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Sample records for acute locomotor stimulant

  1. Acute stress increases the synthesis of 7α-hydroxypregnenolone, a new key neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity, through corticosterone action in newts.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Shogo; Koyama, Teppei; Hasunuma, Itaru; Okuyama, Shin-ichiro; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Kikuyama, Sakae; Do Rego, Jean-Luc; Vaudry, Hubert; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2012-02-01

    7α-Hydroxypregnenolone (7α-OH PREG) is a newly identified bioactive neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity in the brain of newt, a wild animal, which serves as an excellent model to investigate the biosynthesis and biological action of neurosteroids. Here, we show that acute stress increases 7α-OH PREG synthesis in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) through corticosterone (CORT) action in newts. A 30-min restraint stress increased 7α-OH PREG synthesis in the brain tissue concomitant with the increase in plasma CORT concentrations. A 30-min restraint stress also increased the expression of cytochrome P450(7α) (CYP7B), the steroidogenic enzyme of 7α-OH PREG formation, in the DMH. Decreasing plasma CORT concentrations by hypophysectomy or trilostane administration decreased 7α-OH PREG synthesis in the diencephalon, whereas administration of CORT to these animals increased 7α-OH PREG synthesis. Glucocorticoid receptor was present in DMH neurons expressing CYP7B. Thus, CORT appears to act directly on DMH neurons to increase 7α-OH PREG synthesis. We further investigated the biological action of 7α-OH PREG in the brain under stress. A 30-min restraint stress or central administration of 7α-OH PREG increased serotonin concentrations in the diencephalon. Double immunolabeling further showed colocalization of CYP7B and serotonin in the DMH. These results indicate that acute stress increases the synthesis of 7α-OH PREG via CORT action in the DMH, and 7α-OH PREG activates serotonergic neurons in the DMH that may coordinate behavioral responses to stress. This is the first demonstration of neurosteroid biosynthesis regulated by peripheral steroid hormone and of neurosteroid action in the brain under stress in any vertebrate class.

  2. Acute total sleep deprivation potentiates amphetamine-induced locomotor-stimulant effects and behavioral sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    Saito, Luis P; Fukushiro, Daniela F; Hollais, André W; Mári-Kawamoto, Elisa; Costa, Jacqueline M; Berro, Laís F; Aramini, Tatiana C F; Wuo-Silva, Raphael; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2014-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that a prolonged period (48 h) of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) potentiates amphetamine (AMP)-induced behavioral sensitization, an animal model of addiction-related neuroadaptations. In the present study, we examined the effects of an acute short-term deprivation of total sleep (TSD) (6h) on AMP-induced behavioral sensitization in mice and compared them to the effects of short-term PSD (6 h). Three-month-old male C57BL/6J mice underwent TSD (experiment 1-gentle handling method) or PSD (experiment 2-multiple platforms method) for 6 h. Immediately after the sleep deprivation period, mice were tested in the open field for 10 min under the effects of saline or 2.0 mg/kg AMP. Seven days later, to assess behavioral sensitization, all of the mice received a challenge injection of 2.0 mg/kg AMP and were tested in the open field for 10 min. Total, peripheral, and central locomotion, and grooming duration were measured. TSD, but not PSD, potentiated the hyperlocomotion induced by an acute injection of AMP and this effect was due to an increased locomotion in the central squares of the apparatus. Similarly, TSD facilitated the development of AMP-induced sensitization, but only in the central locomotion parameter. The data indicate that an acute period of TSD may exacerbate the behavioral effects of AMP in mice. Because sleep architecture is composed of paradoxical and slow wave sleep, and 6-h PSD had no effects on AMP-induced hyperlocomotion or sensitization, our data suggest that the deprivation of slow wave sleep plays a critical role in the mechanisms that underlie the potentiating effects of TSD on both the acute and sensitized addiction-related responses to AMP.

  3. Locomotor activity and tissue levels following acute ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pyrethroids produce neurotoxicity that depends, in part, on the chemical structure. Common behavioral effects include locomotor activity changes and specific toxic syndromes (types I and II). In general these neurobehavioral effects correlate well with peak internal dose metrics. Products of cyhalothrin, a type II pyrethroid, include mixtures of isomers (e.g., λ-cyhalothrin) as well as enriched active isomers (e.g., γ-cyhalothrin). We measured acute changes in locomotor activity in adult male rats and directly correlated these changes to peak brain and plasma concentrations of λ- and γ-cyhalothrin using a within-subject design. One-hour locomotor activity studies were conducted 1.5 h after oral gavage dosing, and immediately thereafter plasma and brains were collected for analyzing tissue levels using LC/MS/MS methods. Both isomers produced dose-related decreases in activity counts, and the effective dose range for γ-cyhalothrin was lower than for λ-cyhalothrin. Doses calculated to decrease activity by 50% were 2-fold lower for the γ-isomer (1.29 mg/kg) compared to λ-cyhalothrin (2.65 mg/kg). Salivation, typical of type II pyrethroids, was also observed at lower doses of γ-cyhalothrin. Administered dose correlated well with brain and plasma concentrations, which furthermore showed good correlations with activity changes. Brain and plasma levels were tightly correlated across doses. While γ-cyhalothrin was 2-fold more potent based on administ

  4. Food deprivation increases the low-dose locomotor stimulant response to ethanol in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kliethermes, Christopher L

    2013-10-01

    Acute and chronic states of food deprivation result in increased sensitivity to a variety of natural reinforcers as well as to drugs of abuse. Food deprived animals show increased locomotor activity during periods of food deprivation, as well as increased locomotor stimulant responses to drugs of abuse, including cocaine, amphetamine, morphine, and ethanol, implying that drugs of abuse act in part on neural systems that underlie responses towards food. To determine whether this effect extends to an invertebrate, highly genetically tractable animal, the locomotor stimulant effects of low dose ethanol were assessed under a variety of feeding conditions in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Food deprivation resulted in strain specific increases in ethanol-stimulated locomotor activity in most strains tested, although elevated baseline activity confounded interpretation in some strains. Experiments conducted with Canton S flies found that the effects of food deprivation on the locomotor stimulant response to ethanol increased with the duration of deprivation, and could be blocked by refeeding the flies with standard food or sucrose, but not yeast, immediately prior to the ethanol exposure. Life-span extending dietary depletion procedures or previous periods of food deprivation did not affect the response to ethanol, indicating that only animals in an acutely food deprived state are more sensitive to the stimulant effects of ethanol. These results suggest that increased sensitivity to the stimulant effects of some drugs of abuse might reflect an evolutionarily conserved neural mechanism that underlies behavioral responses to natural reinforcers and drugs of abuse. The identification of this mechanism, and the genes that underlie its development and function, will constitute a novel approach towards the study of alcohol abuse and dependence.

  5. Acute Neuroactive Drug Exposures alter Locomotor Activity in Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the development of a rapid in vivo screen for prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae by assessing the acute effects of prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. Initially,...

  6. Locomotor stimulant and discriminative stimulus effects of 'bath salt' cathinones.

    PubMed

    Gatch, Michael B; Taylor, Cynthia M; Forster, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    A number of psychostimulant-like cathinone compounds are being sold as 'legal' alternatives to methamphetamine or cocaine. The purpose of these experiments was to determine whether cathinone compounds stimulate motor activity and have discriminative stimulus effects similar to those of cocaine and/or methamphetamine. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), methylone, mephedrone, naphyrone, flephedrone, and butylone were tested for locomotor stimulant effects in mice and subsequently for substitution in rats trained to discriminate cocaine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or methamphetamine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) from saline. All compounds fully substituted for the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine and methamphetamine. Several commonly marketed cathinones produce discriminative stimulus effects comparable with those of cocaine and methamphetamine, which suggests that these compounds are likely to have similar abuse liabilities. MDPV and naphyrone produced locomotor stimulant effects that lasted much longer than those of cocaine or methamphetamine and therefore may be of particular concern, particularly because MDPV is one of the most commonly found substances associated with emergency room visits because of adverse effects of taking 'bath salts'.

  7. Effects of cocaine on norepinephrine stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and locomotor activity in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mosaddeghi, M.

    1989-01-01

    The function of {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenoceptors was determined by stimulating cortical tissue slices, which were pre-labeled with ({sup 3}H)inositol, with norepinephrine (NE) in the presence of 8 mM LiCl. Results of in vitro studies showed that cocaine 10 {mu}M potentiated maximal NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis by 30%. In addition, the EC{sub 50} was decreased from 3.93 {plus minus} 0.42 to 1.91 {plus minus} 0.31 {mu}M NE. Concentrations of 0.1-100 {mu}M and 0.1-10 {mu}M cocaine enhanced PI hydrolysis stimulated by 0.3 and 3 {mu}M NE, respectively. The concentration-effect curves for NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis were shifted to the right 100-fold in the presence of 0.1 {mu}M prazosin. Cocaine (10 {mu}M) did not potentiate NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis in the presence of 0.1 {mu}M prazosin. ({sup 3}H)Prazosin saturation and NE ({sup 3}H)prazosin competition binding studies using crude membrane preparations showed that 10 {mu}M cocaine did not alter binding parameters B{sub max}, K{sub d}, Hill slope, and IC{sub 50}. Together, these results implied that cocaine in vitro potentiated NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis by blocking NE reuptake. For in vivo studies, the locomotor activity was determined after an acute or chronic injections of either cocaine or saline. Cocaine or saline-treated rats were killed after measurement of the locomotor activity, and NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis was measured. Acute administration of cocaine 3.2-42 mg/kg (i.p.) produced an inverted U shaped dose-response curve on locomotor activity. The peak increase in locomotor activity was at 32 mg/kg cocaine. A dose of 42 mg/kg cocaine produced a significant depression of maximal NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis.

  8. Baclofen blocks the development of sensitization to the locomotor stimulant effect of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti, M; Gubellini, C; Ricci, F; Gaiardi, M

    2005-11-01

    The GABAB agonist baclofen (BCF) has recently been reported to block the expression of sensitization to the locomotor effect of amphetamine (AMPH), and to reverse it after repeated administration. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether baclofen could also prevent the development of sensitization to the psychostimulant. Chronic AMPH treatment (1.5 mg/kg i.p. for 10 days) led to an increased locomotor response to AMPH (1.5 mg/kg) when the animals were challenged 3 and 30 days after the end of repeated treatment. Chronic co-administration of BCF (2 mg/kg, i.p.) and AMPH blocked the development of sensitization to the stimulant effect of AMPH. An ancillary experiment excluded that a 'state-dependency' hypothesis could account for the effect of baclofen. Furthermore, a previous repeated treatment with baclofen alone had no influence either on the acute AMPH effect or on the subsequent development of sensitization to AMPH. In conclusion, the results confirm that GABAB receptors play an important role in the acquisition of AMPH behavioural sensitization and further support a potential use of GABAB agonists in the treatment of psychostimulant addiction.

  9. Acute administration of 3-nitropropionic acid, a reactive oxygen species generator, boosts ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation. New support for the role of brain catalase in the behavioural effects of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Héctor M; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2006-12-01

    The antioxidant enzyme catalase by reacting with H(2)O(2), forms the compound known as compound I (catalase-H(2)O(2)). This compound is able to oxidise ethanol to acetaldehyde in the CNS. It has been demonstrated that 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) induces the activity of the brain catalase-H(2)O(2) system. In this study, we tested the effect of 3-NPA on both the brain catalase-H(2)O(2) system and on the acute locomotor effect of ethanol. To find the optimal interval for the 3-NPA-ethanol interaction mice were treated with 3-NPA 0, 45, 90 and 135min before an ethanol injection (2.4mg/kg). In a second study, 3-NPA (0, 15, 30 or 45mg/kg) was administered SC to animals 90min before saline or several doses of ethanol (1.6 or 2.4g/kg), and the open-field behaviour was registered. The specificity of the effect of 3-NPA (45mg/kg) was evaluated on caffeine (10mg/kg IP) and cocaine (4mg/kg)-induced locomotion. The prevention of 3-NPA effects on both ethanol-induced locomotion and brain catalase activity by L-carnitine, a potent antioxidant, was also studied. Nitropropionic acid boosted ethanol-induced locomotion and brain catalase activity after 90min. The effect of 3-NPA was prevented by l-carnitine administration. These results indicate that 3-NPA enhanced ethanol-induced locomotion by increasing the activity of the brain catalase system.

  10. Efficacy of Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation to Improve Locomotor Performance in a Discordant Sensory Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temple, D. R.; De Dios, Y. E.; Layne, C. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts exposed to microgravity face sensorimotor challenges incurred when readapting to a gravitational environment. Sensorimotor Adaptability (SA) training has been proposed as a countermeasure to improve locomotor performance during re-adaptation, and it is suggested that the benefits of SA training may be further enhanced by improving detection of weak sensory signals via mechanisms such as stochastic resonance when a non-zero level of stochastic white noise based electrical stimulation is applied to the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS). The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of using SVS to improve short-term adaptation in a sensory discordant environment during performance of a locomotor task.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Cell Death in Spinal Networks in Relation to Locomotor Activity After Acute Injury in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kuzhandaivel, Anujaianthi; Nistri, Andrea; Mazzone, Graciela L.; Mladinic, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the pathophysiological changes triggered by an acute spinal cord injury is a primary goal to prevent and treat chronic disability with a mechanism-based approach. After the primary phase of rapid cell death at the injury site, secondary damage occurs via autodestruction of unscathed tissue through complex cell-death mechanisms that comprise caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. To devise novel neuroprotective strategies to restore locomotion, it is, therefore, necessary to focus on the death mechanisms of neurons and glia within spinal locomotor networks. To this end, the availability of in vitro preparations of the rodent spinal cord capable of expressing locomotor-like oscillatory patterns recorded electrophysiologically from motoneuron pools offers the novel opportunity to correlate locomotor network function with molecular and histological changes long after an acute experimental lesion. Distinct forms of damage to the in vitro spinal cord, namely excitotoxic stimulation or severe metabolic perturbation (with oxidative stress, hypoxia/aglycemia), can be applied with differential outcome in terms of cell types and functional loss. In either case, cell death is a delayed phenomenon developing over several hours. Neurons are more vulnerable to excitotoxicity and more resistant to metabolic perturbation, while the opposite holds true for glia. Neurons mainly die because of hyperactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) with subsequent DNA damage and mitochondrial energy collapse. Conversely, glial cells die predominantly by apoptosis. It is likely that early neuroprotection against acute spinal injury may require tailor-made drugs targeted to specific cell-death processes of certain cell types within the locomotor circuitry. Furthermore, comparison of network size and function before and after graded injury provides an estimate of the minimal network membership to express the locomotor program. PMID:21734866

  12. Diurnal changes in the synthesis of the neurosteroid 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone stimulating locomotor activity in newts.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Teppei; Haraguchi, Shogo; Vaudry, Hubert; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2009-04-01

    We recently identified 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone as a novel amphibian neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity in newts. Because male newts show marked diurnal changes in locomotor activity, we hypothesized that 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone may be a key factor for the induction of diurnal changes in locomotor activity in male newts. In this study, we found diurnal changes in 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis in the brain of male newts, which paralleled locomotor activity. Interestingly, the production of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone in the male newt brain increased during the dark phase when locomotor activity of males was high.

  13. Acute neuroactive drug exposures alter locomotor activity in larval zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA's prioritization of toxic chemicals, we are characterizing the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae after exposure to prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. MPTP (1-methyl-4phenyl- 1 ,2,3,6-...

  14. Seasonal changes in the synthesis of the neurosteroid 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone stimulating locomotor activity in newts.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Shogo; Matsunaga, Masahiro; Koyama, Teppei; Do Rego, Jean-Luc; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2009-04-01

    We recently found that the newt brain actively produces 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, a novel amphibian neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity. It is well known that locomotor activity of male newts increases during the breeding period. To understand the physiological role of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, we investigated seasonal changes in 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis in the brain of male newts. Interestingly, 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis in the brain showed marked changes during the annual breeding cycle, with a maximal level in the breeding period when locomotor activity of male newts increases. These results suggest that 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone induces seasonal locomotor changes in male newts.

  15. Modelling spinal circuitry involved in locomotor pattern generation: insights from the effects of afferent stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, Ilya A; Stecina, Katinka; Shevtsova, Natalia A; McCrea, David A

    2006-01-01

    A computational model of the mammalian spinal cord circuitry incorporating a two-level central pattern generator (CPG) with separate half-centre rhythm generator (RG) and pattern formation (PF) networks has been developed from observations obtained during fictive locomotion in decerebrate cats. Sensory afferents have been incorporated in the model to study the effects of afferent stimulation on locomotor phase switching and step cycle period and on the firing patterns of flexor and extensor motoneurones. Here we show that this CPG structure can be integrated with reflex circuits to reproduce the reorganization of group I reflex pathways occurring during locomotion. During the extensor phase of fictive locomotion, activation of extensor muscle group I afferents increases extensor motoneurone activity and prolongs the extensor phase. This extensor phase prolongation may occur with or without a resetting of the locomotor cycle, which (according to the model) depends on the degree to which sensory input affects the RG and PF circuits, respectively. The same stimulation delivered during flexion produces a temporary resetting to extension without changing the timing of following locomotor cycles. The model reproduces this behaviour by suggesting that this sensory input influences the PF network without affecting the RG. The model also suggests that the different effects of flexor muscle nerve afferent stimulation observed experimentally (phase prolongation versus resetting) result from opposing influences of flexor group I and II afferents on the PF and RG circuits controlling the activity of flexor and extensor motoneurones. The results of modelling provide insights into proprioceptive control of locomotion. PMID:17008375

  16. Maternal immune activation in late gestation enhances locomotor response to acute but not chronic amphetamine treatment in male mice offspring: role of the D1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Zager, Adriano; Mennecier, Gregory; Palermo-Neto, João

    2012-06-15

    Exposure to elevated levels of maternal cytokines can lead to functional abnormalities of the dopaminergic system in the adult offspring, including enhanced amphetamine (AMPH)-induced locomotion. Therefore, it seems reasonable to consider that offspring of challenged mothers would behave differently in models of addictive behavior, such as behavioral sensitization. Thus, we sought to evaluate the effects of prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the locomotor response to acute and chronic AMPH treatment in male mice offspring. For this purpose, LPS (Escherichia coli 0127:B8; 120 μg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to pregnant Swiss mice on gestational day 17. At adulthood, male offspring were studied under one of the following conditions: (1) locomotor response to acute AMPH treatment (2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg) in an open field test; (2) behavioral sensitization paradigm, which consists of a daily injection of AMPH (1.0 mg/kg) for 10 days and observation of locomotion in the open field on days 1, 5, 10 (development phase), 15 and 17 (expression phase). The LPS stimulated offspring showed enhancement of the locomotor-stimulant effect after an acute AMPH challenge in comparison to baseline and saline pre-treated mice. They also showed development of behavioral sensitization earlier than the saline pre-treated group, although no changes between saline and LPS pre-treated groups were observed on development or expression of locomotor behavioral sensitization to AMPH. Furthermore, there was up-regulation of D1 receptor protein level within striatum in the LPS-stimulated offspring which was strongly correlated with increased grooming behavior. Taken together, our results indicate that motor and dopaminergic alterations caused by maternal immune activation are restricted to the acute AMPH challenge, mostly due to up-regulation of the D1 receptor within the mesolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways, but no locomotor differences were observed for behavioral

  17. NR2B-deficient mice are more sensitive to the locomotor stimulant and depressant effects of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Badanich, K A; Doremus-Fitzwater, T L; Mulholland, P J; Randall, P K; Delpire, E; Becker, H C

    2011-10-01

    The NR2B subunit of N-methyl d-aspartate glutamate receptors influences pharmacological properties and confers greater sensitivity to the modulatory effects of ethanol. This study examined behavioral responses to acute ethanol in a conditional knockout mouse model that allowed for a delayed genetic deletion of the NR2B subunit to avoid mouse lethality. Mice lacking the NR2B gene (knockout) were produced by mating NR2B[f/f] mice with CAMKIIa-driven tTA transgenic mice and the tetO-CRE transgenic mice. Adult male and female offspring representing each of the resultant genotypes (knockout, CAM, CRE and wildtype mice) were tested for open-field locomotor activity following acute low- and high-dose ethanol challenge as well as loss of righting reflex. Findings indicate that male and female mice lacking the NR2B subunit exhibited greater overall activity in comparison to other genotypes during the baseline locomotor activity test. NR2B knockout mice exhibited an exaggerated stimulant response to 1.5 g/kg (i.p.) and an exaggerated depressant response to 3.0 g/kg (i.p.) ethanol challenge. In addition, NR2B knockout mice slept longer following a high dose of ethanol (4.0 g/kg, i.p.). To evaluate pharmacokinetics, clearance rates of ethanol (1.5, 4.0 g/kg, i.p.) were measured and showed that female NR2B knockouts had a faster rate of metabolism only at the higher ethanol dose. Western blot analyses confirmed significant reduction in NR2B expression in the forebrain of knockout mice. Collectively, these data indicate that the NR2B subunit of the N-methyl d-aspartate glutamate receptor is involved in regulating low-dose stimulant effects of ethanol and the depressant/hypnotic effects of ethanol.

  18. Electro-acupuncture stimulation improves spontaneous locomotor hyperactivity in MPTP intoxicated mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haomin; Liang, Xibin; Wang, Xuan; Luo, Dingzhen; Jia, Jun; Wang, Xiaomin

    2013-01-01

    Bradykinesia is one of the major clinical symptoms of Parkinson`s disease (PD) for which treatment is sought. In most mouse models of PD, decreased locomotor activity can be reflected in an open field behavioral test. Therefore the open field test provides a useful tool to study the clinic symptoms of PD patients. Our previous work demonstrated that 100 Hz electro-acupuncture (EA) stimulation at ZUSANLI and SANYINJIAO protected the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system of C57BL/6 mice from MPTP toxicity, indicating that acupuncture might be an effective therapy for PD sufferers. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 100 Hz EA stimulation on the spontaneous locomotor activity in MPTP injured mice. Here we found that, in MPTP treated mice, the total movements significantly decreased and the movement time, velocity and distance dramatically increased, although the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system was devastated, revealed by immunohistochemistry and HPLC-ECD. After 12 sessions of 100 Hz EA stimulation, the total movements elevated and the movement time, velocity and distance decreased, in MPTP mice. 100 Hz EA increased striatal dopamine content in MPTP mice by 35.9%, but decreased its striatal dopamine turnover. We assumed that the injury of other regions in the brain, such as the A11 group in diencephalon, might be involved in the hypermotility in MPTP mice. The effects of 100 Hz EA on spontaneous locomotor activity in MPTP mice might not relate with the striatal dopamine, but with its neuroprotective and regulatory effects on motor circuits in the brain. Our study suggests that EA might be a promising treatment for neurological disorders including PD.

  19. Development of a home cage locomotor tracking system capable of detecting the stimulant and sedative properties of drugs in rats.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Fergal; O'Halloran, Ambrose; Kelly, John P

    2007-10-01

    The advent of automated locomotor activity methodologies has been extremely useful in removing the subjectivity and bias out of measuring this parameter in rodents. However, many of these behavioural studies are still conducted in novel environments, rather than in ones that the animals are familiar with, such as their home cage. The purpose of the present series of experiments was to develop an automated home cage tracking (HCT) profile using EthoVision software and assessing the acute effects of stimulant (amphetamine and methamphetamine, 0-5 mg/kg, sc) and sedative (diazepam, 0-20 mg/kg, sc and chlordiazepoxide, 0-50 mg/kg sc) drugs in this apparatus. Young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used, and the home cage locomotor activity was recorded for 11-60 min following administration (n=4 per group). For amphetamine and methamphetamine, a dose-dependent increase in home cage activity was evident for both drugs, with a plateau, followed by reduction at higher doses. Methamphetamine was more potent, whereas amphetamine produced greater maximal responses. Both diazepam and chlordiazepoxide dose-dependently reduced locomotor activity, with diazepam exhibiting a greater potency and having stronger sedative effects than chlordiazepoxide. Three doses of each drug were selected at the 31-40 min time period following administration, and compared to open field responses. Diazepam, chlordiazepoxide and amphetamine did not produce significant changes in the open field, whilst methamphetamine produced a significant increase in the 2.5 mg/kg group. In conclusion, these studies have successfully developed a sensitive HCT methodology that has been validated using drugs with stimulant and sedative properties in the same test conditions, with relatively small numbers of animals required to produce statistically significant results. It has proven superior to the open field investigations in allowing dose-response effects to be observed over a relatively short observation period

  20. Exaggerated sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Nan; Mitchell, Jere H.; Smith, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The sympathetic and pressor responses to exercise are exaggerated in hypertension. However, the underlying mechanisms causing this abnormality remain to be fully elucidated. Central command, a neural drive originating in higher brain centers, is known to activate cardiovascular and locomotor control circuits concomitantly. As such, it is a viable candidate for the generation of the augmented vascular response to exercise in this disease. We hypothesized that augmentations in central command function contribute to the heightened cardiovascular response to exercise in hypertension. To test this hypothesis, changes in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to electrical stimulation of mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR; 20–50 μA in 10-μA steps evoking fictive locomotion), a putative component of the central command pathway, were examined in decerebrate, paralyzed normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Tibial nerve discharge during MLR stimulation significantly increased in an intensity-dependent manner in both WKY and SHR but was not different between groups. Stimulation of the MLR evoked significantly larger increases in RSNA and MAP with increasing stimulation intensity in both groups. Importantly, the increases in sympathetic and pressor responses to this fictive locomotion were significantly greater in SHR compared with WKY across all stimulation intensities (e.g., at 50 μA, ΔRSNA: WKY 153±31%, SHR 287±42%; ΔMAP: WKY 87±9 mmHg, SHR 139±7 mmHg). These findings provide the first evidence that central command may be a critical contributor to the exaggerated rise in sympathetic activity and blood pressure during exercise in hypertension. PMID:26545711

  1. Exaggerated sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Nan; Mitchell, Jere H; Smith, Scott A; Mizuno, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The sympathetic and pressor responses to exercise are exaggerated in hypertension. However, the underlying mechanisms causing this abnormality remain to be fully elucidated. Central command, a neural drive originating in higher brain centers, is known to activate cardiovascular and locomotor control circuits concomitantly. As such, it is a viable candidate for the generation of the augmented vascular response to exercise in this disease. We hypothesized that augmentations in central command function contribute to the heightened cardiovascular response to exercise in hypertension. To test this hypothesis, changes in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to electrical stimulation of mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR; 20-50 μA in 10-μA steps evoking fictive locomotion), a putative component of the central command pathway, were examined in decerebrate, paralyzed normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Tibial nerve discharge during MLR stimulation significantly increased in an intensity-dependent manner in both WKY and SHR but was not different between groups. Stimulation of the MLR evoked significantly larger increases in RSNA and MAP with increasing stimulation intensity in both groups. Importantly, the increases in sympathetic and pressor responses to this fictive locomotion were significantly greater in SHR compared with WKY across all stimulation intensities (e.g., at 50 μA, ΔRSNA: WKY 153 ± 31%, SHR 287 ± 42%; ΔMAP: WKY 87 ± 9 mmHg, SHR 139 ± 7 mmHg). These findings provide the first evidence that central command may be a critical contributor to the exaggerated rise in sympathetic activity and blood pressure during exercise in hypertension.

  2. 7alpha-Hydroxypregnenolone acts as a neuronal activator to stimulate locomotor activity of breeding newts by means of the dopaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Baulieu, Etienne-Emile; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2004-12-07

    It is becoming clear that steroids can be synthesized de novo by the brain and other nervous systems. Such steroids are called neurosteroids, and de novo neurosteroidogenesis from cholesterol is a conserved property of vertebrate brains. In this study, we show that the newt brain actively produces 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, a previously undescribed amphibian neurosteroid that stimulates locomotor activity. 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone was identified as a most abundant amphibian neurosteroid in the newt brain by using biochemical techniques combined with HPLC, TLC, and GC-MS analyses. The production of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone in the diencephalon and rhombencephalon was higher than that in the telencephalon and peripheral steroidogenic glands. In addition, 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis in the brain showed marked changes during the annual breeding cycle, with a maximal level in the spring breeding period when locomotor activity of the newt increases. Behavioral analysis of newts in the nonbreeding period demonstrated that administration of this previously undescribed amphibian neurosteroid acutely increased locomotor activity. In vitro analysis further revealed that 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone treatment resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the release of dopamine from cultured brain tissue of nonbreeding newts. The effect of this neurosteroid on locomotion also was abolished by dopamine D(2)-like receptor antagonists. These results indicate that 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone acts as a neuronal activator to stimulate locomotor activity of breeding newts through the dopaminergic system. This study demonstrates a physiological function of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone that has not been described previously in any vertebrate class. This study also provides findings on the regulatory mechanism of locomotor activity from a unique standpoint.

  3. Activation of the GABA(B) Receptor Prevents Nicotine-Induced Locomotor Stimulation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lobina, Carla; Carai, Mauro A M; Froestl, Wolfgang; Mugnaini, Claudia; Pasquini, Serena; Corelli, Federico; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that activation of the GABA(B) receptor, either by means of orthosteric agonists or positive allosteric modulators (PAMs), inhibited different nicotine-related behaviors, including intravenous self-administration and conditioned place preference, in rodents. The present study investigated whether the anti-nicotine effects of the GABA(B) receptor agonist, baclofen, and GABA(B) PAMs, CGP7930, and GS39783, extend to nicotine stimulant effects. To this end, CD1 mice were initially treated with baclofen (0, 1.25, and 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), CGP7930 (0, 25, and 50 mg/kg, i.g.), or GS39783 (0, 25, and 50 mg/kg, i.g.), then treated with nicotine (0 and 0.05 mg/kg, s.c.), and finally exposed to an automated apparatus for recording of locomotor activity. Pretreatment with doses of baclofen, CGP7930, or GS39783 that did not alter locomotor activity when given with nicotine vehicle fully prevented hyperlocomotion induced by 0.05 mg/kg nicotine. These data extend to nicotine stimulant effects the capacity of baclofen and GABA(B) PAMs to block the reinforcing, motivational, and rewarding properties of nicotine. These data strengthen the hypothesis that activation of the GABA(B) receptor may represent a potentially useful, anti-smoking therapeutic strategy.

  4. Functional Electrical Stimulation Alters the Postural Component of Locomotor Activity in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Talis, Vera; Ballay, Yves; Grishin, Alexander; Pozzo, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the effects of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) of different intensity on postural stability during walking in healthy subjects is necessary before these relationships in patients with postural disorders can be assessed and understood. We examined healthy subjects in Control group walking on a treadmill for 40 min and in FES group—provided with 30 min of stimulation, which intensity increased every 10 min. The main difference between Control and FES group was the progressive increase of trunk oscillations in sagittal, frontal, and horizontal planes and an increase of relative stance duration in parallel with FES intensity increase. Both Control and FES groups exhibited shank elevation angle increase as an after-effect. It is concluded, that high intensity FES significantly changes the postural component of locomotor activity, but the fatigue signs afterwards were not FES specific. PMID:26733791

  5. Enkephalin contributes to the locomotor stimulating effects of 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Compan, V; Scearce-Levie, K; Crosson, C; Daszuta, A; Hen, R

    2003-07-01

    3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') is a potent inhibitor of serotonin uptake, which induces both an increase in locomotion and a decrease in exploratory activity in rodents. Serotonin 5-HT1B receptors, located on the terminals of striatal efferent neurons, have been suggested to mediate these motor effects of MDMA. Striatal neurons projecting to the globus pallidus contain met-enkephalin, whilst those projecting to the substantia nigra contain substance P. We therefore analysed the levels of both peptides using radioimmunocytochemistry after MDMA administration (10 mg/kg, 3 h) in wild-type and 5-HT1B receptor knockout mice. Our results demonstrate that MDMA induces a decrease in pallidal met-enkephalin immunolabelling in wild-type, but not in 5-HT1B receptor knockout mice. Similar results were obtained following treatment with the 5-HT1A/1B agonist RU24969 (5 mg/kg, 3 h), suggesting that activation of 5-HT1B receptors leads to a reduction in met-enkephalin levels in the globus pallidus. In contrast, MDMA had no effect on the nigral substance P levels. We have previously shown that both MDMA and RU24969 fail to stimulate locomotor activity in 5-HT1B receptor knockout mice. Our present data indicate that the opioid antagonist naloxone suppressed the locomotor effects of MDMA. This study is the first to demonstrate that Enk contributes to MDMA-induced increases in locomotor activity. Such an effect may be related to the 5-HT control of pallidal met-enkephalin levels via the 5-HT1B receptors.

  6. Disruption of Locomotor Adaptation with Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over the Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Choi, Julia T; Bouyer, Laurent J; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-07-01

    Locomotor patterns are adapted on a trial-and-error basis to account for predictable dynamics. Once a walking pattern is adapted, the new calibration is stored and must be actively de-adapted. Here, we tested the hypothesis that storage of newly acquired ankle adaptation in walking is dependent on corticospinal mechanisms. Subjects were exposed to an elastic force that resisted ankle dorsiflexion during treadmill walking. Ankle movement was adapted in <30 strides, leading to after-effects on removal of the force. We used a crossover design to study the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the primary motor cortex (M1), compared with normal adaptation without TMS. In addition, we tested the effects of TMS over the primary sensory cortex (S1) and premotor cortex (PMC) during adaptation. We found that M1 TMS, but not S1 TMS and PMC TMS, reduced the size of ankle dorsiflexion after-effects. The results suggest that suprathreshold M1 TMS disrupted the initial processes underlying locomotor adaptation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that corticospinal mechanisms underlie storage of ankle adaptation in walking.

  7. Differential roles of GABAB1 subunit isoforms on locomotor responses to acute and repeated administration of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Laura H; Sweeney, Fabian F; Kaupmann, Klemens; O'Leary, Olivia F; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Cryan, John F

    2016-02-01

    GABAB receptors are crucial modulators of the behavioural effects of drug abuse, and agonists and positive allosteric modulators show promise as pharmacological strategies for anti-addiction therapeutics. GABAB receptors are functional heterodimers of GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits. The predominant neuronal GABAB1 subunit isoforms are GABAB1a and GABAB1b. Selective ablation of these isoforms in mice revealed differential behavioural responses in fear, cognition and stress sensitivity. However, the influence of the two GABAB1 isoforms on responses to drugs of abuse is unclear. Therefore we examined the responses of GABAB1 subunit isoform null mice to cocaine in acute locomotor activity and conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigms. During habituation for the acute locomotor activity assay, GABAB1b(-/-) mice showed higher levels of locomotor activity relative to wild-type (WT) and GABAB1a(-/-) mice, in accordance with previous studies. Acute cocaine (10 mg/kg) increased locomotor activity in habituated mice of all three genotypes, with GABAB1a(-/-) mice showing sustained hyperlocomotor responses 30 min after cocaine relative to WT and GABAB1b(-/-) mice. No genotypes demonstrated a cocaine-induced place preference, however, GABAB1a(-/-) mice demonstrated enhanced locomotor sensitisation to chronic cocaine in the CPP paradigm in comparison to WT mice, whereas GABAB1b(-/-) mice failed to develop locomotor sensitisation, despite higher levels of basal locomotor activity. These findings indicate that GABAB1a and GABAB1b isoforms differentially regulate behavioural responses to cocaine, with deletion of GABAB1a enhancing cocaine-induced locomotor activity and deletion of GABAB1b protecting from cocaine-induced sensitisation.

  8. Effect of 1 GeV/n Fe particles on cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, M.; Bruneus, M.; Gatley, J.; Russell, S.; Billups, A.

    Space travel beyond the Earth's protective magnetic field (for example, to Mars) will involve exposure of astronauts to irradiation by high-energy nuclei such as 56Fe (HZE radiation), which are a component of galactic cosmic rays. These particles have high linear energy transfer (LET) and are expected to irreversibly damage cells they traverse. Our working hypothesis is that long-term behavioral alterations are induced after exposure of the brain to 1 GeV/n iron particles with fluences of 1 to 8 particles/cell targets. Previous studies support this notion but are not definitive, especially with regard to long-term effects. Using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) we expose C57 mice to 1 GeV/n 56Fe radiation (head only) at doses of 0, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 cGy. There were originally 19 mice per group. The ability of cocaine to increase locomotor activity in 16 of these animals in response to an intraperitoneal injection of cocaine has been measured so far at 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28 weeks. Cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity was chosen in part because it is a behavioral assay with which we have considerable experience. More importantly, the ability to respond to cocaine is a complex behavior involving many neurotransmitter systems and brain circuits. Therefore, the probability of alteration of this behavior by HZE particles was considered high. However, the central circuit is the nigrostriatal dopamine system, in which dopamine is released in striatum from nerve terminals whose cell bodies are located in the substantia nigra. Cocaine activates behavior by blocking dopamine transporters on striatal nerve terminals and therefore elevating the concentration of dopamine in the synapse. Dopamine activates receptors on striatal GABAergic cells that project via other brain regions to the thalamus. Activation of the motor cortex by glutamatergic projections from the thalamus leads ultimately to increased locomotion. The experimental paradigm involves

  9. Dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines in a novel acute mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Barak, Larry S; Wetsel, William C; Caron, Marc G; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2005-08-01

    Brain dopamine is critically involved in movement control, and its deficiency is the primary cause of motor symptoms in Parkinson disease. Here we report development of an animal model of acute severe dopamine deficiency by using mice lacking the dopamine transporter. In the absence of transporter-mediated recycling mechanisms, dopamine levels become entirely dependent on de novo synthesis. Acute pharmacological inhibition of dopamine synthesis in these mice induces transient elimination of striatal dopamine accompanied by the development of a striking behavioral phenotype manifested as severe akinesia, rigidity, tremor, and ptosis. This phenotype can be reversed by administration of the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA, or by nonselective dopamine agonists. Surprisingly, several amphetamine derivatives were also effective in reversing these behavioral abnormalities in a dopamine-independent manner. Identification of dopamine transporter- and dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines suggests a novel paradigm in the search for prospective anti-Parkinsonian drugs.

  10. Augmentation of Voluntary Locomotor Activity by Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation in Motor-Incomplete Spinal Cord-Injured Individuals.

    PubMed

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Krenn, Matthias; Danner, Simon M; Hofer, Christian; Kern, Helmut; McKay, William B; Mayr, Winfried; Minassian, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The level of sustainable excitability within lumbar spinal cord circuitries is one of the factors determining the functional outcome of locomotor therapy after motor-incomplete spinal cord injury. Here, we present initial data using noninvasive transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) to modulate this central state of excitability during voluntary treadmill stepping in three motor-incomplete spinal cord-injured individuals. Stimulation was applied at 30 Hz with an intensity that generated tingling sensations in the lower limb dermatomes, yet without producing muscle reflex activity. This stimulation changed muscle activation, gait kinematics, and the amount of manual assistance required from the therapists to maintain stepping with some interindividual differences. The effect on motor outputs during treadmill-stepping was essentially augmentative and step-phase dependent despite the invariant tonic stimulation. The most consistent modification was found in the gait kinematics, with the hip flexion during swing increased by 11.3° ± 5.6° across all subjects. This preliminary work suggests that tSCS provides for a background increase in activation of the lumbar spinal locomotor circuitry that has partially lost its descending drive. Voluntary inputs and step-related feedback build upon the stimulation-induced increased state of excitability in the generation of locomotor activity. Thus, tSCS essentially works as an electrical neuroprosthesis augmenting remaining motor control.

  11. Role of dopaminergic and GABAergic mechanisms in discrete brain areas in phencyclidine-induced locomotor stimulation and turning behavior.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Nabeshima, T; Kameyama, T

    1986-12-01

    This study was designed to test whether phencyclidine (PCP)-induced turning behavior and locomotor stimulation result from the action of this drug on functionally different neuronal systems and different sites of the brain. PCP produced turning behavior towards the drug injection side with unilateral injection of PCP (50-100 micrograms) into the globus pallidus, but not the nucleus accumbens and the caudate nucleus. This turning behavior was strongly attenuated by a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist, bicuculline, and by pimozide which reduces dopaminergic transmission in non-injection sites. Turning behavior induced by intraperitoneal injection of PCP (7.5 mg/kg) was enhanced by a GABA agonist, baclofen, and attenuated by GABA antagonists (bicuculline, picrotoxin). On the other hand, PCP produced significant locomotor stimulation, sniffing, rearing and forward locomotion with unilateral injection of 25-100 micrograms into the nucleus accumbens and the caudate nucleus. These behaviors were strongly antagonized by intraperitoneal injection of pimozide. The locomotor stimulation induced by intraperitoneal injection of PCP (5 mg/kg) was markedly enhanced by a small dose of methamphetamine and, by contrast, attenuated by reserpine, 6-hydroxydopamine, haloperidol, pimozide and a low dose of apomorphine which inhibits the release of dopamine by the stimulation of presynaptic receptors. These results suggest that PCP-induced turning behavior may be produced through stimulation of GABAergic transmission in the globus pallidus, although PCP-induced locomotor stimulation, sniffing, rearing and forward locomotion may be produced by increasing dopaminergic transmission in the nucleus accumbens and the caudate nucleus.

  12. Locomotor activity and tissue levels following acute administration of lambda- and gamma-cyhalothrin in rats.

    PubMed

    Moser, Virginia C; Liu, Zhiwei; Schlosser, Christopher; Spanogle, Terri L; Chandrasekaran, Appavu; McDaniel, Katherine L

    2016-12-15

    Pyrethroids produce neurotoxicity that depends, in part, on the chemical structure. Common behavioral effects include locomotor activity changes and specific toxic syndromes (types I and II). In general these neurobehavioral effects correlate well with peak internal dose metrics. Products of cyhalothrin, a type II pyrethroid, include mixtures of isomers (e.g., λ-cyhalothrin) as well as enriched active isomers (e.g., γ-cyhalothrin). We measured acute changes in locomotor activity in adult male rats and directly correlated these changes to peak brain and plasma concentrations of λ- and γ-cyhalothrin using a within-subject design. One-hour locomotor activity studies were conducted 1.5h after oral gavage dosing, and immediately thereafter plasma and brains were collected for analyzing tissue levels using LC/MS/MS methods. Both isomers produced dose-related decreases in activity counts, and the effective dose range for γ-cyhalothrin was lower than for λ-cyhalothrin. Doses calculated to decrease activity by 50% were 2-fold lower for the γ-isomer (1.29mg/kg) compared to λ-cyhalothrin (2.65mg/kg). Salivation, typical of type II pyrethroids, was also observed at lower doses of γ-cyhalothrin. Administered dose correlated well with brain and plasma concentrations, which furthermore showed good correlations with activity changes. Brain and plasma levels were tightly correlated across doses. While γ-cyhalothrin was 2-fold more potent based on administered dose, the differences based on internal concentrations were less, with γ-cyhalothrin being 1.3- to 1.6-fold more potent than λ-cyhalothrin. These potency differences are consistent with the purity of the λ-isomer (approximately 43%) compared to the enriched isomer γ-cyhalothrin (approximately 98%). Thus, administered dose as well as differences in cyhalothrin isomers is a good predictor of behavioral effects.

  13. Acute effects of ethanol or d-amphetamine on the locomotor activity of larval zebrafish in a microtiter plate format.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. We are assessing the acute effects of prototypic drugs that are known to act on the central ...

  14. Optic flow improves adaptability of spatiotemporal characteristics during split-belt locomotor adaptation with tactile stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Anthony Eikema, Diderik Jan A.; Chien, Jung Hung; Stergiou, Nicholas; Myers, Sara A.; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa M.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mukherjee, Mukul

    2015-01-01

    Human locomotor adaptation requires feedback and feed-forward control processes to maintain an appropriate walking pattern. Adaptation may require the use of visual and proprioceptive input to decode altered movement dynamics and generate an appropriate response. After a person transfers from an extreme sensory environment and back, as astronauts do when they return from spaceflight, the prolonged period required for re-adaptation can pose a significant burden. In our previous paper, we showed that plantar tactile vibration during a split-belt adaptation task did not interfere with the treadmill adaptation however, larger overground transfer effects with a slower decay resulted. Such effects, in the absence of visual feedback (of motion) and perturbation of tactile feedback, is believed to be due to a higher proprioceptive gain because, in the absence of relevant external dynamic cues such as optic flow, reliance on body-based cues is enhanced during gait tasks through multisensory integration. In this study we therefore investigated the effect of optic flow on tactile stimulated split-belt adaptation as a paradigm to facilitate the sensorimotor adaptation process. Twenty healthy young adults, separated into two matched groups, participated in the study. All participants performed an overground walking trial followed by a split-belt treadmill adaptation protocol. The tactile group (TC) received vibratory plantar tactile stimulation only, whereas the virtual reality and tactile group (VRT) received an additional concurrent visual stimulation: a moving virtual corridor, inducing perceived self-motion. A post-treadmill overground trial was performed to determine adaptation transfer. Interlimb coordination of spatiotemporal and kinetic variables was quantified using symmetry indices, and analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA. Marked changes of step length characteristics were observed in both groups during split-belt adaptation. Stance and swing time symmetry were

  15. Chemokines and cocaine: CXCR4 receptor antagonist AMD3100 attenuates cocaine place preference and locomotor stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae; Connelly, Krista L; Unterwald, Ellen M; Rawls, Scott M

    2016-08-26

    Plasma levels of the chemokine CXCL12 are elevated in mice following acute cocaine exposure and decreased in human cocaine abusers during withdrawal. CXCL12 is also one of the few chemokines located in the brain and can modulate dopamine transmission through activation of its receptor CXCR4. To assess a role for the CXCL12/CXCR4 system in behavioral effects of cocaine, we tested the hypothesis that AMD 3100 (Plerixafor), a CXCR4 antagonist, would inhibit conditioned place preference (CPP) and locomotor activation produced by cocaine. Rats injected with cocaine (10mg/kg) displayed CPP relative to saline-injected controls following 4 conditioning sessions. AMD 3100 (1, 2.5, 5mg/kg) administered prior to cocaine conditioning reduced development of cocaine CPP. AMD 3100 (5mg/kg) also inhibited expression of cocaine-induced CPP in a paradigm in which it was injected once (following cocaine conditioning and just prior to CPP testing). In addition, AMD 3100 (5, 10mg/kg) pretreatment reduced locomotor activation produced by an acute cocaine injection (15mg/kg) but did not affect basal locomotor activity relative to saline-injected controls. Repeated cocaine exposure produced a significant increase (1.49-fold) in CXCL12 mRNA expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Our results suggest that the CXCL12/CXCR4 system in the brain reward circuit is impacted by cocaine exposure and influences behavioral effects related to the abuse liability of cocaine.

  16. Combined Scopolamine and Ethanol Treatment Results in a Locomotor Stimulant Response Suggestive of Synergism That is Not Blocked by Dopamine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Scibelli, Angela C.; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are well positioned to mediate ethanol’s stimulant effects. To investigate this possibility, we examined the effects of scopolamine, a receptor subtype nonselective mAChR antagonist, on ethanol-induced stimulation in genotypes highly sensitive to this effect of ethanol. We also investigated whether the dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist, SCH-23390 or the dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist, haloperidol, could block the extreme stimulant response found following co-administration of scopolamine and ethanol. Methods Scopolamine (0, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, or 0.5 mg/kg) was given 10 minutes prior to saline or ethanol (0.75 to 2 g/kg) to female FAST (Experiment I) or DBA/2J (Experiment II) mice that were then tested for locomotion for 30 minutes. In Experiments III and IV, respectively, SCH-23390 (0, 0.015, or 0.03 mg/kg) was given 10 minutes prior, and haloperidol (0, 0.08, or 0.16 mg/kg) was given 2 minutes prior, to scopolamine (0 or 0.5 mg/kg), followed 10 minutes later by saline or ethanol (1.5 g/kg) and female DBA/2J mice were tested for locomotion for 30 minutes. Results FAST and DBA/2J mice displayed a robust enhancement of the locomotor effects of ethanol following pretreatment with scopolamine that was suggestive of synergism. SCH-23390 had no effect on the response to the scopolamine + ethanol drug combination, nor did it attenuate ethanol- or scopolamine-induced locomotor activity. Haloperidol, while attenuating the effects of ethanol, was not able to block the effects of scopolamine or the robust response to the scopolamine-ethanol drug combination. Conclusions These results suggest that while muscarinic receptor antagonism robustly enhances acute locomotor stimulation to ethanol, dopamine receptors are not involved in the super-additive interaction of scopolamine and ethanol treatment. They also suggest that in addition to cautions regarding the use of alcohol when scopolamine is clinically

  17. Acute exposure to DE-71: effects on locomotor behavior and developmental neurotoxicity in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lianguo; Huang, Changjiang; Hu, Chenyan; Yu, Ke; Yang, Lihua; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute developmental neurotoxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in zebrafish larvae. From 2 to 120 h postfertilization zebrafish embryos were exposed to DE-71 (0, 31.0, 68.7, and 227.6 µg/L). The authors studied the locomotor behavior of larvae, involvement of the cholinergic system, and selected gene and protein expressions in the central nervous system. The results showed that low DE-71 concentration caused hyperactivity, whereas higher concentrations decreased activity during the dark period. During the light period, larval activity was significantly reduced in a concentration-dependent manner. In the cholinergic system, acetylcholinesterase activity significantly increased (10.7 and 12.4%) in the 68.7 and 227.6 µg/L exposure groups, respectively, and acetylcholine concentration accordingly decreased (60.5%) in the 227.6 µg/L exposure group. The mRNA expressions of genes encoding myelin basic protein, neuron microtubule protein (α1-tubulin), and sonic hedgehog a were significantly downregulated. Western blotting assay demonstrated that the protein concentration of α1-tubulin was also decreased. Overall, the present study demonstrated that acute exposure to PBDEs can disrupt the neurobehavior of zebrafish larvae and affect cholinergic neurotransmission and neuron development.

  18. Acute locomotor effects of fluoxetine, sertraline, and nomifensine in young versus aged Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Stanford, John A; Currier, Theresa D; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2002-01-01

    Spontaneous locomotor activity was measured in young (6-8 months) and aged (24-26 months) Fischer 344 (F344) rats. Following habituation to the activity monitors, aged rats demonstrated significantly diminished motor activity as quantified by total distance traveled and vertical activity. Movement speed did not differ significantly between the two groups. Following habituation, rats were administered acute doses of fluoxetine, sertraline, or nomifensine (1.0, 3.0, and 10.0 mg/kg). Fluoxetine diminished all three behavioral measures in the young rats, while in the old rats, fluoxetine's effects were limited to a robust attenuation of vertical activity. Sertraline decreased movement speed and vertical activity, but not total distance traveled, in the young rats. Unlike fluoxetine, sertraline produced no significant effects on any of the three behavioral variables in the old rats. Nomifensine increased behavioral scores for both age groups. The results are discussed in relation to acute motor side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in motor-impaired aged individuals, as these effects may influence their eventual use in the clinic.

  19. GHRP-6 mimics ghrelin-induced stimulation of food intake and suppression of locomotor activity in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Yahashi, Satowa; Kang, Ki Sung; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Kouhei

    2012-04-01

    Ghrelin was first identified and characterized from rat stomach as an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin also acts as an orexigenic factor and regulates energy balance in rodents. In goldfish, native ghrelin consists of 11 molecular variants, the major form being a 17-residue peptide with n-octanoic acid modification (n-octanoyl ghrelin17), and intraperitoneal (IP) administration of n-octanoyl ghrelin17 induces central actions such as stimulation of food intake and suppression of locomotor activity through capsaicin-sensitive afferents. Four types of GHS-Rs (1a-1, 1a-2, 2a-1 and 2a-2) have been identified in goldfish, and one GHS, GHRP-6, can activate only GHS-R2a-1 in vitro. However, there is no information about the effect of GHRP-6 on food intake and locomotor activity in goldfish in vivo. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether IP-administered GHRP-6 would mimic the orexigenic action of n-octanoyl ghrelin17 and its suppression of locomotor activity. IP administration of GHRP-6 at 1pmol/g body weight (BW) stimulated food intake, and was equipotent to the orexigenic action of n-octanoyl ghrelin17 at 10 pmol/g BW. IP-injected GHRP-6 at 1 pmol/g BW also induced a significant decrease of locomotor activity, as was the case for IP-injected n-octanoyl ghrelin17 at 10 pmol/g BW. The action of GHRP-6 was blocked by IP-preinjected capsaicin at 160 nmol/g BW. These results suggest that the central action of GHRP-6 might be mediated via the GHS-R2a-1-signaling pathway, and subsequently through capsaicin-sensitive afferents in goldfish.

  20. Locomotor Stimulant and Rewarding Effects of Inhaling Methamphetamine, MDPV, and Mephedrone via Electronic Cigarette-Type Technology.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jacques D; Aarde, Shawn M; Cole, Maury; Vandewater, Sophia A; Grant, Yanabel; Taffe, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Although inhaled exposure to drugs is a prevalent route of administration for human substance abusers, preclinical models that incorporate inhaled exposure to psychomotor stimulants are not commonly available. Using a novel method that incorporates electronic cigarette-type technology to facilitate inhalation, male Wistar rats were exposed to vaporized methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) in propylene glycol vehicle using concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 200 mg/ml. Rats exhibited increases in spontaneous locomotor activity, measured by implanted radiotelemetry, following exposure to methamphetamine (12.5 and 100 mg/ml), MDPV (25, 50, and 100 mg/ml), and mephedrone (200 mg/ml). Locomotor effects were blocked by pretreatment with the dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist SCH23390 (10 μg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)). MA and MDPV vapor inhalation also altered activity on a running wheel in a biphasic manner. An additional group of rats was trained on a discrete trial intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure interpreted to assess brain reward status. ICSS-trained rats that received vaporized MA, MDPV, or mephedrone exhibited a significant reduction in threshold of ICSS reward compared with vehicle. The effect of vapor inhalation of the stimulants was found comparable to the locomotor and ICSS threshold-reducing effects of i.p. injection of mephedrone (5.0 mg/kg), MA (0.5-1.0 mg/kg), or MDPV (0.5-1.0 mg/kg). These data provide robust validation of e-cigarette-type technology as a model for inhaled delivery of vaporized psychostimulants. Finally, these studies demonstrate the potential for human use of e-cigarettes to facilitate covert use of a range of psychoactive stimulants. Thus, these devices pose health risks beyond their intended application for the delivery of nicotine.

  1. The GABAB agonist baclofen blocks the expression of sensitisation to the locomotor stimulant effect of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti, M; Gubellini, C; Ricci, F; Gaiardi, M

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the possible influence of baclofen, a GABAB agonist, on the long-term sensitisation to amphetamine in rats. As expected, chronic amphetamine treatment (1.5 mg/kg i.p. daily for 10 days) led to an increased locomotor response to amphetamine (0.75 mg/kg i.p.), when the animals were challenged 20 days after the end of repeated treatment. Baclofen (2 mg/kg i.p.), administered before the test session, did not significantly modify the spontaneous locomotor activity of rats, but decreased the normal and, to a greater extent, the sensitised locomotor response to amphetamine; thus baclofen prevented the expression of sensitisation to amphetamine. Moreover a previous chronic treatment with baclofen (2 mg/kg i.p. daily for 10 days) attenuated the amphetamine-induced locomotor activity in sensitised, but not in control animals. This effect was observed 20 days after the last baclofen administration. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate that GABAB receptors play an important role in the expression of the sensitised behavioural response to amphetamine and further support a potential role of GABAB agonists in the treatment of psychostimulant addiction.

  2. Association of environmental enrichment and locomotor stimulation in a rodent model of cerebral palsy: Insights of biological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Meireles, André L F; Marques, Marília R; Segabinazi, Ethiane; Spindler, Christiano; Piazza, Francele V; Salvalaggio, Gabriela S; Augustin, Otávio A; Achaval, Matilde; Marcuzzo, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Several physiotherapy approaches are used with different aims in the treatment of cerebral palsy (CP), such as the early stimulation and the locomotor training, but their biological effects, isolated or combined, are not completely known. In animals models, these strategies can be compared, with due translational restrictions, to the environmental enrichment (EE), that involves the enhancement of animal's physical and social environment, and locomotor stimulation (LS), that can be performed using the treadmill adapted for rats. This study was designed to describe which biological and functional mechanisms underlying rehabilitative process in clinical practice. Male rat pups were initially divided in two groups: control (healthy) and submitted to a CP model. Then, pups were divided in eight groups: CP, CPEE, CPLS, CPEELS and its respectively control groups. Functional outcomes were assessed at the postnatal day (P) 31 and P52. The tibialis anterior and soleus muscles, tibia bone parameters, the expression of synaptophysin in the primary motor cortex (M1) and ventral horn (VH) of the spinal cord, were evaluated. The association of therapies was able to improve the functional assessments and musculoskeletal parameters. Isolated therapies presented complementary benefits in CP, but the association of therapies proved to be a fundamental and effective strategy to functional recovery, besides alter positively all biological tissues evaluated in this study.

  3. Locomotor activity and tissue levels following acute administration of lambda- and gamma-cyhalothrin in rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids produce neurotoxicity that depends, in part, on the chemical structure. Common behavioral effects include locomotor activity changes and specific toxic syndromes (types I and II). In general these neurobehavioral effects correlate well with peak internal dose metric...

  4. The role of age, genotype, sex, and route of acute and chronic administration of methylphenidate: a review of its locomotor effects.

    PubMed

    Dafny, Nachum; Yang, Pamela B

    2006-02-15

    Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are treated for extended periods of time with the psychostimulant methylphenidate (MPD). The psychostimulants cocaine, amphetamine, and MPD exhibit similar structural configuration and pharmacological profile. The consequence of the long-term use of psychostimulants such as MPD as treatment for ADHD in the developing brain of children is unknown. Repeated treatment with psychostimulants has been shown to elicit adverse effects in behavior, such as dependence, paranoia, schizophrenia, and behavioral sensitization. Behavioral sensitization and cross-sensitization between two drugs are used as experimental markers to determine the potential of a drug to develop dependence/addiction. Although there are many reviews written about behavioral sensitization involving psychostimulants, scarcely any have focused specifically on MPD-elicited behavioral sensitization and cross-sensitization with other psychostimulants. Moreover, the response to MPD and the expression of ADHD vary among females and males and among different populations due to genetic variability. Since the interpretation and synthesis of the data reported are controversial, this review focuses on the adverse effects of MPD and the role of age, sex, and genetic composition on the acute and chronic effects of MPD, such as MPD-elicited behavioral sensitization and cross-sensitization with amphetamine in animal models. Animal models of drug-induced locomotor stimulation, particularly locomotor sensitization, can be used to understand the mechanisms underlying human drug-induced dependence.

  5. Interactions between Dorsal and Ventral Root Stimulation on the Generation of Locomotor-Like Activity in the Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Pujala, Avinash; Blivis, Dvir; O'Donovan, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether dorsal (DR) and ventral root (VR) stimulus trains engage common postsynaptic components to activate the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion in the neonatal mouse spinal cord. VR stimulation did not activate the first order interneurons mediating the activation of the locomotor CPG by sacrocaudal afferent stimulation. Simultaneous stimulation of adjacent dorsal or ventral root pairs, subthreshold for evoking locomotor-like activity, did not summate to activate the CPG. This suggests that locomotor-like activity is triggered when a critical class of efferent or afferent axons is stimulated and does not depend on the number of stimulated axons or activated postsynaptic neurons. DR- and VR-evoked episodes exhibited differences in the coupling between VR pairs. In DR-evoked episodes, the coupling between the ipsilateral and contralateral flexor/extensor roots was similar and stronger than the bilateral extensor roots. In VR-evoked episodes, ipsilateral flexor/extensor coupling was stronger than both the contralateral flexor/extensor and the bilateral extensor coupling. For both types of stimulation, the coupling was greatest between the bilateral L1/L2 flexor-dominated roots. This indicates that the recruitment and/or the firing pattern of motoneurons differed in DR and VR-evoked episodes. However, the DR and VR trains do not appear to activate distinct CPGs because trains of DR and VR stimuli at frequencies too low to evoke locomotor-like activity did so when they were interleaved. These results indicate that the excitatory actions of VR stimulation converge onto the CPG through an unknown pathway that is not captured by current models of the locomotor CPG.

  6. Interactions between Dorsal and Ventral Root Stimulation on the Generation of Locomotor-Like Activity in the Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated whether dorsal (DR) and ventral root (VR) stimulus trains engage common postsynaptic components to activate the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion in the neonatal mouse spinal cord. VR stimulation did not activate the first order interneurons mediating the activation of the locomotor CPG by sacrocaudal afferent stimulation. Simultaneous stimulation of adjacent dorsal or ventral root pairs, subthreshold for evoking locomotor-like activity, did not summate to activate the CPG. This suggests that locomotor-like activity is triggered when a critical class of efferent or afferent axons is stimulated and does not depend on the number of stimulated axons or activated postsynaptic neurons. DR- and VR-evoked episodes exhibited differences in the coupling between VR pairs. In DR-evoked episodes, the coupling between the ipsilateral and contralateral flexor/extensor roots was similar and stronger than the bilateral extensor roots. In VR-evoked episodes, ipsilateral flexor/extensor coupling was stronger than both the contralateral flexor/extensor and the bilateral extensor coupling. For both types of stimulation, the coupling was greatest between the bilateral L1/L2 flexor-dominated roots. This indicates that the recruitment and/or the firing pattern of motoneurons differed in DR and VR-evoked episodes. However, the DR and VR trains do not appear to activate distinct CPGs because trains of DR and VR stimuli at frequencies too low to evoke locomotor-like activity did so when they were interleaved. These results indicate that the excitatory actions of VR stimulation converge onto the CPG through an unknown pathway that is not captured by current models of the locomotor CPG. PMID:27419215

  7. Effects of the imidazobenzodiazepine R015-4513 on the stimulant and depressant actions of ethanol on spontaneous locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the imidazobenzodiazepine R015-4513, a partial inverse agonist at benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors, on the stimulant and depressant actions of ethanol in mice. For comparative purposes, another BDZ inverse agonist, FG-7142, was examined as well. Neither R015-4513 nor FG-7142 influenced the low-dose excitatory effects of ethanol on spontaneous locomotor activity. However, both R015-4513 and FG-7142 significantly antagonized the depressant effects of ethanol, and this antagonism was completely reversed by pretreatment with the BDZ receptor antagonist, R015-1788. These data suggest that R015-4513 is capable of antagonizing only some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, and in particular, those responses to ethanol that are mediated by modulation of the GABA/BDZ-chloride channel receptor complex.

  8. Activation of spinal locomotor circuits in the decerebrated cat by spinal epidural and/or intraspinal electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Igor; Musienko, Pavel E; Selionov, Victor A; Zdunowski, Sharon; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury

    2015-03-10

    The present study was designed to further compare the stepping-like movements generated via epidural (ES) and/or intraspinal (IS) stimulation. We examined the ability to generate stepping-like movements in response to ES and/or IS of spinal lumbar segments L1-L7 in decerebrate cats. ES (5-10 Hz) of the dorsal surface of the spinal cord at L3-L7 induced hindlimb stepping-like movements on a moving treadmill belt, but with no rhythmic activity in the forelimbs. IS (60 Hz) of the dorsolateral funiculus at L1-L3 (depth of 0.5-1.0mm from the dorsal surface of the spinal cord) induced quadrupedal stepping-like movements. Forelimb movements appeared first, followed by stepping-like movements in the hindlimbs. ES and IS simultaneously enhanced the rhythmic performance of the hindlimbs more robustly than ES or IS alone. The differences in the stimulation parameters, site of stimulation, and motor outputs observed during ES vs. IS suggest that different neural mechanisms were activated to induce stepping-like movements. The effects of ES may be mediated more via dorsal structures in the lumbosacral region of the spinal cord, whereas the effects of IS may be mediated via more ventral propriospinal networks and/or brainstem locomotor areas. Furthermore, the more effective facilitation of the motor output during simultaneous ES and IS may reflect some convergence of pathways on the same interneuronal populations involved in the regulation of locomotion.

  9. Acute injection of ASP in the third ventricle inhibits food intake and locomotor activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Roy, Christian; Roy, Marie-Claude; Gauvreau, Danny; Poulin, Anne-Marie; Tom, Fun-Qun; Timofeeva, Elena; Richard, Denis; Cianflone, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    Acylation-stimulating protein (ASP; also known as C3adesArg) stimulates triglyceride synthesis and glucose transport via interaction with its receptor C5L2, which is expressed peripherally (adipose tissue, muscle) and centrally. Previous studies have shown that ASP-deficient mice (C3KO) and C5L2-deficient mice (C5L2KO) are hyperphagic (59 to 229% increase, P < 0.0001), which is counterbalanced by increased energy expenditure measured as oxygen consumption (Vo(2)) and a lower RQ. The aim of the present study was to evaluate ASP's effect on food intake, energy expenditure, and neuropeptide expression. Male rats were surgically implanted with intracerebroventricular (icv) cannulas directed toward the third ventricle. After a 5-h fast, rats were injected, and food intake was assessed at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 16, 24, and 48 h, with a 5- to 7-day washout period between each injection. Acute icv injections of ASP (0.3-1,065 pmol) had a time-dependent effect on decreasing food intake by 20 to 57% (P < 0.05). Decreases were detected by 30 min (maximum 57%, P < 0.01) and at the highest dose effects extended to 48 h (19%, P < 0.05, 24- to 48-h period). Daily body weight gain was decreased by 131% over the first 24 h and 29% over the second 24 h (P < 0.05). A conditioned taste aversion test indicated that there was no malaise. Furthermore, acute ASP injection affected energy substrate usage, demonstrated by decreased Vo(2) and RQ (P < 0.05; implicating greater fatty acid usage), with a 49% decrease in total activity over 24 h (P < 0.05). ASP administration also increased anorexic neuropeptide POMC expression (44%) in the arcuate nucleus, with no change in NPY. Altogether ASP may have central in addition to peripheral effects.

  10. The Effects of Acute Exposure to Neuroactive Drugs on the Locomotor Activity of Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae using prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. Initially, we chose to define the beh...

  11. Influences of acute ethanol exposure on locomotor activities of zebrafish larvae under different illumination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ning; Lin, Jia; Peng, Xiaolan; Chen, Haojun; Zhang, Yinglan; Liu, Xiuyun; Li, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Larval zebrafish present unique opportunities to study the behavioral responses of a model organism to environmental challenges during early developmental stages. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the locomotor activities of AB strain zebrafish larvae at 5 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) in response to light changes under the influence of ethanol, and to explore potential neurological mechanisms that are involved in ethanol intoxication. AB strain zebrafish larvae at both 5 and 7 dpf were treated with ethanol at 0% (control), 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% (v/v%). The locomotor activities of the larvae during alternating light-dark challenges, as well as the locomotor responses immediately following the light transitions, were investigated. The levels of various neurotransmitters were also measured in selected ethanol-treated groups. The larvae at 5 and 7 dpf demonstrated similar patterns of locomotor responses to ethanol treatment. Ethanol treatment at 1% increased the swimming distances of the zebrafish larvae in the dark periods, but had no effect on the swimming distances in the light periods. In contrast, ethanol treatment at 2% increased the swimming distances in the light periods, but did not potentiate the swimming activity in the dark periods, compared to controls. Differences in the levels of neurotransmitters that are involved in norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin pathways were also observed in groups with different ethanol treatments. These results indicated the behavioral studies concerning the ethanol effects on locomotor activities of zebrafish larvae could be carried out as early as 5 dpf. The 1% and 2% ethanol-treated zebrafish larvae modeled ethanol effects at different intoxication states, and the differences in neurotransmitter levels suggested the involvement of various neurotransmitter pathways in different ethanol intoxication states.

  12. Dopamine transporter occupancy by RTI-55, inhibition of dopamine transport and stimulation of locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Gifford, A.N.; Volkow, N.D.

    1997-05-01

    Cocaine analogs such as RTI-55 (or {beta}CIT) with a higher affinity for the DAT are potentially useful as therapeutic drugs in cocaine abuse as well as for radiopharmaceutical use. Previously we showed that in mice RTI-55 (2 mg/Kg, i/p) reduced H-3 cocaine striatum-to-cerebellum ratios (St/Cb, {lg_bullet}) from 1.6 to 1.2 at 3 h after administration, with recovery by 12 h. In the present study we demonstrate a very similar time-course for transport {triangle} measured in striatal homo within 2 min of sacrifice. The maximum inhibition of uptake at about 1 h corresponded to about 80% of the control uptake rate, similar to the percent reduction in St/Cb. The time-course of the effect of this dose of RTI-55 on locomotor activity ({sq_bullet}) was complex, with a drop in the activity measure at 7 h, after a further injection of RTI-55, but activity remained higher than in saline controls. In spite of this complexity, which may be associated with stereotypies and/or exhaustion, the duration of increased activity is consistent with the duration of transporter blockade. These experiments support the notion that PET/SPECT measures of transporter occupancy accurately reflect transporter inhibition.

  13. The Anorexigenic Peptide Neuromedin U (NMU) Attenuates Amphetamine-Induced Locomotor Stimulation, Accumbal Dopamine Release and Expression of Conditioned Place Preference in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vallöf, Daniel; Vestlund, Jesper; Engel, Jörgen A.; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine dependence, besides its substantial economical consequence, is a serious cause of mortality and morbidity. By investigations of the neurochemical correlates through which addictive drugs, such as amphetamine, activate the mesoaccumbal dopamine system unique targets for treatment of drug addiction can be identified. This reward link consists of a dopamine projection from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) suggesting that these brain areas are important for reward. The physiological function of gut-brain peptides has expanded beyond food intake modulation and involves regulation of drug reinforcement. A novel candidate for reward regulation is the anorexigenic peptide neuromedin U (NMU). We therefore investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of NMU on amphetamine’s well-documented effects on the mesoaccumbal dopamine system, i.e. locomotor stimulation and accumbal dopamine release in mice. In addition, the effect of accumbal NMU administration on locomotor activity was examined. The effect of NMU, icv or intra-NAc, on the expression of conditioned place preference (CPP) was elucidated. Firstly, we showed that icv administration of NMU attenuate the amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation, accumbal dopamine release and expression of CPP in mice. Secondly, we found that a lower dose of NMU (icv) reduce the amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation in mice. Thirdly, we demonstrated that NMU administration into the NAc block the ability of amphetamine to cause a locomotor stimulation in mice. However, accumbal NMU administration did not attenuate the amphetamine-induced expression of CPP in mice. Our novel data suggest that central NMU signalling is involved in development of amphetamine dependence. PMID:27139195

  14. Epidural Stimulation Induced Modulation of Spinal Locomotor Networks in Adult Spinal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lavrov, Igor; Dy, Christine J.; Fong, Andy J.; Gerasimenko, Yury; Courtine, Grégoire; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2010-01-01

    The importance of the in vivo dynamic nature of the circuitries within the spinal cord that generate locomotion is becoming increasingly evident. We examined the characteristics of hindlimb EMG activity evoked in response to epidural stimulation at the S1 spinal cord segment in complete mid-thoracic spinal cord transected rats at different stages of post-lesion recovery. A progressive and phase-dependent modulation of monosynaptic (middle) and long latency (late) stimulation-evoked EMG responses was observed throughout the step cycle. During the first three weeks after injury the amplitude of the middle response was potentiated during the EMG bursts, whereas after 4 weeks both the middle and late responses were phase-dependently modulated. The middle and late response magnitudes were closely linked to the amplitude and duration of the EMG bursts during locomotion facilitated by epidural stimulation. The optimum stimulation frequency that maintained consistent activity of the long latency responses ranged from 40 to 60 Hz, whereas the short latency responses were consistent from 5 to 130 Hz. These data demonstrate that both middle and late evoked potentials within a motor pool are strictly gated during in vivo bipedal stepping as a function of the general excitability of the motor pool and, thus as a function of the phase of the step cycle. These data demonstrate that spinal cord epidural stimulation can facilitate locomotion in a time-dependent manner post-lesion. The long latency responses to epidural stimulation are correlated with the recovery of weight-bearing bipedal locomotion and may reflect activation of interneuronal central pattern-generating circuits. PMID:18524907

  15. Epidural stimulation induced modulation of spinal locomotor networks in adult spinal rats.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Igor; Dy, Christine J; Fong, Andy J; Gerasimenko, Yury; Courtine, Grégoire; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2008-06-04

    The importance of the in vivo dynamic nature of the circuitries within the spinal cord that generate locomotion is becoming increasingly evident. We examined the characteristics of hindlimb EMG activity evoked in response to epidural stimulation at the S1 spinal cord segment in complete midthoracic spinal cord-transected rats at different stages of postlesion recovery. A progressive and phase-dependent modulation of monosynaptic (middle) and long-latency (late) stimulation-evoked EMG responses was observed throughout the step cycle. During the first 3 weeks after injury, the amplitude of the middle response was potentiated during the EMG bursts, whereas after 4 weeks, both the middle and late responses were phase-dependently modulated. The middle- and late-response magnitudes were closely linked to the amplitude and duration of the EMG bursts during locomotion facilitated by epidural stimulation. The optimum stimulation frequency that maintained consistent activity of the long-latency responses ranged from 40 to 60 Hz, whereas the short-latency responses were consistent from 5 to 130 Hz. These data demonstrate that both middle and late evoked potentials within a motor pool are strictly gated during in vivo bipedal stepping as a function of the general excitability of the motor pool and, thus, as a function of the phase of the step cycle. These data demonstrate that spinal cord epidural stimulation can facilitate locomotion in a time-dependent manner after lesion. The long-latency responses to epidural stimulation are correlated with the recovery of weight-bearing bipedal locomotion and may reflect activation of interneuronal central pattern-generating circuits.

  16. Using low levels of stochastic vestibular stimulation to improve locomotor stability

    PubMed Central

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Kofman, Igor S.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian T.; Goel, Rahul; Galvan-Garza, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2015-01-01

    Low levels of bipolar binaural white noise based imperceptible stochastic electrical stimulation to the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS) have been shown to improve stability during balance tasks in normal, healthy subjects by facilitating enhanced information transfer using stochastic resonance (SR) principles. We hypothesize that detection of time-critical sub-threshold sensory signals using low levels of bipolar binaural SVS based on SR principles will help improve stability of walking during support surface perturbations. In the current study 13 healthy subjects were exposed to short continuous support surface perturbations for 60 s while walking on a treadmill and simultaneously viewing perceptually matched linear optic flow. Low levels of bipolar binaural white noise based SVS were applied to the vestibular organs. Multiple trials of the treadmill locomotion test were performed with stimulation current levels varying in the range of 0–1500 μA, randomized across trials. The results show that subjects significantly improved their walking stability during support surface perturbations at stimulation levels with peak amplitude predominantly in the range of 100–500 μA consistent with the SR phenomenon. Additionally, objective perceptual motion thresholds were measured separately as estimates of internal noise while subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and received 1 Hz bipolar binaural sinusoidal electrical stimuli. The optimal improvement in walking stability was achieved on average with peak stimulation amplitudes of approximately 35% of perceptual motion threshold. This study shows the effectiveness of using low imperceptible levels of SVS to improve dynamic stability during walking on a laterally oscillating treadmill via the SR phenomenon. PMID:26347619

  17. Caffeine stimulates locomotor activity in the mammalian spinal cord via adenosine A1 receptor-dopamine D1 receptor interaction and PKA-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, JeanMarie; Santana-Almansa, Alexandra; Matos-Vergara, Nikol; Marrero-Cordero, Luis René; Cabezas-Bou, Ernesto; Díaz-Ríos, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine is a potent psychostimulant that can have significant and widely variable effects on the activity of multiple neuronal pathways. The most pronounced caffeine-induced behavioral effect seen in rodents is to increase locomotor activity which has been linked to a dose-dependent inhibition of A1 and A(2A) receptors. The effects of caffeine at the level of the lumbar spinal central pattern generator (CPG) network for hindlimb locomotion are lacking. We assessed the effects of caffeine to the locomotor function of the spinal CPG network via extracellular ventral root recordings using the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord preparation. Addition of caffeine and of an A1 receptor antagonist significantly decreased the cycle period accelerating the ongoing locomotor rhythm, while decreasing burst duration reversibly in most preparations suggesting the role of A1 receptors as the primary target of caffeine. Caffeine and an A1 receptor antagonist failed to stimulate ongoing locomotor activity in the absence of dopamine or in the presence of a D1 receptor antagonist supporting A1/D1 receptor-dependent mechanism of action. The use of caffeine or an A1 receptor blocker failed to stimulate an ongoing locomotor rhythm in the presence of a blocker of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) supporting the need of this intracellular pathway for the modulatory effects of caffeine to occur. These results support a stimulant effect of caffeine on the lumbar spinal network controlling hindlimb locomotion through the inhibition of A1 receptors and subsequent activation of D1 receptors via a PKA-dependent intracellular mechanism.

  18. An enriched environment reduces the stress level and locomotor activity induced by acute morphine treatment and by saline after chronic morphine treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Sun, Jinling; Xue, Zhaoxia; Li, Xinwang

    2014-06-18

    This study investigated the relationships among an enriched environment, stress levels, and drug addiction. Mice were divided randomly into four treatment groups (n=12 each): enriched environment without restraint stress (EN), standard environment without restraint stress (SN), enriched environment with restraint stress (ES), and standard environment with restraint stress (SS). Mice were reared in the respective environment for 45 days. Then, the ES and SS groups were subjected to restraint stress daily (2 h/day) for 14 days, whereas the EN and SN groups were not subjected to restraint stress during this stage. The stress levels of all mice were tested in the elevated plus maze immediately after exposure to restraint stress. After the 2-week stress testing period, mice were administered acute or chronic morphine (5 mg/kg) treatment for 7 days. Then, after a 7-day withdrawal period, the mice were injected with saline (1 ml/kg) or morphine (5 mg/kg) daily for 2 days to observe locomotor activity. The results indicated that the enriched environment reduced the stress and locomotor activity induced by acute morphine administration or saline after chronic morphine treatment. However, the enriched environment did not significantly inhibit locomotor activity induced by morphine challenge. In addition, the stress level did not mediate the effect of the enriched environment on drug-induced locomotor activity after acute or chronic morphine treatment.

  19. Sex differences in the effects of social and physical environment on novelty-induced exploratory behavior and cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Elena; Starosciak, Amy; Wade, Dean; Izenwasser, Sari

    2012-04-21

    Many factors influence the rewarding effects of drugs such as cocaine. The present study was done to determine whether social and environmental factors alter behavior in adolescent male and female rats. On postnatal day (PND) 23, rats were housed in one of several same-sex conditions. Both social (number of rats per cage) and environmental (availability of toys) factors were manipulated. Socially isolated rats were housed alone (1 rat/cage) in an environment that either was impoverished (with no toys; II) or enriched (with toys; IE). Standard housing for these studies was social and impoverished, which was 2 rats/cage with no toys (SI2). Other rats were housed 2/cage with toys (SE2), or 3/cage with (SE3) or without (SI3) toys. On PND 37, novelty-induced locomotor activity was measured for 30min. On PND 44-46, locomotor activity in response to an injection of 5mg/kg cocaine was measured for 60min each day. For male rats, only social conditions altered novelty-induced activity. Males housed in groups of three had the most activity, compared to pair-housed and isolated rats. For females, social and environmental enrichment interacted to alter novelty-induced activity. In contrast to males, isolated females had increased activity, compared to group-housed females. Further, isolated females in impoverished environments had more activity than isolated females in enriched environments and group-housed females in impoverished environments. The effect of environmental enrichment on cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity was altered depending upon the number of rats living in a cage for males. For females, only social conditions altered cocaine-stimulated behavior, with activity increasing with the number of rats in the cage, regardless of environmental enrichment. These data show that social and environmental enrichment differentially alter novelty-induced and cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity in adolescent male and female rats.

  20. Effects of chronic and acute methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) administration on locomotor activity, ultrasonic vocalizations, and neuromotor development in 3- to 11-day-old CD-1 mouse pups.

    PubMed

    Penner, M R; McFadyen, M P; Carrey, N; Brown, R E

    2001-11-01

    The present study examined the effects of chronic and acute treatment with methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) on isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations, spontaneous locomotor activity, and neuromotor coordination in 3- to 11-day-old CD-1 mouse pups. In Experiment 1, 3- to 11-day-old pups received daily injections of saline, 5 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg of methylphenidate hydrochloride, or no injection and were tested on postnatal Days 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. Both doses of methylphenidate resulted in significant increases in locomotor activity at all ages, but had no significant effect on body weight, neuromotor development, or emission of ultrasonic vocalizations. In Experiment 2, pups were given a single dose of methylphenidate (5 or 20 mg/kg), saline, or no injection on one of postnatal Days 5, 7, 9, or 11. This acute methylphenidate treatment increased locomotor activity, but had no significant effects on ultrasonic vocalizations or neuromotor coordination. These results indicate that short-term, chronic methylphenidate treatment elevates locomotor responses, but has no immediate effects on anxietylike responses or on the development of neuromotor behavior of CD-1 mice in the first 11 days of life.

  1. Dopamine neurotransmission is involved in the attenuating effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist MDL 72222 on acute methamphetamine-induced locomotor hyperactivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji-Hoon; Nam, Yun-Sun; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that 5-HT3 receptors are involved in the development and expression of methamphetamine (MAP)-induced locomotor sensitization in mice. In the present study, we further examined whether the dopaminergic system is involved in the attenuating effects of MDL 72222, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, on acute MAP-induced locomotor hyperactivity. For this, we examined alterations of dopamine (DA) in the form of D1 receptor, D2 receptor, and dopamine transporter (DAT) binding labeled with [3H]SCH23390 for D1, [3H]raclopride for D2, and [3H]mazindol for DAT binding in the mouse brains with acute MAP exposure or pretreatment of MDL 72222 with MAP. No significant differences were detected in the D1 receptor, D2 receptor, or DAT binding between any of the groups studied. Interestingly, we found increased DA levels in the striatum following acute MAP exposure; these increased levels were reversed by pretreatment with MDL 72222, but did not affect 5-HT levels in the dorsal raphe. Overall, our results suggest that dopamine neurotransmission plays an important role in the attenuating effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist MDL 72222 on acute MAP-induced locomotor hyperactivity in mice.

  2. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation improves open field locomotor recovery after low but not high thoracic spinal cord compression-injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Poirrier, Anne-Lise; Nyssen, Yves; Scholtes, Felix; Multon, Sylvie; Rinkin, Charline; Weber, Géraldine; Bouhy, Delphine; Brook, Gary; Franzen, Rachelle; Schoenen, Jean

    2004-01-15

    Electromagnetic fields are able to promote axonal regeneration in vitro and in vivo. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used routinely in neuropsychiatric conditions and as an atraumatic method to activate descending motor pathways. After spinal cord injury, these pathways are disconnected from the spinal locomotor generator, resulting in most of the functional deficit. We have applied daily 10 Hz rTMS for 8 weeks immediately after an incomplete high (T4-5; n = 5) or low (T10-11; n = 6) thoracic closed spinal cord compression-injury in adult rats, using 6 high- and 6 low-lesioned non-stimulated animals as controls. Functional recovery of hindlimbs was assessed using the BBB locomotor rating scale. In the control group, the BBB score was significantly better from the 7th week post-injury in animals lesioned at T4-5 compared to those lesioned at T10-11. rTMS significantly improved locomotor recovery in T10-11-injured rats, but not in rats with a high thoracic injury. In rTMS-treated rats, there was significant positive correlation between final BBB score and grey matter density of serotonergic fibres in the spinal segment just caudal to the lesion. We propose that low thoracic lesions produce a greater functional deficit because they interfere with the locomotor centre and that rTMS is beneficial in such lesions because it activates this central pattern generator, presumably via descending serotonin pathways. The benefits of rTMS shown here suggest strongly that this non-invasive intervention strategy merits consideration for clinical trials in human paraplegics with low spinal cord lesions.

  3. Comparison of (+)- and (−)-Naloxone on the Acute Psychomotor-Stimulating Effects of Heroin, 6-Acetylmorphine, and Morphine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jannike Mørch; Boix, Fernando; Bergh, Marianne Skov-Skov; Vindenes, Vigdis; Rice, Kenner C.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Mørland, Jørg

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling is implied in opioid reinforcement, reward, and withdrawal. Here, we explored whether TLR4 signaling is involved in the acute psychomotor-stimulating effects of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), and morphine as well as whether there are differences between the three opioids regarding TLR4 signaling. To address this, we examined how pretreatment with (+)-naloxone, a TLR4 active but opioid receptor (OR) inactive antagonist, affected the acute increase in locomotor activity induced by heroin, 6-AM, or morphine in mice. We also assessed the effect of pretreatment with (−)-naloxone, a TLR4 and OR active antagonist, as well as the pharmacokinetic profiles of (+) and (−)-naloxone in the blood and brain. We found that (−)-naloxone reduced acute opioid-induced locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, (+)-naloxone, administered in doses assumed to antagonize TLR4 but not ORs, did not affect acute locomotor activity induced by heroin, 6-AM, or morphine. Both naloxone isomers exhibited similar concentration versus time profiles in the blood and brain, but the brain concentrations of (−)-naloxone reached higher levels than those of (+)-naloxone. However, the discrepancies in their pharmacokinetic properties did not explain the marked difference between the two isomers’ ability to affect opioid-induced locomotor activity. Our results underpin the importance of OR activation and do not indicate an apparent role of TLR4 signaling in acute opioid-induced psychomotor stimulation in mice. Furthermore, there were no marked differences between heroin, 6-AM, and morphine regarding involvement of OR or TLR4 signaling. PMID:27278234

  4. Brief light stimulation during the mouse nocturnal activity phase simultaneously induces a decline in core temperature and locomotor activity followed by EEG-determined sleep.

    PubMed

    Studholme, Keith M; Gompf, Heinrich S; Morin, Lawrence P

    2013-03-15

    Light exerts a variety of effects on mammals. Unexpectedly, one of these effects is the cessation of nocturnal locomotion and the induction of behavioral sleep (photosomnolence). Here, we extend the initial observations in several ways, including the fundamental demonstration that core body temperature (T(c)) drops substantially (about 1.5°C) in response to the light stimulation at CT15 or CT18 in a manner suggesting that the change is a direct response to light rather than simply a result of the locomotor suppression. The results show that 1) the decline of locomotion and T(c) begin soon after nocturnal light stimulation; 2) the variability in the magnitude and onset of light-induced locomotor suppression is very large, whereas the variability in T(c) is very small; 3) T(c) recovers from the light-induced decline in advance of the recovery of locomotion; 4) under entrained and freerunning conditions, the daily late afternoon T(c) increase occurs in advance of the corresponding increase in wheel running; and 5) toward the end of the subjective night, the nocturnally elevated T(c) persists longer than does locomotor activity. Finally, EEG measurements confirm light-induced sleep and, when T(c) or locomotion was measured, show their temporal association with sleep onset. Both EEG- and immobility-based sleep detection methods confirm rapid induction of light-induced sleep. The similarities between light-induced loss of locomotion and drop in T(c) suggest a common cause for parallel responses. The photosomnolence response may be contingent upon both the absence of locomotion and a simultaneous low T(c).

  5. Brief light stimulation during the mouse nocturnal activity phase simultaneously induces a decline in core temperature and locomotor activity followed by EEG-determined sleep

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, Keith M.; Gompf, Heinrich S.

    2013-01-01

    Light exerts a variety of effects on mammals. Unexpectedly, one of these effects is the cessation of nocturnal locomotion and the induction of behavioral sleep (photosomnolence). Here, we extend the initial observations in several ways, including the fundamental demonstration that core body temperature (Tc) drops substantially (about 1.5°C) in response to the light stimulation at CT15 or CT18 in a manner suggesting that the change is a direct response to light rather than simply a result of the locomotor suppression. The results show that 1) the decline of locomotion and Tc begin soon after nocturnal light stimulation; 2) the variability in the magnitude and onset of light-induced locomotor suppression is very large, whereas the variability in Tc is very small; 3) Tc recovers from the light-induced decline in advance of the recovery of locomotion; 4) under entrained and freerunning conditions, the daily late afternoon Tc increase occurs in advance of the corresponding increase in wheel running; and 5) toward the end of the subjective night, the nocturnally elevated Tc persists longer than does locomotor activity. Finally, EEG measurements confirm light-induced sleep and, when Tc or locomotion was measured, show their temporal association with sleep onset. Both EEG- and immobility-based sleep detection methods confirm rapid induction of light-induced sleep. The similarities between light-induced loss of locomotion and drop in Tc suggest a common cause for parallel responses. The photosomnolence response may be contingent upon both the absence of locomotion and a simultaneous low Tc. PMID:23364525

  6. 3-Methoxynaltrexone is not a selective antagonist for the acute psychomotor stimulating effects of heroin and 6-monoacetylmorphine in mice.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Guro Søe; Andersen, Jannike Mørch; Boix, Fernando; Mørland, Jørg

    2014-07-01

    The opioid receptor antagonist 3-methoxynaltrexone (3-MeONtx) has previously been shown in rodents to selectively reverse the analgesic actions of heroin and its metabolites 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G), but not that of morphine. Based on these and other results, a heroin/6-MAM/M6G μ-opioid receptor binding site or subreceptor mediating their analgesic activity has been proposed. It is however unknown whether this also accounts for the acute psychomotor stimulating properties of these opioids. The aim of the present study was therefore to explore if the acute psychomotor stimulating effects of heroin, 6-MAM, and morphine are mediated by distinct μ-opioid receptor binding sites or subreceptors. To address this aim, we examined how pretreatment with 3-MeONtx or naltrexone (NTX) affected the acute increase in locomotor activity induced by heroin, 6-MAM, or morphine in mice. The pharmacokinetic profiles of 3-MeONtx and NTX were also assessed in mouse brain. We found that 3-MeONtx similarly antagonized the acute increase in locomotor activity induced by equipotent doses of heroin, 6-MAM, or morphine. This antagonistic effect was comparable to the one observed following administration of NTX, and both antagonists gave similar pharmacokinetic profiles in mouse brain. Our findings do not support that different μ-opioid receptor subtypes or a distinct binding site at the μ-opioid receptor is involved in morphine-induced versus heroin/6-MAM-induced psychomotor activation. This might suggest that the opioid-induced psychomotor stimulation is mediated by different μ-opioid subreceptors than those responsible for their analgesic effects.

  7. Effects of acute hippocampal stimulation on EEG dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sandeep P; Sackellares, J Chris; Shiau, Deng-Shan; Norman, Wendy M; Dance, Linda K; Pardalos, Panos M; Principe, Jose C; Carney, Paul R

    2006-01-01

    Progressive preictal dynamical convergence and postictal divergence of dynamical EEG descriptors among brain regions has been reported in human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in a rodent model of TLE. There are also reports of anticonvulsant effects of high frequency stimulation of the hippocampus in humans. We postulate that this anticonvulsant effect is due to dynamical resetting by the electrical stimulation. The following study investigated the effects of acute hippocampal electrical stimulation on dynamical transitions in the brain of a spontaneously seizing animal model of TLE to test the hypothesis of divergence in dynamical values by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus.

  8. Acute normobaric hypoxia stimulates erythropoietin release.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Richard W A; Watt, Peter W; Maxwell, Neil S

    2008-01-01

    Investigations studying the secretion of EPO (erythropoietin) in response to acute hypoxia have produced mixed results. Further, the errors associated with the various methods used to determine EPO are not well documented. The purpose of the current study was to determine the EPO response of 17 trained male subjects to either an acute bout of normobaric hypoxia (Hy; n = 10) or normoxia (Con; n = 7). A secondary aim was to determine the error associated with the measurement of EPO. After baseline tests, the treatment group (Hy) underwent a single bout of hypoxic exposure (F(I(O(2))) approximately 0.148; 3100 m) consisting of a 90-min rest period followed by a 30-min exercise phase (50% V(O)(2max)). Venous blood samples were drawn pre (0 min) and post (120 min) each test to assess changes in plasma EPO (DeltaEPO). The control (Con) group was subjected to the same general experimental design, but placed in a normoxic environment (F(I(O(2))) approximately 0.2093). The Hy group demonstrated a mean increase in EPO [19.3 (4.4) vs. 24.1 (5.1) mU/mL], p < 0.04, post 120 min of normobaric hypoxia. The calculated technical error of measurement for EPO was 2.1 mU/mL (9.8%). It was concluded that an acute bout of hypoxia, has the capacity to elevate plasma EPO. This study also demonstrates that the increase in EPO accumulation was 2 times greater than the calculated measurement of error.

  9. Effects of voluntary wheel running on heart rate, body temperature, and locomotor activity in response to acute and repeated stressor exposures in rats.

    PubMed

    Masini, Cher V; Nyhuis, Tara J; Sasse, Sarah K; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge

    2011-05-01

    Stress often negatively impacts physical and mental health but it has been suggested that voluntary physical activity may benefit health by reducing some of the effects of stress. The present experiments tested whether voluntary exercise can reduce heart rate, core body temperature and locomotor activity responses to acute (novelty or loud noise) or repeated stress (loud noise). After 6 weeks of running-wheel access, rats exposed to a novel environment had reduced heart rate, core body temperature, and locomotor activity responses compared to rats housed under sedentary conditions. In contrast, none of these measures were different between exercised and sedentary rats following acute 30-min noise exposures, at either 85 or 98 dB. Following 10 weeks of running-wheel access, both groups displayed significant habituation of all these responses to 10 consecutive daily 30-min presentations of 98 dB noise stress. However, the extent of habituation of all three responses was significantly enhanced in exercised compared to sedentary animals on the last exposure to noise. These results suggest that in physically active animals, under some conditions, acute responses to stress exposure may be reduced, and response habituation to repeated stress may be enhanced, which ultimately may reduce the negative and cumulative impact of stress.

  10. Blockade of acute microglial activation by minocycline promotes neuroprotection and reduces locomotor hyperactivity after closed head injury in mice: a twelve-week follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Homsi, Shadi; Piaggio, Tomaso; Croci, Nicole; Noble, Florence; Plotkine, Michel; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Jafarian-Tehrani, Mehrnaz

    2010-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes a wide spectrum of consequences, such as microglial activation, cerebral inflammation, and focal and diffuse brain injury, as well as functional impairment. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of acute treatment with minocycline as an inhibitor of microglial activation on cerebral focal and diffuse lesions, and on the spontaneous locomotor activity following TBI. The weight-drop model was used to induce TBI in mice. Microglial activation and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) were detected by immunohistochemistry using CD11b and ss-amyloid precursor protein (ss-APP) immunolabeling, respectively. Focal injury was determined by the measurement of the brain lesion volume. Horizontal and vertical locomotor activities were measured for up to 12 weeks post-injury by an automated actimeter. Minocycline or vehicle were administered three times post-insult, at 5 min (90 mg/kg i.p.), 3 h, and 9 h post-TBI (45 mg/kg i.p.). Minocycline treatment attenuated microglial activation by 59% and reduced brain lesion volume by 58%, yet it did not affect DAI at 24 h post-TBI. More interestingly, minocycline significantly decreased TBI-induced locomotor hyperactivity at 48 h post-TBI, and its effect lasted for up to 8 weeks. Taken together, the results indicate that microglial activation appears to play an important role in the development of TBI-induced focal injury and the subsequent locomotor hyperactivity, and its short-term inhibition provides long-lasting functional recovery after TBI. These findings emphasize the fact that minocycline could be a promising new therapeutic strategy for head-injured patients.

  11. Chronic electrical stimulation of the intact corticospinal system after unilateral injury restores skilled locomotor control and promotes spinal axon outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Jason B; Berrol, Lauren J; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Martin, John H

    2010-08-11

    Injury to the brain or spinal cord usually preserves some corticospinal (CS) connections. These residual circuits sprout spontaneously and in response to activity-based treatments. We hypothesized that augmenting activity in spared CS circuits would restore the skilled motor control lost after injury and augment outgrowth of CS terminations in the spinal cord. After selective injury of one half of the CS tract (CST) in the rat, we applied 10 d of electrical stimulation to the forelimb area of motor cortex of the spared half and tested motor performance for 30 d. Rats with injury and CST stimulation showed substantial improvements in skilled paw placement while walking over a horizontal ladder. By the end of the testing period, the walking errors of the previously impaired forelimb in rats with injury and stimulation returned to baseline, while the errors remained elevated in rats with injury only. Whereas the time to perform the task returned to normal in all animals, the pattern of errors returned to normal only in the stimulated group. Electrical stimulation also caused robust outgrowth of CST axon terminations in the ipsilateral spinal cord, the side of impairment, compared with rats with injury only. The outgrowth was directed to the normal gray matter territory of ipsilateral CST axon terminations. Thus, stimulation of spared CS circuits induced substantial axon outgrowth to the largely denervated side of the spinal cord and restored normal motor control in the previously impaired limbs.

  12. Cognitive enhancement by transcranial laser stimulation and acute aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jungyun; Castelli, Darla M; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2016-08-01

    This is the first randomized, controlled study comparing the cognitive effects of transcranial laser stimulation and acute aerobic exercise on the same cognitive tasks. We examined whether transcranial infrared laser stimulation of the prefrontal cortex, acute high-intensity aerobic exercise, or the combination may enhance performance in sustained attention and working memory tasks. Sixty healthy young adults were randomly assigned to one of the following four treatments: (1) low-level laser therapy (LLLT) with infrared laser to two forehead sites while seated (total 8 min, 1064 nm continuous wave, 250 mW/cm(2), 60 J/cm(2) per site of 13.6 cm(2)); (2) acute exercise (EX) of high-intensity (total 20 min, with 10-min treadmill running at 85-90 % VO2max); (3) combined treatment (LLLT + EX); or (4) sham control (CON). Participants were tested for prefrontal measures of sustained attention with the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) and working memory with the delayed match-to-sample task (DMS) before and after the treatments. As compared to CON, both LLLT and EX reduced reaction time in the PVT [F(1.56) = 4.134, p = 0.01, η (2)  = 0.181] and increased the number of correct responses in the DMS [F(1.56) = 4.690, p = 0.005, η (2)  = 0.201], demonstrating a significant enhancing effect of LLLT and EX on cognitive performance. LLLT + EX effects were similar but showed no significantly greater improvement on PVT and DMS than LLLT or EX alone. The transcranial infrared laser stimulation and acute aerobic exercise treatments were similarly effective for cognitive enhancement, suggesting that they augment prefrontal cognitive functions similarly.

  13. Spinal neuronal activation during locomotor-like activity enabled by epidural stimulation and 5-HT agonists in spinal rats

    PubMed Central

    Duru, Paul O.; Tillakaratne, Niranjala J.K.; Kim, Jung A.; Zhong, Hui; Stauber, Stacey M.; Pham, Trinh T.; Xiao, Mei S.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Roy, Roland R.

    2015-01-01

    The neural networks that generate stepping in complete spinal adult rats remain poorly defined. To address this problem we used c-fos (an activity-dependent marker) to identify active interneurons and motoneurons in the lumbar spinal cord of adult spinal rats during a 30-minute bout of bipedal stepping. Spinal rats were either step trained (30 min/day, 3 days/week for 7.5 weeks) or not step-trained. Stepping was enabled by epidural stimulation and the administration of the serotonergic agonists quipazine and 8-OHDPAT. A third group of spinal rats served as untreated (no stimulation, drugs, or stepping) controls. The number of activated cholinergic central canal cluster cells and partition neurons was higher in both step-trained and non-trained than untreated rats, and higher in non-trained than step-trained rats. The latter finding suggests that daily treatment with epidural stimulation plus serotonergic agonist treatment without step training enhanced the excitability of a broader cholinergic interneuronal population than step training. The number of activated interneurons in laminae II-VI of lumbar cross sections was higher in both step-trained and non-trained than untreated rats, and highest in step-trained rats. This finding suggests that this population of interneurons was responsive to epidural stimulation plus serotonergic treatment and that load-bearing induced when stepping had an additive effect. The number of activated motoneurons of all size categories was higher in the step-trained than the other two groups, reflecting a strong effect of loading on motoneuron recruitment. In general, these results indicate that the spinal networks for locomotion are similar with and without brain input. PMID:25789848

  14. Identification of the first biased NPS receptor agonist that retains anxiolytic and memory promoting effects with reduced levels of locomotor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Clark, Stewart D; Kenakin, Terrence P; Gertz, Steven; Hassler, Carla; Gay, Elaine A; Langston, Tiffany L; Reinscheid, Rainer K; Runyon, Scott P

    2017-03-03

    The neuropeptide S system has been implicated in a number of centrally mediated behaviors including memory consolidation, anxiolysis, and increased locomotor activity. Characterization of these behaviors has been primarily accomplished using the endogenous 20AA peptide (NPS) that demonstrates relatively equal potency for the calcium mobilization and cAMP second messenger pathways at human and rodent NPS receptors. This study is the first to demonstrate that truncations of the NPS peptide provides small fragments that retain significant potency only at one of two single polymorphism variants known to alter NPSR function (NPSR-107I), yet demonstrate a strong level of bias for the calcium mobilization pathway over the cAMP pathway. We have also determined that the length of the truncated peptide correlates with the degree of bias for the calcium mobilization pathway. A modified tetrapeptide analog (4) has greatly attenuated hyperlocomotor stimulation in vivo but retains activity in assays that correlate with memory consolidation and anxiolytic activity. Analog 4 also has a bias for the calcium mobilization pathway, at the human and mouse receptor. This suggests that future agonist ligands for the NPS receptor having a bias for calcium mobilization over cAMP production will function as non-stimulatory anxiolytics that augment memory formation.

  15. Neurochemical factors underlying individual differences in locomotor activity and anxiety-like behavioral responses in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Muraleetharan, Arrujyan; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2016-02-04

    Variation among individuals may arise for several reasons, and may have diverse underlying mechanisms. Individual differences have been studied in a variety of species, but recently a new model organism has emerged in this field that offers both sophistication in phenotypical characterization and powerful mechanistic analysis. Recently, zebrafish, one of the favorites of geneticists, have been shown to exhibit consistent individual differences in baseline locomotor activity. In the current study, we further explore this finding and examine whether individual differences in locomotor activity correlate with anxiety-like behavioral measures and with levels of dopamine, serotonin and the metabolites of these neurotransmitters. In addition, we examine whether individual differences in locomotor activity are also associated with reactivity to the locomotor stimulant effects of and neurochemical responses to acute ethanol exposure (30min long, 1% v/v ethanol bath application). Principal component analyses revealed a strong association among anxiety-like responses, locomotor activity, serotonin and dopamine levels. Furthermore, ethanol exposure was found to abolish the locomotion-dependent anxiety-like behavioral and serotonergic responses suggesting that this drug also engages a common underlying pathway. Overall, our results provide support for an important role of the serotonergic system in mediating individual differences in anxiety-like responses and locomotor activity in zebrafish and for a minor modulatory role of the dopaminergic system.

  16. Pharmacologic Antagonism of Ghrelin Receptors Attenuates Development of Nicotine Induced Locomotor Sensitization in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, Paul J.; Clifford, P. Shane; Rodriguez, Juan; Hughes, Samuel; Eitan, Shoshana; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Aims Ghrelin (GHR) is an orexigenic gut peptide that interacts with ghrelin receptors (GHR-Rs) to modulate brain reinforcement circuits. Systemic GHR infusions augment cocaine stimulated locomotion and conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats, whereas genetic or pharmacological ablation of GHR-Rs has been shown to attenuate the acute locomotor-enhancing effects of nicotine, cocaine, amphetamine and alcohol and to blunt the CPP induced by food, alcohol, amphetamine and cocaine in mice. The stimulant nicotine can induce CPP and like amphetamine and cocaine, repeated administration of nicotine induces locomotor sensitization in rats. A key issue is whether pharmacological antagonism of GHR-Rs would similarly attenuate nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization. Method To examine the role of GHR-Rs in the behavioral sensitizing effects of nicotine, adult male rats were injected with either 0, 3 or 6 mg/kg of the GHR-R receptor antagonist JMV 2959 (i.p.) and 20 minutes later with either vehicle or 0.4 mg/kg nicotine hydrogen tartrate (s.c.) on each of 7 consecutive days. Results Rats treated with nicotine alone showed robust locomotor sensitization, whereas rats pretreated with JMV 2959 showed significantly attenuated nicotine-induced hyperlocomotion. Conclusions These results suggest that GHR-R activity is required for the induction of locomotor sensitization to nicotine and complement an emerging literature implicating central GHR systems in drug reward/reinforcement. PMID:21903141

  17. In vivo potency and efficacy of the novel cathinone α-pyrrolidinopentiophenone and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone: Self-administration and locomotor stimulation in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Aarde, Shawn M.; Creehan, Kevin M.; Vandewater, Sophia A.; Dickerson, Tobin J.; Taffe, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Numerous substituted cathinone drugs have appeared in recreational use. This variety is often a response to legal actions; the scheduling of 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV; “bath salts”) in the U.S.A. was followed by the appearance of the closely related drug α-pyrrolidinopentiophenone (alpha-PVP; “flakka”). Objectives To directly compare the efficacy and potency of alpha-PVP with that of MDPV. Methods Groups of male Wistar rats were trained in the intravenous self-administration (IVSA) alpha-PVP or MDPV under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement. An additional group was examined for locomotor and body temperature responses to non-contingent administration of MDVP or alpha-PVP (1.0, 5.6, 10.0 mg/kg, i.p.). Results Acquisition of alpha-PVP (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) IVSA resulted in low, yet consistent drug intake and excellent discrimination for the drug-paired lever. Dose-substitution (0.05-0.25 mg/kg/infusion) under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule confirmed potency is similar to MDPV in prior studies. In direct comparison to MDPV (0.05 mg/kg/infusion), rats trained on alpha-PVP (0.05 mg/kg/infusion) responded for more infusions but demonstrated similar drug-lever discrimination by the end of acquisition. However, the dose-response (0.018-0.56 mg/kg/inf) functions of these drugs under a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement reflected identical efficacy and potency. Peak locomotor responses to MDPV or alpha-PVP were observed after the 1.0 mg/kg, i.p. dose and lasted ~2 hours. Modest body temperature decreases were of similar magnitude (~0.75°C) for each compound. Conclusions The potency and efficacy of MDPV and alpha-PVP were very similar across multiple assays, predicting that the abuse liability of alpha-PVP will be significant and similar to that of MDPV. PMID:25925780

  18. Local field potentials in the ventral tegmental area during cocaine-induced locomotor activation: Measurements in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Harris Bozer, Amber L; Li, Ai-Ling; Sibi, Jiny E; Bobzean, Samara A M; Peng, Yuan B; Perrotti, Linda I

    2016-03-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) has been established as a critical nucleus for processing behavioral changes that occur during psychostimulant use. Although it is known that cocaine induced locomotor activity is initiated in the VTA, not much is known about the electrical activity in real time. The use of our custom-designed wireless module for recording local field potential (LFP) activity provides an opportunity to confirm and identify changes in neuronal activity within the VTA of freely moving rats. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in VTA LFP activity in real time that underlie cocaine induced changes in locomotor behavior. Recording electrodes were implanted in the VTA of rats. Locomotor behavior and LFP activity were simultaneously recorded at baseline, and after saline and cocaine injections. Results indicate that cocaine treatment caused increases in both locomotor behavior and LFP activity in the VTA. Specifically, LFP activity was highest during the first 30 min following the cocaine injection and was most robust in Delta and Theta frequency bands; indicating the role of low frequency VTA activity in the initiation of acute stimulant-induced locomotor behavior. Our results suggest that LFP recording in freely moving animals can be used in the future to provide valuable information pertaining to drug induced changes in neural activity.

  19. Acute Stimulant Ingestion and Neurocognitive Performance in Healthy Participants

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Concussion management has become an area of great concern in athletics, and neurocognitive tests, such as Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT), are commonly used as management tools. Given the restrictive nature of current management plans, anecdotal concerns have been raised about athletes trying to cheat the assessments and return to participation sooner. Stimulants have been shown to improve neurocognitive measures similar to those used in ImPACT. Therefore, they could possibly improve performance during baseline and postinjury testing. Objective: To examine the effects of a supplement containing stimulants on ImPACT performance. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 5 men (age = 20.6 ± 1.5 years, height = 176.3 ± 9.6 cm, mass = 76.9 ± 18.6 kg) and 7 women (age = 20.6 ± 1.1 years, height = 162.9 ± 7.8 cm, mass = 60.9 ± 8.2 kg) with no histories of physician-diagnosed head injury, learning disability, or attention-deficit disorder. Intervention(s): Participants were assessed under supplement (5.5 g of Jacked 3D, which contains caffeine and 1,3-dimethylamylamine), placebo, and control conditions separated by 1 week. Main Outcome Measure(s): I compared ImPACT composite scores for verbal and visual memory, visual motor speed, reaction time, impulse control, and a cognitive-efficiency index under each of the 3 conditions and assessed them 30 minutes after ingestion. Results: I observed a difference when comparing reaction times, as the participants reacted faster during the supplement condition (0.53 ± 0.03 seconds) than during the placebo (0.55 ± 0.03 seconds) and control (0.55 ± 0.03 seconds) conditions (F2,22 = 4.31, P = .03). A difference also was observed for the cognitive-efficiency index, as participants scored higher during the supplement condition (0.49 ± 0.09) than during the placebo (0.41 ± 0.10) and control (0.41 ± 0.12) conditions (F2,22 = 4

  20. Acute stimulation of transplanted neurons improves motoneuron survival, axon growth, and muscle reinnervation.

    PubMed

    Grumbles, Robert M; Liu, Yang; Thomas, Christie M; Wood, Patrick M; Thomas, Christine K

    2013-06-15

    Few options exist for treatment of pervasive motoneuron death after spinal cord injury or in neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Local transplantation of embryonic motoneurons into an axotomized peripheral nerve is a promising approach to arrest the atrophy of denervated muscles; however, muscle reinnervation is limited by poor motoneuron survival. The aim of the present study was to test whether acute electrical stimulation of transplanted embryonic neurons promotes motoneuron survival, axon growth, and muscle reinnervation. The sciatic nerve of adult Fischer rats was transected to mimic the widespread denervation seen after disease or injury. Acutely dissociated rat embryonic ventral spinal cord cells were transplanted into the distal tibial nerve stump as a neuron source for muscle reinnervation. Immediately post-transplantation, the cells were stimulated at 20 Hz for 1 h. Other groups were used to control for the cell transplantation and stimulation. When neurons were stimulated acutely, there were significantly more neurons, including cholinergic neurons, 10 weeks after transplantation. This led to enhanced numbers of myelinated axons, reinnervation of more muscle fibers, and more medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscles were functionally connected to the transplant. Reinnervation reduced muscle atrophy significantly. These data support the concept that electrical stimulation rescues transplanted motoneurons and facilitates muscle reinnervation.

  1. Evaluation of focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants in acutely deafened cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. The conductive nature of the fluids and tissues of the cochlea can lead to broad activation of spiral ganglion neurons using contemporary cochlear implant stimulation configurations such as monopolar (MP) stimulation. The relatively poor spatial selectivity is thought to limit implant performance, particularly in noisy environments. Several current focusing techniques have been proposed to reduce the spread of activation with the aim towards achieving improved clinical performance. Approach. The present research evaluated the efficacy of focused multipolar (FMP) stimulation, a relatively new focusing technique in the cochlea, and compared its efficacy to both MP stimulation and tripolar (TP) stimulation. The spread of neural activity across the inferior colliculus (IC), measured by recording the spatial tuning curve, was used as a measure of spatial selectivity. Adult cats (n = 6) were acutely deafened and implanted with an intracochlear electrode array before multi-unit responses were recorded across the cochleotopic gradient of the contralateral IC. Recordings were made in response to acoustic and electrical stimulation using the MP, TP and FMP configurations. Main results. FMP and TP stimulation resulted in greater spatial selectivity than MP stimulation. However, thresholds were significantly higher (p < 0.001) for FMP and TP stimulation compared to MP stimulation. There were no differences found in spatial selectivity and threshold between FMP and TP stimulation. Significance. The greater spatial selectivity of FMP and TP stimulation would be expected to result in improved clinical performance. However, further research will be required to demonstrate the efficacy of these modes of stimulation after longer durations of deafness.

  2. Acute seizure suppression by transcranial direct current stimulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dhamne, Sameer C; Ekstein, Dana; Zhuo, Zhihong; Gersner, Roman; Zurakowski, David; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Jensen, Frances E; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a focal neuromodulation technique that suppresses cortical excitability by low-amplitude constant electrical current, and may have an antiepileptic effect. Yet, tDCS has not been tested in status epilepticus (SE). Furthermore, a combined tDCS and pharmacotherapy antiseizure approach is unexplored. We therefore examined in the rat pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) SE model whether cathodal tDCS (1) suppresses seizures, (2) augments lorazepam (LZP) efficacy, and (3) enhances GABAergic cortical inhibition. Methods Experiment 1 aimed to identify an effective cathodal tDCS intensity. Rats received intraperitoneal PTZ followed by tDCS (sham, cathodal 1 mA, or cathodal 0.1 mA; for 20 min), and then a second PTZ challenge. In Experiment 2, two additional animal groups received a subtherapeutic LZP dose after PTZ, and then verum or sham tDCS. Clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) epileptic activity were compared between all groups. In Experiment 3, we measured GABA-mediated paired-pulse inhibition of the motor evoked potential by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS) in rats that received PTZ or saline, and either verum or sham tDCS. Results Cathodal 1 mA tDCS (1) reduced EEG spike bursts, and suppressed clinical seizures after the second PTZ challenge, (2) in combination with LZP was more effective in seizure suppression and improved the clinical seizure outcomes compared to either tDCS or LZP alone, and (3) prevented the loss of ppTMS motor cortex inhibition that accompanied PTZ injection. Interpretation These results suggest that cathodal 1 mA tDCS alone and in combination with LZP can suppress seizures by augmenting GABAergic cortical inhibition. PMID:26339678

  3. Locomotor exercise in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W.; Whitmore, H.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements for exercise in space by means of locomotion are established and addressed with prototype treadmills for use during long-duration spaceflight. The adaptation of the human body to microgravity is described in terms of 1-G locomotor biomechanics, the effects of reduced activity, and effective activity-replacement techniques. The treadmill is introduced as a complement to other techniques of force replacement with reference given to the angle required for exercise. A motor-driven unit is proposed that can operate at a variety of controlled speeds and equivalent grades. The treadmills permit locomotor exercise as required for long-duration space travel to sustain locomotor and cardiorespiratory capacity at a level consistent with postflight needs.

  4. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Susick, Laura L; Lowing, Jennifer L; Bosse, Kelly E; Hildebrandt, Clara C; Chrumka, Alexandria C; Conti, Alana C

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  5. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure

    PubMed Central

    Susick, Laura L.; Lowing, Jennifer L.; Bosse, Kelly E.; Hildebrandt, Clara C.; Chrumka, Alexandria C.; Conti, Alana C.

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  6. Acute d-Amphetamine Pretreatment Does Not Alter Stimulant Self-Administration in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Vansickel, Andrea R.; Lile, Joshua A.; Rush, Craig R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent clinical research indicates that d-amphetamine is effective in treating cocaine and methamphetamine dependence. There is concern, however, with the use of d-amphetamine as a pharmacotherapy because acute administration of d-amphetamine decreases inhibition in cocaine-using individuals and may increase drug-taking behavior. The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether acute d-amphetamine pretreatment would alter the reinforcing, subject-rated, and cardiovascular effects of d-amphetamine. To this end, 7 human volunteers first sampled doses of oral d-amphetamine (0, 8, and 16 mg). These doses engender moderate drug taking and were selected to avoid a ceiling or floor effect. Volunteers were then allowed to self-administer these sampled doses using a modified-progressive ratio procedure in two sessions in which they received pretreatments with either 0 or 15 mg oral d-amphetamine 2 hours prior to completing the modified progressive-ratio procedure. d-Amphetamine produced prototypical stimulant-like effects (e.g., increased ratings of stimulated, elevated blood pressure) and maintained responding on the modified progressive-ratio schedule. Pretreatment with 15 mg oral d-amphetamine also produced prototypical stimulant-like effects, but failed to alter break points for d-amphetamine on the modified progressive-ratio procedure relative to placebo pretreatment. These results indicate that acute d-amphetamine pretreatment does not increase stimulant self-administration. PMID:17490738

  7. Novel remodeling of the mouse heart mitochondrial proteome in response to acute insulin stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Brian A; Yazdi, Puya G; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute changes in the mitochondrial proteome in response to insulin stimulation. Cardiac mitochondria from C57BL/6 mice after insulin stimulation were analyzed using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis. MALDI-TOF MS/MS was utilized to identify differences. Two enzymes involved in metabolism and four structural proteins were identified. Succinyl-CoA ligase [ADP forming] subunit beta was identified as one of the differentially regulated proteins. Upon insulin stimulation, a relatively more acidic isoform of this protein was increased by 53% and its functional activity was decreased by ∼32%. This proteomic remodeling in response to insulin stimulation may play an important role in the normal and diabetic heart. PMID:26610654

  8. Acute Response to Unilateral Unipolar Electrical Carotid Sinus Stimulation in Patients With Resistant Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Heusser, Karsten; Tank, Jens; Brinkmann, Julia; Menne, Jan; Kaufeld, Jessica; Linnenweber-Held, Silvia; Beige, Joachim; Wilhelmi, Mathias; Diedrich, André; Haller, Hermann; Jordan, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral bipolar electric carotid sinus stimulation acutely reduced muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant arterial hypertension but is no longer available. The second-generation device uses a smaller unilateral unipolar disk electrode to reduce invasiveness while saving battery life. We hypothesized that the second-generation device acutely lowers BP and MSNA in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. Eighteen treatment-resistant hypertensive patients (9 women/9 men; 53±11 years; 33±5 kg/m(2)) on stable medications have been included in the study. We monitored finger and brachial BP, heart rate, and MSNA. Without stimulation, BP was 165±31/91±18 mm Hg, heart rate was 75±17 bpm, and MSNA was 48±14 bursts per minute. Acute stimulation with intensities producing side effects that were tolerable in the short term elicited interindividually variable changes in systolic BP (-16.9±15.0 mm Hg; range, 0.0 to -40.8 mm Hg; P=0.002), heart rate (-3.6±3.6 bpm; P=0.004), and MSNA (-2.0±5.8 bursts per minute; P=0.375). Stimulation intensities had to be lowered in 12 patients to avoid side effects at the expense of efficacy (systolic BP, -6.3±7.0 mm Hg; range, 2.8 to -14.5 mm Hg; P=0.028 and heart rate, -1.5±2.3 bpm; P=0.078; comparison against responses with side effects). Reductions in diastolic BP and MSNA (total activity) were correlated (r(2)=0.329; P=0.025). In our patient cohort, unilateral unipolar electric baroreflex stimulation acutely lowered BP. However, side effects may limit efficacy. The approach should be tested in a controlled comparative study.

  9. Acute Auditory Stimulation with Different Styles of Music Influences Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Men

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Sheila Ap. F.; Guida, Heraldo L.; dos Santos Antonio, Ana Marcia; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Monteiro, Carlos B. M.; Ferreira, Celso; Ribeiro, Vivian F.; Barnabe, Viviani; Silva, Sidney B.; Fonseca, Fernando L. A.; Adami, Fernando; Petenusso, Marcio; Raimundo, Rodrigo D.; Valenti, Vitor E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: No clear evidence is available in the literature regarding the acute effect of different styles of music on cardiac autonomic control. Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate the acute effects of classical baroque and heavy metal musical auditory stimulation on Heart Rate Variability (HRV) in healthy men. Patients and Methods: In this study, HRV was analyzed regarding time (SDNN, RMSSD, NN50, and pNN50) and frequency domain (LF, HF, and LF / HF) in 12 healthy men. HRV was recorded at seated rest for 10 minutes. Subsequently, the participants were exposed to classical baroque or heavy metal music for five minutes through an earphone at seated rest. After exposure to the first song, they remained at rest for five minutes and they were again exposed to classical baroque or heavy metal music. The music sequence was random for each individual. Standard statistical methods were used for calculation of means and standard deviations. Besides, ANOVA and Friedman test were used for parametric and non-parametric distributions, respectively. Results: While listening to heavy metal music, SDNN was reduced compared to the baseline (P = 0.023). In addition, the LF index (ms2 and nu) was reduced during exposure to both heavy metal and classical baroque musical auditory stimulation compared to the control condition (P = 0.010 and P = 0.048, respectively). However, the HF index (ms2) was reduced only during auditory stimulation with music heavy metal (P = 0.01). The LF/HF ratio on the other hand decreased during auditory stimulation with classical baroque music (P = 0.019). Conclusions: Acute auditory stimulation with the selected heavy metal musical auditory stimulation decreased the sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation on the heart, while exposure to a selected classical baroque music reduced sympathetic regulation on the heart. PMID:25177673

  10. Acute and chronic effects of anteromedial globus pallidus stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Durif, F.; Lemaire, J.; Debilly, B.; Dordain, G.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the effects of acute and chronic stimulation in the anteromedial part of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) on the symptoms of patients with Parkinson's disease.
METHODS—Six patients with severe Parkinson's disease (Hoehn and Yahr stage 4-5 in "off" drug condition) with motor fluctuations and levodopa induced dyskinesia (LID) were operated on. Chronic electrodes were implanted in the anteromedial GPi bilaterally in five patients and unilaterally in one patient. The effect of stimulation via the four contacts for each electrode (n=11) was assessed postoperatively on the contralateral parkinsonian signs in the off condition and on the contralateral and ipsilateral LID in the "on" condition. The core assessement program for intracerebral transplantation protocol was performed before surgery and then 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery in on and off conditions and in on and off stimulation conditions.
RESULTS—Stimulation performed postoperatively showed a significant improvement (p<0.05) by 47% (contralateral rigidity) and 32% (contralateral bradykinesia) when stimulation was applied through the distal contact. Levodopa induced dyskinesias were improved by 95% (contralateral LID) and by 66% (ipsilateral LID) when stimulation was applied through the distal contact. Six months after the surgery, GPi stimulation in the off condition led to a mean improvement in the motor score of UPDRS by 36%. The mean daily duration in the off state decreased by 52% (p<0.05). The mean duration of LIDs decreased by 68% (p<0.05) and their severity by 53% (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION—Chronic stimulation in the anteromedial GPi shows that this is a safe and effective treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease with benefit sustained for at least 6months.

 PMID:10449552

  11. Abdominal Functional Electrical Stimulation to Assist Ventilator Weaning in Acute Tetraplegia: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McCaughey, Euan J.; Berry, Helen R.; McLean, Alan N.; Allan, David B.; Gollee, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe impairment of the major respiratory muscles resulting from tetraplegia reduces respiratory function, causing many people with tetraplegia to require mechanical ventilation during the acute stage of injury. Abdominal Functional Electrical Stimulation (AFES) can improve respiratory function in non-ventilated patients with sub-acute and chronic tetraplegia. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical feasibility of using an AFES training program to improve respiratory function and assist ventilator weaning in acute tetraplegia. Methods AFES was applied for between 20 and 40 minutes per day, five times per week on four alternate weeks, with 10 acute ventilator dependent tetraplegic participants. Each participant was matched retrospectively with a ventilator dependent tetraplegic control, based on injury level, age and sex. Tidal Volume (VT) and Vital Capacity (VC) were measured weekly, with weaning progress compared to the controls. Results Compliance to training sessions was 96.7%. Stimulated VT was significantly greater than unstimulated VT. VT and VC increased throughout the study, with mean VC increasing significantly (VT: 6.2 mL/kg to 7.8 mL/kg VC: 12.6 mL/kg to 18.7 mL/kg). Intervention participants weaned from mechanical ventilation on average 11 (sd: ± 23) days faster than their matched controls. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that AFES is a clinically feasible technique for acute ventilator dependent tetraplegic patients and that this intervention may improve respiratory function and enable faster weaning from mechanical ventilation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02200393 PMID:26047468

  12. Attenuated acute salivary α-amylase responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid in thin children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long Hui; Yang, Ze Min; Chen, Wei Wen; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Min; Yang, Xiao Rong; Zhao, Ling Bo

    2015-04-14

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) is responsible for the 'pre-digestion' of starch in the oral cavity and accounts for up to 50 % of salivary protein in human saliva. An accumulating body of literature suggests that sAA is of nutritional importance; however, it is still not clear how sAA is related to individual's nutritional status. Although copy number variations (CNV) of the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) are associated with variation in sAA levels, a significant amount of sAA variation is not explained by AMY1 CNV. To measure sAA responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid, we used sAA ratio (the ratio of stimulated sAA levels to those of resting sAA) and investigated acute sAA responses to citric acid in children with normal (Normal-BMI, n 22) and low (Low-BMI, n 21) BMI. The AMY1 gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR. We, for the first time, demonstrated attenuated acute sAA responses (decreased sAA ratio) to gustatory stimulation in Low-BMI (thinness grade 3) children compared with the Normal-BMI children, which suggest that sAA responses to gustatory stimulation may be of nutritional importance. However, child's nutritional status was not directly related to their resting or stimulated sAA levels, and it was not associated with AMY1 gene copy number. Finally, AMY1 CNV might influence, but did not eventually determine, sAA levels in children.

  13. Mild sensory stimulation re-establishes cortical function during the acute phase of ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Christopher C.; Davis, Melissa F.; Chen-Bee, Cynthia H.; Frostig, Ron D.

    2011-01-01

    When delivered within 1 and in most cases 2 hours of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO), mild sensory stimulation (intermittent single whisker stimulation) was shown to be completely neuroprotective according to assessment with multiple techniques 24 hours after pMCAO in a rodent model of ischemic stroke (Lay et al., 2010). The acute effect of stimulation treatment on the ischemic cortex however, had yet to be reported. Here we characterize cortical function and perfusion during the 120 minute whisker stimulation period in four experimental groups with treatment initiated 0, 1, 2 hours (protected groups) or 3 hours post-pMCAO (unprotected group) using multiple techniques. According to functional imaging, a gradual return of evoked whisker functional representation to baseline levels was initiated with treatment onset and completed within the treatment period. Evoked neuronal activity and reperfusion to the ischemic area also showed a gradual recovery in protected animals. Surprisingly, a similar recovery profile was observed in response to treatment in all protected animals, irrespective of treatment onset time. Non-stimulated pMCAO control group data demonstrate that reperfusion is not spontaneous. This makes the complete protection observed in the majority of animals stimulated at 2 hours post-pMCAO even more surprising as these animals recovered despite having been in this severely ischemic state for two full hours. In summary, when delivered within a 2 hour window post- pMCAO, whisker stimulation treatment initiated reperfusion and a gradual recovery of cortical function that was completed or nearly completed within the treatment period. PMID:21832179

  14. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate acutely inhibits and chronically stimulates Na/H antiporter in OKP cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cano, A; Preisig, P; Alpern, R J

    1993-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone, dopamine, alpha-adrenergic catecholamines, and angiotensin II regulate renal Na excretion, at least in part through modulation of acute cyclic (c)AMP-induced proximal tubule Na/H antiporter inhibition. The present studies examined the effect of chronic increases in cell cAMP on Na/H antiporter activity in OKP cells. Whereas 8-bromo cAMP acutely inhibited Na/H antiporter activity, chronic application for 6 h led to a 24% increase in Na/H antiporter activity measured 16-20 h after cAMP removal. This chronic persistent activation of the Na/H antiporter required > 2 h exposure. This effect was not a nonspecific effect of 8-bromo cAMP, in that addition of forskolin or forskolin + 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine for 6 h also led to a chronic persistent increase in Na/H antiporter activity. Inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide prevented 8-bromo cAMP-induced Na/H antiporter stimulation. Although 8-bromo cAMP addition decreased cell pH by 0.15-0.20 pH U, Na/H antiporter stimulation could be dissociated from cell acidification. In summary, while cAMP acutely inhibits Na/H antiporter activity, it chronically increases antiporter activity. This chronic activation occurs with exogenous addition or endogenous generation of cAMP. These results imply that for hormones that modulate renal Na excretion and proximal tubule Na/H antiporter activity via cAMP and protein kinase A, acute effects may not predict chronic effects. PMID:7691881

  15. Predicting acute affective symptoms after deep brain stimulation surgery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Frank; Reske, Martina; Finkelmeyer, Andreas; Wojtecki, Lars; Timmermann, Lars; Brosig, Timo; Backes, Volker; Amir-Manavi, Atoosa; Sturm, Volker; Habel, Ute; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate predictive markers for acute symptoms of depression and mania following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery of the subthalamic nucleus for the treatment of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fourteen patients with PD (7 males) were included in a prospective longitudinal study. Neuropsychological tests, psychopathology scales and tests of motor functions were administered at several time points prior to and after neurosurgery. Pre-existing psychopathological and motor symptoms predicted postoperative affective side effects of DBS surgery. As these can easily be assessed, they should be considered along with other selection criteria for DBS surgery.

  16. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Komůrková, Denisa; Hoferová, Zuzana

    2014-04-16

    This article concisely summarizes data on the action of one of the principal and best known growth factors, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), in a mammalian organism exposed to radiation doses inducing acute radiation syndrome. Highlighted are the topics of its real or anticipated use in radiation accident victims, the timing of its administration, the possibilities of combining G-CSF with other drugs, the ability of other agents to stimulate endogenous G-CSF production, as well as of the capability of this growth factor to ameliorate not only the bone marrow radiation syndrome but also the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. G-CSF is one of the pivotal drugs in the treatment of radiation accident victims and its employment in this indication can be expected to remain or even grow in the future.

  17. Effects of acute acamprosate and homotaurine on ethanol intake and ethanol-stimulated mesolimbic dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Olive, M Foster; Nannini, Michelle A; Ou, Christine J; Koenig, Heather N; Hodge, Clyde W

    2002-02-15

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the acute effects of the anticraving compound acamprosate (calcium acetylhomotaurinate) and the closely related compound homotaurine on ethanol intake and ethanol-stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Male rats were treated with acamprosate (200 or 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally, i.p.) or homotaurine (10, 50, or 100 mg/kg i.p.) 15 min prior to access to 10% ethanol and water for 1 h in a two-bottle choice restricted access paradigm. A separate group of rats was implanted with microdialysis probes in the nucleus accumbens and given an acute injection of ethanol (1.5 g/kg i.p.) that was preceded by saline, acamprosate, or homotaurine. Acamprosate and homotaurine dose-dependently reduced ethanol intake and preference. These compounds also delayed or suppressed ethanol-stimulated increases in nucleus accumbens dopamine release, suggesting that acamprosate and homotaurine may reduce ethanol intake by interfering with the ability of ethanol to activate the mesolimbic dopamine reward system.

  18. Transient Muscarinic and Glutamatergic Stimulation of Neural Stem Cells Trigger Acute and Persistent Changes in Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Samarasinghe, Ranmal A.; Kanuparthi, Prasad S.; Greenamyre, J. Timothy; DeFranco, Donald B.; Di Maio, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    While aberrant cell proliferation and differentiation may contribute to epileptogenesis, the mechanisms linking an initial epileptic insult to subsequent changes in cell fate remain elusive. Using both mouse and human iPSC-derived neural progenitor/stem cells (NPSCs), we found that a combined transient muscarinic and mGluR1 stimulation inhibited overall neurogenesis but enhanced NPSC differentiation into immature GABAergic cells. If treated NPSCs were further passaged, they retained a nearly identical phenotype upon differentiation. A similar profusion of immature GABAergic cells was seen in rats with pilocarpine-induced chronic epilepsy. Furthermore, live cell imaging revealed abnormal de-synchrony of Ca++ transients and altered gap junction intercellular communication following combined muscarinic/glutamatergic stimulation, which was associated with either acute site-specific dephosphorylation of connexin 43 or a long-term enhancement of its degradation. Therefore, epileptogenic stimuli can trigger acute and persistent changes in cell fate by altering distinct mechanisms that function to maintain appropriate intercellular communication between coupled NPSCs. PMID:25003306

  19. Relationship between production of acute-phase proteins and strength of inflammatory stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Takashi; Tomizawa, Misaki; Seita, Tetsurou; Tagata, Kazutoshi; Yamamoto, Shizuo

    2011-07-01

    The relationship between intensity of inflammatory stimulation and production of α(2)-macroglobulin (α2M) and α(1)-acid glycoprotein (AAG) in rats was investigated. Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with turpentine oil at doses of 0.05, 0.2 or 0.4 mL/rat. Serum levels of α2M, interleukin (IL)-6 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and AAG was measured by single radial immunodiffusion. Peak serum levels of α2M and AAG in rats injected at 0.05 mL/rat were significantly lower than those at 0.2 or 0.4 mL/rat. However, no significant differences were observed for peak serum levels of these acute-phase proteins between 0.2 and 0.4 mL/rat. Furthermore, peak serum levels of IL-6 and CINC-1 in rats injected at 0.05 mL/rat were significantly lower than those at 0.2 or 0.4 mL/rat. Thus, the production of these acute-phase proteins has upper limits, even under increased strength of inflammatory stimulation in rats injected with turpentine oil.

  20. Altered Gene Expression in Cerulein-Stimulated Pancreatic Acinar Cells: Pathologic Mechanism of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji Hoon; Lim, Joo Weon

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a multifactorial disease associated with the premature activation of digestive enzymes. The genes expressed in pancreatic acinar cells determine the severity of the disease. The present study determined the differentially expressed genes in pancreatic acinar cells treated with cerulein as an in vitro model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatic acinar AR42J cells were stimulated with 10-8 M cerulein for 4 h, and genes with altered expression were identified using a cDNA microarray for 4,000 rat genes and validated by real-time PCR. These genes showed a 2.5-fold or higher increase with cerulein: lithostatin, guanylate cyclase, myosin light chain kinase 2, cathepsin C, progestin-induced protein, and pancreatic trypsin 2. Stathin 1 and ribosomal protein S13 showed a 2.5-fold or higher decreases in expression. Real-time PCR analysis showed time-dependent alterations of these genes. Using commercially available antibodies specific for guanylate cyclase, myosin light chain kinase 2, and cathepsin C, a time-dependent increase in these proteins were observed by Western blotting. Thus, disturbances in proliferation, differentiation, cytoskeleton arrangement, enzyme activity, and secretion may be underlying mechanisms of acute pancreatitis. PMID:20054485

  1. Efferent vagal nerve stimulation attenuates acute lung injury following burn: The importance of the gut-lung axis

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Michael J.; Peterson, Carrie Y.; Cheadle, Gerald; Loomis, William; Wolf, Paul; Kennedy, Vince; Putnam, James G.; Bansal, Vishal; Eliceiri, Brian; Baird, Andrew; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess acute lung injury when protection to the gut mucosal barrier offered by vagus nerve stimulation is eliminated by an abdominal vagotomy. Methods Male balb/c mice were subjected to 30% total body surface area steam burn with and without electrical stimulation to the right cervical vagus nerve. A cohort of animals were subjected to abdominal vagotomy. Lung histology, myeloperoxidase and ICAM-1 immune staining, myeloperoxidase enzymatic assay, and tissue KC levels were analyzed 24 hours after burn. Additionally, lung IkB-α, NF-kB immunoblots, and NF-kB-DNA binding measured by photon emission analysis using NF-kB-luc transgenic mice were performed. Results Six hours post burn, phosphorylation of both NF-kB p65 and IkB-α were observed. Increased photon emission signal was seen in the lungs of NF-kB-luc transgenic animals. Vagal nerve stimulation blunted NF-kB activation similar to sham animals whereas abdominal vagotomy eliminated the anti-inflammatory effect. After burn, MPO positive cells and ICAM-1 expression in the lung endothelium was increased, and lung histology demonstrated significant injury at 24 hours. Vagal nerve stimulation markedly decreased neutrophil infiltration as demonstrated by MPO immune staining and enzyme activity. Vagal stimulation also markedly attenuated acute lung injury at 24 hours. The protective effects of vagal nerve stimulation were reversed by performing an abdominal vagotomy. Conclusion Vagal nerve stimulation is an effective strategy to protect against acute lung injury following burn. Moreover, the protective effects of vagal nerve stimulation in the prevention of acute lung injury are eliminated by performing an abdominal vagotomy. These results establish the importance of the gut-lung axis after burn in the genesis of acute lung injury. PMID:21783215

  2. Locomotor adaptations of some gelatinous zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Bone, Q

    1985-01-01

    Swimming behaviour and locomotor adaptations are described in chaetognaths, larvacean tunicates, some cnidaria, and thaliacean tunicates. The first two groups swim by oscillating a flattened tail, the others by jet propulsion. In chaetognaths, the locomotor muscle fibres are extensively coupled and relatively sparsely innervated, they exhibit compound spike-like potentials. The motoneurons controlling the rhythmic activity of the locomotor muscle lie in a ventral ganglion whose organization is briefly described. Rhythmic swimming bursts in larvaceans are similarly driven by a caudal ganglion near the base of the tail, but each caudal muscle cell is separately innervated by two sets of motor nerves, as well as being coupled to its neighbours. The external epithelium is excitable, and linked to the caudal ganglion by the axons of central cells. Mechanical stimulation of the epithelium evokes receptor potentials followed by action potentials and by bursts of rapid swimming. The trachyline medusa Aglantha and the small siphonophore Chelophyes also show rapid escape responses; in Aglantha these are driven by a specialized giant axon system lacking in other hydromedusae, and in Chelophyes. Slow swimming in Aglantha apparently involves a second nerve supply to the same muscle sheets used in rapid swimming, whereas in Chelophyes slow swimming results from the activity of the smaller posterior nectophore. Slow swimming in siphonophores is more economical than the rapid responses. In the hydrozoan medusa Polyorchis (as in Chelophyes) action potentials in the locomotor muscle sheet change in shape during swimming bursts, and their duration is related to the size of the medusa; they are not simply triggers of muscular contraction. The two groups of thaliacean tunicates are specialized differently. Doliolum is adapted for single rapid jet pulses (during which it achieves instantaneous velocities of 50 body lengths s-l), whilst salps are adapted for slow continuous swimming. The

  3. Acute damage threshold for infrared neural stimulation of the cochlea: functional and histological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Vinay; Rajguru, Suhrud; Matic, Agnella I; Stock, Stuart R; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2012-11-01

    This article provides a mini review of the current state of infrared neural stimulation (INS), and new experimental results concerning INS damage thresholds. INS promises to be an attractive alternative for neural interfaces. With this method, one can attain spatially selective neural stimulation that is not possible with electrical stimulation. INS is based on the delivery of short laser pulses that result in a transient temperature increase in the tissue and depolarize the neurons. At a high stimulation rate and/or high pulse energy, the method bears the risk of thermal damage to the tissue from the instantaneous temperature increase or from potential accumulation of thermal energy. With the present study, we determined the injury thresholds in guinea pig cochleae for acute INS using functional measurements (compound action potentials) and histological evaluation. The selected laser parameters for INS were the wavelength (λ = 1,869 nm), the pulse duration (100 μs), the pulse repetition rate (250 Hz), and the radiant energy (0-127 μJ/pulse). For up to 5 hr of continuous irradiation at 250 Hz and at radiant energies up to 25 μJ/pulse, we did not observe any functional or histological damage in the cochlea. Functional loss was observed for energies above 25 μJ/pulse and the probability of injury to the target tissue resulting in functional loss increased with increasing radiant energy. Corresponding cochlear histology from control animals and animals exposed to 98 or 127 μJ/pulse at 250 Hz pulse repetition rate did not show a loss of spiral ganglion cells, hair cells, or other soft tissue structures of the organ of Corti. Light microscopy did not reveal any structural changes in the soft tissue either. Additionally, microcomputed tomography was used to visualize the placement of the optical fiber within the cochlea.

  4. Capsaicin, arterial hypertensive crisis and acute myocardial infarction associated with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; Di Bella, Gianluca; Cerrito, Marco; Coglitore, Sebastiano

    2009-05-01

    Chili peppers are rich in capsaicin. The potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is stored in a population of C-fiber afferents that are sensitive to capsaicin. CGRP and peptides released from cardiac C fibers have a beneficial effect in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. It has been reported that capsaicin pretreatment deplete cardiac C-fiber peptide stores. Furthermore, it has also been reported that capsaicin-treated pigs significantly increase mean arterial blood pressure compared with controls and that the decrease in CGRP synthesis and release contributes to the elevated blood pressure. It has also been reported that sub-clinical hypothyroidism is associated with a significant risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We present a case of arterial hypertensive crisis and acute myocardial infarction in a 59-year-old Italian man with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone and with an abundant ingestion of peppers and of chili peppers which occurred the day before.

  5. Muscarinic contribution to the acute cortical effects of vagus nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Justin A.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (VNS) has been used to treat more than 60,000 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and is under investigation as a treatment for several other neurological disorders and conditions. Among these, VNS increases memory performance and enhances recovery of motor and cognitive function in animal models of traumatic brain injury. Recent research indicates that pairing brief VNS with tones multiple-times a day for several weeks induces long-term, input specific cortical plasticity, which can be used to re-normalize the pathological cortical reorganization and eliminate a behavioral correlate of chronic tinnitus in noise exposed rats. Despite the therapeutic potential, the mechanisms of action of VNS remain speculative. In chapter 2 of this dissertation, the acute effects of VNS on cortical synchrony, excitability, and temporal processing are examined. In anesthetized rats implanted with multi-electrode arrays, VNS increased and decorrelated spontaneous multi-unit activity, and suppressed entrainment to repetitive noise burst stimulation at 6 to 8 Hz, but not after systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Chapter 3 focuses on VNS-tone pairing induced cortical plasticity. Pairing VNS with a tone one hundred times in anesthetized rats resulted in frequency specific plasticity in 31% of the auditory cortex sites. Half of these sites exhibited a frequency specific increase in firing rate and half exhibited a frequency specific decrease. Muscarinic receptor blockade with scopolamine almost entirely prevented the frequency specific increases, but not decreases. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the capacity for VNS to not only acutely influence cortical synchrony, and excitability, but to also influence temporal and spectral tuning via muscarinic receptor activation. These results strengthen the hypothesis that acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors are involved in the mechanisms of action of VNS and

  6. Temporal gene expression profile after acute electroconvulsive stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dyrvig, Mads; Christiansen, Søren H; Woldbye, David P D; Lichota, Jacek

    2014-04-10

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains one of the most effective treatments of major depression. It has been suggested that the mechanisms of action involve gene expression. In recent decades there have been several investigations of gene expression following both acute and chronic electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS). These studies have focused on several distinct gene targets but have generally included only few time points after ECS for measuring gene expression. Here we measured gene expression of three types of genes: Immediate early genes, synaptic proteins, and neuropeptides at six time points following an acute ECS. We find significant increases for c-Fos, Egr1, Neuritin 1 (Nrn 1), Bdnf, Snap29, Synaptotagmin III (Syt 3), Synapsin I (Syn 1), and Psd95 at differing time points after ECS. For some genes these changes are prolonged whereas for others they are transient. Npy expression significantly increases whereas the gene expression of its receptors Npy1r, Npy2r, and Npy5r initially decreases. These decreases are followed by a significant increase for Npy2r, suggesting anticonvulsive adaptations following seizures. In summary, we find distinct changes in mRNA quantities that are characteristic for each gene. Considering the observed transitory and inverse changes in expression patterns, these data underline the importance of conducting measurements at several time points post-ECS.

  7. Exendin-4 Decreases Amphetamine-induced Locomotor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Erreger, Kevin; Davis, Adeola R.; Poe, Amanda M.; Greig, Nigel H.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Galli, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is released in response to nutrient ingestion and is a regulator of energy metabolism and consummatory behaviors through both peripheral and central mechanisms. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is widely distributed in the central nervous system, however little is known about how GLP-1Rs regulate ambulatory behavior. The abused psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH) promotes behavioral locomotor activity primarily by inducing the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Here, we identify the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) as a modulator of behavioral activation by AMPH. We report that in rats a single acute administration of Ex-4 decreases both basal locomotor activity as well as AMPH-induced locomotor activity. Ex-4 did not induce behavioral responses reflecting anxiety or aversion. Our findings implicate GLP-1R signaling as a novel modulator of psychostimulant-induced behavior and therefore a potential therapeutic target for psychostimulant abuse. PMID:22465309

  8. Dense arrays of micro-needles for recording and electrical stimulation of neural activity in acute brain slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, D. E.; Beggs, J. M.; Dabrowski, W.; Hottowy, P.; Kenney, C. J.; Sher, A.; Litke, A. M.; Mathieson, K.

    2013-02-01

    Objective. This paper describes the design, microfabrication, electrical characterization and biological evaluation of a high-density micro-needle array. The array records from and electrically stimulates individual neurons simultaneously in acute slices of brain tissue. Approach. Acute slices, arguably the closest in-vitro model of the brain, have a damaged surface layer. Since electrophysiological recording methods rely heavily on electrode-cell proximity, this layer significantly attenuates the signal amplitude making the use of traditional planar electrodes unsuitable. To penetrate into the tissue, bypassing the tissue surface, and to record and stimulate neural activity in the healthy interior volume of the slice, an array of 61 micro-needles was fabricated. Main results. This device is shown to record extracellular action potentials from individual neurons in acute cortical slices with a signal to noise ratio of up to ˜15:1. Electrical stimulation of individual neurons is achieved with stimulation thresholds of 1.1-2.9 µA. Significance. The novelty of this system is the combination of close needle spacing (60 µm), needle heights of up to 250 µm and small (5-10 µm diameter) electrodes allowing the recording of single unit activity. The array is coupled to a custom-designed readout system forming a powerful electrophysiological tool that permits two-way electrode-cell communication with populations of neurons in acute brain slices.

  9. Increased BOLD Signals Elicited by High Gamma Auditory Stimulation of the Left Auditory Cortex in Acute State Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Hironori; Onitsuka, Toshiaki; Hirano, Yoji; Nakamura, Itta; Oribe, Naoya; Mizuhara, Hiroaki; Kanai, Ryota; Kanba, Shigenobu; Ueno, Takefumi

    2016-10-01

    Recent MRI studies have shown that schizophrenia is characterized by reductions in brain gray matter, which progress in the acute state of the disease. Cortical circuitry abnormalities in gamma oscillations, such as deficits in the auditory steady state response (ASSR) to gamma frequency (>30-Hz) stimulation, have also been reported in schizophrenia patients. In the current study, we investigated neural responses during click stimulation by BOLD signals. We acquired BOLD responses elicited by click trains of 20, 30, 40 and 80-Hz frequencies from 15 patients with acute episode schizophrenia (AESZ), 14 symptom-severity-matched patients with non-acute episode schizophrenia (NASZ), and 24 healthy controls (HC), assessed via a standard general linear-model-based analysis. The AESZ group showed significantly increased ASSR-BOLD signals to 80-Hz stimuli in the left auditory cortex compared with the HC and NASZ groups. In addition, enhanced 80-Hz ASSR-BOLD signals were associated with more severe auditory hallucination experiences in AESZ participants. The present results indicate that neural over activation occurs during 80-Hz auditory stimulation of the left auditory cortex in individuals with acute state schizophrenia. Given the possible association between abnormal gamma activity and increased glutamate levels, our data may reflect glutamate toxicity in the auditory cortex in the acute state of schizophrenia, which might lead to progressive changes in the left transverse temporal gyrus.

  10. Sex differences in locomotor effects of morphine in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Craft, Rebecca M.; Clark, James L.; Hart, Stephen P.; Pinckney, Megan K.

    2007-01-01

    Sex differences in reinforcing, analgesic and other effects of opioids have been demonstrated; however, the extent to which sex differences in motoric effects of opioids contribute to apparent sex differences in their primary effects is not known. The goal of this study was to compare the effects of the prototypic mu opioid agonist morphine on locomotor activity in male vs. female rats. Saline or morphine (1-10 mg/kg) was administered s.c. to adult Sprague-Dawley rats, which were placed into a photobeam apparatus for 3-5 hr to measure activity. Modulation of morphine's effects by gonadal hormones and by handling (either during the test session or for 4 days before the test session) were examined. Morphine initially suppressed and later increased locomotor activity in both sexes relative to their saline-injected controls, but males were more sensitive than females to the initial locomotor suppressant effect of morphine. Intermittent, brief handling during the 3-hr test session blunted morphine-induced locomotor activation in both sexes. Females in proestrus were the most sensitive to morphine's locomotor-stimulant effect, with females in estrus showing the least response to morphine. Gonadectomized (GDX) males with or without testosterone were equally sensitive to morphine's effects, whereas GDX females treated with estradiol showed a blunted response to morphine's effects, similar to intact females in estrus. Brief handling on each of 4 consecutive days pre-test attenuated morphine's locomotor suppressant effect in males but had no effect in females, thereby eliminating the sex difference. These data suggest that sex differences in morphine's effects on locomotor activity can be attributed to gonadal hormones in females, and to differential stress-induced modulation of morphine's effects in males vs. females. PMID:17217999

  11. Combined neuromodulatory interventions in acute experimental pain: assessment of melatonin and non-invasive brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Nádia Regina Jardim; Laste, Gabriela; Deitos, Alícia; Stefani, Luciana Cadore; Cambraia-Canto, Gustavo; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Brunoni, Andre R.; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and melatonin can effectively treat pain. Given their potentially complementary mechanisms of action, their combination could have a synergistic effect. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that compared to the control condition and melatonin alone, tDCS combined with melatonin would have a greater effect on pain modulatory effect, as assessed by quantitative sensory testing (QST) and by the pain level during the Conditioned Pain Modulation (CPM)-task. Furthermore, the combined treatment would have a greater cortical excitability effect as indicated by the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and on the serum BDNF level. Healthy males (n = 20), (aged 18–40 years), in a blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover, clinical trial, were randomized into three groups: sublingual melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) + a-tDCS, melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) + sham-(s)-tDCS, or sublingual placebo+sham-(s)-tDCS. Anodal stimulation (2 mA, 20 min) was applied over the primary motor cortex. There was a significant difference in the heat pain threshold (°C) for melatonin+a-tDCS vs. placebo+s-tDCS (mean difference: 4.86, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9 to 8.63) and melatonin+s-tDCS vs. placebo+s-tDCS (mean: 5.16, 95% CI: 0.84 to 8.36). There was no difference between melatonin+s-tDCS and melatonin+a-tDCS (mean difference: 0.29, 95% CI: −3.72 to 4.23). The mean change from the baseline on amplitude of motor evocate potential (MEP) was significantly higher in the melatonin+a-tDCS (−19.96% ± 5.2) compared with melatonin+s-tDCS group (−1.36% ± 5.35) and with placebo+s-tDCS group (3.61% ± 10.48), respectively (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). While melatonin alone or combined with a-tDCS did not significantly affect CPM task result, and serum BDNF level. The melatonin effectively reduced pain; however, its association with a-tDCS did not present an additional modulatory effect on acute induced pain. PMID:25873871

  12. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicators of early immune stimulation: a Childhood Leukemia International Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G; Ashton, Lesley J; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-04-15

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980-2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2-14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL.

  13. Movement Exploration and Locomotor Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers 23 materials for teaching movement exploration and locomotor skills to handicapped students at all educational levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS…

  14. Mode of inhibitory actions of acute and chronic chloroquine administration on the electrically stimulated mouse diaphragm in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Okwuasaba, F. K.; Otubu, J. A.; Udoh, F. V.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of bath applied chloroquine (Chlo) and of acute and chronic Chlo administration on skeletal muscle reactivity to electrical stimulation and to drugs have been studied on mouse hemidiaphragm preparations in vitro. 2. Chlo (0.15-150 micrograms) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition twitch and tetanic contractions due to direct muscle stimulation (MS). Acute and chronic administration of Chlo (45 mg kg-1, i.p. daily, for 3-28 days) progressively shifted the concentration-response curve to bath-applied Chlo to the right, with maximum effect occurring from day 14 of Chlo pretreatment. 3. Acute and chronic administration of Chlo decreased the twitch and tetanus tension, raised the minimal fusion frequency (MFR) for tetanic contraction to occur and did not alter the twitch/tetanus tension ratio. Tetanus tension unlike twitch tension was not significantly decreased on day 3. 4. Caffeine (5-500 microM)--and isoprenaline (0.001-0.8 microM)-induced potentiations of twitch contraction were attenuated in a concentration-dependent manner by bath-applied Chlo and by acute and chronic administration of Chlo. Higher concentrations of caffeine (0.1-5 microM) and KCl (10 mM-130 mM) produced contracture of the muscle which was sensitive to inhibition by Chlo (50-150 microM). Moreover, the spike contractions superimposed on caffeine contracture were more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of Chlo than the contracture. 5. The inhibitory effects of dantrolene sodium and (+)-tubocurarine on MS and on indirectly stimulated hemidiaphragm respectively were not significantly altered by acute and chronic administration of Chlo. In contrast, the inhibitory concentration-response curve to procaine was shifted to the right.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2282456

  15. Ultrasound guided, painful electrical stimulation of lumbar facet joint structures: an experimental model of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Søren; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Manniche, Claus; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-07-01

    Quantitative sensory testing has indicated generalized muscle hyperalgesia in patients with chronic low back pain. The temporal development of such hyperalgesia is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether generalized muscle hyperalgesia can develop within minutes of acute low back pain using a new experimental model of lumbar facet joint pain. Thirteen healthy volunteers were included and baseline pressure pain thresholds were assessed at eight separate sites, outside the area of evoked low back and referred pain. Using ultrasonography, two electrode needles were placed either side of a lumbar facet joint (right L3-4) and used to induce experimental low back pain for 10 min with continuous stimulation. Thresholds, stimulus-response relationships, distribution and quality of the electrically induced pain were recorded. Electrical facet joint stimulation induced low back pain and pain referral into the anterior leg, ipsilaterally, proximal to the knee, similar to what is observed clinically. Pressure pain thresholds did not change significantly before, during and after facet joint stimulation. In conclusion, we describe a novel model of acute experimental low back pain and demonstrate that generalized hyperalgesia did not develop within minutes of acute low back pain.

  16. cGMP-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and promote recovery from acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Ryan M; Wills, Lauren P; Stallons, L Jay; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction is a mediator of acute kidney injury (AKI). Consequently, restoration of mitochondrial function after AKI may be key to the recovery of renal function. Mitochondrial function can be restored through the generation of new, functional mitochondria in a process called mitochondrial biogenesis (MB). Despite its potential therapeutic significance, very few pharmacological agents have been identified to induce MB. To examine the efficacy of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors (PDE3: cAMP and cGMP activity; and PDE4: cAMP activity) in stimulating MB, primary cultures of renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) were treated with a panel of inhibitors for 24 hours. PDE3, but not PDE4, inhibitors increased the FCCP-uncoupled oxygen consumption rate (OCR), a marker of MB. Exposure of RPTCs to the PDE3 inhibitors, cilostamide and trequinsin, for 24 hours increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α, and multiple mitochondrial electron transport chain genes. Cilostamide and trequinsin also increased mRNA expression of mitochondrial genes and mitochondrial DNA copy number in mice renal cortex. Consistent with these experiments, 8-Br-cGMP increased FCCP-uncoupled OCR and mitochondrial gene expression, whereas 8-Br-cAMP had no effect. The cGMP-specific PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil also induced MB in RPTCs and in vivo in mouse renal cortex. Treatment of mice with sildenafil after folic acid-induced AKI promoted restoration of MB and renal recovery. These data provide strong evidence that specific PDE inhibitors that increase cGMP are inducers of MB in vitro and in vivo, and suggest their potential efficacy in AKI and other diseases characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction and suppressed MB.

  17. Early applied electric field stimulation attenuates secondary apoptotic responses and exerts neuroprotective effects in acute spinal cord injury of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Zhang, G; Rong, W; Wang, A; Wu, C; Huo, X

    2015-04-16

    Injury potential, which refers to a direct current voltage between intact and injured nerve ends, is mainly caused by injury-induced Ca2+ influx. Our previous studies revealed that injury potential increased with the onset and severity of spinal cord injury (SCI), and an application of applied electric field stimulation (EFS) with the cathode distal to the lesion could delay and attenuate injury potential formation. As Ca2+ influx is also considered as a major trigger for secondary injury after SCI, we hypothesize that EFS would protect an injured spinal cord from secondary injury and consequently improve functional and pathological outcomes. In this study, rats were divided into three groups: (1) sham group, laminectomy only; (2) control group, subjected to SCI only; and (3) EFS group, received EFS immediately post-injury with the injury potential modulated to 0±0.5 mV by EFS. Functional recovery of the hind limbs was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale. Results revealed that EFS-treated rats exhibited significantly better locomotor function recovery. Luxol fast blue staining was performed to assess the spared myelin area. Immunofluorescence was used to observe the number of myelinated nerve fibers. Ultrastructural analysis was performed to evaluate the size of myelinated nerve fibers. Findings showed that the EFS group rats exhibited significantly less myelin loss and had larger and more myelinated nerve fibers than the control group rats in dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST) 8 weeks after SCI. Furthermore, we found that EFS inhibited the activation of calpain and caspase-3, as well as the expression of Bax, as detected by Western blot analysis. Moreover, EFS decreased cellular apoptosis, as measured by TUNEL, within 4 weeks post-injury. Results suggest that early EFS could significantly reduce spinal cord degeneration and improve functional and historical recovery. Furthermore, these neuroprotective effects may be related to

  18. Training Locomotor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Edgerton, V. Reggie; Courtine, Grégoire; Gerasimenko, Yury P.; Lavrov, Igor; Ichiyama, Ronaldo M.; Fong, Andy J.; Cai, Lance L.; Otoshi, Chad K.; Tillakaratne, Niranjala J.K.; Burdick, Joel W.; Roy, Roland R.

    2008-01-01

    For a complete adult spinal rat to regain some weight-bearing stepping capability, it appears that a sequence of specific proprioceptive inputs that are similar, but not identical, from step to step must be generated over repetitive step cycles. Furthermore, these cycles must include the activation of specific neural circuits that are intrinsic to the lumbosacral spinal cord segments. For these sensorimotor pathways to be effective in generating stepping, the spinal circuitry must be modulated to an appropriate excitability level. This level of modulation is sustained from supraspinal input in intact, but not spinal, rats. In a series of experiments with complete spinal rats, we have shown that an appropriate level of excitability of the spinal circuitry can be achieved using widely different means. For example, this modulation level can be acquired pharmacologically, via epidural electrical stimulation over specific lumbosacral spinal cord segments, and/or by use-dependent mechanisms such as step or stand training. Evidence as to how each of these treatments can “tune” the spinal circuitry to a “physiological state” that enables it to respond appropriately to proprioceptive input will be presented. We have found that each of these interventions can enable the proprioceptive input to actually control extensive details that define the dynamics of stepping over a range of speeds, loads, and directions. A series of experiments will be described that illustrate sensory control of stepping and standing after a spinal cord injury and the necessity for the “physiological state” of the spinal circuitry to be modulated within a critical window of excitability for this control to be manifested. The present findings have important consequences not only for our understanding of how the motor pattern for stepping is formed, but also for the design of rehabilitation intervention to restore lumbosacral circuit function in humans following a spinal cord injury. PMID

  19. Characterization of pulse amplitude and pulse rate modulation for a human vestibular implant during acute electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. A. K.; DiGiovanna, J.; Cavuscens, S.; Ranieri, M.; Guinand, N.; van de Berg, R.; Carpaneto, J.; Kingma, H.; Guyot, J.-P.; Micera, S.; Perez Fornos, A.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The vestibular system provides essential information about balance and spatial orientation via the brain to other sensory and motor systems. Bilateral vestibular loss significantly reduces quality of life, but vestibular implants (VIs) have demonstrated potential to restore lost function. However, optimal electrical stimulation strategies have not yet been identified in patients. In this study, we compared the two most common strategies, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and pulse rate modulation (PRM), in patients. Approach. Four subjects with a modified cochlear implant including electrodes targeting the peripheral vestibular nerve branches were tested. Charge-equivalent PAM and PRM were applied after adaptation to baseline stimulation. Vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movement responses were recorded to evaluate stimulation efficacy during acute clinical testing sessions. Main results. PAM evoked larger amplitude eye movement responses than PRM. Eye movement response axes for lateral canal stimulation were marginally better aligned with PRM than with PAM. A neural network model was developed for the tested stimulation strategies to provide insights on possible neural mechanisms. This model suggested that PAM would consistently cause a larger ensemble firing rate of neurons and thus larger responses than PRM. Significance. Due to the larger magnitude of eye movement responses, our findings strongly suggest PAM as the preferred strategy for initial VI modulation.

  20. Strategies of locomotor collision avoidance.

    PubMed

    Basili, Patrizia; Sağlam, Murat; Kruse, Thibault; Huber, Markus; Kirsch, Alexandra; Glasauer, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Collision avoidance during locomotion can be achieved by a variety of strategies. While in some situations only a single trajectory will successfully avoid impact, in many cases several different strategies are possible. Locomotor experiments in the presence of static boundary conditions have suggested that the choice of an appropriate trajectory is based on a maximum-smoothness strategy. Here we analyzed locomotor trajectories of subjects avoiding collision with another human crossing their path orthogonally. In such a case, changing walking direction while keeping speed or keeping walking direction while changing speed would be two extremes of solving the problem. Our participants clearly favored changing their walking speed while keeping the path on a straight line between start and goal. To interpret this result, we calculated the costs of the chosen trajectories in terms of a smoothness-maximization criterion and simulated the trajectories with a computational model. Data analysis together with model simulation showed that the experimentally chosen trajectory to avoid collision with a moving human is not the optimally smooth solution. However, even though the trajectory is not globally smooth, it was still locally smooth. Modeling further confirmed that, in presence of the moving human, there is always a trajectory that would be smoother but would deviate from the straight line. We therefore conclude that the maximum smoothness strategy previously suggested for static environments no longer holds for locomotor path planning and execution in dynamically changing environments such as the one tested here.

  1. Sex-related effects of agmatine on caffeine-induced locomotor activity in Swiss Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun; Kose, Akin; Kayir, Hakan; Ulusoy, Gokhan; Celik, Turgay

    2010-03-25

    In mammalian brain, agmatine is an endogenous amine that is synthesized through the decarboxylation of l-arginine by arginine decarboxylase. It has been proposed as a new neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator. It was shown that agmatine had some beneficial effects in animal models of opioid and alcohol addiction. Locomotor stimulant properties of drugs such as ethanol, caffeine, nicotine and amphetamine have been linked to their addictive properties. The present study investigates the effects of agmatine on caffeine-induced locomotor activity both in male and female mice. Adult Swiss Webster mice were used in the study. Locomotor activity was measured for 30min immediately following caffeine (2.5, 5, 10 and 20mg/kg, i.p.) or saline treatments. Agmatine (5, 10 and 20mg/kg, i.p.) were injected 20min before caffeine (2.5 and 5mg/kg, i.p.) administration. In both sexes, agmatine (5-20mg/kg) were also tested for ability to depress or stimulate locomotor activity in the absence of caffeine. Caffeine (5mg/kg) induced a significant increase in locomotor activity of both male and female mice. There was no significant difference in the locomotor-activating effects of caffeine between male and female mice. Agmatine blocked the caffeine (5mg/kg)-induced locomotor stimulation dose dependently in male but not female mice. Agmatine had not any effect on the lower dose (2.5mg/kg) of caffeine in both sexes. These results suggest that agmatine has sex-related inhibitory effects on caffeine-induced locomotor activity in Swiss Webster mice, and male mice are more sensitive than the females to the effect of agmatine.

  2. Methylphenidate enhances the abuse-related behavioral effects of nicotine in rats: intravenous self-administration, drug discrimination, and locomotor cross-sensitization.

    PubMed

    Wooters, Thomas E; Neugebauer, Nichole M; Rush, Craig R; Bardo, Michael T

    2008-04-01

    Stimulant drugs, including D-amphetamine, cocaine, and methylphenidate, increase cigarette smoking in controlled human laboratory experiments. Although the mechanism(s) underlying this effect are unknown, it is possible that stimulants may enhance directly the abuse-related effects of nicotine. In the present study, we characterized the behavioral pharmacological interactions between methylphenidate and nicotine in the intravenous self-administration, drug discrimination, and locomotor cross-sensitization procedures. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to respond for intravenous nicotine (0.01 or 0.03 mg/kg/infusion) or sucrose, and the acute effects of methylphenidate (1.25-10 mg/kg) were determined; in addition, separate groups of rats were treated with methylphenidate (2.5 mg/kg) or saline before 12 consecutive nicotine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) self-administration sessions. Next, the discriminative stimulus effects of nicotine (0.03-0.3 mg/kg) and methylphenidate (1.25-10 mg/kg), alone and in combination with a low nicotine dose (0.056 mg/kg), were tested in nicotine-trained rats. Finally, the locomotor effect of repeated methylphenidate (2.5 mg/kg) was tested in rats previously treated with nicotine (0.2-0.8 mg/kg). Results indicated that acute methylphenidate increased the rate of nicotine self-administration at doses that reduced sucrose-maintained responding; furthermore, tolerance to this effect was not apparent following repeated methylphenidate. Methylphenidate, while not substituting for nicotine alone, dose-dependently enhanced the discriminative stimulus effect of a low nicotine dose. In addition, repeated nicotine exposure promoted the development of locomotor sensitization to methylphenidate. Taken together with recent clinical findings, these results suggest that methylphenidate may enhance the abuse-related behavioral effects of nicotine, perhaps increasing vulnerability to tobacco dependence.

  3. Stimulation of the primary anti-HIV antibody response by IFN-{alpha} in patients with acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Godot, Véronique; Colin, Céline; Krzysiek, Roman; Tran, Thi; Poignard, Pascal; Venet, Alain; Hosmalin, Anne; Lebon, Pierre; Rouzioux, Christine; Chêne, Geneviève; Emilie, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Type I IFNs are needed for the production of antiviral antibodies in mice; whether they also stimulate primary antibody responses in vivo during human viral infections is unknown. This was assessed in patients acutely infected with HIV-1 and treated with IFN-α2b. Patients with acute HIV-1 infection were randomized to receive anti-retroviral therapy alone (Group A, n=60) or combined for 14 weeks with pegylated-IFN-α2b (Group B, n=30). Emergence of anti-HIV antibodies was monitored during 32 weeks by Western blot (WB) analyses of serum samples. IFN-α2b treatment stimulated the production of anti-HIV antibodies. On Week 32, 19 weeks after the last IFN-α2b administration, there were 8.5 (6.5–10.0) HIV WB bands (median, interquartile range) in Group B and 7.0 (5.0–10.0) bands in Group A (P=0.054), and band intensities were stronger in Group B (P<0.05 for p18, p24, p34, p40, and p55 HIV antigens). IFN-α2b treatment also increased circulating concentrations of the B cell-activating factor of the TNF family (P<0.001) and ex vivo production of IL-12 (P<0.05), reflecting its effect on innate immune cells. Withdrawal of antiretroviral treatment on Week 36 resulted in a lower rebound of HIV replication in Group B than in Group A (P<0.05). Therefore, type I IFNs stimulate the emerging anti-HIV immune response in patients with acute HIV-1 infection, resulting in an improved control of HIV replication. Type I IFNs are thus critical in the development of efficient antiviral immune responses in humans, including the production of antiviral antibodies. PMID:18182457

  4. Stimulation of the primary anti-HIV antibody response by IFN-alpha in patients with acute HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Godot, Véronique; Colin, Céline; Krzysiek, Roman; Tran, Thi; Poignard, Pascal; Venet, Alain; Hosmalin, Anne; Lebon, Pierre; Rouzioux, Christine; Chene, Genevieve; Emilie, Dominique

    2008-04-01

    Type I IFNs are needed for the production of antiviral antibodies in mice; whether they also stimulate primary antibody responses in vivo during human viral infections is unknown. This was assessed in patients acutely infected with HIV-1 and treated with IFN-alpha2b. Patients with acute HIV-1 infection were randomized to receive antiretroviral therapy alone (Group A, n=60) or combined for 14 weeks with pegylated-IFN-alpha2b (Group B, n=30). Emergence of anti-HIV antibodies was monitored during 32 weeks by Western blot (WB) analyses of serum samples. IFN-alpha2b treatment stimulated the production of anti-HIV antibodies. On Week 32, 19 weeks after the last IFN-alpha2b administration, there were 8.5 (6.5-10.0) HIV WB bands (median, interquartile range) in Group B and 7.0 (5.0-10.0) bands in Group A (P=0.054), and band intensities were stronger in Group B (P<0.05 for p18, p24, p34, p40, and p55 HIV antigens). IFN-alpha2b treatment also increased circulating concentrations of the B cell-activating factor of the TNF family (P<0.001) and ex vivo production of IL-12 (P<0.05), reflecting its effect on innate immune cells. Withdrawal of antiretroviral treatment on Week 36 resulted in a lower rebound of HIV replication in Group B than in Group A (P<0.05). Therefore, type I IFNs stimulate the emerging anti-HIV immune response in patients with acute HIV-1 infection, resulting in an improved control of HIV replication. Type I IFNs are thus critical in the development of efficient antiviral immune responses in humans, including the production of antiviral antibodies.

  5. Organization of mammalian locomotor rhythm and pattern generation

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, David A.; Rybak, Ilya A.

    2008-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) located in the spinal cord produce the coordinated activation of flexor and extensor motoneurons during locomotion. Previously proposed architectures for the spinal locomotor CPG have included the classical half-center oscillator and the unit burst generator (UBG) comprised of multiple coupled oscillators. We have recently proposed another organization in which a two-level CPG has a common rhythm generator (RG) that controls the operation of the pattern formation (PF) circuitry responsible for motoneuron activation. These architectures are discussed in relation to recent data obtained during fictive locomotion in the decerebrate cat. The data show that the CPG can maintain the period and phase of locomotor oscillations both during spontaneous deletions of motoneuron activity and during sensory stimulation affecting motoneuron activity throughout the limb. The proposed two-level CPG organization has been investigated with a computational model which incorporates interactions between the CPG, spinal circuits and afferent inputs. The model includes interacting populations of spinal interneurons and motoneurons modeled in the Hodgkin-Huxley style. Our simulations demonstrate that a relatively simple CPG with separate RG and PF networks can realistically reproduce many experimental phenomena including spontaneous deletions of motoneuron activity and a variety of effects of afferent stimulation. The model suggests plausible explanations for a number of features of real CPG operation that would be difficult to explain in the framework of the classical single-level CPG organization. Some modeling predictions and directions for further studies of locomotor CPG organization are discussed. PMID:17936363

  6. Creating an acute energy deficit without stimulating compensatory increases in appetite: is there an optimal exercise protocol?

    PubMed

    Deighton, Kevin; Stensel, David J

    2014-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed significant interest from both the scientific community and the media regarding the influence of exercise on subsequent appetite and energy intake responses. This review demonstrates a consensus among the majority of scientific investigations that an acute bout of land-based endurance exercise does not stimulate any compensatory increases in appetite and energy intake on the day of exercise. Alternatively, preliminary evidence suggests that low volume, supramaximal exercise may stimulate an increase in appetite perceptions during the subsequent hours. In accordance with the apparent insensitivity of energy intake to exercise in the short term, the daily energy balance response to exercise appears to be primarily determined by the energy cost of exercise. This finding supports the conclusions of recent training studies that the energy expenditure of exercise is the strongest predictor of fat loss during an exercise programme.

  7. Acute deep brain stimulation in the thalamic reticular nucleus protects against acute stress and modulates initial events of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel; Pantoja-Jiménez, Christopher Rodrigo; Bazaldúa, Adrián; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador; Bolaños-Alejos, Fernanda; Ortíz-López, Leonardo; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabé

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used as an alternative therapeutic procedure for pharmacoresistant psychiatric disorders. Recently the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) gained attention due to the description of a novel pathway from the amygdala to this nucleus suggesting that may be differentially disrupted in mood disorders. The limbic system is implicated in the regulation of these disorders that are accompanied by neuroplastic changes. The hippocampus is highly plastic and shows the generation of new neurons, process affected by stress but positively regulated by antidepressant drugs. We explored the impact of applying acute DBS to the TRN (DBS-TRN) in male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress caused by the forced-swim Porsolt's test (FST) and on initial events of hippocampal neurogenesis. After the first session of forced-swim, rats were randomly subdivided in a DBS-TRN and a Sham group. Stimulated rats received 10min of DBS, thus the depressant-like behavior reflected as immobility was evaluated in the second session of forced-swim. Locomotricity was evaluated in the open field test. Cell proliferation and doublecortin-associated cells were quantified in the hippocampus of other cohorts of rats. No effects of electrode implantation were found in locomotricity. Acute DBS-TRN reduced immobility in comparison to the Sham group (p<0.001). DBS-TRN increased cell proliferation (Ki67 or BrdU-positive cells; p=0.02, p=0.02) and the number of doublecortin-cells compared to the Sham group (p<0.02). Similar effects were found in rats previously exposed to the first session of forced-swim. Our data could suggest that TRN brain region may be a promising target for DBS to treat intractable depression.

  8. Studies of locomotor network neuroprotection by the selective poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibitor PJ-34 against excitotoxic injury to the rat spinal cord in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nasrabady, Sara E; Kuzhandaivel, Anujaianthi; Nistri, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Delayed neuronal destruction after acute spinal injury is attributed to excitotoxicity mediated by hyperactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) that induces 'parthanatos', namely a non-apoptotic cell death mechanism. With an in vitro model of excitotoxicity, we have previously observed parthanatos of rat spinal cord locomotor networks to be decreased by a broad spectrum PARP-1 inhibitor. The present study investigated whether the selective PARP-1 inhibitor N-(6-oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-(N,N-dimethylamino)acetamide.HCl (PJ-34) not only protected networks from kainate-evoked excitotoxicity, but also prevented loss of locomotor patterns recorded as fictive locomotion from lumbar (L) ventral roots (VRs) 24 h later. PJ-34 (60 μm) blocked PARP-1 activation and preserved dorsal, central and ventral gray matter with maintained reflex activity even after a large dose of kainate. Fictive locomotion could not, however, be restored by either electrical stimulation or bath-applied neurochemicals (N-methyl-D-aspartate plus 5-hydroxytryptamine). A low kainate concentration induced less histological damage that was widely prevented by PJ-34. Nonetheless, fictive locomotion was observed in just over 50% of preparations whose histological profile did not differ (except for the dorsal horn) from those lacking such a rhythm. Our data show that inhibition of PARP-1 could amply preserve spinal network histology after excitotoxicity, with return of locomotor patterns only when the excitotoxic stimulus was moderate. These results demonstrated divergence between histological and functional outcome, implying a narrow borderline between loss of fictive locomotion and neuronal preservation. Our data suggest that either damage of a few unidentified neurons or functional network inhibition was critical for ensuring locomotor cycles.

  9. Chronic tolerance to ethanol-induced sedation: implication for age-related differences in locomotor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Quoilin, Caroline; Didone, Vincent; Tirelli, Ezio; Quertemont, Etienne

    2013-06-01

    The adolescent brain has been suggested to be particularly sensitive to ethanol-induced neuroadaptations, which in turn could increase the risk of youths for alcohol abuse and dependence. Sensitization to the locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol has often been used as an animal model of ethanol-induced neuroadaptations. Previously, we showed that young mice were more sensitive than adults to the locomotor sensitization induced by high ethanol doses. However, this effect could be due to age-related differences in chronic tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol. The aim of the present study is to assess chronic tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol in weaning 21-day-old (P21), adolescent 35-day-old (P35) and adult 63-day-old (P63) female Swiss mice. After a daily injection of saline or 4 g/kg ethanol during 6 consecutive days, all P21, P35 and P63 mice were injected with 4 g/kg ethanol and submitted to the loss of righting reflex procedure. Our results confirm that the sensitivity to the acute sedative effects of ethanol gradually increases with age. Although this schedule of ethanol injections induces significant age-related differences in ethanol sensitization, it did not reveal significant differences between P21, P35 and P63 mice in the development of a chronic ethanol tolerance to its sedative effects. The present results show that age-related differences in the development of ethanol sensitization cannot be explained by differences in chronic ethanol tolerance to its sedative effects. More broadly, they do not support the idea that ethanol-induced sensitization is a by-product of chronic ethanol tolerance.

  10. Inflammation-associated repression of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) reduces alveolar-capillary barrier function during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Henes, Janek; Schmit, Marthe A.; Morote-Garcia, Julio C.; Mirakaj, Valbona; Köhler, David; Glover, Louise; Eldh, Therese; Walter, Ulrich; Karhausen, Jörn; Colgan, Sean P.; Rosenberger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory disorder associated with reduced alveolar-capillary barrier function, increased pulmonary vascular permeability, and infiltration of leukocytes into the alveolar space. Pulmonary function might be compromised, its most severe form being the acute respiratory distress syndrome. A protein central to physiological barrier properties is vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). Given the fact that VASP expression is reduced during periods of cellular hypoxia, we investigated the role of VASP during ALI. Initial studies revealed reduced VASP expressional levels through cytokines in vitro. Studies in the putative human VASP promoter identified NF-κB as a key regulator of VASP transcription. This VASP repression results in increased paracellular permeability and migration of neutrophils in vitro. In a model of LPS-induced ALI, VASP−/− mice demonstrated increased pulmonary damage compared with wild-type animals. These findings were confirmed in a second model of ventilator-induced lung injury. Studies employing bone marrow chimeric animals identified tissue-specific repression of VASP as the underlying cause of decreased barrier properties of the alveolar-capillary barrier during ALI. Taken together these studies identify tissue-specific VASP as a central protein in the control of the alveolar-capillary barrier properties during ALI.—Henes, J., Schmit, M. A., Morote-Garcia, J. C., Mirakaj, V., Köhler, D., Glover, L., Eldh, T., Walter, U., Karhausen, J., Colgan, S. P., Rosenberger, P. Inflammation-associated repression of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) reduces alveolar-capillary barrier function during acute lung injury. PMID:19690214

  11. Antifungal activity of recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor in models of acute and chronic candidiasis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vitt, C R; Fidler, J M; Ando, D; Zimmerman, R J; Aukerman, S L

    1994-02-01

    Models of acute and chronic candidiasis were developed in Fischer 344 rats to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhM-CSF) alone and in combination with the antifungal agent fluconazole. In the acute model, rats were challenged by intravenous injection with 2 x 10(6) Candida albicans, approximately 4 times the LD50. Daily subcutaneous (sc) bolus injections of rhM-CSF for 10 days plus a single sc bolus dose of 0.3 mg/kg of fluconazole improved the median survival time from 5 days (32% survival) with fluconazole alone to > 30 days (88% survival) in the rhM-CSF- and fluconazole-treated rats. In the chronic model, daily sc bolus injections of rhM-CSF for 10 days plus a single sc bolus dose of 1.0 mg/kg of fluconazole decreased the median titer of C. albicans cultured from the kidneys by 10-fold at 15 and 30 days after infection. These studies showed that rhM-CSF treatment improved the therapeutic outcome in both the acute and chronic rat model of candidiasis when used with fluconazole, a standard fungistatic agent.

  12. Hepatic fatty acid biosynthesis is more responsive to protein than carbohydrate in rainbow trout during acute stimulations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weiwei; Panserat, Stéphane; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Terrier, Frédéric; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Seiliez, Iban; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The link between dietary carbohydrate/protein and de novo lipogenesis (DNL) remains debatable in carnivorous fish. We aimed to evaluate and compare the response of hepatic lipogenic gene expression to dietary carbohydrate intake/glucose and dietary protein intake/amino acids (AAs) during acute stimulations using both in vivo and in vitro approaches. For the in vivo trial, three different diets and a controlled-feeding method were employed to supply fixed amount of dietary protein or carbohydrate in a single meal; for the in vitro trial, primary hepatocytes were stimulated with a low or high level of glucose (3 mM or 20 mM) and a low or high level of AAs (one-fold or four-fold concentrated AAs). In vitro data showed that a high level of AAs upregulated the expression of enzymes involved in DNL [fatty acid synthase (FAS) and ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)], lipid bioconversion [elongation of very long chain fatty acids like-5 (Elovl5), Elovl2, Δ6 fatty acyl desaturase (D6D) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1)], NADPH production [glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and malic enzyme (ME)], and transcriptional factor sterol regulatory element binding protein 1-like, while a high level of glucose only elevated the expression of ME. Data in trout liver also showed that high dietary protein intake induced higher lipogenic gene expression (FAS, ACLY, and Elovl2) regardless of dietary carbohydrate intake, while high carbohydrate intake markedly suppressed the expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and Elovl5. Overall, we conclude that, unlike rodents or humans, hepatic fatty acid biosynthetic gene expression in rainbow trout is more responsive to dietary protein intake/AAs than dietary carbohydrate intake/glucose during acute stimulations. This discrepancy probably represents one important physiological and metabolic difference between carnivores and omnivores.

  13. Pre-stimulation of the kallikrein system in cisplatin-induced acute renal injury: An approach to renoprotection

    SciTech Connect

    Aburto, Andrés; Barría, Agustín; Cárdenas, Areli; Carpio, Daniel; Figueroa, Carlos D.; Burgos, Maria E.; Ardiles, Leopoldo

    2014-10-15

    Antineoplastic treatment with cisplatin is frequently complicated by nephrotoxicity. Although oxidative stress may be involved, the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for renal damage have not been completely clarified. In order to investigate the role of the renal kinin system in this condition, a group of rats was submitted to high potassium diet to stimulate the synthesis and excretion of tissue kallikrein 1 (rKLK1) previous to an intraperitoneal injection of 7 mg/kg cisplatin. A significant reduction in lipoperoxidation, evidenced by urinary excretion of malondialdehyde and renal immunostaining of hidroxy-nonenal, was accompanied by a decline in apoptosis. Coincident with these findings we observed a reduction in the expression of renal KIM-1 suggesting that renoprotection may be occurring. Stimulation or indemnity of the renal kinin system deserves to be evaluated as a complementary pharmacological measure to diminish cisplatin nephrotoxicity. - Highlights: • Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced-renal damage have not been completely clarified. • Cisplatin induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. • The renal kallikrein-kinin system is protective in experimental acute renal damage. • Kallikrein stimulation reduces oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by cisplatin. • Protection of the kallikrein-kinin system may reduce cisplatin toxicity.

  14. Locomotor Expertise Predicts Infants' Perseverative Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    This research examined the development of inhibition in a locomotor context. In a within-subjects design, infants received high- and low-demand locomotor A-not-B tasks. In Experiment 1, walking 13-month-old infants followed an indirect path to a goal. In a control condition, infants took a direct route. In Experiment 2, crawling and walking…

  15. A Pair of Dopamine Neurons Target the D1-Like Dopamine Receptor DopR in the Central Complex to Promote Ethanol-Stimulated Locomotion in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Eric C.; Woo, Katherine; Li, Haiyan; Lebestky, Tim; Mayer, Nasima; Sniffen, Melissa R.; Heberlein, Ulrike; Bainton, Roland J.; Hirsh, Jay; Wolf, Fred W.

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine is a mediator of the stimulant properties of drugs of abuse, including ethanol, in mammals and in the fruit fly Drosophila. The neural substrates for the stimulant actions of ethanol in flies are not known. We show that a subset of dopamine neurons and their targets, through the action of the D1-like dopamine receptor DopR, promote locomotor activation in response to acute ethanol exposure. A bilateral pair of dopaminergic neurons in the fly brain mediates the enhanced locomotor activity induced by ethanol exposure, and promotes locomotion when directly activated. These neurons project to the central complex ellipsoid body, a structure implicated in regulating motor behaviors. Ellipsoid body neurons are required for ethanol-induced locomotor activity and they express DopR. Elimination of DopR blunts the locomotor activating effects of ethanol, and this behavior can be restored by selective expression of DopR in the ellipsoid body. These data tie the activity of defined dopamine neurons to D1-like DopR-expressing neurons to form a neural circuit that governs acute responding to ethanol. PMID:20376353

  16. Fluctuation-Driven Neural Dynamics Reproduce Drosophila Locomotor Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Cruchet, Steeve; Gustafson, Kyle; Benton, Richard; Floreano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The neural mechanisms determining the timing of even simple actions, such as when to walk or rest, are largely mysterious. One intriguing, but untested, hypothesis posits a role for ongoing activity fluctuations in neurons of central action selection circuits that drive animal behavior from moment to moment. To examine how fluctuating activity can contribute to action timing, we paired high-resolution measurements of freely walking Drosophila melanogaster with data-driven neural network modeling and dynamical systems analysis. We generated fluctuation-driven network models whose outputs—locomotor bouts—matched those measured from sensory-deprived Drosophila. From these models, we identified those that could also reproduce a second, unrelated dataset: the complex time-course of odor-evoked walking for genetically diverse Drosophila strains. Dynamical models that best reproduced both Drosophila basal and odor-evoked locomotor patterns exhibited specific characteristics. First, ongoing fluctuations were required. In a stochastic resonance-like manner, these fluctuations allowed neural activity to escape stable equilibria and to exceed a threshold for locomotion. Second, odor-induced shifts of equilibria in these models caused a depression in locomotor frequency following olfactory stimulation. Our models predict that activity fluctuations in action selection circuits cause behavioral output to more closely match sensory drive and may therefore enhance navigation in complex sensory environments. Together these data reveal how simple neural dynamics, when coupled with activity fluctuations, can give rise to complex patterns of animal behavior. PMID:26600381

  17. Sigma ligand S14905 and locomotor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hascoet, M; Bourin, M; Payeur, R; Lombet, A; Peglion, J L

    1995-12-01

    The binding and locomotor profile of a new sigma ligand, S14905, (isobutyl-N-(1-indan-2yl-piperid-4-yl)N-methyl carbamate, furamate) was studied. The binding data revealed that S14905 has a high affinity for sigma receptors and very low affinity for both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. We have demonstrated that this sigma ligand prevents the locomotor stimulation induced by morphine (32 and 64 mg/kg), cocaine (16 mg/kg), amphetamine (4 mg/kg) and adrafinil (32 mg/kg) at doses lower than those required to depress spontaneous locomotor activity. The antagonism observed in the present study seems to be more specific of morphine induced hyperlocomotion. The high affinity of this compound for sigma receptors makes it a good choice to study the role of this receptor in the CNS. In addition, S14905 does not directly block dopamine receptors but may modulate them in some manner, and would thus warrant further study as a potential atypical antipsychotic agent, and an antagonist for the hyperactivity induced by opiate drug.

  18. Drugs that Target Dopamine Receptors: Changes in Locomotor Activity in Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort at the US Environmental Protection Agency to develop a rapid in vivo screen for prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. This includes assessing the acute effects of drugs known...

  19. Reduced Anticipatory Locomotor Responses to Scheduled Meals in Ghrelin Receptor Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Ian D.; Patterson, Zack; Khazall, Rim; Lamont, Elaine Waddington; Sleeman, Mark W.; Horvath, Tamas L.; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach, is secreted in anticipation of scheduled meals and in correlation with anticipatory locomotor activity. We hypothesized that ghrelin is directly implicated in stimulating locomotor activity in anticipation of scheduled meals. To test this hypothesis, we observed 24 hr patterns of locomotor activity in mice with targeted mutations of the ghrelin receptor gene (GHSR KO) and wild-type littermates, all given access to food for four hours daily for 14 days. While WT and GHSR KO mice produced increases in anticipatory locomotor activity, anticipatory locomotor activity in GHSR KO mice was attenuated (p.< 0.05). These behavioral measures correlated with attenuated levels of Fos immunoreactivity in a number of hypothalamic nuclei from GHSR KO placed on the same restricted feeding schedule for seven days and sacrificed at ZT4. Interestingly, seven daily intraperitoeneal ghrelin injections mimicked hypothalamic Fos expression patterns to those seen in mice under restricted feeding schedules. These data suggest that ghrelin acts in the hypothalamus to augment locomotor activity in anticipation of scheduled meals. PMID:19666088

  20. Acute exposure of mercury chloride stimulates the tissue regeneration program and reactive oxygen species production in the Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Wu, Xiaochun; Luo, Hongjie; Zhao, Lingling; Ji, Xin; Qiao, Xianfeng; Jin, Yaping; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We used Drosophila as an animal model to study the digestive tract in response to the exposure of inorganic mercury (HgCl2). We found that after oral administration, mercury was mainly sequestered within the midgut. This resulted in increased cell death, which in turn stimulated the tissue regeneration program, including accelerated proliferation and differentiation of the intestinal stem cells (ISCs). We further demonstrated that these injuries correlate closely with the excessive production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), as vitamin E, an antioxidant reagent, efficiently suppressed the HgCl2-induced phenotypes of midgut and improved the viability. We propose that the Drosophila midgut could serve as a suitable model to study the treatment of acute hydrargyrism on the digestive systems.

  1. Characterization of postsynaptic potentials evoked by sural nerve stimulation in hindlimb motoneurons from acute and chronic spinal cats.

    PubMed

    Baker, L L; Chandler, S H

    1987-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the changes in postsynaptic potentials recorded in ankle extensor motoneurons resulting from activation of the sural nerve after spinal cord transection in the adult cat. Eight acute and nine chronic animals were spinalized at T12. Intracellular recordings from motoneurons innervating the triceps surae were performed. Sural nerve stimulation evoked complex synaptic potentials consisting of early and late components in all motoneurons. Early excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (PSPs), as well as long latency excitatory postsynaptic potentials were recorded and averaged for assessment of PSP amplitude and duration. Early PSPs, both excitatory and inhibitory, were significantly larger in the motoneurons of cats spinalized 4-6 months earlier. Central latency of excitatory potentials were similar in the two samples of motoneurons, but the central latency associated with the initial inhibitory PSP was significantly shorter in the recordings from motoneurons of chronic spinal cats. In most recordings, an additional inhibitory PSP followed the initial excitatory PSP in motoneurons, and this secondary inhibitory PSP was similar in peak amplitude and duration in both samples of motoneurons. Also, a long latency excitatory PSP was recorded in a large percentage of motoneurons from both samples. This potential was typically of greater amplitude and longer duration in the motoneurons from chronic animals, when compared to recordings from acute animals. Although changes in amplitude and duration of PSP activity could be documented, there was no marked alteration in the frequency of occurrence of each PSP pattern recorded from the two preparations. This suggests that the synaptic pathways mediating the sural nerve reflexes have not qualitatively changed in the chronic spinal animal. The changes in amplitudes and durations of the PSPs in the chronic spinal cat indicate, however, that quantitative changes have occurred

  2. Effects of Acute and Repeated Administration of Oxycodone and Naloxone-Precipitated Withdrawal on Intracranial Self-Stimulation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wiebelhaus, Jason M.; Walentiny, D. Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of prescription opioid abuse and overdose, often led by oxycodone, continues to increase, producing twice as many overdose deaths as heroin. Surprisingly, preclinical reports relevant to oxycodone’s abuse-related effects are relatively sparse considering its history and patient usage. The goal of this study was to characterize dose- and time-dependent effects of acute and repeated oxycodone administration in a frequency-rate intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure, an assay often predictive of drug-related reinforcing effects, in male Sprague-Dawley rats. We hypothesized that oxycodone would produce a biphasic profile of rate-increasing and rate-decreasing effects maintained by ICSS similar to μ-opioid receptor agonists. Oxycodone (0.03, 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg, s.c.) produced dose- and time-dependent alterations on ICSS, with the predicted biphasic profile of rate-increasing effects at lower stimulation frequencies followed by rate-decreasing effects at higher frequencies. Peak effects were observed between 30 and 60 minutes, which were reversed by naloxone pretreatment (30 minutes). Tolerance to rate-decreasing effects was observed over a 5-day period when rats were treated with 1 mg/kg oxycodone twice a day. Subsequently, the dosing regimen was increased to 3 mg/kg twice a day over 10 days, although further marked tolerance did not develop. When then challenged with 10 mg/kg naloxone, a significant suppression below baseline levels of ICSS-maintained responding occurred indicative of dependence that recovered to baseline within 5 hours. The results of this study provide the first report of acute and chronic effects of oxycodone on responding maintained by ICSS presentation and the use of ICSS-maintained responding to characterize its tolerance and dependence effects. PMID:26491062

  3. Effects of Acute and Repeated Administration of Oxycodone and Naloxone-Precipitated Withdrawal on Intracranial Self-Stimulation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wiebelhaus, Jason M; Walentiny, D Matthew; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of prescription opioid abuse and overdose, often led by oxycodone, continues to increase, producing twice as many overdose deaths as heroin. Surprisingly, preclinical reports relevant to oxycodone's abuse-related effects are relatively sparse considering its history and patient usage. The goal of this study was to characterize dose- and time-dependent effects of acute and repeated oxycodone administration in a frequency-rate intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure, an assay often predictive of drug-related reinforcing effects, in male Sprague-Dawley rats. We hypothesized that oxycodone would produce a biphasic profile of rate-increasing and rate-decreasing effects maintained by ICSS similar to μ-opioid receptor agonists. Oxycodone (0.03, 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg, s.c.) produced dose- and time-dependent alterations on ICSS, with the predicted biphasic profile of rate-increasing effects at lower stimulation frequencies followed by rate-decreasing effects at higher frequencies. Peak effects were observed between 30 and 60 minutes, which were reversed by naloxone pretreatment (30 minutes). Tolerance to rate-decreasing effects was observed over a 5-day period when rats were treated with 1 mg/kg oxycodone twice a day. Subsequently, the dosing regimen was increased to 3 mg/kg twice a day over 10 days, although further marked tolerance did not develop. When then challenged with 10 mg/kg naloxone, a significant suppression below baseline levels of ICSS-maintained responding occurred indicative of dependence that recovered to baseline within 5 hours. The results of this study provide the first report of acute and chronic effects of oxycodone on responding maintained by ICSS presentation and the use of ICSS-maintained responding to characterize its tolerance and dependence effects.

  4. Glutamatergic Mechanisms of Comorbidity Between Acute Stress and Cocaine Self-administration

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Kupchik, Yonatan; Gipson, Cassandra D; Brown, Robyn M; Spencer, Sade; Bollati, Flavia; Esparza, Maria A; Roberts-Wolfe, Doug; Heinsbroek, Jasper; Bobadilla, Ana-Clara; Cancela, Liliana M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial comorbidity between stress disorders and substance use disorders (SUDs), and acute stress augments the locomotor stimulant effect of cocaine in animal models. Here we endeavor to understand the neural underpinnings of comorbid stress disorders and drug use by determining if the glutamatergic neuroadaptations that characterize cocaine self-administration are induced by acute stress. Rats were exposed to acute (2 h) immobilization stress and 3 weeks later the nucleus accumbens core was examined for changes in glutamate transport, glutamate mediated synaptic currents, and dendritic spine morphology. We also determined if acute stress potentiated the acquisition of cocaine self-administration. Acute stress produced an enduring reduction in glutamate transport, and potentiated excitatory synapses on medium spiny neurons. Acute stress also augmented the acquisition of cocaine self-administration. Importantly, by restoring glutamate transport in the accumbens core with ceftriaxone the capacity of acute stress to augment the acquisition of cocaine self-administration was abolished. Similarly, ceftriaxone treatment prevented stress-induced potentiation of cocaine-induced locomotor activity. However, ceftriaxone did not reverse stress-induced synaptic potentiation, indicating that this effect of stress exposure did not underpin the increased acquisition of cocaine self-administration. Reversing acute stress-induced vulnerability to self-administer cocaine by normalizing glutamate transport poses a novel treatment possibility for reducing comorbid SUDs in stress disorders. PMID:26821978

  5. Neuroinflammation and disruption in working memory in aged mice after acute stimulation of the peripheral innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Buchanan, Jessica B.; Sparkman, Nathan L.; Godbout, Jonathan P.; Freund, Gregory G.; Johnson, Rodney W.

    2008-01-01

    Acute cognitive disorders are common in elderly patients with peripheral infections but it is not clear why. Here we injected old and young mice with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mimic an acute peripheral infection and separated the hippocampal neuronal cell layers from the surrounding hippocampal tissue by laser capture microdissection and measured mRNA for several inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα) that are known to disrupt cognition. The results showed that old mice had an increased inflammatory response in the hippocampus after LPS compared to younger cohorts. Immunohistochemistry further showed more microglial cells in the hippocampus of old mice compared to young adults, and that more IL-1β-positive cells were present in the dentate gyrus and in the CA1, CA2 and CA3 regions of LPS-treated old mice compared to young adults. In a test of cognition that required animals to effectively integrate new information with a preexisting schema to complete a spatial task, we found that hippocampal processing is more easily disrupted in old animals than in younger ones when the peripheral innate immune system is stimulated. Collectively, the results suggest that aging can facilitate neurobehavioral complications associated with peripheral infections probably by allowing the over expression of inflammatory cytokines in brain areas that mediate cognitive processing. PMID:17951027

  6. Acute Stimulant Treatment and Reinforcement Increase the Speed of Information Accumulation in Children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Fosco, Whitney D; White, Corey N; Hawk, Larry W

    2016-10-27

    The current studies utilized drift diffusion modeling (DDM) to examine how reinforcement and stimulant medication affect cognitive task performance in children with ADHD. In Study 1, children with (n = 25; 88 % male) and without ADHD (n = 33; 82 % male) completed a 2-choice discrimination task at baseline (100 trials) and again a week later under alternating reinforcement and no-reinforcement contingencies (400 trials total). In Study 2, participants with ADHD (n = 29; 72 % male) completed a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg methylphenidate and completed the same task utilized in Study 1 at baseline (100 trials). Children with ADHD accumulated information at a much slower rate than controls, as evidenced by a lower drift rate. Groups were similar in nondecision time and boundary separation. Both reinforcement and stimulant medication markedly improved drift rate in children with ADHD (ds = 0.70 and 0.95 for reinforcement and methylphenidate, respectively); both treatments also reduced boundary separation (ds = 0.70 and 0.39). Reinforcement, which emphasized speeded accuracy, reduced nondecision time (d = 0.37), whereas stimulant medication increased nondecision time (d = 0.38). These studies provide initial evidence that frontline treatments for ADHD primarily impact cognitive performance in youth with ADHD by improving the speed/efficiency of information accumulation. Treatment effects on other DDM parameters may vary between treatments or interact with task parameters (number of trials, task difficulty). DDM, in conjunction with other approaches, may be helpful in clarifying the specific cognitive processes that are disrupted in ADHD, as well as the basic mechanisms that underlie the efficacy of ADHD treatments.

  7. Effect of physical exercise prelabyrinthectomy on locomotor balance compensation in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igarashi, M.; Ohashi, K.; Yoshihara, T.; MacDonald, S.

    1989-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of physical exercise, during a prepathology state, on locomotor balance compensation after subsequent unilateral labyrinthectomy in squirrel monkeys. An experimental group underwent 3 hr. of daily running exercise on a treadmill for 3 mo. prior to the surgery, whereas a control group was not exercised. Postoperatively, the locomotor balance function of both groups was tested for 3 mo. There was no significant difference in gait deviation counts in the acute phase of compensation. However, in the chronic compensation maintenance phase, the number of gait deviation counts was fewer in the exercise group, which showed significantly better performance stability.

  8. The Effect of Intravenous Lidocaine on Brain Activation During Non-Noxious and Acute Noxious Stimulation of the Forepaw: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhongchi; Yu, Mei; Smith, S. David; Kritzer, Mary; Du, Congwu; Ma, Yu; Volkow, Nora D.; Glass, Peter S.; Benveniste, Helene

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lidocaine can alleviate acute as well as chronic neuropathic pain at very low plasma concentrations in humans and laboratory animals. The mechanism(s) underlying lidocaine’s analgesic effect when administered systemically is poorly understood but clearly not related to interruption of peripheral nerve conduction. Other targets for lidocaine’s analgesic action(s) have been suggested, including sodium channels and other receptor sites in the central rather than peripheral nervous system. To our knowledge, the effect of lidocaine on the brain’s functional response to pain has never been investigated. Here, we therefore characterized the effect of systemic lidocaine on the brain’s response to innocuous and acute noxious stimulation in the rat using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). METHODS Alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats underwent fMRI to quantify brain activation patterns in response to innocuous and noxious forepaw stimulation before and after IV administration of lidocaine. RESULTS Innocuous forepaw stimulation elicited brain activation only in the contralateral primary somatosensory (S1) cortex. Acute noxious forepaw stimulation induced activation in additional brain areas associated with pain perception, including the secondary somatosensory cortex (S2), thalamus, insula and limbic regions. Lidocaine administered at IV doses of either 1 mg/kg, 4 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg did not abolish or diminish brain activation in response to innocuous or noxious stimulation. In fact, IV doses of 4 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg lidocaine enhanced S1 and S2 responses to acute nociceptive stimulation, increasing the activated cortical volume by 50%–60%. CONCLUSION The analgesic action of systemic lidocaine in acute pain is not reflected in a straightforward interruption of pain-induced fMRI brain activation as has been observed with opioids. The enhancement of cortical fMRI responses to acute pain by lidocaine observed here has also been reported for cocaine. We

  9. Dynamics and plasticity of spinal locomotor circuits.

    PubMed

    El Manira, Abdeljabbar

    2014-12-01

    Spinal circuits generate coordinated locomotor movements. These hardwired circuits are supplemented with neuromodulation that provide the necessary flexibility for animals to move smoothly through their environment. This review will highlight some recent insights gained in understanding the functional dynamics and plasticity of the locomotor circuits. First the mechanisms governing the modulation of the speed of locomotion will be discussed. Second, advantages of the modular organization of the locomotor networks with multiple circuits engaged in a task-dependent manner will be examined. Finally, the neuromodulation and the resulting plasticity of the locomotor circuits will be summarized with an emphasis on endocannabinoids and nitric oxide. The intention is to extract general principles of organization and discuss some onto-genetic and phylogenetic divergences.

  10. Phospholemman is not required for the acute stimulation of Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase α₂-activity during skeletal muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Palanikumar; Radzyukevich, Tatiana L; Hakim Javadi, Hesamedin; Stiner, Cory A; Landero Figueroa, Julio A; Lingrel, Jerry B; Heiny, Judith A

    2015-12-15

    The Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase α2-isoform in skeletal muscle is rapidly stimulated during muscle use and plays a critical role in fatigue resistance. The acute mechanisms that stimulate α2-activity are not completely known. This study examines whether phosphorylation of phospholemman (PLM/FXYD1), a regulatory subunit of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, plays a role in the acute stimulation of α2 in working muscles. Mice lacking PLM (PLM KO) have a normal content of the α2-subunit and show normal exercise capacity, in contrast to the greatly reduced exercise capacity of mice that lack α2 in the skeletal muscles. Nerve-evoked contractions in vivo did not induce a change in total PLM or PLM phosphorylated at Ser63 or Ser68, in either WT or PLM KO. Isolated muscles of PLM KO mice maintain contraction and resist fatigue as well as wild type (WT). Rb(+) transport by the α2-Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase is stimulated to the same extent in contracting WT and contracting PLM KO muscles. Phosphorylation of sarcolemmal membranes prepared from WT but not PLM KO skeletal muscles stimulates the activity of both α1 and α2 in a PLM-dependent manner. The stimulation occurs by an increase in Na(+) affinity without significant change in Vmax and is more effective for α1 than α2. These results demonstrate that phosphorylation of PLM is capable of stimulating the activity of both isozymes in skeletal muscle; however, contractile activity alone is not sufficient to induce PLM phosphorylation. Importantly, acute stimulation of α2, sufficient to support exercise and oppose fatigue, does not require PLM or its phosphorylation.

  11. Repeatability of locomotor performance and morphology-locomotor performance relationships.

    PubMed

    Conradsen, Cara; Walker, Jeffrey A; Perna, Catherine; McGuigan, Katrina

    2016-09-15

    There is good evidence that natural selection drives the evolution of locomotor performance, but the processes that generate the among-individual variation for selection to act on are relatively poorly understood. We measured prolonged swimming performance, Ucrit, and morphology in a large cohort (n=461) of wild-type zebrafish (Danio rerio) at ∼6 months and again at ∼9 months. Using mixed-model analyses to estimate repeatability as the intraclass correlation coefficient, we determined that Ucrit was significantly repeatable (r=0.55; 95% CI: 0.45-0.64). Performance differences between the sexes (males 12% faster than females) and changes with age (decreasing 0.07% per day) both contributed to variation in Ucrit and, therefore, the repeatability estimate. Accounting for mean differences between sexes within the model decreased the estimate of Ucrit repeatability to 21% below the naïve estimate, while fitting age in the models increased the estimate to 14% above the naïve estimate. Greater consideration of factors such as age and sex is therefore necessary for the interpretation of performance repeatability in wild populations. Body shape significantly predicted Ucrit in both sexes in both assays, with the morphology-performance relationship significantly repeatable at the population level. However, morphology was more strongly predicative of performance in older fish, suggesting a change in the contribution of morphology relative to other factors such as physiology and behaviour. The morphology-performance relationship changed with age to a greater extent in males than females.

  12. NBCe1 mediates the acute stimulation of astrocytic glycolysis by extracellular K+

    PubMed Central

    Ruminot, Iván; Gutiérrez, Robin; Peña-Münzenmayer, Gaspar; Añazco, Carolina; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Lerchundi, Rodrigo; Niemeyer, María Isabel; Shull, Gary E.; Barros, L. Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Excitatory synaptic transmission stimulates brain tissue glycolysis. This phenomenon is the signal detected in FDG-PET imaging and, through enhanced lactate production, is also thought to contribute to the fMRI signal. Using a method based on Förster resonance energy transfer in mouse astrocytes, we have recently observed that a small rise in extracellular K+ can stimulate glycolysis by over 300% within seconds. The K+ response was blocked by ouabain, but intracellular engagement of the Na+/K+ ATPase pump with Na+ was ineffective, suggesting that the canonical feedback regulatory pathway involving the Na+ pump and ATP depletion is only permissive and that a second mechanism is involved. Because of their predominant K+ permeability and high expression of the electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransporter NBCe1, astrocytes respond to a rise in extracellular K+ with plasma membrane depolarization and intracellular alkalinization. In the present article we show that a fast glycolytic response can be elicited independently of K+ by plasma membrane depolarization or by intracellular alkalinization. The glycolytic response to K+ was absent in astrocytes from NBCe1 null mice (Slc4a4) and was blocked by functional or pharmacological inhibition of the NBCe1. Hippocampal neurons acquired K+-sensitive glycolysis upon heterologous NBCe1 expression. The phenomenon could also be reconstituted in HEK293 cells by co-expression of the NBCe1 and a constitutively-open K+ channel. We conclude that the NBCe1 is a key element in a feedforward mechanism linking excitatory synaptic transmission to fast modulation of glycolysis in astrocytes. PMID:21976511

  13. Acute increases of renal medullary osmolality stimulate endothelin release from the kidney.

    PubMed

    Boesen, Erika I; Pollock, David M

    2007-01-01

    Experiments conducted in vitro suggest that high osmolality stimulates endothelin production and release by renal tubular epithelial cells. Whether hyperosmotic solutions exert similar effects in vivo is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that increasing renal medullary osmolality enhances urinary excretion of endothelin in anesthetized rats. Isosmotic NaCl (284 mosmol/kgH(2)O) was infused either intravenously (1.5 ml/h) or into the renal medullary interstitium (0.5 ml/h) during a 1-h equilibration period and 30-min baseline urine collection period, followed by either isosmotic or hyperosmotic NaCl (921 or 1,664 mosmol/kgH(2)O iv; 1,714 mosmol/kgH(2)O into renal medulla) for two further 30-min periods. Compared with isosmotic NaCl, infusion of hyperosmotic NaCl into the renal medulla significantly increased the endothelin excretion rate (P < 0.05; from 0.30 +/- 0.02 to 0.49 +/- 0.03 fmol/min). Intravenous infusion of hyperosmotic NaCl also significantly increased endothelin excretion rate in a concentration-dependent manner (from 0.79 +/- 0.07 to 1.77 +/- 0.16 fmol/min and 0.59 +/- 0.04 to 1.11 +/- 0.08 fmol/min for 1,664 and 921 mosmol/kgH(2)O, respectively). To differentiate between effects of osmolality and NaCl, similar experiments were performed using mannitol solutions. Compared with isosmotic mannitol, medullary interstitial infusion of hyperosmotic mannitol (1,820 mosmol/kgH(2)O) significantly increased endothelin excretion rate (P < 0.05; from 0.54 +/- 0.03 to 0.94 +/- 0.12 fmol/min). Thus exposing the renal medulla to hyperosmotic concentrations of either NaCl or mannitol stimulates endothelin release in vivo, consistent with medullary osmolality being an important regulator of renal endothelin synthesis.

  14. NBCe1 mediates the acute stimulation of astrocytic glycolysis by extracellular K+.

    PubMed

    Ruminot, Iván; Gutiérrez, Robin; Peña-Münzenmayer, Gaspar; Añazco, Carolina; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Lerchundi, Rodrigo; Niemeyer, María Isabel; Shull, Gary E; Barros, L Felipe

    2011-10-05

    Excitatory synaptic transmission stimulates brain tissue glycolysis. This phenomenon is the signal detected in FDG-PET imaging and, through enhanced lactate production, is also thought to contribute to the fMRI signal. Using a method based on Förster resonance energy transfer in mouse astrocytes, we have recently observed that a small rise in extracellular K(+) can stimulate glycolysis by >300% within seconds. The K(+) response was blocked by ouabain, but intracellular engagement of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase pump with Na(+) was ineffective, suggesting that the canonical feedback regulatory pathway involving the Na(+) pump and ATP depletion is only permissive and that a second mechanism is involved. Because of their predominant K(+) permeability and high expression of the electrogenic Na(+)/HCO(3)(-) cotransporter NBCe1, astrocytes respond to a rise in extracellular K(+) with plasma membrane depolarization and intracellular alkalinization. In the present article, we show that a fast glycolytic response can be elicited independently of K(+) by plasma membrane depolarization or by intracellular alkalinization. The glycolytic response to K(+) was absent in astrocytes from NBCe1 null mice (Slc4a4) and was blocked by functional or pharmacological inhibition of the NBCe1. Hippocampal neurons acquired K(+)-sensitive glycolysis upon heterologous NBCe1 expression. The phenomenon could also be reconstituted in HEK293 cells by coexpression of the NBCe1 and a constitutively open K(+) channel. We conclude that the NBCe1 is a key element in a feedforward mechanism linking excitatory synaptic transmission to fast modulation of glycolysis in astrocytes.

  15. Acute application of TNF stimulates apical 70-pS K+ channels in the thick ascending limb of rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan; Babilonia, Elisa; Pedraza, Paulina L; Ferreri, Nicholas R; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2003-09-01

    TNF has been shown to be synthesized by the medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) (21). In the present study, we used the patch-clamp technique to study the acute effect of TNF on the apical 70-pS K+ channel in the mTAL. Addition of TNF (10 nM) significantly stimulated activity of the 70-pS K+ channel and increased NPo [a product of channel open probability (Po) and channel number (N)] from 0.20 to 0.97. The stimulatory effect of TNF was observed only in cell-attached patches but not in excised patches. Moreover, addition of TNF had no effect on the ROMK-like small-conductance K+ channels in the TAL. The dose-response curve of the TNF effect yielded a Km value of 1 nM, a concentration that increased channel activity to 50% maximal stimulatory effect of TNF. The concentrations required for reaching the plateau of the TNF effect were between 5 and 10 nM. The stimulatory effect of TNF on the 70-pS K+ channel was observed in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. This indicated that the effect of TNF was not mediated by a nitric oxide-dependent pathway. Also, inhibition of PKA did not affect the stimulatory effect of TNF. In contrast, inhibition of protein tyrosine kinase not only increased activity of the 70-pS K+ channel but also abolished the effect of TNF. Moreover, inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) blocked the stimulatory effect of TNF on the 70-pS K+ channel. The notion that the TNF effect results from stimulation of PTP activity is supported by PTP activity assay in which treatment of mTAL cells with TNF significantly increased the activity of PTP. We conclude that TNF stimulates the 70-pS K+ channel via stimulation of PTP in the mTAL.

  16. Contribution of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to the acute mobilization of endothelial precursor cells by vascular disrupting agents.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Yuval; Tang, Terence; Woloszynek, Jill; Daenen, Laura G; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Cai, Shi-Rong; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Voest, Emile E; Chaplin, David J; Smythe, Jon; Harris, Adrian; Nathan, Paul; Judson, Ian; Rustin, Gordon; Bertolini, Francesco; Link, Daniel C; Kerbel, Robert S

    2009-10-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDA) cause acute shutdown of abnormal established tumor vasculature, followed by massive intratumoral hypoxia and necrosis. However, a viable rim of tumor tissue invariably remains from which tumor regrowth rapidly resumes. We have recently shown that an acute systemic mobilization and homing of bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial precursor (CEP) cells could promote tumor regrowth following treatment with either a VDA or certain chemotherapy drugs. The molecular mediators of this systemic reactive host process are unknown. Here, we show that following treatment of mice with OXi-4503, a second-generation potent prodrug derivative of combretastatin-A4 phosphate, rapid increases in circulating plasma vascular endothelial growth factor, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels are detected. With the aim of determining whether G-CSF is involved in VDA-induced CEP mobilization, mutant G-CSF-R(-/-) mice were treated with OXi-4503. We found that as opposed to wild-type controls, G-CSF-R(-/-) mice failed to mobilize CEPs or show induction of SDF-1 plasma levels. Furthermore, Lewis lung carcinomas grown in such mice treated with OXi-4503 showed greater levels of necrosis compared with tumors treated in wild-type mice. Evidence for rapid elevations in circulating plasma G-CSF, vascular endothelial growth factor, and SDF-1 were also observed in patients with VDA (combretastatin-A4 phosphate)-treated cancer. These results highlight the possible effect of drug-induced G-CSF on tumor regrowth following certain cytotoxic drug therapies, in this case using a VDA, and hence G-CSF as a possible therapeutic target.

  17. Electrical stimulation and motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several investigators have successfully regenerated axons in animal spinal cords without locomotor recovery. One explanation is that the animals were not trained to use the regenerated connections. Intensive locomotor training improves walking recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in people, and >90% of people with incomplete SCI recover walking with training. Although the optimal timing, duration, intensity, and type of locomotor training are still controversial, many investigators have reported beneficial effects of training on locomotor function. The mechanisms by which training improves recovery are not clear, but an attractive theory is available. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed a famous rule that has been paraphrased as "neurons that fire together, wire together." This rule provided a theoretical basis for a widely accepted theory that homosynaptic and heterosynaptic activity facilitate synaptic formation and consolidation. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord has a locomotor center, called the central pattern generator (CPG), which can be activated nonspecifically with electrical stimulation or neurotransmitters to produce walking. The CPG is an obvious target to reconnect after SCI. Stimulating motor cortex, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves can modulate lumbar spinal cord excitability. Motor cortex stimulation causes long-term changes in spinal reflexes and synapses, increases sprouting of the corticospinal tract, and restores skilled forelimb function in rats. Long used to treat chronic pain, motor cortex stimuli modify lumbar spinal network excitability and improve lower extremity motor scores in humans. Similarly, epidural spinal cord stimulation has long been used to treat pain and spasticity. Subthreshold epidural stimulation reduces the threshold for locomotor activity. In 2011, Harkema et al. reported lumbosacral epidural stimulation restores motor control in chronic motor complete patients. Peripheral nerve or functional electrical

  18. Stimulation of Brain AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mulchandani, Nikhil; Yang, Weng-Lang; Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Zhang, Fangming; Marambaud, Philippe; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are enormous public health problems with astronomical financial repercussions on health systems worldwide. The central nervous system (CNS) is closely intertwined in the septic process but the underlying mechanism is still obscure. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a ubiquitous energy sensor enzyme and plays a key role in regulation of energy homeostasis and cell survival. In this study, we hypothesized that activation of AMPK in the brain would attenuate inflammatory responses in sepsis, particularly in the lungs. Adult C57BL/6 male mice were treated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR, 20 ng), an AMPK activator, or vehicle (normal saline) by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection, followed by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) at 30 min post-ICV. The septic mice treated with AICAR exhibited elevated phosphorylation of AMPKα in the brain along with reduced serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), compared with the vehicle. Similarly, the expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β, keratinocyte-derived chemokine and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 as well as myeloperoxidase activity in the lungs of AICAR-treated mice were significantly reduced. Moreover, histological findings in the lungs showed improvement of morphologic features and reduction of apoptosis with AICAR treatment. We further found that the beneficial effects of AICAR on septic mice were diminished in AMPKα2 deficient mice, showing that AMPK mediates these effects. In conclusion, our findings reveal a new functional role of activating AMPK in the CNS to attenuate inflammatory responses and acute lung injury in sepsis. PMID:26252187

  19. The acute effects of flotation restricted environmental stimulation technique on recovery from maximal eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Paul M; Salacinski, Amanda J; Stults-Kolehmainen, Matthew A

    2013-12-01

    Flotation restricted environmental stimulation technique (REST) involves compromising senses of sound, sight, and touch by creating a quiet dark environment. The individual lies supine in a tank of Epsom salt and water heated to roughly skin temperature (34-35° C). This study was performed to determine if a 1-hour flotation REST session would aid in the recovery process after maximal eccentric knee extensions and flexions. Twenty-four untrained male students (23.29 ± 2.1 years, 184.17 ± 6.85 cm, 85.16 ± 11.54 kg) participated in a randomized, repeated measures crossover study. The participants completed 2 exercise and recovery protocols: a 1-hour flotation REST session and a 1-hour seated control (passive recovery). After isometric muscle strength testing, participants were fatigued with eccentric isokinetic muscle contractions (50 repetitions at 60°·s) of the nondominant knee extensors and flexors. Blood lactate, blood glucose, heart rate, OMNI-rating of perceived exertion for resistance exercise (OMNI-RPE), perceived pain, muscle soreness, and isometric strength were collected before exercise, after treatment, and 24 and 48 hours later. A multivariate analysis of covariance found that treatment had a significant main effect on blood lactate, whereas subsequent univariate analyses of variance found statistical significance with the immediate posttreatment blood lactate measures. The results indicate that flotation REST appears to have a significant impact on blood lactate and perceived pain compared with a 1-hour passive recovery session in untrained healthy men. No difference was found between conditions for muscle strength, blood glucose, muscle soreness, heart rate, or OMNI-RPE. Flotation REST may be used for recreational and professional athletes to help reduce blood lactate levels after eccentric exercise.

  20. Angiogenesis Is Induced and Wound Size Is Reduced by Electrical Stimulation in an Acute Wound Healing Model in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ud-Din, Sara; Sebastian, Anil; Giddings, Pamela; Colthurst, James; Whiteside, Sigrid; Morris, Julie; Nuccitelli, Richard; Pullar, Christine; Baguneid, Mo; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for wound healing. Insufficient angiogenesis can result in impaired wound healing and chronic wound formation. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been shown to enhance angiogenesis. We previously showed that ES enhanced angiogenesis in acute wounds at one time point (day 14). The aim of this study was to further evaluate the role of ES in affecting angiogenesis during the acute phase of cutaneous wound healing over multiple time points. We compared the angiogenic response to wounding in 40 healthy volunteers (divided into two groups and randomised), treated with ES (post-ES) and compared them to secondary intention wound healing (control). Biopsy time points monitored were days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14. Objective non-invasive measures and H&E analysis were performed in addition to immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB). Wound volume was significantly reduced on D7, 10 and 14 post-ES (p = 0.003, p = 0.002, p<0.001 respectively), surface area was reduced on days 10 (p = 0.001) and 14 (p<0.001) and wound diameter reduced on days 10 (p = 0.009) and 14 (p = 0.002). Blood flow increased significantly post-ES on D10 (p = 0.002) and 14 (p = 0.001). Angiogenic markers were up-regulated following ES application; protein analysis by IHC showed an increase (p<0.05) in VEGF-A expression by ES treatment on days 7, 10 and 14 (39%, 27% and 35% respectively) and PLGF expression on days 3 and 7 (40% on both days), compared to normal healing. Similarly, WB demonstrated an increase (p<0.05) in PLGF on days 7 and 14 (51% and 35% respectively). WB studies showed a significant increase of 30% (p>0.05) on day 14 in VEGF-A expression post-ES compared to controls. Furthermore, organisation of granulation tissue was improved on day 14 post-ES. This randomised controlled trial has shown that ES enhanced wound healing by reduced wound dimensions and increased VEGF-A and PLGF expression in acute cutaneous wounds, which further substantiates the role of ES in up

  1. Acute Feasibility of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation in Severely Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Borel, Anne-Laure; Grangier, Angélique; Wuyam, Bernard; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are closely interconnected conditions both leading to high cardiovascular risk. Inactivity is frequent and physical activity programs remain difficult in these patients. We investigated the acute feasibility of two neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) modalities in extremely inactive obese patients with OSA. Design. A randomized cross-over study, with two experimental sessions (one per condition: multipath NMES versus conventional NMES). Setting. Outpatient research hospital. Subjects. Twelve patients with obesity, already treated for OSA. Interventions. No intervention. Measures. Feasibility outcomes included NMES current intensity, knee extension force evoked by NMES, and self-reported discomfort. Results. We found higher current intensity, a trend to significantly higher evoked force and lower discomfort during multipath NMES versus conventional NMES, suggesting better tolerance to the former NMES modality. However, patients were rapidly limited in the potential of increasing current intensity of multipath NMES. Conclusion. Both NMES modalities were feasible and relatively well tolerated by obese patients with OSA, even if multipath NMES showed a better muscle response/discomfort ratio than conventional NMES. There is an urgent need for a proof-of-concept study and interventional randomized controlled trials comparing NMES therapy versus current care to justify its utilization in obese and apneic patients with low physical activity levels. PMID:28194410

  2. Chronic central administration of apelin-13 over 10 days increases food intake, body weight, locomotor activity and body temperature in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Valle, A; Hoggard, N; Adams, A C; Roca, P; Speakman, J R

    2008-01-01

    The peptide apelin has been located in a wide range of tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, stomach and adipose tissue. Apelin and its receptor has also been detected in the arcuate and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, which are involved in the control of feeding behaviour and energy expenditure. This distribution suggests apelin may play a role in energy homeostasis, but previous attempts to discern the effects of apelin by acute injection into the brain have yielded conflicting results. We examined the effect of a chronic 10-day intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of apelin-13 into the third ventricle on food intake, body temperature and locomotor activity in C57BL/6 mice. Apelin-13 (1 microg/day) increased food intake significantly on days 3-7 of infusion; thereafter, food intake of treated and control individuals converged. This convergence was potentially because of progressive conversion of apelin-13 to [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 which has a four-fold lower receptor binding affinity at the orphan G protein-coupled receptor, APJ. Locomotor activity was also higher in the apelin-treated mice, especially during the nocturnal peak, when most feeding occurs, and the first hours of the light phase. Body temperature was also elevated during this increased period of activity, but was otherwise unaffected. Apelin-13-infused animals gained more weight than the saline-infused controls, suggesting the elevated locomotor activity did not offset the increased food intake. Elevated locomotion and the consequent increases in body temperature were probably secondary effects to the increased food intake. These results suggest that apelin-13 may play a central role in the control of feeding behaviour and is one of only two peripheral ligands known to stimulate rather than inhibit intake. As apelin production is elevated during obesity, this may provide an important feed-forward mechanism exacerbating the problem. Antagonists of the apelin receptor may

  3. Locomotor expertise predicts infants' perseverative errors.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sarah E

    2010-03-01

    This research examined the development of inhibition in a locomotor context. In a within-subjects design, infants received high- and low-demand locomotor A-not-B tasks. In Experiment 1, walking 13-month-old infants followed an indirect path to a goal. In a control condition, infants took a direct route. In Experiment 2, crawling and walking 13-month-old infants crawled through a tunnel to reach a goal at the other end and received the same control condition as in Experiment 1. In both experiments, perseverative errors occurred more often in the high-demand condition than in the low-demand condition. Moreover, in Experiment 2, walkers perseverated more than crawlers, and extent of perseveration was related to infants' locomotor experience. In Experiment 3, the authors addressed a possible confound in Experiment 2 between locomotor expertise and locomotor posture. Novice crawlers perseverated in the difficult tunnels condition, behaving more like novice walkers than expert crawlers. As predicted by a cognitive capacity account of infant perseveration, overtaxed attentional resources resulted in a cognition-action trade-off. Experts who found the task less motorically effortful than novices had more cognitive resources available for problem solving.

  4. Development and characterization of an equine behaviour chamber and the effects of amitraz and detomidine on spontaneous locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Harkins, J D; Queiroz-Neto, A; Mundy, G D; West, D; Tobin, T

    1997-10-01

    This report describes the development of a behaviour chamber and the validation of the chamber of measure locomotor activity of a horse. Locomotor activity was detected by four Mini-beam sensors and recorded on a data logger every 5 min for 22 h. Horses were more active during daytime than in the evening, which was at least partially related to human activity in their surroundings. To validate the ability of the chambers to detect changes in activity, fentanyl citrate and xylazine HCl, agents well-characterized as a stimulant and a depressant, respectively, were administered to five horses. Fentanyl citrate (0.016 mg/kg) significantly increased locomotor activity which persisted for 30 min. Xylazine HCl (1 mg/kg) significantly reduced locomotor activity for 90 min. Amitraz produced a dose-dependent decrease in locomotor activity, lasting 75 min for the 0.05 mg/kg dose, 120 min for the 0.10 mg/kg dose, and 180 min for the 0.15 mg/kg dose. In a separate experiment, yohimbine administration immediately reversed the sedative effect of amitraz. This suggests there is a similarity in the mode of action of amitraz, xylazine and detomidine, as yohimbine acts primarily by blocking central alpha 2 -adrenoceptors that are stimulated by agents like xylazine. There was also a significant decrease in locomotor activity following injection of detomidine (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08 mg/kg) for 1.5, 3.5 and 5.0 h, respectively. The locomotor chamber is a useful, sensitive and highly reproducible tool for measuring spontaneous locomotor activity in the horse, which allows investigators to determine an agent's average time of onset, duration and intensity of effect on movement.

  5. Differential effects of serotonin (5-HT)2 receptor-targeting ligands on locomotor responses to nicotine-repeated treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; McCreary, Andrew C; Wydra, Karolina; Filip, Małgorzata

    2010-07-01

    We verified the hypothesis that serotonin (5-HT)(2) receptors control the locomotor effects of nicotine (0.4 mg kg(-1)) in rats by using the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist M100907, the preferential 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist DOI, the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084, and the 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists Ro 60-0175 and WAY 163909. Repeated pairings of a test environment with nicotine for 5 days, on Day 10 significantly augmented the locomotor activity following nicotine administration. Of the investigated 5-HT(2) receptor ligands, M100907 (2 mg kg(-1)) or DOI (1 mg kg(-1)) administered during the first 5 days in combination with nicotine attenuated or enhanced, respectively, the development of nicotine sensitization. Given acutely on Day 10, M100907 (2 mg kg(-1)), Ro 60-0175 (1 mg kg(-1)), and WAY 163909 (1.5 mg kg(-1)) decreased the expression of nicotine sensitization. In another set of experiments, where the nicotine challenge test was performed on Day 15 in animals treated repeatedly (Days: 1-5, 10) with nicotine, none of 5-HT(2) receptor ligands administered during the second withdrawal period (Days: 11-14) to nicotine-treated rats altered the sensitizing effect of nicotine given on Day 15. Our data indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptors (but not 5-HT(2C) receptors) play a permissive role in the sensitizing effects of nicotine, while stimulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors enhances the development of nicotine sensitization and activation of 5-HT(2C) receptors is essential for the expression of nicotine sensitization. Repeated treatment with the 5-HT(2) receptor ligands within the second nicotine withdrawal does not inhibit previously established sensitization.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of Vagus Nerve Stimulation Parameters on Acute Cardiac Autonomic Responses: Chronotropic, Inotropic and Dromotropic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, David; Le Rolle, Virginie; Romero-Ugalde, Hector M.; Gallet, Clément; Bonnet, Jean-Luc; Henry, Christine; Bel, Alain; Mabo, Philippe; Carrault, Guy; Hernández, Alfredo I.

    2016-01-01

    Although the therapeutic effects of Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) have been recognized in pre-clinical and pilot clinical studies, the effect of different stimulation configurations on the cardiovascular response is still an open question, especially in the case of VNS delivered synchronously with cardiac activity. In this paper, we propose a formal mathematical methodology to analyze the acute cardiac response to different VNS configurations, jointly considering the chronotropic, dromotropic and inotropic cardiac effects. A latin hypercube sampling method was chosen to design a uniform experimental plan, composed of 75 different VNS configurations, with different values for the main parameters (current amplitude, number of delivered pulses, pulse width, interpulse period and the delay between the detected cardiac event and VNS onset). These VNS configurations were applied to 6 healthy, anesthetized sheep, while acquiring the associated cardiovascular response. Unobserved VNS configurations were estimated using a Gaussian process regression (GPR) model. In order to quantitatively analyze the effect of each parameter and their combinations on the cardiac response, the Sobol sensitivity method was applied to the obtained GPR model and inter-individual sensitivity markers were estimated using a bootstrap approach. Results highlight the dominant effect of pulse current, pulse width and number of pulses, which explain respectively 49.4%, 19.7% and 6.0% of the mean global cardiovascular variability provoked by VNS. More interestingly, results also quantify the effect of the interactions between VNS parameters. In particular, the interactions between current and pulse width provoke higher cardiac effects than the changes on the number of pulses alone (between 6 and 25% of the variability). Although the sensitivity of individual VNS parameters seems similar for chronotropic, dromotropic and inotropic responses, the interacting effects of VNS parameters provoke

  7. Mechanisms for independent and combined effects of calorie restriction and acute exercise on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by skeletal muscle of old rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naveen; Wang, Haiyan; Arias, Edward B; Castorena, Carlos M; Cartee, Gregory D

    2015-04-01

    Either calorie restriction [CR; consuming 60-65% of ad libitum (AL) intake] or acute exercise can independently improve insulin sensitivity in old age, but their combined effects on muscle insulin signaling and glucose uptake have previously been unknown. Accordingly, we assessed the independent and combined effects of CR (beginning at 14 wk old) and acute exercise (3-4 h postexercise) on insulin signaling and glucose uptake in insulin-stimulated epitrochlearis muscles from 30-mo-old rats. Either CR alone or exercise alone vs. AL sedentary controls induced greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Combined CR and exercise vs. either treatment alone caused an additional increase in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Either CR or exercise alone vs. AL sedentary controls increased Akt Ser(473) and Akt Thr(308) phosphorylation. Combined CR and exercise further elevated Akt phosphorylation on both sites. CR alone, but not exercise alone, vs. AL sedentary controls significantly increased Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) Ser(588) and Thr(642) phosphorylation. Combined CR and exercise did not further enhance AS160 phosphorylation. Exercise alone, but not CR alone, modestly increased GLUT4 abundance. Combined CR and exercise did not further elevate GLUT4 content. These results suggest that CR or acute exercise independently increases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake via overlapping (greater Akt phosphorylation) and distinct (greater AS160 phosphorylation for CR, greater GLUT4 for exercise) mechanisms. Our working hypothesis is that greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the combined CR and exercise group vs. CR or exercise alone relies on greater Akt activation, leading to greater phosphorylation of one or more Akt substrates other than AS160.

  8. Monocyte-conditioned medium, interleukin-1, and tumor necrosis factor stimulate the acute phase response in human hepatoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Human hepatoma cells mimic the acute phase response after treatment with monocyte-conditioned medium. Levels of secreted fibrinogen, alpha- 1 acid glycoprotein, C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, and the third component of complement were elevated compared with control levels after 48 h of incubation with conditioned supernatant medium from an enriched fraction of normal peripheral monocytes. Albumin levels declined and alpha-1 antitrypsin remained unchanged. Levels of specific mRNA were measured by hybridization to slot blots and Northern blots and changed in correspondence with protein alterations. Interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor stimulated the third component of complement, but did not elevate any other member of the acute phase group and were therefore only partially active in this system. The identification of an in vitro model of the human acute phase response will permit analysis of the molecular basis for coordinate regulation of this group of facultative genes. PMID:3017995

  9. Extremes of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Expression Associate with Worse Outcomes in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nick, Jerry A.; Caceres, Silvia M.; Kret, Jennifer E.; Poch, Katie R.; Strand, Matthew; Faino, Anna V.; Nichols, David P.; Saavedra, Milene T.; Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L.; Geraci, Mark W.; Burnham, Ellen L.; Fessler, Michael B.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Abraham, Edward; Moss, Marc; Malcolm, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) severity may be influenced by heterogeneity of neutrophil activation. Interferon-stimulated genes (ISG) are a broad gene family induced by Type I interferons, often as a response to viral infections, which evokes extensive immunomodulation. We tested the hypothesis that over- or under-expression of immunomodulatory ISG by neutrophils is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with ARDS. Genome-wide transcriptional profiles of circulating neutrophils isolated from patients with sepsis-induced ARDS (n = 31) and healthy controls (n = 19) were used to characterize ISG expression. Hierarchical clustering of expression identified 3 distinct subject groups with Low, Mid and High ISG expression. ISG accounting for the greatest variability in expression were identified (MX1, IFIT1, and ISG15) and used to analyze a prospective cohort at the Colorado ARDS Network site. One hundred twenty ARDS patients from four urban hospitals were enrolled within 72 hours of initiation of mechanical ventilation. Circulating neutrophils were isolated from patients and expression of ISG determined by PCR. Samples were stratified by standard deviation from the mean into High (n = 21), Mid, (n = 82) or Low (n = 17) ISG expression. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with High or Low ISG expression to those with Mid-range expression. At enrollment, there were no differences in age, gender, co-existing medical conditions, or type of physiologic injury between cohorts. After adjusting for age, race, gender and BMI, patients with either High or Low ISG expression had significantly worse clinical outcomes than those in the Mid for number of 28-day ventilator- and ICU-free days (P = 0.0006 and 0.0004), as well as 90-day mortality and 90-day home with unassisted breathing (P = 0.02 and 0.004). These findings suggest extremes of ISG expression by circulating neutrophils from ARDS patients recovered early in the syndrome are associated

  10. Neuronal control of locomotor handedness in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Sean M; Kain, Jamey S; de Bivort, Benjamin L

    2015-05-26

    Genetically identical individuals display variability in their physiology, morphology, and behaviors, even when reared in essentially identical environments, but there is little mechanistic understanding of the basis of such variation. Here, we investigated whether Drosophila melanogaster displays individual-to-individual variation in locomotor behaviors. We developed a new high-throughout platform capable of measuring the exploratory behavior of hundreds of individual flies simultaneously. With this approach, we find that, during exploratory walking, individual flies exhibit significant bias in their left vs. right locomotor choices, with some flies being strongly left biased or right biased. This idiosyncrasy was present in all genotypes examined, including wild-derived populations and inbred isogenic laboratory strains. The biases of individual flies persist for their lifetime and are nonheritable: i.e., mating two left-biased individuals does not yield left-biased progeny. This locomotor handedness is uncorrelated with other asymmetries, such as the handedness of gut twisting, leg-length asymmetry, and wing-folding preference. Using transgenics and mutants, we find that the magnitude of locomotor handedness is under the control of columnar neurons within the central complex, a brain region implicated in motor planning and execution. When these neurons are silenced, exploratory laterality increases, with more extreme leftiness and rightiness. This observation intriguingly implies that the brain may be able to dynamically regulate behavioral individuality.

  11. Neuronal control of locomotor handedness in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Sean M.; Kain, Jamey S.; de Bivort, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically identical individuals display variability in their physiology, morphology, and behaviors, even when reared in essentially identical environments, but there is little mechanistic understanding of the basis of such variation. Here, we investigated whether Drosophila melanogaster displays individual-to-individual variation in locomotor behaviors. We developed a new high-throughout platform capable of measuring the exploratory behavior of hundreds of individual flies simultaneously. With this approach, we find that, during exploratory walking, individual flies exhibit significant bias in their left vs. right locomotor choices, with some flies being strongly left biased or right biased. This idiosyncrasy was present in all genotypes examined, including wild-derived populations and inbred isogenic laboratory strains. The biases of individual flies persist for their lifetime and are nonheritable: i.e., mating two left-biased individuals does not yield left-biased progeny. This locomotor handedness is uncorrelated with other asymmetries, such as the handedness of gut twisting, leg-length asymmetry, and wing-folding preference. Using transgenics and mutants, we find that the magnitude of locomotor handedness is under the control of columnar neurons within the central complex, a brain region implicated in motor planning and execution. When these neurons are silenced, exploratory laterality increases, with more extreme leftiness and rightiness. This observation intriguingly implies that the brain may be able to dynamically regulate behavioral individuality. PMID:25953337

  12. Locomotor Experience Affects Self and Emotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uchiyama, Ichiro; Anderson, David I.; Campos, Joseph J.; Witherington, David; Frankel, Carl B.; Lejeune, Laure; Barbu-Roth, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Two studies investigated the role of locomotor experience on visual proprioception in 8-month-old infants. "Visual proprioception" refers to the sense of self-motion induced in a static person by patterns of optic flow. A moving room apparatus permitted displacement of an entire enclosure (except for the floor) or the side walls and…

  13. High Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Induces Both Acute and Persistent Changes in Broadband Cortical Synchronization: a Simultaneous tDCS-EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Abhrajeet; Baxter, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop methods for simultaneously acquiring electrophysiological data during high definition transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) using high resolution electroencephalography (EEG). Previous studies have pointed to the after effects of tDCS on both motor and cognitive performance, and there appears to be potential for using tDCS in a variety of clinical applications. However, little is known about the real-time effects of tDCS on rhythmic cortical activity in humans due to the technical challenges of simultaneously obtaining electrophysiological data during ongoing stimulation. Furthermore, the mechanisms of action of tDCS in humans are not well understood. We have conducted a simultaneous tDCS-EEG study in a group of healthy human subjects. Significant acute and persistent changes in spontaneous neural activity and event related synchronization (ERS) were observed during and after the application of high definition tDCS over the left sensorimotor cortex. Both anodal and cathodal stimulation resulted in acute global changes in broadband cortical activity which were significantly different than the changes observed in response to sham stimulation. For the group of 8 subjects studied, broadband individual changes in spontaneous activity during stimulation were apparent both locally and globally. In addition, we found that high definition tDCS of the left sensorimotor cortex can induce significant ipsilateral and contralateral changes in event related desynchronization (ERD) and ERS during motor imagination following the end of the stimulation period. Overall, our results demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring high resolution EEG during high definition tDCS and provide evidence that tDCS in humans directly modulates rhythmic cortical synchronization during and after its administration. PMID:24956615

  14. Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of meloxicam in cats with painful locomotor disorders.

    PubMed

    Lascelles, B D; Henderson, A J; Hackett, I J

    2001-12-01

    The ability of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to modify the clinical manifestations of pain associated with locomotor disease was assessed. Sixty-nine cats with acute or chronic locomotor disorders were recruited from 14 first opinion UK veterinary practices and randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups. Group A received meloxicam drops (0.3 mg/kg orally on day 1 followed by 0.1 mg/kg daily for four more consecutive days) and group B received ketoprofen tablets (1.0 mg/kg orally once daily for five days). Each cat underwent a full clinical examination before treatment, 24 hours after initiation of treatment and 24 hours after completion of treatment. General clinical parameters (demeanour and feed intake) and specific locomotor parameters (weightbearing, lameness, local inflammation and pain on palpation) were scored using a discontinuous scale scoring system. The two groups did not differ in terms of age, weight, gender distribution or duration of clinical signs; nor did they differ in terms of general clinical or specific locomotor scores pretreatment. Both treatment regimens resulted in a significant improvement in demeanour, feed intake and weightbearing, and a significant reduction in lameness, pain on palpation and inflammation. No significant difference was observed between the two treatment groups with respect to any of the parameters measured and both treatments were associated with minimal observed side effects. Meloxicam and ketoprofen were found to be effective analgesics and well tolerated in cats with acute or chronic locomotor disorders when administered for short-term treatment (five days) in such cases. However, meloxicam was assessed to be significantly more palatable than ketoprofen.

  15. Mephedrone interactions with cocaine: prior exposure to the 'bath salt' constituent enhances cocaine-induced locomotor activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Ryan A; Tallarida, Christopher S; Reitz, Allen B; Rawls, Scott M

    2013-12-01

    Concurrent use of mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone; MEPH) and established drugs of abuse is now commonplace, but knowledge about interactions between these drugs is sparse. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that prior MEPH exposure enhances the locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine and methamphetamine (METH). For cocaine experiments, rats pretreated with saline, cocaine (15 mg/kg), or MEPH (15 mg/kg) for 5 days were injected with cocaine after 10 days of drug absence. For METH experiments, rats pretreated with saline, METH (2 mg/kg), or MEPH (15 mg/kg) were injected with METH after 10 days of drug absence. Cocaine challenge produced greater locomotor activity after pretreatment with cocaine or MEPH than after pretreatment with saline. METH challenge produced greater locomotor activity after METH pretreatment than after saline pretreatment; however, locomotor activity in rats pretreated with MEPH or saline and then challenged with METH was not significantly different. The locomotor response to MEPH (15 mg/kg) was not significantly affected by pretreatment with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or METH (0.5, 2 mg/kg). The present demonstration that cocaine-induced locomotor activation is enhanced by prior MEPH exposure suggests that MEPH cross-sensitizes to cocaine and increases cocaine efficacy. Interestingly, MEPH cross-sensitization was not bidirectional and did not extend to METH, suggesting that the phenomenon is sensitive to specific psychostimulants.

  16. HIGH ETHANOL DOSE DURING EARLY ADOLESCENCE INDUCES LOCOMOTOR ACTIVATION AND INCREASES SUBSEQUENT ETHANOL INTAKE DURING LATE ADOLESCENCE

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, María Belén; Molina, Juan Carlos; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Spear, Norman E.; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent initiation of ethanol consumption is associated with subsequent heightened probability of ethanol-use disorders. The present study examined the relationship between motivational sensitivity to ethanol initiation in adolescent rats and later ethanol intake. Experiment 1 determined that ethanol induces locomotor activation shortly after administration but not if tested at a later post-administration interval. In Experiment 2, adolescents were assessed for ethanol-induced locomotor activation on postnatal day 28. These animals were then evaluated for ethanol-mediated conditioned taste aversion and underwent a 16-day-long ethanol intake protocol. Ethanol-mediated aversive effects were unrelated to ethanol locomotor stimulation or subsequent ethanol consumption patterns. Ethanol intake during late adolescence was greatest in animals initiated to ethanol earliest at postnatal day 28. Females that were more sensitive to ethanol’s locomotor-activating effects showed a transient increase in ethanol self-administration. Blood ethanol concentrations during initiation were not related to ethanol-induced locomotor activation. Adolescent rats appeared sensitive to the locomotor-stimulatory effects of ethanol. Even brief ethanol exposure during adolescence may promote later ethanol intake. PMID:20373327

  17. An Epstein-Barr Virus Encoded Inhibitor of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Signaling Is an Important Determinant for Acute and Persistent EBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Makoto; Fogg, Mark H.; Orlova, Nina; Quink, Carol; Wang, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is the most common cause of Infectious Mononucleosis. Nearly all adult humans harbor life-long, persistent EBV infection which can lead to development of cancers including Hodgkin Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, and lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients. BARF1 is an EBV replication-associated, secreted protein that blocks Colony Stimulating Factor 1 (CSF-1) signaling, an innate immunity pathway not targeted by any other virus species. To evaluate effects of BARF1 in acute and persistent infection, we mutated the BARF1 homologue in the EBV-related herpesvirus, or lymphocryptovirus (LCV), naturally infecting rhesus macaques to create a recombinant rhLCV incapable of blocking CSF-1 (ΔrhBARF1). Rhesus macaques orally challenged with ΔrhBARF1 had decreased viral load indicating that CSF-1 is important for acute virus infection. Surprisingly, ΔrhBARF1 was also associated with dramatically lower virus setpoints during persistent infection. Normal acute viral load and normal viral setpoints during persistent rhLCV infection could be restored by Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced immunosuppression prior to oral inoculation with ΔrhBARF1 or infection of immunocompetent animals with a recombinant rhLCV where the rhBARF1 was repaired. These results indicate that BARF1 blockade of CSF-1 signaling is an important immune evasion strategy for efficient acute EBV infection and a significant determinant for virus setpoint during persistent EBV infection. PMID:23300447

  18. Effect of chronic caffeine consumption on changes in locomotor activity of WAG/G and Fischer-344 rats induced by nicotine, ethanol, and morphine.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, S K; Rusakova, I V; Medvedeva, O F

    2003-12-01

    We studied the effect of single treatment with nicotine, ethanol, and morphine on locomotor activity of WAG/G and Fischer-344 rats chronically drinking caffeine solution. In Fischer-344 rats receiving caffeine locomotor activity in the open-field test was much lower than in animals drinking water, while in WAG/G rats no differences in locomotor activity were found. Chronic caffeine intake increased rat sensitivity to the stimulating effect of nicotine and ethanol, but decreased their sensitivity to the depressant effect of morphine. Chronic caffeine treatment most significantly modulated the effects of nicotine, ethanol, and morphine in Fischer-344 rats.

  19. Characterization of sacral interneurons that mediate activation of locomotor pattern generators by sacrocaudal afferent input.

    PubMed

    Etlin, Alex; Finkel, Eran; Mor, Yoav; O'Donovan, Michael J; Anglister, Lili; Lev-Tov, Aharon

    2013-01-09

    Identification of the neural pathways involved in retraining the spinal central pattern generators (CPGs) by afferent input in the absence of descending supraspinal control is feasible in isolated rodent spinal cords where the locomotor CPGs are potently activated by sacrocaudal afferent (SCA) input. Here we study the involvement of sacral neurons projecting rostrally through the ventral funiculi (VF) in activation of the CPGs by sensory stimulation. Fluorescent labeling and immunostaining showed that VF neurons are innervated by primary afferents immunoreactive for vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 and by intraspinal neurons. Calcium imaging revealed that 55% of the VF neurons were activated by SCA stimulation. The activity of VF neurons and the sacral and lumbar CPGs was abolished when non-NMDA receptors in the sacral segments were blocked by the antagonist CNQX. When sacral NMDA receptors were blocked by APV, the sacral CPGs were suppressed, VF neurons with nonrhythmic activity were recruited and a moderate-drive locomotor rhythm developed during SCA stimulation. In contrast, when the sacral CPGs were activated by SCA stimulation, rhythmic and nonrhythmic VF neurons were recruited and the locomotor rhythm was most powerful. The activity of 73 and 27% of the rhythmic VF neurons was in-phase with the ipsilateral and contralateral motor output, respectively. Collectively, our studies indicate that sacral VF neurons serve as a major link between SCA and the hindlimb CPGs and that the ability of SCA to induce stepping can be enhanced by the sacral CPGs. The nature of the ascending drive to lumbar CPGs, the identity of subpopulations of VF neurons, and their potential role in activating the locomotor rhythm are discussed.

  20. Fostering Locomotor Behavior of Children with Developmental Disabilities: An Overview of Studies Using Treadmills and Walkers with Microswitches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Didden, Robert; Manfredi, Francesco; Putignano, Pietro; Stasolla, Fabrizio; Basili, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of studies using programs with treadmills or walkers with microswitches and contingent stimulation to foster locomotor behavior of children with developmental disabilities. Twenty-six studies were identified in the period 2000-2008 (i.e., the period in which research in this area has actually taken shape).…

  1. Plantar tactile perturbations enhance transfer of split-belt locomotor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Mukul; Eikema, Diderik Jan A.; Chien, Jung Hung; Myers, Sara A.; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of human locomotion are highly adaptive and flexible, and depend on the environmental context. Locomotor adaptation requires the use of multisensory information to perceive altered environmental dynamics and generate an appropriate movement pattern. In this study, we investigated the use of multisensory information during locomotor learning. Proprioceptive perturbations were induced by vibrating tactors, placed bilaterally over the plantar surfaces. Under these altered sensory conditions, participants were asked to perform a split-belt locomotor task representative of motor learning. Twenty healthy young participants were separated into two groups: no-tactors (NT) and tactors (TC). All participants performed an overground walking trial, followed by treadmill walking including 18 minutes of split-belt adaptation and an overground trial to determine transfer effects. Interlimb coordination was quantified by symmetry indices and analyzed using mixed repeated measures ANOVAs. Both groups adapted to the locomotor task, indicated by significant reductions in gait symmetry during the split-belt task. No significant group differences in spatiotemporal and kinetic parameters were observed on the treadmill. However, significant groups differences were observed overground. Step and swing time asymmetries learned on the split belt treadmill, were retained and decayed more slowly overground in the TC group whereas in NT, asymmetries were rapidly lost. These results suggest that tactile stimulation contributed to increased lower limb proprioceptive gain. High proprioceptive gain allows for more persistent overground after-effects, at the cost of reduced adaptability. Such persistence may be utilized in populations displaying pathologic asymmetric gait by retraining a more symmetric pattern. PMID:26169104

  2. The role of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus in methamphetamine conditioned place preference and locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Lauren K; Cunningham, Christopher L

    2014-05-15

    Methamphetamine (METH) indirectly stimulates the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) acetylcholine (ACh) neurons to increase ACh within the ventral tegmental area (VTA). LDT ACh inhibition attenuates METH and saline locomotor activity. The aim of these experiments was to determine whether LDT ACh contributes to METH conditioned place preference (CPP). C57BL/6J mice received a bilateral electrolytic or sham lesion of the LDT. After recovery, mice received alternating pairings of METH (0.5 mg/kg) and saline with distinct tactile floor cues over 8 days. During preference tests, mice were given access to both floor types and time spent on each was recorded. Mice were tested again after exposure to both extinction and reconditioning trials. Brains were then processed for choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry to label LDT ACh neurons. Lesioned mice had significantly fewer LDT ACh neurons and showed increased saline and METH locomotor activity during the first conditioning trial compared to sham mice. Locomotor activity (saline and METH) was negatively correlated with the number of LDT ACh neurons. Lesioned and sham mice showed similar METH CPP following conditioning, extinction and reconditioning trials. LDT ACh neurons are not necessary for METH reward as indexed by CPP, but may be important for basal and METH-induced locomotor activity.

  3. No Influence of Hypoxia on Coordination Between Respiratory and Locomotor Rhythms During Rowing at Moderate Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Nicolas; Perrey, Stéphane; Passelergue, Philippe; Rouillon, Jean-Denis

    2007-01-01

    Besides neuro-mechanical constraints, chemical or metabolic stimuli have also been proposed to interfere with the coordination between respiratory and locomotor rhythms. In the light of the conflicting data observed in the literature, this study aimed to assess whether acute hypoxia modifies the degree of coordination between respiratory and locomotor rhythms during rowing exercises in order to investigate competitive interactions between neuro-mechanical (movement) and chemical (hypoxia) respiratory drives. Nine male healthy subjects performed one submaximal 6-min rowing exercise on a rowing ergometer in both normoxia (altitude: 304 m) and acute hypoxia (altitude: 2877 m). The exercise intensity was about 40 % and 35 % (for normoxia and hypoxia conditions, respectively) of the individual maximal power output measured during an incremental rowing test to volitional exhaustion carried out in normoxia. Metabolic rate and minute ventilation were continuously collected throughout exercise. Locomotor movement and breathing rhythms were continuously recorded and synchronized cycle-by-cycle. The degree of coordination was expressed as a percentage of breaths starting during the same phase of the locomotor cycle. For a same and a constant metabolic rate, acute hypoxia did not influence significantly the degree of coordination (mean ± SEM, normoxia: 20.0 ± 6.2 %, hypoxia: 21.3 ± 11.1 %, p > 0.05) while ventilation and breathing frequency were significantly greater in hypoxia. Our results may suggest that during rowing exercise at a moderate metabolic load, neuro-mechanical locomotion-linked respiratory stimuli appear “stronger ”than peripheral chemoreceptors- linked respiratory stimuli induced by hypoxia, in the context of our study. Key pointsChanges in breathing frequency and ventilation induced by altitude have no effect on the degree of coordination between locomotor and breathing rhythms during moderate rowing exercise.During moderate rowing exercise in hypoxia

  4. Challenges in comparing the acute cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) vs. electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depression: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kedzior, Karina Karolina; Schuchinsky, Maria; Gerkensmeier, Imke; Loo, Colleen

    2017-03-02

    The present study aimed to systematically compare the cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in head-to-head studies with major depression (MDD) patients. A systematic literature search identified six studies with 219 MDD patients that were too heterogeneous to reliably detect meaningful differences in acute cognitive outcomes after ECT vs. HF-rTMS. Cognitive effects of brain stimulation vary depending on the timeframe and methods of assessment, stimulation parameters, and maintenance treatment. Thus, acute and longer-term differences in cognitive outcomes both need to be investigated at precisely defined timeframes and with similar instruments assessing comparable functions.

  5. Amino acids augment muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs during acute endotoxemia by stimulating mTOR-dependent translation initiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In skeletal muscle of adults, sepsis reduces protein synthesis by depressing translation initiation and induces resistance to branched-chain amino acid stimulation. Normal neonates maintain a high basal muscle protein synthesis rate that is sensitive to amino acid stimulation. In the present study...

  6. Leucine supplementation stimulates protein synthesis and reduces degradation signal activation in muscle of newborn pigs during acute endotoxemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sepsis disrupts skeletal muscle proteostasis and mitigates the anabolic response to leucine (Leu) in muscle of mature animals. We have shown that Leu stimulates muscle protein synthesis (PS) in healthy neonatal piglets. To determine if supplemental Leu can stimulate PS and reduce protein degradation...

  7. Melanin-concentrating hormone is necessary for olanzapine-inhibited locomotor activity in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Melissa J. S.; Douris, Nicholas; Forrow, Avery B.; Monnard, Arnaud; Lu, Shuangyu; Flaherty, Stephen E.; Adams, Andrew C.; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    Olanzapine (OLZ), an atypical antipsychotic, can be effective in treating patients with restricting type anorexia nervosa who exercise excessively. Clinical improvements include weight gain and reduced pathological hyperactivity. However the neuronal populations and mechanisms underlying OLZ actions are not known. We studied the effects of OLZ on hyperactivity using male mice lacking the hypothalamic neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCHKO) that are lean and hyperactive. We compared the in vivo effects of systemic or intra-accumbens nucleus (Acb) OLZ administration on locomotor activity in WT and MCHKO littermates. Acute systemic OLZ treatment in WT mice significantly reduced locomotor activity, an effect that is substantially attenuated in MCHKO mice. Furthermore, OLZ infusion directly into the Acb of WT mice reduced locomotor activity, but not in MCHKO mice. To identify contributing neuronal mechanisms, we assessed the effect of OLZ treatment on Acb synaptic transmission ex vivo and in vitro. Intraperitoneal OLZ treatment reduced Acb GABAergic activity in WT but not MCHKO neurons. This effect was also seen in vitro by applying OLZ to acute brain slices. OLZ reduced the frequency and amplitude of GABAergic activity that was more robust in WT than MCHKO Acb. These findings indicate that OLZ reduced Acb GABAergic transmission and that MCH is necessary for the hypolocomotor effects of OLZ. PMID:26092201

  8. Changes in cell death of peripheral blood lymphocytes isolated from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia upon stimulation with 7 Hz, 30 mT pulsed electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Ćwiklińska, Magdalena; Balwierz, Walentyna; Chorobik, Paulina; Nowak, Bernadeta; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Ziomber, Agata; Malina-Novak, Kinga; Zaraska, Wiesław; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-03-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) influenced the viability of proliferating in vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from Crohn's disease patients as well as acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) patients by induction of cell death, but did not cause any vital changes in cells from healthy donors. Experiments with lymphoid U937 and monocytic MonoMac6 cell lines have shown a protective effect of PEMF on the death process in cells treated with death inducers. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of PEMF on native proliferating leukocytes originating from newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. The effects of exposure to PEMF were studied in PBMCs from 20 children with ALL. PBMCs were stimulated with three doses of PEMF (7 Hz, 30 mT) for 4 h each with 24 h intervals. After the last stimulation, the cells were double stained with annexin V and propidium iodide dye to estimate viability by flow cytometric analysis. The results indicated an increase of annexin V positive as well as double stained annexin V and propidium iodide positive cells after exposure to threefold PEMF stimulation. A low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field induces cell death in native proliferating cells isolated from ALL patients. The increased vulnerability of proliferating PBMCs to PEMF-induced interactions may be potentially applied in the therapy of ALL. The analysis of expression of apoptosis-related genes revealed changes in mRNA of some genes engaged in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway belonging to the Bcl-2 family and the pathway with apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) abundance upon PEMF stimulation of PBMCs.

  9. The anti-tumor role of NK cells in vivo pre-activated and re-stimulated by interleukins in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Fengyan; Lin, Hai; Gao, Sujun; Hu, Zheng; Zuo, Song; Sun, Liguang; Jin, Chunhui; Li, Wei; Yang, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    Although natural killer cells (NK cells) were traditionally classified as members of the innate immune system, NK cells have recently been found also to be an important player in the adaptive immune systems. In this context, in vitro activation of NK cells by cytokines leads to generation of NK cells with memory-like properties characterized by increased interferon-γ (IFNγ) production. However, it remains to be defined whether these memory-like NK cells exist in vivo after cytokine activation. Furthermore, it is also unclear whether such memory-like NK cells induced in vivo by cytokines could have effective anti-leukemia response. To address these issues, we used an in vivo pre-activation and re-stimulation system that was able to produce NK cells with increased IFNγ secretion. It was found that after in vivo pre-activation and re-stimulation with interleukins (ILs), NK cells retained a state to produce increased amount of IFNγ. Of note, whereas this intrinsic capacity of enhanced IFNγ production after in vivo IL pre-activation and re-stimulation could be transferred to the next generation of NK cells and was associated with prolonged survival of the mice with acute lymphoid leukemia. Moreover, the anti-leukemia activity of these memory-like NK cells was associated with IFNγ production and up-regulation of NK cells activation receptor-NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D). Together, these findings argue strongly that in vivo IL pre-activation and re-stimulation is capable to induce memory-like NK cells as observed previously in vitro, which are effective against acute lymphoblastic leukemia, likely via NKG2D-dependent IFNγ production, in intact animals. PMID:27816971

  10. Involvement of spinal α2 -adrenoceptors in prolonged modulation of hind limb withdrawal reflexes following acute noxious stimulation in the anaesthetized rabbit.

    PubMed

    Harris, John

    2016-03-01

    The role of spinal α2 -adrenoceptors in mediating long-lasting modulation of hind limb withdrawal reflexes following acute noxious chemical stimulation of distant heterotopic and local homotopic locations has been investigated in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rabbits. Reflexes evoked in the ankle extensor muscle medial gastrocnemius (MG) by electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral heel, and reflexes elicited in the ankle flexor tibialis anterior and the knee flexor semitendinosus by stimulation at the base of the ipsilateral toes, could be inhibited for over 1 h after mustard oil (20%) was applied to either the snout or into the contralateral MG. The heel-MG response was also inhibited after applying mustard oil across the plantar metatarsophalangeal joints of the ipsilateral foot, whereas this homotopic stimulus facilitated both flexor responses. Mustard oil also caused a significant pressor effect when applied to any of the three test sites. The selective α2 -adrenoceptor antagonist, RX 821002 (100-300 μg, intrathecally), had no effect on reflexes per se, but did cause a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure. In the presence of the α2 -blocker, inhibitory and facilitatory effects of mustard oil on reflexes were completely abolished. These data imply that long-lasting inhibition of spinal reflexes following acute noxious stimulation of distant locations involves activation of supraspinal noradrenergic pathways, the effects of which are dependent on an intact α2 -adrenoceptor system at the spinal level. These pathways and receptors also appear to be involved in facilitation (sensitization) as well as inhibition of reflexes following a noxious stimulus applied to the same limb.

  11. A silent synapse-based mechanism for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Brown, Travis E; Lee, Brian R; Mu, Ping; Ferguson, Deveroux; Dietz, David; Ohnishi, Yoshinori N; Lin, Ying; Suska, Anna; Ishikawa, Masago; Huang, Yanhua H; Shen, Haowei; Kalivas, Peter W; Sorg, Barbara A; Zukin, R Suzanne; Nestler, Eric J; Dong, Yan; Schlüter, Oliver M

    2011-06-01

    Locomotor sensitization is a common and robust behavioral alteration in rodents whereby following exposure to abused drugs such as cocaine, the animal becomes significantly more hyperactive in response to an acute drug challenge. Here, we further analyzed the role of cocaine-induced silent synapses in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and their contribution to the development of locomotor sensitization. Using a combination of viral vector-mediated genetic manipulations, biochemistry, and electrophysiology in a locomotor sensitization paradigm with repeated, daily, noncontingent cocaine (15 mg/kg) injections, we show that dominant-negative cAMP-element binding protein (CREB) prevents cocaine-induced generation of silent synapses of young (30 d old) rats, whereas constitutively active CREB is sufficient to increase the number of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) at synapses and to generate silent synapses. We further show that occupancy of CREB at the NR2B promoter increases and is causally related to the increase in synaptic NR2B levels. Blockade of NR2B-containing NMDARs by administration of the NR2B-selective antagonist Ro256981 directly into the NAc, under conditions that inhibit cocaine-induced silent synapses, prevents the development of cocaine-elicited locomotor sensitization. Our data are consistent with a cellular cascade whereby cocaine-induced activation of CREB promotes CREB-dependent transcription of NR2B and synaptic incorporation of NR2B-containing NMDARs, which generates new silent synapses within the NAc. We propose that cocaine-induced activation of CREB and generation of new silent synapses may serve as key cellular events mediating cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. These findings provide a novel cellular mechanism that may contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral alterations.

  12. Effects of phthalate esters on the locomotor activity of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex

    SciTech Connect

    Thuren, A. ); Woin, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Phthalates are of environmental concern owing to their large-scale annual production and to their ubiquitous use as additives in the manufacture of plastics. Among the phthalates, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and dibutylphthalate (DBP) are the most commonly used compounds. Phthalates are lipophilic with a relatively low water solubility and show low acute toxicity to fish and selectively toxic to cladocerans. Little is known, however, about their effects on the behavior, reproductive success or the growth of organisms. In this investigation of locomotor activity of G. pulex was studied under phthalate stress. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of phthalates on overall locomotor activity of G. pulex and the impact of long term exposure on diel activity.

  13. Attenuated methamphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization in serotonin transporter knockout mice is restored by serotonin 1B receptor antagonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Igari, Moe; Shen, Hao-Wei; Hagino, Yoko; Fukushima, Setsu; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Hall, Frank Scott; Uhl, George R; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Repeated administration of methamphetamine (METH) enhances acute locomotor responses to METH administered in the same context, a phenomenon termed as 'locomotor sensitization'. Although many of the acute effects of METH are mediated by its influences on the compartmentalization of dopamine, serotonin systems have also been suggested to influence the behavioral effects of METH in ways that are not fully understood. The present experiments examined serotonergic roles in METH-induced locomotor sensitization by assessing: (a) the effect of serotonin transporter (SERT; Slc6A4) knockout (KO) on METH-induced locomotor sensitization; (b) extracellular monoamine levels in METH-treated animals as determined by in-vivo microdialysis; and (c) effects of serotonin (5-HT) receptor antagonists on METH-induced behavioral sensitization, with focus on effects of the 5-HT1B receptor antagonist SB 216641 and a comparison with the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin. Repeated METH administration failed to induce behavioral sensitization in homozygous SERT KO (SERT-/-) mice under conditions that produced substantial sensitization in wild-type or heterozygous SERT KO (SERT+/-) mice. The selective 5-HT1B antagonist receptor SB 216641 restored METH-induced locomotor sensitization in SERT-/- mice, whereas ketanserin was ineffective. METH-induced increases in extracellular 5-HT (5-HTex) levels were substantially reduced in SERT-/- mice, although SERT genotype had no effect on METH-induced increases in extracellular dopamine. These experiments demonstrate that 5-HT actions, including those at 5-HT1B receptors, contribute to METH-induced locomotor sensitization. Modulation of 5-HT1B receptors might aid therapeutic approaches to the sequelae of chronic METH use.

  14. Locomotor training alters the behavior of flexor reflexes during walking in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew C; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K; Rymer, William Zev; Knikou, Maria

    2014-11-01

    In humans, a chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs the excitability of pathways mediating early flexor reflexes and increases the excitability of late, long-lasting flexor reflexes. We hypothesized that in individuals with SCI, locomotor training will alter the behavior of these spinally mediated reflexes. Nine individuals who had either chronic clinically motor complete or incomplete SCI received an average of 44 locomotor training sessions. Flexor reflexes, elicited via sural nerve stimulation of the right or left leg, were recorded from the ipsilateral tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before and after body weight support (BWS)-assisted treadmill training. The modulation pattern of the ipsilateral TA responses following innocuous stimulation of the right foot was also recorded in 10 healthy subjects while they stepped at 25% BWS to investigate whether body unloading during walking affects the behavior of these responses. Healthy subjects did not receive treadmill training. We observed a phase-dependent modulation of early TA flexor reflexes in healthy subjects with reduced body weight during walking. The early TA flexor reflexes were increased at heel contact, progressively decreased during the stance phase, and then increased throughout the swing phase. In individuals with SCI, locomotor training induced the reappearance of early TA flexor reflexes and changed the amplitude of late TA flexor reflexes during walking. Both early and late TA flexor reflexes were modulated in a phase-dependent pattern after training. These new findings support the adaptive capability of the injured nervous system to return to a prelesion excitability and integration state.

  15. Effects of 3-O-methyldopa, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine metabolite, on locomotor activity and dopamine turnover in rats.

    PubMed

    Onzawa, Yoritaka; Kimura, Yasuhiro; Uzuhashi, Kengo; Shirasuna, Megumi; Hirosawa, Tasuku; Taogoshi, Takanori; Kihira, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    It has been well known that 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD) is a metabolite of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) formed by catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT), and 3-OMD blood level often reaches higher than physiological level in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients receiving long term L-DOPA therapy. However, the physiological role of 3-OMD has not been well understood. Therefore, in order to clarify the effects of 3-OMD on physiological function, we examined the behavioral alteration in rats based on locomotor activity, and measured dopamine (DA) and its metabolites levels in rats at the same time after 3-OMD subchronic administration. The study results showed that repeated administrations of 3-OMD increased its blood and the striatum tissue levels in those rats, and decreased locomotor activity in a dose dependent manner. Although 3-OMD subchronic administration showed no significant change in DA level in the striatum, DA metabolite levels, such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), and homovanillic acid (HVA) were significantly decreased. After 3-OMD washout period (7 d), locomotor activity and DA turnover in those rats returned to normal levels. Furthermore, locomotor activity and DA turnover decreased by 3-OMD administration were recovered to normal level by acute L-DOPA administration. These results suggested that 3-OMD affect to locomotor activity via DA neuron system. In conclusion, 3-OMD itself may have a disadvantage in PD patients receiving L-DOPA therapy.

  16. Dose-dependent changes in the locomotor responses to methamphetamine in BALB/c mice: low doses induce hypolocomotion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rana A K; Kosten, Therese A; Kinsey, Berma M; Shen, Xiaoyun; Lopez, Angel Y; Kosten, Thomas R; Orson, Frank M

    2012-12-01

    The overall goal of the present study was to determine the effects of different doses of (+)-methamphetamine (meth) on locomotor activity of Balb/C mice. Four experiments were designed to test a wide range of meth doses in BALB/c female mice. In Experiment 1, we examined locomotor activity induced by an acute administration of low doses of meth (0.01 and 0.03mg/kg) in a 90-min session. Experiment 2 was conducted to test higher meth doses (0.3-10mg/kg). In Experiment 3, separate sets of mice were pre-treated with various meth doses once or twice (one injection/week) prior to a locomotor challenge with a low meth dose. Finally, in Experiment 4, we tested whether locomotor activation would be affected by pretreatment with a low or moderate dose of meth one month prior to the low meth dose challenge. Results show that low doses of meth induce hypolocomotion whereas moderate to high doses induce hyperlocomotion. Prior exposure to either one moderate or high dose of meth or to two, low doses of meth attenuated the hypolocomotor effect of a low meth dose one week later. This effect was also attenuated in mice tested one month after administration of a moderate meth dose. These results show that low and high doses of meth can have opposing effects on locomotor activity. Further, prior exposure to the drug leads to tolerance, rather than sensitization, of the hypolocomotor response to low meth doses.

  17. Evidence That GABA Mediates Dopaminergic and Serotonergic Pathways Associated with Locomotor Activity in Juvenile Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clements, S.; Schreck, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the control of locomotor activity in juvenile salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by manipulating 3 neurotransmitter systems-gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (GABA), dopamine, and serotonin-as well as the neuropeptide corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of CRH and the GABAAagonist muscimol stimulated locomotor activity. The effect of muscimol was attenuated by administration of a dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol. Conversely, the administration of a dopamine uptake inhibitor (4???,4??? -difluoro-3-alpha-[diphenylmethoxy] tropane hydrochloride [DUI]) potentiated the effect of muscimol. They found no evidence that CRH-induced hyperactivity is mediated by dopaminergic systems following concurrent injections of haloperidol or DUI with CRH. Administration of muscimol either had no effect or attenuated the locomotor response to concurrent injections of CRH and fluoxetine, whereas the GABAA antagonist bicuculline methiodide potentiated the effect of CRH and fluoxetine.

  18. Acute Neuropathic Orchalgia and Scrotalgia After Percutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulator Lead Placement: Two Cases with an Unusual Complication

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Virendra R; Ho, David; Simpson, Richard K

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation is an effective adjunct to the treatment of a variety of chronic pain syndromes. Complications are relatively low in morbidity and are most often secondary to hardware malfunction/malposition. Infection and undesired dysesthesias represent only a minority of complications. Neuropathic orchalgia and scrotalgia after placement of epidural spinal cord stimulator is a previously unreported morbidity. While alarming, this condition is physiologically benign, causing no neurological or urological dysfunction. The two cases we encountered both occurred during uncomplicated percutaneous trial stimulator placement. Corticosteroid treatment and stimulator activation facilitated resolution of the dysesthesia and allowed completion of the trial in one case, while the other case was refractory and resulted in termination of the trial. PMID:28286722

  19. Effects of acute administration of omeprazole or ranitidine on basal and vagally stimulated gastric acid secretion and alkalinization of the duodenum in anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Fändriks, L; Jönson, C

    1990-02-01

    Experiments were performed on acutely vagotomized cats during chloralose anaesthesia. In order to avoid sympathoadrenergic influences, the adrenal glands were ligated and the splanchnic nerves were cut bilaterally in all animals. The gastric lumen was perfused with saline and the H+ secretion was calculated from pH measurements in the perfusate. HCO3- secretion by the duodenal mucosa was titrated in situ. Omeprazole (4 mg kg-1 i.v., dissolved in PEG400, 40% w/v) did not influence basal or vagally induced HCO3- secretions, but inhibited by about 80% the H+ secretory response induced by electric vagal stimulation. Acute administration of ranitidine (5 mg kg-1 i.v.) transiently lowered arterial pressure, an effect which was followed by a sustained compensatory tachycardia. Ranitidine raised basal duodenal HCO3- secretion by 50% and inhibited vagally induced gastric H+ secretion by about 70%, whereas vagally induced HCO3- secretion was not influenced. The results suggest that vagal nerve stimulation raises the duodenal bicarbonate secretion via a mechanism independent of the level of gastric H+ secretion.

  20. ΔFosB induction in orbitofrontal cortex potentiates locomotor sensitization despite attenuating the cognitive dysfunction caused by cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, Catharine A.; Green, Thomas A.; Theobald, David E.H.; Renthal, William; LaPlant, Quincey; DiLeone, Ralph J.; Chakravarty, Sumana; Nestler, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of addictive drugs change with repeated use: many individuals become tolerant of their pleasurable effects but also more sensitive to negative sequelae (e.g., anxiety, paranoia, and drug craving). Understanding the mechanisms underlying such tolerance and sensitization may provide valuable insight into the basis of drug dependency and addiction. We have recently shown that chronic cocaine administration reduces the ability of an acute injection of cocaine to affect impulsivity in rats. However, animals become more impulsive during withdrawal from cocaine self-administration. We have also shown that chronic administration of cocaine increases expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Mimicking this drug-induced elevation in OFC ΔFosB through viral-mediated gene transfer mimics these behavioural changes: ΔFosB over-expression in OFC induces tolerance to the effects of an acute cocaine challenge but sensitizes rats to the cognitive sequelae of withdrawal. Here we report novel data demonstrating that increasing ΔFosB in the OFC also sensitizes animals to the locomotor-stimulant properties of cocaine. Analysis of nucleus accumbens tissue taken from rats over-expressing ΔFosB in the OFC and treated chronically with saline or cocaine does not provide support for the hypothesis that increasing OFC ΔFosB potentiates sensitization via the nucleus accumbens. These data suggest that both tolerance and sensitization to cocaine’s many effects, although seemingly opposing processes, can be induced in parallel via the same biological mechanism within the same brain region, and that drug-induced changes in gene expression within the OFC play an important role in multiple aspects of addiction. PMID:19135469

  1. Modelling the locomotor energetics of extinct hominids.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P A

    1999-10-01

    Bipedality is the defining characteristic of Hominidae and, as such, an understanding of the adaptive significance and functional implications of bipedality is imperative to any study of human evolution. Hominid bipedality is, presumably, a solution to some problem for the early hominids, one that has much to do with energy expenditure. Until recently, however, little attention could be focused on the quantifiable energetic aspects of bipedality as a unique locomotor form within Primates because of the inability to measure empirically the energy expenditure of non-modern hominids. A recently published method provides a way of circumventing the empirical measurement dilemma by calculating energy expenditure directly from anatomical variables and movement profiles. Although the origins of bipedality remain clouded, two discernible forms of locomotor anatomy are present in the hominid fossil record: the australopithecine and modern configurations. The australopithecine form is best represented by AL 288-1, a partial skeleton of Australopithecus afarensis, and is characterized as having short legs and a wide pelvis. The modern form is represented by modern humans and has long legs and a narrow pelvis. Human walking is optimized to take advantage of the changing levels of potential and kinetic energy that occur as the body and limbs move through the stride cycle. Although this optimization minimizes energy expenditure, some energy is required to maintain motion. I quantify this energy by developing a dynamic model that uses kinematic equations to determine energy expenditure. By representing both configurations with such a model, I can compare their rates of energy expenditure. I find that the australopithecine configuration uses less energy than that of a modern human. Despite arguments presented in the anthropological literature, the shortness of the legs of AL 288-1 provides no evidence that she was burdened with a compromised or transitional locomotor anatomy

  2. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study of the Triple Stimulation Technique in the Assessment of Electroacupuncture for Motor Function Recovery in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Feng; Wang, Xuewen; Li, Hui-qin; Lu, Lin; Li, Ming; Li, Ji-huang; Fang, Meifeng; Meng, Di

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to objectively assess electroacupuncture for motor function recovery in patients with acute ischemic stroke using the triple-stimulation technique (TST). The patients received either electroacupuncture plus western conventional medication (WCM) (n = 32) or single WCM (n = 31) for 14 days. The total clinical effective rate was statistically significantly superior in electroacupuncture group to that in WCM group (P < 0.01). Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) score, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, and TSTratio were statistically more significant in electroacupuncture group than those in WCM group (P < 0.01). There was positive correlation between TSTratio and NIHS score both before and after treatment (P < 0.01) and negative correlation between TSTratio and FAM score both before treatment and after treatment (P < 0.01). Comparing between the two groups or between pretreatment and posttreatment, adverse events, electrocardiogram, liver function, and kidney function showed no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). In conclusion, electroacupuncture was beneficial for the motor function recovery of patients with acute ischemic stroke and was generally safe. TST can be used for quantitative evaluation of electroacupuncture for motor function recovery in patients with acute ischemic stroke because it can objectively analyze the injury and recovery of corticospinal tract impairments. PMID:23840255

  3. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pashut, Tamar; Magidov, Dafna; Ben-Porat, Hana; Wolfus, Shuki; Friedman, Alex; Perel, Eli; Lavidor, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar; Yeshurun, Yosef; Korngreen, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Here we tested these theoretical predictions by combining in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices with magnetic stimulation and compartmental modeling. In agreement with the modeling, our recordings demonstrate the dependence of magnetic stimulation-triggered action potentials on the type and state of the neuron and its orientation within the magnetic field. Our results suggest that the observed effects of TMS are deeply rooted in the biophysical properties of single neurons in the central nervous system and provide a framework both for interpreting existing TMS data and developing new simulation-based tools and therapies. PMID:24917788

  4. Electroacupuncture Reduces the Effects of Acute Noxious Stimulation on the Electrical Activity of Pain-Related Neurons in the Hippocampus of Control and Neuropathic Pain Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Ying; Chen, Renbo; Feng, Xiu-Mei; Yan, Yaxia; Lippe, Irmgard Th.

    2016-01-01

    To study the effects of acupuncture analgesia on the hippocampus, we observed the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitor on pain-excited neurons (PENs) and pain-inhibited neurons (PINs) in the hippocampal area CA1 of sham or chronic constrictive injury (CCI) rats. The animals were randomly divided into a control, a CCI, and a U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor) group. In all experiments, we briefly (10-second duration) stimulated the sciatic nerve electrically and recorded the firing rates of PENs and PINs. The results showed that in both sham and CCI rats brief sciatic nerve stimulation significantly increased the electrical activity of PENs and markedly decreased the electrical activity of PINs. These effects were significantly greater in CCI rats compared to sham rats. EA treatment reduced the effects of the noxious stimulus on PENs and PINs in both sham and CCI rats. The effects of EA treatment could be inhibited by U0126 in sham-operated rats. The results suggest that EA reduces effects of acute sciatic nerve stimulation on PENs and PINs in the CA1 region of the hippocampus of both sham and CCI rats and that the ERK (extracellular regulated kinase) signaling pathway is involved in the modulation of EA analgesia. PMID:27833763

  5. Long-Term Potentiation by Theta-Burst Stimulation Using Extracellular Field Potential Recordings in Acute Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Therese; Lalanne, Txomin; Watt, Alanna J; Sjöström, P Jesper

    2016-06-01

    This protocol describes how to carry out theta-burst long-term potentiation (LTP) with extracellular field recordings in acute rodent hippocampal slices. This method is relatively simple and noninvasive and provides a way to sample many neurons simultaneously, making it suitable for applications requiring higher throughput than whole-cell recording.

  6. Long-Term Potentiation by Theta-Burst Stimulation using Extracellular Field Potential Recordings in Acute Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, Therese; Lalanne, Txomin; Watt, Alanna J.; Sjöström, P. Jesper

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes how to carry out theta-burst long-term potentiation (LTP) with extracellular field recordings in acute rodent hippocampal slices. This method is relatively simple and noninvasive and provides a way to sample many neurons simultaneously, making it suitable for applications requiring higher throughput than whole-cell recording. PMID:27250947

  7. Stem cell mobilisation by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Long-term results of the REVIVAL-2 trial.

    PubMed

    Steppich, Birgit; Hadamitzky, Martin; Ibrahim, Tareq; Groha, Philip; Schunkert, Heribert; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Kastrati, Adnan; Ott, Ilka

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilises cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood. Previous preclinical and early clinical trials may suggest that treatment with G-CSF leads to improved myocardial perfusion and function in acute or chronic ischaemic heart disease. In the REVIVAL-2 study we found that stem cell mobilisation by G-CSF does not influence infarct size, left ventricular function and coronary restenosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) that underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention. The objective of the present analysis was to assess the impact of G-CSF treatment on seven-year clinical outcomes from the REVIVAL-2 trial. In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled REVIVAL-2 study, 114 patients with the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction were enrolled five days after successful reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were assigned to receive 10 µg/kg G-CSF (n=56) or placebo (n=58) for five days. The primary endpoint for this long-term outcome analysis was the composite of death, myocardial infarction or stroke seven years after randomisation. The endpoint occurred in 14.3 % of patients in the G-CSF group versus 17.2 % assigned to placebo (p=0.67). The combined incidence of death or myocardial infarction occurred in 14.3 % of the patients assigned to G-CSF and 15.5 % of the patients assigned to placebo (p=0.85). In conclusion, these long-term follow-up data show that G-CSF does not improve clinical outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  8. Subchronic MK-801 treatment and post-weaning social isolation in rats: differential effects on locomotor activity and hippocampal long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Donovan M; Habib, Diala; Dringenberg, Hans C; Reynolds, James N; Beninger, Richard J

    2010-09-01

    Subchronic NMDA receptor antagonist treatment and post-weaning social isolation are two animal models of schizophrenia symptoms. However, behavioral and physiological changes following a combination of these two procedures have not been investigated. Thus, we examined effects of a novel, "double hit" model combining these two treatments, comparing them to standard models involving only NMDA antagonist treatment or social isolation. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were either group-housed or maintained in social isolation (starting at postnatal day [PD] 21 and continuing throughout the study). Each housing condition was further subdivided into two groups, receiving either subchronic treatment with either saline or MK-801 (0.5mg/kg, i.p., 2xday for seven days starting at PD 56). Post-weaning social isolation increased locomotor activity (assessed at PD 70) in response to a novel environment and an acute amphetamine injection, while subchronic MK-801 increased only amphetamine induced locomotor activity. Subsequent electrophysiological experiments (under urethane anesthesia) assessing changes in plasticity of hippocampal synapses showed that subchronic MK-801 treatment resulted in an increase in long-term potentiation in area CA1 in response to high frequency stimulation of the contralateral CA3 area, while housing condition had no effect. No other changes in hippocampal electrophysiology (input-output curves, paired-pulse facilitation) were observed. These data are the first to demonstrate an enhancement in hippocampal long-term plasticity in vivo following subchronic MK-801 administration, an effect that may be related to the well-characterized changes in glutamatergic and GABAergic systems seen after subchronic NMDA receptor blockade. That lack of additive or synergistic effects in the "double hit model" suggests that combining isolation and subchronic MK-801 treatment does not necessarily produce greater behavioral or physiological dysfunction than that seen with either

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Bovine Axonemes Exposed to Acute Alcohol: Role of eNOS and HSP90 in Cilia Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Simet, Samantha M.; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Sisson, Joseph H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cilia are fingerlike motor-driven organelles, which propel inhaled particles and mucus from the lung and airways. We have previously shown that brief alcohol exposure stimulates ciliary motility through an endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS)-dependent pathway localized in the ciliary metabolon. However, the signaling molecules of the ciliary metabolon involved in alcohol-triggered cilia beat frequency (CBF) stimulation upstream of eNOS activation are unknown. Methods and Results We hypothesized that brief alcohol exposure alters threonine and serine phosphorylation of proteins involved in stimulating ciliary beat frequency. Two-dimensional electrophoresis indicated both increases and deceases in the serine and threonine phosphorylation states of several proteins. One of the proteins identified was heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), which undergoes increased threonine phosphorylation after brief alcohol exposure. Because HSP90 has been shown to associate with eNOS in lung tissue, we hypothesized that HSP90 is a key component in alcohol-triggered eNOS activation and that these two proteins co-localize within the ciliary metabolon. Immunofluorescence experiments demonstrate that eNOS and HSP90 co-localize within basal bodies of the ciliary metabolon and partially translocate to the axoneme upon brief alcohol exposure. Pretreatment with geldanamycin, which disrupts HSP90 chaperone functions, prevented eNOS-HSP90 association and prevented the translocation of eNOS from the ciliary metabolon to the axoneme. Functional cilia motility studies revealed that geldanamycin blocked alcohol-stimulated ciliary motility in bovine bronchial epithelial cells and mouse tracheal rings. Conclusions Based on the HSP90 localization with eNOS, alcohol activation of HSP90 phosphorylation, and geldanamycin’s ability inhibit HSP90-eNOS association, prevent eNOS translocation to the axoneme, and block alcohol-stimulated ciliary motility, we conclude that alcohol-induced cilia stimulation

  10. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  11. Effects of Ibuprofen and High-Voltage Electric Stimulation on Acute Edema Formation After Blunt Trauma to Limbs of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Michael G; Graves, Paul; Nakazawa, Chika; Delano, Teresa; Hutson, Alan; Mendel, Frank C

    2005-01-01

    Context: Ibuprofen is widely used to manage pain and inflammation after orthopaedic trauma, but its effect on acute swelling has not been investigated. Cathodal high-voltage pulsed current (CHVPC) at 120 pulses per second and 90% of visible motor threshold is known to curb edema formation after blunt trauma to the hind limbs of rats. Objective: To examine the effects of ibuprofen, continuous CHVPC, and simultaneous ibuprofen and CHVPC on acute edema formation after blunt trauma to the hind limbs of rats. Design: Randomized, parallel-group, repeated-measures design. Setting: Laboratory animal facility. Participants: A total of 21 3-month-old Zucker Lean rats (mass = 288 ± 55 g) were studied. Intervention(s): We assessed the effects of ibuprofen, continuous CHVPC, and simultaneous ibuprofen and CHVPC on acute edema formation after blunt trauma to the hind limbs of rats. Main Outcome Measure(s): Limb volumes were measured immediately before and after trauma and every 30 minutes over the 4 hours of the experiment. Results: Volumes of treated limbs of all 3 experimental groups were smaller (P < .05) than those of untreated limbs, but no treatment was more effective than another. Conclusions: Ibuprofen, CHVPC, and simultaneous ibuprofen and CHVPC effectively curbed edema after blunt injury by roughly 50% relative to untreated but similarly injured control limbs of rats. PMID:15970957

  12. Locomotor Behaviour of Blattella germanica Modified by DEET

    PubMed Central

    Sfara, Valeria; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón A.; Zerba, Eduardo N.; Alzogaray, Raúl A.

    2013-01-01

    N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) is the active principle of most insect repellents used worldwide. However, its toxicity on insects has not been widely studied. The aim of this work is to study the effects of DEET on the locomotor activity of Blattella germanica. DEET has a dose-dependent repellent activity on B. germanica. Locomotor activity was significantly lower when insects were pre-exposed to 700 µg/cm2 of DEET for 20 or 30 minutes, but it did not change when pre-exposure was shorter. Locomotor activity of insects that were pre-exposed to 2.000 µg/cm2 of DEET for 10 minutes was significantly lower than the movement registered in controls. No differences were observed when insects were pre-exposed to lower concentrations of DEET. A 30-minute pre-exposure to 700 µg/cm2 of DEET caused a significant decrease in locomotor activity. Movement was totally recovered 24 h later. The locomotor activity measured during the exposure to different concentrations of DEET remained unchanged. Insects with decreased locomotor activity were repelled to the same extent than control insects by the same concentration of DEET. We demonstrated that the repellency and modification of locomotor activity elicited by DEET are non-associated phenomena. We also suggested that the reduction in locomotor activity indicates toxicity of DEET, probably to insect nervous system. PMID:24376701

  13. Locomotor behaviour of Blattella germanica modified by DEET.

    PubMed

    Sfara, Valeria; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón A; Zerba, Eduardo N; Alzogaray, Raúl A

    2013-01-01

    N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) is the active principle of most insect repellents used worldwide. However, its toxicity on insects has not been widely studied. The aim of this work is to study the effects of DEET on the locomotor activity of Blattella germanica. DEET has a dose-dependent repellent activity on B. germanica. Locomotor activity was significantly lower when insects were pre-exposed to 700 µg/cm(2) of DEET for 20 or 30 minutes, but it did not change when pre-exposure was shorter. Locomotor activity of insects that were pre-exposed to 2.000 µg/cm(2) of DEET for 10 minutes was significantly lower than the movement registered in controls. No differences were observed when insects were pre-exposed to lower concentrations of DEET. A 30-minute pre-exposure to 700 µg/cm(2) of DEET caused a significant decrease in locomotor activity. Movement was totally recovered 24 h later. The locomotor activity measured during the exposure to different concentrations of DEET remained unchanged. Insects with decreased locomotor activity were repelled to the same extent than control insects by the same concentration of DEET. We demonstrated that the repellency and modification of locomotor activity elicited by DEET are non-associated phenomena. We also suggested that the reduction in locomotor activity indicates toxicity of DEET, probably to insect nervous system.

  14. Insulin-Dependent Activation of MCH Neurons Impairs Locomotor Activity and Insulin Sensitivity in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Hausen, A Christine; Ruud, Johan; Jiang, Hong; Hess, Simon; Varbanov, Hristo; Kloppenburg, Peter; Brüning, Jens C

    2016-12-06

    Melanin-concentrating-hormone (MCH)-expressing neurons (MCH neurons) in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) are critical regulators of energy and glucose homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that insulin increases the excitability of these neurons in control mice. In vivo, insulin promotes phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in MCH neurons, and cell-type-specific deletion of the insulin receptor (IR) abrogates this response. While lean mice lacking the IR in MCH neurons (IR(ΔMCH)) exhibit no detectable metabolic phenotype under normal diet feeding, they present with improved locomotor activity and insulin sensitivity under high-fat-diet-fed, obese conditions. Similarly, obesity promotes PI3 kinase signaling in these neurons, and this response is abrogated in IR(ΔMCH) mice. In turn, acute chemogenetic activation of MCH neurons impairs locomotor activity but not insulin sensitivity. Collectively, our experiments reveal an insulin-dependent activation of MCH neurons in obesity, which contributes via distinct mechanisms to the manifestation of impaired locomotor activity and insulin resistance.

  15. Evidence for a Role of Orexin/Hypocretin System in Vestibular Lesion-Induced Locomotor Abnormalities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Leilei; Qi, Ruirui; Wang, Junqin; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Jiluo; Cai, Yiling

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular damage can induce locomotor abnormalities in both animals and humans. Rodents with bilateral vestibular loss showed vestibular deficits syndrome such as circling, opisthotonus as well as locomotor and exploratory hyperactivity. Previous studies have investigated the changes in the dopamine system after vestibular loss, but the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. Numerous evidences indicate that the orexin system is implicated in central motor control. We hypothesized that orexin may be potentially involved in vestibular loss-induced motor disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of arsanilate- or 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN)-induced vestibular lesion (AVL or IVL) on the orexin-A (OXA) labeling in rat hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. The vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities were recorded and verified using a histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 (20 mg/kg, i.p.). The effects of the orexin receptor type 1 antagonist SB334867 (16 μg, i.c.v.) on these behavior responses were also investigated. At 72 h post-AVL and IVL, animals exhibited vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity in the home cages. These responses were significantly alleviated by JNJ7777120 which also eliminated AVL-induced increases in exploratory behavior in an open field. The numbers of OXA-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus were significantly increased in the AVL animals at 72 h post-AVL and in the IVL animals at 24, 48, and 72 h post-IVL. SB334867 significantly attenuated the vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity at 72 h post-AVL and IVL. It also decreased exploratory behavior in the AVL animals. These results suggested that the alteration of OXA expression might contribute to locomotor abnormalities after acute vestibular lesion. The orexin receptors might be the potential therapeutic targets for vestibular disorders. PMID:27507932

  16. The effects of acute exposure to ethanol on neurotensin and guanine nucleotide-stimulation of phospholipase C activity in intact NIE-115 neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Both ethanol and neurotensin produce sedation and hypothermia. When administered in combination the behavioral effects of these two substances are potentiated. In order to better understand the biochemical nature of this interaction, the direct effects of ethanol on neurotensin receptors and an associated signal transduction process were determined in NIE-115 neuroblastoma cells. Ethanol in physiologically relevant concentrations significantly reduced neurotensin stimulated ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production while having no effect on the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)neurotensin. In addition, ethanol up to 200 mM had no effect on GTPYS mediated ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production. The results indicate that acute exposure ethanol partially disrupts the normal coupling of activated neurotensin receptors to the guanine nucleotide binding protein associated with phospholipase C.

  17. Programmed Ventricular Stimulation to Risk Stratify for Early Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation to Prevent Tachyarrhythmias following Acute Myocardial Infarction (PROTECT-ICD): Trial Protocol, Background and Significance.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Sarah; Taylor, Andrew J; Stiles, Martin; Chow, Clara; Kovoor, Pramesh

    2016-11-01

    The 'Programmed Ventricular Stimulation to Risk Stratify for Early Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation to Prevent Tachyarrhythmias following Acute Myocardial Infarction' (PROTECT-ICD) trial is an Australian-led multicentre randomised controlled trial targeting prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients who have at least moderately reduced cardiac function following a myocardial infarct (MI). The primary objective of the trial is to assess whether electrophysiological study to guide prophylactic implantation of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) early following MI (first 40 days) will lead to a significant reduction in sudden cardiac death and non-fatal arrhythmia. The secondary objective is to assess the utility of cardiac MRI (CMR) in assessing early myocardial characteristics, and its predictive value for both inducible ventricular tachycardia (VT) at EPS and SCD/ non-fatal arrhythmia at follow-up.

  18. Neurophysiological responses to unpleasant stimuli (acute electrical stimulations and emotional pictures) are increased in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Céline Z.; Goumon, Yannick; Kemmel, Véronique; Kornmeier, Jürgen; Dufour, André; Andlauer, Olivier; Vidailhet, Pierre; Poisbeau, Pierrick; Salvat, Eric; Muller, André; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoé G.; Schmidt-Mutter, Catherine; Giersch, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia have often been described as insensitive to nociceptive signals, but objective evidence is sparse. We address this question by combining subjective behavioral and objective neurochemical and neurophysiological measures. The present study involved 21 stabilized and mildly symptomatic patients with schizophrenia and 21 control subjects. We applied electrical stimulations below the pain threshold and assessed sensations of pain and unpleasantness with rating scales, and Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEPs/EEG). We also measured attention, two neurochemical stress indices (ACTH/cortisol), and subjective VEPs/EEG responses to visual emotional stimuli. Our results revealed that, subjectively, patients’ evaluations do not differ from controls. However, the amplitude of EEG evoked potentials was greater in patients than controls as early as 50 ms after electrical stimulations and beyond one second after visual processing of emotional pictures. Such responses could not be linked to the stress induced by the stimulations, since stress hormone levels were stable. Nor was there a difference between patients and controls in respect of attention performance and tactile sensitivity. Taken together, all indices measured in patients in our study were either heightened or equivalent relative to healthy volunteers. PMID:26935652

  19. AMN082, a metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 allosteric agonist, attenuates locomotor sensitization and cross-sensitization induced by cocaine and morphine in mice.

    PubMed

    Jenda, M; Gawel, K; Marszalek, M; Komsta, L; Kotlinska, J H

    2015-03-03

    Previous studies have indicated that metabotropic glutamate receptors 7 (mGluR7s) are involved in drug addiction. However, the role of these receptors in drug-induced behavioral sensitization is unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether systemic injection of AMN082, a selective mGluR7 allosteric agonist, reduces the cocaine- and morphine-induced hyperactivity and the development and expression of locomotor sensitization, and also affects the reciprocal cross-sensitization to the stimulant effect of cocaine and morphine in mice. AMN082 (1.25-10.0 mg/kg, i.p.) did not have an impact on locomotion of naive mice and did not affect the acute cocaine- or morphine-induced hyperactivity, except the dose of 10 mg/kg that suppressed the locomotor effect of both drugs. Repeated exposure to cocaine or morphine (10 mg/kg, 5× every 3 days) gradually increased locomotion during induction of sensitization and after 4 (cocaine) or 7 day (morphine) withdrawal phase when challenged with cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or morphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) on day 17 or 20, respectively. Pretreatment of animals with the lower doses of AMN082 (1.25-5.0 mg/kg, i.p.), 30 min before every cocaine or morphine injection during repeated drug administration or before cocaine or morphine challenge, dose-dependently attenuated the development, as well as the expression of cocaine or morphine locomotor sensitization. AMN082 also inhibited the reciprocal cross-sensitization between these drugs. Prior to administration of MMPIP (10 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective mGluR7 antagonist reversed the inhibitory effect of AMN082 on the development or expression of cocaine or morphine sensitization. These data indicate that AMN082 attenuated the development and expression of cocaine and morphine sensitization, and the reciprocal cross-sensitization via a mechanism that involves mGluR7s. Thus, AMN082 might have therapeutic implications not only in the treatment of cocaine or opioid addiction but also in the

  20. Conditioned Reinforcement and Locomotor Activating Effects of Caffeine and Ethanol Combinations in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Megan L.T.; May, Christina E.; Griffin, William C.

    2013-01-01

    A growing trend among ethanol drinkers, especially young adults, is to combine caffeinated energy drinks with ethanol during a drinking episode. The primary active ingredient of these mixers is caffeine, which may significantly interact with ethanol. We tested the two hypotheses that caffeine would enhance ethanol-conditioned place preference and also enhance ethanol-stimulated locomotor activity. The interactive pharmacology of ethanol and caffeine was examined in C57BL/6J (B6) mice in a conditioned place preference procedure with 1.75 g/kg ethanol and 3 mg/kg caffeine. Additionally, we used B6 mice to evaluate ethanol/caffeine combinations on locomotor activity using 3 doses of ethanol (1.75, 2.5 and 3.25 g/kg) and 2 two doses of caffeine (3 and 15 mg/kg). Both ethanol and caffeine administered alone increased preference for the drug paired side, though the effect of caffeine was more modest than that of ethanol. The drug combination produced significant place preference itself, but this was not greater than that for ethanol alone. Additionally, the combination of caffeine and ethanol significantly increased locomotion compared to giving either drug alone. The effect was strongest with a stimulatory dose of ethanol (1.75 g/kg) and waned with increasing doses of ethanol. Thus, combinations of caffeine and ethanol had significant conditioned reinforcing and locomotor activating effects in mice. PMID:23872371

  1. Removing sensory input disrupts spinal locomotor activity in the early postnatal period

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, JeanMarie; Díaz-Ríos, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Motor patterns driving rhythmic movements of our lower limbs during walking are generated by groups of neurons within the spinal cord, called central pattern generators (CPGs). After suffering a spinal cord injury (SCI), many descending fibers from our brain are severed or become nonfunctional which leaves the spinal CPG network without its initiating drive. Recent studies are focusing on the importance of maintaining sensory stimulation to the legs on SCI patients as a way to initiate and control the CPG locomotor network. We began assessing the role of sensory feedback to the locomotor CPG network by using a neonatal mouse spinal cord preparation were the lower limbs are still attached. Removing sensory feedback coming from the hindlimbs by way of a lower lumbar transection or by ventral root denervation revealed a positive correlation in the ability of sensory input deprivation to disrupt ongoing locomotor activity on older versus younger animals. The differences in the motor responses as a function of age could be correlated with the loss of excitatory activity from sensory afferents. Continued studies on this field could eventually provide key information that translates in the design of novel therapeutic strategies to treat patients that have suffered a SCI. PMID:24043359

  2. The anti-(+)-methamphetamine monoclonal antibody mAb7F9 attenuates acute (+)-methamphetamine effects on intracranial self-stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew C; LeSage, Mark G; Shelley, David; Perry, Jennifer L; Pentel, Paul R; Owens, S Michael

    2015-01-01

    Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against (+)-methamphetamine (METH) is being evaluated for the treatment of METH addiction. A human/mouse chimeric form of the murine anti-METH mAb7F9 has entered clinical trials. This study examined the effects of murine mAb7F9 on certain addiction-related behavioral effects of METH in rats as measured using intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). Initial studies indicated that acute METH (0.1-0.56 mg/kg, s.c.) lowered the minimal (threshold) stimulation intensity that maintained ICSS. METH (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.) also blocked elevations in ICSS thresholds (anhedonia-like behavior) during spontaneous withdrawal from a chronic METH infusion (10 mg/kg/day x 7 days). In studies examining effects of i.v. pretreatment with mAb7F9 (at 30, 100, or 200 mg/kg), 200 mg/kg blocked the ability of an initial injection of METH (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.) to reduce baseline ICSS thresholds, but was less capable of attenuating the effect of subsequent daily injections of METH. MAb7F9 (200 mg/kg) also produced a small but significant reduction in the ability of METH (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.) to reverse METH withdrawal-induced elevations in ICSS thresholds. These studies demonstrate that mAb7F9 can partially attenuate some addiction-related effects of acute METH in an ICSS model, and provide some support for the therapeutic potential of mAb7F9 for the treatment of METH addiction.

  3. The effect of baclofen and aminooxyacetic acid on the action of drugs stimulating the dopaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Sypniewska, M

    1978-01-01

    Baclofen and aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA) depressed the explorative and locomotor activity in rats. Baclofen, but not AOAA, decreased the locomotor stimulation, produced by apomorphine. Both compounds did not affect hyperactivity, induced by D, L-amphetamine, amantadine and methylphenidate. Neither baclofen nor AOAA influenced stereotypy induced by the above four substances.

  4. Naloxone blocks ethanol-mediated appetitive conditioning and locomotor activation in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Acevedo, María Belén; Spear, Norman E

    2011-01-01

    Age-related differences in ethanol sensitivity could put adolescents at risk for developing alcohol-related problems. Little information exists, however, about adolescent sensitivity to ethanol's appetitive effects and the neurobiological mechanisms underlying ethanol reinforcement during this developmental stage. The present study assessed the role of the opioid system in adolescent rats in an appetitive second-order schedule of ethanol reinforcement and ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation. On postnatal day 32 (PD32), animals were pretreated with the general opioid antagonist naloxone (0.0, 0.75, 1.50, or 2.5 mg/kg) and then given pairings of ethanol (0.0 or 2.0 g/kg, intragastrically) with intraoral pulses of water (conditioned stimulus 1 [CS₁], first-order conditioning phase). CS₁ delivery occurred 30-45 min after ethanol administration when the effect of ethanol was assumed to be appetitive. On PD33, adolescents were exposed to CS₁ (second-order conditioning phase) while in a chamber featuring distinctive exteroceptive cues (CS₂). Preference for CS₂ was then tested. Adolescents given CS₁-ethanol pairings exhibited greater preference for CS₂ than controls, indicating ethanol-mediated reinforcement, but only when not pretreated with naloxone. Blood alcohol levels during conditioning were not altered by naloxone. Experiment 2 revealed that ethanol-induced locomotor activation soon after administration, and naloxone dose-dependently suppressed this stimulating effect. The present study indicates that adolescent rats are sensitive to ethanol's reinforcing and locomotor-stimulating effects. Both effects of ethanol appear to be mediated by endogenous opioid system activation.

  5. NALOXONE BLOCKS ETHANOL-MEDIATED APPETITIVE CONDITIONING AND LOCOMOTOR ACTIVATION IN ADOLESCENT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Acevedo, María Belén; Spear, Norman E.

    2010-01-01

    Age-related differences in ethanol sensitivity could put adolescents at risk for developing alcohol-related problems. Little information exists, however, about adolescent sensitivity to ethanol's appetitive effects and the neurobiological mechanisms underlying ethanol reinforcement during this developmental stage. The present study assessed the role of the opioid system in adolescent rats in an appetitive second-order schedule of ethanol reinforcement and ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation. On postnatal day 32 (PD32), animals were pretreated with the general opioid antagonist naloxone (0.0, 0.75, 1.50, or 2.5 mg/kg) and then given pairings of ethanol (0.0 or 2.0 g/kg, intragastrically) with intraoral pulses of water (conditioned stimulus 1 [CS1], first-order conditioning phase). CS1 delivery occurred 30–45 min after ethanol administration when the effect of ethanol was assumed to be appetitive. On PD33, adolescents were exposed to CS1 (second-order conditioning phase) while in a chamber featuring distinctive exteroceptive cues (CS2). Preference for CS2 was then tested. Adolescents given CS1-ethanol pairings exhibited greater preference for CS2 than controls, indicating ethanol-mediated reinforcement, but only when not pretreated with naloxone. Blood alcohol levels during conditioning were not altered by naloxone. Experiment 2 revealed that ethanol induced locomotor activation soon after administration, and naloxone dose-dependently suppressed this stimulating effect. The present study indicates that adolescent rats are sensitive to ethanol's reinforcing and locomotor-stimulating effects. Both effects of ethanol appear to be mediated by endogenous opioid system activation. PMID:20708642

  6. The mesencephalic locomotor region sends a bilateral glutamatergic drive to hindbrain reticulospinal neurons in a tetrapod

    PubMed Central

    Ryczko, Dimitri; Auclair, Francois; Cabelguen, Jean‐Marie

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) on one side evokes symmetrical locomotor movements on both sides. How this occurs was previously examined in detail in a swimmer using body undulations (lamprey), but in tetrapods the downstream projections from the MLR to brainstem neurons are not fully understood. Here we examined the brainstem circuits from the MLR to identified reticulospinal neurons in the salamander Notophthalmus viridescens. Using neural tracing, we show that the MLR sends bilateral projections to the middle reticular nucleus (mRN, rostral hindbrain) and the inferior reticular nucleus (iRN, caudal hindbrain). Ca2+ imaging coupled to electrophysiology in in vitro isolated brains revealed very similar responses in reticulospinal neurons on both sides to a unilateral MLR stimulation. As the strength of MLR stimulation was increased, the responses increased in size in reticulospinal neurons of the mRN and iRN, but the responses in the iRN were smaller. Bath‐application or local microinjections of glutamatergic antagonists markedly reduced reticulospinal neuron responses, indicating that the MLR sends glutamatergic inputs to reticulospinal neurons. In addition, reticulospinal cells responded to glutamate microinjections and the size of the responses paralleled the amount of glutamate microinjected. Immunofluorescence coupled with anatomical tracing confirmed the presence of glutamatergic projections from the MLR to reticulospinal neurons. Overall, we show that the brainstem circuits activated by the MLR in the salamander are organized similarly to those previously described in lampreys, indicating that the anatomo‐physiological features of the locomotor drive are well conserved in vertebrates. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1361–1383, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26470600

  7. Integrated Locomotor Function Tests for Countermeasure Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Cohen, H. S.; Landsness, E. C.; Black, F. O.

    2005-01-01

    Following spaceflight crewmembers experience locomotor dysfunction due to inflight adaptive alterations in sensorimotor function. Countermeasures designed to mitigate these postflight gait alterations need to be assessed with a new generation of tests that evaluate the interaction of various sensorimotor sub-systems central to locomotor control. The goal of the present study was to develop new functional tests of locomotor control that could be used to test the efficacy of countermeasures. These tests were designed to simultaneously examine the function of multiple sensorimotor systems underlying the control of locomotion and be operationally relevant to the astronaut population. Traditionally, gaze stabilization has been studied almost exclusively in seated subjects performing target acquisition tasks requiring only the involvement of coordinated eye-head movements. However, activities like walking involve full-body movement and require coordination between lower limbs and the eye-head-trunk complex to achieve stabilized gaze during locomotion. Therefore the first goal of this study was to determine how the multiple, interdependent, full-body sensorimotor gaze stabilization subsystems are functionally coordinated during locomotion. In an earlier study we investigated how alteration in gaze tasking changes full-body locomotor control strategies. Subjects walked on a treadmill and either focused on a central point target or read numeral characters. We measured: temporal parameters of gait, full body sagittal plane segmental kinematics of the head, trunk, thigh, shank and foot, accelerations along the vertical axis at the head and the shank, and the vertical forces acting on the support surface. In comparison to the point target fixation condition, the results of the number reading task showed that compensatory head pitch movements increased, peak head acceleration was reduced and knee flexion at heel-strike was increased. In a more recent study we investigated the

  8. Locomotor training: experiencing the changing body.

    PubMed

    Hannold, Elizabeth M; Young, Mary Ellen; Rittman, Maude R; Bowden, Mark G; Behrman, Andrea L

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of persons with incomplete spinal cord injury who participated in loco-motor training (LT). LT is an emerging rehabilitation intervention for enhancing the recovery of walking in persons with central nervous system disorders. Multiple interviews and field observations provided data from eight participants, including four veterans. Findings indicate that experiences of bodily changes were prevalent among participants. Themes included (1) experiencing impaired or absent proprioception, (2) struggling for bodily control, and (3) experiencing emergent bodily sensations. Themes 1 and 2 reflected bodily disruption as a result of spinal cord injury and were challenging to participants as they attempted to reconnect the body and self through LT. Theme 3 reflected bodily sensations (burning, soreness) that were seen as positive signs of recovery and resulted in hope and motivation. Understanding how LT participants experience bodily changes may enable therapists to develop improved participant-centered intervention approaches.

  9. C57BL/6J MICE EXHIBIT REDUCED DOPAMINE D3 RECEPTOR-MEDIATED LOCOMOTOR-INHIBITORY FUNCTION RELATIVE TO DBA/2J MICE

    PubMed Central

    McNAMARA, R. K.; LEVANT, B.; TAYLOR, B.; AHLBRAND, R.; LIU, Y.; SULLIVAN, J. R.; STANFORD, K.; RICHTAND, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    Previous reports have identified greater sensitivity to the locomotor-stimulating, sensitizing, and reinforcing effects of amphetamine in inbred C57BL/6J mice relative to inbred DBA/2J mice. The dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of rodent locomotor activity, and exerts inhibitory opposition to D1 receptor (D1R)-mediated signaling. Based on these observations, we investigated D3R expression and D3R-mediated locomotor-inhibitory function, as well as D1R binding and D1R-mediated locomotor-stimulating function, in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice. C57BL/6J mice exhibited lower D3R binding density (−32%) in the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens/islands of Calleja), lower D3R mRNA expression (−26%) in the substantia nigra/ventral tegmentum, and greater D3R mRNA expression (+40%) in the hippocampus, relative to DBA/2J mice. There were no strain differences in DR3 mRNA expression in the ventral striatum or prefrontal cortex, nor were there differences in D1R binding in the ventral striatum. Behaviorally, C57BL/6J mice were less sensitive to the locomotor-inhibitory effect of the D3R agonist PD128907 (10 μg/kg), and more sensitive to the locomotor-stimulating effects of novelty, amphetamine (1 mg/kg), and the D1R-like agonist ±-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazepine-7,8,-diol hydrochloride (SKF38393) (5–20 mg/kg) than DBA/2J mice. While the selective D3R antagonist N-(4-[4-{2,3-dichlorphenyl}-1 piperazinyl]butyl)-2-fluorenylcarboxamide (NGB 2904) (0.01–1.0 mg/kg) augmented novelty-, amphetamine-, and SKF38393-induced locomotor activity in DBA/2J mice, it reduced novelty-induced locomotor activity in C57BL/6J mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate that C57BL/6J mice exhibit less D3R-mediated inhibitory function relative to DBA/2J mice, and suggest that reduced D3R-mediated inhibitory function may contribute to heightened sensitivity to the locomotor-stimulating effects of amphetamine in the C57BL/6J mouse strain

  10. Locomotor activating effects of cocaine and scopolamine combinations in rats: isobolographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morgane

    2014-08-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors are currently receiving renewed interest as viable targets for treating various psychiatric disorders. Dopaminergic and muscarinic systems interact in complex ways. The goal of this study was to quantify the interaction between a systemically administered psychomotor stimulant and muscarinic antagonist at the behavioral level. Through isobolographic analysis of locomotor activity data, we assessed the effects of three cocaine/scopolamine mixtures in terms of deviation from simple dose addition (additivity), at four effect levels. All three mixtures produced some more-than-additive (synergistic) effects, as lower doses were needed to produce the given effects relative to the calculated effect of additive doses. A mixture with comparable contributions from cocaine and scopolamine produced significantly more-than-additive effects at all but the lowest effect level examined. A mostly-cocaine mixture was more-than-additive only at low effect levels, whereas a mostly-scopolamine mixture produced effects more consistent with additivity, with only the highest effect level barely reaching significant synergism. Our study confirms and quantifies previous findings that suggested synergistic effects of stimulants and muscarinic antagonists. The synergism implies that cocaine and scopolamine stimulate locomotor activity through nonidentical pathways, and was most pronounced for a mixture containing cocaine and scopolamine in comparable proportions.

  11. Interactions between morphine and the morphine-glucuronides measured by conditioned place preference and locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Vindenes, Vigdis; Ripel, Ase; Handal, Marte; Boix, Fernando; Mørland, Jørg

    2009-07-01

    After intake of heroin or morphine, active metabolites are formed in the body. The two most important morphine metabolites are morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G). M6G and M3G are present for longer time periods and in higher concentrations than the parent drug, but their potential contribution to reward and to development of dependence and addiction is not clear. We tested the effects of morphine and M6G separately (doses of 10, 20, 30 and 50 micromol/kg), administered together, and also in combination with with 200 microm l/kg M3G in male C57BL/6J-Bom mice. M3G in doses of 50, 100, 200, 300 and 400 micromol/kg were also tested alone. We evaluated the rewarding effects in a conditioning place preference (CPP) model and the psychomotor stimulating effects by recording locomotor activity. Mice were subjected to three consecutive conditioning days with drugs or saline before testing. Changes in locomotor activity from conditioning day one to day three were also compared to the expression of CPP on the test day. This study revealed that coadministration of morphine and M6G induced CPP of similar magnitude to the sum of equimolar doses of these compounds alone, and different ratios of the two drugs did not affect the results. M3G did not cause CPP and reduced the CPP induced by both morphine and M6G when coadministered with these drugs. Morphine induced locomotor activity was reduced by coadministration of M3G, but this was not seen when M3G was co-injected with M6G. The changes in locomotor activity during the conditioning periods did not correlated with the expression of CPP. This study revealed that the morphine-glucuronides in different and complex ways can influence the pharmacological effects of psychomotor activation and reward observed after intake of morphine.

  12. Effects of nicotine on ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization: A model of neuroadaptation.

    PubMed

    Gubner, Noah R; Phillips, Tamara J

    2015-07-15

    Co-morbid use of nicotine-containing tobacco products and alcohol (ethanol) is prevalent in young adults initiating use and in alcohol dependent adults, suggesting that these drugs in combination may increase risk to develop dependence on one or both drugs. Neuroadaptations caused by repeated drug exposure are related to the development of drug dependence and vulnerability to relapse. Locomotor sensitization has been used as a behavioral measure used to detect changes in neural drug sensitivity that are thought to contribute to drug dependence and relapse. Locomotor sensitization was measured in the current studies to examine potential differences in the effects of nicotine and ethanol given alone and in combination. Baseline activity levels of DBA/2J mice were assessed on 2 days, then mice were treated for 10 days with saline, nicotine (1 or 2mg/kg of nicotine tartrate), ethanol (1 or 2g/kg), or nicotine plus ethanol and locomotor activity was assessed every third day. On the following day, all mice were challenged with ethanol to measure the expression of sensitization. Mice treated with both nicotine and ethanol exhibited greater stimulation than predicted from the combined independent effects of these drugs, consistent with our previously published results. The combined effects of nicotine and ethanol on locomotor sensitization were dependent on the dose of ethanol and whether testing was performed after the drugs were given together, or after challenge with ethanol alone. These results suggest that nicotine and ethanol in combination can have neuroadaptive effects that differ from the independent effects of these drugs.

  13. Proximal tubule-derived Colony Stimulating Factor-1 mediates polarization of renal macrophages and dendritic cells, and recovery in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinqiu; Chang, Jian; Yao, Bing; Niu, Aolei; Kelly, Emily; Breeggemann, Matthew C.; Abboud Werner, Sherry L.; Harris, Raymond C.; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Infiltrating cells play an important role in both the development of and recovery from acute kidney injury (AKI). Macrophages and renal dendritic cells are of particular interest because they can exhibit distinctly different functional phenotypes, broadly characterized as proinflammatory (M1) or tissue reparative (M2). Resident renal macrophages and dendritic cells participate in recovery from AKI in response to either ischemia/reperfusion or a model of selective proximal tubule injury induced by diphtheria toxin-induced apoptosis in transgenic mice expressing the human diphtheria toxin receptor on proximal tubule cells. Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) is an important factor mediating the recovery from AKI, and CSF-1 can stimulate macrophage and dendritic cell proliferation and polarization during the recovery phase of AKI. The kidney, and specifically the proximal tubule, is a major source of intrarenal CSF-1 production in response to AKI. We induced selective deletion of proximal tubule CSF-1 to determine its role in expansion and proliferation of renal macrophages and dendritic cells and in recovery from AKI. In both models of AKI, there was decreased M2 polarization, delayed functional and structural recovery and increased tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Thus, intrarenal CSF-1 is an important mediator of macrophage/dendritic cell polarization and recovery from AKI. PMID:26422503

  14. Combined administration of G-CSF and GM-CSF stimulates monocyte-derived pro-angiogenic cells in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Stefania; Bussolati, Benedetta; Scacciatella, Paolo; Marra, Sebastiano; Sanavio, Fiorella; Tarella, Corrado; Camussi, Giovanni

    2006-04-01

    Mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells has been suggested to contribute to neo-vascularization of ischemic organs. Aim of this study was to investigate whether the combination of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF may influence the expansion of circulating KDR+ cells in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). KDR+ cells significantly increased in peripheral blood of AMI patients treated with G-CSF and GM-CSF compared to untreated patients. This KDR+ cells population was CD14+ but not CD34+ or CD133+. CD14+/KDR+ cells were also obtained in vitro by culturing mononuclear cells from healthy donors in a Rotary Cell Culture System in the presence of G-CSF + GM-CSF, but not of the individual growth factors. CD14+/KDR+ cells, obtained from patients or from in vitro culture, co-expressed hematopoietic (CD45, CD14) and endothelial markers (CD31, CD105, and VE-cadherin). CD14+/KDR+, but not CD14+/KDR- cells, stimulated the organization of human microvascular endothelial cells into capillary-like structures on Matrigel both in vitro and in vivo. The combination of G-CSF and GM-CSF induced a CD14+/KDR+ cell population with potential pro-angiogenic properties.

  15. Subcellular redistribution of m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in striatal interneurons in vivo after acute cholinergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bernard, V; Laribi, O; Levey, A I; Bloch, B

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of our work was to investigate how the cholinergic environment influences the targeting and the intracellular trafficking of the muscarinic receptor m2 (m2R) in vivo. To address this question, we have used immunohistochemical approaches at light and electron microscopic levels to detect the m2R in control rats and rats treated with muscarinic receptor agonists. In control animals, m2Rs were located mostly at postsynaptic sites at the plasma membrane of perikarya and dendrites of cholinergic and NPY-somatostatin interneurons as autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, respectively. Presynaptic receptors were also detected in boutons. The m2Rs were usually detected at extrasynaptic sites, but they could be found rarely in association with symmetrical synapses, suggesting that the cholinergic transmission mediated by m2R occurs via synaptic and nonsynaptic mechanisms. The stimulation of muscarinic receptors with oxotremorine provoked a dramatic alteration of m2R compartmentalization, including endocytosis with a decrease of the density of m2R at the membrane (-63%) and an increase of those associated with endosomes (+86%) in perikarya. The very strong increase of m2R associated with multivesicular bodies (+732%) suggests that oxotremorine activated degradation. The slight increase in the Golgi apparatus (+26%) suggests that the m2R stimulation had an effect on the maturation of m2R. The substance P receptor located at the membrane of the same neurons was unaffected by oxotremorine. Our data demonstrate that cholinergic stimulation dramatically influences the subcellular distribution of m2R in striatal interneurons in vivo. These events may have key roles in controlling abundance and availability of muscarinic receptors via regulation of receptor endocytosis, degradation, and/or neosynthesis. Further, the control of muscarinic receptor trafficking may influence the activity of striatal interneurons, including neurotransmitter release and/or electric activity.

  16. Antidepressant-like activity of EMD 386088, a 5-HT6 receptor partial agonist, following systemic acute and chronic administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Siwek, Agata; Partyka, Anna; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Wasik, Anna; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Wesołowska, Anna

    2015-10-01

    The study was designed to examine the potency of EMD 386088, a 5-HT6 receptor partial agonist, to exert antidepressant-like properties in animal models following acute and chronic intraperitoneal administration to rats. The modified rat forced swim test (FST) was utilized to examine a potential antidepressant effect of EMD 386088 after acute treatment (30 min before the test) and three times in a 24-h administration scheme (24 h, 5 h, and 30 min prior to the FST). The olfactory bulbectomy (OB) model was used to assess its antidepressant-like properties after chronic treatment (the drug was administered once daily for 14 days). EMD 386088 showed an antidepressant-like effect in all conducted tests. Its activity in FST after its acute administration (5 mg/kg) was blocked by the selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist SB 271046. The obtained results seem to be specific, as there was no observed locomotor stimulation by the drug given at a lower/antidepressant dose. In the three times in the 24-h treatment scheme, EMD 386088 (2.5 mg/kg) exerted antidepressant properties in FST as well as increased locomotor activity in the open field test. Chronic administration of EMD 386088 (2.5 mg/kg) significantly improved the learning deficit in OB rats without affecting performance in Sham-operated (SH) animals in the passive avoidance test, and reduced OB-related rats' locomotor hyperactivity, but did not change the number of rearing + peeping episodes. The obtained findings suggest that EMD 386088 produces antidepressant-like activity after systemic acute and chronic administration which may result from direct stimulation of 5-HT6 receptors.

  17. Assessing blood granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as a potential biomarker of acute traumatic brain injury in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A; Dohi, Kenji; Hansen, Kim; Thompson, Hilaire J

    2016-02-01

    Previous work has found that serum G-CSF was acutely elevated in mice 24h but not one week after controlled cortical impact (CCI). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether blood G-CSF correlates with the elevated brain cytokines in mice after CCI and also if it correlates with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans. Here, we found in mice undergoing CCI, a procedure that induces direct injury to the brain, that serum G-CSF correlated directly or indirectly with several brain cytokines, indicating it is a useful marker for the neuroinflammation of TBI. A pilot study in humans (phase I, n=19) confirmed that plasma G-CSF is acutely elevated on day 1 (p<0.001) of TBI and has returned to baseline by one week. In a second human sample (phase II) (n=80), we found plasma G-CSF peaks about 12h after arriving in the emergency department (41.6+/-5.4 pg/ml). Aging was weakly associated (p<0.05) with a less robust elevation in serum G-CSF, but there was no difference with gender. ISS, a measure of total severity of injury, correlated with the degree of elevation in serum G-CSF (r=.419; p<0.05), but severity of head injury (via AIS) did not. The latter may have been because of the statistically narrow range of head injuries among our cases and the high number of cases diagnosed with closed head injury (a non-codable diagnosis). In conclusion, plasma G-CSF may be a useful biomarker of TBI, correlating with neuroinflammation in the animal model and in the human studies with time since injury and total severity of injury. As such, it may be useful in determining whether TBI has occurred within the last 24h.

  18. Mechanisms for greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in normal and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle after acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Cartee, Gregory D

    2015-12-15

    Enhanced skeletal muscle and whole body insulin sensitivity can persist for up to 24-48 h after one exercise session. This review focuses on potential mechanisms for greater postexercise and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU) by muscle in individuals with normal or reduced insulin sensitivity. A model is proposed for the processes underlying this improvement; i.e., triggers initiate events that activate subsequent memory elements, which store information that is relayed to mediators, which translate memory into action by controlling an end effector that directly executes increased insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Several candidates are potential triggers or memory elements, but none have been conclusively verified. Regarding potential mediators in both normal and insulin-resistant individuals, elevated postexercise ISGU with a physiological insulin dose coincides with greater Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) phosphorylation without improved proximal insulin signaling at steps from insulin receptor binding to Akt activity. Causality remains to be established between greater AS160 phosphorylation and improved ISGU. The end effector for normal individuals is increased GLUT4 translocation, but this remains untested for insulin-resistant individuals postexercise. Following exercise, insulin-resistant individuals can attain ISGU values similar to nonexercising healthy controls, but after a comparable exercise protocol performed by both groups, ISGU for the insulin-resistant group has been consistently reported to be below postexercise values for the healthy group. Further research is required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the improved postexercise ISGU in individuals with normal or subnormal insulin sensitivity and to explain the disparity between these groups after similar exercise.

  19. Levo-tetrahydropalmatine attenuates the development and expression of methamphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization and the accompanying activation of ERK in the nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, N; Chen, Y; Zhu, J; Wang, L; Cao, G; Dang, Y; Yan, C; Wang, J; Chen, T

    2014-01-31

    Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) is an alkaloid purified from corydalis and has been used in many traditional Chinese herbal preparations for its analgesic, sedative, and hypnotic properties. Previous studies indicated that l-THP has modest antagonist activity against dopamine receptors and thus it might have potential therapeutic effects on drug addiction. However, whether and how l-THP contributes to methamphetamine (METH)-induced locomotor sensitization remains unclear. Therefore, the current study aims to examine the roles of l-THP in the development and expression of METH-induced locomotor sensitization as well as the accompanying extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), caudate putamen (CPu) and prefrontal cortex (PFc) in mice. We found that moderate doses of METH (0.5 and 2 mg/kg) induced hyper-locomotor activity in mice on all METH injection days whereas high dose of METH (5 mg/kg)-treated mice displayed only acute locomotor response to METH and severe stereotyped behaviors on the first day after drug injection. Interestingly, only 2 mg/kg dose of METH-induced locomotor sensitization which was accompanied by the activation of ERK1/2 in the NAc and CPu in mice. Although l-THP (5 and 10 mg/kg) per se did not induce obvious changes in locomotor activities in mice, its co-administration with METH could significantly attenuate acute METH-induced hyper-locomotor activity, the development and expression of METH-induced locomotor sensitization, and the accompanying ERK1/2 activation in the NAc and CPu. These results suggest that l-THP has potential therapeutic effect on METH-induced locomotor sensitization, and the underlying molecular mechanism might be related to its inhibitory effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the NAc and CPu.

  20. A behavioural comparison of acute and chronic Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol in C57BL/6JArc mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Leonora E; Chesworth, Rose; Huang, Xu-Feng; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C; Karl, Tim

    2010-08-01

    Cannabis contains over 70 unique compounds and its abuse is linked to an increased risk of developing schizophrenia. The behavioural profiles of the psychotropic cannabis constituent Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) and the non-psychotomimetic constituent cannabidiol (CBD) were investigated with a battery of behavioural tests relevant to anxiety and positive, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Male adult C57BL/6JArc mice were given 21 daily intraperitoneal injections of vehicle, Delta9-THC (0.3, 1, 3 or 10 mg/kg) or CBD (1, 5, 10 or 50 mg/kg). Delta9-THC produced the classic cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated tetrad of hypolocomotion, analgesia, catalepsy and hypothermia while CBD had modest hyperthermic effects. While sedative at this dose, Delta9-THC (10 mg/kg) produced locomotor-independent anxiogenic effects in the open-field and light-dark tests. Chronic CBD produced moderate anxiolytic-like effects in the open-field test at 50 mg/kg and in the light-dark test at a low dose (1 mg/kg). Acute and chronic Delta9-THC (10 mg/kg) decreased the startle response while CBD had no effect. Prepulse inhibition was increased by acute treatment with Delta9-THC (0.3, 3 and 10 mg/kg) or CBD (1, 5 and 50 mg/kg) and by chronic CBD (1 mg/kg). Chronic CBD (50 mg/kg) attenuated dexamphetamine (5 mg/kg)-induced hyperlocomotion, suggesting an antipsychotic-like action for this cannabinoid. Chronic Delta9-THC decreased locomotor activity before and after dexamphetamine administration suggesting functional antagonism of the locomotor stimulant effect. These data provide the first evidence of anxiolytic- and antipsychotic-like effects of chronic but not acute CBD in C57BL/6JArc mice, extending findings from acute studies in other inbred mouse strains and rats.

  1. Interactions of serotonin (5-HT)2 receptor-targeting ligands and nicotine: locomotor activity studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; McCreary, Andrew C; Filip, Małgorzata

    2009-08-01

    Male Wistar rats were used to verify the hypothesis that serotonin (5-HT)(2A) or 5-HT(2C) receptors may control the locomotor effects evoked by nicotine (0.4 mg/kg). The 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist (M100,907), the 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist (DOI), the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist (SB 242,084), and the 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists (Ro 60-0175 and WAY 163,909) were used. M100,907 (0.5-2mg/kg) did not alter, while DOI (1 mg/kg) enhanced the nicotine-induced hyperlocomotion. The effect of DOI was antagonized by M100,907 (1 mg/kg). SB 242,084 (0.25-1 mg/kg) augmented, while Ro 60-0175 (1 and 3 mg/kg) and WAY 163,909 (1.5 mg/kg) decreased the overall effect of acute nicotine; effects of Ro 60-0175 and WAY 163,909 were attenuated by SB 242,084 (0.125 mg/kg). In another set of experiments, M100,907 (2 mg/kg) on Day 10 attenuated, while DOI (0.1-1 mg/kg) enhanced the nicotine-evoked conditioned hyperlocomotion in rats repeatedly (Days 1-5) treated with nicotine in experimental chambers. SB 242,084 (0.125 or 1 mg/kg) did not change, while Ro 60-0175 (1 mg/kg) or WAY 163,909 (1.5 mg/kg) decreased the expression of nicotine-induced conditioned hyperactivity. Only DOI (0.3 and 1 mg/kg) and SB 242,084 (1 mg/kg) enhanced the basal locomotion. The present data indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptors are significant for the expression of nicotine-evoked conditioned hyperactivity. Conversely, 5-HT(2C) receptors play a pivotal role in the acute effects of nicotine. Pharmacological stimulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors enhances the conditioned hyperlocomotion, while activation of 5-HT(2C) receptors decreases both the response to acute nicotine and conditioned hyperactivity.

  2. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, blocks the development and expression of ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    Umathe, Sudhir N; Bhutada, Pravinkumar S; Raut, Vivek S; Jain, Nishant S; Mundhada, Yogita R

    2009-02-01

    Manipulation of the serotonergic system has been shown to alter ethanol sensitization. Ondansetron is a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, reported to attenuate cocaine and methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization, but no reports are available on its role in ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization. Therefore, an attempt has been made to assess this issue by using an earlier used animal model of ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization. Results indicated that ondansetron (0.25-1.0 mg/kg, subcutaneously) given before the challenge dose of ethanol (2.4 g/kg, intraperitoneally) injection, significantly and dose dependently attenuated the expression of sensitization. In addition, ondansetron (1.0 mg/kg, subcutaneously) given before ethanol injection on days 1, 4, 7, and 10 significantly blocked the development (days 1, 4, 7, and 10), and expression (day 15) of sensitization to the locomotor stimulant effect of ethanol injection. Ondansetron had no effect per se on locomotor activity and did not affect blood ethanol levels. Therefore, the results raise the possibility that ondansetron blocked the development and expression of ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization by acting on 5-HT3 receptors.

  3. Hindlimb Stretching Alters Locomotor Function Post-Spinal Cord Injury in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Caudle, Krista L.; Atkinson, Darryn A.; Brown, Edward H.; Donaldson, Katie; Seibt, Erik; Chea, Tim; Smith, Erin; Chung, Karianne; Shum-Siu, Alice; Cron, Courtney C.; Magnuson, David S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Stretching is a widely accepted standard-of-care therapy following spinal cord injury that has not been systematically studied in animal models. Objective To investigate the influence of a daily stretch-based physical therapy program on locomotor recovery in adult rats with moderate T9 contusive SCI. Methods A randomized treatment and control study of stretching in an animal model of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Moderate spinal cord injuries were delivered with the NYU Impactor. Daily stretching (30 min./day, 5 days/wk for 8 wks) was provided by a team of animal handlers. Hindlimb function was assessed using the BBB Open Field Locomotor Scale and kinematically. Passive range-of-motion for each joint was determined weekly using a goniometer. Results Declines in hindlimb function during overground stepping were observed for the first 4 weeks. BBB scores improved weeks 5–10 but remained below the control group. Stretched animals had significant deficits in knee passive ROM starting at week 4 and for the duration of the study. Kinematic assessment showed decreased joint excursion during stepping that partially recovered beginning at week 5. Conclusion Stretch-based therapy significantly impaired functional recovery in adult rats with a moderate contusive SCI at T10. The negative impact on function was greatest acutely, but persisted even after the stretching ceased at 8 weeks post-injury. PMID:25106555

  4. Human spinal locomotor control is based on flexibly organized burst generators.

    PubMed

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Constant drive provided to the human lumbar spinal cord by epidural electrical stimulation can cause local neural circuits to generate rhythmic motor outputs to lower limb muscles in people paralysed by spinal cord injury. Epidural spinal cord stimulation thus allows the study of spinal rhythm and pattern generating circuits without their configuration by volitional motor tasks or task-specific peripheral feedback. To reveal spinal locomotor control principles, we studied the repertoire of rhythmic patterns that can be generated by the functionally isolated human lumbar spinal cord, detected as electromyographic activity from the legs, and investigated basic temporal components shared across these patterns. Ten subjects with chronic, motor-complete spinal cord injury were studied. Surface electromyographic responses to lumbar spinal cord stimulation were collected from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae in the supine position. From these data, 10-s segments of rhythmic activity present in the four muscle groups of one limb were extracted. Such samples were found in seven subjects. Physiologically adequate cycle durations and relative extension- and flexion-phase durations similar to those needed for locomotion were generated. The multi-muscle activation patterns exhibited a variety of coactivation, mixed-synergy and locomotor-like configurations. Statistical decomposition of the electromyographic data across subjects, muscles and samples of rhythmic patterns identified three common temporal components, i.e. basic or shared activation patterns. Two of these basic patterns controlled muscles to contract either synchronously or alternatingly during extension- and flexion-like phases. The third basic pattern contributed to the observed muscle activities independently from these extensor- and flexor-related basic patterns. Each bifunctional muscle group was able to express both extensor- and flexor-patterns, with variable ratios across the

  5. Behavioral cross-sensitization between DOCA-induced sodium appetite and cocaine-induced locomotor behavior.

    PubMed

    Acerbo, Martin J; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2011-05-01

    Behavioral sensitization involves increases in the magnitude of a response to a stimulus after repeated exposures to the same response initiator. Administration of psychomotor stimulants and the induction of appetitive motivational states associated with natural reinforcers like sugar and salt are among experimental manipulations producing behavioral sensitization. In rats, repeated administration of the mineralocorticoid agonist deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) initially induces incremental increases in daily hypertonic saline consumption (i.e., sensitization of sodium appetite) in spite of the retention of sodium. The present studies investigated whether sodium appetite sensitization induced by DOCA shares mechanisms similar to those of psychomotor stimulant-induced sensitization, and whether there is evidence for reciprocal cross-sensitization. In Experiments 1 and 3, rats received control or cocaine treatments to induce locomotor sensitization. A week later DOCA (or vehicle) was administered to generate a sodium appetite. Animals pretreated with cocaine showed a greater sodium appetite. In Experiment 2, the order of the putative sensitizing treatments was reversed. Rats first received either a series of DOCA or vehicle treatments either with or without access to saline and were later tested for sensitization of the locomotor response to cocaine. Animals pretreated with DOCA without access to saline showed greater locomotor responses to cocaine than animals receiving vehicle treatments. Together these experiments indicate that treatments generating a sustained salt appetite and producing cocaine-induced psychomotor responses show reciprocal behavioral cross-sensitization. The underlying mechanisms accounting for this relationship may be the fact that psychostimulants and an unresolved craving for sodium can act as potent stressors.

  6. Enhanced locomotor adaptation aftereffect in the “broken escalator” phenomenon using anodal tDCS

    PubMed Central

    Kaski, D.; Quadir, S.; Patel, M.; Yousif, N.

    2012-01-01

    The everyday experience of stepping onto a stationary escalator causes a stumble, despite our full awareness that the escalator is broken. In the laboratory, this “broken escalator” phenomenon is reproduced when subjects step onto an obviously stationary platform (AFTER trials) that was previously experienced as moving (MOVING trials) and attests to a process of motor adaptation. Given the critical role of M1 in upper limb motor adaptation and the potential for transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to increase cortical excitability, we hypothesized that anodal tDCS over leg M1 and premotor cortices would increase the size and duration of the locomotor aftereffect. Thirty healthy volunteers received either sham or real tDCS (anodal bihemispheric tDCS; 2 mA for 15 min at rest) to induce excitatory effects over the primary motor and premotor cortex before walking onto the moving platform. The real tDCS group, compared with sham, displayed larger trunk sway and increased gait velocity in the first AFTER trial and a persistence of the trunk sway aftereffect into the second AFTER trial. We also used transcranial magnetic stimulation to probe changes in cortical leg excitability using different electrode montages and eyeblink conditioning, before and after tDCS, as well as simulating the current flow of tDCS on the human brain using a computational model of these different tDCS montages. Our data show that anodal tDCS induces excitability changes in lower limb motor cortex with resultant enhancement of locomotor adaptation aftereffects. These findings might encourage the use of tDCS over leg motor and premotor regions to improve locomotor control in patients with neurological gait disorders. PMID:22323638

  7. Higher Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, Triiodothyronine and Thyroxine Values Are Associated with Better Outcome in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Jan-Peter; Manka, Paul; Katsounas, Antonios; Syn, Wing-Kin; Führer, Dagmar; Gieseler, Robert K.; Bechmann, Lars P.; Gerken, Guido; Moeller, Lars C.; Canbay, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Changes in thyroid hormone levels, mostly as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), have been described in many diseases. However, the relationship between acute liver failure (ALF) and thyroid hormone levels has not yet been clarified. The present study evaluates potential correlations of select thyroid functional parameters with ALF. Methods 84 consecutively recruited ALF patients were grouped according to the outcome of ALF (spontaneous recovery: SR; transplantation or death: NSR). TSH, free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), T4, and T3 were determined. Results More than 50% of patients with ALF presented with abnormal thyroid parameters. These patients had greater risk for an adverse outcome than euthyroid patients. SR patients had significantly higher TSH, T4, and T3 concentrations than NSR patients. Albumin concentrations were significantly higher in SR than in NSR. In vitro T3 treatment was not able to rescue primary human hepatocytes from acetaminophen induced changes in mRNA expression. Conclusions In patients with ALF, TSH and total thyroid hormone levels differed significantly between SR patients and NSR patients. This might be related to diminished liver-derived transport proteins, such as albumin, in more severe forms of ALF. Thyroid parameters may serve as additional indicators of ALF severity. PMID:26147961

  8. Membrane Proteome Analysis of Cerulein-Stimulated Pancreatic Acinar Cells: Implication for Early Event of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jangwon; Seo, Ji Hye; Lim, Joo Weon

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Cerulein pancreatitis is similar to human edematous pancreatitis with dysregulation of the production and secretion of digestive enzymes, edema formation, cytoplasmic vacuolization and the death of acinar cells. We hypothesized that membrane proteins may be altered as the early event during the induction of acute pancreatitis. Present study aims to determine the differentially expressed proteins in the membranes of cerulein-treated pancreatic acinar cells. Methods Pancreatic acinar AR42J cells were treated with 10-8 M cerulein for 1 hour. Membrane proteins were isolated from the cells and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis using pH gradients of 5-8. Membrane proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis of the peptide digests. The differentially expressed proteins, whose expression levels were more or less than three-fold in cerulein-treated cells, were analyzed. Results Two differentially expressed proteins (mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2, heat shock protein 60) were up-regulated while four proteins (protein disulfide isomerase, γ-actin, isocitrate dehydrogenase 3, seven in absentia homolog 1A) were down-regulated by cerulein treatment in pancreatic acinar cells. These proteins are related to cell signaling, oxidative stress, and cytoskeleton arrangement. Conclusions Oxidative stress may induce cerulein-induced cell injury and disturbances in defense mechanism in pancreatic acinar cells. PMID:20479917

  9. Na,K-ATPase α2 activity in mammalian skeletal muscle T-tubules is acutely stimulated by extracellular K+.

    PubMed

    DiFranco, Marino; Hakimjavadi, Hesamedin; Lingrel, Jerry B; Heiny, Judith A

    2015-10-01

    The Na,K-ATPase α2 isoform is the predominant Na,K-ATPase in adult skeletal muscle and the sole Na,K-ATPase in the transverse tubules (T-tubules). In quiescent muscles, the α2 isozyme operates substantially below its maximal transport capacity. Unlike the α1 isoform, the α2 isoform is not required for maintaining resting ion gradients or the resting membrane potential, canonical roles of the Na,K-ATPase in most other cells. However, α2 activity is stimulated immediately upon the start of contraction and, in working muscles, its contribution is crucial to maintaining excitation and resisting fatigue. Here, we show that α2 activity is determined in part by the K+ concentration in the T-tubules, through its K+ substrate affinity. Apparent K+ affinity was determined from measurements of the K1/2 for K+ activation of pump current in intact, voltage-clamped mouse flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers. Pump current generated by the α2 Na,K-ATPase, Ip, was identified as the outward current activated by K+ and inhibited by micromolar ouabain. Ip was outward at all potentials studied (-90 to -30 mV) and increased with depolarization in the subthreshold range, -90 to -50 mV. The Q10 was 2.1 over the range of 22-37°C. The K1/2,K of Ip was 4.3±0.3 mM at -90 mV and was relatively voltage independent. This K+ affinity is lower than that reported for other cell types but closely matches the dynamic range of extracellular K+ concentrations in the T-tubules. During muscle contraction, T-tubule luminal K+ increases in proportion to the frequency and duration of action potential firing. This K1/2,K predicts a low fractional occupancy of K+ substrate sites at the resting extracellular K+ concentration, with occupancy increasing in proportion to the frequency of membrane excitation. The stimulation of preexisting pumps by greater K+ site occupancy thus provides a rapid mechanism for increasing α2 activity in working muscles.

  10. Reliability review of the remote tool delivery system locomotor

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser, J.B.

    1999-04-01

    The locomotor being built by RedZone Robotics is designed to serve as a remote tool delivery (RID) system for waste retrieval, tank cleaning, viewing, and inspection inside the high-level waste tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 at West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS). The RTD systm is to be deployed through a tank riser. The locomotor portion of the RTD system is designed to be inserted into the tank and is to be capable of moving around the tank by supporting itself and moving on the tank internal structural columns. The locomotor will serve as a mounting platform for a dexterous manipulator arm. The complete RTD system consists of the locomotor, dexterous manipulator arm, cameras, lights, cables, hoses, cable/hose management system, power supply, and operator control station.

  11. Salicylate acutely stimulates 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin-independent glucose transport in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Yasuhiro; Oshima, Rieko; Yoshida, Mitsuki; Sakon, Ichika; Kitani, Kazuto; Goto, Ayumi; Tsuda, Satoshi; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2014-10-10

    Salicylate (SAL) has been recently implicated in the antidiabetic effect in humans. We assessed whether 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in skeletal muscle is involved in the effect of SAL on glucose homeostasis. Rat fast-twitch epitrochlearis and slow-twitch soleus muscles were incubated in buffer containing SAL. Intracellular concentrations of SAL increased rapidly (<5 min) in both skeletal muscles, and the Thr(172) phosphorylation of the α subunit of AMPK increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. SAL increased both AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 activities. These increases in enzyme activity were accompanied by an increase in the activity of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport, and decreases in ATP, phosphocreatine, and glycogen contents. SAL did not change the phosphorylation of insulin receptor signaling including insulin receptor substrate 1, Akt, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase. These results suggest that SAL may be transported into skeletal muscle and may stimulate AMPK and glucose transport via energy deprivation in multiple muscle types. Skeletal muscle AMPK might be part of the mechanism responsible for the metabolic improvement induced by SAL.

  12. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking.

    PubMed

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-04-01

    Voluntary limb modifications must be integrated with basic walking patterns during visually guided walking. In this study we tested whether voluntary gait modifications can become more automatic with practice. We challenged walking control by presenting visual stepping targets that instructed subjects to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence-nonspecific learning during walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 yr,n= 20) could learn a specific sequence of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 yr,n= 8) had lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning were the same compared with those of older children (11-16 yr,n= 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task such as walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during visually guided walking.

  13. The locomotor anatomy of Australopithecus afarensis.

    PubMed

    Stern, J T; Susman, R L

    1983-03-01

    The postcranial skeleton of Australopithecus afarensis from the Hadar Formation, Ethiopia, and the footprints from the Laetoli Beds of northern Tanzania, are analyzed with the goal of determining (1) the extent to which this ancient hominid practiced forms of locomotion other than terrestrial bipedality, and (2) whether or not the terrestrial bipedalism of A. afarensis was notably different from that of modern humans. It is demonstrated that A. afarensis possessed anatomic characteristics that indicate a significant adaptation for movement in the trees. Other structural features point to a mode of terrestrial bipedality that involved less extension at the hip and knee than occurs in modern humans, and only limited transfer of weight onto the medial part of the ball of the foot, but such conclusions remain more tentative than that asserting substantive arboreality. A comparison of the specimens representing smaller individuals, presumably female, to those of larger individuals, presumably male, suggests sexual differences in locomotor behavior linked to marked size dimorphism. The males were probably less arboreal and engaged more frequently in terrestrial bipedalism. In our opinion, A. afarensis from Hadar is very close to what can be called a "missing link." We speculate that earlier representatives of the A. afarensis lineage will present not a combination of arboreal and bipedal traits, but rather the anatomy of a generalized ape.

  14. Acute exposure to cadmium induces prolonged neutrophilia along with delayed induction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the livers of mice.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Hyogo; Oguma, Etsuko

    2016-12-01

    Acute exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes systemic inflammation characterized by neutrophilia. To elucidate the mechanism of neutrophilia induced by Cd, we investigated the induction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), which regulates neutrophil production, in mice with acute Cd toxicity, and compared it with mice injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an inducer of general inflammatory responses. We injected BALB/c mice with Cd at 2.5 mg/kg i.p. or LPS at 0.5 mg/kg i.p. and sampled the peripheral blood and organs at time points up to 24 h. In Cd-treated mice, the peripheral neutrophil count increased steadily up to 24 h, whereas LPS-treated mice showed a more rapid increase with a peak at 12 h. The serum G-CSF level increased gradually to reach a plateau at 12-18 h in Cd-treated mice, but LPS-treated mice showed a marked increase, reaching a peak at 2-3 h. A gradual elevation of G-CSF mRNA expression up to 24 h was detected by real-time PCR in the livers of Cd-treated mice, but in LPS-treated mice its highest expression was observed in the liver with a rapid increase at 2 h. By in situ hybridization using G-CSF RNA probes, hepatic Kupffer cells were identified as G-CSF-producing cells in the liver. These results indicated that Cd has a characteristic effect of delayed induction of G-CSF in the liver, causing systemic inflammation accompanied by prolonged neutrophilia.

  15. Emotional and risk seeking behavior after prepuberal subchronic or adult acute stimulation of 5-HT7-Rs in Naples High Excitability rats.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Lucia A; Romano, Emilia; Treno, Concetta; Lacivita, Enza; Arra, Claudio; Gironi-Carnevale, Ugo A; Travaglini, Domenica; Leopoldo, Marcello; Laviola, Giovanni; Sadile, Adolfo G; Adriani, Walter

    2014-04-01

    We report here the results of studies aimed to investigate the involvement of serotonin receptor 7 subtype (5-HT7-R) in the modulation of emotional response in Naples High-Excitability (NHE) rat, a validated model for hyperactivity and impaired attention. A range of dosages (0.0, 0.125, 0.250, or 0.500 mg/kg) of LP-211, a selective agonist of 5-HT7-Rs, has been evaluated in animals at different age (adolescence and adulthood). Male NHE and random bred (NRB) control rats were tested in an Elevated Zero-Maze (EZM) after LP-211 treatment in two different regimens: at the issue of adolescent, subchronic exposure (14 intraperitoneal [i.p.] injections, once/day, pnd 31-44, tested on pnd 45--Exp. 1) or as adult, acute effect (15 min after i.p. injection--Exp. 2). Adolescent, subchronic LP-211 at 0.500 mg/kg dosage increased the frequency of head-dips only in NHE rats. Drug effect on time spent and entries in open EZM quadrants were revealed with adult, acute administration of 0.125 mg/kg LP-211 (both strains), indicating a tendency toward anxiolytic effects. In conclusion, data demonstrate that subchronic stimulation of 5-HT7-Rs during prepuberal period increases novelty-seeking/risk-taking propensity in NHE adults. These sequels are revealing increased disinhibition and/or motivation to explore in the NHE rats, which are characterized by a hyperactive dopaminergic system. These data may open new perspectives in studying mechanism of risk-seeking behavior.

  16. The anatomy and physiology of the locomotor system.

    PubMed

    Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella; Hendry, Charles

    Mobilisation is one of the activities of living. The term locomotor system refers to those body tissues and organs responsible for movement. Nurses and healthcare workers should be familiar with the body structures that enable mobilisation to assist those in their care with this activity. This article outlines the structure and function of the locomotor system, including the skeleton, joints, muscles and muscle attachments. Two common bone disorders, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, are also considered.

  17. The effects of locomotor-respiratory coupling on the pattern of breathing in horses.

    PubMed Central

    Lafortuna, C L; Reinach, E; Saibene, F

    1996-01-01

    1. To investigate the effect of locomotor activity on the pattern of breathing in quadrupeds, ventilatory response was studied in four healthy horses during horizontal and inclined (7%) treadmill exercise at different velocities (1.4-6.9 m s(-1)) and during chemical stimulation with a rebreathing method. Stride frequency (f(s)) and locomotor-respiratory coupling (LRC) were also simultaneously determined by means of video recordings synchronized with respiratory events. 2. Tidal volume (V(T)) was positively correlated with pulmonary ventilation (V(E)) but significantly different linear regression equations were found between the experimental conditions (P < 0.0001), since the chemical hyperventilation was mainly due to increases in V(T), whereas the major contribution to exercise hyperpnoea came from changes in respiratory frequency (f(R)). 3. The average f(R) at each exercise level was not significantly different from f(S), although there was not always a tight 1:1 LRC. At constant speeds, f(S) was independent of the treadmill slope and hence the greater V(E) during inclined exercise was due to increased V(T). 4. At any ventilatory level, the differences in breathing patterns between locomotion and rebreathing or locomotion at different slopes derived from different set points of the inspiratory off-switch mechanism. 5. The percentage of single breaths entrained with locomotor rhythm rose progressively and significantly with treadmill speed (P < 0.0001) up to a 1:1 LRC and was significantly affected by treadmill slope (P < 0.001). 6. A LRC of 1:1 was systematically observed at canter (10 out of 10 trials) and sometimes at trot (5 out of 14) and it entailed (i) a 4- to 5-fold reduction in both V(T) and f(R) variability, and (ii) a gait-specific phase locking of inspiratory onset during the locomotor cycle. 7. It is concluded that different patterns of breathing are employed during locomotion and rebreathing due to the interference between locomotor and respiratory

  18. Colony-stimulating factors for the treatment of the hematopoietic component of the acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS): a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Newman, Victoria L; Seed, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest national security threats to the United States is the detonation of an improvised nuclear device or a radiological dispersal device in a heavily populated area. As such, this type of security threat is considered to be of relatively low risk, but one that would have an extraordinary high impact on health and well-being of the US citizenry. Psychological counseling and medical assessments would be necessary for all those significantly impacted by the nuclear/radiological event. Direct medical interventions would be necessary for all those individuals who had received substantial radiation exposures (e.g., >1 Gy). Although no drugs or products have yet been specifically approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) to treat the effects of acute radiation syndrome (ARS), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and pegylated G-CSF have been used off label for treating radiation accident victims. Recent threats of terrorist attacks using nuclear or radiologic devices makes it imperative that the medical community have up-to-date information and a clear understanding of treatment protocols using therapeutically effective recombinant growth factors and cytokines such as G-CSF and GM-CSF for patients exposed to injurious doses of ionizing radiation. Based on limited human studies with underlying biology, we see that the recombinants, G-CSF and GM-CSF appear to have modest, but significant medicinal value in treating radiation accident victims. In the near future, the US FDA may approve G-CSF and GM-CSF as ‘Emergency Use Authorization’ (EUA) for managing radiation-induced aplasia, an ARS-related pathology. In this article, we review the status of growth factors for the treatment of radiological/nuclear accident victims.

  19. Electroacupuncture Ameliorates Acute Renal Injury in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Rabbits via Induction of HO-1 through the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Li-rong; Dong, Shu-an; Cao, Xin-shun; Wu, Li-li; Wu, Li-na

    2015-01-01

    Electroacupuncture at select acupoints have been verified to protect against organ dysfunctions during endotoxic shock. And, heme oxygenase (HO)-1 as a phase II enzyme and antioxidant contributed to the protection of kidney in septic shock rats. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway mediated the activation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (Nrf2), which was involved in HO-1 induction. To understand the efficacy of electroacupuncture stimulation in ameliorating acute kidney injury (AKI) through the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathway and subsequent HO-1 upregulation, a dose of LPS 5mg/kg was administered intravenously to replicate the rabbit model of AKI induced by endotoxic shock. Electroacupuncture pretreatment was handled bilaterally at Zusanli and Neiguan acupoints for five consecutive days while sham electroacupuncture at non-acupoints as control. Results displayed that electroacupuncture stimulation significantly alleviated the morphologic renal damage, attenuated renal tubular apoptosis, suppressed the elevated biochemical indicators of AKI caused by LPS, enhanced the expressions of phospho-Akt, HO-1protein, Nrf2 total and nucleoprotein, and highlighted the proportions of Nrf2 nucleoprotein as a parallel. Furthermore, partial protective effects of elecroacupuncture were counteracted by preconditioning with wortmannin (the selective PI3K inhibitor), indicating a direct involvement of PI3K/Akt pathway. Inconsistently, wortmannin pretreatment made little difference to the expressions of HO-1, Nrf2 nucleoprotein and total protein, which indicated that PI3K/Akt may be not the only pathway responsible for electroacupuncture-afforded protection against LPS-induced AKI. These findings provide new insights into the potential future clinical applications of electroacupuncture for AKI induced by endotoxic shock instead of traditional remedies. PMID:26524181

  20. Vagal nerve stimulation blocks interleukin 6-dependent synaptic hyperexcitability induced by lipopolysaccharide-induced acute stress in the rodent prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Peña, David; Housini, Mohammad; Cheng, Derek; Lopez, Diego; Borland, Michael S.; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Salgado, Humberto; D’Mello, Santosh; Kilgard, Michael P.; Rose-John, Stefan; Atzori, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The ratio between synaptic inhibition and excitation (sI/E) is a critical factor in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disease. We recently described a stress-induced interleukin-6 dependent mechanism leading to a decrease in sI/E in the rodent temporal cortex. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a similar mechanism takes place in the prefrontal cortex, and to elaborate strategies to prevent or attenuate it. We used aseptic inflammation (single acute injections of lipopolysaccharide, LPS, 10 mg/kg) as stress model, and patch-clamp recording on a prefrontal cortical slice preparation from wild-type rat and mice, as well as from transgenic mice in which the inhibitor of IL-6 trans-signaling sgp130Fc was produced in a brain-specific fashion (sgp130Fc mice). The anti-inflammatory reflex was activated either by vagal nerve stimulation or peripheral administration of the nicotinic α7 receptor agonist PHA543613. We found that the IL-6-dependent reduction in prefrontal cortex synaptic inhibition was blocked in sgp130Fc mice, or – in wild-type animals – upon application sgp130Fc. Similar results were obtained by activating the “anti-inflammatory reflex” – a neural circuit regulating peripheral immune response – by stimulation of the vagal nerve or through peripheral administration of the α7 nicotinic receptor agonist PHA543613. Our results indicate that the prefrontal cortex is an important potential target of IL-6 mediated trans-signaling, and suggest a potential new avenue in the treatment of a large class of hyperexcitable neuropsychiatric conditions, including epilepsy, schizophrenic psychoses, anxiety disorders, autism spectrum disorders, and depression. PMID:25128387

  1. Obstacle avoidance locomotor tasks: adaptation, memory and skill transfer.

    PubMed

    Kloter, Evelyne; Dietz, Volker

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the neural basis of adaptation, memory and skill transfer during human stepping over obstacles. Whilst walking on a treadmill, subjects had to perform uni- and bilateral obstacle steps. Acoustic feedback information about foot clearance was provided. Non-noxious electrical stimuli were applied to the right tibial nerve during the mid-stance phase of the right leg, i.e. 'prior' to the right or 'during' the left leg swing over the obstacle. The electromyogram (EMG) responses evoked by these stimuli in arm and leg muscles are known to reflect the neural coordination during normal and obstacle steps. The leading and trailing legs rapidly adapted foot clearance during obstacle steps with small further changes when the same obstacle condition was repeated. This adaptation was associated with a corresponding decrease in arm and leg muscle reflex EMG responses. Arm (but not leg) muscle EMG responses were greater when the stimulus was applied 'during' obstacle crossing by the left leg leading compared with stimulation 'prior' to right leg swing over the obstacle. A corresponding difference existed in arm muscle background EMG. The results indicate that, firstly, the somatosensory information gained by the performance and adaptation of uni- and bilateral obstacle stepping becomes transferred to the trailing leg in a context-specific manner. Secondly, EMG activity in arm and leg muscles parallels biomechanical adaptation of foot clearance. Thirdly, a consistently high EMG activity in the arm muscles during swing over the obstacle is required for equilibrium control. Thus, such a precision locomotor task is achieved by a context-specific, coordinated activation of arm and leg muscles for performance and equilibrium control that includes adaptation, memory and skill transfer.

  2. Dynamic "Range of Motion" Hindlimb Stretching Disrupts Locomotor Function in Rats with Moderate Subacute Spinal Cord Injuries.

    PubMed

    Keller, Anastasia; Rees, Kathlene; Prince, Daniella; Morehouse, Johnny; Shum-Siu, Alice; Magnuson, David

    2017-04-12

    Joint contractures and spasticity are two common secondary complications of a severe spinal cord injury (SCI), which can significantly reduce quality of life, and stretching is one of the top strategies for rehabilitation of these complications. We have previously shown that a daily static stretching protocol administered to rats at either acute or chronic time points after a moderate or moderate-severe T10 SCI significantly disrupts their hindlimb locomotor function. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of dynamic range of motion (ROM) stretching on the locomotor function of rats with SCI as an alternative to static stretching. Starting at 6 weeks post-injury (T10 moderate contusion) eight adult Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to hindlimb stretching for 4 weeks. Our standard stretching protocol (six maneuvers to stretch the major hindlimb muscle groups) was modified from 1 min static stretch-and-hold at the end ROM of each stretch position to a dynamic 2 sec hold, 1 sec release rhythm repeated for a duration of 1 min. Four weeks of daily (5 days/week) dynamic stretching led to significant disruption of locomotor function as assessed by the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) Open Field Locomotor Scale and three-dimensional (3D) kinematic and gait analyses. In addition, we identified and analyzed an apparently novel hindlimb response to dynamic stretch that resembles human clonus. The results of the current study extend the observation of the stretching phenomenon to a new modality of stretching that is also commonly used in SCI rehabilitation. Although mechanisms and clinical relevance still need to be established, our findings continue to raise concerns that stretching as a therapy can potentially hinder aspects of locomotor recovery.

  3. Perfluorododecanoic acid-induced steroidogenic inhibition is associated with steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and reactive oxygen species in cAMP-stimulated Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhimin; Feng, Yixing; Wang, Jianshe; Zhang, Hongxia; Ding, Lina; Dai, Jiayin

    2010-04-01

    Perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA) can be detected in environmental matrices and human serum and has been shown to inhibit testicular steroidogenesis in rats. However, the mechanisms that are responsible for the toxic effects of PFDoA remain unknown. The aims of this study were to investigate the mechanism of steroidogenesis inhibition by PFDoA and to identify the molecular target of PFDoA in Leydig cells. The effects of PFDoA on steroid synthesis in Leydig cells were assessed by radioimmunoassay. The expression of key genes and proteins in steroid biosynthesis was determined by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels were determined using bioluminescence assays. PFDoA inhibited adenosine 3',5'-cyclophosphate (cAMP)-stimulated steroidogenesis in mouse Leydig tumor cells (mLTC-1) and primary rat Leydig cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, PFDoA (1-100 microM) did not exhibit effects on cell viability and cellular ATP levels in mLTC-1 cells. PFDoA inhibited steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) promoter activity and StAR expression at the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels but did not affect mRNA levels of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, or 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in cAMP-stimulated mLTC-1 cells. PFDoA treatment also resulted in increased levels of mitochondrial ROS and H(2)O(2). After excessive ROS and H(2)O(2) were eliminated in PFDoA-treated mLTC-1 cells by MnTMPyP (a superoxide dismutase analog), progesterone production was partially restored and StAR mRNA and protein levels were partially recovered. These data show that PFDoA inhibits steroidogenesis in cAMP-stimulated Leydig cells by reducing the expression of StAR through a model of action involving oxidative stress.

  4. Low-dose cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor priming regimen versus idarubicin plus cytarabine regimen as induction therapy for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jie; Chen, Jian; Suo, Shanshan; Qian, Wenbin; Meng, Haitao; Mai, Wenyuan; Tong, Hongyan; Huang, Jian; Yu, Wenjuan; Wei, Juyin; Lou, Yinjun

    2015-06-01

    With limited data available on the low-dose cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CAG) regimen in newly diagnosed older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), this study aimed at comparing the efficacy and toxicity of CAG with idarubicin plus cytarabine (IA) remission induction therapy in these patients. A total of 154 consecutive patients (52 with CAG and 102 with IA) were retrospectively analyzed. The patients in the CAG group had a higher median age (68 vs. 65 years, p = 0.002) and a higher proportion of previous myelodysplastic syndrome (25.0% vs. 2.9%, p < 0.0001) compared to those in the IA group. The complete remission rates with the CAG and IA regimens were 55.8% and 52.9% (p = 0.864). The median overall survival (12.1 vs. 11.7 months, p = 0.650) and 3-year disease-free survival rates (29.6% vs. 48.6%, p = 0.657) were not statistically different in the two groups. The CAG regimen might be an alternative to conventional chemotherapy in older patients with AML.

  5. The Gottingen minipig is a model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome: G-CSF stimulates hematopoiesis and enhances survival from lethal total-body gamma-irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS), to enhance discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematological parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery following irradiation provide a convenient means to compare efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials Male Gottingen minipigs, 4–5 months old and weighing 9–11 kg were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen®, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body gamma-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results Results indicate G-CSF enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusion These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing numbers of circulating granulocytes. PMID:23845847

  6. The Relationship between Membrane Potential and Calcium Dynamics in Glucose-Stimulated Beta Cell Syncytium in Acute Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slices

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Evan W.; Slak Rupnik, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Oscillatory electrical activity is regarded as a hallmark of the pancreatic beta cell glucose-dependent excitability pattern. Electrophysiologically recorded membrane potential oscillations in beta cells are associated with in-phase oscillatory cytosolic calcium activity ([Ca2+]i) measured with fluorescent probes. Recent high spatial and temporal resolution confocal imaging revealed that glucose stimulation of beta cells in intact islets within acute tissue slices produces a [Ca2+]i change with initial transient phase followed by a plateau phase with highly synchronized [Ca2+]i oscillations. Here, we aimed to correlate the plateau [Ca2+]i oscillations with the oscillations of membrane potential using patch-clamp and for the first time high resolution voltage-sensitive dye based confocal imaging. Our results demonstrated that the glucose-evoked membrane potential oscillations spread over the islet in a wave-like manner, their durations and wave velocities being comparable to the ones for [Ca2+]i oscillations and waves. High temporal resolution simultaneous records of membrane potential and [Ca2+]i confirmed tight but nevertheless limited coupling of the two processes, with membrane depolarization preceding the [Ca2+]i increase. The potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium increased the velocity at which oscillations advanced over the islet by several-fold while, at the same time, emphasized differences in kinetics of the membrane potential and the [Ca2+]i. The combination of both imaging techniques provides a powerful tool that will help us attain deeper knowledge of the beta cell network. PMID:24324777

  7. Adiponectin (15-36) stimulates steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein expression and cortisol production in human adrenocortical cells: role of AMPK and MAPK kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Ramanjaneya, Manjunath; Conner, Alex C; Brown, James E P; Chen, Jing; Digby, Janet E; Barber, Thomas M; Lehnert, Hendrik; Randeva, Harpal S

    2011-05-01

    Adiponectin is an abundantly circulating adipokine, orchestrating its effects through two 7-transmembrane receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2). Steroidogenesis is regulated by a variety of neuropeptides and adipokines. Earlier studies have reported adipokine mediated steroid production. A key rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis is cholesterol transportation across the mitochondrial membrane by steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Several signalling pathways regulate StAR expression. The actions of adiponectin and its role in human adrenocortical steroid biosynthesis are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adiponectin on StAR protein expression, steroidogenic genes, and cortisol production and to dissect the signalling cascades involved in the activation of StAR expression. Using qRT-PCR, Western blot analysis and ELISA, we have demonstrated that stimulation of human adrenocortical H295R cells with adiponectin results in increased cortisol secretion. This effect is accompanied by increased expression of key steroidogenic pathway genes including StAR protein expression via ERK1/2 and AMPK-dependent pathways. This has implications for our understanding of adiponectin receptor activation and peripheral steroidogenesis. Finally, our study aims to emphasise the key role of adipokines in the integration of metabolic activity and energy balance partly via the regulation of adrenal steroid production. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium.

  8. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) induced by donor-derived anti-HLA antibodies in aplastic anemia: possible priming effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the recipient neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Mitsuhashi, Ryuichi; Ohno, Tatsuharu

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is currently the leading cause of transfusion-related death. A 67-year-old man with severe aplastic anemia developed TRALI, consisting of acute respiratory insufficiency with severe hypoxia and diffuse pulmonary infiltration 2 hours after the transfusion of platelet concentrates. Although he required intensive respiratory support, he promptly recovered within 4 days. The presence of anti-HLA antibody (anti-HLA B52) in the donated blood product was demonstrated, and a lymphocytotoxicity test disclosed antibody-mediated cytotoxicity against the patient's cells. Furthermore, administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor was suggested to predispose the patient to TRALI by priming the neutrophils.

  9. Individual differences in cocaine-induced locomotor activity of male Sprague-Dawley rats are not explained by plasma corticosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Anna M; Kleschen, Melissa J; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2010-05-26

    Humans differ in their initial response to, and subsequent abuse of, addictive drugs like cocaine. Rodents also exhibit marked individual differences in responsiveness to cocaine. Previously, we classified male Sprague-Dawley rats as either low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs, respectively), based on their acute low-dose cocaine-induced locomotor activity, and found that with repeated drug exposure LCRs exhibit greater cocaine locomotor sensitization, reward and reinforcement than HCRs. Differential cocaine-induced increases in striatal dopamine help to explain the LCR/HCR phenotypes. Differential levels of stress and/or anxiety could also contribute but have not been explored. Here we measured open-field activity and plasma corticosterone levels both pre- and post-cocaine treatment in LCRs, HCRs, and saline-treated controls. The three groups did not differ in baseline locomotor activity or corticosterone levels. Importantly, LCR/HCR differences in corticosterone levels were also not observed following acute cocaine (10mg/kg, i.p.), when cocaine induced approximately 3.5-fold greater locomotor activity in HCRs than LCRs. Additionally, there were no LCR/HCR differences in plasma corticosterone levels following 5 days of once-daily cocaine, during which time LCRs developed locomotor sensitization such that their cocaine-induced locomotor activity no longer differed from that of HCRs. Likewise, there were no group activity differences in any of four concentric zones within the open-field chamber. In summary, neither plasma corticosterone levels nor thigmotaxis-type anxiety appears to be a factor that contributes to the observed cocaine-induced LCR/HCR behavioral differences.

  10. Adaptive locomotor behavior in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Portugues, Ruben; Engert, Florian

    2011-01-01

    In this study we report that larval zebrafish display adaptive locomotor output that can be driven by unexpected visual feedback. We develop a new assay that addresses visuomotor integration in restrained larval zebrafish. The assay involves a closed-loop environment in which the visual feedback a larva receives depends on its own motor output in a way that resembles freely swimming conditions. The experimenter can control the gain of this closed feedback loop, so that following a given motor output the larva experiences more or less visual feedback depending on whether the gain is high or low. We show that increases and decreases in this gain setting result in adaptive changes in behavior that lead to a generalized decrease or increase of motor output, respectively. Our behavioral analysis shows that both the duration and tail beat frequency of individual swim bouts can be modified, as well as the frequency with which bouts are elicited. These changes can be implemented rapidly, following an exposure to a new gain of just 175 ms. In addition, modifications in some behavioral parameters accumulate over tens of seconds and effects last for at least 30 s from trial to trial. These results suggest that larvae establish an internal representation of the visual feedback expected from a given motor output and that the behavioral modifications are driven by an error signal that arises from the discrepancy between this expectation and the actual visual feedback. The assay we develop presents a unique possibility for studying visuomotor integration using imaging techniques available in the larval zebrafish.

  11. Adaptive Locomotor Behavior in Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Portugues, Ruben; Engert, Florian

    2011-01-01

    In this study we report that larval zebrafish display adaptive locomotor output that can be driven by unexpected visual feedback. We develop a new assay that addresses visuomotor integration in restrained larval zebrafish. The assay involves a closed-loop environment in which the visual feedback a larva receives depends on its own motor output in a way that resembles freely swimming conditions. The experimenter can control the gain of this closed feedback loop, so that following a given motor output the larva experiences more or less visual feedback depending on whether the gain is high or low. We show that increases and decreases in this gain setting result in adaptive changes in behavior that lead to a generalized decrease or increase of motor output, respectively. Our behavioral analysis shows that both the duration and tail beat frequency of individual swim bouts can be modified, as well as the frequency with which bouts are elicited. These changes can be implemented rapidly, following an exposure to a new gain of just 175 ms. In addition, modifications in some behavioral parameters accumulate over tens of seconds and effects last for at least 30 s from trial to trial. These results suggest that larvae establish an internal representation of the visual feedback expected from a given motor output and that the behavioral modifications are driven by an error signal that arises from the discrepancy between this expectation and the actual visual feedback. The assay we develop presents a unique possibility for studying visuomotor integration using imaging techniques available in the larval zebrafish. PMID:21909325

  12. The Effects of 4-Methylethcathinone on Conditioned Place Preference, Locomotor Sensitization, and Anxiety-Like Behavior: A Comparison with Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Qiu, Yi; Zhang, Yizhi; Βai, Yanping; Xu, Pengfei; Liu, Yuan; Kim, Jee Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background: 4-Methylethcathinone is a drug that belongs to the second generation of synthetic cathinones, and recently it has been ranked among the most popular “legal highs”. Although it has similar in vitro neurochemical actions to other drugs such as cocaine, the behavioral effects of 4-methylethcathinone remain to be determined. Methods: The addictive potential and locomotor potentiation by 4-methylethcathinone were investigated in rats using the conditioned place preference and sensitization paradigm. Methamphetamine was used as a positive control. Because synthetic cathinones can have psychological effects, we also examined anxiety-like behavior using the elevated plus maze. Results: A conditioning dose of 10mg/kg 4-methylethcathinone was able to induce conditioned place preference and reinstatement (following 2 weeks of withdrawal). Acute or repeated injections of 4-methylethcathinone at 3 or 10mg/kg failed to alter locomotor activity. At 30mg/kg, however, acute 4-methylethcathinone increased locomotor activity compared with saline, while chronic 4-methylethcathinone induced a delayed and attenuated sensitization compared with methamphetamine. Additionally, repeated daily injections of 4-methylethcathinone (30mg/kg) reduced, whereas methamphetamine increased time spent by rats in the open arm of an elevated plus maze compared with saline injections. Interestingly, a 2-week withdrawal period following chronic injections of 4-methylethcathinone or methamphetamine increased time spent in the open arm in all rats. Conclusions: The rewarding properties of 4-methylethcathinone were found to be dissociated from its effects on locomotor activity. Additionally, chronic 4-methylethcathinone use may trigger abnormal anxious behaviors. These behavioral effects caused by 4-methylethcathinone appear to last even after a withdrawal period. PMID:26612552

  13. Effects of stress and tranylcypromine on amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and GABA(B) receptor function in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sands, S A; Reisman, S A; Enna, S J

    2003-01-17

    Modification in gamma-aminobutyric acid-B (GABA(B)) receptors may contribute to the symptoms of some neurological and psychiatric disorders and to the clinical response to psychotherapeutics. The present study was undertaken to determine whether chronic administration of tranylcypromine (TCP), an antidepressant, and chronic stress influence GABA(B) receptor function in rat brain. The results indicate that TCP treatment, but not stress, increases GABA(B) receptor activity in the cerebral cortex, as measured by baclofen-stimulated GTPgammaS binding. In addition, chronic administration of TCP enhances significantly the locomotor response to a single dose of amphetamine, an effect that is abolished by restraint stress. These results indicate that although TCP administration modifies brain GABA(B) receptor activity, which may contribute to the antidepressant response to this agent, this effect is unrelated to the interaction of stress and TCP treatment on the locomotor response to amphetamine.

  14. Prolactin increases the synthesis of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, a key factor for induction of locomotor activity, in breeding male Newts.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Shogo; Koyama, Teppei; Hasunuma, Itaru; Vaudry, Hubert; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2010-05-01

    We recently found that the Japanese red-bellied newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster, actively produces 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, a previously undescribed amphibian neurosteroid. 7alpha-Hydroxypregnenolone stimulates locomotor activity of male newts. Locomotor activity of male newts increases during the breeding period as in other wild animals, but the molecular mechanism for such a change in locomotor activity is poorly understood. Here we show that the adenohypophyseal hormone prolactin (PRL) stimulates 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis in the brain, thus increasing locomotor activity of breeding male newts. In this study, cytochrome P450(7alpha) (CYP7B), a steroidogenic enzyme catalyzing the formation of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, was first identified to analyze seasonal changes in 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis. Only males exhibited marked seasonal changes in 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis and CYP7B expression in the brain, with a maximum level in the spring breeding period when locomotor activity of males increases. Subsequently we identified PRL as a key component of the mechanism regulating 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis. Hypophysectomy decreased 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis in the male brain, whereas administration of PRL but not gonadotropins to hypophysectomized males caused a dose-dependent increase in 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis. To analyze the mode of PRL action, CYP7B and the receptor for PRL were localized in the male brain. PRL receptor was expressed in the neurons expressing CYP7B in the magnocellular preoptic nucleus. Thus, PRL appears to act directly on neurosteroidogenic magnocellular preoptic nucleus neurons to regulate 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis, thus inducing seasonal locomotor changes in male newts. This is the first report describing the regulation of neurosteroidogenesis in the brain by an adenohypophyseal hormone in any vertebrate.

  15. Developmental Deltamethrin Exposure Causes Persistent Changes in Dopaminergic Gene Expression, Neurochemistry, and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Tiffany S.; Richardson, Jason R.; Cooper, Keith R.; White, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used insecticides that are considered to pose little risk to human health. However, there is an increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. We used the zebrafish model to test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to low doses of the pyrethroid deltamethrin results in persistent alterations in dopaminergic gene expression, neurochemistry, and locomotor activity. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25–0.50 μg/l), at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the embryonic period [3–72 h postfertilization (hpf)], after which transferred to fresh water until the larval stage (2-weeks postfertilization). Deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased transcript levels of the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor (drd1) and increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase at 72 hpf. The reduction in drd1 transcripts persisted to the larval stage and was associated with decreased D2 dopamine receptor transcripts. Larval fish, exposed developmentally to deltamethrin, had increased levels of homovanillic acid, a DA metabolite. Since the DA system is involved in locomotor activity, we measured the swim activity of larval fish following a transition to darkness. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin significantly increased larval swim activity which was attenuated by concomitant knockdown of the DA transporter. Acute exposure to methylphenidate, a DA transporter inhibitor, increased swim activity in control larva, while reducing swim activity in larva developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin causes locomotor deficits in larval zebrafish, which is likely mediated by dopaminergic dysfunction. This highlights the need to understand the persistent effects of low-dose neurotoxicant exposure during development. PMID:25912032

  16. Brain Stimulation in Addiction.

    PubMed

    Salling, Michael C; Martinez, Diana

    2016-11-01

    Localized stimulation of the human brain to treat neuropsychiatric disorders has been in place for over 20 years. Although these methods have been used to a greater extent for mood and movement disorders, recent work has explored brain stimulation methods as potential treatments for addiction. The rationale behind stimulation therapy in addiction involves reestablishing normal brain function in target regions in an effort to dampen addictive behaviors. In this review, we present the rationale and studies investigating brain stimulation in addiction, including transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and deep brain stimulation. Overall, these studies indicate that brain stimulation has an acute effect on craving for drugs and alcohol, but few studies have investigated the effect of brain stimulation on actual drug and alcohol use or relapse. Stimulation therapies may achieve their effect through direct or indirect modulation of brain regions involved in addiction, either acutely or through plastic changes in neuronal transmission. Although these mechanisms are not well understood, further identification of the underlying neurobiology of addiction and rigorous evaluation of brain stimulation methods has the potential for unlocking an effective, long-term treatment of addiction.

  17. Two Components of Nocturnal Locomotor Suppression by Light

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Lituma, Pablo J.; Studholme, Keith M.

    2010-01-01

    In nocturnal rodents, millisecond light (“flash”) stimuli can induce both a large circadian rhythm phase shift and an associated state change from highly active to quiescence followed by behavioral sleep. Suppression of locomotion (“negative masking”) is an easily measured correlate of the state change. The present mouse studies used both flashes and longer light stimuli (“pulses”) to distinguish initiation from maintenance effects of light on locomotor suppression and to determine whether the locomotor suppression exhibits temporal integration as is thought to be characteristic of phase shift responses to pulse, but not flash, stimuli. In Expt. 1, locomotor suppression increased with irradiance (0.01–100 μW/cm2), in accordance with previous reports. It also increased with stimulus duration (3–3000 sec), but interpretation of this result is complicated by the ability of light to both initiate and maintain locomotor suppression. In Expt. 2, an irradiance response curve was determined using a stimulus series of 10 flashes, 2 msec each, with total flash energy varying from 0.0025 – 110.0 J/m2. This included a test for temporal integration in which the effects of two equal energy series of flashes were compared, but which differed in the number of flashes per series (10 vs 100). The 10 flash series more effectively elicited locomotor suppression than the 100 flash series, a result consistent with prior observations involving flash-induced phase shifts. In Expt. 3, exposure of mice to an 11 hr light stimulus yielded irradiance-dependent locomotor suppression that can be maintained for the entire stimulus duration by a 100 μW/cm2 stimulus. Light has the ability to initiate a time-limited (30–40 min) interval of locomotor suppression (initiation effect) that can be extended by additional light (maintenance effect). Temporal integration resembling that seen in phase shifting responses to light does not exist for either phase shift or locomotor

  18. Attenuation of Cocaine Induced Locomotor Sensitization in Rats Sustaining Genetic or Pharmacologic Antagonism of Ghrelin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, P. Shane; Rodriguez, Juan; Schul, Destri; Hughes, Samuel; Kniffin, Tracey; Hart, Nigel; Eitan, Shoshana; Wellman, Paul J.; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Systemic infusions of the orexigenic peptide ghrelin (GHR) increase dopamine levels within the nucleus accumbens and augment cocaine stimulated locomotion and conditioned place preference in rats; observations that suggest an important role for ghrelin and GHR receptors (GHR-Rs) in drug reinforcement. In the present studies, we examined the development of cocaine locomotor sensitization in rats sustaining either pharmacologic antagonism or genetic ablation of GHR-Rs. In a pharmacologic study, adult male rats were injected (i.p.) with either 0, 3 or 6 mg/kg JMV 2959 (a GHR-R1 receptor antagonist) and 20 minutes later with either vehicle or 10 mg/kg cocaine HCl on each of 7 consecutive days. Rats pretreated with JMV 2959 showed significantly attenuated cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. In a second study, adult wild type (WT) or mutant rats sustaining ENU-induced knockout of GHR-R (GHR-R (−/−)) received daily injections (i.p) of vehicle (0.9% saline) or 10.0 mg/kg cocaine HCl for 14 successive days. GHR-R null rats treated repeatedly with cocaine showed diminished development of cocaine locomotor sensitization relative to WT rats treated with cocaine. To verify the lack of GHR-R function in the GHR-R (−/−) rats, a separate feeding experiment was conducted in which WT rats, but not GHR-R (−/−) rats, were noted to eat more after a systemic injection of 15 nmol ghrelin than after vehicle. These results suggest that GHR-R activity is required for the induction of locomotor sensitization to cocaine and complement an emerging literature implicating central GHR systems in drug reward. Ghrelin (GHR) is an orexigenic gut peptide that is transported across the blood brain barrier and interacts with GHR receptors (GHR-R) located on ventral tegmental dopamine neurons. PMID:21790898

  19. Non–Invasive Vagus Nerve Stimulation for the ACute Treatment of Cluster Headache: Findings From the Randomized, Double‐Blind, Sham‐Controlled ACT1 Study

    PubMed Central

    Mechtler, Laszlo L.; Kudrow, David B.; Calhoun, Anne H.; McClure, Candace; Saper, Joel R.; Liebler, Eric J.; Rubenstein Engel, Emily; Tepper, Stewart J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate non‐invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) as an acute cluster headache (CH) treatment. Background Many patients with CH experience excruciating attacks at a frequency that is not sufficiently addressed by current symptomatic treatments. Methods One hundred fifty subjects were enrolled and randomized (1:1) to receive nVNS or sham treatment for ≤1 month during a double‐blind phase; completers could enter a 3‐month nVNS open‐label phase. The primary end point was response rate, defined as the proportion of subjects who achieved pain relief (pain intensity of 0 or 1) at 15 minutes after treatment initiation for the first CH attack without rescue medication use through 60 minutes. Secondary end points included the sustained response rate (15‐60 minutes). Subanalyses of episodic cluster headache (eCH) and chronic cluster headache (cCH) cohorts were prespecified. Results The intent‐to‐treat population comprised 133 subjects: 60 nVNS‐treated (eCH, n = 38; cCH, n = 22) and 73 sham‐treated (eCH, n = 47; cCH, n = 26). A response was achieved in 26.7% of nVNS‐treated subjects and 15.1% of sham‐treated subjects (P = .1). Response rates were significantly higher with nVNS than with sham for the eCH cohort (nVNS, 34.2%; sham, 10.6%; P = .008) but not the cCH cohort (nVNS, 13.6%; sham, 23.1%; P = .48). Sustained response rates were significantly higher with nVNS for the eCH cohort (P = .008) and total population (P = .04). Adverse device effects (ADEs) were reported by 35/150 (nVNS, 11; sham, 24) subjects in the double‐blind phase and 18/128 subjects in the open‐label phase. No serious ADEs occurred. Conclusions In one of the largest randomized sham‐controlled studies for acute CH treatment, the response rate was not significantly different (vs sham) for the total population; nVNS provided significant, clinically meaningful, rapid, and sustained benefits for eCH but not for cCH, which affected

  20. A Single Session of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Enhances Vascular Endothelial Function and Peripheral Blood Circulation in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shinya; Masuda, Takashi; Kamiya, Kentaro; Hamazaki, Nobuaki; Akiyama, Ayako; Kamada, Yumi; Maekawa, Emi; Noda, Chiharu; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Ako, Junya

    2016-12-02

    This study aimed to investigate whether a single session of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) can enhance vascular endothelial function and peripheral blood circulation in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Thirty-four male patients with AMI were alternately assigned to 2 groups, and received NMES with muscle contraction (NMES group, n = 17) or without muscle contraction (control group, n = 17) after admission. NMES was performed for quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles of both legs for 30 minutes. We measured systolic blood pressure as a parameter of cardiovascular responses and the low-frequency component of blood pressure variability as an index of sympathetic activity. Reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT) index and transcutaneous oxygen pressure in foot (Foot-tcPO2) were also measured as parameters of vascular endothelial function and peripheral blood circulation, respectively. All patients completed the study without severe adverse events. Systolic blood pressure and the low-frequency component increased significantly during the NMES session in both groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). However, elevation from systolic blood pressure at rest was < 10 mmHg in both groups. In the NMES group, the RH-PAT index and Foot-tcPO2 increased significantly after NMES (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). No significant changes were observed in these parameters throughout the session in the control group. In conclusion, a single session of NMES with muscle contraction enhanced vascular endothelial function, leading to improvement in peripheral blood circulation without inducing excessive cardiovascular and autonomic responses in patients with AMI (UMIN000014196).

  1. Treating parents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: the effects of behavioral parent training and acute stimulant medication treatment on parent-child interactions.

    PubMed

    Babinski, Dara E; Waxmonsky, James G; Pelham, William E

    2014-10-01

    This multiple baseline study evaluated the efficacy of behavioral parent training (BPT) for 12 parents (M age = 39.17 years; 91% mothers) and their children (ages 6-12; 83% boys) both with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and also explored the acute effect of stimulant medication for parents before and after BPT. Parents rated their own and their children's symptoms and impairment and were stabilized on optimally dosed medication. Then, parents discontinued medication and were randomly assigned to a 3, 4, or 5 week baseline (BL), during which they provided twice-weekly ratings of their impairment, parenting, and their child's behavior. Following BL, parents and their children completed two laboratory tasks, once on their optimally dosed medication and once on a placebo to assess observable effects of medication on parent-child behavior, and they completed additional assessments of family functioning. Parents then completed eight BPT sessions, during which they were unmedicated. Twice-weekly ratings of parent and child behavior were collected during BPT and additional ratings were collected upon completing BPT. Two more parent-child tasks with and without parent medication were conducted upon BPT completion to assess the observable effects of BPT and BPT plus medication. Ten (83.33%) parents completed the trial. Improvements in parent and child behavior were observed, and parents reported improved child behavior with BPT. Few benefits of BPT emerged through parent reports of parent functioning, with the exception of inconsistent discipline, and no medication or interaction effects emerged. These results, although preliminary, suggest that some parents with ADHD benefit from BPT. While pharmacological treatment is the most common intervention for adults with ADHD, further examination of psychosocial treatments for adults is needed.

  2. Developing Sensorimotor Countermeasures to Mitigate Post-Flight Locomotor Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Cohen, H.; Miller, C. A.; Richards, J. T.; Houser, J.; McDonald, P. V.; Seidler, R. D.; Merkle, L. A.; Stelmach, G. E.

    2001-01-01

    Following spaceflight, crewmembers experience postural and locomotor instability. The magnitude and duration of post-flight sensorimotor disturbances increase with longer duration exposure to microgravity. These post-flight postural and locomotor alterations can pose a risk to crew safety and to mission objectives if nominal or emergency vehicle egress is required immediately following long-duration spaceflight. Gait instabilities could prevent or extend the time required to make an emergency egress from the Orbiter, Crew Return Vehicle or a future Martian lander leading to compromised mission objectives. We propose a countermeasure that aids in maintaining functional locomotor performance. This includes retaining the ability to perform vehicular egress and meet early mission objectives soon after landing on a planetary surface.

  3. Perception--action coupling model for human locomotor pointing.

    PubMed

    de Rugy, A; Taga, G; Montagne, G; Buekers, M J; Laurent, M

    2002-08-01

    How do humans achieve the precise positioning of the feet during walking, for example, to reach the first step of a stairway? We addressed this question at the visuomotor integration level. Based on the optical specification of the required adaptation, a dynamical system model of the visuomotor control of human locomotor pointing was devised for the positioning of a foot on a visible target on the floor during walking. Visuomotor integration consists of directly linking optical information to a motor command that specifically modulates step length in accordance with the ongoing dynamics of locomotor pattern generation. The adaptation of locomotion emerges from a perception-action coupling type of control based on temporal information rather than on feedforward planning of movements. The proposed model reproduces experimental results obtained for human locomotor pointing.

  4. Quaternary naltrexone reverses radiogenic and morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; Galbraith, J.A.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    The present study attempted to determine the relative role of the peripheral and central nervous system in the production of morphine-induced or radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the mouse. Toward this end, we used a quaternary derivative of an opiate antagonist (naltrexone methobromide), which presumably does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Quaternary naltrexone was used to challenge the stereotypic locomotor response observed in these mice after either an i.p. injection of morphine or exposure to 1500 rads /sup 60/Co. The quaternary derivative of naltrexone reversed the locomotor hyperactivity normally observed in the C57BL/6J mouse after an injection of morphine. It also significantly attenuated radiation-induced locomotion. The data reported here support the hypothesis of endorphin involvement in radiation-induced and radiogenic behaviors. However, these conclusions are contingent upon further research which more fully evaluates naltrexone methobromide's capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  5. Acute withdrawal but not long-term withdrawal from methamphetamine affects sexual behavior in female rats.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Rachel B; Ornelas, Laura C; Romero, Jordan; Memos, Nicoletta; Scheible, Matthew; Avila, Alfred; Schumacher, Abby; Navarro, April; Zimmermann, Karen; Cuenod, Bethany A; Frohardt, Russell J; Guarraci, Fay A

    2013-02-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the long-term effects of repeated methamphetamine (MA) exposure on sexual motivation in female rats tested after a period of drug abstinence. In Experiment 1, female subjects received three injections of MA (1.0mg/kg/day, every other day) or saline and were tested for paced mating behavior (where females could control the receipt of sexual stimulation from one male rat) 21 days after their last injection. In Experiment 2, female subjects received 12 consecutive injections of MA (1.0mg/kg/day) or saline and were tested for mate choice (where females could control the receipt of sexual stimulation from two male rats simultaneously) 6 days after their last injection. Experiment 3 was identical to Experiment 2 except that female subjects received no baseline mating test and were tested for mate choice 24h and 6 days after their last injection. Open field tests were conducted in each experiment to measure locomotor activity after repeated exposure to MA. Although repeated MA exposure increased locomotor activity, mating behavior was not facilitated after either a short (6 days) or long (21 days) period of drug abstinence. Nevertheless, sexual behavior was disrupted during the 24h acute withdrawal period. Therefore, although the present study found no evidence of cross-sensitization between female sexual behavior and MA after either a short or a long period of drug abstinence, sexual behavior in sexually naïve female rats is sensitive to the depressive state associated with acute withdrawal from MA. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that MA acts differently from other psychomotor stimulants, and that the effects of MA withdrawal on sexual behavior differ between male and female rats.

  6. Nitric oxide-mediated modulation of the murine locomotor network.

    PubMed

    Foster, Joshua D; Dunford, Catherine; Sillar, Keith T; Miles, Gareth B

    2014-02-01

    Spinal motor control networks are regulated by neuromodulatory systems to allow adaptability of movements. The present study aimed to elucidate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the modulation of mammalian spinal locomotor networks. This was investigated with isolated spinal cord preparations from neonatal mice in which rhythmic locomotor-related activity was induced pharmacologically. Bath application of the NO donor diethylamine NONOate (DEA/NO) decreased the frequency and modulated the amplitude of locomotor-related activity recorded from ventral roots. Removal of endogenous NO with coapplication of a NO scavenger (PTIO) and a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocker [nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)] increased the frequency and decreased the amplitude of locomotor-related activity. This demonstrates that endogenously derived NO can modulate both the timing and intensity of locomotor-related activity. The effects of DEA/NO were mimicked by the cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP. In addition, the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ blocked the effects of DEA/NO on burst amplitude and frequency, although the frequency effect was only blocked at low concentrations of DEA/NO. This suggests that NO-mediated modulation involves cGMP-dependent pathways. Sources of NO were studied within the lumbar spinal cord during postnatal development (postnatal days 1-12) with NADPH-diaphorase staining. NOS-positive cells in the ventral horn exhibited a rostrocaudal gradient, with more cells in rostral segments. The number of NOS-positive cells was also found to increase during postnatal development. In summary, we have shown that NO, derived from sources within the mammalian spinal cord, modulates the output of spinal motor networks and is therefore likely to contribute to the fine-tuning of locomotor behavior.

  7. Short-term Cortical Plasticity Associated With Feedback-Error Learning After Locomotor Training in a Patient With Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Sue; Borich, Michael R.; Boyd, Lara A.; Lam, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose For rehabilitation strategies to be effective, training should be based on principles of motor learning, such as feedback-error learning, that facilitate adaptive processes in the nervous system by inducing errors and recalibration of sensory and motor systems. This case report suggests that locomotor resistance training can enhance somatosensory and corticospinal excitability and modulate resting-state brain functional connectivity in a patient with motor-incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Case Description The short-term cortical plasticity of a 31-year-old man who had sustained an incomplete SCI 9.5 years previously was explored in response to body-weight–supported treadmill training with velocity-dependent resistance applied with a robotic gait orthosis. The following neurophysiological and neuroimaging measures were recorded before and after training. Sensory evoked potentials were elicited by electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve and recorded from the somatosensory cortex. Motor evoked potentials were generated with transcranial magnetic stimulation applied over the tibialis anterior muscle representation in the primary motor cortex. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed to evaluate short-term changes in patterns of brain activity associated with locomotor training. Outcomes Somatosensory excitability and corticospinal excitability were observed to increase after locomotor resistance training. Motor evoked potentials increased (particularly at higher stimulation intensities), and seed-based resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging analyses revealed increased functional connectivity strength in the motor cortex associated with the less affected side after training. Discussion The observations suggest evidence of short-term cortical plasticity in 3 complementary neurophysiological measures after one session of locomotor resistance training. Future investigation in a sample of people with

  8. Locomotor activity, object exploration and space preference in children with autism and Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawa, Rafał; Pisula, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    There have been ambiguous accounts of exploration in children with intellectual disabilities with respect to the course of that exploration, and in particular the relationship between the features of explored objects and exploratory behaviour. It is unclear whether reduced exploratory activity seen with object exploration but not with locomotor activity is autism-specific or if it is also present in children with other disabilities. The purpose of the present study was to compare preschool children with autism with their peers with Down syndrome and typical development in terms of locomotor activity and object exploration and to determine whether the complexity of explored objects affects the course of exploration activity in children with autism. In total there were 27 children in the study. The experimental room was divided into three zones equipped with experimental objects providing visual stimulation of varying levels of complexity. Our results indicate that children with autism and Down syndrome differ from children with typical development in terms of some measures of object exploration (i.e. looking at objects) and time spent in the zone with the most visually complex objects.

  9. Genotypic structure of a Drosophila population for adult locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grechanyi, G.V.; Korzun, V.M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the variation of adult locomotor activity in four samples taken at different times from a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster showed that the total variation of this trait is relatively stable in time and has a substantial genetic component. Genotypic structure of the population for locomotor activity is characterized by the presence of large groups of genotypes with high and low values of this trait. A possible explanation for the presence of such groups in a population is cyclic density-dependent selection.

  10. Effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists in assays of acute pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior in male rats: role of μ-agonist efficacy and noxious stimulus intensity.

    PubMed

    Altarifi, Ahmad A; Rice, Kenner C; Negus, S Stevens

    2015-02-01

    Pain is associated with stimulation of some behaviors and depression of others, and μ-opioid receptor agonists are among the most widely used analgesics. This study used parallel assays of pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior in male Sprague-Dawley rats to compare antinociception profiles for six μ-agonists that varied in efficacy at μ-opioid receptors (from highest to lowest: methadone, fentanyl, morphine, hydrocodone, buprenorphine, and nalbuphine). Intraperitoneal injection of diluted lactic acid served as an acute noxious stimulus to either stimulate stretching or depress operant responding maintained by electrical stimulation in an intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). All μ-agonists blocked both stimulation of stretching and depression of ICSS produced by 1.8% lactic acid. The high-efficacy agonists methadone and fentanyl were more potent at blocking acid-induced depression of ICSS than acid-stimulated stretching, whereas lower-efficacy agonists displayed similar potency across assays. All μ-agonists except morphine also facilitated ICSS in the absence of the noxious stimulus at doses similar to those that blocked acid-induced depression of ICSS. The potency of the low-efficacy μ-agonist nalbuphine, but not the high-efficacy μ-agonist methadone, to block acid-induced depression of ICSS was significantly reduced by increasing the intensity of the noxious stimulus to 5.6% acid. These results demonstrate sensitivity of acid-induced depression of ICSS to a range of clinically effective μ-opioid analgesics and reveal distinctions between opioids based on efficacy at the μ-receptor. These results also support the use of parallel assays of pain-stimulated and -depressed behaviors to evaluate analgesic efficacy of candidate drugs.

  11. Assessment of substance abuse liability in rodents: self-administration, drug discrimination, and locomotor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Neil E

    2012-09-01

    Assessing abuse liability is a crucial step in the development of a novel chemical entity (NCE) with central nervous system (CNS) activity or with chemical or pharmacological properties in common with known abused substances. Rodent assessment of abuse liability is highly attractive due to its relatively low cost and high predictive validity. Described in this unit are three rodent assays commonly used to provide data on the potential for abuse liability based on the acute effects of NCEs: specifically, self-administration, drug discrimination, and locomotor sensitization. As these assays provide insight into the potential abuse liability of NCEs as well as in vivo pharmacological mechanism(s) of action, they should form a key part of the development process for novel therapeutics aimed at treating CNS disorders.

  12. Rapid Sensitization of Physiological, Neuronal, and Locomotor Effects of Nicotine: Critical Role of Peripheral Drug Actions

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie; Tang, Jeremy S.; Woods, Amina S.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to nicotine and other psychostimulant drugs produces persistent increases in their psychomotor and physiological effects (sensitization), a phenomenon related to the drugs' reinforcing properties and abuse potential. Here we examined the role of peripheral actions of nicotine in nicotine-induced sensitization of centrally mediated physiological parameters (brain, muscle, and skin temperatures), cortical and VTA EEG, neck EMG activity, and locomotion in freely moving rats. Repeated injections of intravenous nicotine (30 μg/kg) induced sensitization of the drug's effects on all these measures. In contrast, repeated injections of the peripherally acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (nicotinePM, 30 μg/kg, i.v.) resulted in habituation (tolerance) of the same physiological, neuronal, and behavioral measures. However, after repeated nicotine exposure, acute nicotinePM injections induced nicotine-like physiological responses: powerful cortical and VTA EEG desynchronization, EMG activation, a large brain temperature increase, but weaker hyperlocomotion. Additionally, both the acute locomotor response to nicotine and nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization were attenuated by blockade of peripheral nicotinic receptors by hexamethonium (3 mg/kg, i.v.). These data suggest that the peripheral actions of nicotine, which precede its direct central actions, serve as a conditioned interoceptive cue capable of eliciting nicotine-like physiological and neural responses after repeated nicotine exposure. Thus, by providing a neural signal to the CNS that is repeatedly paired with the direct central effects of nicotine, the drug's peripheral actions play a critical role in the development of nicotine-induced physiological, neural, and behavioral sensitization. PMID:23761889

  13. Conditioned place preference and locomotor activity in response to methylphenidate, amphetamine and cocaine in mice lacking dopamine D4 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, P.K.; Thanos, P.K.; Bermeo, C.; Rubinstein, M.; Suchland, K.L.; Wang, G.-J.; Grandy, D.K.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) and amphetamine (AMPH) are the most frequently prescribed medications for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Both drugs are believed to derive their therapeutic benefit by virtue of their dopamine (DA)-enhancing effects, yet an explanation for the observation that some patients with ADHD respond well to one medication but not to the other remains elusive. The dopaminergic effects of MP and AMPH are also thought to underlie their reinforcing properties and ultimately their abuse. Polymorphisms in the human gene that codes for the DA D4 receptor (D4R) have been repeatedly associated with ADHD and may correlate with the therapeutic as well as the reinforcing effects of responses to these psychostimulant medications. Conditioned place preference (CPP) for MP, AMPH and cocaine were evaluated in wild-type (WT) mice and their genetically engineered littermates, congenic on the C57Bl/6J background, that completely lack D4Rs (knockout or KO). In addition, the locomotor activity in these mice during the conditioning phase of CPP was tested in the CPP chambers. D4 receptor KO and WT mice showed CPP and increased locomotor activity in response to each of the three psychostimulants tested. D4R differentially modulates the CPP responses to MP, AMPH and cocaine. While the D4R genotype affected CPP responses to MP (high dose only) and AMPH (low dose only) it had no effects on cocaine. Inasmuch as CPP is considered an indicator of sensitivity to reinforcing responses to drugs these data suggest a significant but limited role of D4Rs in modulating conditioning responses to MP and AMPH. In the locomotor test, D4 receptor KO mice displayed attenuated increases in AMPH-induced locomotor activity whereas responses to cocaine and MP did not differ. These results suggest distinct mechanisms for D4 receptor modulation of the reinforcing (perhaps via attenuating dopaminergic signalling) and locomotor properties of these stimulant drugs

  14. The potentiating effect of sertraline and fluoxetine on amphetamine-induced locomotor activity is not mediated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Sills, T L; Greenshaw, A J; Baker, G B; Fletcher, P J

    1999-04-01

    Sertraline dose-dependently increased the locomotor stimulating effect of amphetamine. At the highest dose, 20 mg/kg sertraline had a biphasic effect on amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, producing an initial reduction in amphetamine-induced hyperactivity that was later followed by an augmentation of amphetamine-induced hyperactivity in the last hour of the 3-h test. Sertraline, at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg, produced an augmentation of amphetamine-induced hyperactivity over the last 2 h of the 3-h test session. Further, there was an increase in the concentration of amphetamine in the brain in rats pretreated with 5 mg/kg sertraline. Both sertraline (5 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) produced an augmentation of amphetamine-induced hyperactivity that was unaltered by a serotonergic lesion of the median and dorsal raphe nuclei that resulted in a greater than 90% depletion of serotonin in hippocampus, striatum, and nucleus accumbens. Further, both sertraline and fluoxetine inhibited spontaneous locomotor activity and this effect was also unaltered by the depletion of serotonin. Thus, serotonergic neurotransmission is not essential for the effects of sertraline and fluoxetine on spontaneous and amphetamine-induced locomotion. It is probable that sertraline and fluoxetine augment the locomotor stimulatory effect of amphetamine by decreasing the metabolism of amphetamine, perhaps via actions on cytochrome P450 isozymes.

  15. Effects of caffeine and L-phenylisopropyladenosine on locomotor activity of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Buckholtz, N.S.; Middaugh, L.D.

    1987-10-01

    C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice were used to determine if possible differences in the behavioral response to caffeine might be related to differences in A1 adenosine receptors. Caffeine stimulated locomotor activity of both strains, but the dose-response relationship and time course of drug action differed according to strain. Although their response to caffeine differed, the strains did not differ in response to the A1 adenosine agonist L-phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA) nor in the binding of the A1 agonist (/sup 3/H)N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) in various brain regions. Thus, the behavioral differences in response to caffeine could not be accounted for by differences in adenosine binding. Of alternative mechanisms, strain differences in A2 receptors appear to be the most promising.

  16. Locomotor Experience and Use of Social Information Are Posture Specific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S.; Ishak, Shaziela; Karasik, Lana B.; Lobo, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of locomotor experience on infants' perceptual judgments in a potentially risky situation--descending steep and shallow slopes--while manipulating social incentives to determine where perceptual judgments are most malleable. Twelve-month-old experienced crawlers and novice walkers were tested on an adjustable…

  17. Limits to human locomotor performance: phylogenetic origins and comparative perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dudley, R

    2001-09-01

    Studies of human exercise physiology have been conducted from a largely ahistorical perspective. This approach usefully elucidates proximate limits to locomotor performance, but ignores potential sources of biomechanical and physiological variation that derive from adaptation to ancestral environments. Phylogenetic reconstruction suggests that multiple hominoid lineages, including that leading to Homo sapiens, evolved in African highlands at altitudes of 1000-2000 m. The evolution of human locomotor physiology therefore occurred under conditions of hypobaric hypoxia. In contrast to present-day humans running on treadmills or exercising in otherwise rectilinear trajectories, ancestral patterns of hominid locomotion probably involved intermittent knuckle-walking over variable terrain, occasional bouts of arboreality and an evolving capacity for bipedalism. All such factors represent potential axes of locomotor variation at present unstudied in extant hominoid taxa. As with humans, hummingbirds evolved in mid-montane contexts but pose an extreme contrast with respect to body size, locomotor mode and metabolic capacity. Substantial biomechanical and physiological challenges are associated with flight in hypobaria. Nonetheless, hummingbird lineages demonstrate a progressive invasion of higher elevations and a remarkable tolerance to hypoxia during hovering. Upregulation of aerobic capacity and parallel resistance to hypoxia may represent coupled evolutionary adaptations to flight under high-altitude conditions.

  18. DRUG EFFECTS ON THE LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY OF LARVAL ZEBRAFISH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae and the effects of prototype drugs. Zebrafish larvae (6-7 days post-fertilization) were indiv...

  19. Unraveling a locomotor network, many neurons at a time.

    PubMed

    Brownstone, Robert M; Stifani, Nicolas

    2015-04-08

    In this issue of Neuron, Bruno et al. (2015) use large-scale recordings in Aplysia, and apply novel dimensionality-reduction techniques to define dynamical building blocks involved in locomotor behavior. These techniques open new avenues to the study of neuronal networks.

  20. Active Gaze, Visual Look-Ahead, and Locomotor Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkie, Richard M.; Wann, John P.; Allison, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined observers steering through a series of obstacles to determine the role of active gaze in shaping locomotor trajectories. Participants sat on a bicycle trainer integrated with a large field-of-view simulator and steered through a series of slalom gates. Steering behavior was determined by examining the passing distance through…

  1. A Model of Locomotor-Respiratory Coupling in Quadrupeds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliodori,, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Briggs, Whitney S.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    Locomotion and respiration are not independent phenomena in running mammals because locomotion and respiration both rely on cyclic movements of the ribs, sternum, and associated musculature. Thus, constraints are imposed on locomotor and respiratory function by virtue of their linkage. Specifically, locomotion imposes mechanical constraints on…

  2. Anxiolytic-like, stimulant and neuroprotective effects of Ilex paraguariensis extracts in mice.

    PubMed

    Santos, E C S; Bicca, M A; Blum-Silva, C H; Costa, A P R; Dos Santos, A A; Schenkel, E P; Farina, M; Reginatto, F H; de Lima, T C M

    2015-04-30

    Yerba-mate (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil.) is the most used beverage in Latin America with approximately 426 thousand of tons consumed per year. Considering the broad use of this plant, we aimed to investigate the anxiety-like and stimulant activity of both the hydroethanolic (HE) and aqueous (AE) extracts from leaves of I. paraguariensis. Swiss mice were treated with I. paraguariensis HE or AE chronically or acutely, respectively, followed by evaluation in the elevated plus-maze (EPM; anxiety-like paradigm), open field (OF; locomotor activity) or the step-down avoidance task (memory assessment). Following behavioral protocols the brains were collected for evaluation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity ex vivo. Chronic treatment with HE induced an anxiolytic-like effect and increased motor activity besides augmented AChE activity. Additionally, acute treatment with AE prevented the scopolamine-induced memory deficit in the step-down avoidance task. Overall, our results indicate the importance of the I. paraguariensis-induced CNS effects, since it is a widely used nutraceutical. We have reported anxiolytic, stimulant and neuroprotective effects for this plant species. These effects are potentially modulated by the cholinergic system as well as by caffeine.

  3. Anatomical Location of the Mesencephalic Locomotor Region and Its Possible Role in Locomotion, Posture, Cataplexy, and Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, David; Fuller, Patrick M.; Marcus, Jacob; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Ping; Chamberlin, Nancy L.; Saper, Clifford B.; Lu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The mesencephalic (or midbrain) locomotor region (MLR) was first described in 1966 by Shik and colleagues, who demonstrated that electrical stimulation of this region induced locomotion in decerebrate (intercollicular transection) cats. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) cholinergic neurons and midbrain extrapyramidal area (MEA) have been suggested to form the neuroanatomical basis for the MLR, but direct evidence for the role of these structures in locomotor behavior has been lacking. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the MLR is composed of non-cholinergic spinally projecting cells in the lateral pontine tegmentum. Our results showed that putative MLR neurons medial to the PPT and MEA in rats were non-cholinergic, glutamatergic, and express the orexin (hypocretin) type 2 receptors. Fos mapping correlated with motor behaviors revealed that the dorsal and ventral MLR are activated, respectively, in association with locomotion and an erect posture. Consistent with these findings, chemical stimulation of the dorsal MLR produced locomotion, whereas stimulation of the ventral MLR caused standing. Lesions of the MLR (dorsal and ventral regions together) resulted in cataplexy and episodic immobility of gait. Finally, trans-neuronal tracing with pseudorabies virus demonstrated disynaptic input to the MLR from the substantia nigra via the MEA. These findings offer a new perspective on the neuroanatomic basis of the MLR, and suggest that MLR dysfunction may contribute to the postural and gait abnormalities in Parkinsonism. PMID:26157418

  4. Ethanol induces locomotor activating effects in preweanling Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Carlos; Mlewski, Cecilia E.; Molina, Juan Carlos; Spear, Norman E.

    2009-01-01

    Drugs of abuse exert biphasic motor activity effects, which seem to be associated with their motivational effects. In the case of ethanol, heterogenous rat strains appear to be particularly sensitive to the sedative effects of the drug. In contrast, ethanol’s activating effects have been consistently reported in rats genetically selected for ethanol affinity. Heightened ethanol affinity and sensitivity to ethanol’s reinforcement are also observed in non-selected rats during early ontogeny. In the present study we examined psychomotor effects of ethanol (1.25 and 2.5 g/kg) in 8, 12 and 15-day-old pups. Motor activity in a novel environment was assessed 5–10 or 15–20 minutes following drug treatment. Rectal temperatures and latency to exhibit the righting reflex were recorded immediately after locomotor activity assessment. Ethanol exerted clear activating effects at 8 and 12 days of age (Experiments 1a and 1b) and to a lesser extent at 15 days. At this age ethanol enhanced locomotor activity in the first testing interval (Experiment 1b) and suppressed locomotion at 15–20 minutes (Experiment 1a). Ethanol-mediated motor impairment was more pronounced in the youngest group (PD 8) than in the older ones. Blood ethanol concentrations were equivalent in all age groups. The present study indicates that preweanling rats are sensitive to ethanol’s stimulating effects during the second postnatal week, and suggest that specific periods during early ontogeny of the rat can provide a valuable framework for the study of mechanisms underlying ethanol’s stimulation and reinforcement effects. PMID:19185206

  5. Chronic nicotine alters cannabinoid-mediated locomotor activity and receptor density in periadolescent but not adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Werling, Linda L.; Reed, Stephanie Collins; Wade, Dean; Izenwasser, Sari

    2009-01-01

    A significant number of youths use cigarettes, and more than half of the youths who smoke daily also use illicit drugs. The focus of these studies is on how exposure to nicotine affects subsequent responses to both nicotine and cannabinoids in adolescents compared with adults. We have shown previously that chronic treatment with nicotine produces sensitization to its locomotor-activating effects in female and adult rats but not male adolescent rats. To better understand the effects of nicotine on adolescent and adult rats, rats were injected with nicotine or saline for 7 days and, on day 8, either challenged with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) or the cannabinoid agonist CP 55,940 and tested for locomotor activity, or the brains were removed for quantitative autoradiography studies of the cannabinoid1 receptor. A separate group of rats was treated with nicotine plus the cannabinoid antagonist AM 251 and then challenged with CP 55,940. In adolescent male rats, nicotine administration led to sensitization to the locomotor-decreasing effects of both Δ9-THC and CP 55,940, but in adult male rats, the response to either drug was unchanged compared to controls. The effect of nicotine on CP 55,940-mediated locomotor activity was blocked by co-administration of AM 251 with the nicotine. Further, cannabinoid receptor density was increased in the prelimbic prefrontal cortex, ventral tegmental area, and select regions of the hippocampus in adolescent male rats pretreated with nicotine compared to vehicle-treated controls. There were no significant changes in cannabinoid receptor binding, however, in any of the brain regions examined in adult males pretreated with nicotine. The prelimbic prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus have been shown previously to be involved in stimulant reinforcement; thus it is possible that these changes contribute to the unique behavioral effects of chronic nicotine and subsequent drug administration in adolescents compared with adults. PMID

  6. Zinc Chloride and Zinc Acetate Injected into the Neostriatum Produce Opposite Effect on Locomotor Behavior of Rats.

    PubMed

    Yakimovskii, A F; Kryzhanovskaya, S Yu

    2015-12-01

    Zinc chloride and zinc acetate solutions injected in a dose of 1 μg into the rostral neostriatum produced opposite effect on locomotor behavior of rats. Zink chloride disturbed conditioned avoidance and reduced spontaneous motor activity. Zink acetate virtually did not modify avoidance behavior and stimulated motor activity with elements of motor stereotypy. It was hypothesized that important factors here were the relationship between the effect and the level of metal released after salt dissociation and different reactivity of the synaptic substrate of the neostriatum to the presence of zinc ions.

  7. Activation of Neurotensin Receptor Type 1 Attenuates Locomotor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vadnie, Chelsea A.; Hinton, David J.; Choi, Sun; Choi, YuBin; Ruby, Christina L.; Oliveros, Alfredo; Prieto, Miguel L.; Park, Jun Hyun; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of neurotensin (NT) suppresses locomotor activity. However, the brain regions that mediate the locomotor depressant effect of NT and receptor subtype-specific mechanisms involved are unclear. Using a brain-penetrating, selective NT receptor type 1 (NTS1) agonist PD149163, we investigated the effect of systemic and brain region-specific NTS1 activation on locomotor activity. Systemic administration of PD149163 attenuated the locomotor activity of C57BL/6J mice both in a novel environment and in their homecage. However, mice developed tolerance to the hypolocomotor effect of PD149163 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.). Since NTS1 is known to modulate dopaminergic signaling, we examined whether PD149163 blocks dopamine receptor-mediated hyperactivity. Pretreatment with PD149163 (0.1 or 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited D2R agonist bromocriptine (8 mg/kg, i.p.)-mediated hyperactivity. D1R agonist SKF81297 (8 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced hyperlocomotion was only inhibited by 0.1 mg/kg of PD149163. Since the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) have been implicated in the behavioral effects of NT, we examined whether microinjection of PD149163 into these regions reduces locomotion. Microinjection of PD149163 (2 pmol) into the NAc, but not the mPFC suppressed locomotor activity. In summary, our results indicate that systemic and intra-NAc activation of NTS1 is sufficient to reduce locomotion and NTS1 activation inhibits D2R-mediated hyperactivity. Our study will be helpful to identify pharmacological factors and a possible therapeutic window for NTS1-targeted therapies for movement disorders. PMID:24929110

  8. Interpreting locomotor biomechanics from the morphology of human footprints.

    PubMed

    Hatala, Kevin G; Wunderlich, Roshna E; Dingwall, Heather L; Richmond, Brian G

    2016-01-01

    Fossil hominin footprints offer unique direct windows to the locomotor behaviors of our ancestors. These data could allow a clearer understanding of the evolution of human locomotion by circumventing issues associated with indirect interpretations of habitual locomotor patterns from fossil skeletal material. However, before we can use fossil hominin footprints to understand better the evolution of human locomotion, we must first develop an understanding of how locomotor biomechanics are preserved in, and can be inferred from, footprint morphologies. In this experimental study, 41 habitually barefoot modern humans created footprints under controlled conditions in which variables related to locomotor biomechanics could be quantified. Measurements of regional topography (depth) were taken from 3D models of those footprints, and principal components analysis was used to identify orthogonal axes that described the largest proportions of topographic variance within the human experimental sample. Linear mixed effects models were used to quantify the influences of biomechanical variables on the first five principal axes of footprint topographic variation, thus providing new information on the biomechanical variables most evidently expressed in the morphology of human footprints. The footprint's overall depth was considered as a confounding variable, since biomechanics may be linked to the extent to which a substrate deforms. Three of five axes showed statistically significant relationships with variables related to both locomotor biomechanics and substrate displacement; one axis was influenced only by biomechanics and another only by the overall depth of the footprint. Principal axes of footprint morphological variation were significantly related to gait type (walking or running), kinematics of the hip and ankle joints and the distribution of pressure beneath the foot. These results provide the first quantitative framework for developing hypotheses regarding the

  9. Low-dose effect of ethanol on locomotor activity induced by activation of the mesolimbic system.

    PubMed

    Milton, G V; Randall, P K; Erickson, C K

    1995-06-01

    Four experiments were designed to study the ability of 0.5 g/kg ethanol (EtOH) intraperitoneally to modify locomotor activity induced by drugs that interact with different sites in the mesolimbic system (MLS) of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Locomotor activity was measured in a doughnut-shaped circular arena after various treatments. EtOH alone did not alter locomotor activity in any of the experiments. Amphetamine (AMP, intraperitoneally or intraaccumbens) increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner, and the presence of EtOH attenuated AMP-induced locomotor activity. Bilateral infusion of GABAA antagonist picrotoxin (PIC) into the ventral tegmental area also increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner, and the presence of EtOH attenuated PIC-induced locomotor activity. On the other hand, the interaction between bilateral infusion of mu-receptor agonist Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-NMe-Phe-Gly-ol (DAGO) and EtOH on locomotor activity is complex. The highest dose of DAGO that significantly increased locomotor activity was not affected by the presence of EtOH. But, with lower doses of DAGO that either had no effect or a small increase in locomotor activity, the combination of EtOH and DAGO increased and attenuated locomotor activity, respectively. Results from this study support our hypothesis that a low dose of EtOH that does not modify behavior can interact with neurotransmitter systems in the brain and modify drug-induced locomotor activity. Modification of this drug-induced locomotor activity by a low dose of EtOH is dependent on the rate of ongoing locomotor behavior induced by drug and the neurotransmitter substrate that the drug modified to induce locomotor behavior.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Inducible Nitric Oxide Inhibitors Block NMDA Antagonist-Stimulated Motoric Behaviors and Medial Prefrontal Cortical Glutamate Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, Hadley C.; Darvesh, Altaf S.; Berger, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a critical role in the motoric and glutamate releasing action of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-antagonist stimulants. Earlier studies utilized neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (nNOS) for studying the neurobehavioral effects of non-competitive NMDA-antagonist stimulants such as dizocilpine (MK-801) and phencyclidine (PCP). This study explores the role of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (iNOS) aminoguanidine (AG) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in NMDA-antagonist induced motoric behavior and prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux. Adult male rats were administered a dose range of AG, EGCG, or vehicle prior to receiving NMDA antagonists MK-801, PCP, or a conventional psychostimulant (cocaine) and tested for motoric behavior in an open arena. Glutamate in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) was measured using in vivo microdialysis after a combination of AG or EGCG prior to MK-801. Acute administration of AG or EGCG dose-dependently attenuated the locomotor and ataxic properties of MK-801 and PCP. Both AG and EGCG were unable to block the motoric effects of cocaine, indicating the acute pharmacologic action of AG and EGCG is specific to NMDA antagonism and not generalizable to all stimulant class drugs. AG and EGCG normalized MK-801-stimulated mPFC glutamate efflux. These data demonstrate that AG and EGCG attenuates NMDA antagonist-stimulated motoric behavior and cortical glutamate efflux. Our results suggest that EGCG-like polyphenol nutraceuticals (contained in “green tea” and chocolate) may be clinically useful in protecting against the adverse behavioral dissociative and cortical glutamate stimulating effects of NMDA antagonists. Medications that interfere with NMDA antagonists such as MK-801 and PCP have been proposed as treatments for schizophrenia. PMID:26696891

  11. The Nicotine-Evoked Locomotor Response: A Behavioral Paradigm for Toxicity Screening in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryos and Eleutheroembryos Exposed to Methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Zamorano, Francisco X.; Svoboda, Kurt R.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This study is an adaptation of the nicotine-evoked locomotor response (NLR) assay, which was originally utilized for phenotype-based neurotoxicity screening in zebrafish embryos. Zebrafish embryos do not exhibit spontaneous swimming until roughly 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), however, a robust swimming response can be induced as early as 36 hours post-fertilization (hpf) by means of acute nicotine exposure (30–240μM). Here, the NLR was tested as a tool for early detection of locomotor phenotypes in 36, 48 and 72 hpf mutant zebrafish embryos of the non-touch-responsive maco strain; this assay successfully discriminated mutant embryos from their non-mutant siblings. Then, methylmercury (MeHg) was used as a proof-of-concept neurotoxicant to test the effectiveness of the NLR assay as a screening tool in toxicology. The locomotor effects of MeHg were evaluated in 6 dpf wild type eleutheroembryos exposed to waterborne MeHg (0, 0.01, 0.03 and 0.1μM). Afterwards, the NLR assay was tested in 48 hpf embryos subjected to the same MeHg exposure regimes. Embryos exposed to 0.01 and 0.03μM of MeHg exhibited significant increases in locomotion in both scenarios. These findings suggest that similar locomotor phenotypes observed in free swimming fish can be detected as early as 48 hpf, when locomotion is induced with nicotine. PMID:27123921

  12. Locomotor Dysfunction after Long-duration Space Flight and Development of Countermeasures to Facilitate Faster Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Wood, Scott; Cohen, Helen; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2012-07-01

    movement control and a functional mobility test to investigate overall functional locomotor ability. Postflight sessions were given on days 1, 2, 4, 7 after their return. Subjects walked on a treadmill driven at 1.8 m/s while performing a visual task. Motion data from head and trunk segmental motion data were obtained to calculate the angular head pitch (HP) movements during walking trials while subjects performed the visual task, to estimate the contributions of vestibular reflexive mechanisms in HP movements. Astronauts showed a heterogeneous response pattern of both increases and decreases in the amplitude of HP movement. We investigated the underlying mechanisms of this heterogeneity in postflight responses in head movement control by examining data obtained using the same experimental test paradigm on a vestibular clinical population (VC) and in normal subjects undergoing adaptation to acute body load support unloading. Results showed that exposure to unloaded locomotion caused a significant increase in HP movements, whereas in the VC patients the HP movements were significantly decreased. We infer that BLS-mediated somatosensory input centrally modulates vestibular input and can adaptively modify head-movement control during locomotion. Thus, space flight may cause a central adaptation of the converging vestibular and body load-sensing somatosensory systems. To investigate changes in functional mobility astronaut subjects walked at their preferred pace around an obstacle course consisting of several pylons and obstacles set up on a foam floor, which provided an unstable walking surface. Subjects were instructed to walk around the course as fast as possible without touching any of the objects on the course for a total of six individual trials per test session. One of the dependent measures was time to complete the course (TCC, sec). The learning rate over the six trials performed on preflight and the first day after landing (micro curve) was used to characterize the

  13. Development of a Countermeasure to Enhance Postflight Locomotor Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight experience locomotor dysfunction following their return to Earth. Our laboratory is currently developing a gait adaptability training program that is designed to facilitate recovery of locomotor function following a return to a gravitational environment. The training program exploits the ability of the sensorimotor system to generalize from exposure to multiple adaptive challenges during training so that the gait control system essentially learns to learn and therefore can reorganize more rapidly when faced with a novel adaptive challenge. We have previously confirmed that subjects participating in adaptive generalization training programs using a variety of visuomotor distortions can enhance their ability to adapt to a novel sensorimotor environment. Importantly, this increased adaptability was retained even one month after completion of the training period. Adaptive generalization has been observed in a variety of other tasks requiring sensorimotor transformations including manual control tasks and reaching (Bock et al., 2001, Seidler, 2003) and obstacle avoidance during walking (Lam and Dietz, 2004). Taken together, the evidence suggests that a training regimen exposing crewmembers to variation in locomotor conditions, with repeated transitions among states, may enhance their ability to learn how to reassemble appropriate locomotor patterns upon return from microgravity. We believe exposure to this type of training will extend crewmembers locomotor behavioral repertoires, facilitating the return of functional mobility after long duration space flight. Our proposed training protocol will compel subjects to develop new behavioral solutions under varying sensorimotor demands. Over time subjects will learn to create appropriate locomotor solution more rapidly enabling acquisition of mobility sooner after long-duration space flight. Our laboratory is currently developing adaptive generalization training procedures and the

  14. Distinct sets of locomotor modules control the speed and modes of human locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Hikaru; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Kawashima, Noritaka; Shinya, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    Although recent vertebrate studies have revealed that different spinal networks are recruited in locomotor mode- and speed-dependent manners, it is unknown whether humans share similar neural mechanisms. Here, we tested whether speed- and mode-dependence in the recruitment of human locomotor networks exists or not by statistically extracting locomotor networks. From electromyographic activity during walking and running over a wide speed range, locomotor modules generating basic patterns of muscle activities were extracted using non-negative matrix factorization. The results showed that the number of modules changed depending on the modes and speeds. Different combinations of modules were extracted during walking and running, and at different speeds even during the same locomotor mode. These results strongly suggest that, in humans, different spinal locomotor networks are recruited while walking and running, and even in the same locomotor mode different networks are probably recruited at different speeds. PMID:27805015

  15. Injections of the selective adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3 into the nucleus accumbens core attenuate the locomotor suppression induced by haloperidol in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ishiwari, Keita; Madson, Lisa J.; Farrar, Andrew M.; Mingote, Susana M.; Valenta, John P.; DiGianvittorio, Michael D.; Frank, Lauren E.; Correa, Merce; Hockemeyer, Jörg; Müller, Christa; Salamone, John D.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable evidence of interactions between adenosine A2A receptors and dopamine D2 receptors in striatal areas, and antagonists of the A2A receptor have been shown to reverse the motor effects of DA antagonists in animal models. The D2 antagonist haloperidol produces parkinsonism in humans, and also induces motor effects in rats, such as suppression of locomotion. The present experiments were conducted to study the ability of the adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3 to reverse the locomotor effects of acute or subchronic administration of haloperidol in rats. Systemic (i.p.) injections of MSX-3 (2.5–10.0 mg/kg) were capable of attenuating the suppression of locomotion induced by either acute or repeated (i.e., 14 day) administration of 0.5 mg/kg haloperidol. Bilateral infusions of MSX-3 directly into the nucleus accumbens core (2.5 µg or 5.0 µg in 0.5 µl per side) produced a dose-related increase in locomotor activity in rats treated with 0.5 mg/kg haloperidol either acutely or repeatedly. There were no overall significant effects of MSX-3 infused directly into the dorsomedial nucleus accumbens shell or the ventrolateral neostriatum. These results indicate that antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors can attenuate the locomotor suppression produced by DA antagonism, and that this effect may be at least partially mediated by A2A receptors in the nucleus accumbens core. These studies suggest that adenosine and dopamine systems interact to modulate the locomotor and behavioral activation functions of nucleus accumbens core. PMID:17223207

  16. Acute total sleep deprivation potentiates cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion in mice.

    PubMed

    Berro, L F; Santos, R; Hollais, A W; Wuo-Silva, R; Fukushiro, D F; Mári-Kawamoto, E; Costa, J M; Trombin, T F; Patti, C L; Grapiglia, S B; Tufik, S; Andersen, M L; Frussa-Filho, R

    2014-09-05

    Sleep deprivation is common place in modern society. Nowadays, people tend to self-impose less sleep in order to achieve professional or social goals. In the social context, late-night parties are frequently associated with higher availability of recreational drugs with abuse potential. Physiologically, all of these drugs induce an increase in dopamine release in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, which leads to hyperlocomotion in rodents. Sleep deprivation also seems to play an important role in the events related to the neurotransmission of the dopaminergic system by potentiating its behavioral effects. In this scenario, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of total sleep deprivation (6h) on the acute cocaine-induced locomotor stimulation in male mice. Animals were sleep deprived or maintained in their home cages and subsequently treated with an acute i.p. injection of 15mg/kg cocaine or saline and observed in the open field. Total sleep deprivation for 6h potentiated the hyperlocomotion induced by acute cocaine administration. In addition, the cocaine sleep deprived group showed a decreased ratio central/total locomotion compared to the cocaine control group, which might be related to an increase in the impulsiveness of mice. Our data indicate that acute periods of sleep loss should be considered risk factors for cocaine abuse.

  17. Stereoselective Effects of Abused "Bath Salt" Constituent 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone in Mice: Drug Discrimination, Locomotor Activity, and Thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Brenda M; Williamson, Adrian; Suzuki, Masaki; Rice, Kenner C; Fantegrossi, William E

    2016-03-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) is a common constituent of illicit "bath salts" products. MDPV is a chiral molecule, but the contribution of each enantiomer to in vivo effects in mice has not been determined. To address this, mice were trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline, and substitutions with racemic MDPV, S(+)-MDPV, and R(-)-MDPV were performed. Other mice were implanted with telemetry probes to monitor core temperature and locomotor responses elicited by racemic MDPV, S(+)-MDPV, and R(-)-MDPV under a warm (28°C) or cool (20°C) ambient temperature. Mice reliably discriminated the cocaine training dose from saline, and each form of MDPV fully substituted for cocaine, although marked potency differences were observed such that S(+)-MDPV was most potent, racemic MDPV was less potent than the S(+) enantiomer, and R(-)-MDPV was least potent. At both ambient temperatures, locomotor stimulant effects were observed after doses of S(+)-MDPV and racemic MDPV, but R(-)-MDPV did not elicit locomotor stimulant effects at any tested dose. Interestingly, significant increases in maximum core body temperature were only observed after administration of racemic MDPV in the warm ambient environment; neither MDPV enantiomer altered core temperature at any dose tested, at either ambient temperature. These studies suggest that all three forms of MDPV induce biologic effects, but R(-)-MDPV is less potent than S(+)-MDPV and racemic MDPV. Taken together, these data suggest that the S(+)-MDPV enantiomer is likely responsible for the majority of the biologic effects of the racemate and should be targeted in therapeutic efforts against MDPV overdose and abuse.

  18. Chronic nicotine differentially alters cocaine-induced locomotor activity in adolescent vs. adult male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Collins, Stephanie L; Izenwasser, Sari

    2004-03-01

    Tobacco use is prevalent in the adolescent population. It is a major concern because tobacco is highly addictive and has also been linked to illicit drug use. There is not much research, however, on the interaction between nicotine and other stimulant drugs in animal models of early adolescence. This study examined the effects of chronic nicotine alone and on cocaine-stimulated activity in male and female periadolescent rats compared to male and female adult rats. During the seven-day nicotine pretreatment period, nicotine increased locomotor activity in all groups compared to vehicle controls. Male and female adult rats and female periadolescent rats developed sensitization to the locomotor-activating effects of nicotine over the 7-day treatment period, while male periadolescent rats did not. All groups treated with nicotine, however, exhibited sensitization to nicotine-induced repetitive motion over the 7-day nicotine treatment period. On day 8, male periadolescent rats pretreated with nicotine were more markedly sensitized to the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine than male adult rats, while female rats pretreated with nicotine were not sensitized to cocaine. In contrast, male and female periadolescent rats, but not adult rats, had increased amounts of repetitive beam breaks induced by cocaine after nicotine pretreatment. Overall, it appears that cross-sensitization to cocaine is greater in periadolescent than in adult rats, and that males are more sensitized than females. Thus, it may be that nicotine use during adolescence carries a greater risk than during adulthood and that male adolescents may be particularly vulnerable to the risk of cocaine abuse after nicotine use. This information should be taken into account so as to help us better understand the development of drug addiction in adolescents compared to adults.

  19. Acute and chronic hypoxia: implications for cerebral function and exercise tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Stuart; Twomey, Rosie; Amann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To outline how hypoxia profoundly affects neuronal functionality and thus compromise exercise-performance. Methods Investigations using electroencephalography (EEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) detecting neuronal changes at rest and those studying fatiguing effects on whole-body exercise performance in acute (AH) and chronic hypoxia (CH) were evaluated. Results At rest during very early hypoxia (<1-h), slowing of cerebral neuronal activity is evident despite no change in corticospinal excitability. As time in hypoxia progresses (3-h), increased corticospinal excitability becomes evident; however, changes in neuronal activity are unknown. Prolonged exposure (3–5 d) causes a respiratory alkalosis which modulates Na+ channels, potentially explaining reduced neuronal excitability. Locomotor exercise in AH exacerbates the development of peripheral-fatigue; as the severity of hypoxia increases, mechanisms of peripheral-fatigue become less dominant and CNS hypoxia becomes the predominant factor. The greatest central-fatigue in AH occurs when SaO2 is ≤75%, a level that coincides with increasing impairments in neuronal activity. CH does not improve the level of peripheral-fatigue observed in AH; however, it attenuates the development of central-fatigue paralleling increases in cerebral O2 availability and corticospinal excitability. Conclusions The attenuated development of central-fatigue in CH might explain, the improvements in locomotor exercise-performance commonly observed after acclimatisation to high altitude. PMID:25593787

  20. The peacock train does not handicap cursorial locomotor performance

    PubMed Central

    Thavarajah, Nathan K.; Tickle, Peter G.; Nudds, Robert L.; Codd, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated traits, like the peacock train, are recognized as classic examples of sexual selection. The evolution of sexual traits is often considered paradoxical as, although they enhance reproductive success, they are widely presumed to hinder movement and survival. Many exaggerated traits represent an additional mechanical load that must be carried by the animal and therefore may influence the metabolic cost of locomotion and constrain locomotor performance. Here we conducted respirometry experiments on peacocks and demonstrate that the exaggerated sexually selected train does not compromise locomotor performance in terms of the metabolic cost of locomotion and its kinematics. Indeed, peacocks with trains had a lower absolute and mass specific metabolic cost of locomotion. Our findings suggest that adaptations that mitigate any costs associated with exaggerated morphology are central in the evolution of sexually selected traits. PMID:27805067

  1. Multi-terrain locomotor interactions in flying snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeaton, Isaac; Baumgardner, Grant; Ross, Shane; Socha, John

    Arboreal snakes of the genus Chrysopelea are the only known snakes to glide. To execute aerial locomotion, a snake uses one of several stereotyped jumps from a tree into the air, while simultaneously flattening its body into an aerodynamically favorable shape. Large amplitude traveling waves are propagated posteriorly during the stable glide, while landing involves body wrapping, passive body compression, and energy absorption through compliance in the landing substrate to dissipate the accumulated kinetic energy from the glide. In all of these locomotor events, from interacting with cylindrical branches, falling through the air, grasping compliant tree branches and leaves, to landing on solid ground, snakes appropriate the same body morphology and perhaps the same basic neural mechanisms. Here we discuss our use of computational models and animal experiments to understand how flying snakes interact with and locomote on and through multiple media, potentially providing principles for legless locomotor designs. Supported by NSF 1351322.

  2. A Locomotor Deficit Induced by Sublethal Doses of Pyrethroid and Neonicotinoid Insecticides in the Honeybee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Charreton, Mercédès; Decourtye, Axel; Henry, Mickaël; Rodet, Guy; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Charnet, Pierre; Collet, Claude

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of pesticides used in agriculture towards non-targeted organisms and especially pollinators has recently drawn the attention from a broad scientific community. Increased honeybee mortality observed worldwide certainly contributes to this interest. The potential role of several neurotoxic insecticides in triggering or potentiating honeybee mortality was considered, in particular phenylpyrazoles and neonicotinoids, given that they are widely used and highly toxic for insects. Along with their ability to kill insects at lethal doses, they can compromise survival at sublethal doses by producing subtle deleterious effects. In this study, we compared the bee's locomotor ability, which is crucial for many tasks within the hive (e.g. cleaning brood cells, feeding larvae…), before and after an acute sublethal exposure to one insecticide belonging to the two insecticide classes, fipronil and thiamethoxam. Additionally, we examined the locomotor ability after exposure to pyrethroids, an older chemical insecticide class still widely used and known to be highly toxic to bees as well. Our study focused on young bees (day 1 after emergence) since (i) few studies are available on locomotion at this stage and (ii) in recent years, pesticides have been reported to accumulate in different hive matrices, where young bees undergo their early development. At sublethal doses (SLD48h, i.e. causing no mortality at 48 h), three pyrethroids, namely cypermethrin (2.5 ng/bee), tetramethrin (70 ng/bee), tau-fluvalinate (33 ng/bee) and the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam (3.8 ng/bee) caused a locomotor deficit in honeybees. While the SLD48h of fipronil (a phenylpyrazole, 0.5 ng/bee) had no measurable effect on locomotion, we observed high mortality several days after exposure, an effect that was not observed with the other insecticides. Although locomotor deficits observed in the sublethal range of pyrethroids and thiamethoxam would suggest deleterious effects in the field, the case of

  3. A Locomotor Deficit Induced by Sublethal Doses of Pyrethroid and Neonicotinoid Insecticides in the Honeybee Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Charreton, Mercédès; Decourtye, Axel; Henry, Mickaël; Rodet, Guy; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Charnet, Pierre; Collet, Claude

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of pesticides used in agriculture towards non-targeted organisms and especially pollinators has recently drawn the attention from a broad scientific community. Increased honeybee mortality observed worldwide certainly contributes to this interest. The potential role of several neurotoxic insecticides in triggering or potentiating honeybee mortality was considered, in particular phenylpyrazoles and neonicotinoids, given that they are widely used and highly toxic for insects. Along with their ability to kill insects at lethal doses, they can compromise survival at sublethal doses by producing subtle deleterious effects. In this study, we compared the bee’s locomotor ability, which is crucial for many tasks within the hive (e.g. cleaning brood cells, feeding larvae…), before and after an acute sublethal exposure to one insecticide belonging to the two insecticide classes, fipronil and thiamethoxam. Additionally, we examined the locomotor ability after exposure to pyrethroids, an older chemical insecticide class still widely used and known to be highly toxic to bees as well. Our study focused on young bees (day 1 after emergence) since (i) few studies are available on locomotion at this stage and (ii) in recent years, pesticides have been reported to accumulate in different hive matrices, where young bees undergo their early development. At sublethal doses (SLD48h, i.e. causing no mortality at 48h), three pyrethroids, namely cypermethrin (2.5 ng/bee), tetramethrin (70 ng/bee), tau-fluvalinate (33 ng/bee) and the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam (3.8 ng/bee) caused a locomotor deficit in honeybees. While the SLD48h of fipronil (a phenylpyrazole, 0.5 ng/bee) had no measurable effect on locomotion, we observed high mortality several days after exposure, an effect that was not observed with the other insecticides. Although locomotor deficits observed in the sublethal range of pyrethroids and thiamethoxam would suggest deleterious effects in the field, the case

  4. Exploring the role of locomotor sensitization in the circadian food entrainment pathway

    PubMed Central

    Opiol, Hanna; de Zavalia, Nuria; Delorme, Tara; Solis, Pavel; Rutherford, Spencer; Shalev, Uri; Amir, Shimon

    2017-01-01

    Food entrainment is the internal mechanism whereby the phase and period of circadian clock genes comes under the control of daily scheduled food availability. Food entrainment allows the body to efficiently realign the internal timing of behavioral and physiological functions such that they anticipate food intake. Food entrainment can occur with or without caloric restriction, as seen with daily schedules of restricted feeding (RF) or restricted treat (RT) that restrict food or treat intake to a single feeding time. However, the extent of clock gene control is more pronounced with caloric restriction, highlighting the role of energy balance in regulating clock genes. Recent studies have implicated dopamine (DA) to be involved in food entrainment and caloric restriction is known to affect dopaminergic pathways to enhance locomotor activity. Since food entrainment results in the development of a distinct behavioral component, called food anticipatory activity (FAA), we examined the role of locomotor sensitization (LS) in food entrainment by 1) observing whether amphetamine (AMPH) sensitization results in enhanced locomotor output of FAA and 2) measuring LS of circadian and non-circadian feeding paradigms to an acute injection of AMPH (AMPH cross-sensitization). Unexpectedly, AMPH sensitization did not show enhancement of FAA. On the contrary, LS did develop with sufficient exposure to RF. LS was present after 2 weeks of RF, but not after 1, 3 or 7 days into RF. When food was returned and rats regain their original body weight at 10–15 days post-RF, LS remained present. LS did not develop to RT, nor to feedings of a non-circadian schedule, e.g. variable restricted feeding (VRF) or variable RT (VRT). Further, when RF was timed to the dark period, LS was observed only when tested at night; RF timed to the light period resulted in LS that was present during day and night. Taken together our results show that LS develops with food entrainment to RF, an effect that is

  5. Vestibular lesion-induced developmental plasticity in spinal locomotor networks during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Anna; Rao, Guillaume; Ladepeche, Laurent; Jacques, André; Simmers, John; Le Ray, Didier

    2013-01-01

    During frog metamorphosis, the vestibular sensory system remains unchanged, while spinal motor networks undergo a massive restructuring associated with the transition from the larval to adult biomechanical system. We investigated in Xenopus laevis the impact of a pre- (tadpole stage) or post-metamorphosis (juvenile stage) unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) on young adult swimming performance and underlying spinal locomotor circuitry. The acute disruptive effects on locomotion were similar in both tadpoles and juvenile frogs. However, animals that had metamorphosed with a preceding UL expressed restored swimming behavior at the juvenile stage, whereas animals lesioned after metamorphosis never recovered. Whilst kinematic and electrophysiological analyses of the propulsive system showed no significant differences in either juvenile group, a 3D biomechanical simulation suggested that an asymmetry in the dynamic control of posture during swimming could account for the behavioral restoration observed in animals that had been labyrinthectomized before metamorphosis. This hypothesis was subsequently supported by in vivo electromyography during free swimming and in vitro recordings from isolated brainstem/spinal cord preparations. Specifically, animals lesioned prior to metamorphosis at the larval stage exhibited an asymmetrical propulsion/posture coupling as a post-metamorphic young adult. This developmental alteration was accompanied by an ipsilesional decrease in propriospinal coordination that is normally established in strict left-right symmetry during metamorphosis in order to synchronize dorsal trunk muscle contractions with bilateral hindlimb extensions in the swimming adult. Our data thus suggest that a disequilibrium in descending vestibulospinal information during Xenopus metamorphosis leads to an altered assembly of adult spinal locomotor circuitry. This in turn enables an adaptive compensation for the dynamic postural asymmetry induced by the vestibular imbalance

  6. Gestational Toluene Exposure Effects on Spontaneous and Amphetamine-Induced Locomotor Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Michael H.; Batis, Jeffery C.; Hannigan, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The abuse of volatile organic solvents (inhalants) continues to be a major health concern throughout the world. Toluene, which is found in many products such as glues and household cleaners, is among the most commonly abused organic solvents. The neurobehavioral teratogenic sequelae of solvent abuse (i.e., repeated, brief inhalation exposures to very high concentrations of solvents) have not been examined thoroughly. In a preclinical model of inhalant abuse, timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0, 8,000, or 12,000 parts per million (ppm) for 15 min twice daily from gestation day 8 (GD8) through GD20. In the first experiment, separate groups of offspring were observed individually in an open-field on postnatal day 22 (PN22), PN42 or PN63. In the second experiment, other offspring given identical prenatal toluene exposures were observed in an “open-field” following an acute i.p. injection of amphetamine (0, 0.56, 1.78 mg/kg) on PN28. Automated measurements of distance traveled and ambulatory time were recorded. Prenatal toluene exposure resulted in small alterations in spontaneous activity compared to non-exposed rats. Prenatal exposure to 12,000 ppm toluene resulted in significant hyposensitivity to the locomotor stimulatory effects of the amphetamine challenge in male but not female rats on PN28. The results demonstrate that prenatal exposure to abuse patterns of high concentrations of toluene through inhalation can alter spontaneous and amphetamine-induced locomotor behavior in rats. The expression of these effects also appears to depend upon the postnatal age of testing. These results imply that abuse of organic solvents during pregnancy in humans may also produce long-lasting effects on biobehavioral development. PMID:17112700

  7. Plastic Changes in Lumbar Locomotor Networks after a Partial Spinal Cord Injury in Cats.

    PubMed

    Gossard, Jean-Pierre; Delivet-Mongrain, Hugo; Martinez, Marina; Kundu, Aritra; Escalona, Manuel; Rossignol, Serge

    2015-06-24

    After an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), we know that plastic reorganization occurs in supraspinal structures with residual descending tracts. However, our knowledge about spinal plasticity is rather limited. Our recent studies point to changes within the spinal cord below the lesion. After a lateral left hemisection (T10), cats recovered stepping with both hindlimbs within 3 weeks. After a complete section (T13) in these cats, bilateral stepping was seen on the next day, a skill usually acquired after several weeks of treadmill training. This indicates that durable plastic changes occurred below the lesion. However, because sensory feedback entrains the stepping rhythm, it is difficult to reveal central pattern generator (CPG) adaptation. Here, we investigated whether lumbar segments of cats with a chronic hemisection were able to generate fictive locomotion-that is, without phasic sensory feedback as monitored by five muscle nerves in each hindlimb. With a chronic left hemisection, the number of muscle nerves displaying locomotor bursts was larger on the left than on the right. In addition, transmission of cutaneous reflexes was relatively facilitated on the left. Later during the acute experiment, a complete spinalization (T13) was performed and clonidine was injected to induce rhythmic activities. There were still more muscle nerves displaying locomotor bursts on the left. The results demonstrate that spinal networks were indeed modified after a hemisection with a clear asymmetry between left and right in the capacity to generate locomotion. Plastic changes in CPG and reflex transmission below the lesion are thus involved in the stepping recovery after an incomplete SCI.

  8. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Keith E; Kinnaird, Catherine R; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-04-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to "fight" the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations.

  9. Locomotor Experience and Use of Social Information Are Posture Specific

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Karen E.; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S.; Ishak, Shaziela; Karasik, Lana B.; Lobo, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of locomotor experience on infants’ perceptual judgments in a potentially risky situation—descending steep and shallow slopes—while manipulating social incentives to determine where perceptual judgments are most malleable. Twelve-month-old experienced crawlers and novice walkers were tested on an adjustable sloping walkway as their mothers encouraged and discouraged descent. A psychophysical procedure was used to estimate infants’ ability to crawl/walk down slopes, followed by test trials in which mothers encouraged and discouraged infants to crawl/walk down. Both locomotor experience and social incentives affected perceptual judgments. In the encourage condition, crawlers only attempted safe slopes within their abilities, but walkers repeatedly attempted impossibly risky slopes, replicating previous work. The discourage condition showed where judgments are most malleable. When mothers provided negative social incentives, crawlers occasionally avoided safe slopes, and walkers occasionally avoided the most extreme 50° increment, although they attempted to walk on more than half the trials. Findings indicate that both locomotor experience and social incentives play key roles in adaptive responding, but the benefits are specific to the posture that infants use for balance and locomotion. PMID:18999332

  10. Locomotor experience and use of social information are posture specific.

    PubMed

    Adolph, Karen E; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S; Ishak, Shaziela; Karasik, Lana B; Lobo, Sharon A

    2008-11-01

    The authors examined the effects of locomotor experience on infants' perceptual judgments in a potentially risky situation--descending steep and shallow slopes--while manipulating social incentives to determine where perceptual judgments are most malleable. Twelve-month-old experienced crawlers and novice walkers were tested on an adjustable sloping walkway as their mothers encouraged and discouraged descent. A psychophysical procedure was used to estimate infants' ability to crawl/walk down slopes, followed by test trials in which mothers encouraged and discouraged infants to crawl/walk down. Both locomotor experience and social incentives affected perceptual judgments. In the encourage condition, crawlers only attempted safe slopes within their abilities, but walkers repeatedly attempted impossibly risky slopes, replicating previous work. The discourage condition showed where judgments are most malleable. When mothers provided negative social incentives, crawlers occasionally avoided safe slopes, and walkers occasionally avoided the most extreme 50 degrees increment, although they attempted to walk on more than half the trials. Findings indicate that both locomotor experience and social incentives play key roles in adaptive responding, but the benefits are specific to the posture that infants use for balance and locomotion.

  11. Daily rhythms in locomotor circuits in Drosophila involve PDF

    PubMed Central

    Pírez, Nicolás; Christmann, Bethany L.

    2013-01-01

    The neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) has been studied extensively in Drosophila, and its role in circadian time-keeping has been firmly established. The role of PDF outside of the clock circuit, however, is poorly understood. A recent study suggested that PDF may act on the ellipsoid body (EB) to link the clock and sleep/activity circuits. We performed whole brain optical imaging with the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP sensor Epac1-camps expressed under control of the pdfR promoter to address how the clock and sleep deprivation affect the physiology of these cells. Basal cAMP levels in EB were regulated both by PDF and synaptic inputs that are controlled by the circadian clock. Acute application of PDF to the brain caused a significant, and PDF-receptor-dependent, increase in cAMP in EB cells. Application of TTX to block circuit-mediated effects of PDF increased the morning response but not the response at night, implying the existence of a temporally regulated, PDF-stimulated input that blocks cAMP generation. ACh produced both direct (TTX-insensitive) and indirect (TTX-sensitive) increases in cAMP during the day but was totally TTX-insensitive at night, indicating that ACh-stimulated inputs to the EB are suppressed at night. Sleep deprivation did not affect the cAMP responses of these cells to either PDF or ACh. These results suggest a novel role for PDF as a modulator of activity outside of the clock circuit. By elucidating the mechanisms by which the neuropeptide PDF act on its target cells, our work contributes to our understating of how the central clock coordinates activity and sleep. PMID:23678016

  12. Supraspinal Gβγ-dependent stimulation of PLCβ3 originating from G inhibitory protein-μ opioid receptor-coupling is necessary for morphine induced acute hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Enrica; Norcini, Monica; Smrcka, Alan; Ghelardini, Carla

    2009-01-01

    Although alterations in μ-opioid receptor signaling mediate excitatory effects of opiates in opioid tolerance, the molecular mechanism for the excitatory effect of acute low dose morphine, as it relates to μ-opioid receptor coupling, is presently unknown. A pronounced coupling of μ-opioid receptor to the α subunit of G inhibitory protein emerged in periaqueductal gray from mice systemically administered with morphine at a dose producing acute thermal hyperalgesia. This coupling was abolished in presence of the selective μ-opioid receptor receptor antagonist CTOP administered at the periaqueductal gray site, showing that the low dose morphine effect is triggered by μ-opioid receptor activated G inhibitory protein at supraspinal level. When Gβγ downstream signalling was blocked by intra-periaqueductal gray co-administration of M119, a compound that inhibits Gβγ dimer-dependent signaling, a complete prevention of low dose morphine induced acute thermal hyperalgesia was obtained. Phospholipase C β3, an enzyme necessary to morphine hyperalgesia, was revealed to be associated with Gβγ in periaqueductal gray. Although opioid administration induces a shift in μ-opioid receptor-G protein coupling from Gi to Gs after chronic administration, our data support that this condition is not realized in acute treatment providing evidence that a separate molecular mechanism underlies morphine induced acute excitatory effect. PMID:19656263

  13. Identification of multisegmental nociceptive afferents that modulate locomotor circuits in the neonatal mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Mandadi, Sravan; Hong, Peter; Tran, Michelle A; Bráz, Joao M; Colarusso, Pina; Basbaum, Allan I; Whelan, Patrick J

    2013-08-15

    Compared to proprioceptive afferent collateral projections, less is known about the anatomical, neurochemical, and functional basis of nociceptive collateral projections modulating lumbar central pattern generators (CPG). Quick response times are critical to ensure rapid escape from aversive stimuli. Furthermore, sensitization of nociceptive afferent pathways can contribute to a pathological activation of motor circuits. We investigated the extent and role of collaterals of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive sacrocaudal afferent (nSCA) nerves that directly ascend several spinal segments in Lissauer's tract and the dorsal column and regulate motor activity. Anterograde tracing demonstrated direct multisegmental projections of the sacral dorsal root 4 (S4) afferent collaterals in Lissauer's tract and in the dorsal column. Subsets of the traced S4 afferent collaterals expressed transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which transduces a nociceptive response to capsaicin. Electrophysiological data revealed that S4 dorsal root stimulation could evoke regular rhythmic bursting activity, and our data suggested that capsaicin-sensitive collaterals contribute to CPG activation across multiple segments. Capsaicin's effect on S4-evoked locomotor activity was potent until the lumbar 5 (L5) segments, and diminished in rostral segments. Using calcium imaging we found elevated calcium transients within Lissauer's tract and dorsal column at L5 segments when compared to the calcium transients only within the dorsal column at the lumbar 2 (L2) segments, which were desensitized by capsaicin. We conclude that lumbar locomotor networks in the neonatal mouse spinal cord are targets for modulation by direct multisegmental nSCA, subsets of which express TRPV1 in Lissauer's tract and the dorsal column. J. Comp. Neurol. 521:2870-2887, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Sensory-evoked perturbations of locomotor activity by sparse sensory input: a computational study

    PubMed Central

    Brownstone, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory inputs from muscle, cutaneous, and joint afferents project to the spinal cord, where they are able to affect ongoing locomotor activity. Activation of sensory input can initiate or prolong bouts of locomotor activity depending on the identity of the sensory afferent activated and the timing of the activation within the locomotor cycle. However, the mechanisms by which afferent activity modifies locomotor rhythm and the distribution of sensory afferents to the spinal locomotor networks have not been determined. Considering the many sources of sensory inputs to the spinal cord, determining this distribution would provide insights into how sensory inputs are integrated to adjust ongoing locomotor activity. We asked whether a sparsely distributed set of sensory inputs could modify ongoing locomotor activity. To address this question, several computational models of locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs) that were mechanistically diverse and generated locomotor-like rhythmic activity were developed. We show that sensory inputs restricted to a small subset of the network neurons can perturb locomotor activity in the same manner as seen experimentally. Furthermore, we show that an architecture with sparse sensory input improves the capacity to gate sensory information by selectively modulating sensory channels. These data demonstrate that sensory input to rhythm-generating networks need not be extensively distributed. PMID:25673740

  15. In vivo sodium salicylate causes tolerance to acute morphine exposure and alters the ability of high frequency stimulation to induce long-term potentiation in hippocampus area CA1.

    PubMed

    Hosseinmardi, Narges; Azimi, Lila; Fathollahi, Yaghoub; Javan, Mohammad; Naghdi, Naser

    2011-11-30

    Effects of morphine on synaptic transmission and plasticity in the hippocampus area CA1 following in vivo sodium salicylate and the potential molecular mechanism were investigated. Population spikes (PS) were recorded from stratum pylamidale of area CA1 following stimulation of Schaffer collaterals in slices taken from control and sodium salicylate injected rats. To induce long term potentiation (LTP), a 100Hz tetanic stimulation was used. Acute in vitro morphine increased baseline PS amplitude in control slices but not in slices taken from sodium salicylate treated rats. In vivo chronic salicylate did slightly decrease and/or destabilize LTP of CA1 synaptic transmission. We also found that mRNA of NR2A subunit of NMDA receptor was reduced in the hippocampus of sodium salicylate treated rats as compared to control ones. Following LTP induction, the mRNA of NR2A and PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) in slices taken from salicylate-treated rats were more than those of control ones. After long-term exposure to in vitro morphine, high frequency stimulation (HFS) decreased NR2A mRNA level significantly in sodium salicylate treated slices. It is concluded that in vivo sodium salicylate causes tolerance to excitatory effect of morphine and changes the ability of HFS to induce PS LTP in the hippocampus area CA1 in vitro. These changes in synaptic response may be due to alterations in NR2A and PP1 expression.

  16. Spaceflight Sensorimotor Analogs: Simulating Acute and Adaptive Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Laura C.; Harm, Deborah L.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Reschke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive changes in sensorimotor function during spaceflight are reflected by spatial disorientation, motion sickness, gaze destabilization and decrements in balance, locomotion and eye-hand coordination that occur during and following transitions between different gravitational states. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-synthesis of data from spaceflight analogs to evaluate their effectiveness in simulating adaptive changes in sensorimotor function. METHODS. The analogs under review were categorized as either acute analogs used to simulate performance decrements accompanied with transient changes, or adaptive analogs used to drive sensorimotor learning to altered sensory feedback. The effectiveness of each analog was evaluated in terms of mechanisms of action, magnitude and time course of observed deficits compared to spaceflight data, and the effects of amplitude and exposure duration. RESULTS. Parabolic flight has been used extensively to examine effects of acute variation in gravitational loads, ranging from hypergravity to microgravity. More recently, galvanic vestibular stimulation has been used to elicit acute postural, locomotor and gaze dysfunction by disrupting vestibular afferents. Patient populations, e.g., with bilateral vestibular loss or cerebellar dysfunction, have been proposed to model acute sensorimotor dysfunction. Early research sponsored by NASA involved living onboard rotating rooms, which appeared to approximate the time course of adaptation and post-exposure recovery observed in astronauts following spaceflight. Exposure to different bed-rest paradigms (6 deg head down, dry immersion) result in similar motor deficits to that observed following spaceflight. Shorter adaptive analogs have incorporated virtual reality environments, visual distortion paradigms, exposure to conflicting tilt-translation cues, and exposure to 3Gx centrifugation. As with spaceflight, there is considerable variability in responses to most of the analogs

  17. Age Differences of Salivary Alpha-Amylase Levels of Basal and Acute Responses to Citric Acid Stimulation Between Chinese Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ze-Min; Chen, Long-Hui; Zhang, Min; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Wei-Wen; Yang, Xiao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear how salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) levels respond to mechanical stimuli in different age groups. In addition, the role played by the sAA gene (AMY1) copy number and protein expression (glycosylated and non-glycosylated) in sAA activity has also been rarely reported. In this study, we analyzed saliva samples collected before and after citric acid stimulation from 47 child and 47 adult Chinese subjects. We observed that adults had higher sAA activity and sAA glycosylated levels (glycosylated sAA amount/total sAA amount) in basal and stimulated saliva when compared with children, while no differences were found in total or glycosylated sAA amount between them. Interestingly, adults showed attenuated sAA activity levels increase over those of children after stimulation. Correlation analysis showed that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and AMY1 copy number × total sAA amount were all positively correlated with sAA activity before and after stimulation in both groups. Interestingly, correlation r between sAA levels (glycosylated sAA amount and total sAA amount) and sAA activity decreased after stimulation in children, while adults showed an increase in correlation r. In addition, the correlation r between AMY1 copy number × total sAA amount and sAA activity was higher than that between AMY1 copy number, total sAA amount, and sAA activity, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and the positive interaction between AMY1 copy number and total sAA amount are crucial in influencing sAA activity before and after stimulation in children and adults. PMID:26635626

  18. Degradation of mouse locomotor pattern in the absence of proprioceptive sensory feedback.

    PubMed

    Akay, Turgay; Tourtellotte, Warren G; Arber, Silvia; Jessell, Thomas M

    2014-11-25

    Mammalian locomotor programs are thought to be directed by the actions of spinal interneuron circuits collectively referred to as "central pattern generators." The contribution of proprioceptive sensory feedback to the coordination of locomotor activity remains less clear. We have analyzed changes in mouse locomotor pattern under conditions in which proprioceptive feedback is attenuated genetically and biomechanically. We find that locomotor pattern degrades upon elimination of proprioceptive feedback from muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs. The degradation of locomotor pattern is manifest as the loss of interjoint coordination and alternation of flexor and extensor muscles. Group Ia/II sensory feedback from muscle spindles has a predominant influence in patterning the activity of flexor muscles, whereas the redundant activities of group Ia/II and group Ib afferents appear to determine the pattern of extensor muscle firing. These findings establish a role for proprioceptive feedback in the control of fundamental aspects of mammalian locomotor behavior.

  19. Development of a Countermeasure to Mitigate Postflight Locomotor Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Cohen, H. S.; Richards, J. T.; Miller, C. A.; Brady, R.; Warren, L. E.; Ruttley, T. M.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight experience locomotor dysfunction following their return to Earth. Our laboratory is currently developing a gait adaptability training program that is designed to facilitate recovery of locomotor function following a return to a gravitational environment. The training program exploits the ability of the sensorimotor system to generalize from exposure to multiple adaptive challenges during training so that the gait control system essentially learns to learn and therefore can reorganize more rapidly when faced with a novel adaptive challenge. Evidence for the potential efficacy of an adaptive generalization gait training program can be obtained from numerous studies in the motor learning literature which have demonstrated that systematically varying the conditions of training enhances the ability of the performer to learn and retain a novel motor task. These variable practice training approaches have been used in applied contexts to improve motor skills required in a number of different sports. The central nervous system (CNS) can produce voluntary movement in an almost infinite number of ways. For example, locomotion can be achieved with many different combinations of joint angles, muscle activation patterns and forces. The CNS can exploit these degrees of freedom to enhance motor response adaptability during periods of adaptive flux like that encountered during a change in gravitational environment. Ultimately, the functional goal of an adaptive generalization countermeasure is not necessarily to immediately return movement patterns back to normal. Rather the training regimen should facilitate the reorganization of available sensory and motor subsystems to achieve safe and effective locomotion as soon as possible after long duration space flight. Indeed, this approach has been proposed as a basic feature underlying effective neurological rehabilitation. We have previously confirmed that subjects participating in an adaptive

  20. Locomotor function in the early stage of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Carpinella, Ilaria; Crenna, Paolo; Calabrese, Elena; Rabuffetti, Marco; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Nemni, Raffaello; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2007-12-01

    The cardinal motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) have been widely investigated with particular reference to abnormalities of steady-state walking. The great majority of studies, however are related to severe forms of PD patients (phases > = 3 of Hoehn and Yahr scale), where locomotor abnormalities are clearly manifested. Goal of the present study was to quantitatively describe locomotor symptoms in subjects with mild PD. Accordingly, a multitask protocol involving instrumental analysis of steady-state linear walking, initiation of gait, and turning while walking was applied to a group of patients with idiopathic PD in their early clinical stage (phases 1 and 2 of Hoehn and Yahr scale), as well as in age-matched elderly controls. Kinematic, kinetic, and myoelectric measures were obtained by optoelectronic motion analysis, force platform, and telemetric electromyography. Results in PD patients showed a tendency to bradykinetic gait, with reduction of walking speed and cadence. Impairments of gait initiation consisted in reduction of the backward shift of the center of pressure (CoP) and prolongation of the stepping phase. Alterations of the turning task were more consistent and included delayed reorientation of the head toward the new direction, altered head-upper trunk rotational strategy, and adoption of a greater number of steps to complete the turning. It is concluded that patients in the early stage of PD reveal mild alterations of steady-state linear walking and more significant anomalies in the transitional conditions, especially during changes in the travel direction. Quantitative analysis of nonstationary locomotor tasks might be a potentially useful starting point for further studies on the pathophysiology of PD.

  1. Monitoring Locomotor Load in Soccer: Is Metabolic Power, Powerful?

    PubMed

    Buchheit, M; Manouvrier, C; Cassirame, J; Morin, J-B

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the validity and reliability of metabolic power (P) estimated from locomotor demands during soccer-specific drills. 14 highly-trained soccer players performed a soccer-specific circuit with the ball (3×1-min bouts, interspersed with 30-s passive recovery) on 2 different occasions. Locomotor activity was monitored with 4-Hz GPSs, while oxygen update (VO2) was collected with a portable gas analyzer. P was calculated using either net VO2 responses and traditional calorimetry principles (PVO2, W.kg(-1)) or locomotor demands (PGPS, W.kg(-1)). Distance covered into different speed, acceleration and P zones was recorded. While PGPS was 29±10% lower than PVO2 (d<- 3) during the exercise bouts, it was 85±7% lower (d<- 8) during recovery phases. The typical error between PGPS vs. PVO2 was moderate: 19.8%, 90% confidence limits: (18.4;21.6). The correlation between both estimates of P was small: 0.24 (0.14;0.33). Very large day-to-day variations were observed for acceleration, deceleration and > 20 W.kg(-1) distances (all CVs > 50%), while average Po2 and PGPS showed CVs < 10%. ICC ranged from very low- (acceleration and > 20 W.kg(-1) distances) to-very high (PVO2). PGPS largely underestimates the energy demands of soccer-specific drills, especially during the recovery phases. The poor reliability of PGPS >20 W.kg(-1) questions its value for monitoring purposes in soccer.

  2. Locomotor energetics and leg length in hominid bipedality.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P A; Eck, G G

    2000-05-01

    Because bipedality is the quintessential characteristic of Hominidae, researchers have compared ancient forms of bipedality with modern human gait since the first clear evidence of bipedal australopithecines was unearthed over 70 years ago. Several researchers have suggested that the australopithecine form of bipedality was transitional between the quadrupedality of the African apes and modern human bipedality and, consequently, inefficient. Other researchers have maintained that australopithecine bipedality was identical to that of Homo. But is it reasonable to require that all forms of hominid bipedality must be the same in order to be optimized? Most attempts to evaluate the locomotor effectiveness of the australopithecines have, unfortunately, assumed that the locomotor anatomy of modern humans is the exemplar of consummate bipedality. Modern human anatomy is, however, the product of selective pressures present in the particular milieu in which Homo arose and it is not necessarily the only, or even the most efficient, bipedal solution possible. In this report, we investigate the locomotion of Australopithecus afarensis, as represented by AL 288-1, using standard mechanical analyses. The osteological anatomy of AL 288-1 and movement profiles derived from modern humans are applied to a dynamic model of a biped, which predicts the mechanical power required by AL 288-1 to walk at various velocities. This same procedure is used with the anatomy of a composite modern woman and a comparison made. We find that AL 288-1 expends less energy than the composite woman when locomoting at walking speeds. This energetic advantage comes, however, at a price: the preferred transition speed (from a walk to a run) of AL 288-1 was lower than that of the composite woman. Consequently, the maximum daily range of AL 288-1 may well have been substantially smaller than that of modern people. The locomotor anatomy of A. afarensis may have been optimized for a particular ecological niche

  3. Predictive Measures of Locomotor Performance on an Unstable Walking Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Caldwell, E. E.; Batson, C. D.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N. E.; Goel, R.; Wood, S. J.; Cohen, H. S.; Oddsson, L. I.; Seidler, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Locomotion requires integration of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory information to produce the appropriate motor output to control movement. The degree to which these sensory inputs are weighted and reorganized in discordant sensory environments varies by individual and may be predictive of the ability to adapt to novel environments. The goals of this project are to: 1) develop a set of predictive measures capable of identifying individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability, and 2) use this information to inform the design of training countermeasures designed to enhance the ability of astronauts to adapt to gravitational transitions improving balance and locomotor performance after a Mars landing and enhancing egress capability after a landing on Earth.

  4. Locomotor Dysfunction after Spaceflight: Characterization and Countermeasure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Cohen, H. S.; Peters, B. T.; Miller, C. A.; Brady, R.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2007-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight show disturbances in locomotor control manifested by changes in various sub-systems including head-trunk coordination, dynamic visual acuity, lower limb muscle activation patterning and kinematics (Glasauer, et al., 1995; Bloomberg, et al., 1997; McDonald, et al., 1996; 1997; Layne, et al., 1997; 1998, 2001, 2004; Newman, et al., 1997; Bloomberg and Mulavara, 2003). These post flight changes in locomotor performance, due to neural adaptation to the microgravity conditions of space flight, affect the ability of crewmembers especially after a long duration mission to egress their vehicle and perform extravehicular activities soon after landing on Earth or following a landing on the surface of the Moon or Mars. At present, no operational training intervention is available pre- or in- flight to mitigate post flight locomotor disturbances. Our laboratory is currently developing a gait adaptability training program that is designed to facilitate recovery of locomotor function following a return to a gravitational environment. The training program exploits the ability of the sensorimotor system to generalize from exposure to multiple adaptive challenges during training so that the gait control system essentially "learns to learn" and therefore can reorganize more rapidly when faced with a novel adaptive challenge. Ultimately, the functional goal of an adaptive generalization countermeasure is not necessarily to immediately return movement patterns back to "normal". Rather the training regimen should facilitate the reorganization of available sensorimotor sub-systems to achieve safe and effective locomotion as soon as possible after space flight. We have previously confirmed that subjects participating in adaptive generalization training programs, using a variety of visuomotor distortions and different motor tasks from throwing to negotiating an obstacle course as the dependent measure, can learn to enhance their ability to adapt to a

  5. Modular functional organisation of the axial locomotor system in salamanders.

    PubMed

    Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Charrier, Vanessa; Mathou, Alexia

    2014-02-01

    Most investigations on tetrapod locomotion have been concerned with limb movements. However, there is compelling evidence that the axial musculoskeletal system contributes to important functions during locomotion. Adult salamanders offer a remarkable opportunity to examine these functions because these amphibians use axial undulations to propel themselves in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. In this article, we review the currently available biological data on axial functions during various locomotor modes in salamanders. We also present data showing the modular organisation of the neural networks that generate axial synergies during locomotion. The functional implication of this modular organisation is discussed.

  6. Acute iritis induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor used for mobilization in a volunteer unrelated peripheral blood progenitor cell donor.

    PubMed

    Parkkali, T; Volin, L; Sirén, M K; Ruutu, T

    1996-03-01

    We describe a volunteer unrelated peripheral blood progenitor cell donor with previously diagnosed dermatitis herpetiformis in whom the administration of G-CSF for the mobilization of precursor cells induced acute iritis. G-CSF has been administered to healthy people with minimal side-effects but when used in patients with autoimmune disorders worsening of symptoms or new manifestations may be a potential concern.

  7. Cutaneous inputs from the back abolish locomotor-like activity and reduce spastic-like activity in the adult cat following complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Alain; Thibaudier, Yann; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C J; Hurteau, Marie-France

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity is a condition that can include increased muscle tone, clonus, spasms, and hyperreflexia. In this study, we report the effect of manually stimulating the dorsal lumbosacral skin on spontaneous locomotor-like activity and on a variety of reflex responses in 5 decerebrate chronic spinal cats treated with clonidine. Cats were spinalized 1 month before the terminal experiment. Stretch reflexes were evoked by stretching the left triceps surae muscles. Crossed reflexes were elicited by electrically stimulating the right tibial or superficial peroneal nerves. Wind-up of reflex responses was evoked by electrically stimulating the left tibial or superficial peroneal nerves. We found that pinching the skin of the back abolished spontaneous locomotor-like activity. We also found that back pinch abolished the rhythmic activity observed during reflex testing without eliminating the reflex responses. Some of the rhythmic episodes of activity observed during reflex testing were consistent with clonus with an oscillation frequency greater than 3 Hz. Pinching the skin of the back effectively abolished rhythmic activity occurring spontaneously or evoked during reflex testing, irrespective of oscillation frequency. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that locomotion and clonus are produced by common central pattern-generators. Stimulating the skin of the back could prove helpful in managing undesired rhythmic activity in spinal cord-injured humans.

  8. The Expression of Fos, Jun and AP-1 DNA Binding Activity in Rat Supraoptic Nucleus Neurons Following Acute Versus Repeated Osmotic Stimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-22

    stimulation. This pattern has been observed previously in the hippocampus after treatment with the seizure-inducing drug , metrazole (Sonnenberg et al... fosB , and fra-1 and -2. fra refers to ~OS­ ~elated ~ntigen. Western blot experiments and employment of less stringent nucleic acid hybridization...fos, fra-l and fosB , only form heterodimeric complexes with Jun-related proteins (Nakabeppu et al., 1988; Rauscher et al., 1988b) The AP-l site of many

  9. Transplantation of Human Skin-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Improves Locomotor Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Melo, Fernanda Rosene; Bressan, Raul Bardini; Forner, Stefânia; Martini, Alessandra Cadete; Rode, Michele; Delben, Priscilla Barros; Rae, Giles Alexander; Figueiredo, Claudia Pinto; Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves

    2016-08-10

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurologic disorder with significant impacts on quality of life, life expectancy, and economic burden. Although there are no fully restorative treatments yet available, several animal and small-scale clinical studies have highlighted the therapeutic potential of cellular interventions for SCI. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-which are conventionally isolated from the bone marrow-recently emerged as promising candidates for treating SCI and have been shown to provide trophic support, ameliorate inflammatory responses, and reduce cell death following the mechanical trauma. Here we evaluated the human skin as an alternative source of adult MSCs suitable for autologous cell transplantation strategies for SCI. We showed that human skin-derived MSCs (hSD-MSCs) express a range of neural markers under standard culture conditions and are able to survive and respond to neurogenic stimulation in vitro. In addition, using histological analysis and behavioral assessment, we demonstrated as a proof-of-principle that hSD-MSC transplantation reduces the severity of tissue loss and facilitates locomotor recovery in a rat model of SCI. Altogether, the study provides further characterization of skin-derived MSC cultures and indicates that the human skin may represent an attractive source for cell-based therapies for SCI and other neurological disorders. Further investigation is needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which hSD-MSCs elicit tissue repair and/or locomotor recovery.

  10. Locomotor Tests Predict Community Mobility in Children and Youth with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferland, Chantale; Moffet, Helene; Maltais, Desiree

    2012-01-01

    Ambulatory children and youth with cerebral palsy have limitations in locomotor capacities and in community mobility. The ability of three locomotor tests to predict community mobility in this population (N = 49, 27 boys, 6-16 years old) was examined. The tests were a level ground walking test, the 6-min-Walk-Test (6MWT), and two tests of advanced…

  11. White - cGMP Interaction Promotes Fast Locomotor Recovery from Anoxia in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the white (w) gene in Drosophila possesses extra-retinal functions in addition to its classical role in eye pigmentation. We have previously shown that w+ promotes fast and consistent locomotor recovery from anoxia, but how w+ modulates locomotor recovery is largely unknown. Here we show that in the absence of w+, several PDE mutants, especially cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific PDE mutants, display wildtype-like fast locomotor recovery from anoxia, and that during the night time, locomotor recovery was light-sensitive in white-eyed mutant w1118, and light-insensitive in PDE mutants under w1118 background. Data indicate the involvement of cGMP in the modulation of recovery timing and presumably, light-evoked cGMP fluctuation is associated with light sensitivity of locomotor recovery. This was further supported by the observations that w-RNAi-induced delay of locomotor recovery was completely eliminated by upregulation of cGMP through multiple approaches, including PDE mutation, simultaneous overexpression of an atypical soluble guanylyl cyclase Gyc88E, or sildenafil feeding. Lastly, prolonged sildenafil feeding promoted fast locomotor recovery from anoxia in w1118. Taken together, these data suggest that a White-cGMP interaction modulates the timing of locomotor recovery from anoxia. PMID:28060942

  12. Treadmill training promotes spinal changes leading to locomotor recovery after partial spinal cord injury in cats.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marina; Delivet-Mongrain, Hugo; Rossignol, Serge

    2013-06-01

    After a spinal hemisection at thoracic level in cats, the paretic hindlimb progressively recovers locomotion without treadmill training but asymmetries between hindlimbs persist for several weeks and can be seen even after a further complete spinal transection at T13. To promote optimal locomotor recovery after hemisection, such asymmetrical changes need to be corrected. In the present study we determined if the locomotor deficits induced by a spinal hemisection can be corrected by locomotor training and, if so, whether the spinal stepping after the complete spinal cord transection is also more symmetrical. This would indicate that locomotor training in the hemisected period induces efficient changes in the spinal cord itself. Sixteen adult cats were first submitted to a spinal hemisection at T10. One group received 3 wk of treadmill training, whereas the second group did not. Detailed kinematic and electromyographic analyses showed that a 3-wk period of locomotor training was sufficient to improve the quality and symmetry of walking of the hindlimbs. Moreover, after the complete spinal lesion was performed, all the trained cats reexpressed bilateral and symmetrical hindlimb locomotion within 24 h. By contrast, the locomotor pattern of the untrained cats remained asymmetrical, and the hindlimb on the side of the hemisection was still deficient. This study highlights the beneficial role of locomotor training in facilitating bilateral and symmetrical functional plastic changes within the spinal circuitry and in promoting locomotor recovery after an incomplete spinal cord injury.

  13. Insulin-induced hypoglycaemia is co-ordinately regulated by liver and muscle during acute and chronic insulin stimulation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Polakof, Sergio; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine; Choubert, Georges; Panserat, Stéphane

    2010-05-01

    The relative glucose intolerance of carnivorous fish species is often proposed to be a result of poor peripheral insulin action or possibly insulin resistance. In the present study, data from aortic cannulated rainbow trout receiving bovine insulin (75 mIU kg(-1)) injections show for the first time their ability to clear glucose in a very efficient manner. In another set of experiments, mRNA transcripts and protein phosphorylation status of proteins controlling glycaemia and glucose-related metabolism were studied during both acute and chronic treatment with bovine insulin. Our results show that fasted rainbow trout are well adapted at the molecular level to respond to increases in circulating insulin levels, and that this hormone is able to potentially improve glucose distribution and uptake by peripheral tissues. After acute insulin administration we found that to counter-regulate the insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, trout metabolism is strongly modified. This short-term, efficient response to hypoglycaemia includes a rapid, coordinated response involving the reorganization of muscle and liver metabolism. During chronic insulin treatment some of the functions traditionally attributed to insulin actions in mammals were observed, including increased mRNA levels of glucose transporters and glycogen storage (primarily in the muscle) as well as decreased mRNA levels of enzymes involved in de novo glucose production (in the liver). Finally, we show that the rainbow trout demonstrates most of the classic metabolic adjustments employed by mammals to efficiently utilize glucose in the appropriate insulin context.

  14. The Newly Developed CRF1-Receptor Antagonists, NGD 98-2 and NGD 9002, Suppress Acute Stress-Induced Stimulation of Colonic Motor Function and Visceral Hypersensitivity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Million, Mulugeta; Zhao, Jing-Fang; Luckey, Andrew; Czimmer, József; Maynard, George D.; Kehne, John; Hoffman, Diane C.; Taché, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1) is the key receptor that mediates stress-related body responses. However to date there are no CRF1 antagonists that have shown clinical efficacy in stress-related diseases. We investigated the inhibitory effects of a new generation, topology 2 selective CRF1 antagonists, NGD 98-2 and NGD 9002 on exogenous and endogenous CRF-induced stimulation of colonic function and visceral hypersensitivity to colorectal distension (CRD) in conscious rats. CRF1 antagonists or vehicle were administered orogastrically (og) or subcutaneously (sc) before either intracerebroventricular (icv) or intraperitoneal (ip) injection of CRF (10 µg/kg), exposure to water avoidance stress (WAS, 60 min) or repeated CRD (60 mmHg twice, 10 min on/off at a 30 min interval). Fecal pellet output (FPO), diarrhea and visceromotor responses were monitored. In vehicle (og)-pretreated rats, icv CRF stimulated FPO and induced diarrhea in >50% of rats. NGD 98-2 or NGD 9002 (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, og) reduced the CRF-induced FPO response with an inhibitory IC50 of 15.7 and 4.3 mg/kg respectively. At the highest dose, og NGD 98-2 or NGD 9002 blocked icv CRF-induced FPO by 67–87% and decreased WAS-induced-FPO by 23–53%. When administered sc, NGD 98-2 or NGD 9002 (30 mg/kg) inhibited icv and ip CRF-induced-FPO. The antagonists also prevented the development of nociceptive hyper-responsivity to repeated CRD. These data demonstrate that topology 2 CRF1 antagonists, NGD 98-2 and NGD 9002, administered orally, prevented icv CRF-induced colonic secretomotor stimulation, reduced acute WAS-induced defecation and blocked the induction of visceral sensitization to repeated CRD. PMID:24040053

  15. Neurotensin and bombesin, a relationship between their effects on body temperature and locomotor activity?

    PubMed

    van Wimersma Greidanus, T B; Schijff, J A; Noteboom, J L; Spit, M C; Bruins, L; van Zummeren, B M; Rinkel, G J

    1984-08-01

    Neurotensin and bombesin have been tested for their effects on body temperature and locomotor activity in an open field. Both peptides induce hypothermia and suppress ambulation and rearing. The time curves of the hypothermic effects of both peptides appear to be rather similar, although bombesin is a more potent hypothermic agent than neurotensin. The time curves of the effects on locomotor activity appear to be quite different. The suppressive effect of neurotensin on locomotor activity is relatively short lasting and reaches its maximum at approximately 32 minutes. The effect of bombesin follows a different time curve and shows two peaks, suggesting that two different mechanisms are involved in the suppressive action of bombesin on locomotor activity. Calculation of the correlation coefficients between the effects of neurotensin and of bombesin on body temperature and on locomotor activity (ambulation) suggest that a causal relationship between these two effects is not likely, in particular for neurotensin.

  16. Leptin-Dependent Control of Glucose Balance and Locomotor Activity by POMC Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Lihong; Gamber, Kevin; Greeley, Sarah; Silva, Jose; Huntoon, Nicholas; Leng, Xinghong; Bjørbæk, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Summary Leptin plays a pivotal role in regulation of energy balance. Via unknown central pathways leptin also affects peripheral glucose homeostasis and locomotor activity. We hypothesized that specifically Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons mediate those actions. To examine this possibility we applied Cre-Lox technology to express leptin receptors (ObRb) exclusively in POMC neurons of the morbidly obese, profoundly diabetic, and severely hypoactive leptin receptor deficient Leprdb/db mice. We here show that expression of ObRb only in POMC neurons leads to a marked decrease in energy intake and a modest reduction in body weight in Leprdb/db mice. Remarkably, blood glucose levels are entirely normalized. This normalization occurs independently of changes in food intake and body weight. In addition, physical activity is greatly increased despite profound obesity. Our results suggest that leptin signaling exclusively in POMC neurons is sufficient to stimulate locomotion and prevent diabetes in the severely hypoactive and hyperglycemic obese Leprdb/db mice. PMID:19490908

  17. Locomotor Trajectories of Stroke Patients during Oriented Gait and Turning

    PubMed Central

    Van Hamme, Angele; Bensmail, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    Background The Timed Up and Go (TUG) test is widely used to assess locomotion in patients with stroke and is considered to predict the risk of falls. The analysis of locomotor trajectories during the TUG appears pertinent in stroke patients. The aims of this study were i) to analyze locomotor trajectories in patients with stroke during the walking and turning sub-tasks of the TUG, and to compare them with healthy subjects, ii) to determine whether trajectory parameters provide additional information to that provided by the conventional measure (performance time), iii) to compare the trajectory parameters of fallers and non-fallers with stroke and of patients with right and left hemisphere stroke, and iv) to evaluate correlations between trajectory parameters and Berg Balance Scale scores. Methods 29 patients with stroke (mean age 54.2±12.2 years, 18 men, 8 fallers) and 25 healthy subjects (mean age 51.6±8.7 years, 11 men) underwent three-dimensional analysis of the TUG. The trajectory of the center of mass was analyzed by calculation of the global trajectory length, Hausdorff distance and Dynamic Time Warping. The parameters were compared with a reference trajectory during the total task and each sub-task (Go, Turn, Return) of the TUG. Results Values of trajectory parameters were significantly higher for the stroke group during the total TUG and the Go and Turn sub-tasks (p<0.05). Moreover, logistic regression indicated that these parameters better discriminated stroke patients and healthy subjects than the conventional timed performance during the Go sub-task. In addition, fallers were distinguished by higher Dynamic Time Warping during the Go (p<0.05). There were no differences between patients with right and left hemisphere stroke. Discussion and Conclusion The trajectories of the stroke patients were longer and more deviated during the turn and the preceding phase. Trajectory parameters provided additional information to timed performance of this locomotor

  18. Differences in the neurochemical and behavioural profiles of lisdexamfetamine methylphenidate and modafinil revealed by simultaneous dual-probe microdialysis and locomotor activity measurements in freely-moving rats.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Helen L; Kulkarni, Rajiv S; Gosden, Jane; Brammer, Richard J; Hackett, David; Heal, David J

    2014-03-01

    Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate is a novel prodrug approved in North America, Europe and Brazil for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It undergoes rate-limited hydrolysis by red blood cells to yield d-amphetamine. Following our previous work comparing lisdexamfetamine with d-amphetamine, the neurochemical and behavioural profiles of lisdexamfetamine, methylphenidate and modafinil were compared by dual-probe microdialysis in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum of conscious rats with simultaneous locomotor activity measurement. We employed pharmacologically equivalent doses of all compounds and those that spanned the therapeutically relevant and psychostimulant range. Lisdexamfetamine (0.5, 1.5, 4.5 mg/kg d-amphetamine base, per os (po)), methylphenidate (3, 10, 30 mg/kg base, po) and modafinil (100, 300, 600 mg/kg base, po) increased efflux of dopamine and noradrenaline in PFC, and dopamine in striatum. Only lisdexamfetamine increased 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) efflux in PFC and striatum. Lisdexamfetamine had larger and more sustained effects on catecholaminergic neurotransmission than methylphenidate or modafinil. Linear correlations were observed between striatal dopamine efflux and locomotor activity for lisdexamfetamine and methylphenidate, but not modafinil. Regression slopes revealed greater increases in extracellular dopamine could be elicited without producing locomotor activation by lisdexamfetamine than methylphenidate. These results are consistent with clinical findings showing that lisdexamfetamine is an effective ADHD medication with prolonged duration of action and good separation between its therapeutic actions and stimulant side-effects.

  19. Cool running: locomotor performance at low body temperature in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, A. Daniella; Körtner, Gerhard; Geiser, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian torpor saves enormous amounts of energy, but a widely assumed cost of torpor is immobility and therefore vulnerability to predators. Contrary to this assumption, some small marsupial mammals in the wild move while torpid at low body temperatures to basking sites, thereby minimizing energy expenditure during arousal. Hence, we quantified how mammalian locomotor performance is affected by body temperature. The three small marsupial species tested, known to use torpor and basking in the wild, could move while torpid at body temperatures as low as 14.8–17.9°C. Speed was a sigmoid function of body temperature, but body temperature effects on running speed were greater than those in an ectothermic lizard used for comparison. We provide the first quantitative data of movement at low body temperature in mammals, which have survival implications for wild heterothermic mammals, as directional movement at low body temperature permits both basking and predator avoidance. PMID:22675136

  20. Cool running: locomotor performance at low body temperature in mammals.

    PubMed

    Rojas, A Daniella; Körtner, Gerhard; Geiser, Fritz

    2012-10-23

    Mammalian torpor saves enormous amounts of energy, but a widely assumed cost of torpor is immobility and therefore vulnerability to predators. Contrary to this assumption, some small marsupial mammals in the wild move while torpid at low body temperatures to basking sites, thereby minimizing energy expenditure during arousal. Hence, we quantified how mammalian locomotor performance is affected by body temperature. The three small marsupial species tested, known to use torpor and basking in the wild, could move while torpid at body temperatures as low as 14.8-17.9°C. Speed was a sigmoid function of body temperature, but body temperature effects on running speed were greater than those in an ectothermic lizard used for comparison. We provide the first quantitative data of movement at low body temperature in mammals, which have survival implications for wild heterothermic mammals, as directional movement at low body temperature permits both basking and predator avoidance.

  1. Age-Related Differences in Locomotor Strategies During Adaptive Walking.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Kristin A; Sebastian, Katherine; Perera, Subashan; Van Swearingen, Jessie; Smiley-Oyen, Ann L

    2016-11-21

    Simultaneous control of lower limb stepping movements and trunk motion is important for skilled walking; adapting gait to environmental constraints requires frequent alternations in stepping and trunk motion. These alterations provide a window into the locomotor strategies adopted by the walker. The authors examined gait strategies in young and healthy older adults when manipulating step width. Anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) smoothness (quantified by harmonic ratios) and stepping consistency (quantified by gait variability) were analyzed during narrow and wide walking while controlling cadence to preferred pace. Results indicated older adults preserved ML smoothness at the expense of AP smoothness, shortened their steps, and exhibited reduced stepping consistency. The authors conclude that older adults prioritized ML control over forward progression during adaptive walking challenges.

  2. Tarsier-like locomotor specializations in the Oligocene primate Afrotarsius

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, D. Tab; Conroy, Glenn C.; Simons, Elwyn L.

    1998-01-01

    Tarsiers and extinct tarsier-like primates have played a central role in views of primate phylogeny and evolution for more than a century. Because of the importance of tarsiers in so many primatological problems, there has been particular interest in questions about the origin of tarsier specializations and the biogeography of early tarsioid radiations. We report on a new fossil of rare Afrotarsius that shows near identity to modern Tarsius in unique specializations of the leg, which provides information about the locomotor behavior and clarifies the phylogenetic position of this previously controversial primate. These specializations constitute evidence that Afrotarsius is a tarsiid, closely related to extant Tarsius; hence, it is now excluded from being a generalized sister taxon to Anthropoidea. PMID:9843978

  3. Suprachiasmatic vasopressin and the circadian regulation of voluntary locomotor behavior.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Holly C; Della-Maggiore, Valeria; Karatsoreos, Ilia N; Koletar, Margaret M; Ralph, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    A role for arginine vasopressin in the circadian regulation of voluntary locomotor behavior (wheel running activity) was investigated in the golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus. Spontaneous nocturnal running was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by systemic injections of vasopressin, and also in a concentration-dependent manner by microinjections directly into the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Pre-injections of a vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist into the nucleus reduced the suppression of behavior by vasopressin. Ethogram analyses revealed that peripheral drug injections predominantly increased grooming, flank marking, and sleep-related behaviors. Central injections did not induce sleep, but increased grooming and periods of 'quiet vigilance' (awake but not moving). Nocturnal behavioral profiles following either peripheral or central injections were similar to those shown by untreated animals in the hour prior to the onset of nocturnal wheel running. Site control vasopressin injections into the medial preoptic area or periaqueductal gray increased flank marking and grooming, but had no significant effect on locomotion, suggesting behavioral specificity of a vasopressin target near the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Both peripheral and central administration increased FOS-like immunoreactivity in the retinorecipient core of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The distribution of FOS-positive cells overlapped the calbindin subregion, but was more extensive, and most calbindin-positive cells did not co-express FOS. We propose a model of temporal behavioral regulation wherein voluntary behavior, such as nocturnal locomotor activity, is inhibited by the activity of neurons in the suprachiasmatic ventrolateral core that project to the posterior hypothalamus and are driven by rhythmic vasopressin input from the dorsomedial shell.

  4. What does autonomic arousal tell us about locomotor learning?

    PubMed

    Green, D A; Bunday, K L; Bowen, J; Carter, T; Bronstein, A M

    2010-09-29

    Walking onto a stationary sled previously experienced as moving induces locomotor aftereffects (LAE, or "broken escalator phenomenon"). This particular form of aftereffect can develop after a single adaptation trial and occurs despite subjects being fully aware that the sled will not move. Here, we investigate whether such strong LAE expression may relate to arousal or fear related to instability during the gait adaptation process. Forty healthy subjects were allocated to three sled velocity groups; SLOW (0.6 m/s), MEDIUM (1.3 m/s), or FAST (2.0 m/s). Subjects walked onto the stationary sled for five trials (BEFORE), then onto the moving sled for 15 trials (adaptation or MOVING trials) and, finally, again onto the stationary sled for five trials (AFTER). Explicit warning regarding sled status was given. Trunk position, foot-sled contact timing, autonomic markers (electrodermal activity [EDA], ECG, respiratory movements) in addition to self-reported task-related confidence and state/trait anxiety were recorded. Trunk sway, EDA, and R-R interval shortening were greatest during the first MOVING trial (MOVING_1), progressively attenuating during subsequent MOVING trials. A LAE, recorded as increased gait velocity and trunk sway during AFTER_1, occurred in both MEDIUM and FAST sled velocity groups. The amplitude of forward trunk sway in AFTER_1 (an indicator of aftereffect magnitude) was related to EDA during the final adaptation trial (MOVING_15). AFTER_1 gait velocity (also an indicator of aftereffect magnitude) was related to MOVING_1 trunk sway. Hence, gait velocity and trunk sway components of the LAE are differentially related to kinematic and autonomic parameters during the early and late adaptation phase. The finding that EDA is a predictor of LAE expression indicates that autonomic arousal or fear-based mechanisms can promote locomotor learning. This could in turn explain some unusual characteristics of this LAE, namely its resistance to explicit knowledge and

  5. Melatonin and locomotor activity in the fiddler crab Uca pugilator.

    PubMed

    Tilden, Andrea R; Shanahan, J Kearney; Khilji, Zahra S; Owen, Jeffrey G; Sterio, Thomas W; Thurston, Kristy T

    2003-05-01

    The influence of melatonin on locomotor activity levels was measured in the fiddler crab Uca pugilator. First, activity in untreated, laboratory-acclimated crabs was measured over 48 hours in a 12L:12D photoperiod; this study showed a nocturnal increase in activity. In eyestalk-ablated crabs, overall activity was significantly reduced, and no significant activity pattern occurred. Next, crabs were injected with melatonin or saline (controls) at various times during the 12L:12D photoperiod (0900h, 1200h, and twice at 2100h; each trial was separated by 3-4 days) and monitored for 3 hr post-injection. Control crabs had low activity during early photophase, high at mid-photophase, increasing activity during the first scotophase trial, and decreasing activity during the second scotophase trial. Melatonin had no significant influence on activity when injected during the early-photophase activity trough or early-scotophase activity decline, but significantly increased activity when injected during the mid-photophase activity peak and early-scotophase activity incline. Next, crabs were injected during an early scotophase activity trough and monitored throughout the twelve-hour scotophase. Melatonin did not increase activity until the mid-scotophase activity increase, approximately 6 hours later, showing that the pharmacological dosage persisted in the crabs' systems and had later effects during the incline and peak of activity but not the trough. Eyestalk-ablated crabs were injected with melatonin or saline during early photo- and scotophase. Melatonin significantly increased activity in the photophase but not the scotophase trial, indicating that the responsiveness to melatonin continues following eyestalk removal, but the timing may not match that of intact crabs. Melatonin may be involved in the transmission of environmental timing information from the eyestalks to locomotor centers in U. pugilator.

  6. Pelvic Breadth and Locomotor Kinematics in Human Evolution.

    PubMed

    Gruss, Laura Tobias; Gruss, Richard; Schmitt, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A broad pelvis is characteristic of most, if not all, pre-modern hominins. In at least some early australopithecines, most notably the female Australopithecus afarensis specimen known as "Lucy," it is very broad and coupled with very short lower limbs. In 1991, Rak suggested that Lucy's pelvic anatomy improved locomotor efficiency by increasing stride length through rotation of the wide pelvis in the axial plane. Compared to lengthening strides by increasing flexion and extension at the hips, this mechanism could avoid potentially costly excessive vertical oscillations of the body's center of mass (COM). Here, we test this hypothesis. We examined 3D kinematics of walking at various speeds in 26 adult subjects to address the following questions: Do individuals with wider pelves take longer strides, and do they use a smaller degree of hip flexion and extension? Is pelvic rotation greater in individuals with shorter legs, and those with narrower pelves? Our results support Rak's hypothesis. Subjects with wider pelves do take longer strides for a given velocity, and for a given stride length they flex and extend their hips less, suggesting a smoother pathway of the COM. Individuals with shorter legs do use more pelvic rotation when walking, but pelvic breadth was not related to pelvic rotation. These results suggest that a broad pelvis could benefit any bipedal hominin, but especially a short-legged australopithecine such as Lucy, by improving locomotor efficiency, particularly when carrying an infant or traveling in a foraging group with individuals of varying sizes. Anat Rec, 300:739-751, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Immature Spinal Locomotor Output in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Cappellini, Germana; Ivanenko, Yury P.; Martino, Giovanni; MacLellan, Michael J.; Sacco, Annalisa; Morelli, Daniela; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Detailed descriptions of gait impairments have been reported in cerebral palsy (CP), but it is still unclear how maturation of the spinal motoneuron output is affected. Spatiotemporal alpha-motoneuron activation during walking can be assessed by mapping the electromyographic activity profiles from several, simultaneously recorded muscles onto the anatomical rostrocaudal location of the motoneuron pools in the spinal cord, and by means of factor analysis of the muscle activity profiles. Here, we analyzed gait kinematics and EMG activity of 11 pairs of bilateral muscles with lumbosacral innervation in 35 children with CP (19 diplegic, 16 hemiplegic, 2–12 years) and 33 typically developing (TD) children (1–12 years). TD children showed a progressive reduction of EMG burst durations and a gradual reorganization of the spatiotemporal motoneuron output with increasing age. By contrast, children with CP showed very limited age-related changes of EMG durations and motoneuron output, as well as of limb intersegmental coordination and foot trajectory control (on both sides for diplegic children and the affected side for hemiplegic children). Factorization of the EMG signals revealed a comparable structure of the motor output in children with CP and TD children, but significantly wider temporal activation patterns in children with CP, resembling the patterns of much younger TD infants. A similar picture emerged when considering the spatiotemporal maps of alpha-motoneuron activation. Overall, the results are consistent with the idea that early injuries to developing motor regions of the brain substantially affect the maturation of the spinal locomotor output and consequently the future locomotor behavior. PMID:27826251

  8. Novel locomotor muscle design in extreme deep-diving whales.

    PubMed

    Velten, B P; Dillaman, R M; Kinsey, S T; McLellan, W A; Pabst, D A

    2013-05-15

    Most marine mammals are hypothesized to routinely dive within their aerobic dive limit (ADL). Mammals that regularly perform deep, long-duration dives have locomotor muscles with elevated myoglobin concentrations that are composed of predominantly large, slow-twitch (Type I) fibers with low mitochondrial volume densities (V(mt)). These features contribute to extending ADL by increasing oxygen stores and decreasing metabolic rate. Recent tagging studies, however, have challenged the view that two groups of extreme deep-diving cetaceans dive within their ADLs. Beaked whales (including Ziphius cavirostris and Mesoplodon densirostris) routinely perform the deepest and longest average dives of any air-breathing vertebrate, and short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) perform high-speed sprints at depth. We investigated the locomotor muscle morphology and estimated total body oxygen stores of several species within these two groups of cetaceans to determine whether they (1) shared muscle design features with other deep divers and (2) performed dives within their calculated ADLs. Muscle of both cetaceans displayed high myoglobin concentrations and large fibers, as predicted, but novel fiber profiles for diving mammals. Beaked whales possessed a sprinter's fiber-type profile, composed of ~80% fast-twitch (Type II) fibers with low V(mt). Approximately one-third of the muscle fibers of short-finned pilot whales were slow-twitch, oxidative, glycolytic fibers, a rare fiber type for any mammal. The muscle morphology of beaked whales likely decreases the energetic cost of diving, while that of short-finned pilot whales supports high activity events. Calculated ADLs indicate that, at low metabolic rates, both beaked and short-finned pilot whales carry sufficient onboard oxygen to aerobically support their dives.

  9. Individual Differences in Ethanol Locomotor Sensitization Are Associated with Dopamine D1 Receptor Intra-Cellular Signaling of DARPP-32 in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Abrahao, Karina Possa; Oliveira Goeldner, Francine; Souza-Formigoni, Maria Lucia Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    In mice there are clear individual differences in the development of behavioral sensitization to ethanol, a progressive potentiation of its psychomotor stimulant effect. Variability in the behavioral responses to ethanol has been associated with alcohol preference. Here we investigated if the functional hyperresponsiveness of D1 receptors observed in ethanol sensitized mice leads to an increased activation of DARPP-32, a central regulatory protein in medium spiny neurons, in the nucleus accumbens - a brain region known to play a role in drug reinforcement. Swiss Webster mice received ethanol (2.2 g/kg/day) or saline i.p. administrations for 21 days and were weekly evaluated regarding their locomotor activity. From those treated with ethanol, the 33% with the highest levels of locomotor activity were classified as “sensitized” and the 33% with the lowest levels as "non-sensitized”. The latter presented similar locomotor levels to those of saline-treated mice. Different subgroups of mice received intra-accumbens administrations of saline and, 48 h later, SKF-38393, D1 receptor agonist 0.1 or 1 µg/side. Indeed, sensitized mice presented functional hyperresponsiveness of D1 receptors in the accumbens. Two weeks following the ethanol treatment, other subgroups received systemic saline or SKF 10 mg/kg, 20 min before the euthanasia. The nucleus accumbens were dissected for the Western Blot analyses of total DARPP-32 and phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 expression. D1 receptor activation induced higher phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 expression in sensitized mice than in non-sensitized or saline. The functionally hyperresponsiveness of D1 receptors in the nucleus accumbens is associated with an increased phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 expression after D1 receptor activation. These data suggest that an enduring increase in the sensitivity of the dopamine D1 receptor intracellular pathway sensitivity represents a neurobiological correlate associated with the development of locomotor

  10. Favorable effect of priming with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in remission induction of acute myeloid leukemia restricted to dose escalation of cytarabine.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Thomas; Vellenga, Edo; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C; Graux, Carlos; Vekemans, Marie-Christiane; Biemond, Bart; Sonneveld, Peter; Passweg, Jakob; Verdonck, Leo; Legdeur, Marie-Cecile; Theobald, Matthias; Jacky, Emanuel; Bargetzi, Mario; Maertens, Johan; Ossenkoppele, Gert Jan; Löwenberg, Bob

    2012-06-07

    The clinical value of chemotherapy sensitization of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with G-CSF priming has remained controversial. Cytarabine is a key constituent of remission induction chemotherapy. The effect of G-CSF priming has not been investigated in relationship with variable dose levels of cytarabine. We randomized 917 AML patients to receive G-CSF (456 patients) or no G-CSF (461 patients) at the days of chemotherapy. In the initial part of the study, 406 patients were also randomized between 2 cytarabine regimens comparing conventional-dose (199 patients) versus escalated-dose (207 patients) cytarabine in cycles 1 and 2. We found that patients after induction chemotherapy plus G-CSF had similar overall survival (43% vs 40%, P = .88), event-free survival (37% vs 31%, P = .29), and relapse rates (34% vs 36%, P = .77) at 5 years as those not receiving G-CSF. However, patients treated with the escalated-dose cytarabine regimen benefited from G-CSF priming, with improved event-free survival (P = .01) and overall survival (P = .003), compared with patients without G-CSF undergoing escalated-dose cytarabine treatment. A significant survival advantage of sensitizing AML for chemotherapy with G-CSF was not apparent in the entire study group, but it was seen in patients treated with escalated-dose cytarabine during remission induction. The HOVON-42 study is registered under The Netherlands Trial Registry (www.trialregister.nl) as #NTR230.

  11. Intravenous hMSCs Ameliorate Acute Pancreatitis in Mice via Secretion of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Stimulated Gene/Protein 6

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhigang; Hua, Jie; Qian, Daohai; Gong, Jian; Lin, Shengping; Xu, Chenglei; Wei, Ge; Meng, Hongbo; Yang, Tingsong; Zhou, Bo; Song, Zhenshun

    2016-01-01

    The administration of mesenchymal stem cells/multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to enhance tissue repair is currently undergoing clinical trials. Some studies, including our previous work, have also revealed the beneficial effect of MSCs in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP); however, their mechanisms or mode of action remain controversial. In this study, we demonstrated that intravenously (i.v.)-administered human MSCs (hMSCs) remarkably promoted recovery from experimental SAP without significant engraftment of hMSCs in the damaged pancreas. Interestingly, we found that i.v.-administered hMSCs with knockdown of TSG-6 expression lost most of their anti-inflammatory effects and thus could not significantly ameliorate SAP. As expected, the effects of hMSCs were also duplicated by i.v. infusion of recombinant TSG-6. Furthermore, our results showed that the increase of oxidative stress, activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB signaling in SAP was substantially inhibited following administration of hMSCs or TSG-6, which was dependent on the presence of CD-44 receptors in acinar cells. In conclusion, our study, for the first time, revealed that novel mechanisms are responsible for the immunomodulatory effect of i.v. hMSCs. PMID:27917949

  12. A murine model of acute myeloid leukemia with Evi1 overexpression and autocrine stimulation by an intracellular form of GM-CSF in DA-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Maria E; Simonson, Oscar E; Oprea, Iulian I; Moreno, Pedro M D; Silva-Lara, Maria F; Mohamed, Abdalla J; Christensson, Birger; Gahrton, Gösta; Dilber, M Sirac; Smith, C I Edvard; Arteaga, H Jose

    2016-01-01

    The poor treatment response of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) overexpressing high-risk oncogenes such as EVI1, demands specific animal models for new treatment evaluations. Evi1 is a common site of activating integrations in murine leukemia virus (MLV)-induced AML and in retroviral and lentiviral gene-modified HCS. Still, a model of overt AML induced by Evi1 has not been generated. Cell lines from MLV-induced AML are growth factor-dependent and non-transplantable. Hence, for the leukemia maintenance in the infected animals, a growth factor source such as chronic immune response has been suggested. We have investigated whether these leukemias are transplantable if provided with growth factors. We show that the Evi1(+)DA-3 cells modified to express an intracellular form of GM-CSF, acquired growth factor independence and transplantability and caused an overt leukemia in syngeneic hosts, without increasing serum GM-CSF levels. We propose this as a general approach for modeling different forms of high-risk human AML using similar cell lines.

  13. Gradual training reduces practice difficulty while preserving motor learning of a novel locomotor task.

    PubMed

    Sawers, Andrew; Hahn, Michael E

    2013-08-01

    Motor learning strategies that increase practice difficulty and the size of movement errors are thought to facilitate motor learning. In contrast to this, gradual training minimizes movement errors and reduces practice difficulty by incrementally introducing task requirements, yet remains as effective as sudden training and its large movement errors for learning novel reaching tasks. While attractive as a locomotor rehabilitation strategy, it remains unknown whether the efficacy of gradual training extends to learning locomotor tasks and their unique requirements. The influence of gradual vs. sudden training on learning a locomotor task, asymmetric split belt treadmill walking, was examined by assessing whole body sagittal plane kinematics during 24 hour retention and transfer performance following either gradual or sudden training. Despite less difficult and less specific practice for the gradual cohort on day 1, gradual training resulted in equivalent motor learning of the novel locomotor task as sudden training when assessed by retention and transfer a day later. This suggests that large movement errors and increased practice difficulty may not be necessary for learning novel locomotor tasks. Further, gradual training may present a viable locomotor rehabilitation strategy avoiding large movement errors that could limit or impair improvements in locomotor performance.

  14. Evaluation of the interaction of mu and kappa opioid agonists on locomotor behavior in the horse.

    PubMed Central

    Mama, K R; Pascoe, P J; Steffey, E P

    1993-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the interactive effects of mu and kappa opioid agonists on locomotor behavior in the horse. Three doses of a mu agonist, fentanyl (5, 10, 20 micrograms/kg) and a kappa agonist U50,488H (30, 60, 120 micrograms/kg) were administered in a random order to six horses. Locomotor activity was measured using a two minute footstep count. Each dose of U50,488H was then combined with 20 micrograms/kg of fentanyl to determine the interactive effects of the drugs on locomotor activity. A significant increase in locomotor activity was seen with 20 micrograms/kg of fentanyl and all the drug combinations. The combination of U50,488H with fentanyl resulted in an earlier onset of locomotor activity. At the highest doses of the combination (U50,488H 120 micrograms/kg, fentanyl 20 micrograms/kg), the duration of locomotor activity was significantly increased when compared to the other doses. We conclude that locomotor activity is maintained or enhanced in horses when a receptor specific kappa agonist is combined with a mu receptor agonist. PMID:8490803

  15. Locomotor recovery after spinal cord contusion injury in rats is improved by spontaneous exercise.

    PubMed

    Van Meeteren, Nico L U; Eggers, Ruben; Lankhorst, Alex J; Gispen, Willem Hendrik; Hamers, Frank P T

    2003-10-01

    We have recently shown that enriched environment (EE) housing significantly enhances locomotor recovery following spinal cord contusion injury (SCI) in rats. As the type and intensity of locomotor training with EE housing are rather poorly characterized, we decided to compare the effectiveness of EE housing with that of voluntary wheel running, the latter of which is both well characterized and easily quantified. Female Wistar rats were made familiar with three types of housing conditions, social housing (nine together) in an EE (EHC), individual housing in a running wheel cage (RUN, n = 8), and standard housing two together (CON, n = 10). Subsequently, a 12.5 gcm SCI at Th8 was produced and animals were randomly divided over the three housing conditions. Locomotor function was measured regularly, once a week by means of the BBB score, BBB sub score, TLH test, Gridwalk test, and CatWalk test. In the RUN group, daily distance covered was also measured. Locomotor recovery in the EHC and the RUN groups was equal and significantly better than in the CON group. The extent of recovery at 8 weeks post injury in the RUN group did not correlate with distance covered. We conclude that locomotor training needs to exceed a given threshold in order to be effective in enhancing locomotor recovery in this experimental model, but that once this threshold is exceeded no further improvement occurs, and that the specificity of locomotor training plays little role.

  16. Tolerance to the locomotor-activating effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) predicts escalation of MDMA self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement of MDMA seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Ball, Kevin T; Slane, Mylissa

    2014-11-01

    Pre-clinical studies of individual differences in addiction vulnerability have been increasing over recent years, but the amphetamine derivative 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) has received relatively little attention in this regard. Previously, we reported large individual differences both in rats' initial behavioral response to experimenter-administered MDMA and their degree of behavioral sensitization to repeated administration. To determine whether these differences could predict subsequent patterns of MDMA-taking or -seeking behaviors we used the self-administration-extinction-reinstatement model to examine addiction-like behavior (i.e., escalation of MDMA self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement of MDMA seeking) in rats a priori characterized for either locomotor sensitization or tolerance to MDMA. Rats that developed tolerance to the locomotor-activating effects of MDMA had a significantly larger locomotor response to the first MDMA injection relative to rats that developed sensitization. Importantly, rats that developed tolerance subsequently displayed an escalation of MDMA self-administration over days, as well as clear cue-induced reinstatement of MDMA seeking following extinction. Conversely, rats that developed locomotor sensitization to MDMA subsequently maintained relatively stable levels of MDMA self-administration over days and showed no cue-induced reinstatement of MDMA seeking. These results show that differences in the level of psychomotor activation following acute and repeated MDMA administration can reliably predict two important addiction-like behaviors in rats, which may have implications in the prediction of compulsive MDMA use in humans.

  17. Effects on steroid hormones secretion resulting from the acute stimulation of sectioning the superior ovarian nerve to pre-pubertal rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the adult rat, neural signals arriving to the ovary via the superior ovarian nerve (SON) modulate progesterone (P4), testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) secretion. The aims of the present study were to analyze if the SON in the pre-pubertal rat also modulates ovarian hormone secretion and the release of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing (LH) hormone. P4, T, E2, FSH and LH serum levels were measured 30 or 60 minutes after sectioning the SON of pre-pubertal female rats. Our results indicate that the effects on hormone levels resulting from unilaterally or bilaterally sectioning the SON depends on the analyzed hormone, and the time lapse between surgery and autopsy, and that the treatment yielded asymmetric results. The results also suggest that in the pre-pubertal rat the neural signals arriving to the ovaries via the SON regulate the enzymes participating in P4, T and E2 synthesis in a non-parallel way, indicating that the mechanisms regulating the synthesis of each hormone are not regulated by the same signals. Also, that the changes in the steroids hormones are not explained exclusively by the modifications in gonadotropins secretion. The observed differences in hormone levels between rats sacrificed 30 and 60 min after surgery reflect the onset of the compensatory systems regulating hormones secretion. PMID:23110668

  18. Effects of Deep Electroacupuncture Stimulation at “Huantiao” (GB 30) on Expression of Apoptosis-Related Factors in Rats with Acute Sciatic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lili; Han, Yanjing; Ma, Tieming; Liu, Yuli; Ren, Lu; Bai, Zenghua; Li, Ye

    2015-01-01

    SD rats were randomly divided into normal control, model, deep EA, and shallow EA groups. The model was established by mechanical clamping of the sciatic nerve stem. For deep and shallow EA, the needles were inserted into “Huantiao” (GB 30) by about 16 mm and 7 mm, respectively, once daily for 14 days. The results showed that, compared with the normal control group, the nerve-muscle excitability of rat's hip muscle decreased and the nerve conduction velocity of sciatic nerve slowed down in the model group; meanwhile, the number of apoptotic cells and the expression level of Bax protein in the injured nerve increased significantly, and the expression level of Bcl-2 protein and the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax decreased considerably. Compared with the model group, the indices mentioned above were reversed in the two treatment groups, and the changes in the deep EA group were more significant than those in the shallow EA group. These results indicate that EA stimulation at GB 30 can improve the function of injured sciatic nerve, which is closely associated with its effects in upregulating the expression of apoptosis inhibitive factor Bcl-2 and downregulating apoptosis promotive factor Bax. Deep EA is relatively better. PMID:26167187

  19. Hyperglycemia Determines Increased Specific MicroRNAs Levels in Sera and HDL of Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients and Stimulates MicroRNAs Production in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Carnuta, Mihaela G.; Sanda, Gabriela M.; Stancu, Camelia S.; Popescu, Andreea C.; Popescu, Mihaela R.; Vlad, Adelina; Dimulescu, Doina R.; Simionescu, Maya; Sima, Anca V.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) in sera and HDL of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to stable angina (SA) patients with/without hyperglycemia, and evaluate comparatively the functional effect of these sera on the processing machinery proteins (Drosha, DGCR8, Dicer) and miRNAs production in human macrophages. MiRNAs levels in sera and HDL from 35 SA and 72 ACS patients and 30 healthy subjects were measured by using microRNA TaqMan assays. MiR-223, miR-92a, miR-486, miR-122, miR-125a and miR-146a levels were higher in the hyperglycemic ACS compared to normoglycemic sera. MiR-223 and miR-486 prevailed in HDL2, while miR-92a predominated in HDL3, all three miRNAs discriminating between ACS and SA patients; their levels were increased in HDL from hyperglycemic ACS patients versus normoglycemic ones. The incubation of human macrophages with sera from ACS and SA patients showed that all patients’ sera induced an increase of Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expressions and of selected miRNAs levels compared to control sera, the effect being higher in the case of hyperglycemic versus normoglycemic ACS sera. The addition of glucose to SA and ACS sera increased Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expression and miRNAs levels in the exposed macrophages. In conclusion, hyperglycemia is associated with increased miR-223, miR-92a, miR-486 levels in HDL, which discriminate between ACS and SA patients. Exposure of human macrophages to ACS compared to SA sera determines the upregulation of Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expression and the increase of selected miRNAs production, the effect being augmented by an increased glucose concentration. PMID:27519051

  20. Upregulation of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein by Hypoxia Stimulates Aldosterone Synthesis in Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells to Promote Pulmonary Vascular Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Oldham, William M.; Chan, Stephen Y.; Vargas, Sara O.; Arons, Elena; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanism(s) regulating hypoxia-induced vascular fibrosis are unresolved. Hyperaldosteronism correlates positively with vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), suggesting that aldosterone may contribute to the pulmonary vasculopathy of hypoxia. The hypoxia-sensitive transcription factors c-Fos/c-Jun regulate steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), which facilitates the rate-limiting step of aldosterone steroidogenesis. We hypothesized that c-Fos/c-Jun upregulation by hypoxia activates StAR-dependent aldosterone synthesis in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) to promote vascular fibrosis in PAH. Methods and Results Patients with PAH, rats with Sugen/hypoxia-PAH, and mice exposed to chronic hypoxia expressed increased StAR in remodeled pulmonary arterioles, providing a basis for investigating hypoxia-StAR signaling in HPAECs. Hypoxia (2.0% FiO2) increased aldosterone levels selectively in HPAECs, which was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Increased aldosterone by hypoxia resulted from enhanced c-Fos/c-Jun binding to the proximal activator protein (AP-1) site of the StAR promoter in HPAECs, which increased StAR expression and activity. In HPAECs transfected with StAR-siRNA or treated with the AP-1 inhibitor, SR-11302, hypoxia failed to increase aldosterone, confirming that aldosterone biosynthesis required StAR activation by c-Fos/c-Jun. The functional consequences of aldosterone were confirmed by pharmacological inhibition of the mineralocorticoid receptor with spironolactone or eplerenone, which attenuated hypoxia-induced upregulation of the fibrogenic protein connective tissue growth factor and collagen III in vitro, and decreased pulmonary vascular fibrosis to improve pulmonary hypertension in Conclusions Our findings identify autonomous aldosterone synthesis in HPAECs due to hypoxia-mediated upregulation of StAR as a novel molecular mechanism that promotes pulmonary vascular

  1. NMDA receptor blockade attenuates locomotion elicited by intrastriatal dopamine D1-receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, Christian W; Walker, Paul D

    2004-07-01

    Previous behavioral studies suggest that the striatum mediates a hyperactive response to systemic NMDA receptor antagonism in combination with systemic D1 receptor stimulation. However, many experiments conducted at the cellular level suggest that inhibition of NMDA receptors should block D1 receptor-mediated locomotor activity. Therefore, we investigated the consequences of NMDA receptor blockade on the ability of striatal D1 receptors to elicit locomotor activity using systemic and intrastriatal injections of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 combined with intrastriatal injections of the D1 full agonist SKF 82958. Following drug treatment locomotor activity was measured via computerized activity monitors designed to quantify multiple parameters of rodent open-field behavior. Both systemic (0.1 mg/kg) and intrastriatal (1.0 microg) MK-801 pretreatments completely blocked locomotor and stereotypic activity elicited by 10 microg of SKF 82958 directly infused into the striatum. Further, increased activity triggered by intrastriatal SKF 82958 was attenuated by a posttreatment with intrastriatal infusion of 1 microg MK-801. These data suggest that D1-stimulated locomotor behaviors controlled by the striatum require functional NMDA channels.

  2. Acute hypercapnic hyperoxia stimulates reactive species production in the caudal solitary complex of rat brain slices but does not induce oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ciarlone, Geoffrey E; Dean, Jay B

    2016-12-01

    Central CO2 chemoreceptive neurons in the caudal solitary complex (cSC) are stimulated by hyperoxia via a free radical mechanism. Hyperoxia has been shown to increase superoxide and nitric oxide in the cSC, but it remains unknown how changes in Pco2 during hyperoxia affect the production of O2-dependent reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) downstream that can lead to increased levels of oxidative and nitrosative stress, cellular excitability, and, potentially, dysfunction. We used real-time fluorescence microscopy in rat brain slices to determine how hyperoxia and hypercapnic acidosis (HA) modulate one another in the production of key RONS, as well as colorimetric assays to measure levels of oxidized and nitrated lipids and proteins. We also examined the effects of CO2 narcosis and hypoxia before euthanasia and brain slice harvesting, as these neurons are CO2 sensitive and hypothesized to employ CO2/H(+) mechanisms that exacerbate RONS production and potentially oxidative stress. Our findings show that hyperoxia ± HA increases the production of peroxynitrite and its derivatives, whereas increases in Fenton chemistry are most prominent during hyperoxia + HA. Using CO2 narcosis before euthanasia modulates cellular sensitivity to HA postmortem and enhances the magnitude of the peroxynitrite pathway, but blunts the activity of Fenton chemistry. Overall, hyperoxia and HA do not result in increased production of markers of oxidative and nitrosative stress as expected. We postulate this is due to antioxidant and proteosomal removal of damaged lipids and proteins to maintain cell viability and avoid death during protracted hyperoxia.

  3. Volatile Anesthetic Effects on Midbrain-elicited Locomotion Suggest that the Locomotor Network in the Ventral Spinal Cord Is the Primary Site for Immobility

    PubMed Central

    Jinks, Steven L.; Bravo, Milo; Hayes, Shawn G.

    2009-01-01

    Background Volatile anesthetics produce immobility primarily by action in the spinal cord; however, anesthetic effects among different neuronal classes located in different spinal regions, and how they relate to immobility, are not understood. Methods In decerebrated rats, effects of isoflurane and halothane on movement elicited by electrical microstimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) were assessed in relation to minimum alveolar concentration (MAC). Anesthetic effects on step frequency and isometric limb force were measured. The authors also examined effects of MLR stimulation on responses of nociceptive dorsal horn neurons and limb force responses to tail clamp. Results Mean isoflurane requirements to block MLR-elicited stepping were slightly but significantly greater than MAC by 10%. Mean halothane requirements to block MLR-elicited stepping were greater than those for isoflurane and exceeded MAC by 20%. From 0.4 to 1.3 MAC (but not 0.0 to 0.4 MAC), there was a dose-dependent reduction in the frequency and force of hind limb movements elicited by MLR stimulation during both anesthetics. MLR stimulation inhibited noxious stimulus evoked responses of dorsal horn neurons by approximately 80%. Aptly, MLR stimulation produced analgesia that outlasted the midbrain stimulus by at least 15 s, as indicated by an 81% reduction in hind limb force elicited noxious tail clamp. Conclusions Because electrical stimulation of the MLR elicits movement independent of dorsal horn activation, the results suggest that the immobilizing properties of isoflurane and halothane are largely independent of action in the dorsal horn. The results suggest that volatile anesthetics produce immobility mainly by action on ventral spinal locomotor networks. PMID:18497602

  4. Stereoselective Effects of Abused “Bath Salt” Constituent 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone in Mice: Drug Discrimination, Locomotor Activity, and Thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Brenda M.; Williamson, Adrian; Suzuki, Masaki; Rice, Kenner C.

    2016-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) is a common constituent of illicit “bath salts” products. MDPV is a chiral molecule, but the contribution of each enantiomer to in vivo effects in mice has not been determined. To address this, mice were trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline, and substitutions with racemic MDPV, S(+)-MDPV, and R(−)-MDPV were performed. Other mice were implanted with telemetry probes to monitor core temperature and locomotor responses elicited by racemic MDPV, S(+)-MDPV, and R(−)-MDPV under a warm (28°C) or cool (20°C) ambient temperature. Mice reliably discriminated the cocaine training dose from saline, and each form of MDPV fully substituted for cocaine, although marked potency differences were observed such that S(+)-MDPV was most potent, racemic MDPV was less potent than the S(+) enantiomer, and R(−)-MDPV was least potent. At both ambient temperatures, locomotor stimulant effects were observed after doses of S(+)-MDPV and racemic MDPV, but R(−)-MDPV did not elicit locomotor stimulant effects at any tested dose. Interestingly, significant increases in maximum core body temperature were only observed after administration of racemic MDPV in the warm ambient environment; neither MDPV enantiomer altered core temperature at any dose tested, at either ambient temperature. These studies suggest that all three forms of MDPV induce biologic effects, but R(−)-MDPV is less potent than S(+)-MDPV and racemic MDPV. Taken together, these data suggest that the S(+)-MDPV enantiomer is likely responsible for the majority of the biologic effects of the racemate and should be targeted in therapeutic efforts against MDPV overdose and abuse. PMID:26769917

  5. Acute ingestion of citrulline stimulates nitric oxide synthesis but does not increase blood flow in healthy young and older adults with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Young; Schutzler, Scott E; Schrader, Amy; Spencer, Horace J; Azhar, Gohar; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Wolfe, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    To determine if age-associated vascular dysfunction in older adults with heart failure (HF) is due to insufficient synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), we performed two separate studies: 1) a kinetic study with a stable isotope tracer method to determine in vivo kinetics of NO metabolism, and 2) a vascular function study using a plethysmography method to determine reactive hyperemic forearm blood flow (RH-FBF) in older and young adults in the fasted state and in response to citrulline ingestion. In the fasted state, NO synthesis (per kg body wt) was ∼ 50% lower in older vs. young adults and was related to a decreased rate of appearance of the NO precursor arginine. Citrulline ingestion (3 g) stimulated de novo arginine synthesis in both older [6.88 ± 0.83 to 35.40 ± 4.90 μmol · kg body wt(-1) · h(-1)] and to a greater extent in young adults (12.02 ± 1.01 to 66.26 ± 4.79 μmol · kg body wt(-1) · h(-1)). NO synthesis rate increased correspondingly in older (0.17 ± 0.01 to 2.12 ± 0.36 μmol · kg body wt(-1) · h(-1)) and to a greater extent in young adults (0.36 ± 0.04 to 3.57 ± 0.47 μmol · kg body wt(-1) · h(-1)). Consistent with the kinetic data, RH-FBF in the fasted state was ∼ 40% reduced in older vs. young adults. However, citrulline ingestion (10 g) failed to increase RH-FBF in either older or young adults. In conclusion, citrulline ingestion improved impaired NO synthesis in older HF adults but not RH-FBF, suggesting that factors other than NO synthesis play a role in the impaired RH-FBF in older HF adults, and/or it may require a longer duration of supplementation to be effective in improving RH-FBF.

  6. Acute ingestion of citrulline stimulates nitric oxide synthesis but does not increase blood flow in healthy young and older adults with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schutzler, Scott E.; Schrader, Amy; Spencer, Horace J.; Azhar, Gohar; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    To determine if age-associated vascular dysfunction in older adults with heart failure (HF) is due to insufficient synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), we performed two separate studies: 1) a kinetic study with a stable isotope tracer method to determine in vivo kinetics of NO metabolism, and 2) a vascular function study using a plethysmography method to determine reactive hyperemic forearm blood flow (RH-FBF) in older and young adults in the fasted state and in response to citrulline ingestion. In the fasted state, NO synthesis (per kg body wt) was ∼50% lower in older vs. young adults and was related to a decreased rate of appearance of the NO precursor arginine. Citrulline ingestion (3 g) stimulated de novo arginine synthesis in both older [6.88 ± 0.83 to 35.40 ± 4.90 μmol·kg body wt−1·h−1] and to a greater extent in young adults (12.02 ± 1.01 to 66.26 ± 4.79 μmol·kg body wt−1·h−1). NO synthesis rate increased correspondingly in older (0.17 ± 0.01 to 2.12 ± 0.36 μmol·kg body wt−1·h−1) and to a greater extent in young adults (0.36 ± 0.04 to 3.57 ± 0.47 μmol·kg body wt−1·h−1). Consistent with the kinetic data, RH-FBF in the fasted state was ∼40% reduced in older vs. young adults. However, citrulline ingestion (10 g) failed to increase RH-FBF in either older or young adults. In conclusion, citrulline ingestion improved impaired NO synthesis in older HF adults but not RH-FBF, suggesting that factors other than NO synthesis play a role in the impaired RH-FBF in older HF adults, and/or it may require a longer duration of supplementation to be effective in improving RH-FBF. PMID:26442881

  7. Ser1928 phosphorylation by PKA stimulates the L-type Ca2+ channel CaV1.2 and vasoconstriction during acute hyperglycemia and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nystoriak, Matthew A.; Nieves-Cintrón, Madeline; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Buonarati, Olivia R.; Prada, Maria Paz; Morotti, Stefano; Grandi, Eleonora; Fernandes, Julia Dos Santos; Forbush, Katherine; Hofmann, Franz; Sasse, Kent C.; Scott, John D.; Ward, Sean M.; Hell, Johannes W.; Navedo, Manuel F.

    2017-01-01

    Hypercontractility of arterial myocytes and enhanced vascular tone during diabetes are, in part, attributed to the effects of increased glucose (hyperglycemia) on L-type CaV1.2 channels. In murine arterial myocytes, kinase-dependent mechanisms mediate the increase in CaV1.2 activity in response to increased extracellular glucose. We identified a subpopulation of the CaV1.2 channel pore-forming subunit (α1C) within nanometer proximity of protein kinase A (PKA) at the sarcolemma of murine and human arterial myocytes. This arrangement depended upon scaffolding of PKA by an A-kinase anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150) in mice. Glucose-mediated increases in CaV1.2 channel activity were associated with PKA activity, leading to α1C phosphorylation at Ser1928. Compared to arteries from low-fat diet (LFD)–fed mice and nondiabetic patients, arteries from high-fat diet (HFD)–fed mice and from diabetic patients had increased Ser1928 phosphorylation and CaV1.2 activity. Arterial myocytes and arteries from mice lacking AKAP150 or expressing mutant AKAP150 unable to bind PKA did not exhibit increased Ser1928 phosphorylation and CaV1.2 current density in response to increased glucose or to HFD. Consistent with a functional role for Ser1928 phosphorylation, arterial myocytes and arteries from knockin mice expressing a CaV1.2 with Ser1928 mutated to alanine (S1928A) lacked glucose-mediated increases in CaV1.2 activity and vasoconstriction. Furthermore, the HFD-induced increases in CaV1.2 current density and myogenic tone were prevented in S1928A knockin mice. These findings reveal an essential role for α1C phosphorylation at Ser1928 in stimulating CaV1.2 channel activity and vasoconstriction by AKAP-targeted PKA upon exposure to increased glucose and in diabetes. PMID:28119464

  8. A low-dose cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor priming regimen versus a daunorubicin plus cytarabine regimen as induction therapy for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia: A propensity score analysis.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Shin-ichiro; Ito, Shoko; Mashima, Kiyomi; Umino, Kento; Nakano, Hirofumi; Kawasaki, Yasufumi; Sugimoto, Miyuki; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Hatano, Kaoru; Okazuka, Kiyoshi; Sato, Kazuya; Oh, Iekuni; Ohmine, Ken; Suzuki, Takahiro; Muroi, Kazuo; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2016-03-01

    This retrospective analysis compared the efficacy of intensive induction therapy consisting of daunorubicin and cytarabine (DNR-AraC) to that of less-intensive therapy including low-dose cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor priming (CAG). Patients aged 60 years or older who were newly diagnosed as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were analyzed. Sixty-four and 48 patients were treated with DNR-AraC and CAG, respectively. The complete remission rates, 3-year overall survival and event-free survival in the DNR-AraC group were significantly superior to those in the CAG group (65.6% vs. 29.2%, p<0.001, 38.4% vs. 12.3%, p=0.0033, and 20.3% vs. 7.8%, p=0.0030, respectively), although these differences were not statistically significant in multivariate analyses. Next, we calculated a propensity score for selecting the CAG regimen from six factors. The DNR-AraC regimen was associated with better survival than the CAG regimen in a low propensity score group, but there was no difference in survival between regimens in a high propensity score group. Intensive therapy should be performed for patients with sufficient general and comorbid conditions, but less-intensive therapy may be sufficient for patients with higher age, myelodysplasia-related changes, and lower white blood cell counts, which were relevant factors in the propensity score calculation.

  9. Establishment of a retinoic acid-resistant human acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) model in human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Y.; Kizaki, M.; Kinjo, K.; Awaya, N.; Muto, A.; Ito, M.; Kawai, Y.; Umezawa, A.; Hata, J.; Ueyama, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1998-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms and identify novel approaches to overcoming retinoic acid (RA) resistance in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), we established the first human RA-resistant APL model in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. UF-1 cells, an RA-resistant APL cell line established in our laboratory, were transplanted into human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-producing SCID (hGMTg SCID) mice and inoculated cells formed subcutaneous tumours in all hGMTg SCID mice, but not in the non-transgenic control SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions (UF-1/GMTg SCID cells) were similar in morphological, immunological, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features to parental UF-1 cells. All-trans RA did not change the morphological features of cells or their expression of CD11b. RA did not alter the growth curve of cells as determined by MTT assay, suggesting that UF-1/GMTg SCID cells are resistant to RA. These results demonstrate that this is the first RA-resistant APL animal model that may be useful for investigating the biology of this myeloid leukaemia in vivo, as well as for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches including patients with RA-resistant APL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9764578

  10. Effect of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor-Combined Conditioning in Cord Blood Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Retrospective Study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Takaaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Uchida, Naoyuki; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Aoki, Jun; Onishi, Yasushi; Aotsuka, Nobuyuki; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Mori, Takehiko; Masuko, Masayoshi; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Miyamura, Kouichi; Kato, Koji; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Kato, Seiko; Asano, Shigetaka; Takami, Akiyoshi; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2015-09-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) increases the susceptibility of dormant malignant or nonmalignant hematopoietic cells to cytarabine arabinoside (Ara-C) through the induction of cell cycle entry. Therefore, G-CSF-combined conditioning before allogeneic stem cell transplantation might positively contribute to decreased incidences of relapse and graft failure without having to increase the dose of cytotoxic drugs. We conducted a retrospective nationwide study of 336 adult patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML) after single-unit cord blood transplantation (CBT) who underwent 4 different kinds of conditioning regimens: total body irradiation (TBI) ≥ 8 Gy + Ara-C/G-CSF + cyclophosphamide (CY) (n = 65), TBI ≥ 8 Gy + Ara-C + CY (n = 119), TBI ≥ 8 Gy + other (n = 104), or TBI < 8 Gy or non-TBI (n = 48). The TBI ≥ 8 Gy + Ara-C/G-CSF + CY regimen showed significantly higher incidence of neutrophil engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10 to 2.08; P = .009) and lower overall mortality (hazard ratio, .46; 95% CI, .26 to .82; P = .008) rates compared with those without a G-CSF regimen. This retrospective study shows that the G-CSF-combined conditioning regimen provides better engraftment and survival results in CBT for adults with MDS and sAML.

  11. Locomotor activity and zonation of upper shore arthropods in a sandy beach of north central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, E.; Contreras, H.; Duarte, C.; Avellanal, M. H.

    2003-10-01

    The tenebrionid beetle Phalerisida maculata Kulzer, the talitrid amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata Nicolet and the oniscid isopod Tylos spinulosus Dana are semi-terrestrial burrowing species, which coexist on sandy beaches of north central Chile (28-30°S). During the night, these scavengers emerge to make downshore migrations. Given the similarity in niches of these three species (all are known to include macroalgal detritus in their diet) and their relatively high abundance on that beaches, there is the potential for some degree of interaction, both inter- and intraspecific. Field studies were carried out to examine zonation of these burrowing organisms and eventual time and/or space partitioning of locomotor activity during night hours. Locomotor activity on the beach surface was analyzed over 12 h periods during spring and neap tides of September and December 2000, and March 2001. Scavengers moving over the beach surface were captured using pitfall traps buried with their rims flush with the beach surface along a transect extended from the foot of the dunes to the highest levels reached by the swashes. Every 1 h the captured animals in the traps were collected. Locomotor activity was also studied in the laboratory with chambers equipped with infrared recording systems (actographs). Data downloaded from the actographs were graphed to obtain a display of locomotor activity per 15 min interval during the course of the 7 day experiments. Results show space partitioning of burrowed organisms and time partitioning in the locomotor activity of O. tuberculata, T. spinulosus and P. maculata over the beach surface. Circular statistics showed that usually the activity peaks of O. tuberculata were more different from those of P. maculata and T. spinulosus than those of the last two species when compared with each other. Intraspecific differences were also found in the surface locomotor activity, primarily between juveniles and adults of O. tuberculata. Interseasonal

  12. Muscle spindle feedback directs locomotor recovery and circuit reorganization after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Aya; Vollenweider, Isabel; Courtine, Grégoire; Arber, Silvia

    2014-12-18

    Spinal cord injuries alter motor function by disconnecting neural circuits above and below the lesion, rendering sensory inputs a primary source of direct external drive to neuronal networks caudal to the injury. Here, we studied mice lacking functional muscle spindle feedback to determine the role of this sensory channel in gait control and locomotor recovery after spinal cord injury. High-resolution kinematic analysis of intact mutant mice revealed proficient execution in basic locomotor tasks but poor performance in a precision task. After injury, wild-type mice spontaneously recovered basic locomotor function, whereas mice with deficient muscle spindle feedback failed to regain control over the hindlimb on the lesioned side. Virus-mediated tracing demonstrated that mutant mice exhibit defective rearrangements of descending circuits projecting to deprived spinal segments during recovery. Our findings reveal an essential role for muscle spindle feedback in directing basic locomotor recovery and facilitating circuit reorganization after spinal cord injury.

  13. Prenatal Iron Deficiency in Guinea Pigs Increases Locomotor Activity but Does Not Influence Learning and Memory.

    PubMed

    Fiset, Catherine; Rioux, France M; Surette, Marc E; Fiset, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine whether prenatal iron deficiency induced during gestation in guinea pigs affected locomotor activity and learning and memory processes in the progeny. Dams were fed either iron-deficient anemic or iron-sufficient diets throughout gestation and lactation. After weaning, all pups were fed an iron-sufficient diet. On postnatal day 24 and 40, the pups' locomotor activity was observed within an open-field test, and from postnatal day 25 to 40, their learning and memory processes were assessed within a Morris Water Maze. The behavioural and cognitive tests revealed that the iron deficient pup group had increased locomotor activity, but solely on postnatal day 40, and that there were no group differences in the Morris Water Maze. In the general discussion, we propose that prenatal iron deficiency induces an increase in nervousness due to anxiety in the progeny, which, in the current study, resulted in an increase of locomotor activity.

  14. Differential effects of propranolol on conditioned hyperactivity and locomotor sensitization induced by morphine in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuguang; Li, Xinwang

    2014-01-21

    According to memory reconsolidation theory, when long-term memory is reactivated by relevant clues, the memory traces become labile, which can be altered by pharmacological manipulations. Accumulating evidence reveals that memory related to drug abuse can be erased by disrupting reconsolidation process. We used an animal model that could simultaneously measure conditioned hyperactivity and locomotor sensitization induced by morphine. β-Adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol or saline were administered following conditioned stimuli (CS) or a small dose of morphine reactivation. The results showed that the conditioned hyperactivity could be disrupted by propranolol treatment following CS reactivation. However, the expression of locomotor sensitization could not be disrupted by propranolol administration following CS or morphine reactivation. Furthermore, morphine injection and propranolol intervention enhanced the locomotor sensitization effect. These data suggest that blocking the reconsolidation process can disrupt the conditioned hyperactivity induced by environmental cues associated with morphine treatment, but not morphine-induced locomotor sensitization.

  15. Risperidone alters food intake, core body temperature, and locomotor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Cope, Mark B; Li, Xingsheng; Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; DiCostanzo, Catherine A; Jamison, Wendi G; Kesterson, Robert A; Allison, David B; Nagy, Tim R

    2009-03-02

    Risperidone induces significant weight gain in female mice; however, the underlying mechanisms related to this effect are unknown. We investigated the effects of risperidone on locomotor activity, core body temperature, and uncoupling protein (UCP) and hypothalamic orexin mRNA expression. Female C57BL/6J mice were acclimated to individual housing and randomly assigned to either risperidone (4 mg/kg BW day) or placebo (PLA). Activity and body temperature were measured over 48-hour periods twice a week for 3 weeks. Food intake and body weights were measured weekly. UCP1 (BAT), UCP3 (gastrocnemius), and orexin (hypothalamus) mRNA expressions were measured using RT-PCR. Risperidone-treated mice consumed more food (p=0.050) and gained more weight (p=0.0001) than PLA-treated mice after 3 weeks. During the initial 2 days of treatment, there was an acute effect of treatment on activity (p=0.046), but not body temperature (p=0.290). During 3 weeks of treatment, average core body temperatures were higher in risperidone-treated mice compared to controls during the light phase (p=0.0001), and tended to be higher during the dark phase (p=0.057). Risperidone-treated mice exhibited lower activity levels than controls during the dark phase (p=0.006); there were no differences in activity during the light phase (p=0.47). UCP1 (p<0.01) and UCP3 (p<0.05) mRNA expressions were greater in risperidone-treated mice compared to controls, whereas, orexin mRNA expression was lower in risperidone-treated mice (p<0.01). These results suggest that risperidone-induced weight gain in mice is a consequence of increased energy intake and reduced activity, while the elevation in body temperature may be a result of thermogenic effect of food intake and elevated UCP1, UCP3, and a reduced hypothalamic orexin expression.

  16. Limitations imposed by wearing armour on Medieval soldiers' locomotor performance.

    PubMed

    Askew, Graham N; Formenti, Federico; Minetti, Alberto E

    2012-02-22

    In Medieval Europe, soldiers wore steel plate armour for protection during warfare. Armour design reflected a trade-off between protection and mobility it offered the wearer. By the fifteenth century, a typical suit of field armour weighed between 30 and 50 kg and was distributed over the entire body. How much wearing armour affected Medieval soldiers' locomotor energetics and biomechanics is unknown. We investigated the mechanics and the energetic cost of locomotion in armour, and determined the effects on physical performance. We found that the net cost of locomotion (C(met)) during armoured walking and running is much more energetically expensive than unloaded locomotion. C(met) for locomotion in armour was 2.1-2.3 times higher for walking, and 1.9 times higher for running when compared with C(met) for unloaded locomotion at the same speed. An important component of the increased energy use results from the extra force that must be generated to support the additional mass. However, the energetic cost of locomotion in armour was also much higher than equivalent trunk loading. This additional cost is mostly explained by the increased energy required to swing the limbs and impaired breathing. Our findings can predict age-associated decline in Medieval soldiers' physical performance, and have potential implications in understanding the outcomes of past European military battles.

  17. Inbreeding affects locomotor activity in Drosophila melanogaster at different ages.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Tommaso; Pertoldi, Cino; Moghadam, Neda Nasiri; Nasiri, Neda; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kjærsgaard, Anders; Cavicchi, Sandro; Loeschcke, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The ability to move is essential for many behavioural traits closely related to fitness. Here we studied the effect of inbreeding on locomotor activity (LA) of Drosophila melanogaster at different ages under both dark and light regimes. We expected to find a decreased LA in inbred lines compared to control lines. We also predicted an increased differentiation between lines due to inbreeding. LA was higher in the dark compared to the light regime for both inbred and outbred control lines. As expected, inbreeding increased phenotypic variance in LA, with some inbred lines showing higher and some lower LA than control lines. Moreover, age per se did not affect LA neither in control nor in inbred lines, while we found a strong line by age interaction between inbred lines. Interestingly, inbreeding changed the daily activity pattern of the flies: these patterns were consistent across all control lines but were lost in some inbred lines. The departure in the daily pattern of LA in inbred lines may contribute to the inbreeding depression observed in inbred natural populations.

  18. Remote Control of Respiratory Neural Network by Spinal Locomotor Generators

    PubMed Central

    Le Gal, Jean-Patrick; Juvin, Laurent; Cardoit, Laura; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Morin, Didier

    2014-01-01

    During exercise and locomotion, breathing rate rapidly increases to meet the suddenly enhanced oxygen demand. The extent to which direct central interactions between the spinal networks controlling locomotion and the brainstem networks controlling breathing are involved in this rhythm modulation remains unknown. Here, we show that in isolated neonatal rat brainstem-spinal cord preparations, the increase in respiratory rate observed during fictive locomotion is associated with an increase in the excitability of pre-inspiratory neurons of the parafacial respiratory group (pFRG/Pre-I). In addition, this locomotion-induced respiratory rhythm modulation is prevented both by bilateral lesion of the pFRG region and by blockade of neurokinin 1 receptors in the brainstem. Thus, our results assign pFRG/Pre-I neurons a new role as elements of a previously undescribed pathway involved in the functional interaction between respiratory and locomotor networks, an interaction that also involves a substance P-dependent modulating mechanism requiring the activation of neurokinin 1 receptors. This neurogenic mechanism may take an active part in the increased respiratory rhythmicity produced at the onset and during episodes of locomotion in mammals. PMID:24586951

  19. Evolving Hox Activity Profiles Govern Diversity in Locomotor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Heekyung; Mazzoni, Esteban O.; Soshnikova, Natalia; Hanley, Olivia; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Duboule, Denis; Dasen, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The emergence of limb-driven locomotor behaviors was a key event in the evolution of vertebrates and fostered the transition from aquatic to terrestrial life. We show that the generation of limb-projecting lateral motor column (LMC) neurons in mice relies on a transcriptional autoregulatory module initiated via transient activity of multiple genes within the HoxA and HoxC clusters. Repression of this module at thoracic levels restricts expression of LMC determinants, thus dictating LMC position relative to the limbs. This suppression is mediated by a key regulatory domain that is specifically found in the Hoxc9 proteins of appendage-bearing vertebrates. The profile of Hoxc9 expression inversely correlates with LMC position in land vertebrates, and likely accounts for the absence of LMC neurons in limbless species such as snakes. Thus, modulation of both Hoxc9 protein function and Hoxc9 gene expression likely contributed to evolutionary transitions between undulatory and ambulatory motor circuit connectivity programs. PMID:24746670

  20. Locomotor head movements and semicircular canal morphology in primates

    PubMed Central

    Malinzak, Michael D.; Kay, Richard F.; Hullar, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Animal locomotion causes head rotations, which are detected by the semicircular canals of the inner ear. Morphologic features of the canals influence rotational sensitivity, and so it is hypothesized that locomotion and canal morphology are functionally related. Most prior research has compared subjective assessments of animal “agility” with a single determinant of rotational sensitivity: the mean canal radius of curvature (R). In fact, the paired variables of R and body mass are correlated with agility and have been used to infer locomotion in extinct species. To refine models of canal functional morphology and to improve locomotor inferences for extinct species, we compare 3D vector measurements of head rotation during locomotion with 3D vector measures of canal sensitivity. Contrary to the predictions of conventional models that are based upon R, we find that axes of rapid head rotation are not aligned with axes of either high or low sensitivity. Instead, animals with fast head rotations have similar sensitivities in all directions, which they achieve by orienting the three canals of each ear orthogonally (i.e., along planes at 90° angles to one another). The extent to which the canal configuration approaches orthogonality is correlated with rotational head speed independent of body mass and phylogeny, whereas R is not. PMID:23045679

  1. Sex differences in Siberian hamster ultradian locomotor rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Brian J.; Stevenson, Tyler J.; Zucker, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Sex differences in ultradian activity rhythms (URs) and circadian rhythms (CRs) were assessed in Siberian hamsters kept in long day (LD) or short day (SD) photoperiods for 40 weeks. For both sexes URs of locomotor activity were more prevalent, greater in amplitude and more robust in SDs. The UR period was longer in females than males in both day lengths. The reproductive system underwent regression and body mass declined during the initial 10 weeks of SD treatment, and in both sexes these traits spontaneously reverted to the LD phenotype at or before 40 weeks in SD, reflecting the development of neuroendocrine refractoriness to SD patterns of melatonin secretion. Hamsters of both sexes, however, continued to display SD-like URs at the 40 weeks time point. CRs were less prevalent and the waveform less robust and lower in amplitude in SDs than LDs; the SD circadian waveform also did not revert to the long-day phenotype after 40 weeks of SD treatment. Short day lengths enhanced ultradian and diminished circadian rhythms in both sexes. Day length controls several UR characteristics via gonadal steroid and melatonin-independent mechanisms. Sex differences in ultradian timing may contribute to sex diphenisms in rhythms of sleep, food intake and exercise. PMID:23333554

  2. Long-term treatment with PP2 after spinal cord injury resulted in functional locomotor recovery and increased spared tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Odrick R.; Torrado, Aranza I.; Santiago, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Ana E.; Salgado, Iris K.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2014-01-01

    The spinal cord has the ability to regenerate but the microenvironment generated after trauma reduces that capacity. An increase in Src family kinase (SFK) activity has been implicated in neuropathological conditions associated with central nervous system trauma. Therefore, we hypothesized that a decrease in SFK activation by a long-term treatment with 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyramidine (PP2), a selective SFK inhibitor, after spinal cord contusion with the New York University (NYU) impactor device would generate a permissive environment that improves axonal sprouting and/or behavioral activity. Results demonstrated that long-term blockade of SFK activation with PP2 increases locomotor activity at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post-injury in the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan open field test, round and square beam crossing tests. In addition, an increase in white matter spared tissue and serotonin fiber density was observed in animals treated with PP2. However, blockade of SFK activity did not change the astrocytic response or infiltration of cells from the immune system at 28 days post-injury. Moreover, a reduced SFK activity with PP2 diminished Ephexin (a guanine nucleotide exchange factor) phosphorylation in the acute phase (4 days post-injury) after trauma. Together, these findings suggest a potential role of SFK in the regulation of spared tissue and/or axonal outgrowth that may result in functional locomotor recovery during the pathophysiology generated after spinal cord injury. Our study also points out that ephexin1 phosphorylation (activation) by SFK action may be involved in the repulsive microenvironment generated after spinal cord injury. PMID:25657738

  3. Intranasal haloperidol-loaded miniemulsions for brain targeting: Evaluation of locomotor suppression and in-vivo biodistribution.

    PubMed

    El-Setouhy, Doaa Ahmed; Ibrahim, A B; Amin, Maha M; Khowessah, Omneya M; Elzanfaly, Eman S

    2016-09-20

    Haloperidol is a commonly prescribed antipsychotic drug currently administered as oral and injectable preparations. This study aimed to prepare haloperidol intranasal miniemulsion helpful for psychiatric emergencies and exhibiting lower systemic exposure and side effects associated with non-target site delivery. Haloperidol miniemulsions were successfully prepared by spontaneous emulsification adopting 2(3) factorial design. The effect of three independent variables at two levels each namely; oil type (Capmul®-Capryol™90), lipophilic emulsifier type (Span 20-Span 80) and HLB value (12-14) on globule size, PDI and percent locomotor activity inhibition in mice was evaluated. The optimized formula (F4, Capmul®, Tween 80/Span 20, HLB 14) showed globule size of 209.5±0.98nm, PDI of 0.402±0.03 and locomotor inhibition of 83.89±9.15% with desirability of 0.907. Biodistribution study following intranasal and intravenous administration of the radiolabeled (99m)Tc mucoadhesive F4 revealed that intranasal administration achieved 1.72-fold higher and 6 times faster peak brain levels compared with intravenous administration. Drug targeting efficiency percent and brain/blood exposure ratios remained above 100% and 1 respectively after intranasal instillation compared to a maximum brain/blood exposure ratio of 0.8 post intravenous route. Results suggested the CNS delivery of major fraction of haloperidol via direct transnasal to brain pathway that can be a promising alternative to oral and parenteral routes in chronic and acute situations. Haloperidol concentration of 275.6ng/g brain 8h post intranasal instillation, higher than therapeutic concentration range of haloperidol (0.8 to 5.15ng/ml), suggests possible sustained delivery of the drug through nasal route.

  4. Protease-Activated Receptor-1 Supports Locomotor Recovery by Biased Agonist Activated Protein C after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Whetstone, William D.; Walker, Breset; Trivedi, Alpa; Lee, Sangmi; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.; Hsu, Jung-Yu C.

    2017-01-01

    Thrombin-induced secondary injury is mediated through its receptor, protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), by "biased agonism." Activated protein C (APC) acts through the same PAR-1 receptor but functions as an anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory protein, which counteracts many of the effects of thrombin. Although the working mechanism of PAR-1 is becoming clear, the functional role of PAR-1 and its correlation with APC in the injured spinal cord remains to be elucidated. Here we investigated if PAR-1 and APC are determinants of long-term functional recovery after a spinal cord contusive injury using PAR-1 null and wild-type mice. We found that neutrophil infiltration and disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier were significantly reduced in spinal cord injured PAR-1 null mice relative to the wild-type group. Both locomotor recovery and ability to descend an inclined grid were significantly improved in the PAR-1 null group 42 days after injury and this improvement was associated with greater long-term sparing of white matter and a reduction in glial scarring. Wild-type mice treated with APC acutely after injury showed a similar level of improved locomotor recovery to that of PAR-1 null mice. However, improvement of APC-treated PAR-1 null mice was indistinguishable from that of vehicle-treated PAR-1 null mice, suggesting that APC acts through PAR-1. Collectively, our findings define a detrimental role of thrombin-activated PAR-1 in wound healing and further validate APC, also acting through the PAR-1 by biased agonism, as a promising therapeutic target for spinal cord injury. PMID:28122028

  5. Locomotor behavior of fish hatched from embryos exposed to flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleerekoper, H.

    1978-01-01

    Embryos of Fundulus heteroclitus in various stages of development were exposed to space flight conditions aboard Apollo spacecraft and Cosmos satellites. The objective of the study was to ascertain whether fish hatched from these embryos displayed locomotor behavior different from that of control fish of the same age. An electronic monitoring technique was used to record behavior. Results indicate no change in locomotor behavior in fish on Apollo Spacecraft, but inexplicable significant changes were noted in fish aboard Cosmos Satellites.

  6. Effect of locomotor training in completely spinalized cats previously submitted to a spinal hemisection.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marina; Delivet-Mongrain, Hugo; Leblond, Hugues; Rossignol, Serge

    2012-08-08

    After a spinal hemisection in cats, locomotor plasticity occurring at the spinal level can be revealed by performing, several weeks later, a complete spinalization below the first hemisection. Using this paradigm, we recently demonstrated that the hemisection induces durable changes in the symmetry of locomotor kinematics that persist after spinalization. Can this asymmetry be changed again in the spinal state by interventions such as treadmill locomotor training started within a few days after the spinalization? We performed, in 9 adult cats, a spinal hemisection at thoracic level 10 and then a complete spinalization at T13, 3 weeks later. Cats were not treadmill trained during the hemispinal period. After spinalization, 5 of 9 cats were not trained and served as control while 4 of 9 cats were trained on the treadmill for 20 min, 5 d a week for 3 weeks. Using detailed kinematic analyses, we showed that, without training, the asymmetrical state of locomotion induced by the hemisection was retained durably after the subsequent spinalization. By contrast, training cats after spinalization induced a reversal of the left/right asymmetries, suggesting that new plastic changes occurred within the spinal cord through locomotor training. Moreover, training was shown to improve the kinematic parameters and the performance of the hindlimb on the previously hemisected side. These results indicate that spinal locomotor circuits, previously modified by past experience such as required for adaptation to the hemisection, can remarkably respond to subsequent locomotor training and improve bilateral locomotor kinematics, clearly showing the benefits of locomotor training in the spinal state.

  7. Anatomical and electrophysiological plasticity of locomotor networks following spinal transection in the salamander.

    PubMed

    Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Chevallier, Stéphanie; Amontieva-Potapova, Ianina; Philippe, Céline

    2013-08-01

    Recovery of locomotor behavior following spinal cord injury can occur spontaneously in some vertebrates, such as fish, urodele amphibians, and certain reptiles. This review provides an overview of the current status of our knowledge on the anatomical and electrophysiological changes occurring within the spinal cord that lead to, or are associated with the re-expression of locomotion in spinally-transected salamanders. A better understanding of these processes will help to devise strategies for restoring locomotor function in mammals, including humans.

  8. A Combined Robotic and Cognitive Training for Locomotor Rehabilitation: Evidences of Cerebral Functional Reorganization in Two Chronic Traumatic Brain Injured Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Katiuscia; Cauda, Franco; D’Agata, Federico; Duca, Sergio; Zettin, Marina; Virgilio, Roberta; Nascimbeni, Alberto; Belforte, Guido; Eula, Gabriella; Gastaldi, Laura; Appendino, Silvia; Geminiani, Giuliano

    2011-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that automated locomotor training can improve walking capabilities in spinal cord-injured subjects but its effectiveness on brain damaged patients has not been well established. A possible explanation of the discordant results on the efficacy of robotic training in patients with cerebral lesions could be that these patients, besides stimulation of physiological motor patterns through passive leg movements, also need to train the cognitive aspects of motor control. Indeed, another way to stimulate cerebral motor areas in paretic patients is to use the cognitive function of motor imagery. A promising possibility is thus to combine sensorimotor training with the use of motor imagery. The aim of this paper is to assess changes in brain activations after a combined sensorimotor and cognitive training for gait rehabilitation. The protocol consisted of the integrated use of a robotic gait orthosis prototype with locomotor imagery tasks. Assessment was conducted on two patients with chronic traumatic brain injury and major gait impairments, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Physiatric functional scales were used to assess clinical outcomes. Results showed greater activation post-training in the sensorimotor and supplementary motor cortices, as well as enhanced functional connectivity within the motor network. Improvements in balance and, to a lesser extent, in gait outcomes were also found. PMID:22275890

  9. Relating ranging ecology, limb length, and locomotor economy in terrestrial animals.

    PubMed

    Pontzer, Herman

    2012-03-07

    Ecomorphological analyses have identified a number of important evolutionary trends in vertebrate limb design, but the relationships between daily travel distance, locomotor ecology, and limb length in terrestrial animals remain poorly understood. In this paper I model the net rate of energy intake as a function of foraging efficiency, and thus of locomotor economy; improved economy leads to greater net energy intake. However, the relationship between locomotor economy and net intake is highly dependent on foraging efficiency; only species with low foraging efficiencies experience strong selection pressure for improved locomotor economy and increased limb length. Examining 237 terrestrial species, I find that nearly all taxa obtain sufficiently high foraging efficiencies that selection for further increases in economy is weak. Thus selection pressures for increased economy and limb length among living terrestrial animals may be relatively weak and similar in magnitude across ecologically diverse species. The Economy Selection Pressure model for locomotor economy may be useful in investigating the evolution of limb design in early terrestrial taxa and the coevolution of foraging ecology and locomotor anatomy in lineages with low foraging efficiencies.

  10. Caffeine and amphetamine produce cross-sensitization to nicotine-induced locomotor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Celik, Eylem; Uzbay, I Tayfun; Karakas, Sirel

    2006-01-01

    Sensitization development is linked to the addictive potential of the drugs. The same mechanisms might play a role in sensitization development to the different addictive drugs. The aim of the study was to investigate the development of cross-sensitization to caffeine and amphetamine in nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization in mice. Caffeine (2.5-20 mg/kg), amphetamine (1-16 mg/kg) or saline were injected to Swiss-Webster mice and locomotor activity was recorded for 30 min. Nicotine (0.5-2 mg/kg) or saline were injected to mice and locomotor activity was recorded for 30 min. Process was applied for 19 days, every other day (10 sessions). Caffeine (5 mg/kg), amphetamine (4 mg/kg) or saline were challenged to the different groups of nicotine-sensitized mice 2 days later on the last nicotine injection, and locomotor activity was recorded. Repetitive injections of nicotine (0.5-2 mg) produced locomotor sensitization in mice. After caffeine and amphetamine challenge injections, locomotor activity of the nicotine-sensitized mice was found to be significantly higher than saline-pretreated mice. Saline challenge did not produce any significant effect in nicotine- or saline-pretreated mice. Our results suggest that a cross-sensitization developed to both caffeine and amphetamine in nicotine-sensitized mice. In conclusion, similar central mechanisms may be responsible for the development of addiction to these substances.

  11. Treadmill exercise facilitates recovery of locomotor function through axonal regeneration following spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sun-Young; Seo, Tae-Beom; Kim, Dae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) disrupts both axonal pathways and segmental spinal cord circuity, resulting in permanent neurological deficits. Physical exercise is known to increase the expression of neurotrophins for improving the injured spinal cord. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on locomotor function in relation with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression after SCI. The rats were divided into five groups: control group, sham operation group, sham operation and exercise group, SCI group, and SCI and exercise group. The laminectomy was performed at the T9–T10 level. The exposed dorsal surface of the spinal cord received contusion injury (10 g × 25 mm) using the impactor. Treadmill exercise was performed 6 days per a week for 6 weeks. In order to evaluate the locomotor function of animals, Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale was conducted once a week for 6 weeks. We examined BDNF expression and axonal sprouting in the injury site of the spinal cord using Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. SCI induced loss of locomotor function with decreased BDNF expression in the injury site. Treadmill exercise increased the score of BBB locomotor scale and reduced cavity formation in the injury site. BDNF expression and axonal sprouting within the trabecula were further facilitated by treadmill exercise in SCI-exposed rats. The present study provides the evidence that treadmill exercise may facilitate recovery of locomotor function through axonal regeneration via BDNF expression following SCI. PMID:27656624

  12. Effects of sex pheromones and sexual maturation on locomotor activity in female sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walaszczyk, Erin J.; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Steibel, Juan Pedro; Li, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization of male and female locomotor rhythmicity can play a vital role in ensuring reproductive success. Several physiological and environmental factors alter these locomotor rhythms. As sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, progress through their life cycle, their locomotor activity rhythm changes multiple times. The goal of this study was to elucidate the activity patterns of adult female sea lamprey during the sexual maturation process and discern the interactions of these patterns with exposure to male pheromones. During these stages, preovulated and ovulated adult females are exposed to sex pheromone compounds, which are released by spermiated males and attract ovulated females to the nest for spawning. The locomotor behavior of adult females was monitored in a natural stream with a passive integrated tag responder system as they matured, and they were exposed to a sex pheromone treatment (spermiated male washings) or a control (prespermiated male washings). Results showed that, dependent on the hour of day, male sex pheromone compounds reduce total activity (p < 0.05) and cause increases in activity during several daytime hours in preovulated and ovulated females. These results are one of the first examples of how sex pheromones modulate a locomotor rhythm in a vertebrate, and they suggest that the interaction between maturity stage and sex pheromone exposure contributes to the differential locomotor rhythms found in adult female sea lamprey. This phenomenon may contribute to the reproductive synchrony of mature adults, thus increasing reproductive success in this species.

  13. Locomotor activation by theacrine, a purine alkaloid structurally similar to caffeine: involvement of adenosine and dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Feduccia, Allison A; Wang, Yuanyuan; Simms, Jeffrey A; Yi, Henry Y; Li, Rui; Bjeldanes, Leonard; Ye, Chuangxing; Bartlett, Selena E

    2012-08-01

    Purine compounds, such as caffeine, have many health-promoting properties and have proven to be beneficial in treating a number of different conditions. Theacrine, a purine alkaloid structurally similar to caffeine and abundantly present in Camellia kucha, has recently become of interest as a potential therapeutic compound. In the present study, theacrine was tested using a rodent behavioral model to investigate the effects of the drug on locomotor activity. Long Evans rats were injected with theacrine (24 or 48 mg/kg, i.p.) and activity levels were measured. Results showed that the highest dose of theacrine (48 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased locomotor activity compared to control animals and activity remained elevated throughout the duration of the session. To test for the involvement of adenosine receptors underlying theacrine's motor-activating properties, rats were administered a cocktail of the adenosine A₁ agonist, N⁶-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) and A(2A) receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS-21680; 0.2 mg/kg, i.p.). Pre-treatment with theacrine significantly attenuated the motor depression induced by the adenosine receptor agonists, indicating that theacrine is likely acting as an adenosine receptor antagonist. Next, we examined the role of DA D₁ and D₂ receptor antagonism on theacrine-induced hyperlocomotion. Both antagonists, D₁R SCH23390 (0.1 or 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) and D₂R eticlopride (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.), significantly reduced theacrine-stimulated activity indicating that this behavioral response, at least in part, is mediated by DA receptors. In order to investigate the brain region where theacrine may be acting, the drug (10 or 20 μg) was infused bilaterally into nucleus accumbens (NAc). Theacrine enhanced activity levels in a dose-dependent manner, implicating a role of the NAc in modulating theacrine's effects on locomotion. In addition, theacrine did not induce locomotor

  14. Differential involvement of CCK-A and CCK-B receptors in the regulation of locomotor activity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Vasar, E; Harro, J; Lang, A; Pôld, A; Soosaar, A

    1991-01-01

    The influence of the CCK-A antagonist devazepide and the CCK-B/gastrin antagonist L-365,260 on the locomotor activity of mice was studied. Devazepide and L-365,260 had opposite effects on spontaneous locomotor activity, and on caerulein- and apomorphine-induced hypomotility in the mouse. Devazepide in high doses (0.1-1 mg/kg IP) reduced spontaneous motor activity, whereas L-365,260 at a high dose (1 mg/kg IP) increased the activity of mice. Devazepide (0.1-10 micrograms/kg) moderately antagonized the sedative effect of apomorphine (0.1 mg/kg SC) and caerulein (25 micrograms/kg SC), whereas L-365,260 (1-10 micrograms/kg) significantly potentiated the actions of dopamine and CCK agonists. Concomitant administration of caerulein (15 micrograms/kg SC) and apomorphine (0.1 mg/kg SC) caused an almost complete loss of locomotor activity in the mouse. Devazepide and L-365,260 (0.1-10 micrograms/kg) were completely ineffective against caerulein-induced potentiation of apomorphine hypomotility. Devazepide in high doses (0.1-1 mg/kg), reducing the spontaneous motor activity of mice, counteracted the motor excitation induced by d-amphetamine (5 mg/kg IP). The CCK agonist caerulein (100 micrograms/kg SC) had a similar antiamphetamine effect. Devazepide (1-100 micrograms/kg) and L-365,260 (1 micrograms/kg) reversed completely the antiamphetamine effect of caerulein. The results of present study reflect apparently distinct role of CCK-A and CCK-B receptors in the regulation of motor activity. The opposite effect of devazepide and L-365,260 on caerulein- and apomorphine-induced hypolocomotion is probably related to the antagonistic role of CCK-A and CCK-B receptor subtypes in the regulation of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. The antiamphetamine effect of caerulein is possibly linked to the stimulation of CCK-A receptors in the mouse brain, whereas the blockade of both subtypes of the CCK-8 receptor is involved in the antiamphetamine effect of devazepide.

  15. Electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of locomotor activity-related neurons in cfos-EGFP mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yue; Carlin, Kevin P; Li, Zongming; McMahon, Douglas G; Brownstone, Robert M; Jordan, Larry M

    2009-12-01

    Although locomotion is known to be generated by networks of spinal neurons, knowledge of the properties of these neurons is limited. Using neonatal transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) driven by the c-fos promoter, we visualized EGFP-positive neurons in spinal cord slices from animals that were subjected to a locomotor task or drug cocktail [N-methyl-D-aspartate, serotonin (5-HT), dopamine, and acetylcholine (ACh)]. The activity-dependent expression of EGFP was also induced in dorsal root ganglion neurons with electrical stimulation of the neurons. Following 60-90 min of swimming, whole cell patch-clamp recordings were made from EGFP+ neurons in laminae VII, VIII, and X from slices of segments T(12) to L(4). The EGFP+ neurons (n = 55) could be classified into three types based on their responses to depolarizing step currents: single spike, phasic firing, and tonic firing. Membrane properties observed in these neurons include hyperpolarization-activated inward currents (29/55), postinhibitory rebound (11/55), and persistent-inward currents (31/55). Bath application of 10-40 microM 5-HT and/or ACh increased neuronal excitability or output with hyperpolarization of voltage threshold and changes in membrane potential. 5-HT also increased input resistance, reduced the afterhyperpolarization (AHP), and induced membrane oscillations, whereas ACh reduced the input resistance and increased the AHP. In this study, we demonstrate a new way of identifying neurons active in locomotion. Our results suggest that the EGFP+ neurons are a heterogeneous population of interneurons. The actions of 5-HT and ACh on these neurons provide insights into the neuronal properties modulated by these transmitters for generation of locomotion.

  16. (-)-1-(Benzofuran-2-yl)-2-propylaminopentane enhances locomotor activity in rats due to its ability to induce dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, S; Takahata, K; Katsuki, H; Tsunekawa, H; Tanigawa, A; Yoneda, F; Knoll, J; Akaike, A

    2001-06-15

    "Catecholaminergic and serotoninergic activity enhancer" effects are newly found mechanisms of action of a class of compound that enhance impulse propagation-mediated release of catecholamines and serotonin in the brain. In the present study, (-)-1-(benzofuran-2-yl)-2-propylaminopentane hydrochloride [(-)-BPAP HCl], a compound with selective and potent "catecholaminergic and serotoninergic activity enhancer" effects, was tested for its efficacy to potentiate locomotor activity in normal rats and to attenuate hypolocomotion in reserpine-treated rats. (-)-BPAP HCl potentiated locomotor activity in non-habituated rats during a 2-h observation period dose-dependently (0.3-10 mg/kg). (-)-BPAP HCl (1-3 mg/kg) was also effective to reverse reserpine-induced hypolocomotion. The effects of (-)-BPAP HCl in normal and reserpine-treated rats were attenuated by the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (SCH 23390), suggesting that the effects of (-)-BPAP HCl were mediated by activation of the dopaminergic system. In addition, the administration of (-)-BPAP HCl increased ipsilateral turning in unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats, implying presynaptic activation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic terminals by (-)-BPAP HCl. Furthermore, although antiparkinsonian agents, such as apomorphine and amantadine, failed to improve reserpine-induced ptosis, (-)-BPAP HCl significantly improved ptosis. These findings suggested that a "catecholaminergic and serotoninergic activity enhancer" compound, (-)-BPAP, stimulates motor function in rats and improves motor deficits in animal models of Parkinson's disease due to its ability to induce dopamine release.

  17. Acute psychotic disorder and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Singh, S K; Agrawal, J K; Srivastava, A S; Bhardwaj, V K; Bose, B S

    1994-04-01

    A variable array of neuroglycopenic symptoms are frequently encountered in the hypoglycemic stage, but acute psychotic disorders are quite rare. A fifty five year old female presented with an acute psychosis following oral sulfonylurea induced hypoglycemia without preceding features of adrenomedullary stimulation. This case report suggests that an acute and transient psychotic disorder may be an important neuroglycopenic feature and its early recognition protects the patient from severe hypoglycemic brain damage in a state of hypoglycemia unawareness.

  18. General and Specific Strategies Used to Facilitate Locomotor Maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mengnan; Matsubara, Jesse H.; Gordon, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    People make anticipatory changes in gait patterns prior to initiating a rapid change of direction. How they prepare will change based on their knowledge of the maneuver. To investigate specific and general strategies used to facilitate locomotor maneuvers, we manipulated subjects’ ability to anticipate the direction of an upcoming lateral “lane-change” maneuver. To examine specific anticipatory adjustments, we observed the four steps immediately preceding a maneuver that subjects were instructed to perform at a known time in a known direction. We hypothesized that to facilitate a specific change of direction, subjects would proactively decrease margin of stability in the future direction of travel. Our results support this hypothesis: subjects significantly decreased lateral margin of stability by 69% on the side ipsilateral to the maneuver during only the step immediately preceding the maneuver. This gait adaptation may have improved energetic efficiency and simplified the control of the maneuver. To examine general anticipatory adjustments, we observed the two steps immediately preceding the instant when subjects received information about the direction of the maneuver. When the maneuver direction was unknown, we hypothesized that subjects would make general anticipatory adjustments that would improve their ability to actively initiate a maneuver in multiple directions. This second hypothesis was partially supported as subjects increased step width and stance phase hip flexion during these anticipatory steps. These modifications may have improved subjects’ ability to generate forces in multiple directions and maintain equilibrium during the onset and execution of the rapid maneuver. However, adapting these general anticipatory strategies likely incurred an additional energetic cost. PMID:26167931

  19. The evolution of jumping in frogs: morphological evidence for the basal anuran locomotor condition and the radiation of locomotor systems in crown group anurans.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Stephen M; Jorgensen, Michael E

    2011-02-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of frog locomotion follows from the work of Emerson in which anurans are proposed to possess one of three different iliosacral configurations: 1) a lateral-bending system found in walking and hopping frogs; 2) a fore-aft sliding mechanism found in several locomotor modes; and 3) a sagittal-hinge-type pelvis posited to be related to long-distance jumping performance. The most basal living (Ascaphus) and fossil (Prosalirus) frogs are described as sagittal-hinge pelvic types, and it has been proposed that long-distance jumping with a sagittal-hinge pelvis arose early in frog evolution. We revisited osteological traits of the pelvic region to conduct a phylogenetic analysis of the relationships between pelvic systems and locomotor modes in frogs. Using two of Emerson's diagnostic traits from the sacrum and ilium and two new traits from the urostyle, we resampled the taxa originally studied by Emerson and key paleotaxa and conducted an analysis of ancestral-character state evolution in relation to locomotor mode. We present a new pattern for the evolution of pelvic systems and locomotor modes in frogs. Character analysis shows that the lateral-bender, walker/hopper condition is both basal and generally conserved across the Anura. Long-distance jumping frogs do not appear until well within the Neobatrachia. The sagittal-hinge morphology is correlated with long-distance jumping in terrestrial frogs; however, it evolved convergently multiple times in crown group anurans with the same four pelvic traits described herein. Arboreal jumping has appeared in multiple crown lineages as well, but with divergent patterns of evolution involving each of the three pelvic types. The fore-aft slider morph appears independently in three different locomotor modes and, thus, is a more complex system than previously thought. Finally, it appears that the advent of a bicondylar sacro-urostylic articulation was originally related to providing axial rigidity

  20. Modelling spinal circuitry involved in locomotor pattern generation: insights from deletions during fictive locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, Ilya A; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Lafreniere-Roula, Myriam; McCrea, David A

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian spinal cord contains a locomotor central pattern generator (CPG) that can produce alternating rhythmic activity of flexor and extensor motoneurones in the absence of rhythmic input and proprioceptive feedback. During such fictive locomotor activity in decerebrate cats, spontaneous omissions of activity occur simultaneously in multiple agonist motoneurone pools for a number of cycles. During these ‘deletions’, antagonist motoneurone pools usually become tonically active but may also continue to be rhythmic. The rhythmic activity that re-emerges following a deletion is often not phase shifted. This suggests that some neuronal mechanism can maintain the locomotor period when motoneurone activity fails. To account for these observations, a simplified computational model of the spinal circuitry has been developed in which the locomotor CPG consists of two levels: a half-centre rhythm generator (RG) and a pattern formation (PF) network, with reciprocal inhibitory interactions between antagonist neural populations at each level. The model represents a network of interacting neural populations with single interneurones and motoneurones described in the Hodgkin-Huxley style. The model reproduces the range of locomotor periods and phase durations observed during real locomotion in adult cats and permits independent control of the level of motoneurone activity and of step cycle timing. By altering the excitability of neural populations within the PF network, the model can reproduce deletions in which motoneurone activity fails but the phase of locomotor oscillations is maintained. The model also suggests criteria for the functional identification of spinal interneurones involved in the mammalian locomotor pattern generation. PMID:17008376

  1. Postcranial morphology and the locomotor habits of living and extinct carnivorans.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Joshua X; Meachen, Julie A; Sakai, Stacey A

    2013-02-01

    Members of the order Carnivora display a broad range of locomotor habits, including cursorial, scansorial, arboreal, semiaquatic, aquatic, and semifossorial species from multiple families. Ecomorphological analyses from osteological measurements have been used successfully in prior studies of carnivorans and rodents to accurately infer the locomotor habits of extinct species. This study uses 20 postcranial measurements that have been shown to be effective indicators of locomotor habits in rodents and incorporates an extensive sample of over 300 individuals from more than 100 living carnivoran species. We performed statistical analyses, including analysis of variance (ANOVA) and stepwise discriminant function analysis, using a set of 16 functional indices (ratios). Our ANOVA results reveal consistent differences in postcranial skeletal morphology among locomotor groups. Cursorial species display distal elongation of the limbs, gracile limb elements, and relatively narrow humeral and femoral epicondyles. Aquatic and semiaquatic species display relatively robust, shortened femora and elongate metatarsals. Semifossorial species display relatively short, robust limbs with enlarged muscular attachment sites and elongate claws. Both semiaquatic and semifossorial species have relatively elongate olecranon process of the ulna and enlarged humeral and femoral epicondyles. Terrestrial, scansorial, and arboreal species are characterized by having primarily intermediate features, but arboreal species do show relatively elongate manual digits. Morphological indices effectively discriminate locomotor groups, with cursorial and arboreal species more accurately classified than terrestrial, scansorial, or semiaquatic species. Both within and between families, species with similar locomotor habits converge toward similar postcranial morphology despite their independent evolutionary histories. The discriminant analysis worked particularly well to correctly classify members of the

  2. Increasing aclarubicin dosage of the conventional CAG (low-dose cytarabine and aclarubicin in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) regimen is more efficacious as a salvage therapy than CAG for relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qi; Liu, Limin; Zhang, Yanming; Li, Xiaoli; Wu, Depei

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy and safety of a modified CAG (low-dose cytarabine and aclarubicin in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) regimen with an increased aclarubicin dosage [high-dose (HD)-CAG] were observed in 145 patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and compared to the results of 172 patients treated with a conventional CAG regimen. The HD-CAG regimen showed both a higher complete remission (CR) rate (60.7% vs. 46.5%, P=0.013) and overall response (OR) rate (74.5% vs. 63.4%, P=0.039) than CAG. For patients aged <60 years, HD-CAG manifested an efficacy advantage over the CAG regimen (62.6% vs. 47.4%, P=0.015). The 4-year overall survival (OS) rate was 30.3%±13.2% with a median survival time of 19.0±5.4 months for patients re-induced with the HD-CAG regimen, which showed no significant difference compared to the CAG regimen (with a 4-year OS rate of 18.2%±5.3% and a median survival time of 16.0±3.6 months, P=0.485). The main adverse effect was myelosuppression; platelet recovery over 50×10(9)/L was extended by the HD-CAG regimen (15 days vs. 10 days of the CAG regimen, P=0.003), which was tolerable and manageable. HD-CAG can safely improve efficacy compared to the CAG regimen and thus serves as an alternative treatment for R/R AML.

  3. Late reperfusion of a totally occluded infarct-related artery increases granulocyte-colony stimulation factor and reduces stroma-derived factor-1alpha blood levels in patients with ongoing ischemia after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Li-Tang; Chen, Shih-Jen; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Yang, Ning-I; Lee, Chen-Chin; Cheng, Chi-Wen; Verma, Subodh; Wang, Chao-Hung

    2009-07-01

    After acute myocardial infarction (AMI), reopening of a totally occluded infarct-related artery (IRA) at a subacute stage is still controversial in symptom-free patients. However, in patients with persistent ischemic symptoms and inadequate collaterals to the infarct area, recanalization is thought to provide beneficial effects. In addition to augmenting myocardial perfusion, we hypothesized that the benefit of recanalization involves the manipulation of circulating stem cell-mobilizing cytokines. This study included 30 patients with a totally occluded IRA and ongoing ischemic symptoms (the study group) and 30 patients with a partially occluded IRA (the control group). All patients underwent successful angioplasty and/or stenting. Before and immediately after the coronary intervention, blood granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), stem-cell factor (SCF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and stroma-derived factor-1 (SDF-1alpha) were measured. After recanalization, G-CSF levels significantly increased in the study group compared to the control group (P=0.03). SDF-1alpha levels in the study group decreased relative to the controls (P=0.02). However, no significant changes in VEGF or SCF levels between the two groups were found. In the multivariate analysis, reopening of a totally occluded IRA was independently and significantly associated with changes in G-CSF and SDF-1alpha levels after recanalization. In conclusion, our data suggest that the benefits of late reperfusion of a totally occluded IRA in patients with ongoing myocardial ischemia may involve mechanisms associated with stem cell-mobilizing and plaque-stabilizing cytokines. This study provides the rationale to investigate serial changes in cytokines and the numbers of circulating progenitors after reperfusion in the future.

  4. DT388-GM-CSF, a novel fusion toxin consisting of a truncated diphtheria toxin fused to human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, prolongs host survival in a SCID mouse model of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hall, P D; Willingham, M C; Kreitman, R J; Frankel, A E

    1999-04-01

    Despite significant advances in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the majority of patients will succumb to drug-resistant AML. To overcome this resistance, we have developed a novel fusion toxin consisting of the catalytic and translocation subunits of diphtheria toxin (DT388) linked to human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In vitro, DT388-GM-CSF demonstrated significant activity against numerous AML cell lines and fresh AML blasts. To determine its in vivo efficacy, we developed an in vivo model of human AML in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice injected intravenously with 1 x 10(7) HL-60 cells (AML-M2 cell line). The SCID mice developed abdominal masses, infiltration of the liver and bone marrow, and peripheral blasts with a median survival of 42.5 days. We tested DT388-GM-CSF, ara-C, human GM-CSF, and DAB389IL-2, which were injected intraperitoneally on days 2-6 in this model. DT3-GM-CSF significantly improved survival of the SCID mice over Ara-C, DAB389IL-2, or control (P < 0.001). DT388-GM-CSF-treated mice who developed leukemia exhibited no difference in the number of GM-CSF receptors (P = 0.39), ligand affinity (P = 0.77), or sensitivity (P = 0.56) to DT388-GM-CSF as compared to the controls. Frank leukemia in DT388-GM-CSF-treated mice may be due to incomplete penetration of drug into tissues rather than cellular resistance. DT388-GM-CSF is an active therapeutic agent in our SCID mouse model of AML with a unique mechanism of action and differing toxicities than current cytotoxic agents.

  5. Rhythmic 24 h Variation of Core Body Temperature and Locomotor Activity in a Subterranean Rodent (Ctenomys aff. knighti), the Tuco-Tuco

    PubMed Central

    Tachinardi, Patricia; Bicudo, José Eduardo Wilken; Oda, Gisele Akemi; Valentinuzzi, Verónica Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The tuco-tuco Ctenomys aff. knighti is a subterranean rodent which inhabits a semi-arid area in Northwestern Argentina. Although they live in underground burrows where environmental cycles are attenuated, they display robust, 24 h locomotor activity rhythms that are synchronized by light/dark cycles, both in laboratory and field conditions. The underground environment also poses energetic challenges (e.g. high-energy demands of digging, hypoxia, high humidity, low food availability) that have motivated thermoregulation studies in several subterranean rodent species. By using chronobiological protocols, the present work aims to contribute towards these studies by exploring day-night variations of thermoregulatory functions in tuco-tucos, starting with body temperature and its temporal relationship to locomotor activity. Animals showed daily, 24 h body temperature rhythms that persisted even in constant darkness and temperature, synchronizing to a daily light/dark cycle, with highest values occurring during darkness hours. The range of oscillation of body temperature was slightly lower than those reported for similar-sized and dark-active rodents. Most rhythmic parameters, such as period and phase, did not change upon removal of the running wheel. Body temperature and locomotor activity rhythms were robustly associated in time. The former persisted even after removal of the acute effects of intense activity on body temperature by a statistical method. Finally, regression gradients between body temperature and activity were higher in the beginning of the night, suggesting day-night variation in thermal conductance and heat production. Consideration of these day-night variations in thermoregulatory processes is beneficial for further studies on thermoregulation and energetics of subterranean rodents. PMID:24454916

  6. Rhythmic 24 h variation of core body temperature and locomotor activity in a subterranean rodent (Ctenomys aff. knighti), the tuco-tuco.

    PubMed

    Tachinardi, Patricia; Bicudo, José Eduardo Wilken; Oda, Gisele Akemi; Valentinuzzi, Verónica Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The tuco-tuco Ctenomys aff. knighti is a subterranean rodent which inhabits a semi-arid area in Northwestern Argentina. Although they live in underground burrows where environmental cycles are attenuated, they display robust, 24 h locomotor activity rhythms that are synchronized by light/dark cycles, both in laboratory and field conditions. The underground environment also poses energetic challenges (e.g. high-energy demands of digging, hypoxia, high humidity, low food availability) that have motivated thermoregulation studies in several subterranean rodent species. By using chronobiological protocols, the present work aims to contribute towards these studies by exploring day-night variations of thermoregulatory functions in tuco-tucos, starting with body temperature and its temporal relationship to locomotor activity. Animals showed daily, 24 h body temperature rhythms that persisted even in constant darkness and temperature, synchronizing to a daily light/dark cycle, with highest values occurring during darkness hours. The range of oscillation of body temperature was slightly lower than those reported for similar-sized and dark-active rodents. Most rhythmic parameters, such as period and phase, did not change upon removal of the running wheel. Body temperature and locomotor activity rhythms were robustly associated in time. The former persisted even after removal of the acute effects of intense activity on body temperature by a statistical method. Finally, regression gradients between body temperature and activity were higher in the beginning of the night, suggesting day-night variation in thermal conductance and heat production. Consideration of these day-night variations in t