% CI = 1.11–1.98; dominant model: OR = 1.26; 95% CI = 1.05–1.51; recessive model: OR = 1.38; 95% CI = 1.04–1.83). In subgroup analysis on ethnicity, increased risk was shown among mixed ethnicities (Val/Val vs Ile/Ile: OR = 2.36; 95% CI = 1.46–3.82; dominant model: OR = 1.37; 95% CI = 1.01–1.86; recessive model: OR = 2.20; 95% CI = 1.37–3.53) but not Asians or Caucasians. In subgroup analysis on clinical types, increased risk was observed in the acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) subgroup (Val/Val vs Ile/Ile: OR = 2.06; 95% CI = 1.42–3.01; recessive model: OR = 1.91; 95% CI = 1.32–2.76) but not in the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subgroup. Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that CYP1A1 Ile462Val polymorphism might be a low-penetrant risk factor for acute leukemia. Subgroup analyses suggest that homozygous Val/Val alleles might modify the susceptibility to ALL. PMID:23056546

  17. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (ALL) What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for acute lymphocytic ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  19. Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Faderl, Stefan; O’Brien, Susan; Pui, Ching-Hon; Stock, Wendy; Wetzler, Meir; Hoelzer, Dieter; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a clonal expansion of hematopoietic blasts, is a highly heterogeneous disease comprising many entities for which distinct treatment strategies are pursued. Although ALL is a success story in pediatric oncology, results in adults lag behind those in children. An expansion of new drugs, more reliable immunologic and molecular techniques for the assessment of minimal residual disease, and efforts at more precise risk stratification are generating new aspects of adult ALL therapy. For this review, the authors summarized pertinent and recent literature on ALL biology and therapy, and they discuss current strategies and potential implications of novel approaches to the management of adult ALL. PMID:20101737

  20. Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Up; Kim, Jin Kyeung; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Dae Sik; Park, Hee Sook; Park, Kyeung Kyu

    1993-01-01

    The decision to operate for abdominal pain in patients with leukopenia can be exceedingly difficult. Surgical exploration may be the only effective way to differentiate acute appendicitis from other causes, but it involves considerable risk of infectious complications due to immunesuppression. Leukemic patients, who presented significant RLQ pain, had been indicated for operation, despite having advanced disease or having had received chemotherapy or steroids. Four adult leukemia patients, complicated by acute appendictis, were reviewed. Two patients were in induction chemotherapy, one receiving salvage chemotheapy due to relapse and the other was in conservative treatment. Two patients were acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), one had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and the other had aleukemic leukemia. All patients underwent appendectomy and recovered without complication. Our experience supports the theory that the surgical management of appendicitis in acute leukemia is the most effective way, in spite of leukopenia. PMID:8268146

  1. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Leukemia Treatment of Children With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the ... With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  3. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  5. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  6. MicroRNA profiling can classify acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage as either acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, David C; van den Ancker, Willemijn; Denkers, Fedor; de Menezes, Renée X; Westers, Theresia M; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Smit, Linda

    2013-04-15

    Classification of acute leukemia is based on the commitment of leukemic cells to the myeloid or the lymphoid lineage. However, a small percentage of acute leukemia cases lack straightforward immunophenotypical lineage commitment. These leukemias of ambiguous lineage represent a heterogeneous category of acute leukemia that cannot be classified as either acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The lack of clear classification of acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage as either AML or ALL is a hurdle in treatment choice for these patients. Here, we compared the microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of 17 cases with acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage and 16 cases of AML, B-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (B-ALL), and T-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (T-ALL). We show that leukemias of ambiguous lineage do not segregate as a separate entity but exhibit miRNA expression profiles similar to AML, B-ALL, or T-ALL. We show that by using only 5 of the most lineage-discriminative miRNAs, we are able to define acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage as either AML or ALL. Our results indicate the presence of a myeloid or lymphoid lineage-specific genotype, as reflected by miRNA expression, in these acute leukemias despite their ambiguous immunophenotype. miRNA-based classification of acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage might be of additional value in therapeutic decision making.

  7. Advances in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Tim R

    2004-01-01

    Current literature. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a stem cell disorder characterized by an overproduction of lymphoblasts in the bone marrow that eventually spill into circulation, producing lymphocytosis. As with the other acute leukemias, the most common symptoms experienced by patients include fatigue, bleeding, and recurrent infections resulting from the suppression of normal hematopoiesis in the bone marrow by the accumulating blasts. ALL primarily affects children and exhibits the best response to standard chemotherapy as compared to acute myeloblastic leukemias (AML). Further, remission rates are highest among ALL patients, many of whom are experiencing sustained remissions suggesting cure. In light of early treatment successes, researchers began to investigate modifications of standard treatment regimens to accommodate variability in weight, age, and response to therapy among children with ALL. Individualized treatment plans were implemented where some patients received a reduced intensity course of therapy to minimize drug toxicity while others received drug intensification to maximize response. More recently, research efforts have been directed at the elucidation of leukemogenic mechanisms implicated in ALL to identify specific protein mutants that can be used to design drugs tailored to interfere with the activity of these mutant protein targets. Identification of chimeric proteins produced from chromosomal translocations and gene expression profiles from microarray analyses are the primary techniques used to identify the potential therapeutic targets. Several reliable prognostic indicators have been identified and are being used to improve therapeutic planning and outcome prediction in ALL patients. Individualized treatment regimens have been developed based on the specific characteristics of each patient to minimize treatment related adverse events and maximize response. Through the use of cytogenetic, molecular, and microarray testing, ALL

  8. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  9. Epigenetics targeted protein-vorinostat nanomedicine inducing apoptosis in heterogeneous population of primary acute myeloid leukemia cells including refractory and relapsed cases.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Parwathy; Kavalakatt, Anu; Malarvizhi, Giridharan Loghanathan; Vasanthakumari, Divya Rani Vikraman Nair; Retnakumari, Archana Payickattu; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Pavithran, Keechilat; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2014-05-01

    Aberrant epigenetics play a key role in the onset and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Herein we report in silico modelling based development of a novel, protein-vorinostat nanomedicine exhibiting selective and superior anti-leukemic activity against heterogeneous population of AML patient samples (n=9), including refractory and relapsed cases, and three representative cell lines expressing CD34(+)/CD38(-) stem cell phenotype (KG-1a), promyelocytic phenotype (HL-60) and FLT3-ITD mutation (MV4-11). Nano-vorinostat having ~100nm size exhibited enhanced cellular uptake rendering significantly lower IC50 in AML cell lines and patient samples, and induced enhanced HDAC inhibition, oxidative injury, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis compared to free vorinostat. Most importantly, nanomedicine showed exceptional single-agent activity against the clonogenic proliferative capability of bone marrow derived leukemic progenitors, while remaining non-toxic to healthy bone marrow cells. Collectively, this epigenetics targeted nanomedicine appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy against various French-American-British (FAB) classes of AML. Through the use of a protein-vorinostat agent, exceptional single-agent activity was demonstrated against the clonogenic proliferative capability of bone marrow derived leukemic progenitors, while remaining non-toxic to healthy bone marrow cells. The studied epigenetics targeted nanomedicine approach is a promising therapeutic strategy against various French-American-British classes of acute myeloid leukemia. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  11. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia linfoblástica aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  15. Cilengitide in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b)

  16. Pharmacogenetics in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cheok, Meyling H.; Pottier, Nicolas; Kager, Leo

    2009-01-01

    Progress in the treatment of acute leukemia in children has been remarkable, from a disease being lethal four decades ago to current cure rates exceeding 80%. This exemplary progress is largely due to the optimization of existing treatment modalities rather than the discovery of new antileukemic agents. However, despite these high cure rates, the annual number of children whose leukemia relapses after their initial therapy remains greater than that of new cases of most types of childhood cancers. The aim of pharmacogenetics is to develop strategies to personalize treatment and tailor therapy to individual patients, with the goal of optimizing efficacy and safety through better understanding of human genome variability and its influence on drug response. In this review, we summarize recent pharmacogenomic studies related to the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These studies illustrate the promise of pharmacogenomics to further advance the treatment of human cancers, with childhood leukemia serving as a paradigm. PMID:19100367

  17. Acute leukemias of ambiguous origin.

    PubMed

    Porwit, Anna; Béné, Marie C

    2015-09-01

    This session of the Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology Workshop focused on acute leukemias of ambiguous origin. We provide an overview of mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) as recognized in the current World Health Organization classification and summarize diagnostic criteria for major categories of MPAL: B/myeloid, T/myeloid, B/T, and B/T/myeloid. Most MPAL cases submitted were B/myeloid and T/myeloid MPAL, the most frequent types, but three cases of B/T MPAL were also submitted, and examples of all categories are illustrated. We emphasize that a comprehensive approach to immunophenotyping is required to accurately establish the diagnosis of MPAL. Flow cytometry immunophenotyping using a large panel of antibodies is needed as well as confirmatory immunohistochemical analysis and cytochemistry studies for myeloperoxidase and nonspecific esterase. We discuss technical issues in determining blast lineage and possible pitfalls in MPAL diagnosis. In particular, rare cases of B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) can express myeloperoxidase but are otherwise consistent with B-ALL and should be treated as such. Last, we review the differential diagnosis between acute undifferentiated leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia with minimal differentiation. There was an agreement that diagnosis of MPAL can be challenging, especially if applied flow cytometry panels are not comprehensive enough. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  18. PROGRESS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady gains in clinical research and a renaissance of genomics in leukemia have led to improved outcomes. The recognition of tremendous heterogeneity in AML has allowed individualized treatments of specific disease entities within the context of patient age, cytogenetics, and mutational analysis. The following is a comprehensive review of the current state of AML therapy and a roadmap of our approach to these distinct disease entities. PMID:25441110

  19. Benzene and childhood acute leukemia in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Janitz, Amanda E; Campbell, Janis E; Magzamen, Sheryl; Pate, Anne; Stoner, Julie A; Peck, Jennifer D

    2017-10-01

    Although childhood cancer is a leading cause of childhood mortality in the US, evidence regarding the etiology is lacking. The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between benzene, a known carcinogen, and childhood acute leukemia. We conducted a case-control study including cases diagnosed with acute leukemia between 1997 and 2012 (n = 307) from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry and controls matched on week of birth from birth certificates (n = 1013). We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between benzene, measured with the 2005 National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) at census tract of the birth residence, and childhood acute leukemia. We observed no differences in benzene exposure overall between cases and controls. However, when stratified by year of birth, cases born from 2005 to 2010 had a three-fold increased unadjusted odds of elevated exposure compared to controls born in this same time period (4th Quartile OR: 3.53, 95% CI: 1.35, 9.27). Furthermore, the estimates for children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were stronger than those with acute lymphoid leukemia, though not statistically significant. While we did not observe an association between benzene and childhood leukemia overall, our results suggest that acute leukemia is associated with increased benzene exposure among more recent births, and children with AML may have increased benzene exposure at birth. Using the NATA estimates allowed us to assess a specific pollutant at the census tract level, providing an advantage over monitor or point source data. Our study, however, cannot rule out the possibility that benzene may be a marker of other traffic-related exposures and temporal misclassification may explain the lack of an association among earlier births. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  2. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) A A A What's in this article? About ... child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood ...

  4. Outcome after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients included in four consecutive risk-adapted trials by the PETHEMA Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Oriol, Albert; Vives, Susana; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Rivas, Concepción; Bethencourt, Concepción; Moscardó, Federico; Bueno, Javier; Grande, Carlos; del Potro, Eloy; Guardia, Ramon; Brunet, Salut; Bergua, Juan; Bernal, Teresa; Moreno, Maria-José; Calvo, Carlota; Bastida, Pilar; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Background About one half of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are not cured of the disease and ultimately die. The objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing the outcome of adult patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design and Methods We analyzed the characteristics, the outcome and the prognostic factors for survival after first relapse in a series of 263 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (excluding those with mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) prospectively enrolled in four consecutive risk-adapted PETHEMA trials. Results The median overall survival after relapse was 4.5 months (95% CI, 4–5 months) with a 5-year overall survival of 10% (95% CI, 8%–12%); 45% of patients receiving intensive second-line treatment achieved a second complete remission and 22% (95% CI, 14%–30%) of them remained disease free at 5 years. Factors predicting a good outcome after rescue therapy were age less than 30 years (2-year overall survival of 21% versus 10% for those over 30 years old; P<0.022) and a first remission lasting more than 2 years (2-year overall survival of 36% versus 17% among those with a shorter first remission; P<0.001). Patients under 30 years old whose first complete remission lasted longer than 2 years had a 5-year overall survival of 38% (95% CI, 23%–53%) and a 5-year disease-free survival of 53% (95% CI, 34%–72%). Conclusions The prognosis of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse is poor. Those aged less than 30 years with a first complete remission lasting longer than 2 years have reasonable possibilities of becoming long-term survivors while patients over this age or those who relapse early cannot be successfully rescued using the therapies currently available. PMID:20145276

  5. Outcome after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients included in four consecutive risk-adapted trials by the PETHEMA Study Group.

    PubMed

    Oriol, Albert; Vives, Susana; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Rivas, Concepción; Bethencourt, Concepción; Moscardó, Federico; Bueno, Javier; Grande, Carlos; del Potro, Eloy; Guardia, Ramon; Brunet, Salut; Bergua, Juan; Bernal, Teresa; Moreno, Maria-José; Calvo, Carlota; Bastida, Pilar; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-04-01

    About one half of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are not cured of the disease and ultimately die. The objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing the outcome of adult patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We analyzed the characteristics, the outcome and the prognostic factors for survival after first relapse in a series of 263 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (excluding those with mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) prospectively enrolled in four consecutive risk-adapted PETHEMA trials. The median overall survival after relapse was 4.5 months (95% CI, 4-5 months) with a 5-year overall survival of 10% (95% CI, 8%-12%); 45% of patients receiving intensive second-line treatment achieved a second complete remission and 22% (95% CI, 14%-30%) of them remained disease free at 5 years. Factors predicting a good outcome after rescue therapy were age less than 30 years (2-year overall survival of 21% versus 10% for those over 30 years old; P<0.022) and a first remission lasting more than 2 years (2-year overall survival of 36% versus 17% among those with a shorter first remission; P<0.001). Patients under 30 years old whose first complete remission lasted longer than 2 years had a 5-year overall survival of 38% (95% CI, 23%-53%) and a 5-year disease-free survival of 53% (95% CI, 34%-72%). The prognosis of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse is poor. Those aged less than 30 years with a first complete remission lasting longer than 2 years have reasonable possibilities of becoming long-term survivors while patients over this age or those who relapse early cannot be successfully rescued using the therapies currently available.

  6. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  7. Micronucleus expression and acute leukemia prognosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Run-Chao; Yang, Lei; Tang, Yang; Bai, Ou

    2013-01-01

    The micronucleus frequency (MNF) in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) is a biomarker of chromosomal damage and genome instability in human populations.The relationship of micronucleus frequency with prognosis of patients with acute leukemia is not clear. We therefore investigated MNF in mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with hematologic diseases and solid tumours. Patients included 50 with acute leukemia, 49 diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 54 with benign blood diseases, and 45 with solid tumours, examined with 50 healthy controls. The mean MNF was significantly higher in cases of hematologic diseases and solid tumor patients than in healthy controls (P<0.001). There was no evident difference between MNF in the acute leukemia (7.15 ± 2.18) and solid tumor groups (7.11 ± 1.47), but both were higher than in the MDS group (5.12 ± 1.29) and benign blood diseases group (3.08 ± 1.08). Taking 7.15%, the average MNF of the acute leukemia group as standard, and dividing 50 cases of acute leukemia patients into high MNF group (MNF ≥ 7.15%) and low MNF group (MNF<7.15%). The overall response (complete remission + partial remission) rates of the low MNF group were significantly higher than in the high MNF group (P=0.001). The high MNF group further showed lower overall survival rates than the low MNF group. MNF expression and progression-free survival seemed to have a opposite relationship, with a correlation coefficient of -0.702. These data indicate that MNF in peripheral blood lymphocytes is important for evaluation of prognosis of acute leukemia patients, and it can reflect progression of disease to a certain degree.

  8. [MLL rearrangements in acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Urioste, M; Arranz, E; Martínez-Delgado, B; Soto, C; Román, A; Pérez, I; Mayayo, M; Pérez-Pons, C; Barroso, A; Benítez, J

    1999-12-01

    In present study we have studied MLL rearrangements in a serie of acute myeloid, lymphoblastic and biphenotypic leukaemias. We analyzed a total of 11 cases: 9 acute myeloid leukaemias (M4 and M5 subtypes in FAB classification), 1 lymphoid leukaemia, and 1 acute biphenotypic leukaemia. We studied bone marrow samples from all patients by using conventional cytogenetic techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with an MLL probe. We also analyzed the correlation between clinical features and genetic results. Cells from 6 patients showed to contain MLL rearrangements and these arose in all types of leukaemias included in this study. Some MLL rearrangements were detected by FISH in kariotypically normal cases or without cytogenetic evidence of 11q23 aberration. MLL gene duplication has been observed in two cases with M4 and biphenotypic leukaemia, respectively. The presence of MLL gene rearrangements does not shape a group of patients with a common clinical pattern. MLL rearrangements occurs in a wide variety of leukemias. These rearrangements should be screened by FISH techniques, taking into account that gene duplications could arise in cases with normal karyotype. MLL rearrangements appear to have a considerable clinicopathologic heterogeneity.

  9. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  10. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blasts Under 10 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. Acute myelocytic leukemia after exposure to asbestos

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, T.; Ono, T.; Okada, K.

    1988-08-15

    While the carcinogenicity of asbestos has been established in malignant mesotheliomas and lung cancers, and has recently been suspected in several other types of cancer, asbestos has not been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute leukemias. This article includes two cases of acute myelocytic leukemia in individuals with a long history of exposure to asbestos. Significant numbers of asbestos bodies were detected in specimens of their lungs and bone marrow. In addition, the kind of asbestos in both organs was crocidolite, which is implicated in carcinogenesis. No asbestos bodies were detected in the bone marrow specimens from a control group consisting of ten patients with lung cancer with similar occupational histories. The role of asbestos exposure in the development of leukemia requires further study.

  14. Outcomes in patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Fatima; Zerrouk, Jihane; Howard, Scott C; Graoui, Omar; Lahjouji, Ali; Hessissen, Leila; Bennani, Sanae; Quessar, Assmae; El Aouad, Rajae

    2014-08-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) includes biphenotypic and bilineal types of leukemia, which constitute rare subtypes that require individualized therapy. Outcomes in Moroccan patients with MPAL are unknown. Among 1264 patients with acute leukemia, 20 were classified as having MPAL, including 17 with biphenotypic acute leukemia (1.3%) and 3 with bilineal leukemia (0.2%). There were 8 adults and 12 children. In 12 cases (60%), leukemic blasts expressed myeloid and T-lymphoid antigens, and, in 5 cases (25%), leukemic blasts expressed B lymphoid antigens plus myeloid antigens. Patients were initially treated on protocols for acute myeloid leukemia (n=4), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=14), or with palliative care (n=2). The probability of survival at 2 years in MPAL cases was 52%± 14%. Six of the 12 patients younger than 15 years remain alive versus 1 of 8 adult patients. Patients treated with ALL-directed therapy had significantly higher overall survival than those treated with acute myeloid leukemia-directed therapy (P=0.003). There was no association between the phenotypic characteristics and the clinical outcome (P=0.83). In conclusion, MPAL represents 1.5% of acute leukemia in Morocco. The prognosis is poor, but initial treatment with therapy directed toward ALL, improved supportive care, and the prevention of abandonment of therapy may improve outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  15. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  16. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms can suggest that ... described below. Tests used to diagnose and classify ALL If your doctor thinks you have leukemia, he ...

  18. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  5. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Redefining transplant in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sellar, Rob; Goldstone, Anthony H; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2011-12-01

    Assigning the correct treatment to those with acute leukemia is challenging and requires careful assessment of both the disease and the patient. Our ability to assign relapse risk to disease is evolving and incorporates cytogenetics, molecular lesions, and assessment of minimal residual disease after initial treatment. Allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (alloHCPT) is one of the most efficacious treatments available to the physician. In adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) despite the treatment risk, patients with a matched sibling who achieve CR should be referred for transplant. Prospective trials investigating the role of unrelated donors are in progress. There is little prospective evidence, but nonetheless encouraging data, to support referring older patients for alloHPCT using reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), all high-risk patients and the majority of intermediate-risk patients with a matched sibling should be offered alloHPCT in CR1. In addition there is evidence that some patients previously assigned as good-risk would benefit from sibling transplant. Use of unrelated donors will expand the numbers eligible for transplant and should be considered when a matched-sibling is not available particularly in high-risk patients. Similarly to ALL, the use of RIC is allowing transplantation to be offered to those deemed too old or unfit for myeloablative conditioning. The importance of enrolling patients into suitable prospective clinical trials cannot be overstated.

  7. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Genetics Home Reference: core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal acute myeloid leukemia cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  10. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-06

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  13. Vosaroxin and Infusional Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Myeloid Sarcoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  14. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  15. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, T.W.

    1985-06-01

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

  16. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. [Treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Gerecke, D

    1982-11-12

    The effective treatment of acute (myeloblastic and lymphoblastic) leukaemias depends on the induction of remissions as well as on the maintenance of these remissions. Whereas the use of anthracyclines and of cytosine arabinoside in different combinations notably increased the rate of induction of remissions, their maintenance was less successful until now. We present a scheme using, beside MTX and 6-MP, modified COAP regimes periodically every 3 months. The follow-up of 26 patients treated in this way is encouraging since nearly one third remained in full haematological remission after 3 years of observation.

  18. Asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Rytting, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    Cure rates in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia have significantly improved over the past decades. Now, almost 90% of children will survive the disease. The cure rates in adolescents, young adults, and adults have not kept pace with the improvements in younger patients, even though almost an equal proportion of adult patients achieve complete remission as their pediatric counterparts. Differences in treatment regimens might be important. Intensive use of asparaginase has been a key component of successful pediatric therapy. In this review, we focus on the use of asparaginase and the potential of optimizing asparaginase use via monitoring to minimize adverse drug events and improve efficacy of the drug.

  19. Acute Central Nervous System Complications in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baytan, Birol; Evim, Melike Sezgin; Güler, Salih; Güneş, Adalet Meral; Okan, Mehmet

    2015-10-01

    The outcome of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has improved because of intensive chemotherapy and supportive care. The frequency of adverse events has also increased, but the data related to acute central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment are sparse. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these complications and to determine their long term outcome. We retrospectively analyzed the hospital reports of 323 children with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia from a 13-year period for acute neurological complications. The central nervous system complications of leukemic involvement, peripheral neuropathy, and post-treatment late-onset encephalopathy, and neurocognitive defects were excluded. Twenty-three of 323 children (7.1%) suffered from central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. The majority of these complications (n = 13/23; 56.5%) developed during the induction period. The complications included posterior reversible encephalopathy (n = 6), fungal abscess (n = 5), cerebrovascular lesions (n = 5), syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (n = 4), and methotrexate encephalopathy (n = 3). Three of these 23 children (13%) died of central nervous system complications, one from an intracranial fungal abscess and the others from intracranial thrombosis. Seven of the survivors (n = 7/20; 35%) became epileptic and three of them had also developed mental and motor retardation. Acute central neurological complications are varied and require an urgent approach for proper diagnosis and treatment. Collaboration among the hematologist, radiologist, neurologist, microbiologist, and neurosurgeon is essential to prevent fatal outcome and serious morbidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Myeloid Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s ... myeloid leukemia . Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Written by References ...

  2. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients.

  3. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hourigan, Christopher S.; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances in the laboratory have lead to substantial improvements in clinical decision-making by the use of pre-treatment prognostic risk stratification factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Unfortunately similar progress has not been made in treatment response criteria, with the definition of “complete remission” in AML largely unchanged for over half a century. Several recent clinical trials have demonstrated that higher sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden during or after treatment can be performed, that results are predictive for clinical outcome and can be used to improve outcomes by guiding additional therapeutic intervention to patients in clinical complete remission but at increased relapse risk. We review here these recent trials, the characteristics and challenges of the modalities currently used to detect minimal residual disease (MRD), and outline opportunities to both refine detection and better clinically utilize MRD measurements. MRD measurement is already the standard of care in other myeloid malignancies such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). It is our belief that response criteria for non-APL AML should be updated to include assessment for molecular complete remission (mCR) and that recommendations for post-consolidation surveillance should include regular monitoring for molecular relapse as a standard of care. PMID:23799371

  5. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  7. Eltrombopag Olamine in Improving Platelet Recovery in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-26

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Risk Factors for Acute Leukemia in Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Belson, Martin; Kingsley, Beverely; Holmes, Adrianne

    2007-01-01

    Although overall incidence is rare, leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It accounts for 30% of all cancers diagnosed in children younger than 15 years. Within this population, acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) occurs approximately five times more frequently than acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and accounts for approximately 78% of all childhood leukemia diagnoses. Epidemiologic studies of acute leukemias in children have examined possible risk factors, including genetic, infectious, and environmental, in an attempt to determine etiology. Only one environmental risk factor (ionizing radiation) has been significantly linked to ALL or AML. Most environmental risk factors have been found to be weakly and inconsistently associated with either form of acute childhood leukemia. Our review focuses on the demographics of childhood leukemia and the risk factors that have been associated with the development of childhood ALL or AML. The environmental risk factors discussed include ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation, hydrocarbons, pesticides, alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and illicit drug use. Knowledge of these particular risk factors can be used to support measures to reduce potentially harmful exposures and decrease the risk of disease. We also review genetic and infectious risk factors and other variables, including maternal reproductive history and birth characteristics. PMID:17366834

  9. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  10. SJG-136 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  11. New Treatment Approved for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167596.html New Treatment Approved for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Vyxeos combines ... projections from the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The new therapy is sanctioned for high-risk forms of ...

  12. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified? Most types of cancers are assigned numbered ... ALL are now named as follows: B-cell ALL Early pre-B ALL (also called pro-B ...

  13. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  14. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  17. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  18. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  19. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  20. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea. PMID:27695173

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Concise Review

    PubMed Central

    Saultz, Jennifer N.; Garzon, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder characterized by immature myeloid cell proliferation and bone marrow failure. Cytogenetics and mutation testing remain a critical prognostic tool for post induction treatment. Despite rapid advances in the field including new drug targets and increased understanding of the biology, AML treatment remains unchanged for the past three decades with the majority of patients eventually relapsing and dying of the disease. Allogenic transplant remains the best chance for cure for patients with intermediate or high risk disease. In this review, we discuss the landmark genetic studies that have improved outcome prediction and novel therapies. PMID:26959069

  2. Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Version 2.2013

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Margaret R.; Tallman, Martin S.; Abboud, Camille N.; Altman, Jessica K.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Arber, Daniel A.; Attar, Eyal; Borate, Uma; Coutre, Steven E.; Damon, Lloyd E.; Lancet, Jeffrey; Maness, Lori J.; Marcucci, Guido; Martin, Michael G.; Millenson, Michael M.; Moore, Joseph O.; Ravandi, Farhad; Shami, Paul J.; Smith, B. Douglas; Stone, Richard M.; Strickland, Stephen A.; Wang, Eunice S.; Gregory, Kristina M.; Naganuma, Maoko

    2014-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize several key updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and discuss the clinical evidence that support the recommendations. The updates described in this article focus on the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) section, featuring recommendations for additional induction/consolidation regimens in patients with low- or intermediate-risk APL, and providing guidance on maintenance strategies for APL. PMID:24029121

  3. 211^At-BC8-B10 Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-13

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; CD45-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Prognosis of children with mixed phenotype acute leukemia treated on the basis of consistent immunophenotypic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Mejstrikova, Ester; Volejnikova, Jana; Fronkova, Eva; Zdrahalova, Katerina; Kalina, Tomas; Sterba, Jaroslav; Jabali, Yahia; Mihal, Vladimir; Blazek, Bohumir; Cerna, Zdena; Prochazkova, Daniela; Hak, Jiri; Zemanova, Zuzana; Jarosova, Marie; Oltova, Alexandra; Sedlacek, Petr; Schwarz, Jiri; Zuna, Jan; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Hrusak, Ondrej

    2010-01-01

    Background Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) represents a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. The European Group for the Immunological Classification of Leukemias (EGIL) scoring system unambiguously defines MPAL expressing aberrant lineage markers. Discussions surrounding it have focused on scoring details, and information is limited regarding its biological, clinical and prognostic significance. The recent World Health Organization classification is simpler and could replace the EGIL scoring system after transformation into unambiguous guidelines. Design and Methods Simple immunophenotypic criteria were used to classify all cases of childhood acute leukemia in order to provide therapy directed against acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia. Prognosis, genotype and immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangement status were analyzed. Results The incidences of MPAL were 28/582 and 4/107 for children treated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia regimens, respectively. In immunophenotypic principal component analysis, MPAL treated as T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia clustered between cases of non-mixed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, while other MPAL cases were included in the respective non-mixed B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia clusters. Analogously, immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements followed the expected pattern in patients treated as having acute myeloid leukemia (non-rearranged, 4/4) or as having B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (rearranged, 20/20), but were missing in 3/5 analyzed cases of MPAL treated as having T-cell acute lymphobastic leukemia. In patients who received acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment, the 5-year event-free survival of the MPAL cases was worse than that of the non-mixed cases (53±10% and 76±2% at 5 years, respectively, P=0.0075), with a more pronounced difference among B lineage cases

  5. Prognosis of children with mixed phenotype acute leukemia treated on the basis of consistent immunophenotypic criteria.

    PubMed

    Mejstrikova, Ester; Volejnikova, Jana; Fronkova, Eva; Zdrahalova, Katerina; Kalina, Tomas; Sterba, Jaroslav; Jabali, Yahia; Mihal, Vladimir; Blazek, Bohumir; Cerna, Zdena; Prochazkova, Daniela; Hak, Jiri; Zemanova, Zuzana; Jarosova, Marie; Oltova, Alexandra; Sedlacek, Petr; Schwarz, Jiri; Zuna, Jan; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Hrusak, Ondrej

    2010-06-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) represents a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. The European Group for the Immunological Classification of Leukemias (EGIL) scoring system unambiguously defines MPAL expressing aberrant lineage markers. Discussions surrounding it have focused on scoring details, and information is limited regarding its biological, clinical and prognostic significance. The recent World Health Organization classification is simpler and could replace the EGIL scoring system after transformation into unambiguous guidelines. Simple immunophenotypic criteria were used to classify all cases of childhood acute leukemia in order to provide therapy directed against acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia. Prognosis, genotype and immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangement status were analyzed. The incidences of MPAL were 28/582 and 4/107 for children treated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia regimens, respectively. In immunophenotypic principal component analysis, MPAL treated as T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia clustered between cases of non-mixed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, while other MPAL cases were included in the respective non-mixed B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia clusters. Analogously, immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements followed the expected pattern in patients treated as having acute myeloid leukemia (non-rearranged, 4/4) or as having B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (rearranged, 20/20), but were missing in 3/5 analyzed cases of MPAL treated as having T-cell acute lymphobastic leukemia. In patients who received acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment, the 5-year event-free survival of the MPAL cases was worse than that of the non-mixed cases (53+/-10% and 76+/-2% at 5 years, respectively, P=0.0075), with a more pronounced difference among B lineage cases. The small numbers of MPAL cases

  6. Survival of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemias: A large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Runhua; Munker, Reinhold

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the incidence and treatment outcome of patients with acute biphenotypic leukemias. The World Health Organization (WHO) established the term of acute leukemia of ambiguous phenotype in 2001 (revised in 2008) introducing the term of mixed phenotype acute leukemias. Using the database of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry (SEER), we identified 313 patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemias and compared them with 14,739 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 34,326 patients with acute myelogenous leukemias diagnosed between 2001 and 2011. As a further control group, 1777 patients were included who were not classified as myeloid, lymphoid or biphenotypic (other acute leukemias). The incidence of mixed phenotype acute leukemias is 0.35 cases/1,000,000 person-years. In a multivariate analysis, the prognosis depends strongly on age (as with other leukemias) and it has the worst outcome of all four types of leukemia. However, the prognosis has improved, comparing 2001-2005 with 2006-2011. We present the first comprehensive, population-based study of acute biphenotypic or mixed phenotype acute leukemias according to the WHO classification. Especially in older patients, the prognosis is unfavorable and new treatments should be investigated. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-10

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. How I treat hematologic emergencies in adults with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Tsila; Ganzel, Chezi; Tallman, Martin S; Rowe, Jacob M

    2012-09-06

    Acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia remain devastating diseases. Only approximately 40% of younger and 10% of older adults are long-term survivors. Although curing the leukemia is always the most formidable challenge, complications from the disease itself and its treatment are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Such complications, discussed herein, include tumor lysis, hyperleukocytosis, cytarabine-induced cellebellar toxicity, acute promyelocytic leukemia differentiation syndrome, thrombohemorrhagic syndrome in acute promyelocytic leukemia, L-asparaginase-associated thrombosis, leukemic meningitis, neutropenic fever, neutropenic enterocolitis, and transfussion-associated GVHD. Whereas clinical trials form the backbone for the management of acute leukemia, emergent clinical situations, predictable or not, are common and do not readily lend themselves to clinical trial evaluation. Furthermore, practice guidelines are often lacking. Not only are prospective trials impractical because of the emergent nature of the issue at hand, but clinicians are often reluctant to randomize such patients. Extensive practical experience is crucial and, even if there is no consensus, management of such emergencies should be guided by an understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  10. Successful acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type therapy in two children with mixed-phenotype acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Keisuke; Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Fukumura, Akiko; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Masahiko; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) is a rare type of leukemia expressing both myeloid and lymphoid markers. There is limited information, especially on pediatric cases. Therefore, the optimal therapeutic approach to pediatric MPAL has not been defined. Here, we report two pediatric cases of MPAL. According to the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification and European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemias (EGIL) criteria, patient 1 was diagnosed with overt MPAL positive for the myeloid marker myeloperoxidase (MPO), and B-lymphoid markers. Patient 2 was diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) using EGIL criteria. According to the 2008 WHO classification, however, patient 2 was diagnosed with overt MPAL positive for CD3, T-lymphoid markers and MPO. We chose an ALL-type therapy consisting of both lymphoid- and myeloid-directed agents; these patients have maintained complete remission following treatment. Further information on pediatric MPAL is needed to establish an appropriate therapeutic strategy including stem cell transplantation for this rare condition. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. 5-Fluoro-2'-Deoxycytidine and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. S1312, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

  14. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  16. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-11

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-01

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Azacitidine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. S0432 Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-05

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  10. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent neoplastic disease in children, being a rare disease in adults. Many of the advances in pediatric ALL have been through modifications in the doses and schedules of available agents as opposed to the introduction of new compounds. In recent years some improvements in the outcome of ALL in adults have occurred. Application of pediatric regimens to young and middle-aged adults shows promise to improve outcome. Advances in the supportive care of patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), the use of alternative sources of hematopoietic stem cells and the use of reduced-intensity conditioning regimens will expand the number of patients who can benefit from this therapeutic modality. The evaluation of minimal residual disease will further stratify risk classification and redefine the role of therapeutic modalities such as SCT or biologic agents. New drugs such as thyrosin kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies have led to incremental improvements in outcome. Advances in the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of the disease provide hope that targeted therapies can more effectively treat the disease with less toxicity. PMID:22053271

  11. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement for Predicting Treatment Outcome in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-14

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-17

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D.E.; Beuling, Eva; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C. Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations using direct sequencing. Three patients were identified with a single amino acid variant without change of IKZF1 length. No frame-shift mutations were found. Out of 11 patients with an IKZF1 deletion, 8 samples revealed a complete loss of chromosome 7, and 3 cases a focal deletion of 0.1–0.9Mb. These deletions included the complete IKZF1 gene (n=2) or exons 1–4 (n=1), all leading to a loss of IKZF1 function. Interestingly, differentially expressed genes in monosomy 7 cases (n=8) when compared to non-deleted samples (n=247) significantly correlated with gene expression changes in focal IKZF1-deleted cases (n=3). Genes with increased expression included genes involved in myeloid cell self-renewal and cell cycle, and a significant portion of GATA target genes and GATA factors. Together, these results suggest that loss of IKZF1 is recurrent in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and might be a determinant of oncogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia with monosomy 7 PMID:26069293

  15. Childhood acute leukemia and intestinal parasitosis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Luna, R; Cárdenas-Cardos, R; Martínez-Guerra, G; Ayón, A; Leal, C; Rivera-Ortegón, F

    1989-11-01

    Infectious complications are the leading cause of mortality in children with acute leukemia. Despite the fact that intestinal parasitosis is a rather frequent finding and a health problem in underdeveloped countries, in our experience the incidence of helminthic and protozoan infections among children with leukemia is uncommon. We analyzed 54 consecutive patients with leukemia in a period of 5 years, and only seven (12.9%) had intestinal parasites, four of whom died because of the infection or complication by the parasites. One hundred children without any malignancy were the control group, 26 (26%) of whom had intestinal parasitosis. When we compared the frequency of parasitosis in the control group with the children with leukemia and parasitosis, we found a statistical difference (p less than 0.05). We speculate that parasitic infections may reduce the risk of childhood leukemia.

  16. Pattern of subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in India.

    PubMed

    Kamat, D M; Gopal, R; Advani, S H; Nair, C N; Kumar, A; Saikia, T; Nadkarni, J J; Nadkarni, J S

    1985-01-01

    Leukemic cells from 124 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 31 chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL) were examined for sheep erythrocyte receptor (E), surface immunoglobulin (SIg) and their reactivity with a panel of monoclonal antibodies recognizing specific surface antigens including pan-T, Common ALL and Ia antigens. In acute lymphatic leukemia, 33% of patients reveal T-cell receptor associated with higher age group, mediastinal mass and high WBC count. Common ALL was predominant between 2 and 9-yr age group. Among chronic lymphatic leukemia, 2 patients were found to be T-CLL while 29 revealed presence of SIg. Ia antigen was detected in 44.4% of ALL and 64% fo CLL patients. The pattern of surface marker observed in our series may be related to our life style, socio-economic and environmental factors.

  17. Idhifa Approved for Some with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Idhifa Approved for Some With Acute Myeloid Leukemia For adults with specific genetic mutation To use ... that leads to relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The mutation in the IDH2 gene can ...

  18. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Usvasalo, Anu; Räty, Riikka; Knuutila, Sakari; Vettenranta, Kim; Harila-Saari, Arja; Jantunen, Esa; Kauppila, Marjut; Koistinen, Pirjo; Parto, Katriina; Riikonen, Pekka; Salmi, Toivo T; Silvennoinen, Raija; Elonen, Erkki; Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M

    2008-08-01

    Interest has recently been paid to adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, particularly because all reports so far published indicate that these patients have a better outcome when treated with pediatric rather than adult therapeutic protocols. There are different biological subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with distinct features and prognoses; the distribution of these subtypes is not well known among adolescents. We, therefore, studied acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults aged 10 to 25 years in Finland. This population-based study included 225 consecutive patients aged 10-25 years diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during 1990-2004. One hundred and twenty-eight patients (10-16 years) were treated with pediatric Nordic (NOPHO) protocols, and 97 patients (17-25 years) with Finnish Leukemia Group National protocols. We characterized the biological subtypes, clinical features and outcome of these patients. For the whole cohort, the remission rate was 96%, 5-year event-free survival 62% and overall survival 72%. The 5-year event-free survival was 67% for the pediatric treatment group and 60% for the adult treatment group (p=n.s.). Patients with inferior outcome were those with a white blood cell count >or= 100 x 10(9)/L, the Philadelphia chromosome and MLL. Good prognostic features were TEL-AML1, hyperdiploidy, and pediatric intermediate risk stratification. Unlike all previous studies, we found that the outcome of adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with pediatric or adult therapeutic protocols was comparable. The success of the adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy emphasizes the benefit of central referral of patients to academic centers and adherence to research protocols.

  20. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  1. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-29

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sherborne, Amy L; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Agnes F; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L; Leal, Valeria P; Espinoza, Juan P M; Kamel, Azza M; Ebid, Gamal T A; Radwan, Eman R; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S

    2011-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  3. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sherborne, Amy L.; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R.; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L.; Leal, Valeria P.; Espinoza, Juan P.M.; Kamel, Azza M.; Ebid, Gamal T.A.; Radwan, Eman R.; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J.; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  4. Newly Diagnosed Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Avvisati, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents a medical emergency with a high rate of early mortality. As a consequence, as soon as the diagnosis is suspected based upon cytologic criteria, it is necessary to start all- trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment without delay. For patients with newly diagnosed APL, induction therapy with ATRA plus anthracycline based chemotherapy is recommended. At present the combination of arsenic trioxide plus ATRA should be considered for patients who are not candidates for anthracycline-based therapy. For pediatric and adult patients with APL aged < 60 years who achieve a CR with induction, I recommend 3 intensive courses of consolidation chemotherapy associated to ATRA, targeted on the basis of the risk group at diagnosis. In patients treated with a very intensive consolidation chemotherapy maintenance treatment can be omitted. However If a maintenance treatment has to be adopted I suggest the use of intermittent ATRA for 15 days every 3 months for a period of 2 years, rather than ATRA associated to chemotherapy. Moreover, taking into account the medical literature, a reduced dosage of ATRA ( 25 mg/m2) in pediatric patients and a consolidation chemotherapy of reduced intensity in elderly patients is recommended. Furthermore, in order to maximize survival, careful attention should be reserved to the coagulopathy and to the appearance of the differentiation syndrome. Finally, PCR for the PML/RARA fusion gene on a bone marrow specimen every three months for two years, and then every six months for additional three years are needed during the follow-up. PMID:22220261

  5. Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Phase I Combination of Midostaurin, Bortezomib, and Chemo in Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. The biology of pediatric acute megakaryoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Downing, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) comprises between 4% and 15% of newly diagnosed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients. AMKL in children with Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by a founding GATA1 mutation that cooperates with trisomy 21, followed by the acquisition of additional somatic mutations. In contrast, non–DS-AMKL is characterized by chimeric oncogenes consisting of genes known to play a role in normal hematopoiesis. CBFA2T3-GLIS2 is the most frequent chimeric oncogene identified to date in this subset of patients and confers a poor prognosis. PMID:26186939

  11. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Immunomodulatory Drugs: Immune Checkpoint Agents in Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Hanna A; Kanakry, Christopher G; Luznik, Leo; Gojo, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic immune responses to acute leukemia are inhibited by a variety of mechanisms, such as aberrant antigen expression by leukemia cells, secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and expression of inhibitory enzymes in the tumor microenvironment, expansion of immunoregulatory cells, and activation of immune checkpoint pathways, all leading to T cell dysfunction and/or exhaustion. Leukemic cells, similar to other tumor cells, hijack these inhibitory pathways to evade immune recognition and destruction by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, blockade of immune checkpoints has emerged as a highly promising approach to augment innate anti-tumor immunity in order to treat malignancies. Most evidence for the clinical efficacy of this immunotherapeutic strategy has been seen in patients with metastatic melanoma, where anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 antibodies have recently revolutionized treatment of this lethal disease with otherwise limited treatment options. To meet the high demand for new treatment strategies in acute leukemia, clinical testing of these promising therapies is commencing. Herein, we review the biology of multiple inhibitory checkpoints (including CTLA-4, PD-1, TIM-3, LAG-3, BTLA, and CD200R) and their contribution to immune evasion by acute leukemias. In addition, we discuss the current state of preclinical and clinical studies of immune checkpoint inhibition in acute leukemia, which seek to harness the body's own immune system to fight leukemic cells.

  13. New insights to the MLL recombinome of acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Kowarz, E; Hofmann, J; Renneville, A; Zuna, J; Trka, J; Ben Abdelali, R; Macintyre, E; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Delabesse, E; de Oliveira, M P; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; van Dongen, J J M; Balgobind, B V; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Beverloo, H B; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Teigler-Schlegel, A; Harbott, J; Kjeldsen, E; Schnittger, S; Koehl, U; Gruhn, B; Heidenreich, O; Chan, L C; Yip, S F; Krzywinski, M; Eckert, C; Möricke, A; Schrappe, M; Alonso, C N; Schäfer, B W; Krauter, J; Lee, D A; Zur Stadt, U; Te Kronnie, G; Sutton, R; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Lo Nigro, L; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; Szczepanski, T; Strehl, S; Ilencikova, D; Molkentin, M; Burmeister, T; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2009-08-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL gene are associated with high-risk pediatric, adult and therapy-associated acute leukemias. These patients need to be identified, treated appropriately and minimal residual disease was monitored by quantitative PCR techniques. Genomic DNA was isolated from individual acute leukemia patients to identify and characterize chromosomal rearrangements involving the human MLL gene. A total of 760 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from 384 pediatric and 376 adult leukemia patients were characterized at the molecular level. The distribution of MLL breakpoints for clinical subtypes (acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, pediatric and adult) and fused translocation partner genes (TPGs) will be presented, including novel MLL fusion genes. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed 104 different MLL rearrangements of which 64 TPGs are now characterized on the molecular level. Nine TPGs seem to be predominantly involved in genetic recombinations of MLL: AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, MLLT4/AF6, ELL, EPS15/AF1P, MLLT6/AF17 and SEPT6, respectively. Moreover, we describe for the first time the genetic network of reciprocal MLL gene fusions deriving from complex rearrangements.

  14. Immunomodulatory Drugs: Immune Checkpoint Agents in Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Hanna A.; Kanakry, Christopher G.; Luznik, Leo; Gojo, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic immune responses to acute leukemia are inhibited by a variety of mechanisms, such as aberrant antigen expression by leukemia cells, secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and expression of inhibitory enzymes in the tumor microenvironment, expansion of immunoregulatory cells, and activation of immune checkpoint pathways, all leading to T cell dysfunction and/or exhaustion. Leukemic cells, similar to other tumor cells, hijack these inhibitory pathways to evade immune recognition and destruction by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, blockade of immune checkpoints has emerged as a highly promising approach to augment innate anti-tumor immunity in order to treat malignancies. Most evidence for the clinical efficacy of this immunotherapeutic strategy has been seen in patients with metastatic melanoma, where anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 antibodies have recently revolutionized treatment of this lethal disease with otherwise limited treatment options. To meet the high demand for new treatment strategies in acute leukemia, clinical testing of these promising therapies is commencing. Herein, we review the biology of multiple inhibitory checkpoints (including CTLA-4, PD-1, TIM-3, LAG-3, BTLA, and CD200R) and their contribution to immune evasion by acute leukemias. In addition, we discuss the current state of preclinical and clinical studies of immune checkpoint inhibition in acute leukemia, which seek to harness the body’s own immune system to fight leukemic cells. PMID:25981611

  15. CD19/CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Children or Young Adults With Recurrent or Refractory CD19 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-03

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  18. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P < 0.001), with peak risk among persons born in winter. Relative to persons born in summer (June-August), incidence rate ratios for AML were 1.72 (95 % CI 1.25-2.38; P = 0.001) for winter (December-February), 1.37 (95 % CI 0.99-1.90; P = 0.06) for spring (March-May), and 1.27 (95 % CI 0.90-1.80; P = 0.17) for fall (September-November). Other risk factors for AML included high fetal growth, high gestational age at birth, and low maternal education level. These findings did not vary by sex or age at diagnosis. Sex, birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML.

  19. Renal Presentation in Pediatric Acute Leukemia: Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Sherief, Laila M; Azab, Seham F; Zakaria, Marwa M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abd Elbasset Aly, Maha; Ali, Adel; Abd Alhady, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    Renal enlargement at time of diagnosis of acute leukemia is very unusual. We here in report 2 pediatric cases of acute leukemia who had their renal affection as the first presenting symptom with no evidences of blast cells in blood smear and none of classical presentation of acute leukemia. The first case is a 4-year-old girl who presented with pallor and abdominal enlargement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral symmetrical homogenous enlarged kidneys suggestive of infiltration. Complete blood picture (CBC) revealed white blood count 11 × 10⁹/L, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and platelet count 197 × 10⁹/L. Bone marrow aspiration was performed, and diagnosed precursor B-cell ALL was made. The child had an excellent response to modified CCG 1991 standard risk protocol of chemotherapy with sustained remission, but unfortunately relapsed 11 month after the end of therapy. The second child was 13-month old, presented with pallor, vomiting, abdominal enlargement, and oliguria 2 days before admission. Initial CBC showed bicytopenia, elevated blood urea, creatinine, and serum uric acid, while abdominal ultrasonography revealed bilateral renal enlargement. Bone marrow examination was done and showed 92% blast of biphenotypic nature. So, biphynotypic leukemia with bilateral renal enlargement and acute renal failure was subsequently diagnosed. The patients admitted to ICU and received supportive care and prednisolone. Renal function normalized and chemotherapy was started. The child achieved complete remission with marked reduction of kidney size but, unfortunately she died from sepsis in consolidation phase of therapy. This case demonstrates an unusual early renal enlargement in childhood acute leukemia. Renal involvement of acute leukemia should be considered in child presenting with unexplained bilateral renal enlargement with or without renal function abnormalities and bone marrow examination should be included in the workup.

  20. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis.

    PubMed

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R

    2015-08-15

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodies were conspicuous on biopsy and may serve as a morphologic clue to lymphocytic differentiation while molecular and immunophenotypic studies are pending. The patient was successfully treated with local radiation therapy and oral ponatinib.

  1. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  2. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-17

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  3. Vaccine Therapy and Basiliximab in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  4. CPI-613, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Lenalidomide and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Important milestones in acute leukemia in 2013.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jacob M

    2013-09-01

    This year marked the occurrence of several important milestones in the treatment of acute leukemias. First, the standard 7 + 3 protocol for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was developed 40 years ago, and with some adaptations, has stood the test of time. Second, the 1 millionth hematopoietic cell transplant was recorded this year. Stem cell transplant, the first reported by Dr E. Donnall Thomas in 1957, had been considered a rare procedure until about a decade ago. Today, it has become a proven and often life-saving therapy for patients with acute leukemia. Advances in the treatment of patients with AML continue to take place, many of which relate to an increased understanding of the clinical heterogeneity of known subtypes. Forty years ago, the regimen that has come to be known as 7+3 for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was born [1,2]. Cytosine arabinoside, or arabinosylcytosine as it was then called, was given as a continuous intravenous infusion of 100 mg/m(2) for 7 days, and the anthracycline, daunorubicin, was administered at 45 mg/m(2) intravenously for 3 days. Sixteen patients were originally treated on this protocol, and 5 of 8 previously untreated and 2 of 8 previously treated patients achieved a complete response (CR). This regimen has withstood the test of time. Attempts to add or substitute other agents have not yielded superior results. The only major contemporary change is that a higher dose of daunorubicin is safe and has become the standard of care [3].

  8. Myelomalacia as clinical presentation of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Gómez, G; Rubio, M E

    1989-01-01

    The case of a 27-year-old man is reported in whom neurological symptoms of obstruction of spinal arteries (myelomalacia) was the initial picture of acute leukemia. A review is given of the literature. There are no other reported cases of this very rare association.

  9. 47,XYY karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Palanduz, S; Aktan, M; Ozturk, S; Tutkan, G; Cefle, K; Pekcelen, Y

    1998-10-01

    A case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMoL; M4) with a 47,XYY karyotype is reported. This chromosome aneuploidy was found in both bone marrow cells and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. The contribution of XYY chromosomal constitution in the pathogenesis of AMMoL is controversial.

  10. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Ixazomib (MLN9708) in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. AKT Inhibitor MK-2206 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Valspodar in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-12

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Bortezomib, Daunorubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Bortezomib, Mitoxantrone, Etoposide, and Cytarabine in Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Vorinostat and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-30

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Cytarabine With or Without SCH 900776 in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. A Case of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapsed As Myeloid Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Maddalena; Buldini, Barbara; Germano, Giuseppe; Seganfreddo, Elena; Meglio, Annamaria di; Magrin, Elisa; Grillo, Francesca; Pigazzi, Martina; Rizzari, Carmelo; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Khiabanian, Hossein; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    A 4-year-old male with the diagnosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) relapsed after 19 months with an acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements analyses reveal that both leukemias were rearranged with a clonal relationship between them. Comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) and whole-exome sequencing analyses of both samples suggest that this leukemia may have originated from a common T/myeloid progenitor. The presence of homozygous deletion of p16/INK4A, p14/ARF, p15/INK4B, and heterozygous deletion of WT1 locus remained stable in the leukemia throughout phenotypic switch, revealing that this AML can be genetically associated to T-ALL.

  2. Backtracking RAS mutations in high hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wiemels, Joseph L; Kang, Michelle; Chang, Jeffrey S; Zheng, Lily; Kouyoumji, Carina; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T; Scelo, Ghislaine; Metayer, Catherine; Buffler, Patricia; Wiencke, John K

    2010-10-15

    High hyperdiploidy is the single largest subtype of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is defined by the presence of 51-68 chromosomes in a karyotype. The 5 or more extra chromosomes characterizing this subtype are known to occur in a single mitotic event, prenatally. We screened for RAS mutations among 517 acute childhood leukemias (including 437 lymphocytic, of which 393 were B-cell subtypes) and found mutations in 30% of high hyperdiploids compared to only 10% of leukemias of other subtypes (P<0.0001). We assessed whether KRAS mutations occurred before birth using a PCR-restriction enzyme-mediated Taqman quantitative PCR reaction, and found no evidence for prenatal KRAS mutations in 14 patients tested. While RAS mutations were previously associated with prior chemical exposures in childhood and adult leukemias, in this study RAS-mutated cases were not significantly associated with parental smoking when compared to study controls. IGH rearrangements were backtracked in three RAS-positive patients (which were negative for KRAS mutation at birth) and found to be evident before birth, confirming a prenatal origin for the leukemia clone. We posit a natural history for hyperdiploid leukemia in which prenatal mitotic catastrophe is followed by a postnatal RAS mutation to produce the leukemic cell phenotype.

  3. Backtracking RAS mutations in High Hyperdiploid Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph L.; Kang, Michelle; Chang, Jeffrey S.; Zheng, Lily; Kouyoumji, Carina; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T.; Scelo, Ghislaine; Metayer, Catherine; Buffler, Patricia; Wiencke, John K.

    2010-01-01

    High hyperdiploidy is the single largest subtype of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is defined by the presence of 51-68 chromosomes in a karyotype. The 5 or more extra chromosomes characterizing this subtype are known to occur in a single mitotic event, prenatally. We screened for RAS mutations among 517 acute childhood leukemias (including 437 lymphocytic, of which 393 were B-cell subtypes) and found mutations in 30% of high hyperdiploids compared to only 10% of leukemias of other subtypes (P < 0.0001). We assessed whether KRAS mutations occurred before birth using a PCR-restriction enzyme-mediated Taqman quantitative PCR reaction, and found no evidence for prenatal KRAS mutations in 14 patients tested. While RAS mutations were previously associated with prior chemical exposures in childhood and adult leukemias, in this study RAS-mutated cases were not significantly associated with parental smoking when compared to study controls. IGH rearrangements were backtracked in three RAS-positive patients (which were negative for KRAS mutation at birth) and found to be evident before birth, confirming a prenatal origin for the leukemia clone. We posit a natural history for hyperdiploid leukemia in which prenatal mitotic catastrophe is followed by a postnatal RAS mutation to produce the leukemic cell phenotype. PMID:20688547

  4. MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. [Oncogenes and the origin of leukemia. Acute avian leukemia viruses].

    PubMed

    Graf, T

    1988-03-01

    Oncogenes have been intimately associated with the genesis of human neoplasms. A particularly useful system to study the mechanism of tumorigenesis is a small group of avian retroviruses that carry two oncogenes. These viruses causes acute leukemias and can transform hematopoietic cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which viral oncogenes affect the growth control and differentiation of their target cells is now understood in fair detail for two of these virus strains. In the avian erythroblastosis virus AEV, the v-erbB oncogene deregulates the growth control of erythroid precursors, while verbA blocks their terminal differentiation into erythrocytes. Based on the findings that v-erbB oncogene corresponds to a mutated growth factor receptor gene and that v-erbA corresponds to a mutated hormone receptor gene, models have been developed that explain the function of these two oncogenes on a molecular basis. The myelomonocytic leukemia virus MH2 acts by a completely different mechanism. In this case, the v-myc oncogene stimulates the proliferation of macrophage-like cells, while the v-mil gene stimulates them to produce their own growth factor, thus leading to autocrine growth. It will be interesting to determine whether the type of mechanisms of oncogene cooperativity elucidated for acute leukemia viruses are also operative during leukemogenesis in humans.

  6. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Saldivar, María Luisa; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Martínez-Avalos, Armando; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Espinosa-Hernández, Laura; Flores-Chapa, José de Diego; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Francisco Javier; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María Del Carmen; Rivera-Luna, Roberto; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Alvarado-Ibarra, Martha; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Duarte-Rodríguez, David Aldebarán; Paredes-Aguilera, Rogelio; Del Campo-Martínez, María de Los Ángeles; Cárdenas-Cardos, Rocío; Alamilla-Galicia, Paola Hillary; Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Ortega-Alvarez, Manuel Carlos; Mejia-Arangure, Juan Manuel

    2011-08-17

    Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR), and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR) per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level). Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million), followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million), and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million). The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million). For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million) and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million). The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8%) were classified as high risk. There was a positive

  8. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR), and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR) per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level). Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million), followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million), and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million). The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million). For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million) and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million). The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8%) were classified as high

  9. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  10. [Presence of B cell clones in acute myelomonocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Novoa, Viviana; Nuñez, Neri; Cervellini, Mirta; Starosta, Aida; Carballo, Orlando G

    2010-01-01

    The coexistence of acute myeloid leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the same patient is rare. The majority of the cases correspond to patients that developed acute leukemia during the evolutionary course of a chronic lymphatic leukemia following treatment with chemotherapy drugs. We report a case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia concurrent with untreated B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in which the use of flow cytometry analysis with a large panel of monoclonal antibodies, allowed the demonstration of different pathological populations and determine immunophenotyping patterns. Published cases of simultaneous chronic lymphocytic leukemia and acute leukemia are reviewed. The use of multiparametric flow cytometry to differentiate the populations demonstrates the utility of this technology in the diagnosis of these hematological malignancies.

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia targets for bispecific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, S S; Cheung, N K

    2017-01-01

    Despite substantial gains in our understanding of the genomics of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), patient survival remains unsatisfactory especially among the older age group. T cell-based therapy of lymphoblastic leukemia is rapidly advancing; however, its application in AML is still lagging behind. Bispecific antibodies can redirect polyclonal effector cells to engage chosen targets on leukemia blasts. When the effector cells are natural-killer cells, both antibody-dependent and antibody-independent mechanisms could be exploited. When the effectors are T cells, direct tumor cytotoxicity can be engaged followed by a potential vaccination effect. In this review, we summarize the AML-associated tumor targets and the bispecific antibodies that have been studied. The potentials and limitations of each of these systems will be discussed. PMID:28157217

  12. Targeting MTHFD2 in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pikman, Yana; Puissant, Alexandre; Alexe, Gabriela; Furman, Andrew; Chen, Liying M.; Frumm, Stacey M.; Ross, Linda; Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F.; Lewis, Caroline A.; Ramos, Azucena; Gould, Joshua; Stone, Richard M.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Galinsky, Ilene; Clish, Clary B.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hemann, Michael T.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Banerji, Versha

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting metabolism have formed the backbone of therapy for some cancers. We sought to identify new such targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The one-carbon folate pathway, specifically methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase 2 (MTHFD2), emerged as a top candidate in our analyses. MTHFD2 is the most differentially expressed metabolic enzyme in cancer versus normal cells. Knockdown of MTHFD2 in AML cells decreased growth, induced differentiation, and impaired colony formation in primary AML blasts. In human xenograft and MLL-AF9 mouse leukemia models, MTHFD2 suppression decreased leukemia burden and prolonged survival. Based upon primary patient AML data and functional genomic screening, we determined that FLT3-ITD is a biomarker of response to MTHFD2 suppression. Mechanistically, MYC regulates the expression of MTHFD2, and MTHFD2 knockdown suppresses the TCA cycle. This study supports the therapeutic targeting of MTHFD2 in AML. PMID:27325891

  13. Relationship between ABO blood group and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tavasolian, F; Abdollahi, E; Vakili, M; Amini, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) constitute a family of genetically heterogeneous lymphoid neoplasms derived from B- and T-lymphoid progenitors. ALL affects both children and adults. Diagnosis is based on morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features that allow differentiation from normal progenitors and other hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic neoplasms. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ALL and ABO blood group. This is a case-control study that was carried out in Amir Oncology Hospital in Shiraz during 2011 to2013. The case group consisted of 293 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. And compared with 300 subject in control group ( the age in the case group was between 2-5 year, and the age in the control group was between 2-45 year) .Statistical analyzes was done performed by chi -square test. The results was considered significant when p value <0.05. (CI:0.95). The ABO blood group distribution was 82(A), 59 (B), 24 (AB) and 128(O) in patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and the blood group of 300 participants in the control group include, 63% (25) A, 69% (25.6) B, 18 % 06.8) AB and 101% (42.6) O. The ABO blood group distribution showed that there is significant differences between ABO blood group and patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia . This study showed significant association between ALL and ABO blood group and showed that blood group AB was associated with a higher risk of All (p value<0.001).

  14. Non-infectious chemotherapy-associated acute toxicities during childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Müller, Klaus; Mogensen, Signe Sloth; Mogensen, Pernille Rudebeck; Wolthers, Benjamin Ole; Stoltze, Ulrik Kristoffer; Tuckuviene, Ruta; Frandsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    During chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, all organs can be affected by severe acute side effects, the most common being opportunistic infections, mucositis, central or peripheral neuropathy (or both), bone toxicities (including osteonecrosis), thromboembolism, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, endocrinopathies (especially steroid-induced adrenal insufficiency and hyperglycemia), high-dose methotrexate-induced nephrotoxicity, asparaginase-associated hypersensitivity, pancreatitis, and hyperlipidemia. Few of the non-infectious acute toxicities are associated with clinically useful risk factors, and across study groups there has been wide diversity in toxicity definitions, capture strategies, and reporting, thus hampering meaningful comparisons of toxicity incidences for different leukemia protocols. Since treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia now yields 5-year overall survival rates above 90%, there is a need for strategies for assessing the burden of toxicities in the overall evaluation of anti-leukemic therapy programs. PMID:28413626

  15. Upregulation of Leukocytic Syncytin-1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Zhu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxin; Jiang, Yaxian; Ouyang, Hongmei; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Guiqian; Fan, Xin; Tao, Rui; Jiang, Jie; Niu, Hua

    2016-07-09

    BACKGROUND Syncytin-1, a cell membrane-localizing fusogen, is abnormally expressed in several cancers, including endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. Although abnormal syncytin-1 expression has been detected in two-thirds of leukemia blood samples, its expression profile in acute leukemia patients has not yet been analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS Bone marrow samples from 50 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases and 14 B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-cell ALL) patients were subjected to flow cytometry to assess leukocyte type distributions and leukocytic syncytin-1 surface expression. RT-PCR was applied to assess leukocytic syncytin-1 mRNA expression. Statistical analysis was applied to compare syncytin-1 expression between AML and B-cell ALL patients across blasts, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes as well as to determine clinical factors statistically associated with changes in syncytin-1 expression. RESULTS The leukocyte type distributions of the AML and B-cell ALL cohorts highly overlapped, with an observable difference in blast distribution between the 2 cohorts. The AML cohort displayed significantly greater syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression (p<0.05). Syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression was significantly increased across all 4 leukocyte types (p<0.05). The percentage of syncytin-1-expressing blasts was significantly greater in AML patients (p<0.05), with blasts showing the largest fold-change in syncytin-1 expression (p<0.05). M5, M5a, and M5b AML patients displayed significantly higher syncytin-1 surface expression relative to all other AML French-American-British (FAB) classifications (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest leukocytic syncytin-1 expression may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of the AML phenotype and the acute monocytic leukemia phenotype in particular.

  16. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia, Acute Leukemia in Remission, or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-13

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  17. Azacitidine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-25

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Comparing Three Different Combination Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Sirolimus, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-10

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Acute lymphoid leukemia following polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Camós, M; Cervantes, F; Montoto, S; Hernández-Boluda, J C; Villamor, N; Montserrat, E

    1999-01-01

    The tendency to evolve into acute leukemia is a well-known characteristic of polycythemia vera (PV), which is shared with the remaining chronic myeloproliferative disorders and increases after the administration of cytotoxic agents. Acute transformation is usually of myeloid phenotype, whereas acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) following PV is seldom observed. A 63-year-old woman is described who developed ALL at 6 years from the initial diagnosis of PV, for which she had received radioactive phosphorus and hydroxyurea. The ALL was of B-cell type, corresponding to the L-3 subtype of the FAB classification. Despite the administration of combination chemotherapy the patient died shortly after the diagnosis of acute leukemia. The present case adds to seven previously described patients with the above association, all of whom had received cytotoxic therapy for PV. Median interval from PV to ALL diagnosis was 10 years, and there was a predominance of the B-cell phenotype. The prognosis was poor since all but one of the patients had a short survival after ALL diagnosis. The possible etiological and pathogenetic link between PV and the subsequent ALL is discussed.

  3. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D E; Beuling, Eva; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E S; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-09-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations using direct sequencing. Three patients were identified with a single amino acid variant without change of IKZF1 length. No frame-shift mutations were found. Out of 11 patients with an IKZF1 deletion, 8 samples revealed a complete loss of chromosome 7, and 3 cases a focal deletion of 0.1-0.9Mb. These deletions included the complete IKZF1 gene (n=2) or exons 1-4 (n=1), all leading to a loss of IKZF1 function. Interestingly, differentially expressed genes in monosomy 7 cases (n=8) when compared to non-deleted samples (n=247) significantly correlated with gene expression changes in focal IKZF1-deleted cases (n=3). Genes with increased expression included genes involved in myeloid cell self-renewal and cell cycle, and a significant portion of GATA target genes and GATA factors. Together, these results suggest that loss of IKZF1 is recurrent in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and might be a determinant of oncogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia with monosomy 7. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  4. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Pharmacogenetic considerations for acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapies.

    PubMed

    Dulucq, Stéphanie; Laverdière, Caroline; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja

    2014-05-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathobiology of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have led to risk-targeted treatment regimens and remarkable improvement in survival rates. Still, up to 20% of patients experience treatment failure due to drug resistance. Treatment-related toxicities are often life-threatening and are the primary cause of treatment interruption, while ALL survivors may develop complications due to exposure to chemotherapy and/or irradiation during a vulnerable period of development. Different factors may contribute to variable treatment outcomes including patient genetics that has been shown to play important role. This review summarizes candidate gene and genome-wide association studies that identified common polymorphisms underlying variability in treatment responses including a few studies addressing late effects of the treatment. Genetic variants influencing antileukemic drug effects or leukemic cell biology have been identified, including for example variants in folate-dependent enzymes, influx and efflux transporters, metabolizing enzymes, drug receptor or apoptotic proteins. Many pharmacogenetic studies have been conducted in ALL and a variety of potential markers have been identified. Yet more comprehensive insight into genome variations influencing drug responses is needed. Whole exome/genome sequencing, careful study design, mechanistic explanation of association found and collaborative studies will ultimately lead to personalized treatment and improved therapeutic and health outcomes.

  6. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Global characteristics of childhood acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Scelo, G; Smith, M T; Feusner, J; Wiemels, J L; Metayer, C

    2015-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5-10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent-de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Global Characteristics of Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, MS; Scelo, G; Smith, MT; Feusner, J; Wiemels, JL; Metayer, C

    2014-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5–10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent—de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed. PMID:25445717

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia: update in diagnosis and treatment in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Helman, Ricardo; Santos, Fabio Pires de Souza; Simões, Belinda; Atta, Elias Hallack; Callera, Fernando; Dobbin, Jane de Almeida; Mattos, Éderson Roberto; Atalla, Angelo; Maiolino, Angelo; Zanichelli, Maria Aparecida; Diefenbach, Cristiane Fração; Delamain, Marcia Torresan; Hamerschlak, Nelson

    2011-06-01

    To identify how the Brazilian hematology centers treated and diagnosed cases of acute myeloid leukemia in 2009. An epidemiological observational multicenter study of 11 listed Brazilian centers that treat acute myeloid leukemia and perform bone marrow transplantation. Data were collected from clinical charts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia treated at the said centers between 2005 and 2009. The availability for immunophenotyping and cytogenetic tests was assessed. During 2009, a total of 345 new cases of acute myeloid leukemia were diagnosed. Differences were noted in the tests performed between patients who initiated treatment at the center and those referred for treatment. Of the participating centers, 72% conducted some type of molecular study in acute myeloid leukemia upon diagnosis. Treatment for acute myeloid leukemia in Brazil shows significantly inferior results when compared to other centers worldwide.

  10. Molecularly targeted therapies for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stein, Eytan M

    2015-01-01

    The past 15 years have seen major leaps in our understanding of the molecular genetic mutations that act as drivers of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Clinical trials of agents against specific mutant proteins, such as FLT3-internal tandem duplications (ITDs) and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations (IDHs) are ongoing. This review discusses agents in clinical trials that target specific gene mutations and/or epigenetic targets. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular biomarkers in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Prada-Arismendy, Jeanette; Arroyave, Johanna C; Röthlisberger, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults. The pathophysiology of this disease is just beginning to be understood at the cellular and molecular level, and currently cytogenetic markers are the most important for risk stratification and treatment of AML patients. However, with the advent of new technologies, the detection of other molecular markers such as point mutations and characterization of epigenetic and proteomic profiles, have begun to play an important role in how the disease is approached. Recent evidence shows that the identification of new AML biomarkers contributes to a better understanding of the molecular basis of the disease, is significantly useful in screening, diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of AML, as well as the possibility of predicting each individual's response to treatment. This review summarizes the most relevant molecular (genetic, epigenetic, and protein) biomarkers associated with acute myeloid leukemia and discusses their clinical importance in terms of risk prediction, diagnosis and prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Novel agents for the treatment of childhood acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Annesley, Colleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Together, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) make up approximately one-third of all pediatric cancer diagnoses. Despite remarkable improvement in the treatment outcomes of these diseases over the past several decades, the prognosis for certain high-risk groups of leukemia and for relapsed disease remains poor. However, recent insights into different types of ‘driver’ lesions of leukemogenesis, such as the aberrant activation of signaling pathways and various epigenetic modifications, have led to the discovery of novel agents that specifically target the mechanism of transformation. In parallel, emerging approaches in cancer immunotherapy have led to newer therapies that can exploit and harness cytotoxic immunity directed against malignant cells. This review details the rationale and implementation of recent and specifically targeted therapies in acute pediatric leukemia. Topics covered include the inhibition of critical cell signaling pathways [BCR-ABL, FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and Janus-associated kinase (JAK)], proteasome inhibition, inhibition of epigenetic regulators of gene expression [DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, and disruptor of telomeric signaling-1 (DOT1L) inhibitors], monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugated toxins, bispecific T-cell engaging (BiTE) antibodies, and chimeric antigen receptor-modified (CAR) T cells. PMID:25830014

  14. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-06

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-1; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Brain Function in Young Patients Receiving Methotrexate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Long-Term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Phase I Trial of AZD1775 and Belinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myeloid Malignancies or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Ring Sideroblasts; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation

  19. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-02

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Diagnosis of Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia in a Patient Previously Treated for Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bozdag, Sinem Civriz; Namdaroglu, Sinem; Kayikci, Omur; Kaygusuz, Gülsah; Demiriz, Itir; Cinarsoy, Murat; Tekgunduz, Emre; Altuntas, Fevzi

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by the clonal expansion of cytotoxic T or natural killer cells. We report on a patient diagnosed with T-cell LGL leukemia two years after the achievement of hematologic remission for acute myeloblastic leukemia. PMID:24416499

  1. Combination Chemotherapy and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Mutational profiling of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with testicular relapse.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling-Wen; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Mayakonda, Anand; Tan, Kar-Tong; Chien, Wenwen; Lin, De-Chen; Jiang, Yan-Yi; Xu, Liang; Garg, Manoj; Lao, Zhen-Tang; Lill, Michael; Yang, Henry; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2017-03-02

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the leading cause of deaths of childhood cancer. Although relapse usually happens in the bone marrow, extramedullary relapse occasionally occurs including either the central nervous system or testis (<1-2%). We selected two pediatric ALL patients who experienced testicular relapse and interrogated their leukemic cells with exome sequencing. The sequencing results and clonality analyses suggest that relapse of patient D483 directly evolved from the leukemic clone at diagnosis which survived chemotherapy. In contrast, relapse leukemia cells (both bone marrow and testis) of patient D727 were likely derived from a common ancestral clone, and testicular relapse likely arose independently from the bone marrow relapsed leukemia. Our findings decipher the mutational spectra and shed light on the clonal evolution of two cases of pediatric ALL with testicular relapse. Presence of CREBBP/NT5C2 mutations suggests that a personalized therapeutic approach should be applied to these two patients.

  3. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Persistent/Recurrent Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

  5. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Sowmya; Jeong, Daniel K; Muddaraju, Manjunath; Jeong, Katherine; Hill, Ebone D; Greene, John N

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potentially fatal pulmonary disease syndrome that affects individuals with hematological and nonhematological malignancies. The range of inciting factors is wide for this syndrome and includes thrombocytopenia, underlying infection, coagulopathy, and the frequent use of anticoagulants, given the high incidence of venous thrombosis in this population. Dyspnea, fever, and cough are commonly presenting symptoms. However, clinical manifestations can be variable. Obvious bleeding (hemoptysis) is not always present and can pose a potential diagnostic challenge. Without prompt treatment, hypoxia that rapidly progresses to respiratory failure can occur. Diagnosis is primarily based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. This syndrome is especially common in patients with hematological malignancies, given an even greater propensity for thrombocytopenia as a result of bone marrow suppression as well as the often prolonged immunosuppression in this patient population. The syndrome also has an increased incidence in individuals with hematological malignancies who have received a bone marrow transplant. We present a case series of 5 patients with acute myeloid leukemia presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage at our institution. A comparison of clinical manifestations, radiographic findings, treatment course, and outcomes are described. A review of the literature and general overview of the diagnostic evaluation, differential diagnoses, pathophysiology, and treatment of this syndrome are discussed.

  6. Balance in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Varedi, Mitra; McKenna, Raymond; Lamberg, Eric M

    2017-03-01

    Treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) can affect balance via different mechanisms, including sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy, cognitive impairment, and reduced muscle strength and flexibility. To provide an overview of what is currently known about the effects of cancer treatment on balance in pediatric ALL patients and survivors, and of the predictors of poor balance, a review of the literature was conducted. Five databases were searched for English-language original research articles on balance during or after treatment for pediatric ALL. From a total of nine studies, six identified significant balance problems in children with ALL during or after treatment. The percentage of patients or survivors with impaired balance varied between 27% and 69% during treatment, 7% and 65% a few years after completion of treatment, and 14% and 17% many years after the completion of treatment. Factors associated with impaired balance were higher body mass index; higher intrathecal methotrexate dose; cranial radiation; knee extensor weakness; and impaired cognition. Although heterogeneity between the studies regarding patient age; age at diagnosis; time since completion of treatment; and methods of quantifying balance make it difficult to reach a single conclusion, the evidence suggests that survivors may experience short- and/or long-term balance difficulties. While there is a need for additional studies to better understand the effects of impaired balance in survivors, clinicians treating both child and adult survivors of ALL need to be aware of these potential risks. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. Topotecan Hydrochloride and Carboplatin With or Without Veliparib in Treating Advanced Myeloproliferative Disorders and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-21

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelofibrosis; Polycythemia Vera; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  9. Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Philadelphia Chromosome Negative; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Thrombo-hemorrhagic deaths in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has become the most curable form of acute myeloid leukemia after the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, early deaths (ED) mostly due to the disease-associated coagulopathy remain the major cause of treatment failure. In particular, hemorrhagic events account for 40-65% of ED and several prognostic factors have been identified for such hemorrhagic deaths, including poor performance status, high white blood cell (WBC) count and coagulopathy. Occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with ATRA may be associated with differentiation syndrome (DS) or represent an isolated event. Some prognostic factors have been reported to be associated with thrombosis, including increased WBC or aberrant immunophenotype of leukemic promyelocytes. Aim of this review is to report the incidence, severity, possible pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombo-haemorrhagic deaths in APL.

  11. New decision support tool for acute lymphoblastic leukemia classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhukar, Monica; Agaian, Sos; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we build up a new decision support tool to improve treatment intensity choice in childhood ALL. The developed system includes different methods to accurately measure furthermore cell properties in microscope blood film images. The blood images are exposed to series of pre-processing steps which include color correlation, and contrast enhancement. By performing K-means clustering on the resultant images, the nuclei of the cells under consideration are obtained. Shape features and texture features are then extracted for classification. The system is further tested on the classification of spectra measured from the cell nuclei in blood samples in order to distinguish normal cells from those affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. The results show that the proposed system robustly segments and classifies acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on complete microscopic blood images.

  12. Invasive Fungal Infections in Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Vijaya R.; Viola, George M.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed. PMID:23556092

  13. Invasive fungal infections in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya R; Viola, George M; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed.

  14. Skin infiltration in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nagao, K; Kikuchi, A; Kawai, Y; Kizaki, M; Ikeda, Y; Nishikawa, T

    1997-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a type of acute leukemia showing unique clinical, morphological and cytogenetic features. A skin infiltration by APL cells is an extremely rare occasion, but there have been several case reports of leukemia cutis in APL, in which all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) may have induced the skin infiltration. However, no immunohistochemical analyses of the APL cells in the skin have been done to date. A 30-year-old woman with APL developed multiple reddish purple nodules on the extremities in her second complete remission. Histological findings revealed a dense infiltration of medium to large atypical cells, which were positive for myeloperoxidase, throughout the dermis. Despite the conventional chemotherapy and ATRA therapy she died from disseminated intravascular coagulation during her third relapse. Leukemic cells in the peripheral blood before the treatment with ATRA revealed CD3-/CD4-/CD5-/CD7-/CD8-/CD10-/CD13++/CD14-/CD19 -/ CD20-/CD33++/CD38++/CD41-/Ia-, but they expressed CD3-/CD4-/CD5-/CD7++/ CD8-/CD10-/CD13++/CD14-/CD19-/CD20-/CD33++ /CD38++/CD41+/Ia+ after the treatment. We suggest that the alternation of the surface molecules on the tumor cells is closely associated with the skin infiltration of APL cells.

  15. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Acute pediatric leg compartment syndrome in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Eric; Truntzer, Jeremy; Trunzter, Jeremy; Klinge, Steve; Schwartz, Kevin; Schiller, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is an orthopedic surgical emergency and may result in devastating complications in the setting of delayed or missed diagnosis. Compartment syndrome has a variety of causes, including posttraumatic or postoperative swelling, external compression, burns, bleeding disorders, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Rare cases of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in the setting of acute myeloid leukemia and, even less commonly, chronic myeloid leukemia have been reported. The authors report the first known case of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in a patient without a previously known diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. On initial examination, an 11-year-old boy presented with a 2-week history of progressive left calf pain and swelling after playing soccer. Magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a hematoma in the left superficial posterior compartment. The patient had unrelenting pain, intermittent lateral foot parethesias, and inability to bear weight. Subsequently, he was diagnosed with acute compartment syndrome and underwent fasciotomy and evacuation of a hematoma. Laboratory results showed an abnormal white blood cell count of 440×10(9)/L (normal, 4.4-11×10(9)) and international normalized ratio of 1.3 (normal, 0.8-1.2). Further testing included the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene located on the Philadelphia chromosome, leading to a diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. Monotherapy with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) was initiated. This report adds another unique case to the growing literature on compartment syndrome in the pediatric population and reinforces the need to consider compartment syndrome, even in unlikely clinical scenarios. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  18. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Godwin, C D; Gale, R P; Walter, R B

    2017-09-01

    CD33 is variably expressed on leukemia blasts in almost all patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and possibly leukemia stem cells in some. Efforts to target CD33 therapeutically have focused on gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO; Mylotarg), an antibody-drug conjugate delivering a DNA-damaging calicheamicin derivative. GO is most effective in acute promyelocytic leukemia but induces remissions in other AML types and received accelerated approval in the US in 2000. However, because a large follow-up study showed no survival improvement and increased early deaths the drug manufacturer voluntarily withdrew the US New Drug Application in 2010. More recently, a meta-analysis of data from several trials reported better survival in adults with favorable- and intermediate-risk cytogenetics but not adverse-risk AML randomized to receive GO along with intensive induction chemotherapy. As a result, GO is being re-evaluated by regulatory agencies. Responses to GO are diverse and predictive biological response markers are needed. Besides cytogenetic risk, ATP-binding cassette transporter activity and possibly CD33 display on AML blasts may predict response, but established clinical assays and prospective validation are lacking. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in CD33 may also be predictive, most notably rs12459419 where the minor T-allele leads to decreased display of full-length CD33 and preferential translation of a splice variant not recognized by GO. Data from retrospective analyses suggest only patients with the rs12459419 CC genotype may benefit from GO therapy but confirmation is needed. Most important may be markers for AML cell sensitivity to calicheamicin, which varies over 100 000-fold, but useful assays are unavailable. Novel CD33-targeted drugs may overcome some of GO's limitations but it is currently unknown whether such drugs will be more effective in patients benefitting from GO and/or improve outcomes in patients not benefitting from GO, and what the supportive

  20. [Acute leukemia in Jehovah's Witnesses].

    PubMed

    Bueno, J; Zuazu, J; Villalba, T; Julià, A

    1999-10-01

    Two cases of young patients, Jehova Witnesses (JW), diagnosed as having acute lymphoblastic leukaemia are presented. In one case a complete remission (CR) was obtained, lasting until now, 20 months after diagnosis; the other one died 11 months after diagnosis without achieving a CR. Three important questions can be raised in JW: 1) the absolute respect to patients' wishes; 2) to treat or not to treat; and 3) the pertinent therapy. The answer is yes to 1) and 2), and a slight myelotoxic therapy for the last one.

  1. Co-operative leukemogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia reveals C/EBPα as a common target of TRIB1 and PML/RARA

    PubMed Central

    Keeshan, Karen; Vieugué, Pauline; Chaudhury, Shahzya; Rishi, Loveena; Gaillard, Coline; Liang, Lu; Garcia, Elaine; Nakamura, Takuro; Omidvar, Nader; Kogan, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The PML/RARA fusion protein occurs as a result of the t(15;17) translocation in the acute promyelocytic leukemia subtype of human acute myeloid leukemia. Gain of chromosome 8 is the most common chromosomal gain in human acute myeloid leukemia, including acute promyelocytic leukemia. We previously demonstrated that gain of chromosome 8-containing MYC is of central importance in trisomy 8, but the role of the nearby TRIB1 gene has not been experimentally addressed in this context. We have now tested the hypothesis that both MYC and TRIB1 have functional roles underlying leukemogenesis of trisomy 8 by using retroviral vectors to express MYC and TRIB1 in wild-type bone marrow and in marrow that expressed a PML/RARA transgene. Interestingly, although MYC and TRIB1 readily co-operated in leukemogenesis for wild-type bone marrow, TRIB1 provided no selective advantage to cells expressing PML/RARA. We hypothesized that this lack of co-operation between PML/RARA and TRIB1 reflected a common pathway for their effect: both proteins targeting the myeloid transcription factor C/EBPα. In support of this idea, TRIB1 expression abrogated the all-trans retinoic acid response of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. Our data delineate the common and redundant inhibitory effects of TRIB1 and PML/RARA on C/EBPα providing a potential explanation for the lack of selection of TRIB1 in human acute promyelocytic leukemia, and highlighting the key role of C/EBPs in acute promyelocytic leukemia pathogenesis and therapeutic response. In addition, the co-operativity we observed between MYC and TRIB1 in the absence of PML/RARA show that, outside of acute promyelocytic leukemia, gain of both genes may drive selection for trisomy 8. PMID:27390356

  2. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride or Cytarabine and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia: the first 48 hours.

    PubMed

    Ringenberg, Q S; Doll, D C

    1990-08-01

    The initial care of patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia can be lifesaving. Such patients are most often treated at tertiary care centers where resident physicians, working under the supervision of a subspecialist, are responsible for the diagnosis and initial treatment. During the first 48 hours, the house officer must recognize and understand the management of perilous complications such as hyperleukocytosis, hemorrhage, and infection. Specific lifesaving measures will grant the patient and his physicians sufficient time to reach a decision regarding the initiation of curative induction chemotherapy.

  6. Blood group change in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prakash, N. P.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood group antigens are either sugars or proteins found attached to the red blood cell membrane. ABO blood group antigens are the most clinically important antigens because they are the most immunogenic. As red blood cell antigens are inherited traits, they are usually not altered throughout the life of an individual. There have been occasional case reports of ABO blood group antigen change in malignant conditions. We report two such cases of ABO antigen alteration associated with acute myeloid leukemia. These patients had suppression of their blood group antigens during their leukemic phase, and the antigens were reexpressed when the patients attained remission. PMID:28127141

  7. Molecular diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Watt, Christopher D; Bagg, Adam

    2010-11-01

    The diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid leukemia is multifaceted, requiring the integration of a variety of laboratory findings, with genetic approaches now firmly established as a central component. Molecular genetic technologies continue to evolve and provide additional tiers of both clarity and complexity. Many have rapidly moved into clinical laboratories; others remain as relevant discovery tools, while some are poised to take their place in diagnostic testing menus. Here, we attempt to synthesize the role of various testing modalities and exciting nascent fundamental discoveries, with a view as to how these might be integrated into the contemporary and future evaluation of this group of aggressive hematologic malignancies.

  8. Acute promyelocytic leukemia, arsenic, and PML bodies

    PubMed Central

    Le Bras, Morgane; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by a chromosomal translocation whose product, the PML/retinoic acid (RA) receptor α (RARA) fusion protein, affects both nuclear receptor signaling and PML body assembly. Dissection of APL pathogenesis has led to the rediscovery of PML bodies and revealed their role in cell senescence, disease pathogenesis, and responsiveness to treatment. APL is remarkable because of the fortuitous identification of two clinically effective therapies, RA and arsenic, both of which degrade PML/RARA oncoprotein and, together, cure APL. Analysis of arsenic-induced PML or PML/RARA degradation has implicated oxidative stress in the biogenesis of nuclear bodies and SUMO in their degradation. PMID:22778276

  9. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  10. Cutaneous presentation preceding acute monocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xianhua; Li, Fuqiu; Li, Xue; Zhu, Wenjing; Mou, Yan; Huang, Yang; Zhao, Huanyu; Gao, Wei; Xia, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Cutaneous presentation preceding acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is rare, and the prognosis is poor. Patient concerns: We report 4 cases of AML cutis, where skin infiltration precedes any blood or bone marrow evidence of leukemia. We also reviewed 13 cases reported in English and Chinese literature. The 4 cases all presented typical cutaneous lesions without any systemic evidence of leukemia. Histopathological examination found that dense monomorphous cell infiltration involved the dermis. Some cells surrounded blood vessels and skin appendages in a concentric manner or showed single-row arrangement in the collagen fiber bundles. Uninvolved papillary dermis was found to separate normal epidermis from dermal infiltration. Minor cells had a large kidney-shaped or oval nucleus with nucleoli and slightly eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive for CD4, CD56, while CD123 was negative in all cases. Diagnoses: AML-M5. Interventions: 2 patients received chemotherapy ,but others rejected treatment. Outcomes: Most patients died within 1 year after the onset of skin lesions. Lessons: These findings suggest that skin infiltration of AML may precede any systemic evidence, and typical cutaneous lesions in elderly individuals may be indicative for AML. PMID:28272239

  11. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-17

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  13. Driving Toward Precision Medicine for Acute Leukemias: Are We There Yet?

    PubMed

    Chung, Clement; Ma, Hilary

    2017-09-01

    Despite recent progress in the understanding of the molecular basis of acute leukemias, treatment options for these diseases have not changed significantly over the last few decades. We present a nonexhaustive summary of the current cytogenetic and molecular changes associated with acute leukemias in disease prognostication and potential targeted therapies. An emerging paradigm is that many genetic or molecular alterations target similar signal transduction, transcriptional, and epigenetic pathways. Some of these targets may be used as predictive biomarkers for the development of novel targeted therapies that depart significantly from conventional chemotherapy, the current mainstay for the treatment of acute leukemias. Established leukemia-specific predictive biomarkers for precision medicine include those genetic lesions such as BCR-ABL1 for Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia and PML-RARα for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Evidence indicates that targeted therapy for FLT-ITD gene mutations with small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors can extend its use from relapsed disease to up-front induction therapy. Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in adults predicts benefit with high-dose cytarabine in the absence of KIT mutation. Although risk-adapted therapy based on genetic abnormalities in acute leukemias has allowed the beginning of personalized treatment and selective use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the prognostic and/or predictive value of many novel mutations of the acute leukemic genome is yet to be elucidated. Many challenges lie ahead in targeted therapies due to overlapping of chromosomal and molecular lesions as well as other limiting factors. Future work should focus on the understanding of pathogenetic changes that lead to leukemogenesis, which may guide the rational design of new targeted therapies and make the drive toward precision medicine for acute leukemias one step closer. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications

  14. Pleural effusions in patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Saadia A; Bashoura, Lara; Lei, Xiudong; Sampat, Keeran R; Brown, Tiffany C; Eapen, George A; Morice, Rodolfo C; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jimenez, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Pleural effusions are rarely observed in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Therefore the underlying etiology of pleural effusions and the efficacy and safety of pleural procedures in this population has not been well studied. In a retrospective review of cases from 1997 to 2007, we identified 111 patients with acute leukemia or MDS/MPN who underwent pleural procedures. Clinical characteristics were reviewed, and survival outcomes were estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 270 pleural procedures were performed in 111 patients (69 AML, 27 ALL, 15 MDS/MPN). The main indications for pleural procedures were possible infection (49%) and respiratory symptoms (48%), and concomitant clinical symptoms included fever (34%), dyspnea (74%), chest pain (24%) and cough (37%). Most patients had active disease (61%). The most frequent etiology of pleural effusions was infection (47%), followed by malignancy (36%). Severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 20 × 10(3)/µL) was present in 43% of the procedures, yet the procedural complication rate was only 1.9%. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age, AML, MDS/MPN and active disease status were associated with a shorter median overall survival. Infection and malignant involvement are the most common causes of pleural effusion in patients with acute leukemia or MDS. After optimizing platelet count and coagulopathy, thoracentesis may be performed safely and with high diagnostic yield in this population. Survival in these patients is determined by the response to treatment of the hematologic malignancy.

  15. [Leukemia research in Germany: the Competence Network Acute and Chronic Leukemias].

    PubMed

    Kossak-Roth, Ute; Saußele, Susanne; Aul, Carlo; Büchner, Thomas; Döhner, Hartmut; Dugas, Martin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Ganser, Arnold; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Gökbuget, Nicola; Griesshammer, Martin; Hasford, Jörg; Heuser, Michael; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hoelzer, Dieter; Niederwieser, Dietger; Reiter, Andreas; Röllig, Christoph; Hehlmann, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    The Competence Network "Acute and Chronic Leukemias" was founded in 1997 by the consolidation of the leading leukemia study groups in Germany. Key results are the development of new trials and cooperative studies, the setup of patient registries and biobanking facilities, as well as the improvement of study infrastructure. In 2003, the concept of the competence network contributed to the foundation of the European LeukemiaNet (ELN). Synergy with the ELN resulted in cooperation on a European and international level, standardization of diagnostics and treatment, and recommendations for each leukemia and interdisciplinary specialty. The ultimate goal of the network is the cure of leukemia through cooperative research.

  16. Chromosome abnormalities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Less information is available on the cytogenetic abnormalities in marrow cells of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than on abnormalities in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL); nonetheless, some patterns of karyotypic change in ALL are evident. Even with banding, about 50% of patients appear to have a normal karyotype. The modal chromosome number tends to be higher in ALL than in ANLL. Every patient with B-cell ALL has had an abnormality of one chromosome No. 14 that involved the translocation of material to the end of the long arm. Among seven reported cases, the translocation was from 8q in three patients and 11q in one. Cells with a haploid or near-haploid (24 to 35) chromosome number have been reported in five patients with ALL and in four patients in a lymphoid blast crisis of chronic myelogeneous leukemia. The karyotype in the four ALL patients whose cells were analyzed with banding was remarkably consistent. All patients had the haploid number, usually with both sex chromosomes, plus an additional No. 10, 18, and 21. Evolution of the karyotype, which occurs in the leukemic cells of about 50% of patients, involves cells of patients who had an initially normal or an initially abnormal karyotype. The evidence regarding a correlation between the presence of an abnormal clone prior to treatment and response to treatment is contradictory at present. Some chromosome abnormalities, such as the presence of a Philadelphia (Ph/sup 1/) chromosome, a 14q+chromosome, or a haploid clone, are associated with a relatively short survival.

  17. Leukemia-induced phenotypic and functional defects in natural killer cells predict failure to achieve remission in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stringaris, Kate; Sekine, Takuya; Khoder, Ahmad; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Razzaghi, Bonnie; Sargeant, Ruhena; Pavlu, Jiri; Brisley, Gill; de Lavallade, Hugues; Sarvaria, Anushruthi; Marin, David; Mielke, Stephan; Apperley, Jane F; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Barrett, A John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-05-01

    The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia will relapse, and older patients often fail to achieve remission with induction chemotherapy. We explored the possibility that leukemic suppression of innate immunity might contribute to treatment failure. Natural killer cell phenotype and function was measured in 32 consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients at presentation, including 12 achieving complete remission. Compared to 15 healthy age-matched controls, natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients were abnormal at presentation, with downregulation of the activating receptor NKp46 (P=0.007) and upregulation of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A (P=0.04). Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients had impaired effector function against autologous blasts and K562 targets, with significantly reduced CD107a degranulation, TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Failure to achieve remission was associated with NKG2A overexpression and reduced TNF-α production. These phenotypic and functional abnormalities were partially restored in the 12 patients achieving remission. In vitro co-incubation of acute myeloid leukemia blasts with natural killer cells from healthy donors induced significant impairment in natural killer cell TNF-α and IFN-γ production (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively) against K562 targets and a trend to reduced CD107a degranulation (P=0.07). Under transwell conditions, the inhibitory effect of AML blasts on NK cytotoxicity and effector function was still present, and this inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by IL-10. These results suggest that acute myeloid leukemia blasts induce long-lasting changes in natural killer cells, impairing their effector function and reducing the competence of the innate immune system, favoring leukemia survival.

  18. Pediatric acute leukemia: the effect of prognostic factors on clinical outcomes at Phramongkutklao Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rujkijyanont, Piya; Kaewinsang, Suphathida; Monsereenusorn, Chalinee; Traivaree, Chanchai

    2014-02-01

    Leukemia is the most common malignancy in children. Multiple prognostic factors have been used in order to assist the clinician to decide appropriate risk-adjusted treatment for each patient; the current clinical outcomes of those patients have been significantly improved over the past decades. The purpose of this study was to examine survival outcome in children who were diagnosed with acute leukemia and treated in the Department of Pediatrics, Phramongkutklao Hospital during January 1, 2000 and July 31, 2013. The authors retrospectively reviewed the patients who were diagnosed with acute leukemia and treated at Phramongkutklao Hospital. Their clinical data were collected and analyzed based on clinicalfeatures inchluding age, initial WBC count at diagnosis, sex, immnunophenotype and cytogenetic abnormalities. Total 152 patients with acute leukemia, 123 patients were diagnosed with acute lymnphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 29 patients were diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The 5-year survival rates of ALL and AML patients were 72.63% and 30.30%, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between the ALL patients' clinical outcomes and several prognostic factors including initial white blood cell count, CNS status at diagnosis and ploidy. However, there was no correlation between those factors and clinical outcomes in AML patients. Our treatment outcomes on patients with acute leukemia were similar to the reports from other countries. The several prognostic factors especially initial WBC at diagnosis can assist the clinician to select appropriate treatment option for each patient.

  19. Association of acute myeloid leukemia's most immature phenotype with risk groups and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Jonathan M; Zeidner, Joshua F; Morse, Sarah; Blackford, Amanda L; Perkins, Brandy; Yanagisawa, Breann; Zhang, Hao; Morsberger, Laura; Karp, Judith; Ning, Yi; Gocke, Christopher D; Rosner, Gary L; Smith, B Douglas; Jones, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    The precise phenotype and biology of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells remain controversial, in part because the "gold standard" immunodeficient mouse engraftment assay fails in a significant fraction of patients and identifies multiple cell-types in others. We sought to analyze the clinical utility of a novel assay for putative leukemia stem cells in a large prospective cohort. The leukemic clone's most primitive hematopoietic cellular phenotype was prospectively identified in 109 newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients, and analyzed against clinical risk groups and outcomes. Most (80/109) patients harbored CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells. The CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells in 47 of the 80 patients displayed intermediate aldehyde dehydrogenase expression, while normal CD34(+)CD38(-) hematopoietic stem cells expressed high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase. In the other 33/80 patients, the CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells exhibited high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and most (28/33, 85%) harbored poor-risk cytogenetics or FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem translocations. No CD34(+) leukemia cells could be detected in 28/109 patients, including 14/21 patients with nucleophosmin-1 mutations and 6/7 acute promyelocytic leukemia patients. The patients with CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity manifested a significantly lower complete remission rate, as well as poorer event-free and overall survivals. The leukemic clone's most immature phenotype was heterogeneous with respect to CD34, CD38, and ALDH expression, but correlated with acute myeloid leukemia risk groups and outcomes. The strong clinical correlations suggest that the most immature phenotype detectable in the leukemia might serve as a biomarker for "clinically-relevant" leukemia stem cells. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01349972. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  20. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zwaan, C. Michel; Kolb, Edward A.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S.J.M.; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Smith, Owen P.; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and international collaborative efforts have evolved. This overview describes these efforts and includes a summary of the history and contributions of each of the main collaborative pediatric AML groups worldwide. The focus is on translational and clinical research, which includes past, current, and future clinical trials. Separate sections concern acute promyelocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome, and relapsed AML. A plethora of novel antileukemic agents that have emerged, including new classes of drugs, are summarized as well. Finally, an important aspect of the treatment of pediatric AML—supportive care—and late effects are discussed. The future is bright, with a wide range of emerging innovative therapies and with more and more international collaboration that ultimately aim to cure all children with AML, with fewer adverse effects and without late effects. PMID:26304895

  1. Dasatinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Detection of minimal residual disease in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Raanani, P; Ben-Bassat, I

    2004-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is considered to be in complete remission when fewer than 5% of the cells in bone marrow are blasts. Nevertheless, approximately two thirds of patients relapse due to persisting leukemic blasts. The persistence of these cells, below the threshold of morphological detection, is termed minimal residual disease (MRD) and various methods are used for its detection. These methods include classical cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization, qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR and multiparametric flow cytometry. Currently, less than half of the AML patients have a specific marker detectable by RT-PCR techniques. The major specific molecular markers are involvement of the MLL gene with up to 50 different partners and partial tandem duplications, the core binding factor leukemias with AML1/ETO and CBFbeta/MYH11 rearrangements, PML/RARalpha in acute promyelocytic leukemia, internal tandem duplications and mutations of FLT3 and some other rare translocations. In addition, several other genes show abnormal expression levels in AML, including the Wilms tumor gene, the PRAME gene and Ig/TCR rearrangements. Most of these genetic abnormalities can be detected by qualitative but more importantly by quantitative RT-PCR. The kinetics of disappearance of molecular markers in AML differs between the various types of leukemias, although at least a 2 log reduction of transcript after induction chemotherapy is necessary for long-term remission in all types. Conversely, the change of PCR from negativity to positivity is highly predictive of relapse. Whereas in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, multiparametric flow cytometry is an established method for MRD detection, this is less so in AML. The reason is the absence of well-characterized leukemia-specific antigens and the existence of phenotypic changes at relapse. On the other hand, this method is convenient due to its simplicity and universal applicability. In conclusion, several methods can be used

  3. Cytogenetic and environmental factors in the etiology of the acute leukemias in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, D.P.; Collman, G.W.

    1987-12-01

    This review focuses on familial and cytogenetic factors and on environmental exposures that play a role in the etiology of the leukemias. Differential prognosis and treatment responses as well as new cytogenetic assays suggest that acute lymphocytic and acute nonlymphocytic leukemias are each comprised of different diseases with similar appearance. Risk factors, including exposure to ionizing radiations, benzene,cigarette smokes, electric currents, antineoplastic agents, petroleum products and pesticides are discussed. 149 references.

  4. Sorafenib Tosylate and Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (Megakaryoblastic) With t(1;22)(p13;q13); RBM15-MKL1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With a Variant RARA Translocation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(6;9)(p23;q34); DEK-NUP214; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Variant MLL Translocations; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. MEK Inhibitor MEK162, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-26

    Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Cyclosporine, Pravastatin Sodium, Etoposide, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Delirium in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Delirium is a frequently misdiagnosed and inadequately treated neuropsychiatric complication most commonly observed in terminally ill cancer patients. To our knowledge this is the first report describing delirium in two patients aged less than 60 years and enrolled in an intensive chemotherapeutic protocol for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Case presentation Two female Caucasian acute promyelocytic leukemia patients aged 46 and 56 years developed delirium during their induction treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin. In both cases symptoms were initially attributed to all-trans retinoic acid that was therefore immediately suspended. In these two patients several situations may have contribute to the delirium: in patient 1 a previous psychiatric disorder, concomitant treatments with steroids and benzodiazepines, a severe infection and central nervous system bleeding while in patient 2 steroid treatment and isolation. In patient 1 delirium was treated with short-term low-doses of haloperidol while in patient 2 non-pharmacologic interventions had a beneficial role. When the diagnosis of delirium was clear, induction treatment was resumed and both patients completed their therapeutic program without any relapse of the psychiatric symptoms. Both patients are alive and in complete remission as far as their leukemia is concerned. Conclusions We suggest that patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia eligible to intensive chemotherapy should be carefully evaluated by a multisciplinary team including psychiatrists in order to early recognize symptoms of delirium and avoid inadequate treatments. In case of delirium, both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions may be considered. PMID:24237998

  9. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  11. Leukemia cutis and facial nerve palsy as presenting symptoms of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gold, Heidi L; Grynspan, David; Kanigsberg, Nordau

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia cutis and facial nerve palsy are rare presenting symptoms of leukemia. This report describes a case of acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) presenting with only these two symptoms, a presentation of ALL that, to our knowledge, has not been previously described. It serves to alert physicians to look for underlying malignancy in the setting of cutaneous findings associated with facial nerve palsy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. New Strategies in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Leukemogenesis and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gojo, Ivana; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have unraveled the complexity of leukemogenesis and provided the opportunity to design more personalized and pathophysiology-targeted therapeutic strategies. Despite the use of intensive chemotherapy, relapse remains the most common cause for therapeutic failure in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The interactions between leukemia stem cells (LSC) and marrow microenvironment appear to be critical in promoting therapeutic resistance through progressive acquisition of genetic and epigenetic changes within leukemia cells and immune evasion, resulting in leukemia cell survival. With advances in genomic sequencing efforts, epigenetic and phenotypic characterization, personalized therapeutic strategies aimed at critical leukemia survival mechanisms may be feasible in the near future. Here, we review select novel approaches to therapy of AML such as targeting LSC, altering leukemia/marrow microenvironment interactions, inhibiting DNA repair or cell cycle checkpoints, and augmenting immune-based anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25324141

  13. Functional Integration of Acute Myeloid Leukemia into the Vascular Niche

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Ronald P.; Masri, Azzah Al; Clark, Hilary A.; Asbaghi, Steven A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Dunlap, Jennifer; Fan, Guang; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Liu, Qiuying; Meacham, Amy; Hamlin, Kimberly L.; Hromas, Robert A.; Scott, Edward W.; Fleming, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the hematopoietic microenvironment that regulates blood cell production. Recent studies suggest the existence of functional cross-talk between hematologic malignancies and vascular endothelium. Here, we show that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) localizes to the vasculature in both patients and in a xenograft model. A significant number of vascular tissue-associated AML cells (V-AML) integrate into vasculature in vivo and can fuse with endothelial cells. V-AML cells acquire several endothelial cell-like characteristics, including the up-regulation of CD105, a receptor associated with activated endothelium. Remarkably, endothelial-integrated V-AML shows an almost 4-fold reduction in proliferative activity compared to non-vascular associated AML. Primary AML cells can be induced to down regulate the expression of their hematopoietic markers in vitro and differentiate into phenotypically and functionally-defined endothelial-like cells. After transplantation, these leukemia-derived endothelial cells are capable of giving rise to AML. Taken together, these novel functional interactions between AML cells and normal endothelium along with the reversible endothelial cell potential of AML suggest that vascular endothelium may serve as a previously unrecognized reservoir for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:24637335

  14. THE GENOMIC LANDSCAPE OF HYPODIPLOID ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Holmfeldt, Linda; Wei, Lei; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Walsh, Michael; Zhang, Jinghui; Ding, Li; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Churchman, Michelle; Andersson, Anna; Chen, Shann-Ching; McCastlain, Kelly; Becksfort, Jared; Ma, Jing; Wu, Gang; Patel, Samir N.; Heatley, Susan L.; Phillips, Letha A.; Song, Guangchun; Easton, John; Parker, Matthew; Chen, Xiang; Rusch, Michael; Boggs, Kristy; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Hedlund, Erin; Drenberg, Christina; Baker, Sharyn; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Huether, Robert; Lu, Charles; Fulton, Robert S.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Tabib, Yashodhan; Dooling, David J.; Ochoa, Kerri; Minden, Mark; Lewis, Ian D.; To, L. Bik; Marlton, Paula; Roberts, Andrew W.; Raca, Gordana; Stock, Wendy; Neale, Geoffrey; Drexler, Hans G.; Dickins, Ross A.; Ellison, David W.; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Carroll, Andrew J.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Wood, Brent; Borowitz, Michael J.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Downing, James R.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic basis of hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a subtype of ALL characterized by aneuploidy and poor outcome, is unknown. Genomic profiling of 124 hypodiploid ALL cases, including whole genome and exome sequencing of 40 cases, identified two subtypes that differ in severity of aneuploidy, transcriptional profile and submicroscopic genetic alterations. Near haploid cases with 24–31 chromosomes harbor alterations targeting receptor tyrosine kinase- and Ras signaling (71%) and the lymphoid transcription factor IKZF3 (AIOLOS; 13%). In contrast, low hypodiploid ALL with 32–39 chromosomes are characterized by TP53 alterations (91.2%) which are commonly present in non-tumor cells, and alterations of IKZF2 (HELIOS; 53%) and RB1 (41%). Both near haploid and low hypodiploid tumors exhibit activation of Ras- and PI3K signaling pathways, and are sensitive to PI3K inhibitors, indicating that these drugs should be explored as a new therapeutic strategy for this aggressive form of leukemia. PMID:23334668

  15. [Infections in the child with acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Carrillo, J M; Jiménez, E; Jiménez, R

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-five febrile episodes in 82 children with acute leukemia were studied; 46% of the patients were from urban and 54% from rural areas. The origin of the fever was identified in 91% of the episodes, prevailing pneumonia, septicemia, chickenpox and herpes zoster. The etiological agent was identified in 46% of the cases. A viral predominance was evident, and among them varicela-zoster, following in importance gram-negative bacteria. Histoplasma capsulatum and Pneumocystis carinii were isolated in two occassions each. Sepsis was found more frequently in children with active leukemia than in those in remission (p less than 0.001). Forty-four febrile episodes occurred in patients with less than 1,000 neutrophils/ul. The daily-risk rate of infection was higher in children fom rural than in those from urban areas (p less than 0.001). After clinical and laboratory studies, methicillin and gentamicin were used, in addition to carbenicillin or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is selected cases. This treatment was effective in 86% of the cases. Twelve (15%) children died, 6 of whom were in remission at that moment.

  16. Pharmacogenetics of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Lopez, Elixabet; Gutierrez-Camino, Angela; Bilbao-Aldaiturriaga, Nerea; Pombar-Gomez, Maria; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2014-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. Although treatment outcome has improved owing to advances in chemotherapy, there is still a group of patients for which therapy fails while some patients experience severe toxicity. In the last few years, several pharmacogenetic studies have been performed to search for markers of outcome and toxicity in pediatric ALL. However, to date, TPMT is the only pharmacogenetic marker in ALL with clinical guidelines for drug dosing. In this article, we will provide an overview of the most important findings carried out in pharmacogenetics for pediatric ALL, such as the interest drawn by methotrexate transporters in the context of methotrexate treatment. Even if most of the studies are centered on coding genes, we will also point to new approaches focusing on noncoding regions and epigenetic variation that could be interesting for consideration in the near future.

  17. Pneumomediastinum after acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chemotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Portelles, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum, pneumorachis and subcutaneous emphysema are frequently benign and most commonly result from air escaping from the upper respiratory tract, intrathoracic airways, or gastrointestinal tract. Gas can also be generated by certain infections or reach the mediastinal space from outside air after trauma or surgery. In the article presented by Showkat et al a 14-year-old male patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) under chemotherapy developed pneumomediastinum, pneumorachis and subcutaneous emphysema. In the author’s opinion, these complications were caused by ALL or chemotherapy that progressed to severe respiratory failure until the patient finally died in the intensive care unit. I would like to underline some important points, which have been raised following a paper published in the October issue of World Journal of Clinical Cases. PMID:24868520

  18. Dendritic cell vaccination in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Anguille, Sébastien; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Smits, Evelien L; Berneman, Zwi N

    2012-07-01

    The prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains dismal, with a 5-year overall survival rate of only 5.2% for the continuously growing subgroup of AML patients older than 65 years. These patients are generally not considered eligible for intensive chemotherapy and/or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation because of high treatment-related morbidity and mortality, emphasizing the need for novel, less toxic, treatment alternatives. It is within this context that immunotherapy has gained attention in recent years. In this review, we focus on the use of dendritic cell (DC) vaccines for immunotherapy of AML. DC are central orchestrators of the immune system, bridging innate and adaptive immunity and critical to the induction of anti-leukemic immunity. We discuss the rationale and basic principles of DC-based therapy for AML and review the clinical experience that has been obtained so far with this form of immunotherapy for patients with AML.

  19. Precision Medicine for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E.; Hourigan, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints. PMID:26514194

  20. Precision medicine for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E; Hourigan, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints.

  1. Histiocytic differentiation in acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ru, Yong-xin; Dong, Shu-xu; Zhao, Shi-xuan; Liang, Hao-yue; Wang, Hui-jun; Hu, Xiao; Mi, Ying-chang; Wang, Jian-xiang

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid histocytes of dendritic cells (DCs), Langerhans cells (LCs), and macrophages in varied tissues, as leukemic blasts in acute monoblastic and monocytic leukemia (AML-M5a and M5b), are derived from monocyte progenitors in bone marrow. Based on DC induction from hematopoietic stem cells, myeloid progenitors, and monocytes, and occasional expressions of histocyte-related antigens (HRAs) in M5, we presume some M5 cases share histiocytic phenotypes originally. To clarify the conception, 93 M5 cases were tested with antibodies for HRAs, CD1a, CD163, S100, fascin, and langerin by immunostaining, and their morphologic characteristics were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. The study revealed that 23 M5 cases were positive for two or more kinds of HRAs and shared a serial of histocytic immunophenotype and morphologic features, which were closely associated with M5b subtype and expression of CD14 in M5.

  2. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Barajas-Diego, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    The latest scientific findings in the field of cancer research are redefining our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of the disease, moving the emphasis toward the study of the mechanisms underlying the alteration of the normal processes of cellular differentiation. The concepts best exemplifying this new vision are those of cancer stem cells and tumoral reprogramming. The study of the biology of acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs) has provided seminal experimental evidence supporting these new points of view. Furthermore, in the case of B cells, it has been shown that all the stages of their normal development show a tremendous degree of plasticity, allowing them to be reprogrammed to other cellular types, either normal or leukemic. Here we revise the most recent discoveries in the fields of B-cell developmental plasticity and B-ALL research and discuss their interrelationships and their implications for our understanding of the biology of the disease. PMID:22031225

  3. T-cell transcription factor GATA-3 is an immunophenotypic marker of acute leukemias with T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, David M; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Pelton, Ashley; Unitt, Christine

    2017-07-01

    T-cell transcription factor GATA-3, known to play a role in early T-cell development and in the development of T-cell neoplasms, is expressed at high levels in fetal and adult thymus, as well as in acute leukemias with T-cell differentiation, including T-lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (22/22 cases), early T-cell precursor lymphoblastic leukemia (11/11 cases), and mixed-phenotype acute leukemia, T/myeloid (4/5 cases), but only rarely in acute myeloid leukemia/myeloid sarcoma (1/36 cases), and not in B-lymphoblastic leukemia (0/16 cases). In contrast, T-bet, the other T-cell transcription factor that controls Th1/Th2 T-cell fate, is not expressed to any significant extent in immature thymocytes or in cases of T-lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia/myeloid sarcoma, but is expressed in most cases (15/16) of B-lymphoblastic leukemia and in mixed-phenotype acute leukemia, B/myeloid. GATA-3-positive acute leukemias with T-cell differentiation were also found to express proto-oncogene C-MYC, in an average of 52% of neoplastic cells, which, along with GATA-3, may contribute to leukemogenesis, as suggested by transgenic mouse models. We conclude that GATA-3 is a sensitive and specific marker for the diagnosis of acute leukemias with T-cell differentiation and may be a useful addition to the panel of immunophenotypic markers for the diagnostic evaluation of acute leukemias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia by retinoids.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, P; Wang, Z Z; Degos, L

    2007-01-01

    We review the role of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The combination of ATRA and conventional anthracycline-ARA-C chemotherapy (CT) has clearly demonstrated its superiority over CT alone (in terms of relapse and survival) in newly diagnosed APL. Combination treatment probably also reduces the incidence of initial failures, and complete remission (CR) rates greater than 90% are now regularly reported in large multicenter trials. Some randomized studies strongly suggest that prolonged maintenance treatment (for 1 or 2 years) with ATRA and low-dose CT, and possibly very early introduction of anthracycline CT during induction treatment, may reduce the incidence of relapse. With those treatments, the relapse risk appears to be only 10%-15%, although it remains greater in patients who initially have high white blood cell counts (often associated with variant M3 morphology, short bcr3 isoform, etc.) and patients with residual disease detectable by RT-PCR at the end of consolidation courses. In those patients, addition of arsenic derivatives to induction or consolidation treatment (or both treatments together) may prove useful and is currently being tested. ATRA syndrome (now generally called APL differentiation syndrome, as it is also seen with arsenic derivatives) remains the major side effect of ATRA treatment. It occurs in 10%-15% of patients and is currently fatal in at least 10% of them. Rapid onset of CT or high dose steroids (or both) should improve its outcome. A sizeable proportion of APL patients who relapse after ATRA and CT can be durably salvaged by the same treatment followed by allogeneic or autologous stem cell transplantation, provided the transplant (in the autologous setting) is RT-PCR-negative. However, in relapsing APL arsenic derivatives (mainly arsenic trioxide) are now considered to be the reference treatment. Some of the current issues with ATRA treatment in newly diagnosed APL include

  5. Serological identification of immunogenic antigens in acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Li, Fuyang; Liu, Xinping; Yao, Libo

    2005-05-01

    In order to improve disease-free survival and potentially a cure, it is necessary to identify more potent leukemia antigen. Here, we defined the acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (LAA) recognized by the humoral immune system for the first time. We have applied the method of serologic analysis of recombinant cDNA expression library (SEREX) on acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5), followed by DNA sequencing and analyzing of positive clones. Then, the reactivity of normal and other leukemia sera with positive clones were performed. Thirty-five distinct novel antigens reactive with autologous IgG were identified by SEREX analysis on an acute monocytic leukemia patient and were characterized according to cDNA sequence and the reactivity with allogeneic sera. Twenty of the 35 antigens identified in this study were recognized by IgG antibodies in normal sera, and the remaining 15 were recognized exclusively by sera from allogeneic leukemia patients but not by normal donor sera, suggested that the immune response to these 15 antigens are leukemia related. The 15 immunogenic antigens detected by immune responses in the autologous host facilitate the identification of epitopes recognized by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and are potential candidates for diagnosis and immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  6. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Endocarditis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    J, Barshay; A, Nemets; A, Ducach; G, Lugassy

    2008-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a rarely encountered complication among leukemia patient during induction therapy. We describe a young patient who developed prolonged high fever after aggressive chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa endocarditis was found to be the etiology for the febrile state. Our purpose is to emphasize the need for an early diagnosis of this rare, albeit treatable complication. PMID:23675106

  7. Acute erythroid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia in a cat.

    PubMed

    Shirani, Dariush; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Aldavood, Seyed Javid; Seddigh, Hamideh Salari; Fathi, Ezzatollah

    2011-04-01

    Dysplastic features of erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages were observed in a cat with acute erythroid leukemia. We demonstrated that flow cytometry analysis of the expression of glycophorin A and CD71 by neoplastic cells can be helpful in the diagnosis of this type of feline leukemia.

  8. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  9. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-30

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Wieman, Eric A; Guan, Xiuqin; Jakubowski, Ann A; Steinherz, Peter G; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2009-12-29

    We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML)) in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8%) displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5%) displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6%) did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  11. Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-06

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; BCR-ABL1 Fusion Protein Expression; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Donor cell-derived acute myeloblastic leukemia after allogeneic peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Zafer; Tezcan, Gulsun; Karauzum, Sibel Berker; Kupesiz, Alphan; Manguoglu, Ayse Esra; Yesilipek, Akif; Luleci, Guven; Hazar, Volkan

    2006-11-01

    Despite its rarity, donor cell leukemia (DCL) is a most intriguing entity. We report here the case of a 5 year-old girl with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and normal female karyotype who developed acute myeloblastic leukemia with a karyotype of 46, X, t(X; 7) (p21; p11.2), der(7) t(3; 7) (q13.3; q22) 5 months after peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from her HLA-matched sister. We performed the analysis of short tandem repeat sequence markers to DNA obtained from donor peripheral blood, patient's peripheral blood including leukemic blasts and patient's hair root. This analysis showed that the leukemic blood DNA matched the donor blood DNA and not the patient's DNA, thus confirming DCL. To our knowledge, this is the first case of DCL after peripheral blood SCT for juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    MedlinePlus

    ... terminal C/EBPalpha mutation. Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2010 Mar;49(3):237-41. doi: 10.1002/gcc. ... EBPalpha), in acute myeloid leukemia. Nat Genet. 2001 Mar;27(3):263-70. Citation on PubMed Renneville ...

  14. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects your ... this is unknown. Having an identical twin with ALL Someone who has an identical twin who develops ...

  15. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Cancer.gov

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers.

  16. Measurements of treatment response in childhood acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Coustan-Smith, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Measuring response to chemotherapy is a backbone of the clinical management of patients with acute leukemia. This task has historically relied on the ability to identify leukemic cells among normal bone marrow cells by their morphology. However, more accurate ways to identify leukemic cells have been developed, which allow their detection even when they are present in small numbers that would be impossible to be recognized by microscopic inspection. The levels of such minimal residual disease (MRD) are now widely used as parameters for risk assignment in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and increasingly so in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, different MRD monitoring methods may produce discrepant results. Moreover, results of morphologic examination may be in stark contradiction to MRD measurements, thus creating confusion and complicating treatment decisions. This review focusses on the relation between results of different approaches to measure response to treatment and define relapse in childhood acute leukemia. PMID:23320002

  17. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Autologous stem cell transplantation for adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude

    2002-03-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation using marrow or peripheral blood is routinely used to consolidate patients with acute myelocytic leukemia in complete remission. The situation is less clear for adult acute lymphocytic leukemia in which results achieved with all strategies are disappointing. In acute myelocytic leukemia, autografts should be done in patients with good and standard risk factors. Patients with high-risk acute myelocytic leukemia defined by poor cytogenetics or failure to achieve remission with the first induction course, should proceed to allogeneic stem cell transplantation with the best available human leukocyte antigen-identical donor (family or unrelated), and the nature of the conditioning regimen (myelo-ablative or non-myelo-ablative) should be decided in relation to age, and the patient's clinical condition. Results of autografting in acute myelocytic leukemia rely strongly on the quality of the graft. Higher doses of infused stem cells translate into lower relapse rates. Marrow purging with cyclophosphamide derivatives also diminishes the relapse incidence. Autologous stem cell transplantations using peripheral blood are presently preferred to marrow as the source of stem cells, but an aggressive prior in vivo purge (high-dose consolidation course(s) before cytaphereses) is then mandatory. In good-risk acute myelocytic leukemia, autografting is superior to high-dose ARA-C; in standard-risk acute myelocytic leukemia, both are supposedly equivalent. There is no prospective randomized study testing the two approaches in the good-standard-risk population. We presently test the combination of marrow and blood both purged by mafosfamide. In adult acute lymphocytic leukemia, good-risk patients get the best benefit from autografting over conventional chemotherapy. Maintenance chemotherapy after transplant is likely to bring benefit. Research in progress aims at facilitating access of the largest number of patients to autografting and at

  19. [Problems in maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemias in adults].

    PubMed

    Gürtler, R; Raderecht, C

    1975-01-01

    Problems of maintaining therapy for acute myelocytic leukemias in adults are discussed. The analysis of the maintaining therapy in 22 patients affected with an acute myelocytic leukemia and living for more than 6 months revealed that the interval therapy with a high dosage of cytostatic combinations in the sense of the COAP scheme is preferable compared with the daily administration of 6-mercaptopurin, in addition methotrexate twice a week. Reasons for this are discussed.

  20. Liver transplantation in an adolescent with acute liver failure from acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Reddi, D M; Barbas, A S; Castleberry, A W; Rege, A S; Vikraman, D S; Brennan, T V; Ravindra, K V; Collins, B H; Sudan, D L; Lagoo, A S; Martin, A E

    2014-03-01

    The most common identifiable causes of acute liver failure in pediatric patients are infection, drug toxicity, metabolic disease, and autoimmune processes. In many cases, the etiology of acute liver failure cannot be determined. Acute leukemia is an extremely rare cause of acute liver failure, and liver transplantation has traditionally been contraindicated in this setting. We report a case of acute liver failure in a previously healthy 15-yr-old male from pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He underwent liver transplantation before the diagnosis was established, and has subsequently received chemotherapy for pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He is currently alive 31 months post-transplantation. The published literature describing acute lymphoblastic leukemia as a cause of acute liver failure is reviewed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. [Acute myeloid leukemia originating from the same leukemia clone after the complete remission of acute lymphoid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Isao; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Amaya, Hiroshi; Kiyosaki, Masanobu; Kawakami, Keiichiro; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Akihiro; Hino, Ken-ichiro; Tomoyasu, Shigeru

    2003-09-01

    A 22-year-old female was diagnosed as having acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) in February 1995, from the findings of peroxidase negative, CD10+, CD19+, TdT+ and rearrangement of IgH and TCR beta. AdVP (doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) therapy achieved a complete remission (CR). Bone marrow transplantation had to be abandoned because of the lack of an HLA-identical donor. Intensification therapy was thus carried out repeatedly. In June 1998, myeloblast with Auer rods, peroxidase positive, CD13+, CD33+ and HLA-DR+, appeared. The patient was diagnosed as having lineage switch acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from ALL. Though A-DMP (cytosine arabinoside, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine) therapy was resistant, AdVP therapy led to a CR. The patient died of cardiotoxicity from anthracyclines in February 1999. From the results of the Ramasamy method using the clonal rearrangements of the Ig heavy chain gene locus, the origin of the pathological cells of ALL and AML was indicated to be the same leukemia clone.

  2. Acute promyelocytic leukemia: new issues on pathogenesis and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Vitoux, Dominique; Nasr, Rihab; de The, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia appears to be one of the best understood among human malignancies. The ability of retinoic acid (RA) and arsenic trioxide to directly target the oncogenic promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic receptor A (PML-RARA) fusion protein also made this disease the first model for oncogene-targeted therapies. A set of recent data has significantly increased the complexity of our view of acute promyelocytic leukemia pathogenesis, as well as of therapeutic response. This review summarizes and discusses these findings, which yield novels questions and models.

  3. Fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Leptidis, John; Aloizos, Stavros; Chlorokostas, Panagiotis; Gourgiotis, Stavros

    2014-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a hemopoietic myeloid stem cell neoplasm. It is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults,and its incidence increases with age. Acute myeloid leukemia is characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. As the leukemic cells keep filling the bone marrow, symptoms of the disease started to appear: fatigue, bleeding, increased frequency of infections, and shortness of breath. Cardiac tamponade or pericardial tamponade is an acute medical condition in which the accumulation of pericardial fluid prevents the function of the heart. Signs and symptoms include Beck triad (hypotension, distended neck veins, and muffled heart sounds), paradoxus pulses, tachycardia, tachypnea, and breathlessness. Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade are rare and severe complications of leukemia; they often develop during the radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or infections in the course of leukemia. This study sought to assess the fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found no reports in the literature linking these 2 clinical entities. Although the patient had no signs or diagnosis of AML previously, this case was remarkable for the rapidly progressive symptoms and the fatal outcome. The pericardial effusion reaccumulated rapidly after its initial drainage; it is a possible explanation that the leukemic cells interfered with cardiac activity or that they decreased their contractility myocytes secreting a toxic essence.

  4. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-02

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Ph-Like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Fatal stimulation of acute myeloid leukemia blasts by pegfilgrastim.

    PubMed

    Duval, Celine; Boucher, Stephanie; Moulin, Jean-Charles; Gourieux, Benedicte; Mauvieux, Laurent; Leveque, Dominique; Herbrecht, Raoul

    2014-11-01

    We herein report the case of a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia with fatal outcome attributable to pharmacokinetics of pegfilgrastim. An unexplained blast proliferation in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia following cytotoxic induction chemotherapy was investigated in depth. Myeloblast hyperstimulation was likely related to pegfilgrastim, the long half-life of which extended the duration of side-effects, resulting in massive and rapidly fatal leukemia cell proliferation. Pegfilgrastim can cause unexpected deleterious effects in acute myeloid leukemia. We, thus, recommend administering drugs with a shorter half-life, such as filgrastim or lenograstim, to reduce infection incidence in patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy associated with a clinically significant incidence of febrile neutropenia. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. [Our experiences in the treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Jelić, S; Dragović, M; Vidaković, B; Plecas, V

    1976-01-01

    This paper deals with observations concerning treatment of acute leukemia in the Department of haematology of The Clinical hospital of Belgrade during the period from 1970 to 1975, and with results of the treatment itself. During the last five years, 27 patients with different types of acute leukemia were treated. The type of acute leukemia was determined using cytological criteria of Levy and Lortholary and cytochemical criteria as described by Hayhoe. One thrid of the patients died during the first days of hospitalisation, before any effect of cytostatic treatment could be evaluated. The cause of death in those patients was septic shock, intracranial haemorrhage or cardiovascular colapsus; initial signs of those complications of acute leukemia were allready present before diagnosis. Those data point to the fact that diagnosis of acute leukemia is often made too late, when irreversible ocmplications of the disease are allready established. Patients over sixty, often "fragile" to aggresive cytostatic therapy, may enter complete and relatively long lasting remission with induction therapy cosisting of 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate only. Allthough the number of cases was rather limited, the authors had rather disappointing results with the 06-LA-66 protocole in adult lymphoblastic leukemia. The first with COAP treatment protocole seem encouraging. Adequate cytostatic therapy was in several cases impossible, duo to the lack of adequate substitution therapy; such inadequate cytostatic therapy resulted in partial remissions with a rather poor quality survival. A beeter cooperation is needed between hospital centers and institutions which provide matherial for the substitution theapy.

  7. [Acute myeloid leukemia. Genetic diagnostics and molecular therapy].

    PubMed

    Schlenk, R F; Döhner, K; Döhner, H

    2013-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous disease. The genetic diagnostics have become an essential component in the initial work-up for disease classification, prognostication and prediction. More and more promising molecular targeted therapeutics are becoming available. A prerequisite for individualized treatment strategies is a fast pretherapeutic molecular screening including the fusion genes PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1 and CBFB-MYH11 as well as mutations in the genes NPM1, FLT3 and CEBPA. Promising new therapeutic approaches include the combination of all- trans retinoic acid and arsentrioxid in acute promyelocytic leukemia, the combination of intensive chemotherapy with KIT inhibitors in core-binding factor AML and FLT3 inhibitors in AML with FLT3 mutation, as well as gemtuzumab ozogamicin therapy in patients with low and intermediate cytogenetic risk profiles. With the advent of the next generation sequencing technologies it is expected that new therapeutic targets will be identified. These insights will lead to a further individualization of AML therapy.

  8. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Speed of leukemia development and genetic diversity in xenograft models of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Poglio, Sandrine; Lewandowski, Daniel; Calvo, Julien; Caye, Aurélie; Gros, Audrey; Laharanne, Elodie; Leblanc, Thierry; Landman-Parker, Judith; Baruchel, André; Soulier, Jean; Ballerini, Paola; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Pflumio, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) develops through accumulation of multiple genomic alterations within T-cell progenitors resulting in clonal heterogeneity among leukemic cells. Human T-ALL xeno-transplantation in immunodeficient mice is a gold standard approach to study leukemia biology and we recently uncovered that the leukemia development is more or less rapid depending on T-ALL sample. The resulting human leukemia may arise through genetic selection and we previously showed that human T-ALL development in immune-deficient mice is significantly enhanced upon CD7+/CD34+ leukemic cell transplantations. Here we investigated the genetic characteristics of CD7+/CD34+ and CD7+/CD34− cells from newly diagnosed human T-ALL and correlated it to the speed of leukemia development. We observed that CD7+/CD34+ or CD7+/CD34− T-ALL cells that promote leukemia within a short-time period are genetically similar, as well as xenograft-derived leukemia resulting from both cell fractions. In the case of delayed T-ALL growth CD7+/CD34+ or CD7+/CD34− cells were either genetically diverse, the resulting xenograft leukemia arising from different but branched subclones present in the original sample, or similar, indicating decreased fitness to mouse micro-environment. Altogether, our work provides new information relating the speed of leukemia development in xenografts to the genetic diversity of T-ALL cell compartments. PMID:27191650

  11. Clofarabine or Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Followed By Decitabine or Observation in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Reduced Intensity Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With De Novo or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-25

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. GTI-2040 and High-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Expression of CD71 by flow cytometry in acute leukemias: More often seen in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pande, Amit; Dorwal, Pranav; Jain, Dharmendra; Tyagi, Neetu; Mehra, Simmi; Sachdev, Ritesh; Raina, Vimarsh

    2016-01-01

    CD71 is a marker that has been usually used for identifying dysplasia in the erythroid series. We have tried to evaluate the expression of CD71 in various types of acute leukemias. We studied 48 patients of acute leukemia, of which 25 were acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 13 were precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), 8 were T-ALL, and 2 were mixed phenotype acute leukemia (T/myeloid) as per the WHO classification. We found that the expression of CD71 was most prevalent in AMLs (84%), followed by T-ALL (50%) and least in B-ALL (30%). This finding clearly shows the higher expression of CD71 in AMLs compared to other common type of leukemias, such as B- and T-ALL. We suggest that the high expression of CD71 in AMLs could be used as a diagnostic marker and may also be used for minimal residual disease analysis after further studies in posttreatment scenario. This study is the first of its kind in the South Asian population.

  15. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Progress Through Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun J.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pieters, Rob; Schrappe, Martin; Biondi, Andrea; Vora, Ajay; Baruchel, André; Silverman, Lewis B.; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Escherich, Gabriele; Horibe, Keizo; Benoit, Yves C.M.; Izraeli, Shai; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Liang, Der-Cherng; Downing, James R.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. Methods A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was reviewed and revised by the committee chairs of the major ALL study groups. Results With long-term survival rates for ALL approaching 90% and the advent of high-resolution genome-wide analyses, several international study groups or consortia were established to conduct collaborative research to further improve outcome. As a result, treatment strategies have been improved for several subtypes of ALL, such as infant, MLL-rearranged, Philadelphia chromosome–positive, and Philadelphia chromosome–like ALL. Many recurrent genetic abnormalities that respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and multiple genetic determinants of drug resistance and toxicities have been identified to help develop targeted therapy. Several genetic polymorphisms have been recognized that show susceptibility to developing ALL and that help explain the racial/ethnic differences in the incidence of ALL. Conclusion The information gained from collaborative studies has helped decipher the heterogeneity of ALL to help improve personalized treatment, which will further advance the current high cure rate and the quality of life for children and adolescents with ALL. PMID:26304874

  16. [Prognostic factors in acute nonlymphoid leukemias].

    PubMed

    Capelli, D; Tedeschi, A; Montillo, M; Corvatta, L; Bartocci, C; Montroni, M; Leoni, P

    1996-10-01

    Our retrospective study was aimed at assessing parameters affecting the prognosis of acute non lymphoid leukemia (ANLL). Since 1988 to 1994 we observed 84 patients: 52 males, 32 females. For each patient we considered at diagnosis: age, fever, performance status, platelets, hemoglobin and white blood cell count, extramidollary disease, bone marrow blastosis, phenotype and cytogenetic abnormalities of blasts cells. All the parameters listed above were correlated with the time to achieve the complete remission (CR), CR duration and the overall survival. Statistical tests as t-student and chi square test were used. Statistical analysis of the parameters considered revealed that the only value affecting the achievement of a CR was the age. The prognostic significance of immunophenotyping in ANLL has been a controversial issue, with a number of conflicting reports. In our study only the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase was significantly associated with prognosis. Our study, as data reported in literature, confirms that the prognostic impact of the various parameters in ANLL is controversial. The study of prognostic factors and of the immunophenotype is important to identify the clinical and the biologic profile of the disease and to evaluate the optimal post-remission treatment.

  17. Elastase mediated fibrinolysis in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Oudijk, E J; Nieuwenhuis, H K; Bos, R; Fijnheer, R

    2000-06-01

    The bleeding syndrome of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is complex and consists of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and hyperfibrinolysis. Elastase, derived from malignant promyelocytes, is believed to mediate the fibrinogeno- and fibrinolysis by aspecific proteolysis. In this study we measured the role of elastase in fifteen patients with APL by using an assay for elastase degraded fibrin(ogen) and the results were compared with those obtained in patients with sepsis induced DIC. High levels of elastase were observed in sepsis and APL. The levels of fibrinogen and fibrin degradation products were significantly higher in APL patients compared to patients with sepsis induced DIC. Nevertheless, the level of elastase degraded fibrin(ogen) was higher in the sepsis group (635.3 ng/ml, compared to 144.3 ng/ml in APL; p <0.0001). So, the enormous increase in fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products in APL cannot be explained by elastase activity. This study suggests a minor role for elastase mediated proteolysis in the hemorrhagic diathesis in APL patients.

  18. Novel therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Raoul; Vairy, Stéphanie; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Bittencourt, Henrique

    2017-08-01

    During recent decades, the prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved dramatically, nowadays, reaching a cure rate of almost 90%. These results are due to a better management and combination of old therapies, refined risk-group stratification and emergence of minimal residual disease (MRD) combined with treatment's intensification for high-risk subgroups. However, the subgroup of patients with refractory/relapsed ALL still presents a dismal prognosis indicating necessity for innovative therapeutic approaches. Areas covered: We performed an exhaustive review of current first-line therapies for childhood ALL in the worldwide main consortia, summarized the major advances for front-line and relapse treatment and highlighted recent and promising innovative therapies with an overview of the most promising ongoing clinical trials. Expert opinion: Two major avenues marked the beginning of 21(st) century. First, is the introduction of tyrosine-kinase inhibitor coupled to chemotherapy for treatment of Philadelphia positive ALL opening new treatment possibilities for the recently identified subgroup of Ph-like ALL. Second, is the breakthrough of immunotherapy, notably CAR T-cell and specific antibody-based therapy, with remarkable success observed in initial studies. This review gives an insight on current knowledge in these innovative therapeutic directions, summarizes currently ongoing clinical trials and addresses challenges these approaches are faced with.

  19. Acute myeloid leukemia in adults: a case-control study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, R A; Darwin, C; McKinney, P A; Roberts, B; Richards, I D; Bird, C C

    1988-10-01

    This paper reports the results of a case-control analysis of 161 cases of acute myeloid leukemia and 310 matched hospital controls. The patients were interviewed between 1982 and 1986. The study shows a weak association for cases with previous malignant disease. Furnace workers show excess risks. Urticaria and vertigo are in excess, as well as some aspects of family medical histories, including multiple sclerosis and cases of leukemia/lymphoma in blood relations.

  20. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Transcription control by the ENL YEATS domain in acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Michael A.; Scott, Thomas G.; Li, Bin E.; Xie, Huafeng; Paulk, Joshiawa; Seo, Hyuk-Soo; Souza, Amanda; Roberts, Justin M.; Dastjerdi, Shiva; Buckley, Dennis L.; Sanjana, Neville E.; Shalem, Ophir; Nabet, Behnam; Zeid, Rhamy; Offei-Addo, Nana K.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Zhang, Feng; Orkin, Stuart H.; Winter, Georg E.; Bradner, James E.

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent chromosomal translocations involving the mixed lineage leukemia gene (MLL) give rise to a highly aggressive acute leukemia associated with poor clinical outcome1. The preferential involvement of chromatin-associated factors in MLL rearrangement belies a dependency on transcription control2. Despite recent progress made in targeting chromatin regulators in cancer3, available therapies for this well-characterized disease remain inadequate, prompting the present effort to qualify new targets for therapeutic intervention. Using unbiased, emerging CRISPR-Cas9 technology to perform a genome-scale loss-of-function screen in MLL-AF4-positive acute leukemia, we identified ENL (eleven-nineteen leukemia) as an unrecognized dependency particularly indispensable for proliferation in vitro and in vivo. To explain the mechanistic role for ENL in leukemia pathogenesis and dynamic transcription control, we pursued a chemical genetic strategy utilizing targeted protein degradation. Acute ENL loss suppresses transcription initiation and elongation genome-wide, with pronounced effects at genes featuring disproportionate ENL load. Importantly, ENL-dependent leukemic growth was contingent upon an intact YEATS chromatin reader domain. These findings reveal a novel dependency in acute leukemia and a first mechanistic rational for disrupting the YEATS domain in disease. PMID:28241139

  2. Pax5 expression in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianglan; Lin, Zhenhua; Kim, Insun

    2003-12-01

    The Pax5 gene encodes the B-cell-specific activator protein which is a key regulator in development and differentiation of B-cell. We studied the expression of Pax5 in hematologic malignancies to evaluate the diagnostic utility as a B cell marker. Materials included 70 B cell lymphomas, 26 T cell lymphomas, 53 acute leukemias, and 6 multiple myelomas (MMs). Representative areas from the paraffin embedded tissues were selected for tissue microarray, and the expressions of Pax5 was immunohistochemically evaluated. Pax5 was strongly expressed in most of the B cell lymphomas; 44 of 47 diffuse large B cell lymphomas (93.6%), 15 of 16 marginal zone B cell lymphomas (93.8%), all 3 mantle cell lymphomas, 2 follicular lymphomas, and 2 Burkitt's lymphomas (100%). However, Pax5 was expressed in only one of 26 T cell lymphomas. Among leukemias, it was expressed in 10 of the 14 B acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALLs) (72.4%), but also in 3 of the 6 T ALLs (50%), 13 of the 26 acute myelogenous leukemias (AMLs) (50%) and in all 3 ALL arising in chronic myelogenous leukemias and 4 mixed B ALL and AML. In MMs, Pax5 was negative in all cases. We concluded that Pax5 is very useful B cell marker in classification of lymphomas, but not of acute leukemias.

  3. Pax5 expression in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and acute leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianglan; Lin, Zhenhua; Kim, Insun

    2003-01-01

    The Pax5 gene encodes the B-cell-specific activator protein which is a key regulator in development and differentiation of B-cell. We studied the expression of Pax5 in hematologic malignancies to evaluate the diagnostic utility as a B cell marker. Materials included 70 B cell lymphomas, 26 T cell lymphomas, 53 acute leukemias, and 6 multiple myelomas (MMs). Representative areas from the paraffin embedded tissues were selected for tissue microarray, and the expressions of Pax5 was immunohistochemically evaluated. Pax5 was strongly expressed in most of the B cell lymphomas; 44 of 47 diffuse large B cell lymphomas (93.6%), 15 of 16 marginal zone B cell lymphomas (93.8%), all 3 mantle cell lymphomas, 2 follicular lymphomas, and 2 Burkitt's lymphomas (100%). However, Pax5 was expressed in only one of 26 T cell lymphomas. Among leukemias, it was expressed in 10 of the 14 B acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALLs) (72.4%), but also in 3 of the 6 T ALLs (50%), 13 of the 26 acute myelogenous leukemias (AMLs) (50%) and in all 3 ALL arising in chronic myelogenous leukemias and 4 mixed B ALL and AML. In MMs, Pax5 was negative in all cases. We concluded that Pax5 is very useful B cell marker in classification of lymphomas, but not of acute leukemias. PMID:14676435

  4. Bacillus cereus bacteremia in an adult with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Funada, H; Uotani, C; Machi, T; Matsuda, T; Nonomura, A

    1988-03-01

    Bacillus cereus, which used to be considered non-pathogenic, was isolated from the blood of a patient with acute leukemia who was receiving intensive chemotherapy. Fatal bacteremia developed with a clinical syndrome of acute gastroenteritis, followed by both meningoencephalitis with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple liver abscesses probably caused by infective vasculitis. Surveillance stool cultures revealed colonization with the organism prior to the onset of diarrhea, and repetitive blood cultures were found to be positive. Thus, this case suggested some new important clinicopathologic features of true B. cereus bacteremia complicating acute leukemia.

  5. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Paul; Sangster, Cheryl; Lindsay, Scott; Vogelnest, Larry

    2014-12-01

    A captive, 31-yr-old, intact male pygmy hippopotamus presented with nonspecific signs of weight loss, inappetence, diarrhea, and lethargy. After 5 wk of diagnostic investigation and symptomatic treatment, an acute leukemic process with concurrent polycystic kidney disease was suspected. The animal's condition continued to deteriorate prompting euthanasia. Necropsy, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical examination confirmed acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia and polycystic kidneys. Acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia has not previously been documented in this species; however, polycystic kidney disease has been reported. This case report adds to the increasing number of pygmy hippopotamuses diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease and describes acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia, a previously unreported disease of this species.

  6. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies. PMID:27870639

  9. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-11-19

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies.

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumor Lysis Syndrome in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D’Angelo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  11. Eosinophilia in a cat with acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gilroy, Cornelia; Forzán, María; Drew, Anne; Vernau, William

    2011-01-01

    A 4-year-old castrated male domestic shorthaired cat with a history of vomiting and anorexia was diagnosed with leukemia with marked hepatic and splenic infiltration and concurrent eosinophilia with marked tissue infiltration. Despite thorough immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical immunophenotyping, the cell lineage of the leukemia was not identified. PMID:22379202

  12. Eosinophilia in a cat with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gilroy, Cornelia; Forzán, María; Drew, Anne; Vernau, William

    2011-09-01

    A 4-year-old castrated male domestic shorthaired cat with a history of vomiting and anorexia was diagnosed with leukemia with marked hepatic and splenic infiltration and concurrent eosinophilia with marked tissue infiltration. Despite thorough immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical immunophenotyping, the cell lineage of the leukemia was not identified.

  13. Acute leukemia classification by ensemble particle swarm model selection.

    PubMed

    Escalante, Hugo Jair; Montes-y-Gómez, Manuel; González, Jesús A; Gómez-Gil, Pilar; Altamirano, Leopoldo; Reyes, Carlos A; Reta, Carolina; Rosales, Alejandro

    2012-07-01

    Acute leukemia is a malignant disease that affects a large proportion of the world population. Different types and subtypes of acute leukemia require different treatments. In order to assign the correct treatment, a physician must identify the leukemia type or subtype. Advanced and precise methods are available for identifying leukemia types, but they are very expensive and not available in most hospitals in developing countries. Thus, alternative methods have been proposed. An option explored in this paper is based on the morphological properties of bone marrow images, where features are extracted from medical images and standard machine learning techniques are used to build leukemia type classifiers. This paper studies the use of ensemble particle swarm model selection (EPSMS), which is an automated tool for the selection of classification models, in the context of acute leukemia classification. EPSMS is the application of particle swarm optimization to the exploration of the search space of ensembles that can be formed by heterogeneous classification models in a machine learning toolbox. EPSMS does not require prior domain knowledge and it is able to select highly accurate classification models without user intervention. Furthermore, specific models can be used for different classification tasks. We report experimental results for acute leukemia classification with real data and show that EPSMS outperformed the best results obtained using manually designed classifiers with the same data. The highest performance using EPSMS was of 97.68% for two-type classification problems and of 94.21% for more than two types problems. To the best of our knowledge, these are the best results reported for this data set. Compared with previous studies, these improvements were consistent among different type/subtype classification tasks, different features extracted from images, and different feature extraction regions. The performance improvements were statistically significant

  14. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  15. [Viral hepatitis B and C in patients with acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, T S; Shalaev, V A; Shpeer, E L; Terskikh, V A; Nizhechik, Iu S

    1996-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassay has been used in 102 patients with acute leukemia (AL) and 340 donors to identify serological markers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV): HB-sAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc, anti-HBc IgM, HBeAg, anti-HBe. At the moment of AL diagnosis in 50 patients with acute myeloid leukemia and in 28 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at least one HBV marker was found in 68% and 71%, respectively, HBsAg in 12% of patients with AML and 25% of those with ALL. In remission maintenance, HBsAg was registered in 83% of patients with AML and 44% of those with ALL. Anti-HCV in diagnosis of acute leukemia were detected in 1.28% of patients, 12 months after in 40% with ALL and 67% with AML. In examination of the donors at least one HBV marker was found in 36%, HBsAg in 2.1%, anti-HCV in 1.86% of the examinees. It is inferred that acute leukemia patients are often infected with HBV and in long-term follow-up demonstrate reactivation of viral infection, though infection with mutant B viruses is also possible. HCV is a main cause of posttransfusion hepatitis in this group of patients.

  16. Acute monoblastic leukemia in a FeLV-positive cat.

    PubMed

    Prihirunkit, Kreangsak; Narkkong, Nual Anong; Apibal, Suntaree

    2008-03-01

    A 1.6-year-old male domestic short hair cat was brought to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Kasetsart University, with signs of severe anemia, depression, and general lymph node enlargement. Complete blood count revealed leukocytosis and massive undifferentiated blasts. Testing for antibodies specific to feline leukemia virus (FeLV) was positive, and FeLV nucleic acid was confirmed by nested polymerase chain reaction. Base on cytochemistry and ultrastructure, the cat was diagnosed with acute monoblastic leukemia.

  17. What's New in Adult Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) in Adults Research?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What’s New in Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... have the Philadelphia chromosome. Gene expression profiling This new lab technique is being studied to help identify ...

  18. Intracerebral metastasis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Müge; Aytac, Selin; Altan, Ilhan; Unal, Sule; Tuncer, Murat; Gumruk, Fatma; Cetin, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system leukemia may present in different ways. However, intraparenchymal mass is extremely rare in childhood leukemia. Herein, we report a boy who presented with right hemiparesis and anisocoria 1 year after the cessation of the chemotherapy protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Cranial imaging demonstrated an extensive mass located in the anterior white matter of left frontal lobe, and cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed concomitant lymphoblasts. Immunohistochemical staining of the biopsy material showed neoplastic cells with positive CD10 and TdT. Complete remission was achieved with chemotherapy alone for a duration of 2 years. PMID:23560011

  19. Future prospects of therapeutic clinical trials in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Maliha; Mansoor, Armaghan-E-Rehman; Kadia, Tapan M

    2017-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a markedly heterogeneous hematological malignancy that is most commonly seen in elderly adults. The response to current therapies to AML is quite variable, and very few new drugs have been recently approved for use in AML. This review aims to discuss the issues with current trial design for AML therapies, including trial end points, patient enrollment, cost of drug discovery and patient heterogeneity. We also discuss the future directions in AML therapeutics, including intensification of conventional therapy and new drug delivery mechanisms; targeted agents, including epigenetic therapies, cell cycle regulators, hypomethylating agents and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy; and detail of the possible agents that may be incorporated into the treatment of AML in the future.

  20. Humoral immunity to tetanus, measles and rubella in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Onorateli, Myriam; Botana, Claudia; Peralta, Laura; Rebollo, Magali; Ruvinsky, Silvina; Guitter, Myriam; Felice, Maria S; Posadas, Mercedes; Evangelista, Silvina; Villar, Maria V; Golluscio, Mariana; Molina, Agustina; Fraquelli, Lidia

    2016-12-01

    Chemotherapy regimens and clinical support advances have improved survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The after-effects of treatment are a reason for concern, including damage to the immune system induced by immunosuppressive therapy which is reflected in the loss of antibody protection provided by prior immunizations. Our goal was to assess the presence of measles, rubella, and tetanus protective antibody titers among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after completing chemotherapy. Sixty-one children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia seen at the Hospital Garrahan were included; patients had finished their chemotherapy at least 6 months earlier and had a complete immunization schedule before diagnosis. The rates of protective antibodies were 46% (CI: 32-59) for measles, 53% (CI 40-67) for tetanus, and 60% (CI 47-63) for rubella. These results strengthen the need to reconsider revaccination in this group of patients.

  1. Immunotherapy in Acute Leukemias: Implications and Perspectives Using Wt1 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Cebinelli, Guilherme Cesar Martelossi; DE Sousa Pereira, Nathália; Sena, Michelle Mota; DE Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Fujita, Thiago Cezar; DA Rocha, Sérgio Paulo Dejato; DE Abreu Oliveira, Francisco José; Marinello, Poliana Camila; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2016-08-01

    The WT1 gene encodes a transcription factor involved in regulation of many cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, mRNA processing and apoptosis, besides acting as a transcription repressor of growth factors and their receptors' genes. This gene is expressed at high levels in several types of cancers, including acute leukemias. In this regard, many studies have identified WT1 protein as a tumor antigen, considered a target molecule for clinical application in human acute leukemias. Immunotherapy using WT1 antigen has been effective in stimulating immune responses against leukemic cells. Regarding adoptive immunotherapy, the use of dendritic cells (DCs) for the WT1-specific cytotoxic T cells generation proved to be efficient in the development and maintenance of immunologic cells. Therefore, these therapeutic methods, that provided enthusiasm for moving ahead, highlight several opportunities and challenges to be used in clinical practice for managing acute leukemias. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. High-dose ascorbate and arsenic trioxide selectively kill acute myeloid leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia blasts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, Nélida I.; Pelosi, Elvira; Angelini, Daniela F.; Piredda, Maria Liliana; Guerrera, Gisella; Piras, Eleonora; Battistini, Luca; Massai, Lauretta; Berardi, Anna; Catalano, Gianfranco; Cicconi, Laura; Castelli, Germana; D’Angiò, Agnese; Pasquini, Luca; Graziani, Grazia; Fioritoni, Giuseppe; Voso, Maria Teresa; Mastrangelo, Domenico; Testa, Ugo; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    The use of high-dose ascorbate (ASC) for the treatment of human cancer has been attempted several decades ago and has been recently revived by several in vitro and in vivo studies in solid tumors. We tested the cytotoxic effects of ASC, alone or in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Leukemic cell lines and primary blasts from AML and APL patients were treated with graded concentrations of ASC, alone or in association with standard concentration (1 μM) of ATO. The ASC/ATO combination killed myeloid blasts, including leukemic CD34+ cells, while sparing CD34+ progenitors obtained from normal cord blood and bone marrow. Actually, approximately one-third (11/36) of primary AML cases were highly sensitive to the ASC/ATO combination. The mechanism of cell killing appeared to be related to increased oxidative stress and overproduction of ROS in a non-quantitative fashion, which resulted in induction of apoptosis. These effects were reverted by the addition of the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC). In the APL NB4 model, ASC induced direct degradation of the PML and PML/RARA proteins via caspase activation, while the transcriptional repressor DAXX was recruited in re-constituted PML nuclear bodies. Our findings encourage the design of pilot studies to explore the potential clinical benefit of ASC alone or in combination with ATO in advanced AML and APL. PMID:28427227

  3. High-dose ascorbate and arsenic trioxide selectively kill acute myeloid leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia blasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Noguera, Nélida I; Pelosi, Elvira; Angelini, Daniela F; Piredda, Maria Liliana; Guerrera, Gisella; Piras, Eleonora; Battistini, Luca; Massai, Lauretta; Berardi, Anna; Catalano, Gianfranco; Cicconi, Laura; Castelli, Germana; D'Angiò, Agnese; Pasquini, Luca; Graziani, Grazia; Fioritoni, Giuseppe; Voso, Maria Teresa; Mastrangelo, Domenico; Testa, Ugo; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2017-05-16

    The use of high-dose ascorbate (ASC) for the treatment of human cancer has been attempted several decades ago and has been recently revived by several in vitro and in vivo studies in solid tumors. We tested the cytotoxic effects of ASC, alone or in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Leukemic cell lines and primary blasts from AML and APL patients were treated with graded concentrations of ASC, alone or in association with standard concentration (1 μM) of ATO. The ASC/ATO combination killed myeloid blasts, including leukemic CD34+ cells, while sparing CD34+ progenitors obtained from normal cord blood and bone marrow. Actually, approximately one-third (11/36) of primary AML cases were highly sensitive to the ASC/ATO combination. The mechanism of cell killing appeared to be related to increased oxidative stress and overproduction of ROS in a non-quantitative fashion, which resulted in induction of apoptosis. These effects were reverted by the addition of the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC). In the APL NB4 model, ASC induced direct degradation of the PML and PML/RARA proteins via caspase activation, while the transcriptional repressor DAXX was recruited in re-constituted PML nuclear bodies. Our findings encourage the design of pilot studies to explore the potential clinical benefit of ASC alone or in combination with ATO in advanced AML and APL.

  4. Pleural effusions in acute and chronic leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Saadia A; Sahay, Sandeep; Jimenez, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary manifestations have been well described in leukemia, but pleural disease is less common. This review highlights pleural effusions in acute and chronic leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) based on the evidence to date. Diagnostic workup and recommendations for the management of these effusions are also outlined. Pleural effusions in patients with leukemia are most often due to infection and to a lesser extent leukemic infiltration of the pleura. The prognostic implications of these effusions are unclear, but survival is most likely determined by the underlying malignancy and its response to treatment. New therapies have changed survival in these patients, and some of these treatments, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors, have emerged as important causes for these effusions. Pleural interventions may be accomplished with few complications. Pleural effusions may occur with acute and chronic leukemia and MDS. Infection remains the most common cause. Malignant pleural effusions tend to occur in advanced disease in chronic leukemia, but they can be seen at any time with acute leukemia and MDS. With standard precautions, pleural procedures may be performed safely in this population. In cases of unclear cause, pleural and bone marrow biopsy should be considered.

  5. Novel targeted drug therapies for the treatment of childhood acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Patrick; Hunger, Stephen P; Smith, Franklin O; Carroll, William L; Reaman, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    The cure rates for childhood acute leukemia have dramatically improved to approximately 70% overal, with treatments that include intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy and, in some cases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, many children still die of their disease or of treatment-related toxicities. Even in patients that are cured, there can be significant and, not uncommonly debilitating, acute and late complications of treatment. Improved understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of leukemia and the increasing availability of high-throughput genomic techniques have facilitated the development of molecularly targeted therapies that have the potential to be more effective and less toxic than the standard approaches. In this article, we review the progress to date with agents that are showing promise in the treatment of childhood acute leukemia, including monoclonal antibodies, inhibitors of kinases and other signaling molecules (e.g., BCR–ABL, FLT3, farnesyltransferase, mTOR and γ-secretase), agents that target epigenetic regulation of gene expression (DNA methyltransferase inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors) and proteasome inhibitors. For the specific agents in each of these classes, we summarize the published preclinical data and the clinical trials that have been completed, are in progress or are being planned for children with acute leukemia. Finally, we discuss potential challenges to the success of molecularly targeted therapy, including proper target identification, adequate targeting of leukemia stem cells, developing synergistic and tolerable combinations of agents and designing adequately powered clinical trials to test efficacy in molecularly defined subsets of patients. PMID:20126514

  6. Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia: suboptimal treatment when the 2008/2016 WHO classification is used

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantz, Alan; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Demichelis-Gomez, Roberta; Barrera-Lumbreras, Georgina; Barrales-Benitez, Olga; Lopez-Karpovitch, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background Different criteria have been used to diagnose mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), which has impacted the number of individuals diagnosed with this pathology. Better outcomes have been reported when using acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)-type chemotherapy in the treatment of MPAL. Methods We compared the outcome of 4 groups of patients with MPAL. Group 1 included patients diagnosed using the 2008/2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classification; group 2 included patients diagnosed using the European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemias (EGIL) criteria; group 3 included patients diagnosed using either the EGIL or the 2008/2016 WHO criteria; and group 4 was comprised of patients diagnosed with MPAL using the EGIL classification only. Results We found a significantly worse disease-free survival (groups 1-4) and overall survival (OS) (groups 2 and 3) when comparing MPAL patients to other acute leukemia (AL) patients. A significantly better OS was obtained in patients (groups 2-4) treated with ALL-type chemotherapy compared to acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-type regimens. Conclusion In light of these results, and because a trend (P=0.06) was found with regard to a better OS in group 4 when compared to other AL patients, an argument can be made that the 2008/2016 WHO classification is underpowered to diagnose all MPAL cases, potentially resulting in the suboptimal treatment of some individuals with AL. PMID:28090485

  7. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  8. Three hematologic malignancies in the same patient: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, followed by chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fattizzo, Bruno; Radice, Tommaso; Cattaneo, Daniele; Pomati, Mauro; Barcellini, Wilma; Iurlo, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The co-existence of both chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have been described in a few cases, either simultaneously or subsequently presenting. We report an unusual case of three he-matological malignancies in the same patient: CLL, CML, and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). None of the three malignancies shared the same origin, since the marrow sample was negative for BCR-ABL1 transcript at the time of CLL diagnosis, CLL was in remission at CML diagnosis, and CML was in complete cytogenetic response at AML onset, indicating that this was not a blast crisis. Background: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) are the most common proliferative disorders in Western countries, with an incidence of 4.2/100,000/year and 1-1.5/100,000/year, respectively. The co-existence of both CML and CLL is an extremely rare event, even if it has been described in a few cases, either simultaneously or subsequently presenting. Above all, the presence of more than two different hematologic neoplasms has not been described in literature so far. In the present study we report a particular case of a CLL patient, who first developed CML and then acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  9. Pulmonary Embolism in Patients With Acute Leukemia and Severe Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, Samuel W.; Stein, Matthew N.; Hoak, John C.

    1981-01-01

    While pulmonary thromboembolism has been reported in patients with acute leukemia complicated by severe thrombocytopenia, it has been studied infrequently and its pathogenesis remains imprecisely understood. Findings of 80 consecutive autopsies of patients with acute leukemia showed that three had pulmonary thromboembolism. All three patients had been severely thrombocytopenic and had received numerous platelet transfusions. Serial sections of thrombi were evaluated with electron microscopy. In no instance were platelet aggregates detected. However, Candida organisms were prominent in thrombotic specimens from each patient. These findings suggest that thromboembolism in such patients may involve occult fungal infection. Because pulmonary thromboembolism can complicate the course of acute leukemia and severe thrombocytopenia, it should be considered when clinical data suggest its occurrence. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:7257386

  10. Acute myelogenous leukemia and glycogen storage disease 1b.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Maury; Burzynski, Jeffrey; Yhap, Margaret; Fraser, Robert B; Cummings, Brian; Ste-Marie, Micheline

    2002-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease 1b (GSD 1b) is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate translocase and the intracellular accumulation of glycogen. The disease presents with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, as well as neutropenia causing increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections. We present a case of a young woman with GSD 1b who developed acute myelogenous leukemia while on long-term granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy. The presence of two rare diseases in a single patient raises suspicion that GSD 1b and acute myelogenous leukemia are linked. Surveillance for acute myelogenous leukemia should become part of the long-term follow-up for GSD 1b.

  11. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2017.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; Renneville, A; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Emerenciano, M; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Barbieri Blunck, C; Almeida Lopes, B; Zuna, J; Trka, J; Ballerini, P; Lapillonne, H; De Braekeleer, M; Cazzaniga, G; Corral Abascal, L; van der Velden, V H J; Delabesse, E; Park, T S; Oh, S H; Silva, M L M; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Moore, A S; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Zerkalenkova, E; Olshanskaya, Y; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Teigler-Schlegel, A; Zur Stadt, U; Lentes, J; Göhring, G; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Madsen, H O; Gruhn, B; Duarte, X; Gameiro, P; Lippert, E; Bidet, A; Cayuela, J M; Clappier, E; Alonso, C N; Zwaan, C M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Möricke, A; Alten, J; Schrappe, M; Stanulla, M; Strehl, S; Attarbaschi, A; Dworzak, M; Haas, O A; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Caye, A; Suarez, L; Cavé, H; Marschalek, R

    2017-07-13

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL/KMT2A gene are associated with infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. Here we present the data obtained from 2345 acute leukemia patients. Genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and 11 novel TPGs were identified. Thus, a total of 135 different MLL rearrangements have been identified so far, of which 94 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. In all, 35 out of these 94 TPGs occur recurrently, but only 9 specific gene fusions account for more than 90% of all illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene. We observed an age-dependent breakpoint shift with breakpoints localizing within MLL intron 11 associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and younger patients, while breakpoints in MLL intron 9 predominate in AML or older patients. The molecular characterization of MLL breakpoints suggests different etiologies in the different age groups and allows the correlation of functional domains of the MLL gene with clinical outcome. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the MLL recombinome in acute leukemia and demonstrates that the establishment of patient-specific chromosomal fusion sites allows the design of specific PCR primers for minimal residual disease analyses for all patients.Leukemia advance online publication, 8 August 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.213.

  12. Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-18

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  13. Myosin-IIA regulates leukemia engraftment and brain infiltration in a mouse model of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wigton, Eric J.; Thompson, Scott B.; Long, Robert A.; Jacobelli, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia dissemination (the spread of leukemia cells from the bone marrow) and relapse are associated with poor prognosis. Often, relapse occurs in peripheral organs, such as the CNS, which acts as a sanctuary site for leukemia cells to escape anti-cancer treatments. Similar to normal leukocyte migration, leukemia dissemination entails migration of cells from the blood circulation into tissues by extravasation. To extravasate, leukemia cells cross through vascular endothelial walls via a process called transendothelial migration, which requires cytoskeletal remodeling. However, the specific molecular players in leukemia extravasation are not fully known. We examined the role of myosin-IIA a cytoskeletal class II myosin motor protein, in leukemia progression and dissemination into the CNS by use of a mouse model of Bcr-Abl-driven B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Small hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of myosin-IIA did not affect apoptosis or the growth rate of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. However, in an in vivo leukemia transfer model, myosin-IIA depletion slowed leukemia progression and prolonged survival, in part, by reducing the ability of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to engraft efficiently. Finally, myosin-IIA inhibition, either by small hairpin RNA depletion or chemical inhibition by blebbistatin, drastically reduced CNS infiltration of leukemia cells. The effects on leukemia cell entry into tissues were mostly a result of the requirement for myosin-IIA to enable leukemia cells to complete the transendothelial migration process during extravasation. Overall, our data implicate myosin-IIA as a key mediator of leukemia cell migration, making it a promising target to inhibit leukemia dissemination in vivo and potentially reduce leukemia relapses. PMID:26792819

  14. Symptoms of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: red flags to recognize leukemia in daily practice.

    PubMed

    Bernbeck, B; Wüller, D; Janssen, G; Wessalowski, R; Göbel, U; Schneider, D T

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify clinical "red flags" that may assist the general pediatrician in detecting patients with an acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Medical history and clinical findings of 189 children and adolescents, diagnosed with ALL between 1/1995 and 7/2004, were analyzed retrospectively. Only 50% of patients presented with symptoms known in children with leukemia (fever, fatigue, paleness, hemorrhage); 5% were diagnosed accidentally in the absence of any clinical symptoms. The majority of patients had a medical history up to few weeks; in 11% of patients up to several months without impairing curability. 95% of the patients presented at diagnosis with enlargement of lymphnodes, liver and/or spleen. The characteristic laboratory constellation included mono-, respectively bi- or trilinear pathology of the blood count and with blasts in the blood smear. The clinical diagnosis of ALL relies on physical examination and the blood count including microscopic examination. Therefore, the alertness of the treating paediatrician with regard to clinical findings and a pathologic blood count is more important than elaborate laboratory investigations. In uncertain cases, a close follow-up examination may help to unmask ALL, which will most likely be stratified in the low-risk-group. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.New York.

  15. Pneumonia during Remission Induction Chemotherapy in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Javier Barreda; Lei, Xiudong; Wierda, William; Cortes, Jorge E.; Dickey, Burton F.; Evans, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pneumonia is a major cause of death during induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia. The purpose of this study was to quantify the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of pneumonia in patients with acute leukemia. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 801 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who underwent induction chemotherapy. Measurements and Main Results: Pneumonia was present at induction start in 85 patients (11%). Of the 716 remaining patients, 148 (21%) developed pneumonia. The incidence rate of pneumonia was higher in MDS and AML than in ALL (0.013 vs. 0.008 vs. 0.003 pneumonias per day, respectively; P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, age greater than or equal to 60 years, AML, low platelet count, low albumin level, neutropenia, and neutrophil count greater than 7,300 were risk factors. The case fatality rate of pneumonia was 17% (40 of 233). Competing risk analysis demonstrated that in the absence of pneumonia, death was rare: 28-day mortality was 6.2% for all patients but only 1.26% in those without pneumonia. Compared with patients without pneumonia, patients with pneumonia had more intensive care unit days, longer hospital stays, and 49% higher costs (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Pneumonia after induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia continues to be common, and it is the most important determinant of early mortality after induction chemotherapy. Given the high incidence, morbidity, mortality, and cost of pneumonia, interventions aimed at prevention are warranted in patients with acute leukemia. PMID:23987587

  16. Comprehensive scanning of somatic mitochondrial DNA alterations in acute leukemia developing from myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Linnartz, Bjoern; Anglmayer, Roswitha; Zanssen, Stefanie

    2004-03-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis resulting in refractory cytopenias. Transformation resulting in acute myeloblastic leukemia is the final stage in the multistep process of MDS evolution. Functional relevant mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been related to sideroblastic anemia and MDS. To investigate the role of mtDNA in malignant transformation to acute leukemia, we used high-resolution techniques such as single-strand conformational polymorphism and fluorescence sequencing for investigation of the whole mitochondrial genome from blood cells of 10 patients with MDS. Functionally relevant point mutations in mitochondrial RNA and polypeptide-encoding genes were detected in 50% of patients with MDS. Their increasing mutation load connects MDS and the developing acute myeloid leukemias. Several point mutations of mtDNA, including secondary point mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, occur in one bone marrow and may synergically affect bone marrow stem cells by an apoptotic pathway.

  17. Impact of an Alert System on Quality Indicators in Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Lisa M; Bauchmire, Nicole; Bender, Sarah; Tomlinson-Pinkham, Kelly; Roberts, Scott; Rosan, Sherry

    2016-10-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), once the most lethal form of adult acute leukemia, has become the most curable. The goal of early and well-managed treatment induction is to reduce the malignant burden of promyelocytes to below the cytologically detectable level. Oncology nurses who care for patients with APL need to be acutely aware of the basic differences in this disease from other forms of leukemia, including the two main complications for the newly diagnosed patient. This article will briefly review APL and its associated presenting symptoms, prognosis, treatment, and complications. These complications require immediate activation of expert staff and resources to protect critically ill patients with APL from associated morbidity and mortality.

  18. Update on antigen-specific immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Sarah A; Walter, Roland B

    2015-06-01

    Among the few drugs that have shown a benefit for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in randomized clinical trials over the last several decades is the CD33 antibody-drug conjugate, gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO). Undoubtedly, this experience has highlighted the value of antigen-specific immunotherapy in AML. A wide variety of therapeutics directed against several different antigens on AML cells are currently explored in preclinical and early clinical studies. On the one hand, these include passive strategies such as unconjugated antibodies targeting one or more antigens, antibodies armed with drugs, toxic proteins, or radionuclides, or adoptive immunotherapies, in particular utilizing T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or modified T cell receptor (TCR) genes; on the other hand, these include active strategies such as vaccinations. With the documented benefit for GO and the emerging data with several classes of therapeutics in other leukemias, in particular small bispecific antibodies and CAR T cells, the future is bright. Nevertheless, a number of important questions related to the choice of target antigen(s), patient population, exact treatment modality, and supportive care needs remain open. Addressing such questions in upcoming studies will ultimately be required to optimize the clinical use of antigen-specific immunotherapies in AML and ensure that such treatments become an effective, versatile tool for this disease for which the outcomes have remained unsatisfactory in many patients.

  19. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. MicroRNA-128-3p is a novel oncomiR targeting PHF6 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mets, Evelien; Van Peer, Gert; Van der Meulen, Joni; Boice, Michael; Taghon, Tom; Goossens, Steven; Mestdagh, Pieter; Benoit, Yves; De Moerloose, Barbara; Van Roy, Nadine; Poppe, Bruce; Vandesompele, Jo; Wendel, Hans-Guido; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Rondou, Pieter

    2014-08-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arises from the leukemic transformation of developing thymocytes and results from cooperative genetic lesions. Inactivation of the PHF6 gene is frequently observed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, suggesting an important tumor suppressive role for PHF6 in the pathobiology of this leukemia. Although the precise function of PHF6 is still unknown, this gene is most likely involved in chromatin regulation, a strongly emerging theme in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this context, our previous description of a cooperative microRNA regulatory network controlling several well-known T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia tumor suppressor genes, including PHF6, is of great importance. Given the high frequency of PHF6 lesions in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the integration of PHF6 in this microRNA regulatory network, we aimed to identify novel oncogenic microRNAs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia which suppress PHF6. To this end, we performed an unbiased PHF6 3'UTR-microRNA library screen and combined the results with microRNA profiling data of samples from patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and normal thymocyte subsets. We selected miR-128-3p as a candidate PHF6-targeting, oncogenic microRNA and demonstrated regulation of PHF6 expression upon modulation of this microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. In vivo evidence of an oncogenic role of this microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia was obtained through accelerated leukemia onset in a NOTCH1-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia mouse model upon miR-128-3p over-expression. We conclude that miR-128-3p is a strong novel candidate oncogenic microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia which targets the PHF6 tumor suppressor gene.

  1. Diagnostic value of CD117 in differential diagnosis of acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Abbas; Poorfathollah, Ali-Akbar; Aghaiipour, Mahnaz; Rezaei, Mansour; Nikoo-ghoftar, Mahin; Abdi, Mohammad; Gharib, Alireza; Amini, Amir

    2014-07-01

    C-kit receptor (CD117) and its ligand, stem cell factor, play a key role in normal hematopoiesis. It has been demonstrated that its expression extremely increases in leukemias with myeloid commitment. We analyzed findings on CD117 expression together with other myeloid related markers in 203 de novo acute leukemias, referred to Iranian immunophenotyping centers: Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization (IBTO) and Baghiatallah Hospital (BH). All cases were characterized based on the French American British cooperative group (FAB) and European Group for Immunological Classification of Leukemias (EGIL). The cases comprised of 111 acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), 86 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 6 acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL). CD117 was positive in 75 % of AML and 50 % of AUL, whereas none of the ALL cases was positive for this marker. Although CD117 was positive in 100 % of M5a cases, no M5b positive was found (p = 0.036). The calculated specificity for myeloid involvement was 100 % for CD117 and CD33, and 98 % for CD13 and CD15 (p < 0.001). The calculated sensitivity for myeloid involvement was 83, 76, 64, and 41 % for CD13, CD117, CD33, and CD15, respectively (p < 0.001). We concluded that CD117 expression is a specific and rather sensitive marker for differential diagnosis between AML and ALL, and except for M5 subtypes, it fails to determine FAB subtypes; lack of expression in M5 can identify M5b. Therefore, it should be included in the routine primary panel for diagnosis of acute leukemias.

  2. Severe neurotoxicity following intrathecal methotrexate with nitrous oxide sedation in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Löbel, U; Trah, J; Escherich, G

    2015-03-01

    Systemic and intrathecal methotrexate is widely used in treatment protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its side effects vary in characteristics, intensity and time of onset, and depend on the administration route. Interactions with several drugs are known. Side effects of nitrous oxide sedation, often used for moderately painful procedures, typically occur after long time use and include neurological symptoms. We present a child who experienced a severe and long-lasting neurotoxicity after the third intrathecal application of methotrexate with short sedation by nitrous oxide during induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Symptoms completely resolved after 12 months. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Hadi; Baradaran, Behzad; Esfahani, Ali; Sakhinia, Masoud; Sakhinia, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA) on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy. PMID:24754007

  4. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicators of early immune stimulation: a Childhood Leukemia International Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G; Ashton, Lesley J; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-04-15

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980-2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2-14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL.

  5. Parental Tobacco Smoking and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    PubMed

    Metayer, Catherine; Petridou, Eleni; Aranguré, Juan Manuel Mejía; Roman, Eve; Schüz, Joachim; Magnani, Corrado; Mora, Ana Maria; Mueller, Beth A; de Oliveira, Maria S Pombo; Dockerty, John D; McCauley, Kathryn; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Rudant, Jérémie; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Kaatsch, Peter; Miligi, Lucia; Wesseling, Catharina; Doody, David R; Moschovi, Maria; Orsi, Laurent; Mattioli, Stefano; Selvin, Steve; Kang, Alice Y; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    The association between tobacco smoke and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is well established in adults but not in children. Individual-level data on parental cigarette smoking were obtained from 12 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC, 1974-2012), including 1,330 AML cases diagnosed at age <15 years and 13,169 controls. We conducted pooled analyses of CLIC studies, as well as meta-analyses of CLIC and non-CLIC studies. Overall, maternal smoking before, during, or after pregnancy was not associated with childhood AML; there was a suggestion, however, that smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk in Hispanics (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 3.61) but not in other ethnic groups. By contrast, the odds ratios for paternal lifetime smoking were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.62) and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.51) in pooled and meta-analyses, respectively. Overall, increased risks from 1.2- to 1.3-fold were observed for pre- and postnatal smoking (P < 0.05), with higher risks reported for heavy smokers. Associations with paternal smoking varied by histological type. Our analyses suggest an association between paternal smoking and childhood AML. The association with maternal smoking appears limited to Hispanic children, raising questions about ethnic differences in tobacco-related exposures and biological mechanisms, as well as study-specific biases.

  6. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Indicators of Early Immune Stimulation: A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G.; Ashton, Lesley J.; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y.; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980–2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2–14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL. PMID:25731888

  7. Preferential eradication of acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells by fenretinide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Mi, Jian-Qing; Fang, Hai; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Chun; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Bin; Minden, Mark; Yang, Wen-Tao; Wang, Huan-Wei; Li, Jun-Min; Xi, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Sai-Juan; Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zhu; Wang, Kan-Kan

    2013-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play important roles in leukemia initiation, progression, and relapse, and thus represent a critical target for therapeutic intervention. However, relatively few agents have been shown to target LSCs, slowing progress in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on in vitro and in vivo evidence, we report here that fenretinide, a well-tolerated vitamin A derivative, is capable of eradicating LSCs but not normal hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells at physiologically achievable concentrations. Fenretinide exerted a selective cytotoxic effect on primary AML CD34+ cells, especially the LSC-enriched CD34+CD38− subpopulation, whereas no significant effect was observed on normal counterparts. Methylcellulose colony formation assays further showed that fenretinide significantly suppressed the formation of colonies derived from AML CD34+ cells but not those from normal CD34+ cells. Moreover, fenretinide significantly reduced the in vivo engraftment of AML stem cells but not normal hematopoietic stem cells in a nonobese diabetic/SCID mouse xenotransplantation model. Mechanistic studies revealed that fenretinide-induced cell death was linked to a series of characteristic events, including the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of genes associated with stress responses and apoptosis, and repression of genes involved in NF-κB and Wnt signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis revealed that the fenretinide–down-regulated genes were significantly correlated with the existing poor-prognosis signatures in AML patients. Based on these findings, we propose that fenretinide is a potent agent that selectively targets LSCs, and may be of value in the treatment of AML. PMID:23513221

  8. Preferential eradication of acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells by fenretinide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Mi, Jian-Qing; Fang, Hai; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Chun; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Bin; Minden, Mark; Yang, Wen-Tao; Wang, Huan-Wei; Li, Jun-Min; Xi, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Sai-Juan; Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zhu; Wang, Kan-Kan

    2013-04-02

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play important roles in leukemia initiation, progression, and relapse, and thus represent a critical target for therapeutic intervention. However, relatively few agents have been shown to target LSCs, slowing progress in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on in vitro and in vivo evidence, we report here that fenretinide, a well-tolerated vitamin A derivative, is capable of eradicating LSCs but not normal hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells at physiologically achievable concentrations. Fenretinide exerted a selective cytotoxic effect on primary AML CD34(+) cells, especially the LSC-enriched CD34(+)CD38(-) subpopulation, whereas no significant effect was observed on normal counterparts. Methylcellulose colony formation assays further showed that fenretinide significantly suppressed the formation of colonies derived from AML CD34(+) cells but not those from normal CD34(+) cells. Moreover, fenretinide significantly reduced the in vivo engraftment of AML stem cells but not normal hematopoietic stem cells in a nonobese diabetic/SCID mouse xenotransplantation model. Mechanistic studies revealed that fenretinide-induced cell death was linked to a series of characteristic events, including the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of genes associated with stress responses and apoptosis, and repression of genes involved in NF-κB and Wnt signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis revealed that the fenretinide-down-regulated genes were significantly correlated with the existing poor-prognosis signatures in AML patients. Based on these findings, we propose that fenretinide is a potent agent that selectively targets LSCs, and may be of value in the treatment of AML.

  9. No involvement of bovine leukemia virus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.P.; Robison, L.L.; Kashmiri, S.V.; McClain, K.L.; Woods, W.G.; Smithson, W.A.; Heyn, R.; Finlay, J.; Schuman, L.M.; Renier, C.

    1988-05-15

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine lymphosarcoma. Much speculation continues to be directed at the role of BLV in human leukemia. To test this hypothesis rigorously, a case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was conducted between December 1983 and February 1986. Cases (less than or equal to 16 years at diagnosis) derived from patients diagnosed at the primary institutions and affiliated hospitals were matched (age, sex, and race) with regional population controls. DNA samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood from 157 cases (131 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 26 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and peripheral blood from 136 controls were analyzed by Southern blot technique, under highly stringent conditions, using cloned BLV DNA as a probe. None of the 157 case or 136 control DNA samples hybridized with the probe. The high statistical power and specificity of this study provide the best evidence to date that genomic integration of BLV is not a factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  10. [Abnormal Notch-Hes Signaling Pathways and Acute Leukemia -Review].

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhen-Yang; Wang, Li; Gao, Chun-Ji

    2017-02-01

    The abnormal activation of Notch signaling is closely related to the development of acute leukemia (AL). The core elements of the Notch signaling system include Notch receptors, Notch ligands, CSL DNA-binding proteins, and effectors like target genes. Any factors, which affect ligands, receptors, signal transducers and effectors, can influence the signal transduction of Notch signaling greatly. Based on the role of Notch signaling in AL, several targeted drugs against Notch upstream signaling have been developed. However, due to the complexity and pleiotropic effects of Notch upstream signaling, these targeted drugs display strong side effects. Thus, Hes (Hairy Enhancer of Split) factors as a primary Notch effector, also play an important role in the pathogenesis of AL. This review summarizes recent progresses on Notch-Hes signaling in AL, hopping to provide references for further excavation of the Notch-Hes signaling, and lay foundations for developing the next generation of targeted drugs.

  11. Asparaginase-associated toxicity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hijiya, Nobuko; van der Sluis, Inge M

    2016-01-01

    Asparaginase is an integral component of multiagent chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Positive outcomes are seen in patients who are able to complete their entire prescribed course of asparaginase therapy. Toxicities associated with asparaginase use include hypersensitivity (clinical and subclinical), pancreatitis, thrombosis, encephalopathy, and liver dysfunction. Depending on the nature and severity of the toxicity, asparaginase therapy may be altered or discontinued in some patients. Clinical hypersensitivity is the most common asparaginase-associated toxicity requiring treatment discontinuation, occurring in up to 30% of patients receiving Escherichia coli-derived asparaginase. The ability to rapidly identify and manage asparaginase-associated toxicity will help ensure patients receive the maximal benefit from asparaginase therapy. This review will provide an overview of the common toxicities associated with asparaginase use and recommendations for treatment management.

  12. Targeting acute myeloid leukemia with TP53-independent vosaroxin.

    PubMed

    Benton, Christopher B; Ravandi, Farhad

    2017-01-01

    Vosaroxin is a quinolone compound that intercalates DNA and induces TP53-independent apoptosis, demonstrating activity against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in Phase I-III trials. Here, we examine vosaroxin's mechanism of action and pharmacology, and we review its use in AML to date, focusing on details of individual clinical trials. Most recently, when combined with cytarabine in a randomized Phase III trial (VALOR), vosaroxin improved outcomes versus cytarabine alone for relapsed/refractory AML in patients older than 60 years and for patients in early relapse. We consider its continued role in the context of a multifaceted strategy against AML, including its current use in clinical trials. Prospective use will define its role in the evolving landscape of AML therapy.

  13. Treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ottmann, Oliver G; Wassmann, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) includes at least one-quarter of all adults with ALL. Until recently, conventional chemotherapy programs that have been effective in other precursor B-cell ALL cases have been unable to cure patients with this diagnosis. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation early in first remission has been the recommended therapy. The availability of imatinib mesylate and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors and small molecules that affect the BCR/ABL signaling pathways may be changing the treatment paradigm and the prognosis for these patients. The results from clinical trials using imatinib in the frontline setting and in relapsed patients as well as preliminary experience treating imatinib-resistant Ph(+) ALL will be described.

  14. The increasing genomic complexity of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    Therapy of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is impacted by the increasing genomic complexity of the disease. Multiple targets as expressed by genetics and mutations and the relationships between them add another layer of intricacy to the prognosis and treatment of the disease. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the interactions between mutations are of utmost importance, particularly from a prognostic standpoint. For example, inv(16) or 6(16; 16) AML frequently involves a second genetic lesion that significantly impacts prognosis. In addition, epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, are becoming increasingly integrated into the genetic landscape and may also have prognostic impact. Despite increased understanding of the genetic and epigenetic aspects of AML, the outcome for AML patients has not changed significantly. Until it does, further inquiry into the genomic complexity of the disease and advances in drug development are needed.

  15. Acquired pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, A M; Pathare, A V; Dennison, D; Raeburn, J A

    2009-01-01

    Pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 involving the qh region is relatively common as a constitutional genetic aberration without any apparent phenotypic consequences. However, it has not been established as an acquired abnormality in cancer. Among the three patients reported so far in the literature with acquired inv(9), only one had acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we describe an unique case where both chromosomes 9 presented with an acquired pericentric inversion with breakpoints at 9p13 and 9q12 respectively, in a AML patient with aberrant CD7 and CD9 positivity. Additionally, one der(9) also showed short arm deletion at 9p21 to the centromeric region and including the p16 gene. The constitutional karyotype was normal. This is probably the first report describing an acquired inv(9) involving both chromosomes 9 in AML. The possible significance of this inversion is discussed.

  16. Pharmacogenomics and the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Megías-Vericat, Juan Eduardo; Montesinos, Pau; Herrero, María José; Bosó, Virginia; Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Poveda, José Luis; Sanz, Miguel Ángel; Aliño, Salvador F

    2016-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous malignancy that is primarily treated with combinations of cytarabine and anthracyclines. Although this scheme remains effective in most of the patients, variability of outcomes in patients has been partly related with their genetic variability. Several pharmacogenetic studies have analyzed the impact of polymorphisms in genes encoding transporters, metabolizers or molecular targets of chemotherapy agents. A systematic review on all eligible studies was carried out in order to estimate the effect of polymorphisms of anthracyclines and cytarabine pathways on efficacy and toxicity of AML treatment. Other emerging genes recently studied in AML, such as DNA repair genes, genes potentially related to chemotherapy response or AML prognosis, have also been included.

  17. Acute myeloid leukemia risk by industry and occupation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Rebecca J; Luckhaupt, Sara E; Schumacher, Pam; Cress, Rosemary D; Deapen, Dennis M; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2014-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia found in adults. Identifying jobs that pose a risk for AML may be useful for identifying new risk factors. A matched case-control analysis was conducted using California Cancer Registry data from 1988 to 2007. This study included 8999 cases of AML and 24 822 controls. Industries with a statistically significant increased AML risk were construction (matched odds ratio [mOR] = 1.13); crop production (mOR = 1.41); support activities for agriculture and forestry (mOR = 2.05); and animal slaughtering and processing (mOR = 2.09). Among occupations with a statistically significant increased AML risk were miscellaneous agricultural workers (mOR = 1.76); fishers and related fishing workers (mOR = 2.02); nursing, psychiatric and home health aides (mOR = 1.65); and janitors and building cleaners (mOR = 1.54). Further investigation is needed to confirm study findings and to identify specific exposures responsible for the increased risks.

  18. New approaches to transplantation in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative therapeutic option for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). This is due to the combined effect of chemo/radiation therapy and the immunologic graft-versus-leukemia effect. The field of HSCT has benefited from advances in a variety of "fronts," including our increasing ability to break the human leukocyte antigen barrier, which has led to greater access to transplantation. Furthermore, progress in the biologic, genetic, and pharmacologic arenas is creating a scenario where traditional borders between transplant and non-transplant therapies are less clear. This overlap is exemplified by new approaches to pharmacologic maintenance of remission strategies after HSCT. In addition, cellular adoptive immunotherapy has the potential to exploit narrowly targeted anti-tumor effects within or outside the allogeneic HSCT "frame," holding the promise of avoiding off target side effects, such as graft-versus-host disease. Here we discuss these and other lines of active investigation designed to improve outcomes of HSCT for AML. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute myeloid leukemia risk by industry and occupation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Rebecca J.; Luckhaupt, Sara E.; Schumacher, Pam; Cress, Rosemary D.; Deapen, Dennis M.; Calvert, Geoffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia found in adults. Identifying jobs that pose a risk for AML may be useful for identifying new risk factors. A matched case–control analysis was conducted using California Cancer Registry data from 1988 to 2007. This study included 8999 cases of AML and 24 822 controls. Industries with a statistically significant increased AML risk were construction (matched odds ratio [mOR] = 1.13); crop production (mOR = 1.41); support activities for agriculture and forestry (mOR = 2.05); and animal slaughtering and processing (mOR = 2.09). Among occupations with a statistically significant increased AML risk were miscellaneous agricultural workers (mOR = 1.76); fishers and related fishing workers (mOR = 2.02); nursing, psychiatric and home health aides (mOR = 1.65); and janitors and building cleaners (mOR = 1.54). Further investigation is needed to confirm study findings and to identify specific exposures responsible for the increased risks. PMID:24547710

  20. Functional integration of acute myeloid leukemia into the vascular niche.

    PubMed

    Cogle, Christopher R; Goldman, Devorah C; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Leon, Ronald P; Masri, Azzah Al; Clark, Hilary A; Asbaghi, Steven A; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Dunlap, Jennifer; Fan, Guang; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Liu, Qiuying; Meacham, Amy; Hamlin, Kimberly L; Hromas, Robert A; Scott, Edward W; Fleming, William H

    2014-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the hematopoietic microenvironment that regulates blood cell production. Recent studies suggest the existence of functional cross-talk between hematologic malignancies and vascular endothelium. Here we show that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) localizes to the vasculature in both patients and in a xenograft model. A significant number of vascular tissue-associated AML cells (V-AML) integrate into vasculature in vivo and can fuse with endothelial cells. V-AML cells acquire several endothelial cell-like characteristics, including the upregulation of CD105, a receptor associated with activated endothelium. Remarkably, endothelial-integrated V-AML shows an almost fourfold reduction in proliferative activity compared with non-vascular-associated AML. Primary AML cells can be induced to downregulate the expression of their hematopoietic markers in vitro and differentiate into phenotypically and functionally defined endothelial-like cells. After transplantation, these leukemia-derived endothelial cells are capable of giving rise to AML. These novel functional interactions between AML cells and normal endothelium along with the reversible endothelial cell potential of AML suggest that vascular endothelium may serve as a previously unrecognized reservoir for AML.

  1. Molecular Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tasian, Sarah K.; Pollard, Jessica A.; Aplenc, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Approximately two-thirds of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are cured with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy. However, refractory and relapsed AML remains a significant source of childhood cancer mortality, highlighting the need for new therapies. Further therapy intensification with traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy in pediatric AML is not feasible given the risks of both short-term and long-term organ dysfunction. Substantial emphasis has been placed upon the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for adults and children with high-risk subtypes of AML with the goal of improving remission induction and minimizing relapse. Several promising agents are currently in clinical testing or late preclinical development for AML, including monoclonal antibodies against leukemia cell surface proteins, kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, epigenetic agents, and chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell immunotherapies. Many of these therapies have been specifically tested in children with relapsed/refractory AML in Phase 1 and 2 trials with a smaller number of new agents under Phase 3 evaluation for children with de novo AML. Although successful identification and implementation of new drugs for children with AML remain a formidable challenge, enthusiasm for novel molecular therapeutic approaches is great given the potential for significant clinical benefit for children who do not have other curative options. PMID:24672775

  2. Hematopoietic differentiation is required for initiation of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Min; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Henry; Koche, Richard; Staber, Philipp B.; Cusan, Monica; Levantini, Elena; Welner, Robert S.; Bach, Christian S.; Zhang, Junyan; Krivtsov, Andrei; Armstrong, Scott A.; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-associated oncogenes often arise in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and promote acquisition of leukemia stem cell (LSC) phenotypes. However, as LSCs often share features of lineage-restricted progenitors, the relative contribution of differentiation status to LSC transformation is unclear. Using murine MLL-AF9 and MOZ-TIF2 AML models, we show that myeloid differentiation to granulocyte macrophage progenitors (GMPs) is critical for LSC generation. Disrupting GMP formation by deleting the lineage-restricted transcription factor C/EBPa blocked normal granulocyte formation and prevented initiation of AML. However, restoring myeloid differentiation in C/EBPa mutants with inflammatory cytokines reestablished AML transformation capacity. Genomic analyses of GMPs, including gene expression and H3K79me2 profiling in conjunction with ATAC-seq, revealed a permissive genomic environment for activation of a minimal transcription program shared by GMPs and LSCs. Together, these findings show myeloid differentiation is a prerequisite for LSC formation and AML development, providing insights for therapeutic development. PMID:26412561

  3. Novel postremission strategies in adults with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lancet, Jeffrey E.; Karp, Judith E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Given the high rates of relapse in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there is tremendous opportunity for the development of new therapeutic strategies in the postremission state. Unfortunately, the currently available modalities for postremission therapy, namely chemotherapy, have proven largely ineffective in changing the natural history of AML. The challenges to overcome therapeutic failure in the minimal residual disease status may relate to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms and cell populations that are directly related to disease relapse as well as suboptimal ability to identify patients at highest risk for relapse. Recent findings Being a heterogeneous disease, relapsed AML is unlikely to emanate from one predominant mechanism; instead, there are likely multiple biologic factors at play that allow for clinical relapse to occur. These factors likely include multidrug resistance proteins, aberrant signal transduction pathways, survival of leukemia stem cells, microenvironmental interactions, and immune tolerance. Many novel strategies are in development that target these mechanisms, ranging from chemotherapeutic modalities, to signal transduction inhibitors, to upregulation of antileukemic immune responses. Summary Understanding the underlying mechanisms of leukemic cell survival and resistance has spurred the development of novel therapeutic approaches to overcome these mechanisms in the hope of eradicating minimal residual disease and improving survival in AML. PMID:19468272

  4. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-24

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Blastic Phase; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase of Disease; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Disease

  5. The t(11;14)(p15;q11) in a T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line activates multiple transcripts, including Ttg-1, a gene encoding a potential zinc finger protein.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, E A; Hockett, R D; Pollock, K M; Bartholdi, M F; O'Brien, S J; Korsmeyer, S J

    1989-01-01

    Interchromosomal translocations within lymphoid neoplasms frequently involve the antigen receptor genes. We cloned the breakpoints of the t(11;14)(p15;q11) in a CD3-negative T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (RPMI 8402) in order to identify new genes potentially involved in T-cell neoplasia. An extensive comparison of both breakpoints and their germ line counterparts indicated that an inadvertant recombinase-mediated break at chromosome segment 11p15 recombined with the delta T-cell receptor at 14q11. The derivative 11 breakpoint resembles a coding joint in which 11p15 rather than a variable region was introduced 5' to a D delta 1 D delta 2 J delta 1 intermediate rearrangement. Conversely, the derivative 14 breakpoint corresponds to a signal joint between the 5' heptamer-spacer-nonamer recombinational signal of D delta 1 and an isolated heptamer at 11p15. Multiple, apparently distinct transcripts were found flanking both breakpoints of 8402. RNAs of 3.5, 4.4, 1.4, and 8.0 kilobases originating from either side of the derivative 14 breakpoint were highly expressed in 8402 compared with other cells. This suggests that this translocation deregulated multiple genes and provides the opportunity to assess any multifactorial contribution they may have to malignancy. We cloned and sequenced several cDNAs representing the 1.4-kilobase transcript (termed Ttg-1 [T-cell translocation gene 1]) from an 8402 library. The predicted protein of 156 amino acids contained two internal repeats which could potentially form zinc fingers. Images PMID:2501659

  6. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (∼90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements. PMID:23628958

  7. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (≈ 90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements.

  8. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (acute 'malignant' myelofibrosis): An unusual cause of osteosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Karasick, S.; Karasick, D.; Schilling, J.

    1982-11-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia or acute 'malignant' myelosclerosis is an acute and rapidly progressive myeloproliferative syndrome characterized by minimal or absent splenomegaly, pancytopenia, diffuse marrow fibrosis, and circulating blasts of megakaryocytic origin. The disease must be differentiated from other hematologic malignancies especially myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia. The radiographic changes of osteosclerosis in our patient have not been previously reported in the literature.

  9. Relapse of Biphenotypic Acute Leukemia as a Breast Mass

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In acute leukemia, leukemic infiltration of the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) that presented as a breast mass. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 4-month history of a right breast mass with nipple discharge and easy fatigue. She had received chemotherapy and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for BAL and had been in complete remission for the last 2 years. Core needle biopsy of the breast mass revealed monomorphous infiltrates of blast cells with round nuclei and fine chromatin, consistent with leukemic infiltration. Subsequent bone marrow biopsy showed diffuse infiltration of immature cells. However, bone marrow karyotyping showed 46, XY, suggesting complete engraftment of transplanted donor cells. This is the report of BAL recurring as a breast mass. In the differential diagnosis of a breast mass, extramedullary relapse should be considered when the patient has a history of leukemia. PMID:28053635

  10. Diagnosis, treatment, and nursing care of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Viele, Carol S

    2003-05-01

    To review the clinical presentation, current methods of diagnosis and classification, treatment modalities, and novel treatment approaches of acute myelogenous and lymphoblastic leukemia. Professional journals, web sites, and books. The incidence of acute leukemia is increasing. As the population ages, it is anticipated that an even greater number will be diagnosed with this malignancy. The development of monoclonal antibodies, the recognition of the benefit of graft versus leukemia effect, and targeted therapies have improved overall survival rates. Still, age remains a significant prognostic variable. More research is needed to improve both the quality and the quantity of life for these patients. Nurses must understand the rationale and implications of each phase of treatment to educate patients, administer treatments, manage side effects, and provide support throughout the continuum of care.

  11. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia. Blast cell aggregates simulating metastatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Pui, C H; Rivera, G; Mirro, J; Stass, S; Peiper, S; Murphy, S B

    1985-11-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia is a rare leukemia that can present diagnostic problems. We describe two children who have this disease and had clumps of blast cells in their bone marrow, a finding usually attributed to metastatic tumor. The megakaryocytic origin of the cells was supported by their cytochemical staining pattern (positive alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase resistant to sodium fluoride inhibition and negative alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase) and by the presence of factor VIII-related antigen. Ultrastructural studies of blast cells from one patient demonstrated platelet peroxidase. The mechanism of blast cell clump formation in these cases is unknown; nevertheless, awareness that this feature can occur in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia may avoid a misdiagnosis of metastatic solid tumor.

  12. Ultrastructural observations on a variant of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Djaldetti, M; Gardyn, J; Maran, R; Floru, S; Mittelman, M

    1993-03-01

    A patient with acute leukemia is presented in whom the leukemic cells, as seen by light microscopy were typical promyelocytes. The cells had normal or slightly invaginated nuclei with typical cytoplasmic granules and the diagnosis was confirmed by cytochemistry. The clinical course was rapid and the patient died of disseminated intravascular coagulation and urosepsis within a few days of diagnosis. However, electron microscopic examination showed cells with extremely convoluted and lobulated nuclei with nuclear pockets and cytoplasmic bridges as well as the complete absence of cytoplasmic granules in the majority of the cells. Furthermore, the urine lysozyme (muramidase) was elevated. These findings suggest that the leukemia in this patient may be classified as a hypogranular variant of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), with monocytoid ultrastructural appearances.

  13. Relapse of Biphenotypic Acute Leukemia as a Breast Mass.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee-Chul

    2016-12-01

    In acute leukemia, leukemic infiltration of the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) that presented as a breast mass. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 4-month history of a right breast mass with nipple discharge and easy fatigue. She had received chemotherapy and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for BAL and had been in complete remission for the last 2 years. Core needle biopsy of the breast mass revealed monomorphous infiltrates of blast cells with round nuclei and fine chromatin, consistent with leukemic infiltration. Subsequent bone marrow biopsy showed diffuse infiltration of immature cells. However, bone marrow karyotyping showed 46, XY, suggesting complete engraftment of transplanted donor cells. This is the report of BAL recurring as a breast mass. In the differential diagnosis of a breast mass, extramedullary relapse should be considered when the patient has a history of leukemia.

  14. Acute lymphocytic leukemia recurring in the spinal epidural space.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Kawasaki, Takashi; Sakata, Katsumi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Isao

    2007-08-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with a very rare spinal epidural mass associated with recurrence of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) manifesting as acute progressive neurological deficits. The patient presented with shoulder pain and ambulatory difficulties 3 years after remission of ALL treated by bone marrow transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural mass extending from C-7 to T-3, which compressed the cord and extended to the intervertebral foramen along the roots. After decompression surgery, the symptoms dramatically improved. Histological examination showed clusters of immature lymphocytes consistent with recurrence of leukemia, so chemotherapy and radiation therapy were carried out. At 1 year after the operation, no local mass expansion or systemic progression of leukemia had occurred. Leukemic mass must be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural mass, even in patients with ALL.

  15. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a clinical review including Korean cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Only 5th decade ago, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was only recognized as disease group of presenting features like peripheral lymphocytosis, organomegaly including of splenomegaly. As understanding of disease biology and molecular diagnostic tools are getting improved gradually, characterization of variation in CLL’s clinical courses was facilitated, resulting in better risk stratification and targeted treatments. Consequently multiple new targeted agents have been used in treatment of CLL, it makes improved clinical outcome. Rituximab containing chemoimmunotherapy (combination of rituximab, fludarabine, and cyclophosphamide) have shown better overall response rate and progression-free survival on fit patients’ group in front-line setting, result in standard first-line therapeutic option for CLL. Furthermore, after introducing that the B-cell receptor is crucial for the evolution and progression of CLL, emerging treatments targeting highly activated surface antigens and oncogenic signaling pathways have been associated with several successes in recent decades. These include new anti-CD 20 monoclonal antibody (obinutuzumab), the bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor (ibrutinib), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor (idelalisib), and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 inhibitor (ABT-199 and ABT-263). So, we discuss not only general pathophysiology of CLL, but also rapidly advancing treatment strategies that are being studied or approved for treatment of CLL. PMID:27044858

  16. Meralgia Paresthetica as a Presentation of Acute Appendicitis in a Girl With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Miho; Kodama, Yuichi; Fukano, Reiji; Okamura, Jun; Ogaki, Kippei; Sakaguchi, Yoshihisa; Migita, Masahiro; Inagaki, Jiro

    2015-04-01

    A 7-year-old girl with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed recurrent fever and meralgia paresthetica (MP) during chemotherapy, which resolved after administration of antibiotics. Five months after the onset of these symptoms, enhanced computed tomography showed a periappendiceal abscess extending into the psoas muscle. The cause of her fever and MP was thought to be appendicitis, which probably developed during induction chemotherapy but did not result in typical abdominal pain. Patients with recurrent fever and MP should be evaluated by imaging examinations including computed tomography to search for appendicitis.

  17. Radiolabeled BC8 Antibody, Busulfan, Cyclophosphamide Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in First Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  18. Disseminated BCG disease associated with immunotherapy by scarification in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ritch, P S; McCredie, K B; Gutterman, J U; Hersh, E M

    1978-07-01

    Disseminated BCG infection developed in a patient with acute leukemia receiving BCG immunotherapy by scarification. Predisposing factors included the underlying malignancy, intensive chemotherapy, and continuous high-dose corticosteroids. The scarification technique is safe; however, physicians should be alert to this syndrome as a cause of fever of unknown origin in cancer patients receiving BCG immunotherapy.

  19. Azacitidine in Combination With Mitoxantrone, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  1. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  2. [Acute leukemia in Jehovah's Witnesses: difficulties in its management].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Almaguer, D; Ruiz-Argüelles, G; Lozano de la Vega, A; García-Guajardo, B M

    1990-01-01

    The Witnesses of Jehovah is a religious community posing special problems because of their religions conviction which objects to transfusions of blood or blood products. Six patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (one adult and 5 children) are presented. We obtained permission for blood transfusion in four children without resorting to legal pressures which, on the hand, are non-existent in Mexico.

  3. Acute myeloid leukemia therapeutics: CARs in the driver's seat.

    PubMed

    Mardiros, Armen; Brown, Christine E; Budde, L Elizabeth; Wang, Xiuli; Forman, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia remains a difficult disease to cure and novel therapeutic approaches are needed. To this end, we developed CD123 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) redirected T cells which exhibited potent antileukemic activity. We discuss what we learned during the development of CD123 CARs and future directions for this immunotherapy.

  4. Reasons for optimism in the therapy of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Distinct progress has been made in recent years in the therapy of acute leukemia. For acute myeloid leukemia (AML), this progress has been anchored in the increased understanding of genomic complexity. Multiple targets and the relationships among them pose new challenges along with new possibilities for the development of targeted therapies. A number of new drugs are in early clinical development for AML, one of which centers on the role of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in malignancy. Epigenetic modulation, intracellular pathways, and the microenvironment are all being explored for possible therapies to treat AML. Dramatic clinical progress has also been made in therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with the rapid approval of blinatumomab, a bispecific T-cell engager antibody. Yet caution must also be exercised-not every mutation is an epigenetic target and early publication of clinical data is often misleading. Until the survival outcome for adult patients with acute leukemia improves, further inquiry into the biology of the disease and progress in the development of new therapies are needed.

  5. Antibodies: Immunoconjugates and autologous cellular therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Advani, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Using a case study of a 57-year-old man with relapsed/refractory precursor-B (pre-B) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), this review discusses treatment with immunoconjugates and autologous therapy in acute ALL. Three therapies--blinatumomab, inotuzumab, and CAR T cells--are considered here, each with advantages in specific clinical situations. These therapies represent some of the exciting advances that have been made in the treatment of ALL over the last several years.

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia cells polarize macrophages towards a leukemia supporting state in a Growth factor independence 1 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Al-Matary, Yahya S.; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Opalka, Bertram; Hönes, Judith M.; Lams, Robert F.; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Schütte, Judith; Köster, Renata; Lennartz, Klaus; Schroeder, Thomas; Haas, Rainer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    The growth of malignant cells is not only driven by cell-intrinsic factors, but also by the surrounding stroma. Monocytes/Macrophages play an important role in the onset and progression of solid cancers. However, little is known about their role in the development of acute myeloid leukemia, a malignant disease characterized by an aberrant development of the myeloid compartment of the hematopoietic system. It is also unclear which factors are responsible for changing the status of macrophage polarization, thus supporting the growth of malignant cells instead of inhibiting it. We report herein that acute myeloid leukemia leads to the invasion of acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages into the bone marrow and spleen of leukemic patients and mice. In different leukemic mouse models, these macrophages support the in vitro expansion of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines better than macrophages from non-leukemic mice. The grade of macrophage infiltration correlates in vivo with the survival of the mice. We found that the transcriptional repressor Growth factor independence 1 is crucial in the process of macrophage polarization, since its absence impedes macrophage polarization towards a leukemia supporting state and favors an anti-tumor state both in vitro and in vivo. These results not only suggest that acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages play an important role in the progression of acute myeloid leukemia, but also implicate Growth factor independence 1 as a pivotal factor in macrophage polarization. These data may provide new insights and opportunities for novel therapies for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27390361

  7. ZFX controls propagation and prevents differentiation of acute T-lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Stuart P; Smith-Raska, Matthew R; Esquilin, Jose M; Zhang, Ji; Arenzana, Teresita L; Lau, Colleen M; Churchill, Michael; Pan, Haiyan; Klinakis, Apostolos; Dixon, Jack E; Mirny, Leonid A; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Reizis, Boris

    2014-02-13

    Tumor-propagating cells in acute leukemia maintain a stem/progenitor-like immature phenotype and proliferative capacity. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) originate from different lineages through distinct oncogenic events such as MLL fusions and Notch signaling, respectively. We found that Zfx, a transcription factor that controls hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal, controls the initiation and maintenance of AML caused by MLL-AF9 fusion and of T-ALL caused by Notch1 activation. In both leukemia types, Zfx prevents differentiation and activates gene sets characteristic of immature cells of the respective lineages. In addition, endogenous Zfx contributes to gene induction and transformation by Myc overexpression in myeloid progenitors. Key Zfx target genes include the mitochondrial enzymes Ptpmt1 and Idh2, whose overexpression partially rescues the propagation of Zfx-deficient AML. These results show that distinct leukemia types maintain their undifferentiated phenotype and self-renewal by exploiting a common stem-cell-related genetic regulator. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Management of Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia in a Child With Biallelic Mismatch Repair Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Elhasid, Ronit; Dvir, Rina; Rosenfeld Keidar, Hila; Ben Shachar, Shay; Bitan, Menachem; Solar, Irit; Durno, Carol; Aronson, Melyssa; Malkin, David; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Tabori, Uri

    2015-11-01

    Germline biallelic mismatch repair deficiency (bMMRD) results in a unique cancer predisposition syndrome in which the affected children are susceptible to the development of malignancies, especially brain, gastrointestinal, and lymphoid cancers. Acute myeloblastic leukemia is rarely reported in this syndrome. Here we report the decision-making challenges in a bMMRD child with acute myeloblastic leukemia. Our experience should alert physicians to include bMMRD in the differential diagnosis of a child with hyper/hypopigmented spots and leukemia. Furthermore, the presence of the above and consanguinity emphasizes the need to rule out bMMRD when an allogeneic bone marrow transplant is considered and to enable the surveillance of other family members for earlier detection of cancers in these children.

  9. The evolution of clinical trials for infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, R S; Gottardo, N G; Kees, U R; Cole, C H

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants has a significantly inferior outcome in comparison with older children. Despite initial improvements in survival of infants with ALL since establishment of the first pediatric cooperative group ALL trials, the poor outcome has plateaued in recent years. Historically, infants were treated on risk-adapted childhood ALL protocols. These studies were pivotal in identifying the need for infant-specific protocols, delineating prognostic categories and the requirement for a more unified approach between study groups to overcome limitations in accrual because of low incidence. This subsequently led to the development of collaborative infant-specific studies. Landmark outcomes have included the elimination of cranial radiotherapy following the discovery of intrathecal and high-dose systemic therapy as a superior and effective treatment strategy for central nervous system disease prophylaxis, with improved neurodevelopmental outcome. Universal prospective identification of independent adverse prognostic factors, including presence of a mixed lineage leukemia rearrangement and young age, has established the basis for risk stratification within current trials. The infant-specific trials have defined limits to which conventional chemotherapeutic agents can be intensified to optimize the balance between treatment efficacy and toxicity. Despite variations in therapeutic intensity, there has been no recent improvement in survival due to the equilibrium between relapse and toxicity. Ultimately, to improve the outcome for infants with ALL, key areas still to be addressed include identification and adaptation of novel prognostic markers and innovative therapies, establishing the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission, treatment strategies for relapsed/refractory disease and monitoring and timely intervention of late effects in survivors. This would be best achieved through a single unified

  10. Genomics in acute myeloid leukemia: from identification to personalization.

    PubMed

    Martin, James M; Winer, Eric S

    2015-11-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive bone marrow malignancy that is fatal if left untreated. Previous classification was strictly based on morphology, which gave little information in terms of prognosis or guide to treatment. Recent research has provided vital information into the chromosomal and molecular pathogenesis of leukemia development. The discovery of these abnormalities via proteomics and genomics have provided two key insights. First, these novel discoveries provide prognostic significance into the predictive result of chemotherapy. Second, these chromosomal and protein abnormalities have provided potential drug targets for new treatment modalities. This article will elaborate on many of these new molecular findings and discuss their implications on the treatment of AML.

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia: advancing clinical trials and promising therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Daver, Naval; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; Ravandi, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the biology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the identification of targetable driver mutations, leukemia specific antigens and signal transduction pathways has ushered in a new era of therapy. In many circumstances the response rates with such targeted or antibody-based therapies are superior to those achieved with standard therapy and with decreased toxicity. In this review we discuss novel therapies in AML with a focus on two major areas of unmet need: (1) single agent and combination strategies to improve frontline therapy in elderly patients with AML and (2) molecularly targeted therapies in the frontline and salvage setting in all patients with AML. PMID:26910051

  12. Minimal residual disease studies by flow cytometry in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Campana, Dario; Coustan-Smith, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) assays are increasingly important in the clinical management of patients with acute leukemia. Among the methods available for monitoring MRD, flow cytometry holds great promise for clinical application because of its simplicity and wide availability. Several studies have demonstrated strong correlations between MRD levels by flow cytometry during clinical remission and treatment outcome, lending support to the reliability of this approach. Flow-cytometric detection of MRD is based on the identification of immunophenotypic combinations expressed on leukemic cells but not on normal hematopoietic cells. Its sensitivity depends on the specificity of the immunophenotypes used to track leukemic cells and on the number of cells available for study. Immunophenotypes that allow detection of 1 leukemic cell in 10,000 normal cells can be identified in at least 90% of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia; immunophenotypes that allow detection of 1 leukemic cell in 1,000-10,000 normal cells can be identified in at least 85% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Identification of new markers of leukemia by gene array technology should lead to the design of simple and reliable antibody panels for universal monitoring of MRD. Here we review the relative advantages and disadvantages of flow cytometry for MRD studies, as well as results obtained in correlative studies with treatment outcome. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; CD45-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  14. Clinical and Genetic Risk Factors for Acute Pancreatitis in Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengcheng; Yang, Wenjian; Devidas, Meenakshi; Cheng, Cheng; Pei, Deqing; Smith, Colton; Carroll, William L.; Raetz, Elizabeth A.; Bowman, W. Paul; Larsen, Eric C.; Maloney, Kelly W.; Martin, Paul L.; Mattano, Leonard A.; Winick, Naomi J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Fulton, Robert S.; Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Hunger, Stephen P.; Evans, William E.; Loh, Mignon L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acute pancreatitis is one of the common causes of asparaginase intolerance. The mechanism is unknown, and genetic predisposition to asparaginase-induced pancreatitis has not been previously identified. Methods To determine clinical risk factors for asparaginase-induced pancreatitis, we studied a cohort of 5,185 children and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, including 117 (2.3%) who were diagnosed with at least one episode of acute pancreatitis during therapy. A genome-wide association study was performed in the cohort and in an independent case-control group of 213 patients to identify genetic risk factors. Results Risk factors associated with pancreatitis included genetically defined Native American ancestry (P < .001), older age (P < .001), and higher cumulative dose of asparaginase (P < .001). No common variants reached genome-wide significance in the genome-wide association study, but a rare nonsense variant rs199695765 in CPA2, encoding carboxypeptidase A2, was highly associated with pancreatitis (hazard ratio, 587; 95% CI, 66.8 to 5166; P = 9.0 × 10−9). A gene-level analysis showed an excess of additional CPA2 variants in patients who did versus those who did not develop pancreatitis (P = .001). Sixteen CPA2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were associated (P < .05) with pancreatitis, and 13 of 24 patients who carried at least one of these variants developed pancreatitis. Biologic functions that were overrepresented by common variants modestly associated with pancreatitis included purine metabolism and cytoskeleton regulation. Conclusion Older age, higher exposure to asparaginase, and higher Native American ancestry were independent risk factors for pancreatitis in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Those who inherit a nonsense rare variant in the CPA2 gene had a markedly increased risk of asparaginase-induced pancreatitis. PMID:27114598

  15. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  16. Impact of ABO incompatibility on patients’ outcome after haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia - a report from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Canaani, Jonathan; Savani, Bipin N; Labopin, Myriam; Huang, Xiao-jun; Ciceri, Fabio; Arcese, William; Tischer, Johanna; Koc, Yener; Bruno, Benedetto; Gülbas, Zafer; Blaise, Didier; Maertens, Johan; Ehninger, Gerhard; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of hematopoietic stem cell transplants are performed with ABO-mismatched donors. The impact of ABO mismatch on outcome following transplantation remains controversial and there are no published data regarding the impact of ABO mismatch in acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving haploidentical transplants. Using the European Blood and Marrow Transplant Acute Leukemia Working Group registry we identified 837 patients who underwent haploidentical transplantation. Comparative analysis was performed between patients who received ABO-matched versus ABO-mismatched haploidentical transplants for common clinical outcome variables. Our cohort consisted of 522 ABO-matched patients and 315 ABO-mismatched patients including 150 with minor, 127 with major, and 38 with bi-directional ABO mismatching. There were no significant differences between ABO matched and mismatched patients in terms of baseline disease and clinical characteristics. Major ABO mismatching was associated with inferior day 100 engraftment rate whereas multivariate analysis showed that bi-directional mismatching was associated with increased risk of grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease [hazard ratio (HR) 2.387; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22–4.66; P=0.01). Non-relapse mortality, relapse incidence, leukemia-free survival, overall survival, and chronic graft-versus-host disease rates were comparable between ABO-matched and -mismatched patients. Focused analysis on stem cell source showed that patients with minor mismatching transplanted with bone marrow grafts experienced increased grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease rates (HR 2.03; 95% CI: 1.00–4.10; P=0.04). Patients with major ABO mismatching and bone marrow grafts had decreased survival (HR=1.82; CI 95%: 1.048 – 3.18; P=0.033). In conclusion, ABO incompatibility has a marginal but significant clinical effect in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing haploidentical transplantation. PMID:28255020

  17. Hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia treated with bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Keino, Dai; Kondoh, Kensuke; Ohyama, Ryo; Morimoto, Mizuho; Mori, Tetsuya; Ito, Masafumi; Kinoshita, Akitoshi

    2017-04-01

    Hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mainly occurs in elderly patients, and is extremely rare in childhood. There is still no established treatment for hypocellular AML. We report the case of an 11-year-old boy with hypocellular AML who was treated successfully with allogenic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT). He presented with fever, pallor and pancytopenia. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of hypocellular AML. Although low-dose cytarabine induced reduction of blasts, it did not lead to complete remission. He subsequently received myeloablative conditioning and allo-BMT. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis included short-course methotrexate and cyclosporine. Neutrophil engraftment (>5 × 10(8) /L) and platelet recovery (>10 × 10(10) /L) were achieved on days 13 and 27, respectively. He developed acute GVHD of the skin (grade 2), which responded well to treatment with prednisolone. He has remained in complete remission for 5 years since allo-BMT. We consider allo-BMT to be feasible for children with hypocellular AML. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the context of RASopathies.

    PubMed

    Cavé, Hélène; Caye, Aurélie; Strullu, Marion; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Vignal, Cédric; Ferster, Alice; Méchinaud, Françoise; Domenech, Carine; Pierri, Filomena; Contet, Audrey; Cacheux, Valère; Irving, Julie; Kratz, Christian; Clavel, Jacqueline; Verloes, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Noonan syndrome is associated with a range of malignancies including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, little information is available regarding the frequency, natural history, characteristics and prognosis of ALL in Noonan syndrome or RASopathies in general. Cross-referencing data from a large prospective cohort of 1176 patients having a molecularly confirmed RASopathy with data from the French childhood cancer registry allowed us to identify ALL in 6 (0.5%) patients including 4/778 (0.5%) with a germline PTPN11 mutation and 2/94 (2.1%) with a germline SOS1 mutation. None of the patients of our series with CFC syndrome (with germline BRAF or MAP2K1/MAP2K2 mutation - n = 121) or Costello syndrome (with HRAS mutation - n = 35) had an ALL. A total of 19 Noonan-ALL were gathered by adding our patients to those of the International Berlin-Munster-Frankfurt (I-BFM) study group and previously reported patients. Strikingly, all Noonan-associated ALL were B-cell precursor ALL, and high hyperdiploidy with more than 50 chromosomes was found in the leukemia cells of 13/17 (76%) patients with available genetics data. Our data suggest that children with Noonan syndrome are at higher risk to develop ALL. Like what is observed for somatic PTPN11 mutations, NS is preferentially associated with the development of hyperdiploid ALL that will usually respond well to chemotherapy. However, Noonan syndrome patients seem to have a propensity to develop post therapy myelodysplasia that can eventually be fatal. Hence, one should be particularly cautious when treating these patients.

  19. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Advancements in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Meng-Ge; Zheng, Hu-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Leukemia is the most common pediatric malignancy and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Among all subtypes, a lack of consensus exists regarding the diagnosis and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patient survival rates have remained modest for the past three decades in AML. Recently, targeted therapy has emerged as a promising treatment. Data Sources: We searched the PubMed database for recently published research papers on diagnostic development, target therapy, and other novel therapies of AML. Clinical trial information was obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov. For the major purpose of this review that is to outline the latest therapeutic development of AML, we only listed the ongoing clinical trials for reference. However, the published results of complete clinical trials were also mentioned. Study Selection: This article reviewed the latest developments related to the diagnosis and treatment of AML. In the first portion, we provided some novel insights on the molecular basis of AML, as well as provided an update on the classification of AML. In the second portion, we summarized the results of research on potential molecular therapeutic agents including monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase/Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) inhibitors, epigenetic/demethylating agents, and cellular therapeutic agents. We will also highlight ongoing research and clinical trials in pediatric AML. Results: We described clonal evolution and how it changes our view on leukemogenesis, treatment responses, and disease relapse. Pediatric-specific genomic mapping was discussed with a novel diagnostic method highlighted. In the later portion of this review, we summarized the researches on potential molecular therapeutic agents including monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase/FLT3 inhibitors, epigenetic/demethylating agents, and cellular therapeutic agents. Conclusion: Gene sequencing techniques should set the basis for next-generation diagnostic

  20. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved.

  1. Expansion of CD14+CD16+ monocytes is related to acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xin-Quan; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Hong-Ai; Yuan, Ning; Hou, Pei-Qiang; Zhang, Rong-Qiang; Wu, Tuo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Objective: Aim to investigate the proportion of CD14+CD16+ monocytes and understand the pathogenesis of this monocyte subset in acute leukemia. Methods: Flow cytometry was utilized to study the phenotype expression of CD14+CD16+ monocytes and CD3+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood derived from patients with acute leukemia. All the data were analyzed by SPSS 13.0 software. Results: The proportion of CD14+CD16+ monocytes including both intermediate and non-classical monocytes, increased significantly in patients with acute leukemia and changed negatively or positively according to the disease process. Meanwhile, the proportion of CD14+CD16+ monocytes was inversely correlated with absolute number of CD4+ T lymphocytes, ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T cells, and positively correlated with the proportion of neutrophil granulocytes. Conclusions: The proportion of CD14+CD16+ monocytes (especially the intermediate subpopulation) is related to the progression of acute leukemia, and the expansion of this monocyte subset could indicate the severity of the disease. PMID:26550139

  2. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  3. Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute. Acute childhood leukemias are also divided into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) , depending on ... Bone Marrow Childhood Cancer Neutropenia Stem Cell Transplants Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) ...

  4. Multifaceted approach to the diagnosis and classification of acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    McKenna, R W

    2000-08-01

    Until recently, the diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid (AML) and acute lymphoblastic (ALL) leukemias was based almost exclusively on well-defined morphologic criteria and cytochemical stains. Although most cases can be diagnosed by these methods, there is only modest correlation between morphologic categories and treatment responsiveness and prognosis. The expansion of therapeutic options and improvement in remission induction and disease-free survival for both AML and ALL have stimulated emphasis on defining good and poor treatment response groups. This is most effectively accomplished by a multifaceted approach to diagnosis and classification using immunophenotyping, cytogenetics, and molecular analysis in addition to the traditional methods. Immunophenotyping is important in characterizing morphologically poorly differentiated acute leukemias and in defining prognostic categories of ALL. Cytogenetic and molecular studies provide important prognostic information and are becoming vitally important in determining the appropriate treatment protocol. With optimal application of these techniques in the diagnosis of acute leukemias, treatment strategies can be more specifically directed and new therapeutic approaches can be evaluated more effectively.

  5. Acute hepatitis A induction of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a causal relationship?

    PubMed

    Senadhi, V; Emuron, D; Gupta, R

    2010-09-01

    Precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia accounts for 2% of all lymphoid neoplasms in the United States and occurs most frequently in childhood, but can also occur in adults with a median age of 39 years. It is more commonly seen in males and in Caucasians. We present a case of a 51-year-old Caucasian female with the development of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after suffering acute hepatitis A 4 weeks prior to her diagnosis. She presented with malaise for a month without spontaneous bruising/bleeding, infections, or B-symptoms, such as fevers, night sweats, or unintentional weight loss. Nonspecific viral transformation of bone marrow has been discussed in the literature, but we specifically describe hepatitis A-induced adult-onset precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which is the first reported case in the literature.

  6. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia with t(11;19)(q23;p13.3)/ MLL-MLLT1(ENL), B/T-lymphoid type: A first case report.

    PubMed

    Naghashpour, Mojdeh; Lancet, Jeffrey; Moscinski, Lynn; Zhang, Ling

    2010-06-01

    The majority of cases of acute leukemia belong to a specific lineage origin, either lymphoid or myeloid, and therefore are classified as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), based on morphologic features and cytochemical and immunophenotypic profile of the blast cells. A minority of acute leukemias however, show no clear evidence of differentiation along a single lineage. These are now classified under acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage by the most recent WHO classification and account for <4% of all cases of acute leukemia [1]. They include leukemias with no lineage specific antigens (acute undifferentiated leukemias) and those with blasts that express antigens of more than one lineage to such degree that it is not possible to assign the leukemia to any one particular lineage with certainty (mixed phenotype acute leukemias). The latter can either be leukemias with two distinct populations of blasts, each expressing antigens of a different lineage (historically referred to as "bilineal" leukemias) or a single blast population expressing antigens of multiple lineages (historically referred to as "biphenotypic" acute leukemias) [2]. Acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage may harbor a variety of genetic lesions. Those with t(9;22)(q34;q11) or translocations associated with mixed lineage leukemias (MLL) gene, i.e., t(11;V)(q23;V), occur frequently enough and are associated with distinct features, that are considered as separate entities according to the recent WHO classification. Co-expression of myeloid and B-lymphoid antigens is most common in mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), followed by co-expression of myeloid and T-lymphoid antigens, accounting for 66-70% and 23-24% of MLLs, respectively. Coexpression of B- and T-lineage associated antigens or antigens of all three lineages is exceedingly rare, accounting for <5% of MLLs [3,4]. The requirements for assigning more than one lineage to a single blast population has been

  7. [Effects of birth order, maternal abortion and mode of delivery on childhood acute leukemia risk: a meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Zou, Guobin; Sha, Xia

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the associations between birth order, maternal abortion and mode of delivery and childhood acute leukemia risk. Multiple electronic databases were searched to identify relevant studies up to March 2013 using the search terms "childhood leukemia", "acute lymphoblastic leukemia", "acute myeloid leukemia","birth order", "abortion", "miscarriage", "cesarean", "birth characteristics" and "prenatal risk factor". Data from cohort and case-control studies were analyzed using the Stata software. Twenty-three studies were included in this meta-analysis according to the selection criteria. No significant associations were identified for birth order and mode of delivery (birth order = 2: OR = 0.97, 95%CI: 0.89-1.05; birth order = 3: OR = 1.00, 95%CI: 0.91-1.11; birth order ≥ 4: OR = 1.02, 95%CI: 0.87-1.20; mode of delivery: OR = 1.05, 95%CI: 0.96-1.15). However, there was a significant association between maternal abortion and childhood acute leukemia risk (spontaneous abortion: OR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.05-1.41; induced abortion: OR = 1.23, 95%CI: 1.07-1.43). Furthermore, the stratified analysis by disease subtypes showed that spontaneous and induced abortions were significantly associated with the risks of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (OR = 1.71, 95%CI: 1.09-2.70) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (OR = 1.23, 95%CI: 1.05-1.42), respectively. This meta-analysis revealed that maternal abortion might contribute to the childhood acute leukemia risk.

  8. GATA2 Inhibition Sensitizes Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanan; Xuan, Binbin; Fan, Yingchao; Sheng, Huiming; Zhuang, Wenfang

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance constitutes one of the main obstacles for clinical recovery of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Therefore, the treatment of AML requires new strategies, such as adding a third drug. To address whether GATA2 could act as a regulator of chemotherapy resistance in human leukemia cells, we observed KG1a cells and clinical patients’ AML cells with a classic drug (Cerubidine) and Gefitinib. After utilizing chemotherapy, the expression of GATA2 and its target genes (EVI, SCL and WT1) in surviving AML cells and KG1a cells were significantly enhanced to double and quadrupled compared to its original level respectively. Furthermore, with continuous chemotherapeutics, AML cells with GATA2 knockdown or treated with GATA2 inhibitor (K1747) almost eliminated with dramatically reduced expression of WT1, SCL, EVI, and significantly increased apoptotic population. Therefore, we propose that reducing GATA2 expression or inhibition of its transcription activity can relieve the drug resistance of acute myeloid leukemia cells and it would be helpful for eliminating the leukemia cells in patients. PMID:28114350

  9. Thrombotic and hemorrhagic strokes complicating early therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Priest, J R; Ramsay, N K; Latchaw, R E; Lockman, L A; Hasegawa, D K; Coates, T D; Coccia, P F; Edson, J R; Nesbit, M E; Krivit, W

    1980-10-01

    Sudden cerebrovascular insults occurred during or immediately following remission induction therapy in 4 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In 3, cerebral infarction was due to thrombosis. In the fourth, an intracerebral hematoma developed representing either frank hemorrhaging or a hemorrhagic infarction. None of the patients had central nervous system leukemia or extreme leukocytosis at the time of diagnosis. Symptoms were obtundation, hemiparesis, seizures, and headache. The induction chemotherapy included L-asparaginase which causes deficiencies of antithrombin, plasminogen, fibrinogen, and factors IX and XI. These hemostatic abnormalities may explain the thromboses and bleeding observed in these children.

  10. Potential use of the Macrobrachium rosenbergii lectin for diagnosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Campos-Mayoral, Laura; Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro; Pérez-Romano, Beatriz; Zenteno, Edgar; Hernández-Cruz, Pedro; Martínez-Cruz, Ruth; Martínez-Cruz, Margarito; Pina-Canseco, Socorro; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common form of cancer in children. Lectins are proteins or glycoproteins from plants or animals that recognize oligossacharides on the cell surface and have been used to characterize the structural changes of oligosaccharides in leukemias. In this study, we used the lectin from the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium (M. rosenbergii), specific for acetyl groups in sialylated glycans, because increased sialylation of glycoproteins and glycolipids has been identified in lymphoblastic leukemias. We compared the specificity of the M. rosenbergii lectin for lymphoblastic leukemias with the specificities of the lectins from Triticum vulgaris, Solanum tuberosum, Arachis hipogaea, and Phytolacca americana. By morphologic and phenotype characterization with a panel of monoclonal antibodies, we identified four types of leukemias from 106 leukemia patients: 11 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 61 cases of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 24 cases of acute myeloblastic leukemia, and 10 cases of acute biphenotypic leukemia. As determined by cytofluorometric assays, nine of the eleven cases with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (8 +/- 3 years old) were specifically identified with the lectin from M. rosenbergii. In contrast, only six cases of B-cell leukemia, one case of myeloblastic leukemia, and 2 cases of biphenotypic leukemia were identified with this M. rosenbergii lectin. The other lectins tested showed no capacity to differentiate, in a significant manner, any of the four types of leukemias tested. Thus, the lectin from M. rosenbergii could be considered a useful tool for the diagnosis and study of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  11. The Mutation Profile of Calreticulin in Patients with Myeloproliferative Neoplasms and Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Hao, Jianguo; He, Na; Ji, Chunyan; Ma, Daoxin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Calreticulin (CALR) plays important roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and immune responses. CALR mutations were described recently in Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2)-negative or MPL-negative primary myelofibrosis (PMF) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients. CALR trails JAK2 as the second most mutated gene in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). However, little is known about CALR mutation in Chinese patients with leukemia. In the present study, a cohort of 305 Chinese patients with hematopoietic neoplasms was screened for CALR mutations, with the aim of uncovering the frequency of CALR mutations in leukemia and MPNs. Materials and Methods: Polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing were performed to analyze mutations of CALR in 305 patients with hematopoietic malignancies, including 135 acute myeloid leukemia patients, 57 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, and 113 MPN patients. Results: CALR mutations were found in 10.6% (12 of 113) of samples from patients with MPNs. CALR mutations were determined in 11.3% (6 of 53), 21.7% (5 of 23), and 9.1% (1/11) of patients with ET, PMF, and unclassifiable MPN, respectively. Conclusion: We showed that MPN patients carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels compared to those with mutated JAK2. However, all of the leukemia patients had negative results for CALR mutations. PMID:26377485

  12. Therapeutic value of black seed oil in methotrexate hepatotoxicity in Egyptian children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hagag, Adel A; AbdElaal, Ahmed M; Elfaragy, Mohamed S; Hassan, Samir M; Elzamarany, Enas A

    2015-01-01

    'Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common childhood malignancy'. Adding methotrexate to treatment protocols increased survival rate in children with leukemia. Methotrexate efficacy is limited by its hepatotoxicity. To assess the therapeutic value of Black seed oil in 'methotrexate induced hepatotoxicity in Egyptian children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia'. This study was conducted on 40 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia' including 20 patients under methotrexate therapy and Black seeds 80 mg/kg/day for one week after each methotrexate dose [Group II] and 20 patients under methotrexate therapy and placebo [Group III]. This study included also '20 healthy children of matched age and sex as a control group' [Group I]. All patients were subjected to complete blood picture, bone marrow aspiration and liver functions. No significant differences in liver functions between group II and III before therapy were observed. There were nonsignificant increase in total, direct and indirect serum bilirubin, serum ALT, AST, and alkaline phosphatase levels and prothrombin time in group II after methotrexate and Black seed oil therapy but there was significant increase in group III after treatment with methotrexate and placebo with 'significant differences between group II and III ' after therapy. There were significant differences in prognosis regarding remission, relapse, death and 'disease free survival but no significant difference in overall survival between group II and III'. Black cumin seeds decreased MTX hepatotoxicity and improved survival in children with ALL and can be recommended as adjuvant drug in patients with ALL under methotrexate therapy.

  13. [Cytarabine and skin reactions in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Grille, Sofía; Guadagna, Regina; Boada, Matilde; Irigoin, Victoria; Stevenazzi, Mariana; Guillermo, Cecilia; Díaz, Lilián

    2013-01-01

    Cytarabine is an antimetabolite used in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It has many adverse effects as: myelosuppression, toxic reactions involving central nervous system, liver, gastrointestinal tract, eyes or skin. Dermatologic toxicity is often described as rare; nevertheless there are differences in the reported frequency. We performed a retrospective study including all AML treated with chemotherapy that involved cytarabine between 1st July of 2006 and 1st July of 2012; 46 patients were included with a median age of 55 years. The overall incidence of skin reactions was 39% (n = 18). Sex, age, history of atopy, history of drug reactions, or dose of cytarabine used, were not associated with them. Skin reactions were observed from 2 to 8 days after treatment started. Considering injury degree: 27.8% had grade 1, 38.9% grade 2 and 33.3% grade 3. We did not find any injury grade 4 or death associated with skin toxicity. As for the type of injury: 55.6% presented macules, 22.2% papules and 22.2% erythema. Lesions distribution was diffuse in 52% of patients, acral in 39.3%, and at flexural level in 8.7%. Adverse cutaneous reactions secondary to the administration of cytarabine are frequent in our service and include some cases with severe involvement. Although these reactions usually resolve spontaneously, they determine an increased risk of infection and a compromise of the patient quality of life.

  14. Dasatinib in high-risk core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a French Acute Myeloid Leukemia Intergroup trial

    PubMed Central

    Boissel, Nicolas; Renneville, Aline; Leguay, Thibaut; Lefebvre, Pascale Cornillet; Recher, Christian; Lecerf, Thibaud; Delabesse, Eric; Berthon, Céline; Blanchet, Odile; Prebet, Thomas; Pautas, Cécile; Chevallier, Patrice; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Girault, Stéphane; Bonmati, Caroline; Guièze, Romain; Himberlin, Chantal; Randriamalala, Edouard; Preudhomme, Claude; Jourdan, Eric; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is a favorable acute myeloid leukemia subset cytogenetically defined by t(8;21) or inv(16)/t(16;16) rearrangements, disrupting RUNX1 (previously CBFA/AML1) or CBFB transcription factor functions. The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is expressed in the vast majority of these acute myeloid leukemias and frequent activating KIT gene mutations have been associated with a higher risk of relapse. This phase II study aimed to evaluate dasatinib as maintenance therapy in patients with core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first hematologic complete remission, but at higher risk of relapse due to molecular disease persistence or recurrence. A total of 26 patients aged 18–60 years old previously included in the CBF-2006 trial were eligible to receive dasatinib 140 mg daily if they had a poor initial molecular response (n=18) or a molecular recurrence (n=8). The tolerance of dasatinib as maintenance therapy was satisfactory. The 2-year disease-free survival in this high-risk population of patients was 25.7%. All but one patient with molecular recurrence presented subsequent hematologic relapse. Patients with slow initial molecular response had a similar disease-free survival when treated with dasatinib (40.2% at 2 years) or without any maintenance (50.0% at 2 years). The disappearance of KIT gene mutations at relapse suggests that clonal devolution may in part explain the absence of efficacy observed with single-agent dasatinib in these patients (n. EudraCT: 2006-006555-12). PMID:25715404

  15. Dasatinib in high-risk core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a French Acute Myeloid Leukemia Intergroup trial.

    PubMed

    Boissel, Nicolas; Renneville, Aline; Leguay, Thibaut; Lefebvre, Pascale Cornillet; Recher, Christian; Lecerf, Thibaud; Delabesse, Eric; Berthon, Céline; Blanchet, Odile; Prebet, Thomas; Pautas, Cécile; Chevallier, Patrice; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Girault, Stéphane; Bonmati, Caroline; Guièze, Romain; Himberlin, Chantal; Randriamalala, Edouard; Preudhomme, Claude; Jourdan, Eric; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-06-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is a favorable acute myeloid leukemia subset cytogenetically defined by t(8;21) or inv(16)/t(16;16) rearrangements, disrupting RUNX1 (previously CBFA/AML1) or CBFB transcription factor functions. The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is expressed in the vast majority of these acute myeloid leukemias and frequent activating KIT gene mutations have been associated with a higher risk of relapse. This phase II study aimed to evaluate dasatinib as maintenance therapy in patients with core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first hematologic complete remission, but at higher risk of relapse due to molecular disease persistence or recurrence. A total of 26 patients aged 18-60 years old previously included in the CBF-2006 trial were eligible to receive dasatinib 140 mg daily if they had a poor initial molecular response (n=18) or a molecular recurrence (n=8). The tolerance of dasatinib as maintenance therapy was satisfactory. The 2-year disease-free survival in this high-risk population of patients was 25.7%. All but one patient with molecular recurrence presented subsequent hematologic relapse. Patients with slow initial molecular response had a similar disease-free survival when treated with dasatinib (40.2% at 2 years) or without any maintenance (50.0% at 2 years). The disappearance of KIT gene mutations at relapse suggests that clonal devolution may in part explain the absence of efficacy observed with single-agent dasatinib in these patients (n. EudraCT: 2006-006555-12).

  16. Azelaic Acid Exerts Antileukemic Activity in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yunbao; Liu, Dong; Wei, Yongchang; Su, Dan; Lu, Chenyang; Hu, Yanchao; Zhou, Fuling

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an acute leukemia common in most adults; its prevalence intensifies with age. The overall survival of AML is very poor because of therapeutic resistance. Azelaic acid (AZA) is non-toxic, non-teratogenic, and non-mutagenic and its antitumor effect on various tumor cells is well established; Nonetheless, its therapeutic effects in AML cells are largely unknown. In this study, it was shown that AZA significantly inhibits the cell viability and induces apoptosis in AML cells in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, AZA suppressed the expression of phosphorylated Akt, Jab1 and Trx, and this suppression was enhanced by treatment with Jab1 siRNA. Furthermore, AZA sensitized AML cells to Ara-c chemotherapy. The suppressive effect of AZA on tumor growth was examined in vivo by subcutaneously inoculated AML cells in a tumor model using nude mice. These findings indicate that AZA is useful as an effective ingredient in antineoplastic activity.

  17. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bilateral serous macular detachment.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Luisa; Silva, Nuno Aguiar; Medeiros, Marco Dutra; Flores, Rita; Maduro, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a malignant hematopoietic neoplasia, which is rare in adults. Although ocular fundus alterations may be commonly observed in the course of the disease, such alterations are rarely the presenting signs of the disease. Here we describe the case of a patient with painless and progressive loss of visual acuity (right eye, 2/10; left eye, 3/10) developing over two weeks, accompanied by fever and cervical lymphadenopathy. Fundus examination showed bilateral macular serous detachment, which was confirmed by optical coherence tomography. Fluorescein angiography revealed hyperfluorescent pinpoints in the posterior poles. The limits of the macular detachment were revealed in the late phase of the angiogram. The results of blood count analysis triggered a thorough, systematic patient examination. The diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia B (CD10+) was established, and intensive systemic chemotherapy was immediately initiated. One year after the diagnosis, the patient remains in complete remission without any ophthalmologic alterations.

  18. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bongiovanni, Deborah; Saccomani, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive disease caused by the malignant transformation of immature progenitors primed towards T-cell development. Clinically, T-ALL patients present with diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow by immature T-cell blasts high blood cell counts, mediastinal involvement, and diffusion to the central nervous system. In the past decade, the genomic landscape of T-ALL has been the target of intense research. The identification of specific genomic alterations has contributed to identify strong oncogenic drivers and signaling pathways regulating leukemia growth. Notwithstanding, T-ALL patients are still treated with high-dose multiagent chemotherapy, potentially exposing these patients to considerable acute and long-term side effects. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the signaling pathways relevant for the pathogenesis of T-ALL and the opportunities offered for targeted therapy. PMID:28872614

  19. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a comprehensive review and 2017 update

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, T; Abdul-Hay, M

    2017-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the second most common acute leukemia in adults, with an incidence of over 6500 cases per year in the United States alone. The hallmark of ALL is chromosomal abnormalities and genetic alterations involved in differentiation and proliferation of lymphoid precursor cells. In adults, 75% of cases develop from precursors of the B-cell lineage, with the remainder of cases consisting of malignant T-cell precursors. Traditionally, risk stratification has been based on clinical factors such age, white blood cell count and response to chemotherapy; however, the identification of recurrent genetic alterations has helped refine individual prognosis and guide management. Despite advances in management, the backbone of therapy remains multi-agent chemotherapy with vincristine, corticosteroids and an anthracycline with allogeneic stem cell transplantation for eligible candidates. Elderly patients are often unable to tolerate such regimens and carry a particularly poor prognosis. Here, we review the major recent advances in the treatment of ALL. PMID:28665419

  20. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a child with Fanconi's anaemia.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Naureen; Wali, Rabia; Fadoo, Zehra; Saleem, Ali Faisal

    2012-07-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder with progressive bone marrow failure, associated congenital malformation and solid and haematological malignancies. Acute myeloid leukemia is the commonest haematological malignancy followed by myelodysplastic syndrome in children with FA. FA transformed into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a rare phenomenon and one of the rarest haematological malignancies associated with this disorder. We are reporting a 13 years old girl with FA and positive chromosomal breakage. She required regular blood product transfusion. She was planned for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) but the sibling-matched donor was found to have chromosomal breaks as well. Later on, her peripheral smear showed blast cell. Bone marrow showed pre-B ALL. She was started on chemotherapy but died shortly due to complications of the treatment. For this rare condition conservative management is indeed essential, however, safe and appropriate chemotherapy regimen is needed.

  1. Primary hepatic aspergillosis following induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chasan, R; Patel, G; Malone, A; Finn, M; Huprikar, S

    2013-10-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) contributes significantly to the burden of infectious complications in heavily immunosuppressed patients with acute leukemia. The infection is typically acquired via inhalation into the respiratory tract, and the lungs are most commonly involved. However, disseminated disease may occur and reports of isolated extrapulmonary infection suggest the gastrointestinal tract is likely an additional portal of entry for this organism. We describe a case of primary hepatic aspergillosis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. The patient did not respond to medical therapy with antifungals and ultimately required surgical exploration and drainage. IA should be considered in an immunosuppressed patient with hepatic abscesses and may require a combined surgical and medical approach to therapy.

  2. Elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takuya; Yagi, Hirohisa; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Acute leukemia in children presents with various clinical manifestations that mimic orthopaedic conditions. The association of septic arthritis of the elbow with acute leukemia is very rare, and the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia is often established only after treatment of the septic arthritis. In this article, we present a three-year-old child patient with elbow septic arthritis related to acute leukemia, diagnosed promptly by bone marrow aspiration on the same day as emergency surgical debridement of the septic elbow joint due to the maintenance of a high index of suspicion, and treated with chemotherapy as soon as possible. The emergency physician and orthopaedist must recognize unusual patterns of presentation like this. Since delay in initiating treatment of septic arthritis may result in growth disturbance, elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia must be treated promptly and appropriately. Early diagnosis is a good prognostic feature of childhood acute leukemia.

  3. Acute myeloid leukemia with diabetes insipidus and hypophyseal infiltration.

    PubMed

    Harrup, Rosemary; Pham, My; McInerney, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    It has been reported that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with t(3;3)(q21;q26) translocation and monosomy 7 abnormalities may present with diabetes insipidus (DI) without neurohypophysis changes on imaging. We report a second Australian AML case with central diabetes insipidus (CDI) that presented with radiological abnormalities but without the genetic changes as previously reported. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Beating the Clock in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, William L; Aifantis, Iannis; Raetz, Elizabeth

    2017-02-15

    CDK4/6 inhibition was synergistic with dexamethasone and everolimus but antagonistic with conventional chemotherapy in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) preclinical models. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition in combination with glucocorticoids and mTOR inhibition offers a unique therapeutic opportunity in T-ALL. Clin Cancer Res; 23(4); 873-5. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Pikman et al., p. 1012.

  5. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia and loss of the RUNX1 gene.

    PubMed

    Berger, Roland; Busson, Maryvonne; Dastugue, Nicole; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Michaux, Lucienne; Hagemeijer, Anne; Quilichini, Benoît; Benattar, Laurence; Bernard, Olivier; Romana, Serge P

    2006-01-01

    Since the RUNX1 gene contributes to megakaryopoiesis and acquired trisomy 21 is the most frequent numerical chromosome anomaly in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMLK), a systematic study of RUNX1 abnormalities was performed by fluorescence in situ hybridization in AMLK patients. Four abnormalities were detected among 15 patients. One copy of RUNX1 was completeley or partially lost in three patients and translocated onto Xq24 in the fourth. The possible consequences of RUNX1 haploinsufficiency are discussed.

  6. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission.

  7. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission. PMID:27413520

  8. Compliance with a protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Benigna Maria; Valadares, Maria Thereza Macedo; Silva, Marcilene Rezende; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2011-01-01

    Background Remission rates achieved after the initial treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia may be similar in both developed and developing countries, but relapse rates are much higher in the latter. Thus, other reasons are needed, in addition to biological characteristics of the leukemic cells themselves, to explain the unfavorable evolution of patients living in unfavorable socioeconomic and cultural conditions. Objective The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate compliance to an acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment protocol. Methods Main abstracted data were: total duration and reasons for interruption of chemotherapy, prescribed doses of 6-mercaptopurine, and median white blood cell and neutrophil counts during the maintenance phase. Interruptions of chemotherapy were considered inappropriate if they did not follow predetermined criteria established in the protocol. Results Fourteen of 73 patients (19.2%) unduly interrupted chemotherapy by determination of their physicians. The median white blood cell count was higher when compared with the protocol recommendations; the median 6-MP dose was lower than the standard recommended dose. The estimated probability of event-free survival was higher for patients with lower median leukocyte counts and close to those predetermined by the protocol. Event-free survival was also higher for children with a higher percentage of days without chemotherapy due to bone marrow or liver toxicity excluding undue interruptions. In multivariate analysis, both factors remained statistically significant. These results suggest that the intensity of maintenance chemotherapy may not have been enough in some children, to achieve adequate myelosuppression, hence the observation of higher leukocyte counts and none or rare episodes of therapy interruption. Conclusions Compliance to the therapeutic protocol by both doctors and patients should always be considered in the evaluation of therapeutic failure in acute lymphoblastic

  9. Secondary acute myeloid leukemia - a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Szotkowski, T; Rohon, P; Zapletalova, L; Sicova, K; Hubacek, J; Indrak, K

    2010-01-01

    Secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML) may arise from the previous clonal disorder of hematopoiesis, usually from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or from chronic myeloproliferative neoplasia (cMPN) or after exposure to a leukemogenic agent (previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy, some immunosuppressive drugs or environmental leukemogenic agents). Secondary origin of AML is associated with unfavorable prognosis and it is not considered to be conventionally curable (with the exception of secondary acute promyelocytic leukemia). The presented study is a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed and treated at the Department of Hemato-Oncology, University Hospital Olomouc in 1996-2008. Over that period of time, a total 574 patients with AML were diagnosed. Of those, 430 patients were diagnosed as having primary AML; in 86 patients, sAML transformed from myelodysplastic syndrome and 58 patients were followed or treated for various malignancies or were treated with potentially leukemogenic agents because of non-malignant disorders. Patients with secondary AML are older and less commonly treated with curative intention than those with primary AML. According to cytogenetic findings, their prognosis is often worse. Complete hematologic remission is achieved with a low probability, relapse of the disease occurs frequently and overall survival is worse in almost all prognostic subgroups. With the exception of secondary acute promyelocytic leukemia, the prognosis of which does not differ from very good prognosis of the primary forms, secondary AML is not considered a conventionally curable disease.

  10. The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, Charles G

    2012-01-01

    Genomic profiling has transformed our understanding of the genetic basis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent years have seen a shift from microarray analysis and candidate gene sequencing to next-generation sequencing. Together, these approaches have shown that many ALL subtypes are characterized by constellations of structural rearrangements, submicroscopic DNA copy number alterations, and sequence mutations, several of which have clear implications for risk stratification and targeted therapeutic intervention. Mutations in genes regulating lymphoid development are a hallmark of ALL, and alterations of the lymphoid transcription factor gene IKZF1 (IKAROS) are associated with a high risk of treatment failure in B-ALL. Approximately 20% of B-ALL cases harbor genetic alterations that activate kinase signaling that may be amenable to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including rearrangements of the cytokine receptor gene CRLF2; rearrangements of ABL1, JAK2, and PDGFRB; and mutations of JAK1 and JAK2. Whole-genome sequencing has also identified novel targets of mutation in aggressive T-lineage ALL, including hematopoietic regulators (ETV6 and RUNX1), tyrosine kinases, and epigenetic regulators. Challenges for the future are to comprehensively identify and experimentally validate all genetic alterations driving leukemogenesis and treatment failure in childhood and adult ALL and to implement genomic profiling into the clinical setting to guide risk stratification and targeted therapy.

  11. [Transformation of myelodysplastic syndrome to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: 2 new cases].

    PubMed

    Guillén, M; Madero, L; Parra, L; Hernández, C; Herrero, B; Carceller, F; Lassaletta, A; Sevilla, J

    2013-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders of hematopoietic stem cells, with a variable risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Progression into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is an extremely rare event, with very few cases published in children. In this report, we describe two cases of myelodysplastic syndromes that progressed to ALL. Moreover, we review previously reported cases of MDS transformation to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pediatric population whose prognosis seems to be similar to that for adults.

  12. Dasatinib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Did Not Respond to Imatinib Mesylate

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. [Local involvement of the optic nerve by acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Bernardczyk-Meller, Jadwiga; Stefańska, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The leucemias quite commonly involve the eyes and adnexa. In some cases it causes visual complants. Both, the anterior chamber of the eye and the posterior portion of the globe may sites of acute or chronic leukemia and leucemic relapse. We report an unique case of a 14 years old leucemic patient who suffered visual loss and papilloedema, due to a unilateral local involvement within optic nerve, during second relapse of acute lymphocytic leuemia. In spite of typical treatment of main disease, the boy had died. The authors present typical ophthalmic features of the leucemia, too.

  14. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  15. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a combination of genetic and environmental factors. How leukemia forms In general, leukemia is thought to occur ... causing the signs and symptoms of leukemia. How leukemia is classified Doctors classify leukemia based on its ...

  16. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  17. Clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid leukemia-AF10-positive acute leukemias: a report of 2 cases with a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Huh, Ji Young; Chung, Soie; Oh, Doyeun; Kang, Myung Seo; Eom, Hyeon Seok; Cho, Eun Hae; Han, Mi Hwa; Kong, Sun Young

    2010-04-01

    The translocation t(10;11)(p13;q14q21) has been found to be recurrent in acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemias, and results in the fusion of the clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid leukemia (CALM) gene with the AF10 gene; these genes are present on chromosomes 11 and 10, respectively. Because the CALM-AF10 rearrangement is a rare chromosomal abnormality, it is not included in routine molecular tests for acute leukemia. Here, we describe the cases of 2 patients with the CALM-AF10 fusion gene. The first patient (case 1) was diagnosed with T-cell ALL, and the second patient (case 2) was diagnosed with AML. Both patient samples showed expression of the homeobox A gene cluster and the histone methyltransferase hDOT1L, which suggests that they mediate leukemic transformation in CALM-AF10-positive and mixed-lineage leukemia-AF10-positive leukemias. Both patients achieved complete remission after induction chemotherapy. The first patient (case 1) relapsed after double-unit cord blood transplantation; there was no evidence of relapse in the second patient (case 2) after allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Since CALM-AF10- positive leukemias have been shown to have poor prognosis with conventional therapy, molecular tests for CALM-AF10 rearrangement would be necessary to detect minimal residual disease during follow-up.

  18. Activation of a promyelocytic leukemia-tumor protein 53 axis underlies acute promyelocytic leukemia cure.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Rice, Kim; Soilihi, Hassane; de Reynies, Aurélien; Minucci, Saverio; de Thé, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by the promyelocytic leukemia (PML)-retinoic acid receptor-α (PML-RARA) fusion protein, which interferes with nuclear receptor signaling and PML nuclear body (NB) assembly. APL is the only malignancy definitively cured by targeted therapies: retinoic acid (RA) and/or arsenic trioxide, which both trigger PML-RARA degradation through nonoverlapping pathways. Yet, the cellular and molecular determinants of treatment efficacy remain disputed. We demonstrate that a functional Pml-transformation-related protein 53 (Trp53) axis is required to eradicate leukemia-initiating cells in a mouse model of APL. Upon RA-induced PML-RARA degradation, normal Pml elicits NB reformation and induces a Trp53 response exhibiting features of senescence but not apoptosis, ultimately abrogating APL-initiating activity. Apart from triggering PML-RARA degradation, arsenic trioxide also targets normal PML to enhance NB reformation, which may explain its clinical potency, alone or with RA. This Pml-Trp53 checkpoint initiated by therapy-triggered NB restoration is specific for PML-RARA-driven APL, but not the RA-resistant promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF)-RARA variant. Yet, as NB biogenesis is druggable, it could be therapeutically exploited in non-APL malignancies.

  19. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-25

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. The DAC system and associations with acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bug, Gesine; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2010-12-01

    Imbalances of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and deacetylase activity (DAC) that result in deregulated gene expression are commonly observed in leukemias. These alterations provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches that target the epigenetic mechanisms implicated in leukemogenesis. As the acetylation status of histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation of genes involved particularly in differentiation and apoptosis, DAC inhibitors (DACi) have attracted considerable attention for treatment of hematologic malignancies. DACi encompass a structurally diverse family of compounds that are being explored as single agents as well as in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs, small molecule inhibitors of signaling pathways and hypomethylating agents. While DACi have shown clear evidence of activity in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes and lymphoid malignancies, their precise role in treatment of these different entities remain to be elucidated. Successful development of these compounds as elements of novel targeted treatment strategies for leukemia will require that clinical studies be performed in conjunction with translational research including efforts to identify predictive biomarkers.

  2. Classification, subtype discovery, and prediction of outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Eng-Juh; Ross, Mary E; Shurtleff, Sheila A; Williams, W Kent; Patel, Divyen; Mahfouz, Rami; Behm, Fred G; Raimondi, Susana C; Relling, Mary V; Patel, Anami; Cheng, Cheng; Campana, Dario; Wilkins, Dawn; Zhou, Xiaodong; Li, Jinyan; Liu, Huiqing; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Naeve, Clayton; Wong, Limsoon; Downing, James R

    2002-03-01

    Treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is based on the concept of tailoring the intensity of therapy to a patient's risk of relapse. To determine whether gene expression profiling could enhance risk assignment, we used oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze the pattern of genes expressed in leukemic blasts from 360 pediatric ALL patients. Distinct expression profiles identified each of the prognostically important leukemia subtypes, including T-ALL, E2A-PBX1, BCR-ABL, TEL-AML1, MLL rearrangement, and hyperdiploid >50 chromosomes. In addition, another ALL subgroup was identified based on its unique expression profile. Examination of the genes comprising the expression signatures provided important insights into the biology of these leukemia subgroups. Further, within some genetic subgroups, expression profiles identified those patients that would eventually fail therapy. Thus, the single platform of expression profiling should enhance the accurate risk stratification of pediatric ALL patients.

  3. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adi, Y. A.; Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L.; Hardianti, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.

  4. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Adi, Y. A.; Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L.; Hardianti, M. S.

    2016-04-06

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.

  5. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL): Comparison Between Children and Adults.

    PubMed

    Testi, Anna Maria; D'Angiò, Mariella; Locatelli, Franco; Pession, Andrea; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of adults and children with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) has dramatically changed since the introduction of all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) therapy. Based on the results of several multicenter trials, the current recommendations for the treatment of patients with APL include ATRA and anthracycline-based chemotherapy for the remission induction and consolidation, and ATRA combined with low-dose chemotherapy for maintenance. This has improved the prognosis of APL by increasing the complete remission (CR) rate, actually > 90%, decreasing the induction deaths and by reducing the relapse rate, leading to cure rates nowadays exceeding 80% considering both adults and children.1-9 More recently the combination of ATRA and arsenic trioxide (ATO) as induction and consolidation therapy has been shown to be at least not inferior and possibly superior to ATRA plus chemotherapy in adult patients with APL conventionally defined as non-high risk (Sanz score).10 Childhood APL has customarily been treated on adult protocols. Data from several trials have shown that the overall outcome in pediatric APL appears similar to that reported for the adult population; however, some clinical and therapeutic aspects differ in the two cohorts which require some important considerations and treatment adjustments.

  6. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL): Comparison Between Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Testi, Anna Maria; D’Angiò, Mariella; Locatelli, Franco; Pession, Andrea; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of adults and children with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) has dramatically changed since the introduction of all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) therapy. Based on the results of several multicenter trials, the current recommendations for the treatment of patients with APL include ATRA and anthracycline-based chemotherapy for the remission induction and consolidation, and ATRA combined with low-dose chemotherapy for maintenance. This has improved the prognosis of APL by increasing the complete remission (CR) rate, actually > 90%, decreasing the induction deaths and by reducing the relapse rate, leading to cure rates nowadays exceeding 80% considering both adults and children.1–9 More recently the combination of ATRA and arsenic trioxide (ATO) as induction and consolidation therapy has been shown to be at least not inferior and possibly superior to ATRA plus chemotherapy in adult patients with APL conventionally defined as non-high risk (Sanz score).10 Childhood APL has customarily been treated on adult protocols. Data from several trials have shown that the overall outcome in pediatric APL appears similar to that reported for the adult population; however, some clinical and therapeutic aspects differ in the two cohorts which require some important considerations and treatment adjustments. PMID:24804005

  7. Recent discoveries in molecular characterization of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khasawneh, Mohamad K; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2014-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically heterogeneous disease, yet it is one of the most molecularly well-characterized cancers. Risk stratification of patients currently involves determination of the presence of cytogenetic abnormalities in combination with molecular genetic testing in a few genes. Several new recurrent genetic molecular abnormalities have recently been identified, including TET2, ASXL1, IDH1, IDH2, DNMT3A, and PHF6. Mutational analyses have identified that patients with DNMT3A or NPM1 mutations or MLL translocation have improved overall survival with high-dose chemotherapy. Mutational profiling can refine prognostication, particularly for patients in the intermediate-risk group or with a normal karyotype. CD25 expression status improves prognostic risk classification in AML independent of established biomarkers. Biomarkers such as 2- hydroxyglutarate in IDH1/2-mutant AML patients predict patient responses and minimal residual disease. These recent discoveries are being incorporated into our existing molecular risk stratification as well as the exploration of new therapeutics directed to these molecular targets.

  8. ADVANCING THE MRD CONCEPT IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Hokland, Peter; Ommen, Hans B.; Mulé, Matthew P.; Hourigan, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The criteria to evaluate response to treatment in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have changed little in the past sixty years. It is now possible to use higher sensitivity tools to measure residual disease burden in AML. Such minimal or measurable residual disease (MRD) measurements provide a deeper understanding of current patient status and allow stratification for risk of subsequent clinical relapse. Despite these obvious advantages, and after over a decade of laboratory investigation and pre-clinical validation, MRD measurements are not currently routinely used for clinical decision-making or drug development in non-APL AML. We review here some potential constraints that may have delayed adoption including a natural hesitancy of end users, economic impact concerns, misperceptions regarding the meaning of and need for assay sensitivity, the lack of one single MRD solution for all AML patients and finally the need to involve patients in decision making based on such correlates. It is our opinion that none of these issues represent insurmountable barriers and our hope is that by providing potential solutions we can help map a path forward to a future where our patients will be offered personalized treatment plans based on the amount of AML they have left remaining to treat. PMID:26111465

  9. Lipidomic approach for stratification of acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Stefanko, Adam; Thiede, Christian; Ehninger, Gerhard; Simons, Kai; Grzybek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis and progression of many tumors, including hematologic malignancies is highly dependent on enhanced lipogenesis. De novo fatty-acid synthesis permits accelerated proliferation of tumor cells by providing membrane components but these may also alter physicochemical properties of lipid bilayers, which can impact signaling or even increase drug resistance in cancer cells. Cancer type-specific lipid profiles would permit us to monitor and interpret actual effects of lipid changes, potential fingerprints of individual tumors to be explored as diagnostic markers. We have used the shotgun MS approach to identify lipid patterns in different types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients that either show no karyotype change or belong to t(8;21) or inv16 types. Differences in lipidomes of t(8;21) and inv(16) patients, as compared to AML patients without karyotype change, presented mostly as substantial modulation of ceramide/sphingolipid synthesis. Furthermore, between the t(8;21) and all other patients we observed significant changes in physicochemical membrane properties. These were related to a marked alteration in lipid saturation levels. The discovered differences in lipid profiles of various AML types improve our understanding of the pathobiochemical pathways involved and may serve in the development of diagnostic tools. PMID:28207743

  10. The challenges of managing older patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Marks, David I

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), predominantly a disease of children, has a second incidence peak in older adults. Patients older than age 50 but younger than age 65 may be included in trials of intensive treatment with curative intent, but their outcome is poor with high nonrelapse mortality (NRM), high relapse rates, and low overall survival. Using limited published data from the United Kingdom ALL XII and HOVON trials, this manuscript explores the reasons for the high transplant-related mortality (TRM) and presents early data from the United Kingdom ALL 60+ and United Kingdom ALL XIV studies. Factors affecting therapeutic decisions for older patients are discussed. A case study illustrates some of the issues involved in managing these patients and the need to individualize therapy and consider all options. There may be a role for reduced intensity allografting in selected, fitter patients older than age 50; this article presents preliminary transplant data from United Kingdom ALL XIV that prospectively assesses this therapeutic modality. Detailed discussion of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the potential place of novel targeted antibodies and immune T-cell therapies will be not discussed in detail. Finally, there is a description of the major outstanding issues and the trials that are needed to inform decision making and improve outcome in this challenging group of patients.

  11. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of dicentric chromosomes in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sarova, Iveta; Brezinova, Jana; Zemanova, Zuzana; Ransdorfova, Sarka; Izakova, Silvia; Svobodova, Karla; Pavlistova, Lenka; Berkova, Adela; Cermak, Jaroslav; Jonasova, Anna; Siskova, Magda; Michalova, Kyra

    2016-04-01

    Dicentric chromosomes (DCs) have been described in many hematological diseases, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). They are markers of cancer and induce chromosomal instability, leading to the formation of other chromosomal aberrations and the clonal evolution of pathological cells. Our knowledge of the roles and behavior of human DCs is often derived from studies of induced DCs and cell lines. It is difficult to identify all the DCs in the karyotypes of patients because of the limitations of metaphase cytogenetic methods. The aim of this study was to revise the karyotypes of 20 AML patients in whom DCs were found with conventional G-banding or multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) with (multi)centromeric probes and to characterize the DCs at the molecular cytogenetic level. FISH analyses confirmed 23 of the 29 expected DCs in 18 of 20 patients and identified 13 others that had not been detected cytogenetically. Fourteen DCs were altered by other chromosomal changes. In conclusion, karyotypes with DCs are usually very complex, and we have shown that they often contain more than one DC, which can be missed with conventional or mFISH methods. Our study indicates an association between number of DCs in karyotype and very short survival of patients.

  12. Recent advances and novel treatment paradigms in acute lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Papadantonakis, Nikolaos; Advani, Anjali S.

    2016-01-01

    This is an exciting time in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) given the advances in the relapsed/refractory setting. The development of antibody treatments (including antibody drug conjugates with toxins) offers a different treatment approach compared with conventional chemotherapy regimens. Moreover, the use of bispecific T-cell-engager antibodies (BiTEs) such as blinatumomab harness the cytotoxic activity of T cells against CD19-positive lymphoblasts. Another strategy involves the use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. CAR T cells have demonstrated promising results in the relapsed/refractory setting. However, the use of BiTEs and CAR T cells is also associated with a distinct set of adverse reactions that must be taken into account by the treating physician. Apart from the above strategies, the use of other targeted therapies has attracted interest. Namely, the discovery of the Philadelphia (Ph)-like signature in children and young adults with ALL has led to the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in these patients. The different drugs and strategies that are being tested in the relapsed/refractory ALL setting pose a unique challenge in identifying the optimum sequence of treatment and determining which approaches should be considered for frontline treatment. PMID:27695616

  13. Acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes in older adults.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Rao, Arati V; Pardee, Timothy S

    2014-08-20

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases.

  14. Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Rao, Arati V.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases. PMID:25071138

  15. Acute myeloid leukemia ontogeny is defined by distinct somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, R. Coleman; Mar, Brenton G.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Grauman, Peter V.; Shareef, Sarah; Allen, Steven L.; Pigneux, Arnaud; Wetzler, Meir; Stuart, Robert K.; Erba, Harry P.; Damon, Lloyd E.; Powell, Bayard L.; Lindeman, Neal; Steensma, David P.; Wadleigh, Martha; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Neuberg, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can develop after an antecedent myeloid malignancy (secondary AML [s-AML]), after leukemogenic therapy (therapy-related AML [t-AML]), or without an identifiable prodrome or known exposure (de novo AML). The genetic basis of these distinct pathways of AML development has not been determined. We performed targeted mutational analysis of 194 patients with rigorously defined s-AML or t-AML and 105 unselected AML patients. The presence of a mutation in SRSF2, SF3B1, U2AF1, ZRSR2, ASXL1, EZH2, BCOR, or STAG2 was >95% specific for the diagnosis of s-AML. Analysis of serial samples from individual patients revealed that these mutations occur early in leukemogenesis and often persist in clonal remissions. In t-AML and elderly de novo AML populations, these alterations define a distinct genetic subtype that shares clinicopathologic properties with clinically confirmed s-AML and highlights a subset of patients with worse clinical outcomes, including a lower complete remission rate, more frequent reinduction, and decreased event-free survival. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00715637. PMID:25550361

  16. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chessells, J.; Leiper, A.; Rogers, D.

    1984-10-01

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients.

  17. Differential niche and Wnt requirements during acute myeloid leukemia progression.

    PubMed

    Lane, Steven W; Wang, Yingzi J; Lo Celso, Cristina; Ragu, Christine; Bullinger, Lars; Sykes, Stephen M; Ferraro, Francesca; Shterental, Sebastian; Lin, Charles P; Gilliland, D Gary; Scadden, David T; Armstrong, Scott A; Williams, David A

    2011-09-08

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) engage in complex bidirectional signals with the hematopoietic microenvironment (HM), and there is emerging evidence that leukemia stem cells (LSCs) may use similar interactions. Using a syngeneic retroviral model of MLL-AF9 induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we have identified 2 different stages of leukemia progression, propagated by "pre-LSCs" and established leukemia (LSCs) and compared the homing properties of these distinctive entities to that of normal HSCs. The homing and microlocalization of pre-LSCs was most similar to long-term HSCs and was dependent on cell-intrinsic Wnt signaling. In contrast, the homing of established LSCs was most similar to that of committed myeloid progenitors and distinct from HSCs. Although osteoblast-derived Dickkopf-1, a potent Wnt inhibitor known to impair HSC function, dramatically impaired normal HSC localization within the bone marrow, it did not affect pre-LSCs, LSC homing, or AML development. Mechanistically, cell-intrinsic Wnt activation was observed in human and murine AML samples, explaining the independence of MLL-AF9 LSCs from niche-derived Wnt signals. These data identify differential engagement of HM associated with leukemic progression and identify an LSC niche that is physically distinct and independent of the constraints of Wnt signaling that apply to normal HSCs.

  18. Differential niche and Wnt requirements during acute myeloid leukemia progression

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Steven W.; Wang, Yingzi J.; Lo Celso, Cristina; Ragu, Christine; Bullinger, Lars; Sykes, Stephen M.; Ferraro, Francesca; Shterental, Sebastian; Lin, Charles P.; Gilliland, D. Gary

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) engage in complex bidirectional signals with the hematopoietic microenvironment (HM), and there is emerging evidence that leukemia stem cells (LSCs) may use similar interactions. Using a syngeneic retroviral model of MLL-AF9 induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we have identified 2 different stages of leukemia progression, propagated by “pre-LSCs” and established leukemia (LSCs) and compared the homing properties of these distinctive entities to that of normal HSCs. The homing and microlocalization of pre-LSCs was most similar to long-term HSCs and was dependent on cell-intrinsic Wnt signaling. In contrast, the homing of established LSCs was most similar to that of committed myeloid progenitors and distinct from HSCs. Although osteoblast-derived Dickkopf-1, a potent Wnt inhibitor known to impair HSC function, dramatically impaired normal HSC localization within the bone marrow, it did not affect pre-LSCs, LSC homing, or AML development. Mechanistically, cell-intrinsic Wnt activation was observed in human and murine AML samples, explaining the independence of MLL-AF9 LSCs from niche-derived Wnt signals. These data identify differential engagement of HM associated with leukemic progression and identify an LSC niche that is physically distinct and independent of the constraints of Wnt signaling that apply to normal HSCs. PMID:21765021

  19. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  20. Acute myocardial infarction as a finding of acute promyelocytic leukemia-related coagulation disorder.

    PubMed

    Özkurt, Zübeyde N; Aypar, Eda; Sarifakiogullari, Serpil; Taçoy, Gülten; Özdag, Murat; Kahraman, Seda; Çengel, Atiye

    2015-12-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has one of the most favorable prognoses among other leukemia subtypes. However, the major cause of mortality in APL is disseminated intravascular coagulation at the presentation. We present a case of acute myocardial infarction (MI) at the time of APL diagnosis before treatment. The patient suffered from chest pain, sweating and giddiness. He was hypoxic, hypotensive and bradycardic. ECG showed inferior MI. Unfractioned heparin infusion (850 U/h) was started and 5 min after the previous ECG showed total ST resolution. We suggest that in this case, MI was not related to atherosclerotic plaque rupture but related to DIC manifestation.

  1. Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of…

  2. Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of…

  3. Novel gene targets detected by genomic profiling in a consecutive series of 126 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Setareh; Hansson, Markus; Karlsson, Karin; Biloglav, Andrea; Johansson, Bertil; Paulsson, Kajsa

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children, adult cases of this disease are associated with a very poor prognosis. In order to ascertain whether the frequencies and patterns of submicroscopic changes, identifiable with single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, differ between childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses of 126 adult cases, the largest series to date, including 18 paired diagnostic and relapse samples. Apart from identifying characteristic microdeletions of the CDKN2A, EBF1, ETV6, IKZF1, PAX5 and RB1 genes, the present study uncovered novel, focal deletions of the BCAT1, BTLA, NR3C1, PIK3AP1 and SERP2 genes in 2-6% of the adult cases. IKZF1 deletions were associated with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (P=0.036), BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (P<0.001), and higher white blood cell counts (P=0.005). In addition, recurrent deletions of RASSF3 and TOX were seen in relapse samples. Comparing paired diagnostic/relapse samples revealed identical changes at diagnosis and relapse in 27%, clonal evolution in 22%, and relapses evolving from ancestral clones in 50%, akin to what has previously been reported in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicating that the mechanisms of relapse may be similar in adult and childhood cases. These findings provide novel insights into the leukemogenesis of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, showing similarities to childhood disease in the pattern of deletions and the clonal relationship between diagnostic and relapse samples, but with the adult cases harboring additional aberrations that have not been described in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  4. Bone marrow niche-mediated survival of leukemia stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia: Yin and Yang

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Sheng; Carter, Bing Z.; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by the accumulation of circulating immature blasts that exhibit uncontrolled growth, lack the ability to undergo normal differentiation, and have decreased sensitivity to apoptosis. Accumulating evidence shows the bone marrow (BM) niche is critical to the maintenance and retention of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), including leukemia stem cells (LSC), and an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that crosstalk between LSC and the stromal cells associated with this niche greatly influences leukemia initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Undeniably, stromal cells in the BM niche provide a sanctuary in which LSC can acquire a drug-resistant phenotype and thereby evade chemotherapy-induced death. Yin and Yang, the ancient Chinese philosophical concept, vividly portrays the intricate and dynamic interactions between LSC and the BM niche. In fact, LSC-induced microenvironmental reprogramming contributes significantly to leukemogenesis. Thus, identifying the critical signaling pathways involved in these interactions will contribute to target optimization and combinatorial drug treatment strategies to overcome acquired drug resistance and prevent relapse following therapy. In this review, we describe some of the critical signaling pathways mediating BM niche-LSC interaction, including SDF1/CXCL12, Wnt/β-catenin, VCAM/VLA-4/NF-κB, CD44, and hypoxia as a newly-recognized physical determinant of resistance, and outline therapeutic strategies for overcoming these resistance factors. PMID:27458532

  5. T-cell acute lymphoid leukemia resembling Burkitt leukemia cell morphology: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YUE, QINGFANG; LIU, XINYUE; CHEN, LEI; LIU, ZHONGPING; CHEN, WANXIN

    2015-01-01

    Biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) is an uncommon type of cancer, which accounts for <5% of all adult ALs. Based upon a previously described scoring system, the European Group for the Immunological Classification of Leukemias (EGIL) proposed a set of diagnostic criteria for BAL. This scoring system is based upon the number and degree of specificity of several markers for myeloid or T/B-lymphoid blasts. The present study describes a case of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) with Burkitt-like cytology, which according to the French-American-British classification, corresponded to a diagnosis of Burkitt type L3 ALL. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that the blasts were positive for T-lymphoid markers, cytoplasmic cluster of differentiation (CD)3, CD7 and CD56, and myeloid markers, CD13, CD33 and CD15. At first, a diagnosis of BAL was suggested by the EGIL score, however, according to the 2008 World Health Organization criteria, a case of T-ALL with aberrant myeloid markers was established. The study also reviewed the literature and discussed the limitations of the EGIL scoring system in clinical decision making, to aid in the selection of an appropriate therapeutic regimen. PMID:25663889

  6. Development of hairy cell leukemia in familial platelet disorder with predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Toya, Takashi; Yoshimi, Akihide; Morioka, Takehiko; Arai, Shunya; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Familial platelet disorder with predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia (FPD/AML) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mild to moderate thrombocytopenia with or without its impaired function, inherited RUNX1 mutation and high incidence of myeloid malignancy, such as myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia. A 72-year-old male visited our institute because of gradually progressive pancytopenia and splenomegaly, and was diagnosed as having hairy cell leukemia. He was administered one course of intravenous cladribine (0.12 mg/kg, day 1-5) and achieved hematological complete response. Mutation analyses of RUNX1 gene were underwent because familial history of hematological malignancies evoked a possibility of FPD/AML. As a result, RUNX1 L445P mutation was identified in the peripheral blood and the mutation was considered as germ-line mutation because the same mutation was detected in the buccal mucosa. BRAF V600E mutation was also identified in the peripheral blood but not in the buccal mucosa. To our knowledge, this is the first report of B cell malignancy arising from FPD/AML.

  7. Association of Human Development Index with rates and outcomes of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Giebel, Sebastian; Labopin, Myriam; Ehninger, Gerhard; Beelen, Dietrich; Blaise, Didier; Ganser, Arnold; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Czerw, Tomasz; Holowiecki, Jerzy; Fagundes, Evandro M; Nowara, Elzbieta; Frassoni, Francesco; Rocha, Vanderson

    2010-07-08

    Human Development Index (HDI) is used by the United Nations Organization to measure socioeconomic achievements of countries. We evaluated the association of HDI with rates and outcomes of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for patients with acute leukemia. For the analysis of HSCT rates, all adults with acute leukemia (n = 16 403) treated in 30 European countries, between 2001 and 2005, were included. Association of HDI with the outcome was analyzed for 2015 patients with acute myeloid leukemia treated with myeloablative allotransplantation. Countries were classified according to HDI quintiles. Highly significant correlation was found for HDI and the total number of HSCT per population (R = 0.78; P < .001), as well as separately for sibling HSCT (R = 0.84; P < .001), unrelated HSCT (R = 0.66; P < .001), and autologous HSCT (R = 0.43; P = .02). The probabilities of leukemia-free survival for 5 consecutive groups of countries with increasing HDI were: 56%, 59%, 63%, 58%, and 68% (P = .01). In a multivariate analysis, transplantations performed in countries belonging to the upper HDI category were associated with higher leukemia-free survival compared with the remaining ones (HR = 1.36, P = .008), which resulted mainly from reduced risk of relapse (HR = 0.72, P = .04). We conclude that, in Europe, the HDI is associated with both rates and results of HSCT for acute leukemia.

  8. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Laura B.; Janke, Laura J.; Payton, Monique A.; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W.; Karol, Seth E.; Kamdem, Landry Kamdem; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26252865

  9. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Laura B; Janke, Laura J; Payton, Monique A; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W; Karol, Seth E; Kamdem Kamdem, Landry; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  10. Immature MEF2C-dysregulated T-cell leukemia patients have an early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia gene signature and typically have non-rearranged T-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zuurbier, Linda; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Mullighan, Charles G.; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Gevaert, A. Olivier; de Rooi, Johan; Li, Yunlei; Smits, Willem K.; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G.C.A.M.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Look, A. Thomas; Horstmann, Martin; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P.P.

    2014-01-01

    Three distinct immature T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia entities have been described including cases that express an early T-cell precursor immunophenotype or expression profile, immature MEF2C-dysregulated T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cluster cases based on gene expression analysis (immature cluster) and cases that retain non-rearranged TRG@ loci. Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases exclusively overlap with immature cluster samples based on the expression of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia signature genes, indicating that both are featuring a single disease entity. Patients lacking TRG@ rearrangements represent only 40% of immature cluster cases, but no further evidence was found to suggest that cases with absence of bi-allelic TRG@ deletions reflect a distinct and even more immature disease entity. Immature cluster/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases are strongly enriched for genes expressed in hematopoietic stem cells as well as genes expressed in normal early thymocyte progenitor or double negative-2A T-cell subsets. Identification of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases solely by defined immunophenotypic criteria strongly underestimates the number of cases that have a corresponding gene signature. However, early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia samples correlate best with a CD1 negative, CD4 and CD8 double negative immunophenotype with expression of CD34 and/or myeloid markers CD13 or CD33. Unlike various other studies, immature cluster/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated on the COALL-97 protocol did not have an overall inferior outcome, and demonstrated equal sensitivity levels to most conventional therapeutic drugs compared to other pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. PMID:23975177

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia creates an arginase-dependent immunosuppressive microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Mussai, Francis; De Santo, Carmela; Abu-Dayyeh, Issa; Booth, Sarah; Quek, Lynn; McEwen-Smith, Rosanna M.; Qureshi, Amrana; Dazzi, Francesco; Vyas, Paresh

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults and the second most common frequent leukemia of childhood. Patients may present with lymphopenia or pancytopenia at diagnosis. We investigated the mechanisms by which AML causes pancytopenia and suppresses patients’ immune response. This study identified for the first time that AML blasts alter the immune microenvironment through enhanced arginine metabolism. Arginase II is expressed and released from AML blasts and is present at high concentrations in the plasma of patients with AML, resulting in suppression of T-cell proliferation. We extended these results by demonstrating an arginase-dependent ability of AML blasts to polarize surrounding monocytes into a suppressive M2-like phenotype in vitro and in engrafted nonobese diabetic–severe combined immunodeficiency mice. In addition, AML blasts can suppress the proliferation and differentiation of murine granulocyte-monocyte progenitors and human CD34+ progenitors. Finally, the study showed that the immunosuppressive activity of AML blasts can be modulated through small-molecule inhibitors of arginase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, suggesting a novel therapeutic target in AML. The results strongly support the hypothesis that AML creates an immunosuppressive microenvironment that contributes to the pancytopenia observed at diagnosis. PMID:23733335

  12. Induction of acute lymphocytic leukemia differentiation by maintenance therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, TL; Vala, MS; Barber, JP; Karp, JE; Smith, BD; Matsui, W

    2008-01-01

    Despite extensive study in many malignancies, maintenance therapy has clinically benefited only two diseases: acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). ALL maintenance therapy utilizes low-dose 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) and methotrexate (MTX), while maintenance in APL primarily consists of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA). 6MP and MTX as used in ALL are also now usually added to maintenance ATRA for APL, based on data suggesting an improved disease-free survival. Although the mechanism of action of MTX and 6MP as maintenance is unknown, low-dose cytotoxic agents are potent inducers of differentiation in vitro. Thus, we studied whether maintenance therapy in ALL, like ATRA in APL, may be inducing terminal differentiation of ALL progenitors. The APL cell line NB4, the ALL cell lines REH and RS4;11, and patients' ALL blasts were incubated with ATRA, 6MP, and MTX in vitro. All three drugs inhibited the clonogenic growth of the APL and ALL cell lines without inducing immediate apoptosis, but associated with induction of phenotypic differentiation. The three drugs similarly upregulated lymphoid antigen expression, while decreasing CD34 expression, on patients' ALL blasts. These data suggest that induction of leukemia progenitor differentiation plays an important role in the mechanism of action of maintenance therapy in ALL. PMID:17611566

  13. Patient-tailored analysis of minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Malmberg, Erik B R; Ståhlman, Sara; Rehammar, Anna; Samuelsson, Tore; Alm, Sofie J; Kristiansson, Erik; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Garelius, Hege; Pettersson, Louise; Ehinger, Mats; Palmqvist, Lars; Fogelstrand, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques have revealed that leukemic cells in acute myeloid leukemia often are characterized by a limited number of somatic mutations. These mutations can be the basis for the detection of leukemic cells in follow-up samples. The aim of this study was to identify leukemia-specific mutations in cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and to use these mutations as markers for minimal residual disease. Leukemic cells and normal lymphocytes were simultaneously isolated at diagnosis from 17 patients with acute myeloid leukemia using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Exome sequencing of these cells identified 240 leukemia-specific single nucleotide variations and 22 small insertions and deletions. Based on estimated allele frequencies and their accuracies, 191 of these mutations qualified as candidates for minimal residual disease analysis. Targeted deep sequencing with a significance threshold of 0.027% for single nucleotide variations and 0.006% for NPM1 type A mutation was developed for quantification of minimal residual disease. When tested on follow-up samples from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia, targeted deep sequencing of single nucleotide variations as well as NPM1 was more sensitive than minimal residual disease quantification with multiparameter flow cytometry. In conclusion, we here describe how exome sequencing can be used for identification of leukemia-specific mutations in samples already at diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia. We also show that targeted deep sequencing of such mutations, including single nucleotide variations, can be used for high-sensitivity quantification of minimal residual disease in a patient-tailored manner.

  14. Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 define subgroups of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    La Starza, Roberta; Barba, Gianluca; Demeyer, Sofie; Pierini, Valentina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gianfelici, Valentina; Schwab, Claire; Matteucci, Caterina; Vicente, Carmen; Cools, Jan; Messina, Monica; Crescenzi, Barbara; Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin; Basso, Giuseppe; Harrison, Christine J; Mecucci, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 were detected in 23/200 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Genomic studies identified two types of deletions: interstitial and terminal. Interstitial 5q deletions, found in five cases, were present in both adults and children with a female predominance (chi-square, P=0.012). Interestingly, these cases resembled immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing significant down-regulation of five out of the ten top differentially expressed genes in this leukemia group, including TCF7 which maps within the 5q31 common deleted region. Mutations of genes known to be associated with immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, i.e. WT1, ETV6, JAK1, JAK3, and RUNX1, were present, while CDKN2A/B deletions/mutations were never detected. All patients had relapsed/resistant disease and blasts showed an early differentiation arrest with expression of myeloid markers. Terminal 5q deletions, found in 18 of patients, were more prevalent in adults (chi-square, P=0.010) and defined a subgroup of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by 130 up- and 197 down-regulated genes. Down-regulated genes included TRIM41, ZFP62, MAPK9, MGAT1, and CNOT6, all mapping within the 1.4 Mb common deleted region at 5q35.3. Of interest, besides CNOT6 down-regulation, these cases also showed low BTG1 expression and a high incidence of CNOT3 mutations, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with terminal 5q deletions. In conclusion, interstitial and terminal 5q deletions are recurrent genomic losses identifying distinct subtypes of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  15. Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 define subgroups of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    La Starza, Roberta; Barba, Gianluca; Demeyer, Sofie; Pierini, Valentina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gianfelici, Valentina; Schwab, Claire; Matteucci, Caterina; Vicente, Carmen; Cools, Jan; Messina, Monica; Crescenzi, Barbara; Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin; Basso, Giuseppe; Harrison, Christine J.; Mecucci, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 were detected in 23/200 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Genomic studies identified two types of deletions: interstitial and terminal. Interstitial 5q deletions, found in five cases, were present in both adults and children with a female predominance (chi-square, P=0.012). Interestingly, these cases resembled immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing significant down-regulation of five out of the ten top differentially expressed genes in this leukemia group, including TCF7 which maps within the 5q31 common deleted region. Mutations of genes known to be associated with immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, i.e. WT1, ETV6, JAK1, JAK3, and RUNX1, were present, while CDKN2A/B deletions/mutations were never detected. All patients had relapsed/resistant disease and blasts showed an early differentiation arrest with expression of myeloid markers. Terminal 5q deletions, found in 18 of patients, were more prevalent in adults (chi-square, P=0.010) and defined a subgroup of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by 130 up- and 197 down-regulated genes. Down-regulated genes included TRIM41, ZFP62, MAPK9, MGAT1, and CNOT6, all mapping within the 1.4 Mb common deleted region at 5q35.3. Of interest, besides CNOT6 down-regulation, these cases also showed low BTG1 expression and a high incidence of CNOT3 mutations, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with terminal 5q deletions. In conclusion, interstitial and terminal 5q deletions are recurrent genomic losses identifying distinct subtypes of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27151989

  16. Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia: historical overview and a new definition.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, O K; Arber, D A

    2010-11-01

    Acute leukemia with a mixed phenotype is a rare disease and comprises 2-5% of all acute leukemias. These disorders have been known historically by a variety of names, such as mixed lineage leukemia, bilineal leukemia and biphenotypic leukemia, and the criteria for diagnosis have often been arbitrary. The scoring criteria proposed by the European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemias represented a major attempt to define this disorder. However, the relative weight given to some markers and the lack of lineage specificity of most markers have raised questions regarding the significance of this approach. In 2008, the World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic and lymphoid tumors proposed a simpler diagnostic algorithm, which relies on fewer and more lineage-specific markers to define mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL). MPAL with t(9;22) and MLL rearrangement have been separated. Several studies have suggested that patients with acute leukemia of mixed phenotype have a worse clinical outcome when compared with matched controls with acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Further studies are needed to confirm the significance of MPAL as currently defined, to determine a standardized treatment approach and to better understand the biological and clinical aspects of this disease.

  17. Small-molecule Hedgehog inhibitor attenuates the leukemia-initiation potential of acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuaki; Minami, Yosuke; Kakiuchi, Seiji; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Jamieson, Catoriona; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-10-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway has been implicated in the maintenance of leukemia stem cell populations in several model systems. PF-04449913 (PF-913) is a selective, small-molecule inhibitor of Smoothened, a membrane protein that regulates the Hedgehog pathway. However, details of the proof-of-concept and mechanism of action of PF-913 following administration to patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unclear. This study examined the role of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in AML cells, and evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of the Smoothened inhibitor PF-913. In primary AML cells, activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway was more pronounced in CD34(+) cells than CD34(-) cells. In vitro treatment with PF-913 induced a decrease in the quiescent cell population accompanied by minimal cell death. In vivo treatment with PF-913 attenuated the leukemia-initiation potential of AML cells in a serial transplantation mouse model, while limiting reduction of tumor burden in a primary xenotransplant system. Comprehensive gene set enrichment analysis revealed that PF-913 modulated self-renewal signatures and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, PF-913 sensitized AML cells to cytosine arabinoside, and abrogated resistance to cytosine arabinoside in AML cells cocultured with HS-5 stromal cells. These findings imply that pharmacologic inhibition of Hedgehog signaling attenuates the leukemia-initiation potential, and also enhanced AML therapy by sensitizing dormant leukemia stem cells to chemotherapy and overcoming resistance in the bone marrow microenvironment. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  18. CD22: A Promising Target for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    There are about 4,000 new cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the United States each year. Great improvements have been made in the treatment of ALL, but many patients suffer from side effects of standard therapy and continue to die of this disease. One of the most promising therapeutic strategies includes engineering T cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that alters T cell specificity and function to recognize tumor antigens.

  19. World Health Organization Grade II Oligodendroglioma Occurring after Successful Treatment for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang-In; Park, Dong-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Hyuk; Park, Jung-Yul; Chung, Yong-Gu

    2016-01-01

    When treating childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), secondary neoplasms are a significant long term problem. Radiation is generally accepted to be a major cause of the development of secondary neoplasms. Following treatment for ALL, a variety of secondary tumors, including brain tumors, hematologic malignancies, sarcomas, thyroid cancers, and skin cancers have been reported. However, oligodendroglioma as a secondary neoplasm is extremely rare. Herein we present a case of secondary oligodendroglioma occurring 13 years after the end of ALL treatment. PMID:27867928

  20. Sequential appearance of immunoblastic lymphoma and acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in a patient with angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A; Cervantes, F; Viñolas, N; Llebaría, C; Pedro-Botet, J; Rozmann, C

    1985-01-01

    Immunoblastic lymphoma developed in a patient diagnosed as having angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy 5 years earlier. Chemotherapy schedules including alkylating agents were administered for 1 year, resulting in subsequent remission of the lymphoma. Thirty months after the start of chemotherapy, preleukemic changes were observed in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and acute nonlymphocytic leukaemia (M5 of the FAB classification) was diagnosed shortly afterwards. The possible role of both chemotherapy and the immunodeficiency associated to angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy in the pathogenesis of the leukemia is discussed.