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Sample records for acute lung damage

  1. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Lung Acutely Induce Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and DNA Damage in Various Organs of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuvaraju, Priya; Beegam, Sumaya; Fahim, Mohamed A.; Ali, Badreldin H.

    2017-01-01

    CeO2 nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) which are used as a diesel fuel additive are emitted in the particulate phase in the exhaust, posing a health concern. However, limited information exists regarding the in vivo acute toxicity of CeO2 NPs on multiple organs. Presently, we investigated the acute (24 h) effects of intratracheally instilled CeO2 NPs in mice (0.5 mg/kg) on oxidative stress, inflammation, and DNA damage in major organs including lung, heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, and brain. Lipid peroxidation measured by malondialdehyde production was increased in the lungs only, and reactive oxygen species were increased in the lung, heart, kidney, and brain. Superoxide dismutase activity was decreased in the lung, liver, and kidney, whereas glutathione increased in lung but it decreased in the kidney. Total nitric oxide was increased in the lung and spleen but it decreased in the heart. Tumour necrosis factor-α increased in all organs studied. Interleukin- (IL-) 6 increased in the lung, heart, liver, kidney, and spleen. IL-1β augmented in the lung, heart, kidney, and spleen. Moreover, CeO2 NPs induced DNA damage, assessed by COMET assay, in all organs studied. Collectively, these findings indicate that pulmonary exposure to CeO2 NPs causes oxidative stress, inflammation, and DNA damage in multiple organs. PMID:28392888

  2. Flaxseed Mitigates Acute Oxidative Lung Damage in a Mouse Model of Repeated Radiation and Hyperoxia Exposure Associated with Space Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2015-01-01

    Background Spaceflight missions may require crewmembers to conduct extravehicular activities (EVA). Pre-breathe protocols in preparation for an EVA entail 100% hyperoxia exposure that may last for a few hours and be repeated 2-3 times weekly. Each EVA is associated with additional challenges such as low levels of total body cosmic/galactic radiation exposure that may present a threat to crewmember health. We have developed a mouse model of total body radiation and hyperoxia exposure and identified acute damage of lung tissues. In the current study we evaluated the usefulness of dietary flaxseed (FS) as a countermeasure agent for such double-hit exposures. Methods We evaluated lung tissue changes 2 weeks post-initiation of exposure challenges. Mouse cohorts (n=5/group) were pre-fed diets containing either 0% FS or 10% FS for 3 weeks and exposed to: a) normoxia (Untreated); b) >95% O2 (O2); c) 0.25Gy single fraction gamma radiation (IR); or d) a combination of O2 and IR (O2+IR) 3 times per week for 2 consecutive weeks, where 8-hour hyperoxia treatments were spanned by normoxic intervals. Results At 2 weeks post challenge, while control-diet fed mice developed significant lung injury and inflammation across all challenges, FS protected lung tissues by decreasing bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils (p<0.003) and protein levels, oxidative tissue damage, as determined by levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.008) and nitrosative stress as determined by nitrite levels. Lung hydroxyproline levels, a measure of lung fibrosis, were significantly elevated in mice fed 0% FS (p<0.01) and exposed to hyperoxia/radiation or the combination treatment, but not in FS-fed mice. FS also decreased levels of a pro-inflammatory, pro-fibrogenic cytokine (TGF-β1) gene expression levels in lung. Conclusion Flaxseed mitigated adverse effects in lung of repeat exposures to radiation/hyperoxia. This data will provide useful information in the design of countermeasures to early

  3. Evaluating Radioprotective Effect of Hesperidin on Acute Radiation Damage in the Lung Tissue of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rezaeyan, A.; Fardid, R.; Haddadi, G.H.; Takhshid, M.A.; Hosseinzadeh, M.; Najafi, M.; Salajegheh, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage, Lung is a radiosensitive organ and its damage is a dose-limiting factor in radiotherapy. The administration of dietary antioxidants has been suggested to protect against the succeeding tissue damage. The present study aimed to evaluate the radioprotective efficacy of Hesperidin (HES) against γ-irradiation-induced tissue damage in the lung of male rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty two rats were divided into four groups. Rats in Group 1 received PBS and underwent sham irradiation. Rats in Group 2 received HES and underwent sham irradiation. Rats in Group 3 received PBS and underwent γ-irradiation. Rats in Group 4 received HES and underwent γ-irradiation. These rats were exposed to γ-radiation 18 Gy using a single fraction cobalt-60 unit, and were administered HES (100 mg/kg/d, b.w, orally) for 7 days prior to irradiation. Rats in each group were sacrificed 24 hours after radiotherapy (RT) for the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and histopathological evaluations. Results: Compared to group 1, the level of SOD and GSH significantly decreased and MDA level significantly increased in group 3 at 24 h following irradiation, (p=0.001, p<0.001, p=0.001), respectively. A statistically significant difference in all parameters was observed for rats in group 4 as compared to group 3 (p<0.05). Histopathological results 24 hours after RT showed that radiation has increased inflammation, lymphocyte, macrophage and neutrophil compared to group 1 ( p<0.0125). Oral administration of HES before RT significantly decreased macrophage and neutrophil when compared to group 3 (p<0.0125), but partly there was inflammation and lymphocyte that indicated there was no significant difference when compared to group 3 (p>0.0125). Conclusion: Oral administration of HES was found to offer protection against

  4. Loss of extracellular superoxide dismutase leads to acute lung damage in the presence of ambient air: a potential mechanism underlying adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Lob, Heinrich E; Landmesser, Ulf; Guzik, Tomasz J; Martin, W David; Ozumi, Kiyoski; Wall, Susan M; Wilson, David Scott; Murthy, Niren; Gravanis, Michael; Fukai, Tohru; Harrison, David G

    2008-10-01

    The extracellular superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD3) is highly expressed in both blood vessels and lungs. In different models of pulmonary injury, SOD3 is reduced; however, it is unclear whether this contributes to lung injury. To study the role of acute SOD3 reduction in lung injury, the SOD3 gene was deleted in adult mice by using the Cre-Lox technology. Acute reduction of SOD3 led to a fivefold increase in lung superoxide, marked inflammatory cell infiltration, a threefold increase in the arterial-alveolar gradient, respiratory acidosis, histological changes similar to those observed in adult respiratory distress syndrome, and 85% mortality. Treatment with the SOD mimetic MnTBAP and intranasal administration of SOD-containing polyketal microparticles reduced mortality, prevented the histological alterations, and reduced lung superoxide levels. To understand how mice with the SOD3 embryonic deletion survived without lung injury, gene array analysis was performed. These data demonstrated the up-regulation of 37 genes and down-regulation of nine genes, including those involved in cell signaling, inflammation, and gene transcription in SOD3-/- mice compared with either mice with acute SOD3 reduction or wild-type controls. These studies show that SOD3 is essential for survival in the presence of ambient oxygen and that acute loss of this enzyme can lead to severe lung damage. Strategies either to prevent SOD3 inactivation or to augment its levels might prove useful in the treatment of acute lung injury.

  5. Spores of Aspergillus versicolor isolated from indoor air of a moisture-damaged building provoke acute inflammation in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Juha; Komulainen, Hannu; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Nevalainen, Aino; Pelkonen, Jukka; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2002-12-01

    Microbial growth in moisture-damaged buildings has been associated with respiratory health effects, and the spores of the mycotoxin producing fungus Aspergillus versicolor are frequently present in the indoor air. To characterize the potential of these spores to cause harmful respiratory effects, mice were exposed via intratracheal instillation to a single dose of the spores of A. versicolor (1 x 10(5), 1 x 10(6), 5 x 10(6), 1 x 10(7), or 1 x 10(8) spores), isolated from the indoor air of a moisture-damaged building. Inflammation and toxicity in lungs were evaluated 24 h later by assessment of biochemical markers and histopathology. The time course of the effects was investigated with the dose of 5 x 10(6) spores for up to 28 days. The exposure to the spores increased transiently proinflammatory cytokine levels (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] alpha and interleukin [IL]-6) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). The cytokine responses were dose and time dependent. The highest cytokine concentrations were measured at 6 h after the dose, and they returned to the control level by 3 days. Moreover, the spores of A. versicolor recruited inflammatory cells into airways: Neutrophils peaked transiently at 24 h, macrophages at 3 days, and lymphocytes at 7 days after the dosing. The inflammatory cell response did not completely disappear during the subsequent 28 days, though no histopathological changes were seen at that time point. The spores did not induce expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in lavaged cells. Only the highest spore dose (1 x 10(8)) markedly increased serum IL-6, increased vascular leakage, and caused cytotoxicity (i.e., increased levels of albumin, total protein, lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], and hemoglobin in BALF) in the airways. In summary, the spores of A. versicolor caused acute inflammation in mouse lungs. This indicates that they have potential to provoke adverse health effects in the occupants of moisture-damaged buildings.

  6. Extracellular histones are essential effectors of C5aR- and C5L2-mediated tissue damage and inflammation in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bosmann, Markus; Grailer, Jamison J; Ruemmler, Robert; Russkamp, Norman F; Zetoune, Firas S; Sarma, J Vidya; Standiford, Theodore J; Ward, Peter A

    2013-12-01

    We investigated how complement activation promotes tissue injury and organ dysfunction during acute inflammation. Three models of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by LPS, IgG immune complexes, or C5a were used in C57BL/6 mice, all models requiring availability of both C5a receptors (C5aR and C5L2) for full development of ALI. Ligation of C5aR and C5L2 with C5a triggered the appearance of histones (H3 and H4) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). BALF from humans with ALI contained H4 histone. Histones were absent in control BALF from healthy volunteers. In mice with ALI, in vivo neutralization of H4 with IgG antibody reduced the intensity of ALI. Neutrophil depletion in mice with ALI markedly reduced H4 presence in BALF and was highly protective. The direct lung damaging effects of extracellular histones were demonstrated by airway administration of histones into mice and rats (Sprague-Dawley), which resulted in ALI that was C5a receptor-independent, and associated with intense inflammation, PMN accumulation, damage/destruction of alveolar epithelial cells, together with release into lung of cytokines/chemokines. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated lung damage, edema and consolidation in histone-injured lungs. These studies confirm the destructive C5a-dependent effects in lung linked to appearance of extracellular histones.

  7. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  8. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  9. Lung oxidative damage by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Araneda, O F; Tuesta, M

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described.

  10. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, O. F.; Tuesta, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described. PMID:22966417

  11. Nitric oxide and hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-wu; Han, Cui-hong; Zhang, Pei-xi; Zheng, Juan; Liu, Kan; Sun, Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) refers to the damage to the lungs secondary to exposure to elevated oxygen partial pressure. HALI has been a concern in clinical practice with the development of deep diving and the use of normobaric as well as hyperbaric oxygen in clinical practice. Although the pathogenesis of HALI has been extensively studied, the findings are still controversial. Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger and has been considered as a signaling molecule involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Although the role of NO in the occurrence and development of pulmonary diseases including HALI has been extensively studied, the findings on the role of NO in HALI are conflicting. Moreover, inhalation of NO has been approved as a therapeutic strategy for several diseases. In this paper, we briefly summarize the role of NO in the pathogenesis of HALI and the therapeutic potential of inhaled NO in HALI. PMID:27867474

  12. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Schweisfurth, H; Sopivnik, I; Moog, R

    2014-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is primarily caused by transfusion of fresh frozen plasma or platelet concentrates and occurs by definition within 6 hours after transfusion with acute shortness of breath, hypoxemia and radiographically detectable bilateral infiltrates of the lung. Mostly leucocyte antibodies in the plasma of the blood donor (immunogenic TRALI) are responsible. Apart from antibodies, other substances such as biologically active lipids, mainly arising from the storage of platelet and red blood cell concentrates, can activate neutrophilic granulocytes and trigger a non-immunogenic TRALI. Pathophysiologically, granulocytes in the capillaries of the lung vessels release oxygen radicals and enzymes which damage the endothelial cells and cause pulmonary edema. Therapeutically, nasal oxygen administration may be sufficient. In severe cases, mechanical ventilation, invasive hemodynamic monitoring and fluid intake are required. Diuretics should be avoided. The administration of glucocorticoids is controversial. Antibody-related TRALI reactions occurred mainly after transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, which had been obtained from womenimmunized during pregnancy against leukocyte antigens. Therefore, in Germany, since 2009 only plasma from female donors without a history of prior or current pregnancy or negative testing for antibodies against HLA I, II or HNA has been used with the result that since then no TRALI-related death has been registered.

  13. Irradiation damage to the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Fennessy, J.J.

    1987-07-01

    While some degree of injury to normal, non-tumor-bearing, intrathoracic structures always occurs following irradiation for cure or palliation of neoplastic disease, clinical expression of this injury is uncommon. However, under certain circumstances, clinical manifestations may be severe and life threatening. Acute radiographic manifestations of pulmonary injury usually appear either synchronous with or, more typically, seven to ten days after the onset of the clinical syndrome. The acute signs of edema and slight volume loss within the irradiated zone are nonspecific except for their temporal and spatial relationship to the irradiation of the patient. Resolution of the acute changes is followed by pulmonary cicatrization, which is almost always stable within one year after completion of therapy. Change in postirradiation scarring following stabilization of the reaction must always be assumed to be due to some other process. While the radiograph primarily reveals pulmonary injury, all tissues, including the heart and major vessels, are susceptible, and the radiologist must recognize that any change within the thorax of a patient who has undergone thoracic irradiation may be a complication of that treatment. Differentiation of irradiation injury from residual or recurrent tumor, drug reaction, or opportunistic infection may be difficult and at times impossible.

  14. A crucial role of nitric oxide in acute lung injury secondary to the acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Yan, Wen-Mao; Yang, Bin; Shi, Jing-dong; Song, Mao-min; Zhao, Yuqian

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in acute lung inflammation and injury secondary to acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), 5% sodium taurocholate was retrogradely injected into the biliopancreatic duct of rats to ANP model. These ANP rats were given L-Arginine (L-Arg, 100 mg/kg), L-NAME (10 mg/kg), or their combination by intraperitoneal injection 30 min prior to ANP induction. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours after ANP induction, lung NO production, and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression were measured. Lung histopathological changes, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein concentration, proinflammatory mediators tumor necrotic factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and lung tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were examined. Results showed that NO production and iNOS mRNA expression in alveolar macrophages (AMs) were significantly increased along with significant increases in lung histological abnormalities and BAL proteins in the ANP group, all of which were further enhanced by pretreatment with L-Arg and attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, respectively. These markers were slightly attenuated by pretreatment with combination of L-Arg + L-NAME, suggesting that NO is required for initiating the acute lung damage in ANP rats, and also that L-Arg-enhanced lung injury is mediated by its NO generation rather than its direct effect. MPO activity and TNF-alpha expression in lung were upregulated in the ANP rats and further enhanced by pretreatment with L-Arg and attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, respectively. These results suggest that overproduction of NO mediated by iNOS in the lung is required for the acute lung inflammation and damage secondary to ANP.

  15. Lung parenchyma remodeling in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rocco, P R M; Dos Santos, C; Pelosi, P

    2009-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the most severe manifestation of acute lung injury (ALI), is described as a stereotyped response to lung injury with a transition from alveolar capillary damage to a fibroproliferative phase. Most ARDS patients survive the acute initial phase of lung injury and progress to either reparation of the lesion or evolution of the syndrome. Despite advances in the management of ARDS, mortality remains high (40%) and autopsies show extended pulmonary fibrosis in 55% of patients, suggesting the importance of deregulated repair in the morbidity and mortality of these patients. Factors influencing progression to fibroproliferative ARDS versus resolution and reconstitution of the normal pulmonary parenchymal architecture are poorly understood. Abnormal repair and remodeling may be profoundly affected by both environmental and genetic factors. In this line, mechanical ventilation may affect the macromolecules that constitute the extracellular matrix (collagen, elastin, fibronectin, laminin, proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycans), suffer changes and impact the biomechanical behavior of lung parenchyma. Furthermore, evidence suggests that acute inflammation and fibrosis may be partially independent and/or interacting processes that are autonomously regulated, and thus amenable to individual and specific therapies. In this review, we explore recent advances in the field of fibroproliferative ARDS/ALI, with special emphasis on 1) the physiological properties of the extracellular matrix, 2) the mechanisms of remodeling, 3) the impact of mechanical ventilation on lung fibrotic response, and (4) therapeutic interventions in the remodeling process.

  16. Resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce D; Serhan, Charles N

    2014-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli, or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized proresolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

  17. Resolution of Acute Inflammation In The Lung

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Bruce D.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized pro-resolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung. PMID:24313723

  18. Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP): relationship to Hamman-Rich syndrome, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Parambil, Joseph G

    2012-10-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) is a term used for an idiopathic form of acute lung injury characterized clinically by acute respiratory failure with bilateral lung infiltrates and histologically by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), a combination of findings previously known as the Hamman-Rich syndrome. This review aims to clarify the diagnostic criteria of AIP, its relationship with DAD and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), key etiologies that need to be excluded before making the diagnosis, and the salient clinical features. Cases that meet clinical and pathologic criteria for AIP overlap substantially with those that fulfill clinical criteria for ARDS. The main differences between AIP and ARDS are that AIP requires a histologic diagnosis of DAD and exclusion of known etiologies. AIP should also be distinguished from "acute exacerbation of IPF," a condition in which acute lung injury (usually DAD) supervenes on underlying usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP)/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

  19. Shock lung and diffuse alveolar damage pathological and pathogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Blennerhassett, J B

    1985-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar damage may be caused by any one or more of a large number of injurious agents. While the etiology may be diverse, the pathology is relatively uniform ranging from an acute exudative phase characterized by protein-rich interstitial and alveolar edema, through to a reactive subacute proliferative phase characterized by interstitial fibroplasia and collagenization together with granular pneumocyte hyperplasia. Interstitial inflammation is a variable feature and of course mixed exudative and proliferative features are common. In the clinically overt adult respiratory distress syndrome, the mortality is formidable. The pathogenesis is damage to endothelial cells and membranous pneumocytes. This may be caused by direct chemical action or indirectly through the mediation of oxidizing free radicles or leukotrienes. In diffuse alveolar damage associated with shock, recent work suggests mediation of the cellular injury via complement activation following tissue injury, with the major pathology being due to lysosomal enzyme damage from phagocytes chemotactically attracted to the lung. Etiological factors in diffuse alveolar damage are numerous and details of appropriate primary therapy are therefore diverse. The pathogenesis and pathology are however relatively uniform, calling for uniform supportive therapeutic measures of the clinical adult respiratory distress syndrome.

  20. Hyperoxia, but not thoracic X-irradiation, potentiates bleomycin- and cyclophosphamide-induced lung damage in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkinen, P.J.; Whiteley, J.W.; Witschi, H.R.

    1982-08-01

    The intraperitoneal administration of cyclophosphamide or bleomycin to BALB/c mice resulted in lung cell damage followed by cellular proliferation, which was quantitated by measuring the increase in thymidine incorporation into pulmonary DNA. We have previously shown that administration of the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene produces lung damage that can be potentiated by both hyperoxia and thoracic X-irradiation. In the present study we show that hyperoxic exposure also potentiates bleomycin- and cyclophosphamide-induced acute lung damage. However, thoracic X-irradiation does not potentiate bleomycin- and cyclophosphamide-induced lung toxicity.

  1. Relationship of Acute Lung Inflammatory Injury to Fas/FasL System

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Thomas A.; Guo, Ren-Feng; Neff, Simona B.; Sarma, J. Vidya; Speyer, Cecilia L.; Gao, Hongwei; Bernacki, Kurt D.; Huber-Lang, Markus; McGuire, Stephanie; Hoesel, L. Marco; Riedemann, Niels C.; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Zetoune, Firas S.; Ward, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that apoptosis plays a significant role in tissue damage during acute lung injury. To evaluate the role of the apoptosis mediators Fas and FasL in acute lung injury, Fas (lpr)- or FasL (gld)-deficient and wild-type mice were challenged with intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes. Lung injury parameters (125I-albumin leak, accumulation of myeloperoxidase, and wet lung weights) were measured and found to be consistently reduced in both lpr and gld mice. In wild-type mice, lung injury was associated with a marked increase in Fas protein in lung. Inflamed lungs of wild-type mice showed striking evidence of activated caspase-3, which was much diminished in inflamed lungs from lpr mice. Intratracheal administration of a monoclonal Fas-activating antibody (Jo2) in wild-type mice induced MIP-2 and KC production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and a murine alveolar macrophage cell line (MH-S) showed significantly increased MIP-2 production after incubation with this antibody. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid content of MIP-2 and KC was substantially reduced in lpr mice after lung injury when compared to levels in wild-type mice. These data suggest that the Fas/FasL system regulates the acute lung inflammatory response by positively affecting CXC-chemokine production, ultimately leading to enhanced neutrophil influx and tissue damage. PMID:15743781

  2. Visualizing the Propagation of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Meeder, Natalie; Zeng, Johnathan; Jiang, YunQing; Hamedani, Hooman; Profka, Harrilla; Kadlecek, Stephen; Clapp, Justin; Deshpande, Charuhas G.; Wu, Jue; Gee, James C.; Kavanagh, Brian P.; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation worsens acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but this secondary ‘ventilator-associated’ injury is variable and difficult to predict. We aimed to visualize the propagation of such ventilator-induced injury, in the presence (and absence) of a primary underlying lung injury, and to determine the predictors of propagation. Methods Anesthetized rats (n=20) received acid aspiration (HCl) followed by ventilation with moderate tidal volume (VT). In animals surviving ventilation for at least two hours, propagation of injury was quantified using serial computed tomography (CT). Baseline lung status was assessed by oxygenation, lung weight, and lung strain (VT/expiratory lung volume). Separate groups of rats without HCl aspiration were ventilated with large (n=10) or moderate (n=6) VT. Results In 15 rats surviving longer than two hours, CT opacities spread outwards from the initial site of injury. Propagation was associated with higher baseline strain (propagation vs. no propagation, mean ± SD: 1.52 ± 0.13 vs. 1.16 ± 0.20, p<0.01), but similar oxygenation and lung weight. Propagation did not occur where baseline strain <1.29. In healthy animals, large VT caused injury that was propagated inwards from the lung periphery; in the absence of preexisting injury, propagation did not occur where strain was <2.0. Conclusions Compared with healthy lungs, underlying injury causes propagation to occur at a lower strain threshold and, it originates at the site of injury; this suggests that tissue around the primary lesion is more sensitive. Understanding how injury is propagated may ultimately facilitate a more individualized monitoring or management. PMID:26536308

  3. Target organ damage in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Casado Cerrada, J; Zabaleta Camino, J P; Fontecha Ortega, M

    2016-03-01

    Acute heart failure is a prognostic factor due to its high mortality during the acute phase and the increased frequency of medium to long-term adverse events. The pathophysiological mechanisms triggered during these exacerbations can persist after reaching clinical stability, remaining even after the acute episode has ended. A certain degree of neurohormonal activation, oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation (among other conditions) can therefore persist, resulting in organ damage, not just of the myocardium but likely the entire cardiovascular apparatus. This new insight into the persistence of harmful mechanisms that last beyond the exacerbations could be the start of a change in perspective for developing new therapeutic strategies that seek an overall control of hemodynamic and congestive changes that occur during acute decompensated heart failure and changes that remain after achieving clinical stability.

  4. [Definition and biomarkers of acute renal damage: new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Seijas, M; Baccino, C; Nin, N; Lorente, J A

    2014-01-01

    The RIFLE and AKIN criteria have definitely help out to draw attention to the relationship between a deterioration of renal function that produces a small increase in serum creatinine and a worse outcome. However, the specific clinical utility of using these criteria remains to be well-defined. It is believed that the main use of these criteria is for the design of epidemiological studies and clinical trials to define inclusion criteria and objectives of an intervention. AKI adopting term, re-summoning former ARF terminology, it is appropriate to describe the clinical condition characterized by damage to kidney, in the same way as the term is used to describe acute lung damage where the lung injury situation still has not increased to a situation of organ failure (dysfunction). The serum and urine biomarkers (creatinine, urea, and diuresis) currently in use are not sensitive or specific for detecting kidney damage, limiting treatment options and potentially compromising the outcome. New biomarkers are being studied in order to diagnose an earlier and more specific AKI, with the potential to change the definition criteria of AKI with different stages, currently based in diuresis and serum creatinine.

  5. Alveolar edema fluid clearance and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Berthiaume, Yves; Matthay, Michael A

    2007-12-15

    Although lung-protective ventilation strategies have substantially reduced mortality of acute lung injury patients there is still a need for new therapies that can further decrease mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Studies of epithelial ion and fluid transport across the distal pulmonary epithelia have provided important new concepts regarding potential new therapies for acute lung injury. Overall, there is convincing evidence that the alveolar epithelium is not only a tight epithelial barrier that resists the movement of edema fluid into the alveoli, but it is also actively involved in the transport of ions and solutes, a process that is essential for edema fluid clearance and the resolution of acute lung injury. The objective of this article is to consider some areas of recent progress in the field of alveolar fluid transport under normal and pathologic conditions. Vectorial ion transport across the alveolar and distal airway epithelia is the primary determinant of alveolar fluid clearance. The general paradigm is that active Na(+) and Cl(-) transport drives net alveolar fluid clearance, as demonstrated in several different species, including the human lung. Although these transport processes can be impaired in severe lung injury, multiple experimental studies suggest that upregulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) transport might be an effective therapy in acute lung injury. We will review mechanisms involved in pharmacological modulation of ion transport in lung injury with a special focus on the use of beta-adrenergic agonists which has generated considerable interest and is a promising therapy for clinical acute lung injury.

  6. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Roberts, George H

    2004-01-01

    Transfusion is an inevitable event in the life of many individuals. Transfusion medicine personnel attempt to provide blood products that will result in a safe and harmless transfusion. However, this is not always possible since no laboratory test gives totally accurate and reliable results all the time and testing in routine transfusion services is devoted primarily to the identification of red blood cell problems. Thus, when patients are transfused, several possible adverse effects may occur in the transfused patient even though quality testing indicates no potential problem. These adverse events include infectious complications, hemolytic reactions, anaphylaxis, urticaria, circulatory overload, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, chills and fever, immunomodulation, and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

  7. Transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Federico, Anne

    2009-02-01

    Approximately one person in 5,000 will experience an episode of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in conjunction with the transfusion of whole blood or blood components. Its hallmarks include hypoxemia, dyspnea, fever, hypotension, and bilateral pulmonary edema (noncardiogenic). The mortality for reported cases is 16.3%. The incidence and mortality may be even higher than estimated because of under-recognition and under-reporting. Although TRALI was identified as a clinical entity in the 1980s, a lack of consensus regarding a definition was present until 2004. An exact cause has yet to be identified; however, there are two theories regarding the etiology: the "antibody" and the "two-hit" theories. These theories involve both donor and recipient factors. Further education and research are needed to assist in the development of strategies for the prevention and treatment of TRALI.

  8. Effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in rat lungs* **

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Lopes; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Laste, Gabriela; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress, as quantified by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), in rat lungs. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: acute treatment, comprising rats receiving a single injection of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg i.p.); acute control, comprising rats i.p. injected with saline; chronic treatment, comprising rats receiving methylprednisolone in drinking water (6 mg/kg per day for 30 days); and chronic control, comprising rats receiving normal drinking water. Results: The levels of TRAP were significantly higher in the acute treatment group rats than in the acute control rats, suggesting an improvement in the pulmonary defenses of the former. The levels of lung LPO were significantly higher in the chronic treatment group rats than in the chronic control rats, indicating oxidative damage in the lung tissue of the former. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the acute use of corticosteroids is beneficial to lung tissue, whereas their chronic use is not. The chronic use of methylprednisolone appears to increase lung LPO levels. PMID:25029646

  9. Leptin treatment ameliorates acute lung injury in rats with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, Fatma Ayca; Kerem, Mustafa; Tatlicioglu, Ertan; Aricioglu, Aysel; Unsal, Cigdem; Bukan, Neslihan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of exogenous leptin on acute lung injury (ALI) in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into 3 groups. AP was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cerulein (50 μg/kg) four times, at 1 h intervals. The rats received a single i.p. injection of 10 μg/kg leptin (leptin group) or 2 mL saline (AP group) after cerulein injections. In the sham group, animals were given a single i.p. injection of 2 mL saline. Experimental samples were collected for biochemical and histological evaluations at 24 h and 48 h after the induction of AP or saline administration. Blood samples were obtained for the determination of amylase, lipase, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, macrophage inflammatory peptide (MIP)-2 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)-1 levels, while pancreatic and lung tissues were removed for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, nitric oxide (NOx) level, CD40 expression and histological evaluation. RESULTS: Cerulein injection caused severe AP, confirmed by an increase in serum amylase and lipase levels, histopathological findings of severe AP, and pancreatic MPO activity, compared to the values obtained in the sham group. In the leptin group, serum levels of MIP-2, sICMA-1, TNF-α, and IL-1β, pancreatic MPO activity, CD40 expression in pancreas and lung tissues, and NOx level in the lung tissue were lower compared to those in the AP group. Histologically, pancreatic and lung damage was less severe following leptin administration. CONCLUSION: Exogenous leptin attenuates inflamma-tory changes, and reduces pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide levels, and CD40 expression in cerulein-induced AP and may be protective in AP associated ALI. PMID:17589942

  10. Biomarkers for oxidative stress in acute lung injury induced in rabbits submitted to different strategies of mechanical ventilation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative damage has been said to play an important role in pulmonary injury, which is associated with the development and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to identify biomarkers to determine the oxidative stress in an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) using ...

  11. beta2 adrenergic agonists in acute lung injury? The heart of the matter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae W

    2009-01-01

    Despite extensive research into its pathophysiology, acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) remains a devastating syndrome with mortality approaching 40%. Pharmacologic therapies that reduce the severity of lung injury in vivo and in vitro have not yet been translated to effective clinical treatment options, and innovative therapies are needed. Recently, the use of beta2 adrenergic agonists as potential therapy has gained considerable interest due to their ability to increase the resolution of pulmonary edema. However, the results of clinical trials of beta agonist therapy for ALI/ARDS have been conflicting in terms of benefit. In the previous issue of Critical Care, Briot and colleagues present evidence that may help clarify the inconsistent results. The authors demonstrate that, in oleic acid lung injury in dogs, the inotropic effect of beta agonists may recruit damaged pulmonary capillaries, leading to increased lung endothelial permeability.

  12. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production. PMID:26690120

  13. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-12-04

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production.

  14. [Positive end-expiratory pressure : adjustment in acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Bruells, C S; Dembinski, R

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of patients suffering from acute lung injury is a challenge for the treating physician. In recent years ventilation of patients with acute hypoxic lung injury has changed fundamentally. Besides the use of low tidal volumes, the most beneficial setting of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been in the focus of researchers. The findings allow adaption of treatment to milder forms of acute lung injury and severe forms. Additionally computed tomography techniques to assess the pulmonary situation and recruitment potential as well as bed-side techniques to adjust PEEP on the ward have been modified and improved. This review gives an outline of recent developments in PEEP adjustment for patients suffering from acute hypoxic and hypercapnic lung injury and explains the fundamental pathophysiology necessary as a basis for correct treatment.

  15. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Haji, Altaf Gauhar; Sharma, Shekhar; Vijaykumar, DK; Paul, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. Conclusion The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury, with the majority being linked to whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, involving priming of the inflammatory machinery and then activation of this primed mechanism. Treatment is supportive, with prognosis being substantially better than for most other causes of acute lung injury. PMID:18957111

  16. Low Tidal Volume Ventilation in Patients Without Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weibing; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Ye; Zhu, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life threatening respiratory condition characterized by breakdown of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leading to flooding of the alveolar space producing the classical chest radiograph of bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. In this study, we employed lung protective ventilation strategies in patients without acute lung injury (ALI) to determine whether mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volume would provide more clinical benefits to patients without ALI.

  17. Adrenomedullin ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takefumi; Obata, Hiroaki; Murakami, Shinsuke; Hamada, Kaoru; Kangawa, Kenji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nagaya, Noritoshi

    2007-08-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), an endogenous peptide, has been shown to have a variety of protective effects on the cardiovascular system. However, the effect of AM on acute lung injury remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated whether AM infusion ameliorates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in rats. Rats were randomized to receive continuous intravenous infusion of AM (0.1 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) or vehicle through a microosmotic pump. The animals were intratracheally injected with either LPS (1 mg/kg) or saline. At 6 and 18 h after intratracheal instillation, we performed histological examination and bronchoalveolar lavage and assessed the lung wet/dry weight ratio as an index of acute lung injury. Then we measured the numbers of total cells and neutrophils and the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In addition, we evaluated BALF total protein and albumin levels as indexes of lung permeability. LPS instillation caused severe acute lung injury, as indicated by the histological findings and the lung wet/dry weight ratio. However, AM infusion attenuated these LPS-induced abnormalities. AM decreased the numbers of total cells and neutrophils and the levels of TNF-alpha and CINC in BALF. AM also reduced BALF total protein and albumin levels. In addition, AM significantly suppressed apoptosis of alveolar wall cells as indicated by cleaved caspase-3 staining. In conclusion, continuous infusion of AM ameliorated LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats. This beneficial effect of AM on acute lung injury may be mediated by inhibition of inflammation, hyperpermeability, and alveolar wall cell apoptosis.

  18. Dihydro-Resveratrol Ameliorates Lung Injury in Rats with Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ze-Si; Ku, Chuen Fai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Shi, Xiao-Ke; Wang, Hong-Qi; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Tsang, Siu Wai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process originated in the pancreas; however, it often leads to systemic complications that affect distant organs. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is indeed the predominant cause of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. In this study, we aimed to delineate the ameliorative effect of dihydro-resveratrol, a prominent analog of trans-resveratrol, against acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury and the underlying molecular actions. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats with repetitive injections of cerulein (50 µg/kg/h) and a shot of lipopolysaccharide (7.5 mg/kg). By means of histological examination and biochemical assays, the severity of lung injury was assessed in the aspects of tissue damages, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. When treated with dihydro-resveratrol, pulmonary architectural distortion, hemorrhage, interstitial edema, and alveolar thickening were significantly reduced in rats with acute pancreatitis. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the activity of myeloperoxidase in pulmonary tissues were notably repressed. Importantly, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation was attenuated. This study is the first to report the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol ameliorated acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury via an inhibitory modulation of pro-inflammatory response, which was associated with a suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  19. DIETARY FLAXSEED PREVENTS RADIATION-INDUCED OXIDATIVE LUNG DAMAGE, INFLAMMATION AND FIBROSIS IN A MOUSE MODEL OF THORACIC RADIATION INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James C.; Krochak, Ryan; Blouin, Aaron; Kanterakis, Stathis; Chatterjee, Shampa; Arguiri, Evguenia; Vachani, Anil; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Cengel, Keith A.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2009-01-01

    Flaxseed (FS) has high contents of omega-3 fatty acids and lignans with antioxidant properties. Its use in preventing thoracic X-ray radiation therapy (XRT)-induced pneumonopathy has never been evaluated. We evaluated FS supplementation given to mice given before and post-XRT. FS-derived lignans, known for their direct antioxidant properties, were evaluated in abrogating ROS generation in cultured endothelial cells following gamma radiation exposure. Mice were fed 10% FS or isocaloric control diet for three weeks and given 13.5 Gy thoracic XRT. Lungs were evaluated at 24 hours for markers of radiation-induced injury, three weeks for acute lung damage (lipid peroxidation, lung edema and inflammation), and at four months for late lung damage (inflammation and fibrosis). FS-Lignans blunted ROS generation in vitro, resulting from radiation in a dose-dependent manner. FS-fed mice had reduced expression of lung injury biomarkers (Bax, p21, and TGF-beta1) at 24 hours following XRT and reduced oxidative lung damage as measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) levels at 3 weeks following XRT. In addition, FS-fed mice had decreased lung fibrosis as determined by hydroxyproline content and decreased inflammatory cell influx into lungs at 4 months post XRT. Importantly, when Lewis Lung carcinoma cells were injected systemically in mice, FS dietary supplementation did not appear to protect lung tumors from responding to thoracic XRT. Dietary FS is protective against pulmonary fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative lung damage in a murine model. Moreover, in this model, tumor radioprotection was not observed. FS lignans exhibited potent radiation-induced ROS scavenging action. Taken together, these data suggest that dietary flaxseed may be clinically useful as an agent to increase the therapeutic index of thoracic XRT by increasing the radiation tolerance of lung tissues. PMID:18981722

  20. Supplementation of parenteral nutrition with fish oil attenuates acute lung injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kohama, Keisuke; Nakao, Atsunori; Terashima, Mariko; Aoyama-Ishikawa, Michiko; Shimizu, Takayuki; Harada, Daisuke; Nakayama, Mitsuo; Yamashita, Hayato; Fujiwara, Mayu; Kotani, Joji

    2014-01-01

    Fish oil rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has diverse immunomodulatory properties and attenuates acute lung injury when administered in enternal nutrition. However, enteral nutrition is not always feasible. Therefore, we investigated the ability of parenteral nutrition supplemented with fish oil to ameliorate acute lung injury. Rats were infused with parenteral nutrition solutions (without lipids, with soybean oil, or with soybean oil and fish oil) for three days. Lipopolysaccharide (15 mg/kg) was then administered intratracheally to induce acute lung injury, characterized by impaired lung function, polymorphonuclear leukocyte recruitment, parenchymal tissue damage, and upregulation of mRNAs for inflammatory mediators. Administration of parenteral nutrition supplemented with fish oil prior to lung insult improved gas exchange and inhibited neutrophil recruitment and upregulation of mRNAs for inflammatory mediators. Parenteral nutrition supplemented with fish oil also prolonged survival. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, leukotriene B4 and leukotriene B5 secretion was measured in neutrophils from the peritoneal cavity. The neutrophils from rats treated with fish oil-rich parenteral nutrition released significantly more leukotriene B5, an anti-inflammatory eicosanoid, than neutrophils isolated from rats given standard parenteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition with fish oil significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury in rats in part by promoting the synthesis of anti-inflammatory eicosanoids. PMID:24688221

  1. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Liu, Yong; Peng, XiangPing; Liu, Wei; Zhao, FeiYan; Feng, DanDan; Han, JianZhong; Huang, YanHong; Luo, SiWei; Li, Lian; Yue, Shao Jie; Cheng, QingMei; Huang, XiaoTing; Luo, ZiQiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Large amount of glutamate can overstimulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), causing neuronal injury and death. Recently, NMDAR has been reported to be found in the lungs. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of memantine, a NMDAR channel blocker, on bleomycin-induced lung injury mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were intratracheally injected with bleomycin (BLM) to induce lung injury. Mice were randomized to receive saline, memantine (Me), BLM, BLM plus Me. Lungs and BALF were harvested on day 3 or 7 for further evaluation. Results BLM caused leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary edema and increase in cytokines, and imposed significant oxidative stress (MDA as a marker) in lungs. Memantine significantly mitigated the oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury caused by BLM. Moreover, activation of NMDAR enhances CD11b expression on neutrophils. Conclusions Memantine mitigates oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury in BLM challenged mice. PMID:25942563

  2. Acute lung injury in fulminant hepatic failure following paracetamol poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Baudouin, S. V.; Howdle, P.; O'Grady, J. G.; Webster, N. R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--There is little information on the incidence of acute lung injury or changes in the pulmonary circulation in acute liver failure. The aim of this study was to record the incidence of acute lung injury in fulminant hepatic failure caused by paracetamol poisoning, to document the associated pulmonary circulatory changes, and to assess the impact of lung injury on patient outcome. METHODS--The degree of lung injury was retrospectively assessed by a standard scoring system (modified from Murray) in all patients with fulminant hepatic failure caused by paracetamol poisoning, admitted to the intensive care unit over a one year period. The severity of liver failure and illness, other organ system failure, and patient outcome were also analysed. RESULTS--Twenty four patients with paracetamol-induced liver failure were admitted and nine developed lung injury of whom eight (33%) had severe injury (Murray score > 2.5). In two patients hypoxaemia contributed to death. Patients with lung injury had higher median encephalopathy grades (4 v 2 in the non-injured group) and APACHE II scores (29 v 16). Circulatory failure, requiring vasoconstrictor support, occurred in all patients with lung injury but in only 40% of those without. Cerebral oedema, as detected by abnormal rises in intracranial pressure, also occurred in all patients with lung injury but in only 27% of the non-injured patients. The incidence of renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy was similar in both groups (67% and 47%). Pulmonary artery occlusion pressures were normal in the lung injury group. Cardiac output was high (median 11.2 1/min), systemic vascular resistance low (median 503 dynes/s/cm-5), and pulmonary vascular resistance low (median 70 dynes/s/cm-5), but not significantly different from the group without lung injury. Mortality was much higher in the lung injury group than in the non-injured group (89% v 13%). CONCLUSIONS--Acute lung injury was common in patients with paracetamol

  3. Mineral dust exposure and free radical-mediated lung damage

    SciTech Connect

    Doelman, C.J.; Leurs, R.; Oosterom, W.C.; Bast, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Chronic exposure to several types of mineral dust particles induces an inflammatory reaction in the lung. Dust particles activate alveolar macrophages and prime leukocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils), leading to an enhanced release of reactive oxygen species. Sometimes mineral dust particles also contain radicals. Reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, and singlet oxygen) may lead to tissue damage. These are able to break DNA strands, to destroy proteins, and to induce the process of lipid peroxidation. The effects of oxygen radicals on the beta-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor response of the guinea pig and rat tracheal strip are described. The beta-adrenergic receptor response appeared to be more susceptible to oxidative stress than the muscarinic receptor response. This may lead to an autonomic imbalance on exposure to oxygen radicals. The lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2,3-trans-nonenal diminished the beta-adrenergic responsiveness in guinea pig tracheal preparations. Histologic examinations indicated that at low concentrations of cumene hydroperoxide (10(-4) M) the epithelial layer of rat trachea was already destroyed, whereas no effect on the muscarinic response was found. Oxygen radical-mediated damage in lung tissue may lead to lung emphysema, hyperresponsiveness, and hypersensitivity. Pharmacotherapeutic interventions that prevent initiation or propagation of these free radical reactions may have a beneficial effect in mineral dust-associated lung disease. 70 references.

  4. Diagnosis of Lung Cancer by Fractal Analysis of Damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kiminezhadmalaie, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Cancer starts when cells in a part of the body start to grow out of control. In fact cells become cancer cells because of DNA damage. A DNA walk of a genome represents how the frequency of each nucleotide of a pairing nucleotide couple changes locally. In this research in order to study the cancer genes, DNA walk plots of genomes of patients with lung cancer were generated using a program written in MATLAB language. The data so obtained was checked for fractal property by computing the fractal dimension using a program written in MATLAB. Also, the correlation of damaged DNA was studied using the Hurst exponent measure. We have found that the damaged DNA sequences are exhibiting higher degree of fractality and less correlation compared with normal DNA sequences. So we confirmed this method can be used for early detection of lung cancer. The method introduced in this research not only is useful for diagnosis of lung cancer but also can be applied for detection and growth analysis of different types of cancers. PMID:26539245

  5. Obesity-induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Causes Lung Endothelial Dysfunction and Promotes Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Guo, Zhi; Sun, Jianxin; Li, Jonathan; Kallen, Caleb B; Naik, Ulhas P; Summer, Ross

    2017-03-09

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. We recently showed that diet-induced obese (DIO) mice exhibit pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction which is associated with enhanced susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Here, we demonstrate that lung endothelial dysfunction in DIO mice coincides with increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Specifically, we observed enhanced expression of the major sensors of misfolded proteins including PERK, IREα and ATF6, in whole lung and in lung endothelial cells isolated from DIO mice. Further, we found that lung endothelial cells exposed to serum from obese mice, or to saturated fatty acids that mimic obese serum, resulted in enhanced expression of markers of ER stress and the induction of other biological responses that typify the lung endothelium of DIO mice. Similar changes were observed in lung endothelial cells and in whole lung tissue after exposure to tunicamycin, a compound that causes ER stress by blocking N-linked glycosylation; indicating that ER stress causes endothelial dysfunction in the lung. Treatment with 4-PBA, a chemical protein chaperone that reduces ER stress, restored vascular endothelial cell expression of adhesion molecules and protected against LPS-induced acute lung injury in DIO mice. Our work indicates that fatty acids in obese serum induce ER stress in the pulmonary endothelium leading to pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. Our work suggests that reducing protein load in the endoplasmic reticulum of pulmonary endothelial cells might protect against ARDS in obese individuals.

  6. Body temperature control in sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Giueng-Chueng; Chi, Wei-Ming; Perng, Wan-Cherng; Huang, Kun-Lun

    2003-12-31

    Body temperature is precisely regulated to maintain homeostasis in homeothermic animals. Although it remains unproved whether change of body temperature constitutes a beneficial or a detrimental component of the septic response, temperature control should be an important entity in septic experiments. We investigated the effect of body temperature control on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Acute lung injury in rats was induced by intratracheal spray of LPS and body temperature was either clamped at 37 degrees C for 5 hours or not controlled. The severity of lung injury was evaluated at the end of the experiment. Intratracheal administration of aerosolized LPS caused a persistent decline in body temperature and a significant lung injury as indicated by an elevation of protein-concentration and LDH activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio of lungs. Administration of LPS also caused neutrophil sequestration and lipid peroxidation in the lung tissue as indicated by increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) production, respectively. Control of body temperature at 37 degrees C after LPS (LPS/BT37, n = 11) significantly reduced acute lung injury as evidenced by decreases in BAL fluid protein concentration (983 +/- 189 vs. 1403 +/- 155 mg/L) and LDH activity (56 +/- 10 vs. 123 +/- 17 deltamAbs/min) compared with the LPS group (n = 11). Although the W/D ratio of lung and MDA level were lower in the rats received temperature control compared with those received LPS only, the differences were not statistically significant. Our results demonstrated that intratracheal administration of aerosolized LPS induced a hypothermic response and acute lung injury in rats and controlling body temperature at a normal range may alleviate the LPS-induced lung injury.

  7. Therapeutic lymphangiogenesis ameliorates established acute lung allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Monzon-Medina, Maria E.; Padera, Robert F.; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Toprak, Demet; Abdelnour, Elie; D’Agostino, Emmanuel; Goldberg, Hilary J.; Perrella, Mark A.; Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Rosas, Ivan O.; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is the only viable option for patients suffering from otherwise incurable end-stage pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Despite aggressive immunosuppression, acute rejection of the lung allograft occurs in over half of transplant recipients, and the factors that promote lung acceptance are poorly understood. The contribution of lymphatic vessels to transplant pathophysiology remains controversial, and data that directly address the exact roles of lymphatic vessels in lung allograft function and survival are limited. Here, we have shown that there is a marked decline in the density of lymphatic vessels, accompanied by accumulation of low-MW hyaluronan (HA) in mouse orthotopic allografts undergoing rejection. We found that stimulation of lymphangiogenesis with VEGF-C156S, a mutant form of VEGF-C with selective VEGFR-3 binding, alleviates an established rejection response and improves clearance of HA from the lung allograft. Longitudinal analysis of transbronchial biopsies from human lung transplant recipients demonstrated an association between resolution of acute lung rejection and decreased HA in the graft tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that lymphatic vessel formation after lung transplantation mediates HA drainage and suggest that treatments to stimulate lymphangiogenesis have promise for improving graft outcomes. PMID:26485284

  8. IL-6 ameliorates acute lung injury in influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chung-Teng; Yang, Shiu-Ju; Leu, Chia-Hsing; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is involved in innate and adaptive immune responses to defend against pathogens. It also participates in the process of influenza infection by affecting viral clearance and immune cell responses. However, whether IL-6 impacts lung repair in influenza pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of IL-6 in acute influenza infection in mice. IL-6-deficient mice infected with influenza virus exhibited higher lethality, lost more body weight and had higher fibroblast accumulation and lower extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover in the lung than their wild-type counterparts. Deficiency in IL-6 enhanced proliferation, migration and survival of lung fibroblasts, as well as increased virus-induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. IL-6-deficient lung fibroblasts produced elevated levels of TGF-β, which may contribute to their survival. Furthermore, macrophage recruitment to the lung and phagocytic activities of macrophages during influenza infection were reduced in IL-6-deficient mice. Collectively, our results indicate that IL-6 is crucial for lung repair after influenza-induced lung injury through reducing fibroblast accumulation, promoting epithelial cell survival, increasing macrophage recruitment to the lung and enhancing phagocytosis of viruses by macrophages. This study suggests that IL-6 may be exploited for lung repair during influenza infection. PMID:28262742

  9. RAGE/NF-κB signaling mediates lipopolysaccharide induced acute lung injury in neonate rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhong; Wu, Rong; Tian, Yian; Yu, Min; Tang, Yun; Cheng, Huaipin; Tian, Zhaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to induce acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Accumulating data suggest the crucial role of RAGE in the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. However, the mechanism by which RAGE mediates inflammatory lung injury in the neonates remains elusive. In this study we established LPS-induced ALI model in neonate rats, and investigated the role of RAGE/NF-κB signaling in mediating ALI. We found that RAGE antibody or bortezomib reduced LPS-induced histopathological abnormalities in the lung and lung damage score. RAGE antibody or bortezomib also reduced TNF-α level in both serum and BALF of the rats. Furthermore, RAGE antibody or bortezomib significantly reduced LPS-induced upregulation of RAGE and NF-κB expression in the lung. In conclusion, we established ALI model in neonate rats to demonstrate that LPS induced inflammatory lung injury via RAGE/NF-κB signaling. Interference with RAGE/NF-κB signaling is a potential approach to prevent and treat sepsis-related ALI/ARDS.

  10. Thoracic duct ligation in the rat attenuates lung injuries in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Tsui, N; Li, Y; Wang, F

    2013-09-01

    In acute pancreatitis (AP), inflammatory cells and products disseminated in abdominal lymph and blood induce systemic inflammation. Interruption of abdominal lymph flow, and thereby reduction of lymphatic dissemination, could alter the course of the disease. Therefore, we investigated whether thoracic duct ligation (TDL) in a rat model of cerulein-induced AP results in reduced lung damage as a marker for reduction of systemic dissemination through the lymphatic system. Thirty-four male rats were assigned to TDL (TDL-rats, n=8), AP (AP-rats, n=8), TDL+AP (TDL+AP-rats, n=9) or sham TDL (Ctr-rats, n=9) groups. TDL and sham TDL were established first. Two days later, AP was induced in AP- and TDL+AP-rats by a series of subcutaneous injections of cerulein. Vehicle was injected in the same manner in Ctr- and TDL-rats as controls. Rats were sacrificed six hours after the end of the serial injections. Histological examination showed that AP-induced damage to the pancreas and ileum were similar in AP- and TDL+AP-rats whereas lung damage was less severe in TDL+AP-rats than in AP-rats. Assays demonstrated that: hepatic and pulmonary myeloperoxidase activities were increased in AP-rats but not in the TDL+AP-rats; more Il-6 was found in AP-rat than TDL+AP-rat lungs; and lung-lavage fluid from AP-rats yielded more angiopoietin-2 than TDL+AP-rats. In conclusion, prior TDL in the rat attenuates lung damage in acute pancreatitis.

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and lung fibrosis after ingestion of a high dose of ortho-phenylphenol.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shih-Lung; Wang, Hao-Chien; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2005-08-01

    Ortho-phenylphenol (OPP) and its sodium salt are used as fungicides and antibacterial agents, ingestion of which has been found to cause liver toxicity, renal toxicity and carcinomas in the urinary tract of rats. Lung damage due to OPP ingestion has not been reported in humans. We report a suicidal 39-year-old woman with stage II cervical cancer who drank a potentially lethal dose of OPP in the form of a commercial antiseptic, which led to the complication of liver and renal function impairment, severe lung damage with acute respiratory distress syndrome and subsequent severe lung fibrosis. Open lung biopsy showed diffuse alveolar damage. She was discharged after 34 days of hospitalization with continuing domiciliary oxygen therapy.

  12. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-09-29

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model.Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells.

  13. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model. Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells. PMID:26396176

  14. Acute pneumonia in Zimbabwe: bacterial isolates by lung aspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeogu, M O

    1988-01-01

    Forty children, aged 2 months to 11 years, with severe acute pneumonia were investigated by needle aspiration of the lung. Fourteen organisms were isolated in only 13 patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated in six patients, Staphylococcus aureus in three, and Haemophilus influenzae in two. Two patients had mixed organisms. PMID:3196056

  15. Endotoxin-induced lung alveolar cell injury causes brain cell damage

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-González, Raquel; Ramos-Nuez, Ángela; Martín-Barrasa, José Luis; López-Aguilar, Josefina; Baluja, Aurora; Álvarez, Julián; Rocco, Patricia RM; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the most common cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome, a severe lung inflammatory disorder with an elevated morbidity and mortality. Sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome involve the release of inflammatory mediators to the systemic circulation, propagating the cellular and molecular response and affecting distal organs, including the brain. Since it has been reported that sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome contribute to brain dysfunction, we investigated the brain-lung crosstalk using a combined experimental in vitro airway epithelial and brain cell injury model. Conditioned medium collected from an in vitro lipopolysaccharide-induced airway epithelial cell injury model using human A549 alveolar cells was subsequently added at increasing concentrations (no conditioned, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 25%, and 50%) to a rat mixed brain cell culture containing both astrocytes and neurons. Samples from culture media and cells from mixed brain cultures were collected before treatment, and at 6 and 24 h for analysis. Conditioned medium at 15% significantly increased apoptosis in brain cell cultures 24 h after treatment, whereas 25% and 50% significantly increased both necrosis and apoptosis. Levels of brain damage markers S100 calcium binding protein B and neuron-specific enolase, interleukin-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, as well as matrix metalloproteinase-9 increased significantly after treating brain cells with ≥2% conditioned medium. Our findings demonstrated that human epithelial pulmonary cells stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide release inflammatory mediators that are able to induce a translational clinically relevant and harmful response in brain cells. These results support a brain-lung crosstalk during sepsis and sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:25135986

  16. The protective effect of C-phycocyanin on paraquat-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingxin; Zhang, Juan; Yan, Yongjian; Chi, Mingfeng; Chen, Wenwen; Sun, Peng; Qin, Song

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the potential protective effect of C-phycocyanin (PC) on paraquat (PQ)-induced acute lung injury, rats were divided into control, PQ-treated and PQ+PC-treated groups. Rats in PQ-treated group were orally administered with 50mg/kg PQ, and rats in PQ+PC-treated group were intraperitoneally injected with 50mg/kg PC after administration of PQ. At 8, 24, 48 and 72h after treatments, GSH-Px and SOD activities, MDA levels in plasma and BALF, HYP, NF-κB, IκB-α and TNF-α contents in lung tissues were measured. The pathological changes in lung were observed. After treatment with PC, the levels of MDA and the relative contents of NF-κB and TNF-α were significantly decreased, the activities of GSH-Px and SOD and the relative contents of IκB-α were significantly increased. The degree of rat lung damage was obviously reduced in PQ+PC-treated group. The results suggested that PC treatment significantly attenuated PQ-induced acute lung injury.

  17. Involvement of exosomes in lung inflammation associated with experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonjoch, Laia; Casas, Vanessa; Carrascal, Montserrat; Closa, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    A frequent complication of acute pancreatitis is the lung damage associated with the systemic inflammatory response. Although various pro-inflammatory mediators generated at both local and systemic levels have been identified, the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease are still poorly understood. In recent years, exosomes have emerged as a new intercellular communication system able to transfer encapsulated proteins and small RNAs and protect them from degradation. Using an experimental model of taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis in rats, we aimed to evaluate the role of exosomes in the extent of the systemic inflammatory response. Induction of pancreatitis increased the concentration of circulating exosomes, which showed a different proteomic profile to those obtained from control animals. A series of tracking experiments using PKH26-stained exosomes revealed that circulating exosomes effectively reached the alveolar compartment and were internalized by macrophages. In vitro experiments revealed that exosomes obtained under inflammatory conditions activate and polarize these alveolar macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Interestingly, the proteomic analysis of circulating exosomes during acute pancreatitis suggested a multi-organ origin with a relevant role for the liver as a source of these vesicles. Tracking experiments also revealed that the liver retains the majority of exosomes from the peritoneal cavity. We conclude that exosomes are involved in the lung damage associated with experimental acute pancreatitis and could be relevant mediators in the systemic effects of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Kinetics and Role of Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression in Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Albert T.; Barrett, Christopher D.; DeBusk, M. George; Ellson, Christian D.; Gautam, Shiva; Talmor, Daniel S.; Gallagher, Diana C.; Yaffe, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Primed neutrophils that are capable of releasing matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) into the circulation are thought to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that direct measurement of plasma MMP-9 activity may be a predictor of incipient tissue damage and subsequent lung injury, which was investigated in both an animal model of ARDS and a small cohort of 38 critically ill human patients. In a mouse model of ARDS involving instillation of intratracheal LPS to induce lung inflammation, we measured neutrophil-mediated inflammation, along with MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue and MMP-9 expression in the plasma. Neutrophil recruitment, inflammation, and MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue increased throughout the 72 hours after LPS instillation, while plasma MMP-9 expression was greatest at 12–24 hours after LPS instillation. The results suggest that the peak in plasma MMP-9 activity may precede the peak of neutrophil inflammation in the airways and lung tissue in the setting of ARDS. Based on this animal study, a retrospective observational cohort study involving 38 patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) at a tertiary care university hospital with acute respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation was conducted. Plasma samples were collected daily, and MMP-9 activity was compared with lung function as determined by the PaO2/FiO2 ratio. In patients that developed ARDS, a notable increase in plasma MMP-9 activity on a particular day correlated with a decrease in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio on the following day (r = −0.503, p < 0.006). Taken together, these results suggest that plasma MMP-9 activity changes as a surrogate for primed neutrophils may have predictive value for the development of ARDS in a selected subset of critically ill patients. PMID:26009816

  19. Kinetics and Role of Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression in Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Albert T; Barrett, Christopher D; DeBusk, George M; Ellson, Christian D; Gautam, Shiva; Talmor, Daniel S; Gallagher, Diana C; Yaffe, Michael B

    2015-08-01

    Primed neutrophils that are capable of releasing matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) into the circulation are thought to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that direct measurement of plasma MMP-9 activity may be a predictor of incipient tissue damage and subsequent lung injury, which was investigated in both an animal model of ARDS and a small cohort of 38 critically ill human patients. In a mouse model of ARDS involving instillation of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce lung inflammation, we measured neutrophil-mediated inflammation, along with MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue and MMP-9 expression in the plasma. Neutrophil recruitment, inflammation, and MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue increased throughout the 72 h after LPS instillation, whereas plasma MMP-9 expression was greatest at 12 to 24 h after LPS instillation. The results suggest that the peak in plasma MMP-9 activity may precede the peak of neutrophil inflammation in the airways and lung tissue in the setting of ARDS. Based on this animal study, a retrospective observational cohort study involving 38 patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit at a tertiary care university hospital with acute respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation was conducted. Plasma samples were collected daily, and MMP-9 activity was compared with lung function as determined by the PaO2/FiO2 ratio. In patients who developed ARDS, a notable increase in plasma MMP-9 activity on a particular day correlated with a decrease in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio on the following day (r = -0.503, P < 0.006). Taken together, these results suggest that plasma MMP-9 activity changes, as a surrogate for primed neutrophils may have predictive value for the development of ARDS in a selected subset of critically ill patients.

  20. Lung function after acute chlorine exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.N.; Hughes, J.M.; Glindmeyer, H.; Weill, H.

    1986-12-01

    Chlorine gas, spreading from a train derailment, caused the deaths of 8 persons and the hospitalization of 23 with sublethal respiratory injuries. Twenty-five others had at least one sign of lower respiratory abnormality but were not hospitalized. One hundred thirteen who were examined for gas effects in the forty-eight hours after exposure, including 20 of 23 of those hospitalized and 21 of 25 of those not hospitalized but with respiratory abnormality, participated in follow-up studies. Probability of admission to hospital was related to distance from the spill, but by 3 wk after exposure there was no detectable difference in lung function relating to distance or apparent severity of injury. In 60 adults tested multiple times over the following 6 yr, longitudinal change in lung function showed expected differences related to smoking but none related to distance or severity of injury. The average annual change in FEV was -34 ml/yr in current smokers and -18 ml/yr in ex and never-smokers. The lack of a discernible chlorine effect in this cohort accords with the findings in most previous studies. Without pre-exposure measurements, a single, lasting reduction in lung function cannot be excluded, but there is no evidence for a persisting abnormal rate of decline.

  1. Metallothionein-induced zinc partitioning exacerbates hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Min; McLaughlin, Joseph N.; Frederick, Daniel R.; Zhu, Lin; Thambiayya, Kalidasan; Wasserloos, Karla J.; Kaminski, Iris; Pearce, Linda L.; Peterson, Jim; Li, Jin; Latoche, Joseph D.; Peck Palmer, Octavia M.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Fattman, Cheryl L.; Alcorn, John F.; Oury, Tim D.; Angus, Derek C.; Pitt, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Hypozincemia, with hepatic zinc accumulation at the expense of other organs, occurs in infection, inflammation, and aseptic lung injury. Mechanisms underlying zinc partitioning or its impact on extrahepatic organs are unclear. Here we show that the major zinc-binding protein, metallothionein (MT), is critical for zinc transmigration from lung to liver during hyperoxia and preservation of intrapulmonary zinc during hyperoxia is associated with an injury-resistant phenotype in MT-null mice. Particularly, lung-to-liver zinc ratios decreased in wild-type (WT) and increased significantly in MT-null mice breathing 95% oxygen for 72 h. Compared with female adult WT mice, MT-null mice were significantly protected against hyperoxic lung injury indicated by reduced inflammation and interstitial edema, fewer necrotic changes to distal airway epithelium, and sustained lung function at 72 h hyperoxia. Lungs of MT-null mice showed decreased levels of immunoreactive LC3, an autophagy marker, compared with WT mice. Analysis of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the lungs revealed similar levels of manganese-SOD activity between strains under normoxia and hyperoxia. Lung extracellular SOD activity decreased significantly in both strains at 72 h of hyperoxia, although there was no difference between strains. Copper-zinc-SOD activity was ∼4× higher under normoxic conditions in MT-null compared with WT mice but was not affected in either group by hyperoxia. Collectively the data suggest that genetic deletion of MT-I/II in mice is associated with compensatory increase in copper-zinc-SOD activity, prevention of hyperoxia-induced zinc transmigration from lung to liver, and hyperoxia-resistant phenotype strongly associated with differences in zinc homeostasis during hyperoxic acute lung injury. PMID:23275622

  2. Dasatinib Reduces Lung Inflammation and Fibrosis in Acute Experimental Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Horta, Lucas Felipe Bastos; Maia, Lígia de Albuquerque; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; da Silva, André Benedito; Morales, Marcelo Marco; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Takiya, Christina Maeda; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease with no effective treatment. We hypothesized that dasatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, might exhibit therapeutic efficacy in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Silicosis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by a single intratracheal administration of silica particles, whereas the control group received saline. After 14 days, when the disease was already established, animals were randomly assigned to receive DMSO or dasatinib (1 mg/kg) by oral gavage, twice daily, for 14 days. On day 28, lung morphofunction, inflammation, and remodeling were investigated. RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) were incubated with silica particles, followed by treatment or not with dasatinib, and evaluated for macrophage polarization. On day 28, dasatinib improved lung mechanics, increased M2 macrophage counts in lung parenchyma and granuloma, and was associated with reduction of fraction area of granuloma, fraction area of collapsed alveoli, protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β, and reduced neutrophils, M1 macrophages, and collagen fiber content in lung tissue and granuloma in silicotic animals. Additionally, dasatinib reduced expression of iNOS and increased expression of arginase and metalloproteinase-9 in silicotic macrophages. Dasatinib was effective at inducing macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype and reducing lung inflammation and fibrosis, thus improving lung mechanics in a murine model of acute silicosis. PMID:26789403

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells improves survival in LPS-induced acute lung injury acting through inhibition of NETs formation.

    PubMed

    Pedrazza, Leonardo; Cunha, Aline Andrea; Luft, Carolina; Nunes, Nailê Karine; Schimitz, Felipe; Gassen, Rodrigo Benedetti; Breda, Ricardo Vaz; Donadio, Marcio Vinícius Fagundes; de Souza Wyse, Angela Terezinha; Pitrez, Paulo Marcio Condessa; Rosa, Jose Luis; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues

    2017-01-23

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are syndromes of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure resulting from a variety of direct and indirect injuries to the gas exchange parenchyma of the lungs. During the ALI, we have an increase release of proinflammatory cytokines and high reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. These factors are responsible for the release and activation of neutrophil-derived proteases and the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). The excessive increase in the release of NETs cause damage to lung tissue. Recent studies have studies involving the administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the treatment of experimental ALI has shown promising results. In this way, the objective of our study is to evaluate the ability of MSCs, in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI model, to reduce inflammation, oxidative damage, and consequently decrease the release of NETs. Mice were submitted lung injury induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS and subsequently treated or not with MSCs. Treatment with MSCs was able to modulate pulmonary inflammation, decrease oxidative damage, and reduce the release of NETs. These benefits from treatment are evident when we observe a significant increase in the survival curve in the treated animals. Our results demonstrate that MSCs treatment is effective for the treatment of ALI. For the first time, it is described that MSCs can reduce the formation of NETs and an experimental model of ALI. This finding is directly related to these cells modulate the inflammatory response and oxidative damage in the course of the pathology.

  4. Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of Lung Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Criteria for diagnosing ALI and predicting...Rationale: Smoke inhalation victims are at high risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Given the delay of 12 or more hours...Background: Although smoke inhalation injury victims frequently develop acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ), no early prognostic

  5. Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of Lung Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Given the delay of 12 or...Keywords: Inhalation Burns, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Interleukin-8, Interleukin- 1 beta. 4/14/2006 Markers of Smoke Inhalation Injury 2...Zimmerman 2005; Park et al., 2001), all hallmarks of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). The general

  6. Niacinamide abrogates the organ dysfunction and acute lung injury caused by endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shang-Jyh; Liu, Demeral David; Su, Chain-Fa; Chen, Hsing I

    2007-09-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) synthabse (PARS) or polymerase (PARP) is a cytotoxic enzyme causing cellular damage. Niacinamide inhibits PARS or PARP. The present experiment tests the effects of niacinamide (NCA) on organ dysfunction and acute lung injury (ALI) following lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS was administered to anesthetized rats and to isolated rat lungs. In anesthetized rats, LPS caused systemic hypotension and increased biochemical factors, nitrate/nitrite (NOx), methyl guanidine (MG), tumor necrosis factoralpha (TNFalpha), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). In isolated lungs, LPS increased lung weight (LW) to body weight ratio, LW gain, protein and dye tracer leakage, and capillary permeability. The insult also increased NOx, MG, TNFalpha, and IL-1beta in lung perfusate, while decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content with an increase in PARP activity in lung tissue. Pathological examination revealed pulmonary edema with inflammatory cell infiltration. These changes were abrogated by posttreatment (30 min after LPS) with NCA. Following LPS, the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression was increased. NCA reduced the iNOS expression. Niacinamide exerts protective effects on the organ dysfunction and ALI caused by endotoxin. The mechanisms may be mediated through the inhibition on the PARP activity, iNOS expression and the subsequent suppression of NO, free radicals, and proinflammatory cytokines with restoration of ATP.

  7. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R.L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported. PMID:26312100

  8. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported.

  9. Gene 33/Mig6 inhibits hexavalent chromium-induced DNA damage and cell transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soyoung; Li, Cen; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Xu, Dazhong

    2016-01-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human lung carcinogens and environmental/occupational hazards. The molecular mechanisms of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis appear to be complex and are poorly defined. In this study, we investigated the potential role of Gene 33 (ERRFI1, Mig6), a multifunctional adaptor protein, in Cr(VI)-mediated lung carcinogenesis. We show that the level of Gene 33 protein is suppressed by both acute and chronic Cr(VI) treatments in a dose- and time-dependent fashion in BEAS-2B lung epithelial cells. The inhibition also occurs in A549 lung bronchial carcinoma cells. Cr(VI) suppresses Gene 33 expression mainly through post-transcriptional mechanisms, although the mRNA level of gene 33 also tends to be lower upon Cr(VI) treatments. Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage appears primarily in the S phases of the cell cycle despite the high basal DNA damage signals at the G2M phase. Knockdown of Gene 33 with siRNA significantly elevates Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage in both BEAS-2B and A549 cells. Depletion of Gene 33 also promotes Cr(VI)-induced micronucleus (MN) formation and cell transformation in BEAS-2B cells. Our results reveal a novel function of Gene 33 in Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage and lung epithelial cell transformation. We propose that in addition to its role in the canonical EGFR signaling pathway and other signaling pathways, Gene 33 may also inhibit Cr(VI)-induced lung carcinogenesis by reducing DNA damage triggered by Cr(VI). PMID:26760771

  10. Plasma and lipids from stored packed red blood cells cause acute lung injury in an animal model.

    PubMed Central

    Silliman, C C; Voelkel, N F; Allard, J D; Elzi, D J; Tuder, R M; Johnson, J L; Ambruso, D R

    1998-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious complication of hemotherapy. During blood storage, lipids are generated and released into the plasma. In this study, the role of these lipids in TRALI was investigated using an isolated, perfused rat lung model. Rats were pretreated with endotoxin (LPS) or saline in vivo and the lungs were isolated, ventilated, and perfused with saline, or (a) 5% (vol/ vol) fresh human plasma, (b) plasma from stored blood from the day of isolation (D.0) or from the day of outdate (D.42), (c) lipid extracts from D.42 plasma, or (d) purified lysophosphatidylcholines. Lungs from saline or LPS-pretreated rats perfused with fresh (D.0) plasma showed no pulmonary damage as compared with saline perfused controls. LPS pretreatment/D.42 plasma perfusion caused acute lung injury (ALI) manifested by dramatic changes in both pulmonary artery pressure and edema. Incubation of LPS pre-tx rats with mibefradil, a Ca2+ channel blocker, or WEB 2170, a platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist, inhibited ALI caused by D.42 plasma. Lung histology showed neutrophil sequestration without ALI with LPS pretreatment/saline or D.0 plasma perfusion, but ALI with LPS pretreatment/D.42 plasma perfusion, and inhibition of D.42 plasma induced ALI with WEB 2170 or mibefradil. A significant increase in leukotriene E4 was present in LPS-pretreated/D.42 plasma-perfused lungs that was inhibited by WEB 2170. Lastly, significant pulmonary edema was produced when lipid extracts of D.42 plasma or lysophosphatidylcholines were perfused into LPS-pretreated lungs. Lipids caused ALI without vasoconstriction, except at the highest dose employed. In conclusion, both plasma and lipids from stored blood produced pulmonary damage in a model of acute lung injury. TRALI, like the adult respiratory distress syndrome, may be the result of two insults: one derived from stored blood and the other from the clinical condition of the patient. PMID:9525989

  11. Overview of current lung imaging in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zompatori, Maurizio; Ciccarese, Federica; Fasano, Luca

    2014-12-01

    Imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and follow-up of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Chest radiography, bedside lung ultrasonography and computed tomography scans can provide useful information for the management of patients and detection of prognostic factors. However, imaging findings are not specific and several possible differential diagnoses should be taken into account. Herein we will review the role of radiological techniques in ARDS, highlight the plain radiological and computed tomography findings according to the pathological stage of the disease (exudative, inflammatory and fibroproliferative), and summarise the main points for the differential diagnosis with cardiogenic oedema, which is still challenging in the acute stage.

  12. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  13. [Current concept of TRALI (transfusion-related acute lung injury)].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takehiko; Okazai, Hitoshi

    2007-11-01

    It is only 20 years since TRALI was clinically recognized. As it is gradually recognized among Japanese medical community, the number of cases reported is increasing gradually. In the past nine years (1997-2005), Japanese Red Cross confirmed 118 TRALI cases and 38 possible TRALI cases in Japan. Twelve TRALI cases among them occurred during or after anesthesia on the day of operation. Since acute lung injury is caused by multiple pathological factors, it is difficult to identify its main cause as transfusion. Therefore, TRALI has been underdiagnosed and underreported. Several mechanisms have been proposed. Although anti-HLA antibody, anti-HNA antibody, or other immunoreactive substances appear to be involved in developing TRALI, underlying conditions like systemic inflammation may be required for igniting TRALI Although TRALI developed in the operating theater seems to be a small fraction of whole TRALI cases, anesthesiologists should be aware of TRALI, and remember it as one of the causes of acute lung injury.

  14. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI): a review.

    PubMed

    Menitove, Jay E

    2007-01-01

    Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury, or TRALI, denotes the most frequently reported fatal complication of blood transfusion. TRALI accounted for 34% of transfusion associated mortalities reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2005. TRALI caused more deaths than those attributed to hemolytic reactions following incorrect blood administration or sepsis resulting from bacterial contamination of platelet and red cell components. (Holness, Leslie. Food and Drug Administration. Personal Communication, 2006) This paper reviews TRALI for the clinical physician.

  15. Presumptive acute lung injury following multiple surgeries in a cat.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Masaaki; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Rieko; Sasaki, Jun; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Uzuka, Yuji; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Nezu, Yoshinori

    2013-04-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.5-kg spayed female domestic shorthair cat had a tracheal mass identified as malignant B-cell lymphoma. The cat had tracheal resection and subsequently developed laryngeal paralysis. Due to multiple episodes of respiratory distress the cat subsequently had tracheal surgeries. Finally, the cat had a sudden onset of severe respiratory distress and collapsed. Computed tomography imaging and arterial blood gas analysis supported a diagnosis of acute lung injury.

  16. Galangin dampens mice lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yu-Sheng; Tao, Wei; Miao, Qian-Bing; Lu, Shi-Chun; Zhu, Ya-Bing

    2014-10-01

    Galangin, an active ingredient of Alpinia galangal, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Inflammation and oxidative stress are known to play vital effect in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, we determined whether galangin exerts lung protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Male BALB/c mice were randomized to receive galangin or vehicle intraperitoneal injection 3 h after LPS challenge. Samples were harvested 24 h post LPS administration. Galangin administration decreased biochemical parameters of oxidative stress and inflammation, and improved oxygenation and lung edema in a dose-dependent manner. These protective effects of galangin were associated with inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and upregulation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Galangin reduces LPS-induced ALI by inhibition of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  17. Pathophysiological Approaches of Acute Respiratory Distress syndrome: Novel Bases for Study of Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, R.L; Carrasco Loza, R; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Experimental approaches have been implemented to research the lung damage related-mechanism. These models show in animals pathophysiological events for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), such as neutrophil activation, reactive oxygen species burst, pulmonary vascular hypertension, exudative edema, and other events associated with organ dysfunction. Moreover, these approaches have not reproduced the clinical features of lung damage. Lung inflammation is a relevant event in the develop of ARDS as component of the host immune response to various stimuli, such as cytokines, antigens and endotoxins. In patients surviving at the local inflammatory states, transition from injury to resolution is an active mechanism regulated by the immuno-inflammatory signaling pathways. Indeed, inflammatory process is regulated by the dynamics of cell populations that migrate to the lung, such as neutrophils and on the other hand, the role of the modulation of transcription factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS) sources, such as nuclear factor kappaB and NADPH oxidase. These experimental animal models reproduce key components of the injury and resolution phases of human ALI/ARDS and provide a methodology to explore mechanisms and potential new therapies. PMID:26312099

  18. Peptide nanomedicines for treatment of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represent a heterogenous group of lung disease in critically ill patients. Despite the increased understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of ARDS, the mortality remains unacceptably high, ranging from 34% to 64%. Hence, ARDS represents an unmet medical need with an urgency to develop effective pharmacotherapies. Several promising targets that have been identified as potential therapies for ARDS have been limited because of difficulty with delivery. In particular, delivery of peptides and proteins to the lung is an ongoing challenge. Nanobiotechnology and nanoscience are the basis of innovative techniques to deliver drugs targeted to the site of inflamed organs, such as the lungs. Nanoscale drug delivery systems have the ability to improve the pharmacokinetics and pharmakodynamics of agents allowing an increase in the biodistribution of therapeutic agents to target organs, resulting in improved efficacy with reduction in drug toxicity. These systems are exploited for therapeutic purpose to carry the drug in the body in a controlled manner from the site of administration to the therapeutic target. Hence, it is an attractive strategy to test potential targets for ALI/ARDS using nanotechnology. To this end, we have identified several potential targets and proposed the delivery of these agents using nanomicelles to improve the drug delivery.

  19. Cannabidiol improves lung function and inflammation in mice submitted to LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A; Almeida, V I; Costola-de-Souza, C; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Vitoretti, L B; Gimenes-Junior, J A; Akamine, A T; Crippa, J A; Tavares-de-Lima, W; Palermo-Neto, J

    2015-02-01

    We have previously shown that the prophylactic treatment with cannabidiol (CBD) reduces inflammation in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). In this work we analyzed the effects of the therapeutic treatment with CBD in mice subjected to the model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI on pulmonary mechanics and inflammation. CBD (20 and 80 mg/kg) was administered (i.p.) to mice 6 h after LPS-induced lung inflammation. One day (24 h) after the induction of inflammation the assessment of pulmonary mechanics and inflammation were analyzed. The results show that CBD decreased total lung resistance and elastance, leukocyte migration into the lungs, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, protein concentration and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage supernatant. Thus, we conclude that CBD administered therapeutically, i.e. during an ongoing inflammatory process, has a potent anti-inflammatory effect and also improves the lung function in mice submitted to LPS-induced ALI. Therefore the present and previous data suggest that in the future cannabidiol might become a useful therapeutic tool for the attenuation and treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

  20. [Acute lung injury as a consequence of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moyado, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) has been recognized as a consequence of blood transfusion (BT) since 1978; the Food and Drug Administration, has classified it as the third BT mortality issue, in 2004, and in first place related with ALI. It can be mainly detected as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The clinical onset is: severe dyspnea, bilateral lung infiltration and low oxygen saturation. In USA, ARDS has an incidence of three to 22.4 cases/100 000 inhabitants, with 58.3 % mortality. TACO and TRALI are less frequent; they have been reported according to the number of transfusions: one in 1275 to 6000 for TRALI and one in 356 transfusions for TACO. Mortality is reported from two to 20 % in TRALI and 20 % in TACO. Antileukocyte antibodies in blood donors plasma, caused TRALI in 89 % of cases; also it has been found antigen specificity against leukocyte blood receptor in 59 %. The UCI patients who received a BT have ALI as a complication in 40 % of cases. The capillary pulmonary endothelia is the target of leukocyte antibodies and also plasma biologic modifiers of the stored plasma, most probable like a Sanarelli-Shwar-tzman phenomenon.

  1. Acute Lung Injury: Making the Injured Lung Perform Better and Rebuilding Healthy Lungs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    regenerate 3D alveolar lung structure (Figures 4C–4H). To examine this, sorted day 15 Nkx2-1GFP+ ESC-derived cells, delivered by intra-tracheal...indicative of lung and thyroid lineages and can recellularize a 3D lung tissue scaffold. Thus, we have derived a pure population of progenitors able to...Media and Recellularize 3D Lung Tissue Scaffolds A known feature of primary fetal lung epithelial cells late in devel- opment is their capacity to respond

  2. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Prevents Murine Antibody-Mediated Acute Lung Injury at the Level of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Production

    PubMed Central

    Semple, John W.; Kim, Michael; Hou, Jing; McVey, Mark; Lee, Young Jin; Tabuchi, Arata; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Chai, Zhong-Wei; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality that can occur with any type of transfusion and is thought to be primarily due to donor antibodies activating pulmonary neutrophils in recipients. Recently, a large prospective case controlled clinical study of cardiac surgery patients demonstrated that despite implementation of male donors, a high incidence of TRALI still occurred and suggested a need for additional interventions in susceptible patient populations. To examine if intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) may be effective, a murine model of antibody-mediated acute lung injury that approximates human TRALI was examined. When BALB/c mice were injected with the anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody 34-1-2s, mild shock (reduced rectal temperature) and respiratory distress (dyspnea) were observed and pre-treatment of the mice with 2 g/kg IVIg completely prevented these symptoms. To determine IVIg's usefulness to affect severe lung damage, SCID mice, previously shown to be hypersensitive to 34-1-2s were used. SCID mice treated with 34-1-2s underwent severe shock, lung damage (increased wet/dry ratios) and 40% mortality within 2 hours. Treatment with 2 g/kg IVIg 18 hours before 34-1-2s administration completely protected the mice from all adverse events. Treatment with IVIg after symptoms began also reduced lung damage and mortality. While the prophylactic IVIg administration did not affect 34-1-2s-induced pulmonary neutrophil accumulation, bone marrow-derived neutrophils from the IVIg-treated mice displayed no spontaneous ROS production nor could they be stimulated in vitro with fMLP or 34-1-2s. These results suggest that IVIg prevents murine antibody-mediated acute lung injury at the level of neutrophil ROS production and thus, alleviating tissue damage. PMID:22363629

  3. Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppress oleic acid-induced acute lung injury via protein kinase A

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chaoyun; Huang, Qingxian; Wang, Chunhua; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Duan, Yunfeng; Yuan, Shuai; Bai, Xianyong

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation response and oxidative stress play important roles in acute lung injury (ALI). Activation of the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway may attenuate ALI by suppressing immune responses and inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a natural flavonoid compound that reduces oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine-mediated damage. In this study, we examined whether HSYA could protect the lungs from oleic acid (OA)-induced injury, which was used to mimic ALI, and determined the role of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in this process. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO{sub 2}), carbon dioxide tension, pH, and the PaO{sub 2}/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio in the blood were detected using a blood gas analyzer. We measured wet/dry lung weight ratio and evaluated tissue morphology. The protein and inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were determined using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, PKA, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and the concentrations of cAMP and malondialdehyde in the lung tissue were detected using assay kits. Bcl-2, Bax, caspase 3, and p22{sup phox} levels in the lung tissue were analyzed using Western blotting. OA increased the inflammatory cytokine and ROS levels and caused lung dysfunction by decreasing cAMP synthesis, inhibiting PKA activity, stimulating caspase 3, and reducing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. H-89 increased these effects. HSYA significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, inhibited the inflammatory response via cAMP/PKA pathway activation, and attenuated OA-induced lung injury. Our results show that the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is required for the protective effect of HSYA against ALI. - Highlights: • Oleic acid (OA) cause acute lung injury (ALI) via inhibiting cAMP/PKA signal pathway. • Blocking protein kinase A (PKA) activation may

  4. Betulin protects mice from bacterial pneumonia and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianchao; Li, Hongyu; Qiu, Jiaming; Feng, Haihua

    2014-10-01

    Betulin, a naturally occurring triterpene, has shown anti-HIV activity, but details on the anti-inflammatory activity are scanty. In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of Betulin on LPS-induced activation of cell lines with relevance for lung inflammation in vitro and on lung inflammation elicited by either LPS or viable Escherichia coli (E. coli) in vivo. In vitro, Betulin inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and (interleukin) IL-6 levels and up-regulated the level of IL-10. Also Betulin suppressed the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 protein in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. In vivo, Betulin alleviated LPS-induced acute lung injury. Treatment with Betulin diminished pro-inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity and bacterial loads in lung tissue during gram-negative pneumonia. Our findings demonstrated that Betulin inhibits pro-inflammatory responses induced by the gram-negative stimuli LPS and E. coli, suggesting that Betulin may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of lung inflammation.

  5. Afatinib-Induced Acute Fatal Pneumonitis in Metastatic Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sang Hoon; Ryu, Jin Ah; Kim, Seo Ree; Oh, Su Yun; Jung, Gu Sung; Lee, Dong Jae; Kwak, Bong Gyu; Nam, Yu Hyun; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Afatinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that inhibit Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR), Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2), and HER4. The common side effects of EGFR TKI are rash, acne, diarrhea, stomatitis, pruritus, nausea, and loss of appetite. Drug induced pneumonitis is the less common adverse effects of EGFR TKI. Afatinib, 2nd generation EGFR TKI is anticipated to overcome drug resistance from 1st generation EGFR TKI according to preclinical study, and several studies are being conducted to compare clinical efficacy between 1st and 2nd EGFR TKI. Several cases of rug induced acute fatal pneumonitis were reported after use of erlotinib or gefitinib. However, a case of acute fatal pneumonitis associated with afatinib was note reported except drug induced pneumonitis in other clinical study. Here, we present a cases of acute severe pneumonitis related with afatinib in metastatic lung adenocarcinoma with literature review. PMID:27900074

  6. Impact of Preexisting Interstitial Lung Disease on Acute, Extensive Radiation Pneumonitis: Retrospective Analysis of Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yuichi; Abe, Takefumi; Omae, Minako; Matsui, Takashi; Kato, Masato; Hasegawa, Hirotsugu; Enomoto, Yasunori; Ishihara, Takeaki; Inui, Naoki; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the clinical characteristics and predictive factors for developing acute extended radiation pneumonitis with a focus on the presence and radiological characteristics of preexisting interstitial lung disease. Methods Of 1429 irradiations for lung cancer from May 2006 to August 2013, we reviewed 651 irradiations involving the lung field. The presence, compatibility with usual interstitial pneumonia, and occupying area of preexisting interstitial lung disease were retrospectively evaluated by pretreatment computed tomography. Cases of non-infectious, non-cardiogenic, acute respiratory failure with an extended bilateral shadow developing within 30 days after the last irradiation were defined as acute extended radiation pneumonitis. Results Nine (1.4%) patients developed acute extended radiation pneumonitis a mean of 6.7 days after the last irradiation. Although preexisting interstitial lung disease was found in 13% of patients (84 patients), 78% of patients (7 patients) with acute extended radiation pneumonitis cases had preexisting interstitial lung disease, which resulted in incidences of acute extended radiation pneumonitis of 0.35 and 8.3% in patients without and with preexisting interstitial lung disease, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that the presence of preexisting interstitial lung disease (odds ratio = 22.6; 95% confidence interval = 5.29–155; p < 0.001) and performance status (≥2; odds ratio = 4.22; 95% confidence interval = 1.06–20.8; p = 0.049) were significant predictive factors. Further analysis of the 84 patients with preexisting interstitial lung disease revealed that involvement of more than 10% of the lung field was the only independent predictive factor associated with the risk of acute extended radiation pneumonitis (odds ratio = 6.14; 95% confidence interval = 1.0–37.4); p = 0.038). Conclusions Pretreatment computed tomography evaluations of the presence of and area size occupied

  7. [Lung surfactant changes in acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Uchikov, A; Khristov, Zh; Murdzhev, K; Tar'lov, Z

    2000-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), with mortality rate ranging from 15 to 40 per cent, continues to be a serious challenge to emergency surgeons. Not infrequently, in such cases lesions to the respiratory system develop, with the changes in pulmonary surfactant (PS) occurring during SAP considered as one of the major factors implicated. Alterations in structural phospholipids of PS (lecithin and sphyngomyelin) are assessed under experimental conditions in 26 dogs with modulated SAP at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours, and the obtained results compared to the ones prior to pancreatitis triggering. The animals are divided up into two groups--untreated and given Sandostatin treatment. In either group a reduction of PS fractions is documented, with a statistically significant lesser reduction of the indicators under study being established in the Sandostatin-treated group by comparison with the untreated one. Modulated SAP in dogs accounts for a significant reduction of the surfactant phospholipid values--lecithin and sphyngomyelin--in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL).

  8. Bench-to-bedside review: Damage-associated molecular patterns in the onset of ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) has the potential to worsen pre-existing lung injury or even to initiate lung injury. Moreover, it is thought that injurious MV contributes to the overwhelming inflammatory response seen in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is characterized by increased endothelial and epithelial permeability and pulmonary inflammation, in which the innate immune system plays a key role. A growing body of evidence indicates that endogenous danger molecules, also termed damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), are released upon tissue injury and modulate the inflammatory response. DAMPs activate pattern recognition receptors, may induce the release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and have been shown to initiate or propagate inflammation in non-infectious conditions. Experimental and clinical studies demonstrate the presence of DAMPs in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in patients with VILI and the upregulation of pattern recognition receptors in lung tissue by MV. The objective of the present article is to review research in the area of DAMPs, their recognition by the innate immune system, their role in VILI, and the potential utility of blocking DAMP signaling pathways to reduce VILI in the critically ill. PMID:22216838

  9. Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of Lung Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Laboratory assays on the bronchial lavage samples...at high risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Given the delay of 12 or more hours from exposure to development of ARDS , a...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0673 TITLE : Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of

  10. Vascular and epithelial damage in the lung of the mouse after X rays or neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Law, M.P.; Ahier, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The response of the lung was studied in CFLP mice after exposure of the whole thorax to X rays (250 kVp) or cyclotron neutrons (16 MeV deuterons on Be, mean energy 7.5 MeV). To measure blood volume and leakage of plasma proteins, 51Cr-labeled red blood cells and 125I-albumin were injected intravenously and 24 h later lungs were lavaged via the trachea. Radioactivities in lung tissue and lavage fluid were determined to estimate the accumulation of albumin in the interstitial and alveolar spaces indicating damage to blood vessels and alveolar epithelium respectively. Function of type II pneumonocytes was assessed by the amounts of surfactant (assayed as lipid phosphorous) released into the lavage fluid. During the first 6 weeks, lavage protein and surfactant were increased, the neutron relative biological effectiveness (RBE) being unity. During pneumonitis at 12-24 weeks, surfactant levels were normal, blood volume was decreased, and both interstitial and alveolar albumin were increased. Albumin levels then decreased. At late times after exposure (42-64 weeks) alveolar albumin returned to normal but interstitial albumin was still slightly elevated. Values of RBE for changes in blood volume and interstitial and alveolar albumin at 15 weeks and for changes in blood volume and interstitial albumin at 46 weeks were 1.4, comparable with that for animal survival at 180 days. The results indicate that surfactant production is not critical for animal survival. They suggest that changes in blood vessels and alveolar epithelium occur during acute pneumonitis; epithelial repair follows but some vascular damage may persist. The time course of the changes in albumin levels did not correlate with increases in collagen biosynthesis which have been observed as early as 1 month after exposure and persist for up to 1 year.

  11. Resveratrol ameliorates LPS-induced acute lung injury via NLRP3 inflammasome modulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Kai; Fei, Dongsheng; Gong, Rui; Cao, Yanhui; Pan, Shangha; Zhao, Mingran; Zhao, Mingyan

    2016-12-01

    NLRP3 inflammasome plays a pivotal role in the development of acute lung injury (ALI), accelerating IL-1β and IL-18 release and inducing lung inflammation. Resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin, has anti-inflammatory properties via inhibition of oxidation, leukocyte priming, and production of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of resveratrol on NLRP3 inflammasome in lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI. Mice were intratracheally instilled with 3mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce ALI. Resveratrol treatment alleviated the LPS-induced lung pathological damage, lung edema and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, resveratrol reversed the LPS-mediated elevation of IL-1β and IL-18 level in the BAL fluids. In lung tissue, resveratrol also inhibited the LPS-induced NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1 mRNA and protein expression, and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, resveratrol administration not only suppressed the NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, NF-κB activity and ROS production in the LPS-treated mice, but also inhibited the LPS-induced thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) protein expression and interaction of TXNIP-NLRP3 in lung tissue. Meanwhile, resveratrol obviously induced SIRT1 mRNA and protein expression in the LPS-challenged mice. Taken together, our study suggests that resveratrol protects against LPS-induced lung injury by NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition. These findings further suggest that resveratrol may be of great value in the treatment of ALI and a potential and an effective pharmacological agent for inflammasome-relevant diseases.

  12. Pentoxifylline attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced acute lung injury, oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Vasanthi R; Vayas, Kinal N; Cervelli, Jessica A; Malaviya, Rama; Hall, LeRoy; Massa, Christopher B; Gow, Andrew J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic alkylating agent that causes damage to the respiratory tract. Evidence suggests that macrophages and inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α contribute to pulmonary injury. Pentoxifylline is a TNFα inhibitor known to suppress inflammation. In these studies, we analyzed the ability of pentoxifylline to mitigate NM-induced lung injury and inflammation. Exposure of male Wistar rats (150-174 g; 8-10 weeks) to NM (0.125 mg/kg, i.t.) resulted in severe histopathological changes in the lung within 3d of exposure, along with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell number and protein, indicating inflammation and alveolar-epithelial barrier dysfunction. This was associated with increases in oxidative stress proteins including lipocalin (Lcn)2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in the lung, along with pro-inflammatory/cytotoxic (COX-2(+) and MMP-9(+)), and anti-inflammatory/wound repair (CD163+ and Gal-3(+)) macrophages. Treatment of rats with pentoxifylline (46.7 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 3d beginning 15 min after NM significantly reduced NM-induced lung injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress, as measured histologically and by decreases in BAL cell and protein content, and levels of HO-1 and Lcn2. Macrophages expressing COX-2 and MMP-9 also decreased after pentoxifylline, while CD163+ and Gal-3(+) macrophages increased. This was correlated with persistent upregulation of markers of wound repair including pro-surfactant protein-C and proliferating nuclear cell antigen by Type II cells. NM-induced lung injury and inflammation were associated with alterations in the elastic properties of the lung, however these were largely unaltered by pentoxifylline. These data suggest that pentoxifylline may be useful in treating acute lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress induced by vesicants.

  13. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Bux, Jürgen; Sachs, Ulrich J H

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) has developed from an almost unknown transfusion reaction to the most common cause of transfusion-related major morbidities and fatalities. A clinical definition of TRALI was established in 2004, based on acute respiratory distress, non-cardiogenic lung oedema temporal association with transfusion and hypoxaemia. Histological findings reveal lung oedema, capillary leucostasis and neutrophil extravasation. However, the pathogenesis of TRALI remains controversial. Leucocyte antibodies, present in fresh frozen plasma and platelet concentrates from multiparous donors, and neutrophil priming agents released in stored cellular blood components have been considered to be causative. As neutrophils and endothelial cells are pivotal in the pathogenesis of TRALI, a threshold model was established to try to unify the various reported findings on pathogenesis. This model comprises the priming of neutrophils and/or endothelium by the patient's co-morbidity, neutrophil and/or endothelial cell activation by the transfused blood component, and the severity of the TRALI reaction.

  14. Proteomic Biomarkers for Acute Interstitial Lung Disease in Gefitinib-Treated Japanese Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takao; Nagasaka, Keiko; Takami, Sachiko; Wada, Kazuya; Tu, Hsiao-Kun; Otsuji, Makiko; Kyono, Yutaka; Dobashi, Tae; Komatsu, Yasuhiko; Kihara, Makoto; Akimoto, Shingo; Peers, Ian S.; South, Marie C.; Higenbottam, Tim; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakata, Koichiro; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kudoh, Shoji; Clausen, Ib Groth; Nishimura, Toshihide; Marko-Varga, György; Kato, Harubumi

    2011-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) events have been reported in Japanese non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We investigated proteomic biomarkers for mechanistic insights and improved prediction of ILD. Blood plasma was collected from 43 gefitinib-treated NSCLC patients developing acute ILD (confirmed by blinded diagnostic review) and 123 randomly selected controls in a nested case-control study within a pharmacoepidemiological cohort study in Japan. We generated ∼7 million tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) measurements with extensive quality control and validation, producing one of the largest proteomic lung cancer datasets to date, incorporating rigorous study design, phenotype definition, and evaluation of sample processing. After alignment, scaling, and measurement batch adjustment, we identified 41 peptide peaks representing 29 proteins best predicting ILD. Multivariate peptide, protein, and pathway modeling achieved ILD prediction comparable to previously identified clinical variables; combining the two provided some improvement. The acute phase response pathway was strongly represented (17 of 29 proteins, p = 1.0×10−25), suggesting a key role with potential utility as a marker for increased risk of acute ILD events. Validation by Western blotting showed correlation for identified proteins, confirming that robust results can be generated from an MS/MS platform implementing strict quality control. PMID:21799770

  15. Nilotinib ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nilotinib on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given nilotinib (10 mg/kg) by oral gavage twice daily for 1 week prior to exposure to aerosolized LPS. At 24 h after LPS exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples and lung tissue were collected. The lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio, protein level and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF were determined. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities as well as nitrite/nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -}) levels were measured in lung tissues. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were determined in lung tissues. Treatment with nilotinib prior to LPS exposure significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pulmonary edema, as it significantly decreased lung W/D ratio, protein concentration and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the BALF. This was supported by the histopathological examination which revealed marked attenuation of LPS-induced ALI in nilotinib treated rats. In addition, nilotinib significantly increased SOD and GSH activities with significant decrease in MDA content in the lung. Nilotinib also reduced LPS mediated overproduction of pulmonary NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -} levels. Importantly, nilotinib caused down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and iNOS levels in the lung. Taken together, these results demonstrate the protective effects of nilotinib against the LPS-induced ALI. This effect can be attributed to nilotinib ability to counteract the inflammatory cells

  16. Potential Effects of Medicinal Plants and Secondary Metabolites on Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cornélio Favarin, Daniely; Robison de Oliveira, Jhony; Jose Freire de Oliveira, Carlo; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening syndrome that causes high morbidity and mortality worldwide. ALI is characterized by increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary membrane, edema, uncontrolled neutrophils migration to the lung, and diffuse alveolar damage, leading to acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Although corticosteroids remain the mainstay of ALI treatment, they cause significant side effects. Agents of natural origin, such as medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites, mainly those with very few side effects, could be excellent alternatives for ALI treatment. Several studies, including our own, have demonstrated that plant extracts and/or secondary metabolites isolated from them reduce most ALI phenotypes in experimental animal models, including neutrophil recruitment to the lung, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, edema, and vascular permeability. In this review, we summarized these studies and described the anti-inflammatory activity of various plant extracts, such as Ginkgo biloba and Punica granatum, and such secondary metabolites as epigallocatechin-3-gallate and ellagic acid. In addition, we highlight the medical potential of these extracts and plant-derived compounds for treating of ALI. PMID:24224172

  17. Glycyrrhizic Acid Prevents Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury and Mortality in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Zhao, Min; Wang, Yu; Li, Fengchun; Zhang, Zhigang

    2016-02-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), an active ingredient in licorice, has multiple pharmacological activities. However, the effects of GA on sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI) have not been determined. Tthe aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism involved in the effects of GA against sepsis-induced ALI in rats. We found that GA alleviated sepsis-induced ALI through improvements in various pathological changes, as well as decreases in the lung wet/dry weight ratio and total protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and a significant increase in the survival rate of treated rats. Additionally, GA markedly inhibited sepsis-induced pulmonary inflammatory responses. Moreover, we found that treatment with GA inhibited oxidative stress damage and apoptosis in lung tissue induced by ALI. Finally, GA treatment significantly inhibited NF-κ B, JNK and P38 MAPK activation. Our data indicate that GA has a protective effect against sepsis-induced ALI by inhibiting the inflammatory response, damage from oxidative stress, and apoptosis via inactivation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, providing a molecular basis for a new medical treatment for sepsis-induced ALI.

  18. [Ventilation in acute respiratory distress. Lung-protective strategies].

    PubMed

    Bruells, C S; Rossaint, R; Dembinski, R

    2012-11-01

    Ventilation of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with protective ventilator settings is the standard in patient care. Besides the reduction of tidal volumes, the adjustment of a case-related positive end-expiratory pressure and preservation of spontaneous breathing activity at least 48 h after onset is part of this strategy. Bedside techniques have been developed to adapt ventilatory settings to the individual patient and the different stages of ARDS. This article reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and ventilator-induced lung injury and presents current evidence-based strategies for ventilator settings in ARDS.

  19. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) - review].

    PubMed

    Cermáková, Z; Simetka, O; Kořístka, M

    2013-04-01

    TRALI is a major cause of serious morbidity and mortality associated with a blood transfusion. It is clinically manifested by acute respiratory distress within 6 hours of completion of transfusion. Neutrophils have the key role in the pathogenesis. They are activated mostly with leukocyte antibodies (HLA and granulocyte) that are present mainly in plasma containing blood products. TRALI is a clinical diagnosis based on hypoxemia and positive finding on lung X-ray examination. The treatment is only supportive and the mortality is about 5% to 10%. The major preventive measure is transfusing blood products from donors without leukocyte antibodies.

  20. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduces endoplasmic reticulum stress, acinar cell damage, and systemic inflammation in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Seyhun, Ersin; Malo, Antje; Schäfer, Claus; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Göke, Burkhard; Kubisch, Constanze H

    2011-11-01

    In acute pancreatitis, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress prompts an accumulation of malfolded proteins inside the ER, initiating the unfolded protein response (UPR). Because the ER chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is known to inhibit the UPR in vitro, this study examined the in vivo effects of TUDCA in an acute experimental pancreatitis model. Acute pancreatitis was induced in Wistar rats using caerulein, with or without prior TUDCA treatment. UPR components were analyzed, including chaperone binding protein (BiP), phosphorylated protein kinase-like ER kinase (pPERK), X-box binding protein (XBP)-1, phosphorylated c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (pJNK), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologues protein, and caspase 12 and 3 activation. In addition, pancreatitis biomarkers were measured, such as serum amylase, trypsin activation, edema formation, histology, and the inflammatory reaction in pancreatic and lung tissue. TUDCA treatment reduced intracellular trypsin activation, edema formation, and cell damage, while leaving amylase levels unaltered. The activation of myeloperoxidase was clearly reduced in pancreas and lung. Furthermore, TUDCA prevented caerulein-induced BiP upregulation, reduced XBP-1 splicing, and caspase 12 and 3 activation. It accelerated the downregulation of pJNK. In controls without pancreatitis, TUDCA showed cytoprotective effects including pPERK signaling and activation of downstream targets. We concluded that ER stress responses activated in acute pancreatitis are grossly attenuated by TUDCA. The chaperone reduced the UPR and inhibited ER stress-associated proapoptotic pathways. TUDCA has a cytoprotective potential in the exocrine pancreas. These data hint at new perspectives for an employment of chemical chaperones, such as TUDCA, in prevention of acute pancreatitis.

  1. Protective Effect of Isorhamnetin on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Li, Xiao-Ping; Ni, Yun-Feng; Du, Hong-Yin; Wang, Rong; Li, Ming-Jiang; Wang, Wen-Chen; Li, Ming-Ming; Wang, Xu-Hui; Li, Lei; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Jiang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Isorhamnetin has been reported to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-proliferative effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of isorhamnetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice by inhibiting the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The effects of isorhamnetin on LPS-induced lung pathological damage, wet/dry ratios and the total protein level in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inflammatory cytokine release, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA) level were examined. In addition, the COX-2 activation in lung tissues was detected by Western blot. Isorhamnetin pretreatment improved the mice survival rates. Moreover, isorhamnetin pretreatment significantly attenuated edema and the pathological changes in the lung and inhibited protein extravasation in BALF. Isorhamnetin also significantly decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines in BALF. In addition, isorhamnetin markedly prevented LPS-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment significantly suppressed LPS-induced activation of COX-2. Isorhamnetin has been demonstrated to protect mice from LPS-induced ALI by inhibiting the expression of COX-2.

  2. Smoking-promoted oxidative DNA damage response is highly correlated to lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chao; Lai, Tianwen; Li, Miao; Zhou, Hongbin; Lv, Dan; Deng, Zaichun; Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao

    2016-04-05

    Oxidative stress induced by tobacco smoking is one of the main causes of DNA damage and is known to be involved in various cancers. Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, while the role of cigarette smoke-induced oxidative DNA damage response during lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated oxidative DNA damage response levels in smoking and nonsmoking patients with lung cancer, and evaluated the potential diagnostic value of 8-OHdG for lung cancer. We observed a higher level of 8-OHdG expression and secretion in airways of lung cancer patients than that of noncancer controls. 8-OHdG expression was associated with the TNM stages. Additionally, cigarette smoke-induced oxidative DNA damage response was observed in bronchial epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. A statistical significance correlation was found between the levels of 8-OHdG and smoking index. With a cut-off value of 2.86 ng/ml, 8-OHdG showed a sensitivity and specificity of 70.0% and 73.7%, respectively, to identify a patient with lung cancer. These findings not only underscore the importance of smoking in oxidative DNA damage response of lung cancer patients, but also suggest 8-OHdG as a potential diagnostic biomarker for lung cancer.

  3. An integrated physiology model to study regional lung damage effects and the physiologic response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This work expands upon a previously developed exercise dynamic physiology model (DPM) with the addition of an anatomic pulmonary system in order to quantify the impact of lung damage on oxygen transport and physical performance decrement. Methods A pulmonary model is derived with an anatomic structure based on morphometric measurements, accounting for heterogeneous ventilation and perfusion observed experimentally. The model is incorporated into an existing exercise physiology model; the combined system is validated using human exercise data. Pulmonary damage from blast, blunt trauma, and chemical injury is quantified in the model based on lung fluid infiltration (edema) which reduces oxygen delivery to the blood. The pulmonary damage component is derived and calibrated based on published animal experiments; scaling laws are used to predict the human response to lung injury in terms of physical performance decrement. Results The augmented dynamic physiology model (DPM) accurately predicted the human response to hypoxia, altitude, and exercise observed experimentally. The pulmonary damage parameters (shunt and diffusing capacity reduction) were fit to experimental animal data obtained in blast, blunt trauma, and chemical damage studies which link lung damage to lung weight change; the model is able to predict the reduced oxygen delivery in damage conditions. The model accurately estimates physical performance reduction with pulmonary damage. Conclusions We have developed a physiologically-based mathematical model to predict performance decrement endpoints in the presence of thoracic damage; simulations can be extended to estimate human performance and escape in extreme situations. PMID:25044032

  4. Attenuation of acute nitrogen mustard-induced lung injury, inflammation and fibrogenesis by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Venosa, Alessandro; Hall, LeRoy; Gow, Andrew J.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-12-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic vesicant known to cause damage to the respiratory tract. Injury is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In these studies we analyzed the effects of transient inhibition of iNOS using aminoguanidine (AG) on NM-induced pulmonary toxicity. Rats were treated intratracheally with 0.125 mg/kg NM or control. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 1 d–28 d later and lung injury, oxidative stress and fibrosis assessed. NM exposure resulted in progressive histopathological changes in the lung including multifocal lesions, perivascular and peribronchial edema, inflammatory cell accumulation, alveolar fibrin deposition, bronchiolization of alveolar septal walls, and fibrosis. This was correlated with trichrome staining and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) was also increased in the lung following NM exposure, along with levels of protein and inflammatory cells in BAL, consistent with oxidative stress and alveolar-epithelial injury. Both classically activated proinflammatory (iNOS{sup +} and cyclooxygenase-2{sup +}) and alternatively activated profibrotic (YM-1{sup +} and galectin-3{sup +}) macrophages appeared in the lung following NM administration; this was evident within 1 d, and persisted for 28 d. AG administration (50 mg/kg, 2 ×/day, 1 d–3 d) abrogated NM-induced injury, oxidative stress and inflammation at 1 d and 3 d post exposure, with no effects at 7 d or 28 d. These findings indicate that nitric oxide generated via iNOS contributes to acute NM-induced lung toxicity, however, transient inhibition of iNOS is not sufficient to protect against pulmonary fibrosis. -- Highlights: ► Nitrogen mustard (NM) induces acute lung injury and fibrosis. ► Pulmonary toxicity is associated with increased expression of iNOS. ► Transient inhibition of iNOS attenuates acute

  5. Efferent vagal nerve stimulation attenuates acute lung injury following burn: The importance of the gut-lung axis

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Michael J.; Peterson, Carrie Y.; Cheadle, Gerald; Loomis, William; Wolf, Paul; Kennedy, Vince; Putnam, James G.; Bansal, Vishal; Eliceiri, Brian; Baird, Andrew; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess acute lung injury when protection to the gut mucosal barrier offered by vagus nerve stimulation is eliminated by an abdominal vagotomy. Methods Male balb/c mice were subjected to 30% total body surface area steam burn with and without electrical stimulation to the right cervical vagus nerve. A cohort of animals were subjected to abdominal vagotomy. Lung histology, myeloperoxidase and ICAM-1 immune staining, myeloperoxidase enzymatic assay, and tissue KC levels were analyzed 24 hours after burn. Additionally, lung IkB-α, NF-kB immunoblots, and NF-kB-DNA binding measured by photon emission analysis using NF-kB-luc transgenic mice were performed. Results Six hours post burn, phosphorylation of both NF-kB p65 and IkB-α were observed. Increased photon emission signal was seen in the lungs of NF-kB-luc transgenic animals. Vagal nerve stimulation blunted NF-kB activation similar to sham animals whereas abdominal vagotomy eliminated the anti-inflammatory effect. After burn, MPO positive cells and ICAM-1 expression in the lung endothelium was increased, and lung histology demonstrated significant injury at 24 hours. Vagal nerve stimulation markedly decreased neutrophil infiltration as demonstrated by MPO immune staining and enzyme activity. Vagal stimulation also markedly attenuated acute lung injury at 24 hours. The protective effects of vagal nerve stimulation were reversed by performing an abdominal vagotomy. Conclusion Vagal nerve stimulation is an effective strategy to protect against acute lung injury following burn. Moreover, the protective effects of vagal nerve stimulation in the prevention of acute lung injury are eliminated by performing an abdominal vagotomy. These results establish the importance of the gut-lung axis after burn in the genesis of acute lung injury. PMID:21783215

  6. Acute tinnitus and permanent audiovestibular damage after hepatitis B vaccination.

    PubMed

    DeJonckere, P H; de Surgères, G G

    2001-01-01

    Yeast-derived recombinant DNA hepatitis B vaccine usage has been widely accepted since the early 1990s, especially for high-risk patients. Severe adverse effects have been reported infrequently. Certain neurological complications raise concern for hepatitis B vaccine: central nervous system demyelination, acute myelitis, acute cerebellar ataxia, and various peripheral mononeuropathies. Case reports on tinnitus, hearing loss, and vestibular damage are extremely scarce. The case presented here concerns a professionally active nurse, born in 1953, with a medical history of progressive renal failure and hemodialysis. Eleven hours after a second injection of the hepatitis B vaccine Engerix B, an acute left-sided tinnitus occurred and, a few hours later, severe left hearing loss and intense vertigo. Tinnitus and the sensation of vertigo regressed fairly quickly, but the hearing loss and the vestibular paresis were permanent. Increased interpeak intervals on auditory brain responses and lack of recruitment suggested that the lesion probably is located at the level of cranial nerve VIII. From a medicolegal point of view, this audiovestibular damage had to be considered an accident at work and not as an occupational disease.

  7. VEGF Promotes Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carapau, Daniel; Pena, Ana C.; Ataíde, Ricardo; Monteiro, Carla A. A.; Félix, Nuno; Costa-Silva, Artur; Marinho, Claudio R. F.; Dias, Sérgio; Mota, Maria M.

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of the clinical presentation and severity of malaria infections is broad, ranging from uncomplicated febrile illness to severe forms of disease such as cerebral malaria (CM), acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) or severe anemia (SA). Rodent models that mimic human CM, PAM and SA syndromes have been established. Here, we show that DBA/2 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA constitute a new model for malaria-associated ALI. Up to 60% of the mice showed dyspnea, airway obstruction and hypoxemia and died between days 7 and 12 post-infection. The most common pathological findings were pleural effusion, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, consistent with increased lung vessel permeability, while the blood-brain barrier was intact. Malaria-associated ALI correlated with high levels of circulating VEGF, produced de novo in the spleen, and its blockage led to protection of mice from this syndrome. In addition, either splenectomization or administration of the anti-inflammatory molecule carbon monoxide led to a significant reduction in the levels of sera VEGF and to protection from ALI. The similarities between the physiopathological lesions described here and the ones occurring in humans, as well as the demonstration that VEGF is a critical host factor in the onset of malaria-associated ALI in mice, not only offers important mechanistic insights into the processes underlying the pathology related with malaria but may also pave the way for interventional studies. PMID:20502682

  8. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Looney, Mark R; Gropper, Michael A; Matthay, Michael A

    2004-07-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an underreported complication of transfusion therapy, and it is the third most common cause of transfusion-associated death. TRALI is defined as noncardiogenic pulmonary edema temporally related to transfusion therapy. The diagnosis of TRALI relies on excluding other diagnoses such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Supportive diagnostic evidence includes identifying neutrophil or human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies in the donor or recipient plasma. All plasma-containing blood products have been implicated in TRALI, with the majority of cases linked to whole blood, packed RBCs, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of TRALI may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, with the first "hit" being a predisposing inflammatory condition commonly present in the operating room or ICU. The second hit may involve the passive transfer of neutrophil or HLA antibodies from the donor or the transfusion of biologically active lipids from older, cellular blood products. Treatment is supportive, with a prognosis substantially better than most causes of clinical acute lung injury.

  9. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  10. Traumatic forequarter amputation associated acute lung injury (ALI): report of one case.

    PubMed

    Liang, K; Gan, X; Deng, Z

    2012-07-01

    One case of traumatic forequarter amputation associated acute lung injury (ALI) was presented. A discussion reviewing the treatment guidelines for this devastating injury, and pointing out the importance of supporting the lung and preventing the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was included.

  11. A new CT-based method to quantify radiation-induced lung damage in patients.

    PubMed

    Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Wiegman, Erwin M; Langendijk, Johannes A; Widder, Joachim; Coppes, Robert P; van Luijk, Peter

    2015-10-01

    A new method to assess radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) using CT-scans was developed. It is more sensitive in detecting damage and corresponds better to physician-rated radiation pneumonitis than routinely-used methods. Use of this method may improve lung toxicity assessment and thereby facilitate development of more accurate predictive models for RILT.

  12. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Kathleen A.; McKay, Ryan T.; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a “snapshot” in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision

  13. [Organ damage and cardiorenal syndrome in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Casado Cerrada, Jesús; Pérez Calvo, Juan Ignacio

    2014-03-01

    Heart failure is a complex syndrome that affects almost all organs and systems of the body. Signs and symptoms of organ dysfunction, in particular kidney dysfunction, may be accentuated or become evident for the first time during acute decompensation of heart failure. Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney, regardless of which of the two organs may have suffered the initial damage and regardless also of their previous functional status. Research into the mechanisms regulating the complex relationship between the two organs is prompting the search for new biomarkers to help physicians detect renal damage in subclinical stages. Hence, a preventive approach to renal dysfunction may be adopted in the clinical setting in the near future. This article provides a general overview of cardiorenal syndrome and an update of the physiopathological mechanisms involved. Special emphasis is placed on the role of visceral congestion as an emergent mechanism in this syndrome.

  14. Hepatic cryoablation-induced acute lung injury: histopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Washington, K; Debelak, J P; Gobbell, C; Sztipanovits, D R; Shyr, Y; Olson, S; Chapman, W C

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown that hepatic cryoablation (cryo), but not partial hepatectomy, induces a systemic inflammatory response, with distant organ injury and overproduction of NF-kappaB-dependent cytokines. Serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) levels are markedly increased 1 h and beyond after cryo compared with partial hepatectomy where no elevation occurs. NF-kappaB activation (by electrophoretic mobility shift assay) is strikingly increased in the noncryo liver (but not in the lung) at 30 min and in both the liver and lung tissue 1 h after cryo, returning to the baseline by 2 h and beyond. The current study investigated the histopathologic changes associated with cryoablation-induced acute lung injury. Animals underwent 35% hepatic resection or a similar volume hepatic cryo and were sacrificed at 1, 2, 6, and 24 h. Pulmonary histologic features were assessed using hematoxylin and eosin and immunoperoxidase staining with a macrophage-specific antibody (anti-lysozyme, 1:200 dilution, Dako, Carpinteria, CA). The following features were graded semiquantitatively (0-3): perivascular lymphoid cuffs, airspace edema and hemorrhage, margination of neutrophils within pulmonary vasculature, and the presence of macrophages with foamy cytoplasm in the pulmonary interstitium. Hepatic resection (n = 21) resulted in slight perivascular edema at 1, 2, 6, and 24 h post-resection, but there were no other significant changes. Pulmonary findings after hepatic cryo (n = 22) included prominent perivascular lymphoid cuffs 1 and 2 h following hepatic injury that were not present at any other time point (P 0.01). Marginating PMNs and foamy macrophages were more common after cryo at all time points (P<0.05, cryo vs resection). Severe lung injury, as evidenced by airspace edema and parenchymal hemorrhage, was present in four of six (67%) animals at 24 h (P 0.03). In follow-up studies immediate resection (n = 15) of the cryo

  15. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-02-04

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM.

  16. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM. PMID:26841848

  17. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Deficient Mice Are Protected from Lipopolysaccharide Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christine M.; Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Ham III, P. Benson; Meadows, Mary Louise; Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Kangath, Archana; Sridhar, Supriya; Lucas, Rudolf; Black, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria induces acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. This injury is associated with lung edema, inflammation, diffuse alveolar damage, and severe respiratory insufficiency. We have previously reported that LPS-mediated nitric oxide synthase (NOS) uncoupling, through increases in asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), plays an important role in the development of ALI through the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Therefore, the focus of this study was to determine whether mice deficient in endothelial NOS (eNOS-/-) are protected against ALI. In both wild-type and eNOS-/- mice, ALI was induced by the intratracheal instillation of LPS (2 mg/kg). After 24 hours, we found that eNOS-/-mice were protected against the LPS mediated increase in inflammatory cell infiltration, inflammatory cytokine production, and lung injury. In addition, LPS exposed eNOS-/- mice had increased oxygen saturation and improved lung mechanics. The protection in eNOS-/- mice was associated with an attenuated production of NO, NOS derived superoxide, and peroxynitrite. Furthermore, we found that eNOS-/- mice had less RhoA activation that correlated with a reduction in RhoA nitration at Tyr34. Finally, we found that the reduction in NOS uncoupling in eNOS-/- mice was due to a preservation of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) activity that prevented the LPS-mediated increase in ADMA. Together our data suggest that eNOS derived reactive species play an important role in the development of LPS-mediated lung injury. PMID:25786132

  18. Time course changes of oxidative stress and inflammation in hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shouli; Shi, Min; Liu, Changting; Liu, Qinghui; Guo, Jun; Yu, Senyang; Jiang, Tingshu

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Therapies with high levels of oxygen are commonly used in the management of critical care. However, prolonged exposure to hyperoxia can cause acute lung injury. Although oxidative stress and inflammation are purported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury, the exact mechanisms are still less known in the hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI). Materials and Methods: In this study, we investigated the time course changes of oxidative stress and inflammation in lung tissues of rats exposed to >95% oxygen for 12-60 hr. Results: We found that at 12 hr after hyperoxia challenge, the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were significantly reduced with remarkably increased lipid peroxidation. At 12 hr, NF-κB p65 expression was also upregulated, but Iκ-Bα expression showed a remarkable decline. Significant production of inflammatory mediators, e.g, interleukin-1β, occurred 24 hr after hyperoxia exposure. In addition, the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 expression and the activity of myeloperoxidase were significantly increased at 24 hr with a peak at 48 hr. Conclusion: Our data support that hyperoxia-induced oxidative damage and NF-κB pathway activation implicate in the early phase of HALI pathogenesis. PMID:25810882

  19. Peripheral blood monocyte-derived chemokine blockade prevents murine transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Christopher G J; Kim, Michael; Singh, Tarandeep K; Milev, Youli; Freedman, John; Semple, John W

    2014-05-29

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality and can occur with any type of transfusion. TRALI is thought to be primarily mediated by donor antibodies activating recipient neutrophils resulting in pulmonary endothelial damage. Nonetheless, details regarding the interactions between donor antibodies and recipient factors are unknown. A murine antibody-mediated TRALI model was used to elucidate the roles of the F(ab')2 and Fc regions of a TRALI-inducing immunoglobulin G anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antibody (34.1.2s). Compared with intact antibody, F(ab')2 fragments significantly increased serum levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2); however, pulmonary neutrophil levels were only moderately increased, and no pulmonary edema or mortality occurred. Fc fragments did not modulate any of these parameters. TRALI induction by intact antibody was completely abrogated by in vivo peripheral blood monocyte depletion by gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) or chemokine blockade with a MIP-2 receptor antagonist but was restored upon repletion with purified monocytes. The results suggest a two-step process for antibody-mediated TRALI induction: the first step involves antibody binding its cognate antigen on blood monocytes, which generates MIP-2 chemokine production that is correlated with pulmonary neutrophil recruitment; the second step occurs when antibody-coated monocytes increase Fc-dependent lung damage.

  20. Cytochrome b5 and cytokeratin 17 are biomarkers in bronchoalveolar fluid signifying onset of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ménoret, Antoine; Kumar, Sanjeev; Vella, Anthony T

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by pulmonary edema and acute inflammation leading to pulmonary dysfunction and potentially death. Early medical intervention may ameliorate the severity of ALI, but unfortunately, there are no reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis. We screened for biomarkers in a mouse model of ALI. In this model, inhalation of S. aureus enterotoxin A causes increased capillary permeability, cell damage, and increase protein and cytokine concentration in the lungs. We set out to find predictive biomarkers of ALI in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid before the onset of clinical manifestations. A cutting edge proteomic approach was used to compare BAL fluid harvested 16 h post S. aureus enterotoxin A inhalation versus BAL fluid from vehicle alone treated mice. The proteomic PF 2D platform permitted comparative analysis of proteomic maps and mass spectrometry identified cytochrome b5 and cytokeratin 17 in BAL fluid of mice challenged with S. aureus enterotoxin A. Validation of cytochrome b5 showed tropic expression in epithelial cells of the bronchioles. Importantly, S. aureus enterotoxin A inhalation significantly decreased cytochrome b5 during the onset of lung injury. Validation of cytokeratin 17 showed ubiquitous expression in lung tissue and increased presence in BAL fluid after S. aureus enterotoxin A inhalation. Therefore, these new biomarkers may be predictive of ALI onset in patients and could provide insight regarding the basis of lung injury and inflammation.

  1. Inducible expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase attenuates acute rejection of tissue-engineered lung allografts in rats.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Ammar; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Toolabi, LadanTeimoori; Ghanbari, Hossein; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2016-01-15

    Lung disease remains one of the principal causes of death worldwide and the incidence of pulmonary diseases is increasing. Complexity in treatments and shortage of donors leads us to develop new ways for lung disease treatment. One promising strategy is preparing engineered lung for transplantation. In this context, employing new immunosuppression strategies which suppresses immune system locally rather than systemic improves transplant survival. This tends to reduce the difficulties in transplant rejection and the systemic impact of the use of immunosuppressive drugs which causes side effects such as serious infections and malignancies. In our study examining the immunosuppressive effects of IDO expression, we produced rat lung tissues with the help of decellularized tissue, differentiating medium and rat mesenchymal stem cells. Transduction of these cells by IDO expressing lentiviruses provided inducible and local expression of this gene. To examine immunosuppressive properties of IDO expression by these tissues, we transplanted these allografts into rats and, subsequently, evaluated cytokine expression and histopathological properties. Expression of inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and TNFα were significantly downregulated in IDO expressing allograft. Moreover, acute rejection score of this experimental group was also lower comparing other two groups and mRNA levels of FOXP3, a regulatory T cell marker, upregulated in IDO expressing group. However, infiltrating lymphocyte counting did not show significant difference between groups. This study demonstrates that IDO gene transfer into engineered lung allograft tissues significantly attenuates acute allograft damage suggesting local therapy with IDO as a strategy to reduce the need for systemic immunosuppression and, thereby, its side effects.

  2. Comparison of the effects of erdosteine and N-acetylcysteine on apoptosis regulation in endotoxin-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Demiralay, Rezan; Gürsan, Nesrin; Ozbilim, Gülay; Erdogan, Gülgün; Demirci, Elif

    2006-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate comparatively the frequency of apoptosis in lung epithelial cells after intratracheal instillation of endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] in rats and the role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) on apoptosis, and the effects of erdosteine and N-acetylcysteine on the regulation of apoptosis. Female Wistar rats were given oral erdosteine (10-500 mg kg(-1)) or N-acetylcysteine (10-500 mg kg(-1)) once a day for 3 consecutive days. Then the rats were intratracheally instilled with LPS (5 mg kg(-1)) to induce acute lung injury. The rats were killed at 24 h after LPS administration. Lung tissue samples were stained with hematoxylin-eosin for histopathological assessments. The apoptosis level in the lung bronchial and bronchiolar epithelium was determined using the TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick endlabelling) method. Cytoplasmic TNF-alpha was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Pretreatment with erdosteine and pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine at a dose of 10 mg kg(-1) had no protective effect on LPS-induced lung injury. When the doses of drugs increased, the severity of the lung damage caused by LPS decreased. It was found that as the pretreatment dose of erdosteine was increased, the rate of apoptosis induced by LPS in lung epithelial cells decreased and this decrease was statistically significant in doses of 300 mg kg(-1) and 500 mg kg(-1). Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine up to a dose of 500 mg kg(-1) did not show any significant effect on apoptosis regulation. It was noticed that both antioxidants had no significant effect on the local production level of TNF-alpha. These findings suggest that erdosteine could be a possible therapeutic agent for acute lethal lung injury and its mortality.

  3. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Role of Oleic Acid-Triggered Lung Injury and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Burth, Patrícia; Castro-Faria, Mauro Velho; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury especially acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be triggered by diverse stimuli, including fatty acids and microbes. ARDS affects thousands of people worldwide each year, presenting high mortality rate and having an economic impact. One of the hallmarks of lung injury is edema formation with alveoli flooding. Animal models are used to study lung injury. Oleic acid-induced lung injury is a widely used model resembling the human disease. The oleic acid has been linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases; here we focus on lung injury. Firstly, we briefly discuss ARDS and secondly we address the mechanisms by which oleic acid triggers lung injury and inflammation. PMID:26640323

  4. Damaging Effects of Cannabis Use on the Lungs.

    PubMed

    Yayan, Josef; Rasche, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis is the most widely smoked illicit substance in the world. It can be smoked alone in its plant form, marijuana, but it can also be mixed with tobacco. The specific effects of smoking cannabis are difficult to assess accurately and to distinguish from the effects of tobacco; however its use may produce severe consequences. Cannabis smoke affects the lungs similarly to tobacco smoke, causing symptoms such as increased cough, sputum, and hyperinflation. It can also cause serious lung diseases with increasing years of use. Cannabis can weaken the immune system, leading to pneumonia. Smoking cannabis has been further linked with symptoms of chronic bronchitis. Heavy use of cannabis on its own can cause airway obstruction. Based on immuno-histopathological and epidemiological evidence, smoking cannabis poses a potential risk for developing lung cancer. At present, however, the association between smoking cannabis and the development of lung cancer is not decisive.

  5. Protective effects of imipramine in murine endotoxin-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Qu, Jie-ming; Summah, Hanssa; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Ying-gang; Jiang, Hong-ni

    2010-07-25

    The tricyclic antidepressant imipramine has recently emerged as a cytoprotective agent, exerting beneficial effects in inflammatory tissue injury. The present study aimed to investigate therapeutic effects of imipramine in murine model of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. Mice were administrated intraperitoneally with LPS (lipopolysaccharide) from Escherichia coli or vehicle. Imipramine was administrated intraperitoneally 30 min before LPS challenge. Pretreatment of mice with imipramine reduced lethality. Impramine also significantly attenuated lung inflammation, lung edema, MPO (myeloperoxidase) activity, lung tissue pathological changes and nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding activity. The results of this study suggest that imipramine can exert protective effects in endotoxin-induced acute lung injury by suppressing nuclear factor-kappaB-mediated expression of inflammatory genes. Thus, imipramine could be a potential novel therapeutic agent for the treatment for acute lung injury.

  6. Effect of Thoracentesis on Intubated Patients with Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Matthew B; Serna-Gallegos, Derek; Ault, Mark; Khan, Ahsan; Chung, Rex; Ley, Eric J; Melo, Nicolas; Margulies, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusions occur frequently in mechanically ventilated patients, but no consensus exists regarding the clinical benefit of effusion drainage. We sought to determine the impact of thoracentesis on gas exchange in patients with differing severities of acute lung injury (ALI). A retrospective analysis was conducted on therapeutic thoracenteses performed on intubated patients in an adult surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary center. Effusions judged by ultrasound to be 400 mL or larger were drained. Subjects were divided into groups based on their initial P:F ratios: normal >300, ALI 200 to 300, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) <200. Baseline characteristics, physiologic variables, arterial blood gases, and ventilator settings before and after the intervention were analyzed. The primary end point was the change in measures of oxygenation. Significant improvements in P:F ratios (mean ± SD) were seen only in patients with ARDS (50.4 ± 38.5, P = 0.001) and ALI (90.6 ± 161.7, P = 0.022). Statistically significant improvement was observed in the pO2 (31.1, P = 0.005) and O2 saturation (4.1, P < 0.001) of the ARDS group. The volume of effusion removed did not correlate with changes in individual patient's oxygenation. These data support the role of therapeutic thoracentesis for intubated patients with abnormal P:F ratios.

  7. The serpentine path to a novel mechanism-based inhibitor of acute inflammatory lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Comroe lecture on which this review is based described my research path during the past 45 years, beginning with studies of oxidant stress (hyperoxia) and eventuating in the discovery of a synthetic inhibitor of phospholipase A2 activity (called MJ33) that prevents acute lung injury in mice exposed to lipopolysaccharide. In between were studies of lung ischemia, lung surfactant metabolism, the protein peroxiredoxin 6 and its phospholipase A2 activity, and mechanisms for NADPH oxidase activation. These seemingly unrelated research activities provided the nexus for identification of a novel target and a potentially novel therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of acute lung injury. PMID:24744383

  8. Airway pressure release ventilation in morbidly obese surgical patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Testerman, George M; Breitman, Igal; Hensley, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    Morbidly obese patients with body mass index greater than 40 kg/m(2) and respiratory failure requiring critical care services are increasingly seen in trauma and acute care surgical centers. Baseline respiratory pathophysiology including decreased pulmonary compliance with dependent atelectasis and abnormal ventilation-perfusion relationships predisposes these patients to acute lung injury (ALI) and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as well as prolonged stays in the intensive care unit. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is an increasingly used alternative mode for salvage therapy in patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure that also provides lung protection from ventilator-induced lung injury. APRV provides the conceptual advantage of an "open lung" approach to ventilation that may be extended to the morbidly obese patient population with ALI and ARDS. We discuss the theoretical benefits and a recent clinical experience of APRV ventilation in the morbidly obese patient with respiratory failure at a Level I trauma, surgical critical care, and acute care surgery center.

  9. Potential Application of Viral Empty Capsids for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Prof. Ariella Oppenheim CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Hebrew University of Jerusalem...Lung / 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Prof. Ariella...mechanism elicited by VLPs that attenuate 2CLP-induced sepsis, to be performed as the project continues. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Acute Respiratory Distress

  10. Heme Attenuation Ameliorates Irritant Gas Inhalation-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Lam, Adam; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Carlisle, Matthew A.; Traylor, Amie; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Exposure to irritant gases, such as bromine (Br2), poses an environmental and occupational hazard that results in severe lung and systemic injury. However, the mechanism(s) of Br2 toxicity and the therapeutic responses required to mitigate lung damage are not known. Previously, it was demonstrated that Br2 upregulates the heme degrading enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Since heme is a major inducer of HO-1, we determined whether an increase in heme and heme-dependent oxidative injury underlies the pathogenesis of Br2 toxicity. Results: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to Br2 gas (600 ppm, 30 min) and returned to room air. Thirty minutes postexposure, mice were injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of the heme scavenging protein, hemopexin (Hx) (3 μg/gm body weight), or saline. Twenty-four hours postexposure, saline-treated mice had elevated total heme in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma and acute lung injury (ALI) culminating in 80% mortality after 10 days. Hx treatment significantly lowered heme, decreased evidence of ALI (lower protein and inflammatory cells in BALF, lower lung wet-to-dry weight ratios, and decreased airway hyperreactivity to methacholine), and reduced mortality. In addition, Br2 caused more severe ALI and mortality in mice with HO-1 gene deletion (HO-1−/−) compared to wild-type controls, while transgenic mice overexpressing the human HO-1 gene (hHO-1) showed significant protection. Innovation: This is the first study delineating the role of heme in ALI caused by Br2. Conclusion: The data suggest that attenuating heme may prove to be a useful adjuvant therapy to treat patients with ALI. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 99–112. PMID:26376667

  11. Acute renal damage in infants after first urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Salvatore; Chertin, Boris; Yoneda, Akihiro; Rolle, Udo; Kelleher, Jeremiah; Puri, Prem

    2002-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common causes of unexplained fever in neonates. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of urinary tract anomalies and acute renal damage in neonates who presented with first urinary tract infection in the first 8 weeks of life. We reviewed the records of 95 infants, who were hospitalised with UTI during a 6-year period (1994-1999). Patients with antenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis and incomplete radiological investigations were excluded from the study. Of the remaining 57 patients, 42 were boys and 15 girls. The mean age at diagnosis was 32 days (range 5-60 days). All patients underwent renal ultrasonography (US), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan. Urinary tract abnormalities were detected in 20 (35%) patients. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was found in 19 (33%) neonates, 7 girls and 12 boys. Acute cortical defects on DMSA scan were present in 19 kidneys of patients with VUR and in 25 of those without reflux. Only one-third of neonates after first symptomatic UTI had VUR. We recommend that US, VCUG, and DMSA scan should be routinely performed after the first UTI in infants younger than 8 weeks.

  12. Assessment of cone beam computed tomography techniques for imaging lung damage in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanaugh, Dawn

    Lung damage is a common side effect of chemotherapeutic drugs such as bleomycin. This study used a bleomycin mouse model which simulates the lung damage observed in humans. Noninvasive, in vivo cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to visualize and quantify fibrotic and inflammatory damage over the entire lung volume of mice. Bleomycin was used to induce pulmonary damage in vivo and the results from two CBCT systems, a micro-CT and flat panel CT (fpCT), were compared to histologic measurements, the standard method of murine lung damage quantification. Twenty C57BL/6 mice were given either 3 U/kg of bleomycin or saline intratracheally. The mice were scanned at baseline, before the administration of bleomycin, and then 10, 14, and 21 days afterward. At each time point, a subset of mice was sacrificed for histologic analysis. The resulting CT images were used to assess lung volume. Percent lung damage (PLD) was calculated for each mouse on both the fpCT (PLDfpcT) and the micro-CT (PLDmuCT). Histologic PLD (PLDH) was calculated for each histologic section at each time point (day 10, n = 4; day 14, n = 4; day 21, n = 5; control group, n = 5). A linear regression was applied to the PLDfpCT vs. PLDH, PLDmuCT vs. PLDH and PLDfpCT vs. PLDmuCT distributions. This study did not demonstrate strong correlations between PLDCT and PLDH. The coefficient of determination, R, was 0.68 for PLDmuCT vs. PLDH and 0.75 for the PLD fpCT vs. PLDH. The experimental issues identified from this study were: (1) inconsistent inflation of the lungs from scan to scan, (2) variable distribution of damage (one histologic section not representative of overall lung damage), (3) control mice not scanned with each group of bleomycin mice, (4) two CT systems caused long anesthesia time for the mice, and (5) respiratory gating did not hold the volume of lung constant throughout the scan. Addressing these issues might allow for further improvement of the correlation between PLDCT and PLDH.

  13. Acute sun damage and photoprotective responses in whales.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Levasseur, Laura M; Gendron, Diane; Knell, Rob J; O'Toole, Edel A; Singh, Manuraj; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina

    2011-05-22

    Rising levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) secondary to ozone depletion are an issue of concern for public health. Skin cancers and intraepidermal dysplasia are increasingly observed in individuals that undergo chronic or excessive sun exposure. Such alterations of skin integrity and function are well established for humans and laboratory animals, but remain unexplored for mammalian wildlife. However, effects are unlikely to be negligible, particularly for species such as whales, whose anatomical or life-history traits force them to experience continuous sun exposure. We conducted photographic and histological surveys of three seasonally sympatric whale species to investigate sunburn and photoprotection. We find that lesions commonly associated with acute severe sun damage in humans are widespread and that individuals with fewer melanocytes have more lesions and less apoptotic cells. This suggests that the pathways used to limit and resolve UVR-induced damage in humans are shared by whales and that darker pigmentation is advantageous to them. Furthermore, lesions increased significantly in time, as would be expected under increasing UV irradiance. Apoptosis and melanocyte proliferation mirror this trend, suggesting that whales are capable of quick photoprotective responses. We conclude that the thinning ozone layer may pose a risk to the health of whales and other vulnerable wildlife.

  14. Lung Transcriptomics during Protective Ventilatory Support in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Herrera, Marialbert; Lorenzo-Diaz, Fabian; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Corrales, Almudena; Valladares, Francisco; Klassert, Tilman E; Valladares, Basilio; Slevogt, Hortense; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Villar, Jesus; Flores, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe inflammatory process of the lung. The only proven life-saving support is mechanical ventilation (MV) using low tidal volumes (LVT) plus moderate to high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, it is currently unknown how they exert the protective effects. To identify the molecular mechanisms modulated by protective MV, this study reports transcriptomic analyses based on microarray and microRNA sequencing in lung tissues from a clinically relevant animal model of sepsis-induced ALI. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. At 24 hours post-CLP, septic animals were randomized to three ventilatory strategies: spontaneous breathing, LVT (6 ml/kg) plus 10 cmH2O PEEP and high tidal volume (HVT, 20 ml/kg) plus 2 cmH2O PEEP. Healthy, non-septic, non-ventilated animals served as controls. After 4 hours of ventilation, lung samples were obtained for histological examination and gene expression analysis using microarray and microRNA sequencing. Validations were assessed using parallel analyses on existing publicly available genome-wide association study findings and transcriptomic human data. The catalogue of deregulated processes differed among experimental groups. The 'response to microorganisms' was the most prominent biological process in septic, non-ventilated and in HVT animals. Unexpectedly, the 'neuron projection morphogenesis' process was one of the most significantly deregulated in LVT. Further support for the key role of the latter process was obtained by microRNA studies, as four species targeting many of its genes (Mir-27a, Mir-103, Mir-17-5p and Mir-130a) were found deregulated. Additional analyses revealed 'VEGF signaling' as a central underlying response mechanism to all the septic groups (spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated). Based on this data, we conclude that a co-deregulation of 'VEGF signaling' along with 'neuron projection morphogenesis

  15. Caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis results in mild lung inflammation and altered respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Elder, Alison S F; Saccone, Gino T P; Bersten, Andrew D; Dixon, Dani-Louise

    2011-03-01

    Acute lung injury is a common complication of acute pancreatitis (AP) and contributes to the majority of AP-associated deaths. Although some aspects of AP-induced lung inflammation have been demonstrated, investigation of resultant changes in lung function is limited. The aim of this study was to characterize lung injury in caerulein-induced AP. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 7-8/group) received 7 injections of caerulein (50 μg/kg) at 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, or 120 hours before measurement of lung impedance mechanics. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), plasma, pancreatic, and lung tissue were collected to determine pancreatic and lung measures of acute inflammation. AP developed between 12 and 24 hours, as indicated by increased plasma amylase activity and pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, edema, and abnormal acinar cells, before beginning to resolve by 48 hours. In the lung, MPO activity peaked at 12 and 96 hours, with BAL cytokine concentrations peaking at 12 hours, followed by lung edema at 24 hours, and BAL cell count at 48 hours. Importantly, no significant changes in BAL protein concentration or arterial blood gas-pH levels were evident over the same period, and only modest changes were observed in respiratory mechanics. Caerulein-induced AP results in minor lung injury, which is not sufficient to allow protein permeability and substantially alter respiratory mechanics.

  16. Inhibition of Ras signalling reduces neutrophil infiltration and tissue damage in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhui; Merza, Mohammed; Luo, Lingtao; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2015-01-05

    Neutrophil recruitment is known to be a rate-limiting step in mediating tissue injury in severe acute pancreatitis (AP). However, the signalling mechanisms controlling inflammation and organ damage in AP remain elusive. Herein, we examined the role of Ras signalling in AP. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with a Ras inhibitor (farnesylthiosalicylic acid, FTS) before infusion of taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Pancreatic and lung tissues as well as blood were collected 24 h after pancreatitis induction. Pretreatment with FTS decreased serum amylase levels by 82% and significantly attenuated acinar cell necrosis, tissue haemorrhage and oedema formation in taurocholate-induced pancreatitis. Inhibition of Ras signalling reduced myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in the inflamed pancreas by 42%. In addition, administration of FTS decreased pancreatic levels of CXC chemokines as well as circulating levels of interleukin-6 and high-mobility group box 1 in animals exposed to taurocholate. Moreover, treatment with FTS reduced taurocholate-induced MPO levels in the lung. Inhibition of Ras signalling had no effect on neutrophil expression of Mac-1 in mice with pancreatitis. Moreover, FTS had no direct impact on trypsin activation in isolated pancreatic acinar cells. These results indicate that Ras signalling controls CXC chemokine formation, neutrophil recruitment and tissue injury in severe AP. Thus, our findings highlight a new signalling mechanism regulating neutrophil recruitment in the pancreas and suggest that inhibition of Ras signalling might be a useful strategy to attenuate local and systemic inflammation in severe AP.

  17. Early pulmonary inflammation and lung damage in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, André; Stick, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer progressive airway inflammation, infection and lung damage. Airway inflammation and infection are present from early in life, often before children are symptomatic. CF gene mutations cause changes in the CF transmembrane regulator protein that result in an aberrant airway microenvironment including airway surface liquid (ASL) dehydration, reduced ASL acidity, altered airway mucin and a dysregulated inflammatory response. This review discusses how an altered microenvironment drives CF lung disease before overt airway infection, the response of the CF airway to early infection, and methods to prevent inflammation and early lung disease.

  18. Air purifiers that diffuse reactive oxygen species potentially cause DNA damage in the lung.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Kosuke; Sato, Itaru; Yoshida, Midori; Tsuda, Shuji

    2010-12-01

    Several appliance manufacturers have recently released new type air purifiers that can disinfect bacteria, fungi and viruses by diffusing reactive oxygen species (ROS) into the air. In this study, mice were exposed to the outlet air from each of 3 air purifiers from different manufacturers (A, B, C), and the lung was examined for DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and histopathology to confirm the safety of these air purifiers. Neither abnormal behavior during exposure nor gross abnormality at necropsy was observed. No histopathological changes were also observed in the lung. However, significant increase of DNA damage was detected by the comet assay in the lung immediately after the direct exposure for 48 hr to models A and B, and for 16 hr to model B. As for model B, DNA migration was also increased by 2 hr exposure in a 1 m(3) plastic chamber but not by 48 hr exposure in a room (12.6 m(3)). Model C did not cause DNA damage. Lipid peroxidation and 8-hydroxy deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) was not increased under the conditions DNA damage was detected by the comet assay. The present results revealed that some models of air purifiers that diffuse ROS potentially cause DNA damage in the lung although the mechanism was left unsolved.

  19. Pathology consultation on transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amy E; Adamski, Jill

    2012-10-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious condition characterized by respiratory distress, hypoxia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, which occur within 6 hours of transfusion. Several theories have been proposed to explain the underlying pathologic mechanisms of TRALI. Immune-mediated TRALI accounts for over 80% of reported cases and is mediated by donor antibodies to HLAs and/or human neutrophil antigens (HNA). Immune-mediated TRALI is most commonly associated with donor plasma transfusion or other blood products from multiparous women, which has led many countries to reduce or exclude women from donating high-volume plasma products. This policy change has resulted in a decrease in the incidence of TRALI and highlighted the importance of nonimmune-mediated TRALI, which is thought to be caused by bioreactive lipids and other biologic response modifiers that accumulate during storage of blood products. When TRALI is suspected, clinical consultation with a transfusion medicine specialist helps differentiate it from other transfusion reactions with similar characteristics.

  20. [Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI): an unrecognised pathology].

    PubMed

    Moalic, V; Vaillant, C; Ferec, C

    2005-03-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but potentially severe complication of blood transfusion, manifested by pulmonary oedema, fever and hypotension. The signs and symptoms are often attributed to other clinical aspects of a patient's condition, and therefore, TRALI may go unrecognised. It has been estimated to be the third cause of transfusion related mortality, so it should be better diagnosed. Cases are related to multiple blood units, such as white blood cells, red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets or intravenous immunoglobulins. Physiopathology of TRALI is poorly understood, and still controversial. It is often due to an immunological conflict between transfused plasma antibodies and recipients' blood cells. These antibodies are either HLA (class I or II) or granulocyte-specific. They appear to act as mediators, which result in granulocytes aggregation, activation and micro vascular pulmonary injury. Lipids or cytokines in blood units are also involved as TRALI priming agents. Diagnosis is based on antibody screening in blood components and on specific-antigen detection in the recipient. The screening of anti-HLA or anti-granulocytes is recommended as part of prevention for female donors who had been pregnant. Preventative measures should also include leucoreduction and measures to decrease the amount of priming agents in blood components. In this article, we summarise what is known about TRALI, and we focus attention on unanswered questions and controversial issues related to TRALI.

  1. Oxidative Lung Damage Resulting from Repeated Exposure to Radiation and Hyperoxia Associated with Space Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Turowski, Jason B; Arguiri, Evguenia; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Solomides, Charalambos C; Thom, Stephen R; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2013-01-01

    Background Spaceflight missions may require crewmembers to conduct Extravehicular Activities (EVA) for repair, maintenance or scientific purposes. Pre-breathe protocols in preparation for an EVA entail 100% hyperoxia exposure that may last for a few hours (5-8 hours), and may be repeated 2-3 times weekly. Each EVA is associated with additional challenges such as low levels of total body cosmic/galactic radiation exposure that may present a threat to crewmember health and therefore, pose a threat to the success of the mission. We have developed a murine model of combined, hyperoxia and radiation exposure (double-hit) in the context of evaluating countermeasures to oxidative lung damage associated with space flight. In the current study, our objective was to characterize the early and chronic effects of repeated single and double-hit challenge on lung tissue using a novel murine model of repeated exposure to low-level total body radiation and hyperoxia. This is the first study of its kind evaluating lung damage relevant to space exploration in a rodent model. Methods Mouse cohorts (n=5-15/group) were exposed to repeated: a) normoxia; b) >95% O2 (O2); c) 0.25Gy single fraction gamma radiation (IR); or d) a combination of O2 and IR (O2+IR) given 3 times per week for 4 weeks. Lungs were evaluated for oxidative damage, active TGFβ1 levels, cell apoptosis, inflammation, injury, and fibrosis at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks post-initiation of exposure. Results Mouse cohorts exposed to all challenge conditions displayed decreased bodyweight compared to untreated controls at 4 and 8 weeks post-challenge initiation. Chronic oxidative lung damage to lipids (malondialdehyde levels), DNA (TUNEL, cleaved Caspase 3, cleaved PARP positivity) leading to apoptotic cell death and to proteins (nitrotyrosine levels) was elevated all treatment groups. Importantly, significant systemic oxidative stress was also noted at the late phase in mouse plasma, BAL fluid, and urine. Importantly

  2. Animal models and medical countermeasures development for radiation-induced lung damage: report from an NIAID Workshop.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jacqueline P; Jackson, Isabel L; Shah, Jui R; Czarniecki, Christine W; Maidment, Bert W; DiCarlo, Andrea L

    2012-05-01

    Since 9/11, there have been concerns that terrorists may detonate a radiological or nuclear device in an American city. Aside from several decorporation and blocking agents for use against internal radionuclide contamination, there are currently no medications within the Strategic National Stockpile that are approved to treat the immediate or delayed complications resulting from accidental exposure to radiation. Although the majority of research attention has focused on developing countermeasures that target the bone marrow and gastrointestinal tract, since they represent the most acutely radiosensitive organs, individuals who survive early radiation syndromes will likely suffer late effects in the months that follow. Of particular concern are the delayed effects seen in the lung that play a major role in late mortality seen in radiation-exposed patients and accident victims. To address these concerns, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases convened a workshop to discuss pulmonary model development, mechanisms of radiation-induced lung injury, targets for medical countermeasures development, and end points to evaluate treatment efficacy. Other topics covered included guidance on the challenges of developing and licensing drugs and treatments specific to a radiation lung damage indication. This report reviews the data presented, as well as key points from the ensuing discussion.

  3. Acute Bilateral Renal and Splenic Infarctions Occurring during Chemotherapy for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Noriko; Tomoda, Koichi; Matsuda, Masayuki; Fujita, Yukio; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Hontsu, Shigeto; Tasaki, Masato; Yoshikawa, Masanori; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a rare case of acute bilateral renal and splenic infarctions occurring during chemotherapy for lung cancer. A 60-year-old man presented with acute and intensive upper abdominal and back pain during chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for lung cancer. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed bilateral renal and splenic infarctions. After the administration of unfractionated heparin his pain was relieved with a clearance of the infarctions in the CT findings and a recovery of renal dysfunction. Enhanced coagulation by lung cancer and arterial ischemia by chemotherapy may therefore contribute to the development of these infarctions. PMID:27980265

  4. Atomization method for verifying size effects of inhalable particles on lung damage of mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chen; Tang, Yue; Zhang, Lan; Tian, Yonggang; Zhang, Yingmei

    2017-02-01

    To explore the size effects of inhalable particles on lung damage, aqueous aerosol containing cadmium was studied as a model to design a new type of two-stage atomization device that was composed of two adjustable parts with electronic ultrasonic atomization and pneumatic atomization. The working parameters and effectiveness of this device were tested with H2O atomization and CdCl2 inhalation, respectively. By gravimetrically detecting the mass concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 and analysing the particle size with a laser sensor, we confirmed the particle size distribution of the aqueous aerosol produced by the new device under different working conditions. Then, we conducted experiments in male Kunming mice that inhaled CdCl2 to determine the size effects of inhalable particles on lung damage and to confirm the effectiveness of the device. The new device could effectively control the particle size in the aqueous aerosol. The inhaled CdCl2 entered and injured the lungs of the mice by causing tissue damage, oxidative stress, increasing endoplasmic reticulum stress and triggering an inflammatory response, which might be related to where the particles deposited. The smaller particles in the aqueous aerosol atomized by the new two-stage atomization device deposited deeper into lung causing more damage. This device could provide a new method for animal experiments involving inhalation with water-soluble toxins.

  5. Increased T cell glucose uptake reflects acute rejection in lung grafts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Delphine L.; Wang, Xingan; Yamamoto, Sumiharu; Carpenter, Danielle; Engle, Jacquelyn T.; Li, Wenjun; Lin, Xue; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Huang, Howard J.; Gelman, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Although T cells are required for acute lung rejection, other graft-infiltrating cells such as neutrophils accumulate in allografts and are also high glucose utilizers. Positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose probe [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) has been employed to image solid organ acute rejection, but the sources of glucose utilization remain undefined. Using a mouse model of orthotopic lung transplantation, we analyzed glucose probe uptake in the grafts of syngeneic and allogeneic recipients with or without immunosuppression treatment. Pulmonary microPET scans demonstrated significantly higher [18F]FDG uptake in rejecting allografts when compared to transplanted lungs of either immunosuppressed or syngeneic recipients. [18F]FDG uptake was also markedly attenuated following T cell depletion therapy in lung recipients with ongoing acute rejection. Flow-cytometric analysis using the fluorescent deoxyglucose analog 2-NBDG revealed that T cells, and in particular CD8+ T cells, were the largest glucose utilizers in acutely rejecting lung grafts followed by neutrophils and antigen presenting cells. These data indicate that imaging modalities tailored toward assessing T cell metabolism may be useful in identifying acute rejection in lung recipients PMID:23927673

  6. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hodder, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1) an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2) a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician. PMID:27147862

  7. Protective Effects of Cucurbitacin B on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Sepsis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Shu; Liu, Xing; Lv, Shuguang; Wang, Zhifang

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of cucurbitacin B (CuB) on sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats. Material/Methods An ALI model was made by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in SD rats. Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=15 per group): animals undergoing a sham CLP (sham group); animals undergoing CLP (CLP control group); animals undergoing CLP and treated with CuB at 1 mg/kg of body weight (bw) (low-dose CuB [L-CuB] group), animals undergoing CuB at 2 mg/kg of bw (mid-dose CuB [M-CuB] group); and animals undergoing CuB at 5 mg/kg of bw (high-dose CuB [H-CuB] group). Samples of blood and lung tissue were harvested at different time points (6, 12, and 24 hour post-CLP surgery) for the detection of indicators which represented ALI. Five rats were respectively sacrificed at each time point. Pathological changes of lung tissue were observed by H&E staining. Another 50 rats were distributed into the same five groups to record the 72 hour survival rates. Results Treatment with CuB significantly increased the blood gas PaO2 levels and decreased lung wet/dry (W/D) ratio (p<0.05). It significantly reduced protein concentration, accumulation of the inflammatory cells, and levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), (p<0.05), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Pulmonary pathological damage and survival rates at 72 hours were found to be effectively improved by CuB. In addition, CuB performed its pulmonary protection effects in a dose-depended manner. Conclusions CuB can effectively improve the pulmonary gas exchange function, reduce pulmonary edema, and inhibit the inflammatory response in the lung, revealing that CuB may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for sepsis-induced ALI. PMID:28315572

  8. [Lung ultrasound in acute and critical care medicine].

    PubMed

    Zechner, P M; Seibel, A; Aichinger, G; Steigerwald, M; Dorr, K; Scheiermann, P; Schellhaas, S; Cuca, C; Breitkreutz, R

    2012-07-01

    The development of modern critical care lung ultrasound is based on the classical representation of anatomical structures and the need for the assessment of specific sonography artefacts and phenomena. The air and fluid content of the lungs is interpreted using few typical artefacts and phenomena, with which the most important differential diagnoses can be made. According to a recent international consensus conference these include lung sliding, lung pulse, B-lines, lung point, reverberation artefacts, subpleural consolidations and intrapleural fluid collections. An increased number of B-lines is an unspecific sign for an increased quantity of fluid in the lungs resembling interstitial syndromes, for example in the case of cardiogenic pulmonary edema or lung contusion. In the diagnosis of interstitial syndromes lung ultrasound provides higher diagnostic accuracy (95%) than auscultation (55%) and chest radiography (72%). Diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary embolism can be achieved at the bedside by evaluating subpleural lung consolidations. Detection of lung sliding can help to detect asymmetrical ventilation and allows the exclusion of a pneumothorax. Ultrasound-based diagnosis of pneumothorax is superior to supine anterior chest radiography: for ultrasound the sensitivity is 92-100% and the specificity 91-100%. For the diagnosis of pneumothorax a simple algorithm was therefore designed: in the presence of lung sliding, lung pulse or B-lines, pneumothorax can be ruled out, in contrast a positive lung point is a highly specific sign of the presence of pneumothorax. Furthermore, lung ultrasound allows not only diagnosis of pleural effusion with significantly higher sensitivity than chest x-ray but also visual control in ultrasound-guided thoracocentesis.

  9. Endoscopic lung volume reduction effectively treats acute respiratory failure secondary to bullous emphysema.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Paul; Garrett, Jeffrey E; Rankin, Nigel; Anderson, Graeme

    2010-10-01

    Emphysema often affects the lungs in a heterogeneous fashion, and collapse or removal of severely hyperinflated portions of lung can improve overall lung function and symptoms. The role of lung volume reduction (LVR) surgery in selected patients is well established, but that of non-surgical LVR is still being defined. In particular, use of endobronchial LVR is still under development. This case report describes a 48-year-old non-smoker with severe bullous emphysema complicated by acute hypercapnic respiratory failure, who was successfully treated by endobronchial valve placement while intubated in an intensive care unit.

  10. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  11. Genome‑wide analysis of DNA methylation in rat lungs with lipopolysaccharide‑induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Qiang; Lv, Chang-Jun; Liu, Xiang-Yong; Hao, Dong; Qin, Jing; Tian, Huan-Huan; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Zhi

    2013-05-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) are associated with high morbidity and mortality in patients, however, the precise pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS remains unknown. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exhibits a number of critical functions and may be associated with the DNA methylation of genes in the lungs. In the present study a genome‑wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed in rat lungs with LPS‑induced ALI/ARDS. Normal and LPS‑induced lung tissues with ALI were analyzed using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and a rat DNA methylation promoter plus CpG island microarray and the candidate genes were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT‑PCR). Aberrant DNA methylation of the promoter regions of 1,721 genes and the CpG islands of 990 genes was identified when normal lung tissues and lung tissues with LPS‑induced ALI/ARDS were compared. These genes were commonly located on chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 (P<0.01). Methylation level and CpG density were compared and it was found that genes associated with high CpG density promoters had a high ratio of methylation. Furthermore, we performed gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. In addition, three genes (Mapk3, Pak1 and Rac2) were validated in the control and lung tissues with ALI by RT‑PCR. The results indicate that aberrant DNA methylation of lung tissues may be involved in the pathophysiology of LPS‑induced ALI/ARDS. Future studies are required to evaluate the therapeutic and prognostic value of the current novel observations in ALI/ARDS.

  12. The role of leukocytes in the pathogenesis of fibrin deposition in bovine acute lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Car, B. D.; Suyemoto, M. M.; Neilsen, N. R.; Slauson, D. O.

    1991-01-01

    The peculiarly fibrinous nature of bovine acute lung injury due to infection with Pasteurella haemolytica A1 suggests an imbalance between leukocyte-directed procoagulant and profibrinolytic influences in the inflamed bovine lung. Calves with experimental pneumonia produced by intratracheal inoculation with P. haemolytica A1 developed acute locally extensive cranioventral fibrinopurulent bronchopneumonia. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) recovered by segmental lavage from affected lung lobes were 30 times more procoagulant than PAM obtained from unaffected lung lobes and 37-fold more procoagulant than PAM from control calf lungs. Unlike the enhancement of procoagulant activity, profibrinolytic activity (plasminogen activator amidolysis) of total lung leukocytes (PAM and plasminogen activator neutrophils [PMN]) was decreased 23 times in cells obtained from affected lung lobes and also was decreased four times in cells obtained from unaffected lobes of infected animals. This marked imbalance in cellular procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity probably contributes significantly to enhanced fibrin deposition and retarded fibrin removal. In addition, PAM from inflamed lungs were strongly positive for bovine tissue factor antigen as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry. Intensely tissue factor-positive PAM enmeshed in fibrinocellular exudates and positive alveolar walls were situated such that they were likely to have, in concert, initiated extrinsic activation of coagulation in the acutely inflamed lung. These data collectively suggest that enhanced PAM-directed procoagulant activity and diminished PAM- and PMN-directed profibrinolytic activity represent important modifications of local leukocyte function in bovine acute lung injury that are central to the pathogenesis of lesion development with extensive fibrin deposition and retarded fibrin removal. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2024707

  13. Lung damage and pulmonary uptake of serotonin in intact dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, C.A.; Christensen, C.W.; Rickaby, D.A.; Linehan, J.H.; Johnston, M.R.

    1985-06-01

    The authors examined the influence of glass bead embolization and oleic acid, dextran, and imipramine infusion on the pulmonary uptake of trace doses of (/sup 3/H)serotonin and the extravascular volume accessible to (/sup 14/C)antipyrine in anesthetized dogs. Embolization and imipramine decreased serotonin uptake by 53 and 61%, respectively, but no change was observed with oleic acid or dextran infusion. The extravascular volume accessible to the antipyrine was reduced by 77% after embolization and increased by 177 and approximately 44% after oleic acid and dextran infusion, respectively. The results suggest that when the perfused endothelial surface is sufficiently reduced, as with embolization, the uptake of trace doses of serotonin will be depressed. In addition, decreases in serotonin uptake in response to imipramine in this study and in response to certain endothelial toxins in other studies suggest that serotonin uptake can reveal certain kinds of changes in endothelial function. However, the lack of a response to oleic acid-induced damage in the present study suggests that serotonin uptake is not sensitive to all forms of endothelial damage.

  14. Transcriptional alterations of ET-1 axis and DNA damage in lung tissue of a rat obesity model.

    PubMed

    Del Ry, Silvia; Cabiati, Manuela; Salvadori, Costanza; Guiducci, Letizia; Caselli, Chiara; Prescimone, Tommaso; Facioni, Maria Sole; Azzarà, Alessia; Chiaramonte, Anna; Mazzoni, Stefano; Bruschi, Fabrizio; Giannessi, Daniela; Scarpato, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Obesity has been implicated in the development of many cancers. This can lead to genome damage, especially in the form of double-strand break, the presence of which is now easily detected through nuclear phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) focus assay. Recently, the endothelin (ET) axis has also been shown to have a role in the growth and progression of several tumors, including lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ET-1 system transcriptional alterations and γ-H2AX in lung tissue of Zucker rats subdivided into obese (O, n=22) and controls (CO, n=18) rats: under either fasting conditions (CO(fc)-O(fc)) or acute hyperglycemia (CO(AH)-O(AH)). Significantly higher prepro-ET-1 (p=0.05) and ET-converting enzyme (ECE)-2 mRNA expression was observed in O with respect to CO. A significant positive association was observed between prepro-ET-1 and ET-A in the whole rat population (p=0.009) or in the obese group alone (p=0.007). The levels of γ-H2AX in O and in O(AH) rats were significantly higher (p=0.019) than in the corresponding CO and CO(AH) rats (p=0.038). The study shows an inappropriate secretion of ET-1 in O animals with a parallel DNA damage in their lungs, providing novel mechanisms by which ET receptor antagonist may exert organ protection.

  15. Clinical review: the implications of experimental and clinical studies of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, Enrique; Villagrá, Ana; López-Aguilar, Josefina; Blanch, Lluis

    2004-04-01

    Mechanical ventilation can cause and perpetuate lung injury if alveolar overdistension, cyclic collapse, and reopening of alveolar units occur. The use of low tidal volume and limited airway pressure has improved survival in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The use of recruitment maneuvers has been proposed as an adjunct to mechanical ventilation to re-expand collapsed lung tissue. Many investigators have studied the benefits of recruitment maneuvers in healthy anesthetized patients and in patients ventilated with low positive end-expiratory pressure. However, it is unclear whether recruitment maneuvers are useful when patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome are ventilated with high positive end-expiratory pressure, and in the presence of lung fibrosis or a stiff chest wall. Moreover, it is unclear whether the use of high airway pressures during recruitment maneuvers can cause bacterial translocation. This article reviews the intrinsic mechanisms of mechanical stress, the controversy regarding clinical use of recruitment maneuvers, and the interactions between lung infection and application of high intrathoracic pressures.

  16. Polymer-surfactant treatment of meconium-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, K W; William Taeusch, H; Robertson, B; Goerke, J; Clements, J A

    2000-08-01

    Substances (for example, serum proteins or meconium) that interfere with the activity of pulmonary surfactant in vitro may also be important in the pathogenesis or progression of acute lung injury. Addition of polymers such as dextran or polyethylene glycol (PEG) to surfactants prevents and reverses surfactant inactivation. The purpose of this study was to find out whether surfactant/polymer mixtures are more effective for treating one form of acute lung injury than is surfactant alone. Acute lung injury in adult rats was created by tracheal instillation of human meconium. Injured animals, which were anesthetized, paralyzed, and ventilated with 100% oxygen and not treated with surfactant mixtures, remained hypoxic and required high ventilator pressures to maintain Pa(CO(2)) in the normal range over the 3 h of the experiment. Uninjured animals maintained normal values for oxygen and compliance of the respiratory system. The greatest improvement in both oxygenation (178%) and compliance (42%) occurred in animals with lung injury that were treated with Survanta and PEG (versus untreated control animals; p < 0.01), whereas little improvement was found after treatment with Survanta alone. Similar results were found when postmortem pulmonary pressure-volume curves and histology were examined. We conclude that adding PEG to Survanta improves gas exchange, pulmonary mechanics, and histologic appearance of the lungs in a rat model of acute lung injury caused by meconium.

  17. Asialoerythropoietin ameliorates bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in rabbits by reducing inflammation

    PubMed Central

    SONODA, AKINAGA; NITTA, NORIHISA; TSUCHIYA, KEIKO; OTANI, HIDEJI; WATANABE, SHOBU; MUKAISHO, KENICHI; TOMOZAWA, YUKI; NAGATANI, YUKIHIRO; OHTA, SHINICHI; TAKAHASHI, MASASHI; MURATA, KIYOSHI

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury, a critical illness characterized by acute respiratory failure with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, remains unresponsive to current treatments. The condition involves injury to the alveolar capillary barrier, neutrophil accumulation and the induction of proinflammatory cytokines followed by lung fibrosis. In the present study, a rabbit model of bleomycin-induced acute lung injury was established to examine the effects of asialoerythropoietin (AEP), an agent with tissue-protective activities, on pulmonary inflammation. Six Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into two equal groups. Acute lung injury was induced in all rabbits by intratracheally injecting bleomycin. The control group was injected with bleomycin only; the experimental (AEP) group was injected intravenously with AEP (80 μg/kg) prior to the bleomycin injection. Computed tomography (CT) studies were performed seven days later. The CT inflammatory scores of areas exhibiting abnormal density and the pathological inflammatory scores were recorded as a ratio on a 7×7 mm grid. The CT and pathological inflammatory scores were significantly different between the control and AEP groups [122±10 and 16.3±1.5 (controls) vs. 71±8.5 and 9.7±1.4 (AEP), respectively; P<0.01]. Thus, the present study revealed that AEP prevents bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in rabbits. PMID:25289037

  18. Brain damage following prophylactic cranial irradiation in lung cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Simó, Marta; Vaquero, Lucía; Ripollés, Pablo; Jové, Josep; Fuentes, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Bruna, Jordi

    2016-03-01

    Long-term toxic effects of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on cognition in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients have not yet been well-established. The aim of our study was to examine the cognitive toxic effects together with brain structural changes in a group of long-term SCLC survivors treated with PCI. Eleven SCLC patients, who underwent PCI ≥ 2 years before, were compared with an age and education matched healthy control group. Both groups were evaluated using a neuropsychological battery and multimodal structural magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel-based morphometry and Tract-based Spatial Statistics were used to study gray matter density (GMD) and white matter (WM) microstructural changes. Cognitive deterioration was correlated with GMD and Fractional Anisotropy (FA). Finally, we carried out a single-subject analysis in order to evaluate individual structural brain changes. Nearly half of the SCLC met criteria for cognitive impairment, all exhibiting a global worsening of cognitive functioning. Patients showed significant decreases of GMD in basal ganglia bilaterally (putamen and caudate), bilateral thalamus and right insula, together with WM microstructural changes of the entire corpus callosum. Cognitive deterioration scores correlated positively with mean FA values in the corpus callosum. Single-subject analysis revealed that GMD and WM changes were consistently observed in nearly all patients. This study showed neuropsychological deficits together with brain-specific structural differences in long-term SCLC survivors. Our results suggest that PCI therapy, possibly together with platinum-based chemotherapy, was associated to permanent long-term cognitive and structural brain effects in a SCLC population.

  19. The Effects of Quercetin on Acute Lung Injury and Biomarkers of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in the Rat Model of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Gerin, Fethullah; Sener, Umit; Erman, Hayriye; Yilmaz, Ahsen; Aydin, Bayram; Armutcu, Ferah; Gurel, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Experimental studies indicate that sepsis causes remote organ injury although the molecular mechanism has not been clearly defined. In this report, the role of oxidative damage, and inflammation on lung injury, following sepsis model by cecal ligation and puncture, and the effects of quercetin, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory flavonoid, in the lung tissue were investigated. In the present study, we found that administration of single-dose quercetin before cecal ligation and puncture procedure, while markedly diminishing the levels of YKL-40 and oxidant molecules (xanthine oxidase (XO), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA)), increases the antioxidant enzymes levels. Quercetin is beneficial to acute lung injury by decreasing the levels of oxidative stress markers and increasing the antioxidant enzyme activities. Quercetin also causes a decrease in the serum levels of YKL-40 and periostin in the oxidative lung injury induced by the experimental sepsis model.

  20. Effect of Valproic Acid on Acute Lung Injury in a Rodent Model of Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyuseok; Li, Yongqing; Jin, Guang; Chong, Wei; Liu, Baoling; Lu, Jennifer; Lee, Kyoungbun; deMoya, Marc; Velmahos, George; Alam, Hasan B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Acute lung injury (ALI) is developed in many clinical situations and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Valproic acid (VPA), a well-known anti-epileptic drug, has been shown to have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in various ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) models. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether VPA could affect survival and development of ALI in a rat model of intestinal I/R. Methods Two experiments were performed. Experiment I: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–300 g) were subjected to intestinal ischemia (1 hour) and reperfusion (3 hours). They were randomized into 2 groups (n=7/group) 30 min after ischemia: Vehicle (Veh) and VPA (300 mg/kg, IV). Primary end-point for this study was survival over 4 hours from the start of ischemia. Experiment II: The histological and biochemical effects of VPA treatment on lungs were examined 3 hours (1 hr ischemia + 2 hrs reperfusion) after intestinal I/R injury (Veh vs. VPA, n = 9/group). An objective histological score was used to grade the degree of ALI. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to measure serum levels of cytokine interleukins (IL-6 and 10), and lung tissue of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). In addition, the activity of 8-isoprostane was analyzed for pulmonary oxidative damage. Results In Experiment I, four-hour survival rate was significantly higher in VPA treated animals compared to Veh animals (71.4% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.006). In Experiment II, ALI was apparent in all of the Veh group animals. Treatment with VPA prevented the development of ALI, with a reduction in the histological score (3.4 ± 0.3 vs. 5.3 ± 0.6, p = 0.025). Moreover, compared to the Veh control group the animals from the VPA group displayed decreased serum levels of IL-6 (952 ± 213 vs. 7709 ± 1990 pg/ml, p = 0.011), and lung tissue concentrations of CINC (1188 ± 28 vs. 1298 ± 27, p < 0.05), MPO activity (368 ± 23 vs. 490

  1. The role of pneumolysin in mediating lung damage in a lethal pneumococcal pneumonia murine model

    PubMed Central

    García-Suárez, María del Mar; Flórez, Noelia; Astudillo, Aurora; Vázquez, Fernando; Villaverde, Roberto; Fabrizio, Kevin; Pirofski, Liise-Anne; Méndez, Francisco J

    2007-01-01

    Background Intranasal inoculation of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 serotype 2 causes fatal pneumonia in mice. The cytotoxic and inflammatory properties of pneumolysin (PLY) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods To examine the role of PLY in this experimental model we performed ELISA assays for PLY quantification. The distribution patterns of PLY and apoptosis were established by immunohistochemical detection of PLY, caspase-9 activity and TUNEL assay on tissue sections from mice lungs at various times, and the results were quantified with image analysis. Inflammatory and apoptotic cells were also quantified on lung tissue sections from antibody treated mice. Results In bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL), total PLY was found at sublytic concentrations which were located in alveolar macrophages and leukocytes. The bronchoalveolar epithelium was PLY-positive, while the vascular endothelium was not PLY reactive. The pattern and extension of cellular apoptosis was similar. Anti-PLY antibody treatment decreased the lung damage and the number of apoptotic and inflammatory cells in lung tissues. Conclusion The data strongly suggest that in vivo lung injury could be due to the pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory activity of PLY, rather than its cytotoxic activity. PLY at sublytic concentrations induces lethal inflammation in lung tissues and is involved in host cell apoptosis, whose effects are important to pathogen survival. PMID:17257395

  2. Radiation damage to the lung: mitigation by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Medhora, Meetha; Gao, Feng; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Moulder, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Concern regarding accidental overexposure to radiation has been raised after the devastating Tohuku earthquake and tsunami which initiated the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan, in March 2011. Radiation exposure is toxic and can be fatal depending on the dose received. Injury to the lung is often reported as part of multi-organ failure in victims of accidental exposures. Doses of radiation >8 Gray to the chest can induce pneumonitis with right ventricular hypertrophy starting after ~2 months. Higher doses may be followed by pulmonary fibrosis that presents months to years after exposure. Though the exact mechanisms of radiation lung damage are not known, experimental animal models have been widely used to study this injury. Rodent models for pneumonitis and fibrosis exhibit vascular, parenchymal and pleural injuries to the lung. Inflammation is a part of the injuries suggesting involvement of the immune system. Researchers world-wide have tested a number of interventions to prevent or mitigate radiation lung injury. One of the first and most successful class of mitigators are inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), an enzyme that is abundant in the lung. These results offer hope that lung injury from radiation accidents may be mitigated, since the ACE inhibitor captopril was effective when started up to one week after irradiation. PMID:22023053

  3. Corticosteroids prevent acute lung dysfunction caused by thoracic irradiation in unanesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Loyd, J.E.; Bolds, J.M.; Wickersham, N.; Malcolm, A.W.; Brigham, K.L.

    1988-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of corticosteroid therapy in a new acute model of oxidant lung injury, thoracic irradiation in awake sheep. Sheep were irradiated with 1,500 rads to the whole chest except for blocking the heart and adjacent ventral lung. Seven experimental sheep were given methylprednisolone (1 g intravenously every 6 h for four doses) and thoracic irradiation; control sheep received only irradiation. In irradiated control sheep, lung lymph flow increased from baseline (7.6 ml/h) to peak at 3 h (13.2), and lung lymph protein clearance increased from 5.1 to 9.7 ml/h. Mean pulmonary artery pressure increased in the irradiated control sheep from 19 to 32.4 cm H/sub 2/O, whereas the lung lymph thromboxane concentration increased from 0.09 to 6.51 ng/ml at 3 h. Arterial oxygen tension in irradiated control sheep fell gradually from 86 mm Hg at baseline to 65 mm Hg at 8 h. Methylprednisolone administration significantly prevented the increase in lung lymph protein clearance, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and lung lymph thromboxane concentration. Methylprednisolone also prevented the fall in arterial oxygen tension after thoracic irradiation, but did not prevent a further decrease in lymphocytes in blood or lung lymph after radiation. We conclude that corticosteroid therapy prevents most of the acute physiologic changes caused by thoracic irradiation in awake sheep.

  4. Neutrophils as early immunologic effectors in hemorrhage- or endotoxemia-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Abraham, E; Carmody, A; Shenkar, R; Arcaroli, J

    2000-12-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by accumulation of neutrophils in the lungs, accompanied by the development of interstitial edema and an intense inflammatory response. To assess the role of neutrophils as early immune effectors in hemorrhage- or endotoxemia-induced lung injury, mice were made neutropenic with cyclophosphamide or anti-neutrophil antibodies. Endotoxemia- or hemorrhage-induced lung edema was significantly reduced in neutropenic animals. Activation of the transcriptional regulatory factor nuclear factor-kappaB after hemorrhage or endotoxemia was diminished in the lungs of neutropenic mice compared with nonneutropenic controls. Hemorrhage or endotoxemia was followed by increases in pulmonary mRNA and protein levels for interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Endotoxin-induced increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression were greater than those found after hemorrhage. The amounts of mRNA or protein for IL-1beta, MIP-2, and TNF-alpha were significantly lower after hemorrhage in the lungs of neutropenic versus nonneutropenic mice. Neutropenia was associated with significant reductions in IL-1beta and MIP-2 but not in TNF-alpha expression in the lungs after endotoxemia. These experiments show that neutrophils play a central role in initiating acute inflammatory responses and causing injury in the lungs after hemorrhage or endotoxemia.

  5. First-pass studies of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chu, R Y; Sidhu, N; Basmadjian, G; Burow, R; Allen, E W

    1993-10-01

    Mild hydrochloric acid was introduced to a caudal lung section in each of eight dogs to induce injury. Transits of 99mTc-labeled red blood cells (RBC) and [123I]iodoantipyrine (IAP) injected intravenously were recorded by a scintillation camera. Lungs and blood samples were analyzed post-mortem. Peak-to-equilibrium ratios (P/E) of RBC time-activity curves were computed to be 3.83 +/- 0.54 for the control lung, 2.58 +/- 0.55 for the injured lung and 2.23 +/- 0.58 for the injured caudal section. For IAP, the respective results were 3.78 +/- 0.29, 2.02 +/- 0.18 and 1.77 +/- 0.17. The decrease of P/E in injured areas was attributed to reduced blood flow. Using mean transit times of the tracers, we computed extravascular lung water per unit blood volume to be 0.35 +/- 0.18 for the control lungs and an increased value of 0.68 +/- 0.24 for the injured lungs. These results displayed sensitivity to injury, but were gross underestimates relative to the corresponding values of 2.04 +/- 0.54 and 4.56 +/- 1.85 in post-mortem analyses.

  6. Methamphetamine causes acute hyperthermia-dependent liver damage.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Laura E; Gunning, William T; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2013-10-01

    Methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity has been correlated with damage to the liver but this damage has not been extensively characterized. Moreover, the mechanism by which the drug contributes to liver damage is unknown. This study characterizes the hepatocellular toxicity of methamphetamine and examines if hyperthermia contributes to this liver damage. Livers from methamphetamine-treated rats were examined using electron microscopy and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Methamphetamine increased glycogen stores, mitochondrial aggregation, microvesicular lipid, and hydropic change. These changes were diffuse throughout the hepatic lobule, as evidenced by a lack of hematoxylin and eosin staining. To confirm if these changes were indicative of damage, serum aspartate and alanine aminotransferase were measured. The functional significance of methamphetamine-induced liver damage was also examined by measuring plasma ammonia. To examine the contribution of hyperthermia to this damage, methamphetamine-treated rats were cooled during and after drug treatment by cooling their external environment. Serum aspartate and alanine aminotransferase, as well as plasma ammonia were increased concurrently with these morphologic changes and were prevented when methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia was blocked. These findings support that methamphetamine produces changes in hepatocellular morphology and damage persisting for at least 24 h after drug exposure. At this same time point, methamphetamine treatment significantly increases plasma ammonia concentrations, consistent with impaired ammonia metabolism and functional liver damage. Methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia contributes significantly to the persistent liver damage and increases in peripheral ammonia produced by the drug.

  7. Passive targeting of phosphatiosomes increases rolipram delivery to the lungs for treatment of acute lung injury: An animal study.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Wen, Chih-Jen; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Sung, Calvin T; Huang, Chun-Lin; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-09-10

    A novel nanovesicle carrier, phosphatiosomes, was developed to enhance the targeting efficiency of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor to the lungs for treating acute lung injury (ALI) by intravenous administration. Phosphatiosomes were the basis of a niosomal system containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) and distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine polyethylene glycol (DSPE-PEG). Rolipram was used as the model drug loaded in the phosphatiosomes. Bioimaging, biodistribution, activated neutrophil inhibition, and ALI treatment were performed to evaluate the feasibility of phosphatiosomes as the lung-targeting carriers. An encapsulation percentage of >90% was achieved for rolipram-loaded nanovesicles. The vesicle size and zeta potential of the phosphatiosomes were 154 nm and -34 mV, respectively. Real-time imaging in rats showed a delayed and lower uptake of phosphatiosomes by the liver and spleen. Ex vivo bioimaging demonstrated a high accumulation of phosphatiosomes in the lungs. In vivo biodistribution exhibited increased lung accumulation and reduced brain penetration of rolipram in phosphatiosomes relative to the control solution. Phosphatiosomes improved the lungs/brain ratio of the drug by more than 7-fold. Interaction with pulmonary lipoprotein surfactants and the subsequent aggregation may be the mechanisms for facilitating lung targeting by phosphatiosomes. Rolipram could continue to inhibit active neutrophils after inclusion in the nanovesicles by suppressing O2(-) generation and elevating cAMP. Phosphatiosomes significantly alleviated ALI in mice as revealed by examining their pulmonary appearance, edema, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and histopathology. This study highlights the potential of nanovesicles to deliver the drug for targeting the lungs and attenuating nervous system side effects.

  8. Prognostic value of genomic damage in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Juan, C; Iniesta, P; Vega, F J; Peinado, M A; Fernandez, C; Caldés, T; Massa, M J; López, J A; Sánchez, A; Torres, A J; Balibrea, J L; Benito, M

    1998-06-01

    Genomic alterations have been analysed in 65 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue samples by using the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR), which is a PCR-based genomic fingerprinting. We have shown that AP-PCR may be applied as a useful and feasible practical method for detection of the genomic alterations that accompany malignancy in NSCLC. Genomic changes detected by us consisted of: allelic losses or gains in anonymous DNA sequences, homozygously deleted DNA sequences and polymorphic DNA sequences. According to these genomic changes, lung tumours evaluated in the present study have been scored into three groups: low, moderate and high genomic damage tumours. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of genomic damage on patient survival. Survival analysis was carried out in 51 NSCLC patients. Our results revealed that high genomic damage patients showed a poorer prognosis than those with low or moderate genomic damage (P = 0.038). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that patients with higher genomic alterations displayed an adjusted-by-stage risk ratio 4.26 times higher than the remaining patients (95% CI = 1.03-17.54). We can conclude that genomic damage has an independent prognostic value of poor clinical evolution in NSCLC.

  9. GRANZYME A AND B-CLUSTER DEFICIENCY DELAYS ACUTE LUNG INJURY IN PNEUMOVIRUS-INFECTED MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.M.; Lutter, Rene; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Medema, Jan Paul; Rosenberg, Helene F.; Bos, Albert P.

    2009-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infection by the human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus is a frequent cause of acute lung injury in children. Severe pneumovirus disease in humans is associated with activation of the granzyme pathway by effector lymphocytes, which may promote pathology by exaggerating pro-apoptotic caspase activity and pro-inflammatory activity. The main goal of this study was to determine whether granzymes contribute to the development of acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice. Granzyme-expressing mice and granzyme A, and B-cluster single and double-gene deleted mice were inoculated with the rodent pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice strain J3666, and were studied for markers of lung inflammation and injury. Expression of granzyme A and B is detected in effector lymphocytes in mouse lungs in response to pneumovirus infection. Mice deficient for granzyme A and the granzyme B-cluster have unchanged virus titers in the lungs, but show a significantly delayed clinical response to fatal pneumovirus infection, a feature that is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment, diminished activation of caspase-3 and reduced lung permeability. We conclude that granzyme A and B-cluster deficiency delays the acute progression of pneumovirus disease by reducing alveolar injury. PMID:20018616

  10. DNA damage response at telomeres contributes to lung aging and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Birch, Jodie; Anderson, Rhys K; Correia-Melo, Clara; Jurk, Diana; Hewitt, Graeme; Marques, Francisco Madeira; Green, Nicola J; Moisey, Elizabeth; Birrell, Mark A; Belvisi, Maria G; Black, Fiona; Taylor, John J; Fisher, Andrew J; De Soyza, Anthony; Passos, João F

    2015-11-15

    Cellular senescence has been associated with the structural and functional decline observed during physiological lung aging and in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Airway epithelial cells are the first line of defense in the lungs and are important to COPD pathogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying airway epithelial cell senescence, and particularly the role of telomere dysfunction in this process, are poorly understood. We aimed to investigate telomere dysfunction in airway epithelial cells from patients with COPD, in the aging murine lung and following cigarette smoke exposure. We evaluated colocalization of γ-histone protein 2A.X and telomeres and telomere length in small airway epithelial cells from patients with COPD, during murine lung aging, and following cigarette smoke exposure in vivo and in vitro. We found that telomere-associated DNA damage foci increase in small airway epithelial cells from patients with COPD, without significant telomere shortening detected. With age, telomere-associated foci increase in small airway epithelial cells of the murine lung, which is accelerated by cigarette smoke exposure. Moreover, telomere-associated foci predict age-dependent emphysema, and late-generation Terc null mice, which harbor dysfunctional telomeres, show early-onset emphysema. We found that cigarette smoke accelerates telomere dysfunction via reactive oxygen species in vitro and may be associated with ataxia telangiectasia mutated-dependent secretion of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and -8. We propose that telomeres are highly sensitive to cigarette smoke-induced damage, and telomere dysfunction may underlie decline of lung function observed during aging and in COPD.

  11. Acute Lung Injury Accompanying Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Flu Vaccination in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Etsuko; Nei, Takahito; Kuzu, Shinichi; Chubachi, Kumi; Nojima, Daisuke; Taniuchi, Namiko; Yamano, Yoshimitsu; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Flu vaccinations are administered worldwide every winter for prevention. We herein describe a case of acute lung injury resulting from a pathologically confirmed alveolar hemorrhage, which may have been closely related to a preceding vaccination for pandemic influenza A of 2009/10. The present patient had been hospitalized with an acute lung injury after flu vaccination one year prior to the present hospitalization, however, he received another flu vaccination. We should consider a vaccine-related adverse reaction as a potential cause of pulmonary disease if patients present with this illness during the winter season.

  12. Short people got no reason: gender, height, and disparities in the management of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Robert P; Hyzy, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Though the benefits of lung protective ventilation (LPV) in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) have been known for more than a decade, widespread clinical adoption has been slow. Han and colleagues demonstrate that women with ALI/ARDS are less likely than men to receive LPV, though this disparity resolves when the analysis is adjusted for patient height. This analysis identifies patient height as a significant factor in predicting provider adherence with LPV guidelines, and illuminates why some disparities in intensive care exist and how they may be resolved via improved utilization of evidence-driven protocols.

  13. Relevance of Lung Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Acute Respiratory Failure*

    PubMed Central

    Mezière, Gilbert A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study assesses the potential of lung ultrasonography to diagnose acute respiratory failure. Methods: This observational study was conducted in university-affiliated teaching-hospital ICUs. We performed ultrasonography on consecutive patients admitted to the ICU with acute respiratory failure, comparing lung ultrasonography results on initial presentation with the final diagnosis by the ICU team. Uncertain diagnoses and rare causes (frequency < 2%) were excluded.Weincluded 260 dyspneic patients with a definite diagnosis. Three items were assessed: artifacts (horizontal A lines or vertical B lines indicating interstitial syndrome), lung sliding, and alveolar consolidation and/or pleural effusion. Combined with venous analysis, these items were grouped to assess ultrasound profiles. Results: Predominant A lines plus lung sliding indicated asthma (n = 34) or COPD (n = 49) with 89% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Multiple anterior diffuse B lines with lung sliding indicated pulmonary edema (n = 64) with 97% sensitivity and 95% specificity. A normal anterior profile plus deep venous thrombosis indicated pulmonary embolism (n = 21) with 81% sensitivity and 99% specificity. Anterior absent lung sliding plus A lines plus lung point indicated pneumothorax (n = 9) with 81% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Anterior alveolar consolidations, anterior diffuse B lines with abolished lung sliding, anterior asymmetric interstitial patterns, posterior consolidations or effusions without anterior diffuse B lines indicated pneumonia (n = 83) with 89% sensitivity and 94% specificity. The use of these profiles would have provided correct diagnoses in 90.5% of cases. Conclusions: Lung ultrasound can help the clinician make a rapid diagnosis in patients with acute respiratory failure, thus meeting the priority objective of saving time. PMID:18403664

  14. Resolvin D1 protects against inflammation in experimental acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Dan; Long, Fei-Wu; Chen, Ke-Ling; Yang, Hong-Wei; Lv, Zhao-Yin; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that may lead to multisystemic organ failure with considerable mortality. Recently, resolvin D1 (RvD1) as an endogenous anti-inflammatory lipid mediator has been confirmed to protect against many inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to investigate the effects of RvD1 in acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury. Acute pancreatitis varying from mild to severe was induced by cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS, respectively. Mice were pretreated with RvD1 at a dose of 300 ng/mouse 30 min before the first injection of cerulein. Severity of AP was assessed by biochemical markers and histology. Serum cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in pancreas and lung were determined for assessing the extent of inflammatory response. NF-κB activation was determined by Western blotting. The injection of cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS resulted in local injury in the pancreas and corresponding systemic inflammatory changes with pronounced severity in the cerulein and LPS group. Pretreated RvD1 significantly reduced the degree of amylase, lipase, TNF-α, and IL-6 serum levels; the MPO activities in the pancreas and the lungs; the pancreatic NF-κB activation; and the severity of pancreatic injury and associated lung injury, especially in the severe acute pancreatitis model. These results suggest that RvD1 is capable of improving injury of pancreas and lung and exerting anti-inflammatory effects through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in experimental acute pancreatitis, with more notable protective effect in severe acute pancreatitis. These findings indicate that RvD1 may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy in the management of severe acute pancreatitis.

  15. DNA damage sensor protein hRad9, a novel molecular target for lung cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Takeshi; Maniwa, Yoshimasa; Doi, Takefumi; Okada, Kenji; Nishio, Wataru; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Okita, Yutaka

    2008-11-01

    DNA damage sensor proteins are recognized as upstream components of the DNA damage checkpoint signaling pathway and are required for cell cycle control and the induction of apoptosis. hRad9 plays an important role as an upstream regulator of checkpoint signaling. In our previous studies, we confirmed the significant accumulation of hRad9 in the nuclei of tumor cells in surgically-resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens. We also found that the capacity to produce a functional hRad9 protein was intact in lung cancer cells, a finding which suggests that hRad9 would be a vital component in the pathways that lead to the survival and progression of NSCLC. Small interfering RNA targeting hRad9 was transfected into human lung adenocarcinoma A549 and PC3 cells. After the hRad9 knockdown, the cytotoxicity of the transfected cells was measured by a neutral red uptake test, and the G2-M arrest of irradiated cells was examined by flow cytometry. Significant cytotoxicity was observed in the cancer cells in which hRad9 expression was down-regulated. We also detected the inhibition of Chk1 phosphorylation by Western blot analysis. This suggested that hRad9 silencing leads to the impairment of the DNA damage checkpoint signaling pathway in tumor cells. Flow cytometry indicated a reduced population of cells in the G2-M phase, an observation consistent with the findings of several studies that indicated that hRad9 is necessary for G2-M arrest. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that RNA interference targeting hRad9 in cancer cells leads to the impairment of the DNA damage checkpoint signaling pathway, which appears to be essential for maintaining tumor cell proliferation, and induces cell death. Therefore, hRad9 may be a novel molecular target for lung cancer treatment.

  16. Nitrogen dioxide-induced acute lung injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, A J; Mayorga, M A

    1994-05-20

    Lung mechanics, hemodynamics and blood chemistries were assessed in sheep (Ovis aries) before, and up to 24 h following, a 15-20 min exposure to either air (control) or approximately 500 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Histopathologic examinations of lung tissues were performed 24 h after exposure. Nose-only and lung-only routes of exposure were compared for effects on NO2 pathogenesis. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from air- and NO2-exposed sheep were analyzed for biochemical and cellular signs of NO2 insult. The influence of breathing pattern on NO2 dose was also assessed. Five hundred ppm NO2 exposure of intubated sheep (lung-only exposure) was marked by a statistically significant, albeit small, blood methemoglobin increase. The exposure induced an immediate tidal volume decrease, and an increase in both breathing rate and inspired minute ventilation. Pulmonary function, indexed by lung resistance and dynamic lung compliance, progressively deteriorated after exposure. Maximal lung resistance and dynamic lung compliance changes occurred at 24 h post exposure, concomitant with arterial hypoxemia. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid epithelial cell number and total protein were significantly increased while macrophage number was significantly decreased within the 24 h post-exposure period. Histopathologic examination of lung tissue 24 h after NO2 revealed patchy edema, mild hemorrhage and polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocyte infiltration. The NO2 toxicologic profile was significantly attenuated when sheep were exposed to the gas through a face mask (nose-only exposure). Respiratory pattern was not significantly altered, lung mechanics changes were minimal, hypoxemia did not occur, and pathologic evidence of exudation was not apparent in nose-only, NO2-exposed sheep. The qualitative responses of this large animal species to high-level NO2 supports the concept of size dependent species sensitivity to NO2. In addition, when inspired minute ventilation was used as a dose

  17. Acute traumatic anterior glenohumeral dislocation complicated by axillary nerve damage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    1998-01-01

    An elite soccer player presented with a classic acute anterior dislocation of the glenohumeral joint complicated by axillary nerve damage. The incidence, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, conservative treatment and rehabilitation of the anterior glenohumeral joint dislocation and associated axillary nerve damage are discussed in this paper. ImagesFigure 3

  18. Neutrophil extracellular traps are indirectly triggered by lipopolysaccharide and contribute to acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Su, Xiaoli; Pan, Pinhua; Zhang, Lemeng; Hu, Yongbin; Tan, Hongyi; Wu, Dongdong; Liu, Ben; Li, Haitao; Li, Haosi; Li, Yi; Dai, Minhui; Li, Yuanyuan; Hu, Chengping; Tsung, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) facilitate the extracellular killing of pathogens. However, excessive NETs formation and poor degradation are associated with exacerbated immune responses and tissue injury. In this study, we investigated the role of NETs in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated acute lung injury (ALI) and assessed the use of DNase I, for the treatment of ALI. Additionally, we focused on the controversial issue of whether LPS directly induces NETs release in vitro. NETs formation was detected in murine ALI tissue in vivo and was associated with increased NETs markers, citrullinated-histone H3 tissue levels and NET-DNA levels in BALF. Treatment with DNase I significantly degraded NETs and reduced citrullinated-histone H3 levels, which protected against ALI and ameliorated pulmonary oedema and total protein in BALF. In addition, DNase I significantly reduced IL-6 and TNF-α levels in plasma and BALF. In vitro, LPS-activated platelets rather than LPS alone efficiently induced NETs release. In conclusion, NETs formed during LPS-induced ALI, caused organ damage and initiated the inflammatory response. NETs degradation by DNase I promoted NET-protein clearance and protected against ALI in mice; thus, DNase I may be a new potential adjuvant for ALI therapy. Specifically, LPS induced NETs formation in an indirect manner via platelets activation. PMID:27849031

  19. Nitrogen Dioxide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Sheep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    subsequent to inhalation expo- sure. Non- cardiogenic pulmonary edema is produced by brief exposure and unlike hyperoxia (Newman et al., 1983; Fukushima...macrophage number significantly decreased within the 24-h post-exposure period. Examination of lung tissue 24 after NO2 revealed patchy edema , mild hemorrhage...examination of lung tissue 24 h after NO, revealed patchy edema , mild hemorrhage and polymorphonuclear c, and mononuclear leukocyte infiltration. The NO

  20. ACUTE CONSTRICTIVE PERICARDITIS FOLLOWING LUNG TRANSPLANTATION FOR LYMPHANGIOLEIOMYOMATOSIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Martha E.; Mulligan, Michael; Raghu, Ganesh

    2009-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare cystic progressive lung disease with many extra-pulmonary manifestations which may complicate allograft function after transplantation. We present a LAM patient, one-year status-post bilateral lung transplant, with new dyspnea and declining spirometry without rejection, infection or recurrence. Investigation revealed acute constrictive pericarditis which has not previously been reported in LAM lung transplant patients. This represents a novel complication likely due to progression of extra-pulmonary LAM that should be considered in LAM transplant patients with dyspnea. PMID:19134542

  1. Baclofen, a GABABR agonist, ameliorates immune-complex mediated acute lung injury by modulating pro-inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shunying; Merchant, Michael L; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; McLeish, Kenneth R; Lederer, Eleanor D; Torres-Gonzalez, Edilson; Fraig, Mostafa; Barati, Michelle T; Lentsch, Alex B; Roman, Jesse; Klein, Jon B; Rane, Madhavi J

    2015-01-01

    Immune-complexes play an important role in the inflammatory diseases of the lung. Neutrophil activation mediates immune-complex (IC) deposition-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Components of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) signaling, including GABA B receptor 2 (GABABR2), GAD65/67 and the GABA transporter, are present in the lungs and in the neutrophils. However, the role of pulmonary GABABR activation in the context of neutrophil-mediated ALI has not been determined. Thus, the objective of the current study was to determine whether administration of a GABABR agonist, baclofen would ameliorate or exacerbate ALI. We hypothesized that baclofen would regulate IC-induced ALI by preserving pulmonary GABABR expression. Rats were subjected to sham injury or IC-induced ALI and two hours later rats were treated intratracheally with saline or 1 mg/kg baclofen for 2 additional hours and sacrificed. ALI was assessed by vascular leakage, histology, TUNEL, and lung caspase-3 cleavage. ALI increased total protein, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and interleukin-1 receptor associated protein (IL-1R AcP), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Moreover, ALI decreased lung GABABR2 expression, increased phospho-p38 MAPK, promoted IκB degradation and increased neutrophil influx in the lung. Administration of baclofen, after initiation of ALI, restored GABABR expression, which was inhibited in the presence of a GABABR antagonist, CGP52432. Baclofen administration activated pulmonary phospho-ERK and inhibited p38 MAPK phosphorylation and IκB degradation. Additionally, baclofen significantly inhibited pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-1βAcP release and promoted BAL neutrophil apoptosis. Protective effects of baclofen treatment on ALI were possibly mediated by inhibition of TNF-α- and IL-1β-mediated inflammatory signaling. Interestingly, GABABR2 expression was regulated in the type II pneumocytes in lung tissue sections from lung injured patients, further suggesting a

  2. Inflammation-associated repression of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) reduces alveolar-capillary barrier function during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Henes, Janek; Schmit, Marthe A.; Morote-Garcia, Julio C.; Mirakaj, Valbona; Köhler, David; Glover, Louise; Eldh, Therese; Walter, Ulrich; Karhausen, Jörn; Colgan, Sean P.; Rosenberger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory disorder associated with reduced alveolar-capillary barrier function, increased pulmonary vascular permeability, and infiltration of leukocytes into the alveolar space. Pulmonary function might be compromised, its most severe form being the acute respiratory distress syndrome. A protein central to physiological barrier properties is vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). Given the fact that VASP expression is reduced during periods of cellular hypoxia, we investigated the role of VASP during ALI. Initial studies revealed reduced VASP expressional levels through cytokines in vitro. Studies in the putative human VASP promoter identified NF-κB as a key regulator of VASP transcription. This VASP repression results in increased paracellular permeability and migration of neutrophils in vitro. In a model of LPS-induced ALI, VASP−/− mice demonstrated increased pulmonary damage compared with wild-type animals. These findings were confirmed in a second model of ventilator-induced lung injury. Studies employing bone marrow chimeric animals identified tissue-specific repression of VASP as the underlying cause of decreased barrier properties of the alveolar-capillary barrier during ALI. Taken together these studies identify tissue-specific VASP as a central protein in the control of the alveolar-capillary barrier properties during ALI.—Henes, J., Schmit, M. A., Morote-Garcia, J. C., Mirakaj, V., Köhler, D., Glover, L., Eldh, T., Walter, U., Karhausen, J., Colgan, S. P., Rosenberger, P. Inflammation-associated repression of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) reduces alveolar-capillary barrier function during acute lung injury. PMID:19690214

  3. ARRB1 enhances the chemosensitivity of lung cancer through the mediation of DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongchang; Wang, Liguang; Zhang, Jiangang; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Tiehong; Ni, Yang; Cao, Hongxin; Wang, Kai; Li, Yun; Wang, Yibing; Du, Jiajun

    2017-01-01

    ARRB1 (also known as β-arrestin-1) serves as a multifunctional adaptor contributing to the regulation of signaling pathways. ARRB1 may be involved in DNA damage accumulation; however the underlying mechanism involved is unclear. In the present study, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (H520 and SK-MES-1) were transfected with ARRB1 plasmids or small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) and received treatment with DNA-damaging agents (cisplatin and etoposide). A mouse xenograft model was used to assess the impact of ARRB1 on the efficacy of cisplatin in vivo. A total of 30 surgically resected NSCLC patients were recruited for the present study and qRT-PCR was performed to determine the mRNA levels in cancer tissues compared with para-carcinoma tissues. Our data showed that DNA damage was abrogated in the ARRB1-knockdown cells and enhanced in the ARRB1-overexpressing cells. ATR and Chk1 were more activated in the ARRB1-overexpressing cells compared to the ARRB1-knockdown cells, followed by increased H2AX phosphorylation. DNA damage and apoptosis were increased in the ARRB1-overexpressing cells treated with cisplatin. These data provided strong evidence that ARRB1 contributes to the response of NSCLC to DNA-damaging agents and is essential for DNA damage response (DDR). ARRB1 may enhance the efficacy of DNA-damaging agents in NSCLC. PMID:28035404

  4. Protection from Cigarette Smoke-Induced Lung Dysfunction and Damage by H2 Relaxin (Serelaxin).

    PubMed

    Pini, Alessandro; Boccalini, Giulia; Lucarini, Laura; Catarinicchia, Stefano; Guasti, Daniele; Masini, Emanuela; Bani, Daniele; Nistri, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is the major etiologic factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is characterized by airway remodeling, lung inflammation and fibrosis, emphysema, and respiratory failure. The current therapies can improve COPD management but cannot arrest its progression and reduce mortality. Hence, there is a major interest in identifying molecules susceptible of development into new drugs to prevent or reduce CS-induced lung injury. Serelaxin (RLX), or recombinant human relaxin-2, is a promising candidate because of its anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic properties highlighted in lung disease models. Here, we used a guinea pig model of CS-induced lung inflammation, and remodeling reproducing some of the hallmarks of COPD. Animals exposed chronically to CS (8 weeks) were treated with vehicle or RLX, delivered by osmotic pumps (1 or 10 μg/day) or aerosol (10 μg/ml/day) during CS treatment. Controls were nonsmoking animals. RLX maintained airway compliance to a control-like pattern, likely because of its capability to counteract lung inflammation and bronchial remodeling. In fact, treatment of CS-exposed animals with RLX reduced the inflammatory recruitment of leukocytes, accompanied by a significant reduction of the release of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β). Moreover, RLX was able to counteract the adverse bronchial remodeling and emphysema induced by CS exposure by reducing goblet cell hyperplasia, smooth muscle thickening, and fibrosis. Of note, RLX delivered by aerosol has shown a comparable efficacy to systemic administration in reducing CS-induced lung dysfunction and damage. In conclusion, RLX emerges as a new molecule to counteract CS-induced inflammatory lung diseases.

  5. Gene Expression Changes during the Development of Acute Lung Injury Role of Transforming Growth Factor β

    PubMed Central

    Wesselkamper, Scott C.; Case, Lisa M.; Henning, Lisa N.; Borchers, Michael T.; Tichelaar, Jay W.; Mason, John M.; Dragin, Nadine; Medvedovic, Mario; Sartor, Maureen A.; Tomlinson, Craig R.; Leikauf, George D.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Acute lung injury can occur from multiple causes, resulting in high mortality. The pathophysiology of nickel-induced acute lung injury in mice is remarkably complex, and the molecular mechanisms are uncertain. Objectives: To integrate molecular pathways and investigate the role of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in acute lung injury in mice. Methods: cDNA microarray analyses were used to identify lung gene expression changes after nickel exposure. MAPPFinder analysis of the microarray data was used to determine significantly altered molecular pathways. TGF-β1 protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as the effect of inhibition of TGF-β, was assessed in nickel-exposed mice. The effect of TGF-β on surfactant-associated protein B (Sftpb) promoter activity was measured in mouse lung epithelial cells. Measurements and Main Results: Genes that decreased the most after nickel exposure play important roles in lung fluid absorption or surfactant and phospholipid synthesis, and genes that increased the most were involved in TGF-β signaling. MAPPFinder analysis further established TGF-β signaling to be significantly altered. TGF-β–inducible genes involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix function and fibrinolysis were significantly increased after nickel exposure, and TGF-β1 protein was also increased in the lavage fluid. Pharmacologic inhibition of TGF-β attenuated nickel-induced protein in bronchoalveolar lavage. In addition, treatment with TGF-β1 dose-dependently repressed Sftpb promoter activity in vitro, and a novel TGF-β–responsive region in the Sftpb promoter was identified. Conclusions: These data suggest that TGF-β acts as a central mediator of acute lung injury through the alteration of several different molecular pathways. PMID:16100012

  6. Use of Lung Ultrasound For Diagnosing Acute Heart Failure in Emergency Department of Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mrigakshi; Vijan, Vikrant; Vupputuri, Anjith; Chintamani, Sanjeev; Rajendran, Bishnukiran; Thachathodiyal, Rajesh; Chandrasekaran, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diagnosing heart failure is often a challenge for the healthcare providers due to it’s non-specific and usually subtle physical presentations. The outcomes for treatment are strongly related to the stage of the disease. Considering the importance of early and accurate diagnosis, it is important to have an easy, inexpensive, non-invasive, reliable and reproducible method for diagnosis of heart failure. Recent advancement in radiology and cardiology are supporting the emerging technique of lung ultrasound through B-line evaluation for identifying extravascular lung water. Aim To establish lung ultrasound as an easy, inexpensive, non-invasive, reliable and reproducible method for diagnosing Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (ADHF) in emergency department. Materials and Methods The study was a cross-sectional, prospective, observational, diagnostic validation study of lung ultrasound for diagnosis of acute heart failure in an emergency department and was performed at Amrita Institute of Medical Science, Kochi, Kerala, India. A total of 42 patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute decompensated heart failure were evaluated by plasma B-type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP), Echocardiography (ECHO) and X-ray. Lung ultrasound was done to look for the presence of B-lines. Statistical Analysis Sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of diagnostic modalities were calculated using Mc Nemar’s Chi-square test for the presence and absence of heart failure. Results Lung ultrasound showed a sensitivity of 91.9% and a specificity of 100% in diagnosing acute heart failure comparable to plasma BNP which had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 60%. It was also superior to other methods of diagnosing ADHF namely X-ray and ECHO and showed a good association. Conclusion Lung ultrasound and its use to detect ultrasonographic B-lines is an early, sensitive and an equally accurate predictor of ADHF in the emergency setting as compared to BNP. PMID:28050472

  7. Macrophage micro-RNA-155 promotes lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Liu, Zhi; Su, Jie; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Bai, San-Xing; Zhang, Jin-Zhou; Yu, Shi-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Micro-RNA (miR)-155 is a novel gene regulator with important roles in inflammation. Herein, our study aimed to explore the role of miR-155 in LPS-induced acute lung injury(ALI). ALI in mice was induced by intratracheally delivered LPS. Loss-of-function experiments performed on miR-155 knockout mice showed that miR-155 gene inactivation protected mice from LPS-induced ALI, as manifested by preserved lung permeability and reduced lung inflammation compared with wild-type controls. Bone marrow transplantation experiments identified leukocytes, but not lung parenchymal-derived miR-155-promoted acute lung inflammation. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of miR-155 in lung tissue was greatly elevated in wild-type mice after LPS stimulation. In situ hybridization showed that miR-155 was mainly expressed in alveolar macrophages. In vitro experiments performed in isolated alveolar macrophages and polarized bone marrow-derived macrophages confirmed that miR-155 expression in macrophages was increased in response to LPS stimulation. Conversely, miR-155 gain-of-function in alveolar macrophages remarkably exaggerated LPS-induced acute lung injury. Molecular studies identified the inflammation repressor suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS-1) as the downstream target of miR-155. By binding to the 3'-UTR of the SOCS-1 mRNA, miR-155 downregulated SOCS-1 expression, thus, permitting the inflammatory response during lung injury. Finally, we generated a novel miR-155 knockout rat strain and showed that the proinflammatory role of miR-155 was conserved in rats. Our study identified miR-155 as a proinflammatory factor after LPS stimulation, and alveolar macrophages-derived miR-155 has an important role in LPS-induced ALI.

  8. (-)-Anonaine induces DNA damage and inhibits growth and migration of human lung carcinoma h1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing-Hung; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Huang, Hsuan-Min; Chong, Inn-Wen; Chen, Jia-Shing; Chen, Chung-Yi; Wang, Hui-Min

    2011-03-23

    The anticancer effects of (-)-anonaine were investigated in this current study. (-)-Anonaine at concentration ranges of 50-200 μM exhibited significant inhibition to cell growth and migration activities on human lung cancer H1299 cells at 24 h, albeit cell cycle analyses showed that (-)-anonaine at the above concentration ranges did not cause any significant changes in cell-cycle distributions. Significant nuclear damages of H1299 cells were observed with 10-200 μM (-)-anonaine treatment in a comet assay, whereas higher concentrations (6 and 30 mM) of (-)-anonaine concentrations were required to cause DNA damages in an in vitro plasmid cleavage assay. In summary, our results demonstrated that (-)-anonaine exhibited dose-dependent antiproliferatory, antimigratory, and DNA-damaging effects on H1299 cells. We inferred that (-)-anonaine can cause cell-cycle arrest and DNA damage to hamper the physiological behavior of cancer cells at 72 h, and therefore, it can be useful as one of the potential herbal supplements for chemoprevention of human lung cancer.

  9. Oxidative damage induced by cigarette smoke exposure in mice: impact on lung tissue and diaphragm muscle*,**

    PubMed Central

    de Carlos, Samanta Portão; Dias, Alexandre Simões; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Patricio, Patrícia Damiani; Graciano, Thaise; Nesi, Renata Tiscoski; Valença, Samuel; Chiappa, Adriana Meira Guntzel; Cipriano, Gerson; de Souza, Claudio Teodoro; Chiappa, Gaspar Rogério da Silva

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate oxidative damage (lipid oxidation, protein oxidation, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances [TBARS], and carbonylation) and inflammation (expression of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin [p-AMPK and p-mTOR, respectively]) in the lung parenchyma and diaphragm muscles of male C57BL-6 mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 7, 15, 30, 45, or 60 days. METHODS: Thirty-six male C57BL-6 mice were divided into six groups (n = 6/group): a control group; and five groups exposed to CS for 7, 15, 30, 45, and 60 days, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with control mice, CS-exposed mice presented lower body weights at 30 days. In CS-exposed mice (compared with control mice), the greatest differences (increases) in TBARS levels were observed on day 7 in diaphragm-muscle, compared with day 45 in lung tissue; the greatest differences (increases) in carbonyl levels were observed on day 7 in both tissue types; and sulfhydryl levels were lower, in both tissue types, at all time points. In lung tissue and diaphragm muscle, p-AMPK expression exhibited behavior similar to that of TBARS. Expression of p-mTOR was higher than the control value on days 7 and 15 in lung tissue, as it was on day 45 in diaphragm muscle. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that CS exposure produces oxidative damage, not only in lung tissue but also (primarily) in muscle tissue, having an additional effect on respiratory muscle, as is frequently observed in smokers with COPD. PMID:25210964

  10. MATRILYSIN PARTICIPATES IN THE ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY OIL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ROLE OF MATRILYSIN IN THE ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY OIL COMBUSTION PARTICLES.

    K L Dreher1, WY Su2 and C L Wilson3. 1US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC; 2Duke University, Durham, NC;3Washington University, St. Louis, MO.

    Mechanisms by ...

  11. Mechanism of Tissue Remodeling in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    acute lung injury have been identified (e.g., infection, trauma ), little is known about the factors that control the tissue remodeling response. This...in fibroblasts. This suggests that the main player in this process is acetaldehyde . To test this, we exposed cells to acetaldehyde and found that this

  12. ROLE OF CELL SIGNALING IN PROTECTION FROM DIESEL AND LPS INDUCED ACUTE LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously demonstrated in CD-1 mice that pre-administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor (SB203580) reduces acute lung injury and inflammation following pulmonary exposures to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here ...

  13. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  14. Praeruptorin D and E attenuate lipopolysaccharide/hydrochloric acid induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng-Jiu; Li, Jing-Rong; Zhu, Zheng-Guang; Kong, Huan-Yu; Jin, Hong; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Tian, Yuan-Xin; Li, Zhong-Huang; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Jia-Jie; Wu, Shu-Guang

    2013-06-15

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening syndrome characterized by overwhelming lung inflammation and increased microvascular permeability, which causes a high mortality rate worldwide. The dry root of Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn has been long used to treat respiratory diseases in China. In the present study, Praeruptorin A, C, D and E (PA, PC, PD and PE), four pyranocoumarins extracted from this herb, have been investigated for the pharmacological effects in experimental lung injury mouse models. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged mice, PA and PC did not show protective effect against lung injury at the dose of 80 mg/kg. However, PD and PE significantly inhibited the infiltration of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at the same dose. There was no statistically significant difference between PD and PE group. Further study demonstrated that PD and PE suppressed protein extravasations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, attenuated myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the pathological changes in the lung. Both PD and PE suppressed LPS induced Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway activation in the lung by decreasing the cytoplasmic loss of Inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α) protein and inhibiting the translocation of p65 from cytoplasm to nucleus. We also extended our study to acid-induced acute lung injury and found that these two compounds protected mice from hydrochloric acid (HCl)-induced lung injury by inhibiting PMNs influx, IL-6 release and protein exudation. Taken together, these results suggested that PD and PE might be useful in the therapy of lung injury.

  15. A numerical model of the respiratory modulation of pulmonary shunt and PaO2 oscillations for acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Beda, Alessandro; Jandre, Frederico C; Giannella-Neto, Antonio

    2010-03-01

    It is an accepted hypothesis that the amplitude of the respiratory-related oscillations of arterial partial pressure of oxygen (DeltaPaO2) is primarily modulated by fluctuations of pulmonary shunt (Deltas), the latter generated mainly by cyclic alveolar collapse/reopening, when present. A better understanding of the relationship between DeltaPaO2, Deltas, and cyclic alveolar collapse/reopening can have clinical relevance for minimizing the severe lung damage that the latter can cause, for example during mechanical ventilation (MV) of patients with acute lung injury (ALI). To this aim, we numerically simulated the effect of such a relationship on an animal model of ALI under MV, using a combination of a model of lung gas exchange during tidal ventilation with a model of time dependence of shunt on alveolar collapse/opening. The results showed that: (a) the model could adequately replicate published experimental results regarding the complex dependence of DeltaPaO2 on respiratory frequency, driving pressure (DeltaP), and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), while simpler models could not; (b) such a replication strongly depends on the value of the model parameters, especially of the speed of alveolar collapse/reopening; (c) the relationship between DeltaPaO2 and Deltas was overall markedly nonlinear, but approximately linear for PEEP>or=6 cmH2O, with very large DeltaPaO2 associated with relatively small Deltas.

  16. Spred-2 Deficiency Exacerbates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Ito, Toshihiro; Fushimi, Soichiro; Takahashi, Sakuma; Itakura, Junya; Kimura, Ryojiro; Sato, Miwa; Mino, Megumi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Matsukawa, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe and life-threatening acute lung injury (ALI) that is caused by noxious stimuli and pathogens. ALI is characterized by marked acute inflammation with elevated alveolar cytokine levels. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are involved in cytokine production, but the mechanisms that regulate these pathways remain poorly characterized. Here, we focused on the role of Sprouty-related EVH1-domain-containing protein (Spred)-2, a negative regulator of the Ras-Raf-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-MAPK pathway, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung inflammation. Methods Wild-type (WT) mice and Spred-2−/− mice were exposed to intratracheal LPS (50 µg in 50 µL PBS) to induce pulmonary inflammation. After LPS-injection, the lungs were harvested to assess leukocyte infiltration, cytokine and chemokine production, ERK-MAPK activation and immunopathology. For ex vivo experiments, alveolar macrophages were harvested from untreated WT and Spred-2−/− mice and stimulated with LPS. In in vitro experiments, specific knock down of Spred-2 by siRNA or overexpression of Spred-2 by transfection with a plasmid encoding the Spred-2 sense sequence was introduced into murine RAW264.7 macrophage cells or MLE-12 lung epithelial cells. Results LPS-induced acute lung inflammation was significantly exacerbated in Spred-2−/− mice compared with WT mice, as indicated by the numbers of infiltrating leukocytes, levels of alveolar TNF-α, CXCL2 and CCL2 in a later phase, and lung pathology. U0126, a selective MEK/ERK inhibitor, reduced the augmented LPS-induced inflammation in Spred-2−/− mice. Specific knock down of Spred-2 augmented LPS-induced cytokine and chemokine responses in RAW264.7 cells and MLE-12 cells, whereas Spred-2 overexpression decreased this response in RAW264.7 cells. Conclusions The ERK-MAPK pathway is involved in LPS-induced acute lung inflammation. Spred-2 controls the

  17. Hypertonic saline up-regulates A3 adenosine receptors expression of activated neutrophils and increases acute lung injury after sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshiaki; Chen, Yu; Pauzenberger, Reinhard; Mark, Hirsh I.; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Hypertonic saline resuscitation reduces tissue damage by inhibiting polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Hypertonic saline triggers polymorphonuclear neutrophils to release adenosine triphosphate that is converted to adenosine, inhibiting polymorphonuclear neutrophils through A2a adenosine receptors. polymorphonuclear neutrophils also express A3 adenosine receptors that enhance polymorphonuclear neutrophils functions. Here we investigated whether A3 receptors may diminish the efficacy of hypertonic saline in a mouse model of acute lung injury. Design Randomized animal study and laboratory investigation. Setting University research laboratory. Interventions The effect of A3 receptors on the efficacy of hypertonic saline resuscitation was assessed in A3 receptor knockout and wild-type mice. Animals were treated with hypertonic saline (7.5% NaCl, 4 mL/kg) before or after cecal ligation and puncture, and acute lung injury and mortality were determined. The effect of timing of hypertonic saline exposure on A3 receptor expression and degranulation was studied in vitro with isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Measurements and main results Treatment of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with hypertonic saline before stimulation with formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine inhibited A3 receptor expression and degranulation, whereas hypertonic saline-treatment after formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulation augmented A3 receptor expression and degranulation. Acute lung injury in wild-type mice treated with hypertonic saline after cecal ligation and puncture was significantly greater than in wild-type mice pretreated with hypertonic saline. This aggravating effect of delayed hypertonic saline-treatment was absent in A3 receptor knockout mice. Similarly, mortality in wild-type mice with delayed hypertonic saline-treatment was significantly higher (88%) than in animals treated with hypertonic saline before cecal ligation and puncture (50%). Mortality in A3

  18. Genetic damage induced by benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide and risk of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Q.; Cheng, L.; Li, D.

    1997-10-01

    Lung cancer is the paradigm of carcinogen-induced disease. A chemical carcinogen, benzo[a]pyrene, commonly found in tobacco, is both mutagenic and carcinogenic. It is hypothesized that individuals have varying responses to exposure to environmental carcinogens. In this study, we used benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) as the test mutagen to investigate three in-vitro susceptibility markers in lymphocytes from 51 patients with lung cancer and 172 cancer-free controls. These markers were: BPDE-induced chromosomal aberrations, BPDE-induced DNA adducts, and DNA repair capacity using host cell reactivation assay with BPDE-damaged plasmid. Using the medians of the controls as the cutoff values, increased risk of lung cancer was associated with increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations (OR=6.53; 95% confidence interval (C.I.), 3.74-11.4), increased BPDE-DNA adduct level (odds ratio (OR)=4.7; 95% C.I., 1.2-18.5), and reduced DNA repair capacity (OR=5.7; 95% C.I., 2.1-15.7). In correlation analyses, cellular ability to repair BPDE-induced DNA damage was found to be inversely correlated with the levels of BPDE-induced DNA adducts (n=34; r=0.34; p=0.048) and the levels of BPDE-DNA adducts correlated significantly with the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (n=62; r=0.42; p=0.001). However, cellular ability to repair BPDE-induced DNA damage was not correlated significantly with the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (n=47; r=0.06; p=0.677). These biomarkers have differing sensitivities in measuring repair of damage induced by chemical carcinogens; therefore, the complementary use of these assays should increase the probability of identifying individuals with susceptibility to smoking-related cancers.

  19. Detection of acute inhalation injury in fire victims by means of technetium-99m DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Lin, W Y; Kao, C H; Wang, S J

    1997-02-01

    Mortality and morbidity in fire victims are largely a function of injury due to heat and smoke. While the degree and area of burn together constitute a reliable numerical measure of cutaneous injury due to heat, as yet no satisfactory measure of inhalation injury has been developed. In this study, we employed technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) radioaerosol lung scintigraphy (inhalation scan) to evaluate acute inhalation injury in fire victims. Ten normal controls and 17 survivors from a fire accident were enrolled in the study. All patients suffered from respiratory symptoms (dyspnoea and/or cough with sputum). 99mTc-DTPA aerosol inhalation lung scintigraphy was performed in all subjects, using a commercial lung aerosol delivery unit. The degree of lung damage was presented as the clearance rate (k; %/min) calculated from the time-activity curve over the right lungs. In addition, the distribution pattern of the radioactivity in the lungs was evaluated and classified into two groups: homogeneous distribution and inhomogeneous distribution. A plain chest radiograph (CxR) and pulmonary function test (PFT) were performed in the same group of patients. The results showed that 6/17 (35.3%) patients had inhomogeneous distribution of radioactivity in their inhalation scans, and 11/17 (64.7%) had homogeneous scans. Five of the six patients with inhomogeneous scans were admitted for further management, and all patients with homogeneous scans were discharged from the emergency department and needed no further intensive care. The clearance rates of the right lung were 0.73%+/-0.13%/min for normal controls and 1.54%+/-0.58%/min for fire victims. The difference was significant, with a P value of less than 0.01. Using a cut-off value of 0.9%/min (all normal subjects were below 0. 9%/min), 14 (82.4%) patients had abnormal clearance rates of 99mTc-DTPA from the lung. In contrast, only three (17.6%) patients had abnormal CxR and three (17.6%) had abnormal

  20. Short women with severe sepsis-related acute lung injury receive lung protective ventilation less frequently: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lung protective ventilation (LPV) has been shown to improve survival and the duration of mechanical ventilation in acute lung injury (ALI) patients. Mortality of ALI may vary by gender, which could result from treatment variability. Whether gender is associated with the use of LPV is not known. Methods A total of 421 severe sepsis-related ALI subjects in the Consortium to Evaluate Lung Edema Genetics from seven teaching hospitals between 2002 and 2008 were included in our study. We evaluated patients' tidal volume, plateau pressure and arterial pH to determine whether patients received LPV during the first two days after developing ALI. The odds ratio of receiving LPV was estimated by a logistic regression model with robust and cluster options. Results Women had similar characteristics as men with the exception of lower height and higher illness severity, as measured by Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score. 225 (53%) of the subjects received LPV during the first two days after ALI onset; women received LPV less frequently than men (46% versus 59%, P < 0.001). However, after adjustment for height and severity of illness (APACHE II), there was no difference in exposure to LPV between men and women (P = 0.262). Conclusions Short people are less likely to receive LPV, which seems to explain the tendency of clinicians to adhere to LPV less strictly in women. Strategies to standardize application of LPV, independent of differences in height and severity of illness, are necessary. PMID:22044724

  1. Pediatric Artificial Lung: A Low-Resistance Pumpless Artificial Lung Alleviates an Acute Lamb Model of Increased Right Ventricle Afterload.

    PubMed

    Alghanem, Fares; Bryner, Benjamin S; Jahangir, Emilia M; Fernando, Uditha P; Trahanas, John M; Hoffman, Hayley R; Bartlett, Robert H; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Hirschl, Ronald B

    Lung disease in children often results in pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure. The availability of a pediatric artificial lung (PAL) would open new approaches to the management of these conditions by bridging to recovery in acute disease or transplantation in chronic disease. This study investigates the efficacy of a novel PAL in alleviating an animal model of pulmonary hypertension and increased right ventricle afterload. Five juvenile lambs (20-30 kg) underwent PAL implantation in a pulmonary artery to left atrium configuration. Induction of disease involved temporary, reversible occlusion of the right main pulmonary artery. Hemodynamics, pulmonary vascular input impedance, and right ventricle efficiency were measured under 1) baseline, 2) disease, and 3) disease + PAL conditions. The disease model altered hemodynamics variables in a manner consistent with pulmonary hypertension. Subsequent PAL attachment improved pulmonary artery pressure (p = 0.018), cardiac output (p = 0.050), pulmonary vascular input impedance (Z.0 p = 0.028; Z.1 p = 0.058), and right ventricle efficiency (p = 0.001). The PAL averaged resistance of 2.3 ± 0.8 mm Hg/L/min and blood flow of 1.3 ± 0.6 L/min. This novel low-resistance PAL can alleviate pulmonary hypertension in an acute animal model and demonstrates potential for use as a bridge to lung recovery or transplantation in pediatric patients with significant pulmonary hypertension refractory to medical therapies.

  2. Modifications of lung clearance mechanisms by acute influenza A infection

    SciTech Connect

    Levandowski, R.A.; Gerrity, T.R.; Garrard, C.S.

    1985-10-01

    Four volunteers with naturally acquired, culture-proved influenza A infection inhaled a radiolabeled aerosol to permit investigation of lung mucociliary clearance mechanisms during and after symptomatic illness. Mucus transport in the trachea was undetectable when monitored with an external multidetector probe within 48 hours of the onset of the illness, but was found at a normal velocity by 1 week in three of the four subjects. In two volunteers who coughed 23 to 48 times during the 4.5-hour observation period, whole lung clearance was as fast within the first 48 hours of illness as during health 3 months later in spite of the absence of measurable tracheal mucus transport. Conversely, in spite of the return 1 week later of mucus transport at velocities expected in the trachea, whole lung clearance for the 4.5-hour period was slowed in two volunteers who coughed less than once an hour. The data offer evidence that cough is important in maintaining lung clearance for at least several days after symptomatic influenza A infection when other mechanisms that depend on ciliary function are severely deficient.

  3. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in acute hyperoxic mouse lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Barazzone, C; Belin, D; Piguet, P F; Vassalli, J D; Sappino, A P

    1996-01-01

    Hyperoxia-induced lung disease is associated with prominent intraalveolar fibrin deposition. Fibrin turnover is tightly regulated by the concerted action of proteases and antiproteases, and inhibition of plasmin-mediated proteolysis could account for fibrin accumulation in lung alveoli. We show here that lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia overproduce plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and that PAI-1 upregulation impairs fibrinolytic activity in the alveolar compartment. To explore whether increased PAI-1 production is a causal or only a correlative event for impaired intraalveolar fibrinolysis and the development of hyaline membrane disease, we studied mice genetically deficient in PAI-1. We found that these mice fail to develop intraalveolar fibrin deposits in response to hyperoxia and that they are more resistant to the lethal effects of hyperoxic stress. These observations provide clear and novel evidence for the pathogenic contribution of PAI-1 in the development of hyaline membrane disease. They identify PAI-1 as a major deleterious mediator of hyperoxic lung injury. PMID:8981909

  4. Thick lung wedge resection for acute life-threatening massive hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Tomomi; Ikeda, Akihiko; Konishi, Taisuke; Matsuzaki, Kanji

    2016-01-01

    Massive hemoptysis from an aortobronchial fistula due to thoracic aortic dissection is an extremely rare symptom, but is a potentially life-threatening condition. We report a case of acute massive hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula that was successfully controlled by a simple and rapid thick wedge resection of the lung with hematoma by using the black cartilage stapler. A 65-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute massive hemoptysis. After tracheal intubation, chest computed tomography revealed hematoma in the left lung and ruptured aortic dissection from the distal arch to the descending aorta. He was diagnosed with aortobronchial fistula and underwent an emergency surgery on the same day. We performed posterolateral thoracotomy. A dissecting aortic aneurysm (diameter, ~80 mm) with adhesion of the left upper lobe and the superior segment of the lower lobe was found. The lung parenchyma expanded with the hematoma. We stapled the upper and lower lobes by using the black cartridge stapler along the aortopulmonary window. Massive hemoptysis disappeared, and the complete aortic dissection appeared. Aortic dissection with adherent lung was excised, and graft replacement of the distal arch and descending thoracic aorta was performed. Proximal lung wedge resection using black cartridge stapler is a simple and quick method to control massive hemoptysis from aortic dissection; hence, this procedure is an effective option to control massive hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula. This technique could rapidly stop massive hemoptysis and prevent dissection of the adherent lung tissue and intra-thoracic bleeding. PMID:27747035

  5. Protective effect of Launaea procumbens (L.) on lungs against CCl4-induced pulmonary damages in rat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Launaea procumbens (L.) is traditionally used in the treatment of various human ailments including pulmonary damages. The present study was arranged to evaluate the role of Launaea procumbens methanol extract (LME) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced oxidative pulmonary damages in rat. Methods 36 Sprague–Dawley male rats (170-180 g) were randomly divided into 06 groups. After a week of acclamization, group I was remained untreated while group II was given olive oil intraperitoneally (i.p.) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) orally, groups III, IV, V and VI were administered CCl4, 3 ml/kg body weight (30% in olive oil i.p.). Groups IV, V were treated with 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg of LME whereas group VI was administered with 50 mg/kg body weight of rutin (RT) after 48 h of CCl4 treatment for four weeks. Antioxidant profile in lungs were evaluated by estimating the activities of antioxidant enzymes; catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GSR), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), quinone reductase (QR) and reduced glutathione (GSH). CCl4-induced lipid peroxidation was determined by measuring the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) with conjugation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damages, argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) counts and histopathology. Results Administration of CCl4 for 6 weeks significantly (p < 0.01) reduced the activities of antioxidant enzymes and GSH concentration while increased TBARS contents and DNA damages in lung samples. Co-treatment of LME and rutin restored the activities of antioxidant enzymes and GSH contents. Changes in TBARS concentration and DNA fragmentation were significantly (p < 0.01) decreased with the treatment of LME and rutin in lung. Changes induced with CCl4 in histopathology of lungs were significantly reduced with co-treatment of LME and rutin. Conclusion Results of present study

  6. Hesperidin as Radioprotector against Radiation-induced Lung Damage in Rat: A Histopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Haddadi, Gholam Hassan; Rezaeyan, Abolhasan; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Fardid, Reza; Najafi, Masoud; Salajegheh, Ashkan

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by ionizing radiation, and one of the organs commonly affected by ROS is the lung. Radiation-induced lung injury including pneumonia and lung fibrosis is a dose-limiting factor in radiotherapy (RT) of patients with thorax irradiation. Administration of antioxidants has been proved to protect against ROS. The present study was aimed to assess the protective effect of hesperidin (HES) against radiation-induced lung injury of male rats. Fifty rats were divided into three groups. G1: Received no HES and radiation (sham). G2: Underwent γ-irradiation to the thorax. G3: Received HES and underwent γ-irradiation. The rats were exposed to a single dose of 18 Gy using cobalt-60 unit and were administered HES (100 mg/kg) for 7 days before irradiation. Histopathological analysis was performed 24 h and 8 weeks after RT. Histopathological results in 24 h showed radiation-induced inflammation and presence of more inflammatory cells as compared to G1 (P < 0.05). Administration of HES significantly decreased such an effect when compared to G2 (P < 0.05). Histopathological evaluation in 8 weeks showed a significant increase in mast cells, inflammation, inflammatory cells, alveolar thickness, vascular thickness, pulmonary edema, and fibrosis in G2 when compared to G1 (P < 0.05). HES significantly decreased inflammatory response, fibrosis, and mast cells when compared to G2 (P < 0.05). Administration of HES resulted in decreased radiation pneumonitis and radiation fibrosis in the lung tissue. Thus, the present study showed HES to be an efficient radioprotector against radiation-induced damage in the lung of tissue rats.

  7. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F.; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  8. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  9. Noninvasive assessment for acute allograft rejection in a rat lung transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hiroaki; Zhao, Xiangdong; Chen, Fengshi; Fujinaga, Takuji; Shoji, Tsuyoshi; Bando, Toru; Wada, Hiromi; Date, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract After lung transplantation, early detection of acute allograft rejection is important not only for timely and optimal treatment, but also for the prediction of chronic rejection which is a major cause of late death. Many biological and immunological approaches have been developed to detect acute rejection; however, it is not well known whether lung mechanics correlate with disease severity, especially with pathological rejection grade. In this study, we examined the relationship between lung mechanics and rejection grade development in a rat acute rejection model using the forced oscillation technique, which provides noninvasive assessment of lung function. To this end, we assessed lung resistance and elastance (RL and EL) from implanted left lung of these animals. The perivascular/interstitial component of rejection severity grade (A‐grade) was also quantified from histological images using tissue fraction (TF; tissue + cell infiltration area/total area). We found that TF, RL, and EL increased according to A‐grade. There was a strong positive correlation between EL at the lowest frequency (Elow; EL at 0.5 Hz) and TF (r2 = 0.930). Furthermore, the absolute difference between maximum value of EL (Emax) and Elow (Ehet; Emax − Elow) showed the strong relationship with standard deviation of TF (r2 = 0.709), and A‐grade (Spearman's correlation coefficients; rs = 0.964, P < 0.0001). Our results suggest that the dynamic elastance as well as its frequency dependence have the ability to predict A‐grade. These indexes should prove useful for noninvasive detection and monitoring the progression of disease in acute rejection. PMID:25524280

  10. Enhanced nucleotide excision repair capacity in lung cancer cells by preconditioning with DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Ye; Park, Jeong-Min; Yi, Joo Mi; Leem, Sun-Hee; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2015-09-08

    The capacity of tumor cells for nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a major determinant of the efficacy of and resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin. Here, we demonstrate that using lesion-specific monoclonal antibodies, NER capacity is enhanced in human lung cancer cells after preconditioning with DNA-damaging agents. Preconditioning of cells with a nonlethal dose of UV radiation facilitated the kinetics of subsequent cisplatin repair and vice versa. Dual-incision assay confirmed that the enhanced NER capacity was sustained for 2 days. Checkpoint activation by ATR kinase and expression of NER factors were not altered significantly by the preconditioning, whereas association of XPA, the rate-limiting factor in NER, with chromatin was accelerated. In preconditioned cells, SIRT1 expression was increased, and this resulted in a decrease in acetylated XPA. Inhibition of SIRT1 abrogated the preconditioning-induced predominant XPA binding to DNA lesions. Taking these data together, we conclude that upregulated NER capacity in preconditioned lung cancer cells is caused partly by an increased level of SIRT1, which modulates XPA sensitivity to DNA damage. This study provides some insights into the molecular mechanism of chemoresistance through acquisition of enhanced DNA repair capacity in cancer cells.

  11. Intestinal epithelium is more susceptible to cytopathic injury and altered permeability than the lung epithelium in the context of acute sepsis.

    PubMed

    Julian, Mark W; Bao, Shengying; Knoell, Daren L; Fahy, Ruairi J; Shao, Guohong; Crouser, Elliott D

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial morphology and function are altered in intestinal epithelia during endotoxemia. However, it is unclear whether mitochondrial abnormalities occur in lung epithelial cells during acute sepsis or whether mitochondrial dysfunction corresponds with altered epithelial barrier function. Thus, we hypothesized that the intestinal epithelium is more susceptible to mitochondrial injury than the lung epithelium during acute sepsis and that mitochondrial dysfunction precedes impaired barrier function. Using a resuscitated feline model of Escherichia coli-induced sepsis, lung and ileal tissues were harvested after 6 h for histological and mitochondrial ultrastructural analyses in septic (n = 6) and time-matched controls (n = 6). Human lung epithelial cells (HLEC) and Caco-2 monolayers (n = 5) were exposed to 'cytomix' (TNFα: 40 ng/ml, IL-1β: 20 ng/ml, IFNγ: 10 ng/ml) for 24-72 h, and measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), epithelial permeability and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) were taken. Lung epithelial morphology, mitochondrial ultrastructure and pulmonary gas exchange were unaltered in septic animals compared to matching controls. While histologically intact, ileal epithelia demonstrated marked mitochondrial ultrastructural damage during sepsis. Caco-2 monolayers treated with cytomix showed a significant decrease in mitochondrial ΔΨ within 24 h, which was associated with a progressive reduction in TER and increased epithelial permeability over the subsequent 48 h. In contrast, mitochondrial ΔΨ and epithelial barrier functions were preserved in HLEC following cytomix. These findings indicate that intestinal epithelium is more susceptible to mitochondrial damage and dysfunction than the lung epithelium in the context of sepsis. Early alterations in mitochondrial function portend subsequent epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  12. A preclinical rodent model of acute radiation-induced lung injury after ablative focal irradiation reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Lee, Hae-June; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Eun, Sung Ho; Lee, Jung Il; Park, Kwangwoo; Lee, Ji Min; Cho, Jaeho

    2014-07-01

    In a previous study, we established an image-guided small-animal micro-irradiation system mimicking clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The goal of this study was to develop a rodent model of acute phase lung injury after ablative irradiation. A radiation dose of 90 Gy was focally delivered to the left lung of C57BL/6 mice using a small animal stereotactic irradiator. At days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 14 after irradiation, the lungs were perfused with formalin for fixation and paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome. At days 7 and 14 after irradiation, micro-computed tomography (CT) images of the lung were taken and lung functional measurements were performed with a flexiVent™ system. Gross morphological injury was evident 9 days after irradiation of normal lung tissues and dynamic sequential events occurring during the acute phase were validated by histopathological analysis. CT images of the mouse lungs indicated partial obstruction located in the peripheral area of the left lung. Significant alteration in inspiratory capacity and tissue damping were detected on day 14 after irradiation. An animal model of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in the acute phase reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy was established and validated with histopathological and functional analysis. This model enhances our understanding of the dynamic sequential events occurring in the acute phase of radiation-induced lung injury induced by ablative dose focal volume irradiation.

  13. c-ANCA-induced neutrophil-mediated lung injury: a model of acute Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Hattar, K; Oppermann, S; Ankele, C; Weissmann, N; Schermuly, R T; Bohle, R M; Moritz, R; Krögel, B; Seeger, W; Grimminger, F; Sibelius, U; Grandel, U

    2010-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA) targeting proteinase 3 (PR3) are implicated in the pathogenesis of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). Fulminant disease can present as acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, a model of ALI in WG was developed using isolated rat lungs. Isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were primed with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) to induce surface expression of PR3. Co-perfusion of TNF-primed neutrophils and monoclonal anti-PR3 antibodies induced a massive weight gain in isolated lungs. This effect was not observed when control immunoglobulin G was co-perfused with TNF-primed PMNs. The c-ANCA-induced oedema formation was paralleled by an increase in the capillary filtration coefficient as a marker of increased pulmonary endothelial permeability. In contrast, pulmonary artery pressure was not affected. In the presence of the oxygen radical scavenger superoxide dismutase and a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, c-ANCA-induced lung oedema could be prevented. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase was equally effective in preventing c-ANCA-induced lung injury. In conclusion, anti-PR3 antibodies induced neutrophil mediated, elastase- and oxygen radical-dependent ALI in the isolated lung. This experimental model supports the hypothesis of a pathogenic role for c-ANCA in WG and offers the possibility of the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of lung injury in fulminant WG.

  14. Effect of partial liquid ventilation on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema after experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, N R; Kozlowski, J K; Gust, R; Shapiro, S D; Schuster, D P

    2000-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with two different dosages of the perfluorocarbon LiquiVent (perflubron) on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema formation after oleic acid (OA)-induced acute lung injury in dogs. We used imaging with positron emission tomography to measure fractional pulmonary blood flow, lung water concentration (LWC), and the pulmonary transcapillary escape rate (PTCER) of (68)Ga-labeled transferrin at 5 and 21 h after lung injury in five dogs undergoing conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV), five dogs undergoing low-dose PLV (perflubron at 10 ml/kg), and four dogs undergoing high dose PLV (perflubron at 30 ml/kg). A positive end-expiratory pressure of 7.5 cm H(2)O was used in all dogs. After OA (0.08 ml/kg)- induced lung injury, there were no significant differences or trends for PTCER or LWC at any time when the PLV groups were compared with the CMV group. However, lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity was significantly lower in the combined PLV group than in the CMV group (p = 0.016). We conclude that after OA-induced lung injury, the addition of PLV to CMV does not directly attenuate pulmonary vascular leak or lung water accumulation. Rather, the benefits of such treatment may be due to modifications of the inflammatory response.

  15. Transfusion of Human Platelets Treated with Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology Does Not Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Caudrillier, Axelle; Mallavia, Beñat; Rouse, Lindsay; Marschner, Susanne; Looney, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction technology (PRT) has been developed in an effort to make the blood supply safer, but there is controversy as to whether it may induce structural or functional changes to platelets that could lead to acute lung injury after transfusion. In this study, we used a commercial PRT system to treat human platelets that were then transfused into immunodeficient mice, and the development of acute lung injury was determined. P-selectin expression was higher in the Mirasol PRT-treated platelets compared to control platelets on storage day 5, but not storage day 1. Transfusion of control vs. Mirasol PRT-treated platelets (day 5 of storage, 109 platelets per mouse) into NOD/SCID mice did not result in lung injury, however transfusion of storage day 5 platelets treated with thrombin receptor-activating peptide increased both extravascular lung water and lung vascular permeability. Transfusion of day 1 platelets did not produce lung injury in any group, and LPS priming 24 hours before transfusion had no effect on lung injury. In a model of transfusion-related acute lung injury, NOD/SCID mice were susceptible to acute lung injury when challenged with H-2Kd monoclonal antibody vs. isotype control antibody. Using lung intravital microscopy, we did not detect a difference in the dynamic retention of platelets in the lung circulation in control vs. Mirasol PRT-treated groups. In conclusion, Mirasol PRT produced an increase in P-selectin expression that is storage-dependent, but transfusion of human platelets treated with Mirasol PRT into immunodeficient mice did not result in greater platelet retention in the lungs or the development of acute lung injury.

  16. Altered Exosomal RNA Profiles in Bronchoalveolar Lavage from Lung Transplants with Acute Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hoji, Aki; Injean, Patil; Poynter, Steven T.; Briones, Claudia; Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav; Sam Weigt, S.; Shino, Michael Y.; Derhovanessian, Ariss; Saggar, Rajan; Ross, David; Ardehali, Abbas; Lynch, Joseph P.; Belperio, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The mechanism by which acute allograft rejection leads to chronic rejection remains poorly understood despite its common occurrence. Exosomes, membrane vesicles released from cells within the lung allograft, contain a diverse array of biomolecules that closely reflect the biologic state of the cell and tissue from which they are released. Exosome transcriptomes may provide a better understanding of the rejection process. Furthermore, biomarkers originating from this transcriptome could provide timely and sensitive detection of acute cellular rejection (AR), reducing the incidence of severe AR and chronic lung allograft dysfunction and improving outcomes. Objectives: To provide an in-depth analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid exosomal shuttle RNA population after lung transplantation and evaluate for differential expression between acute AR and quiescence. Methods: Serial bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were ultracentrifuged to obtain the exosomal pellet for RNA extraction, on which RNA-Seq was performed. Measurements and Main Results: AR demonstrates an intense inflammatory environment, skewed toward both innate and adaptive immune responses. Novel, potential upstream regulators identified offer potential therapeutic targets. Conclusions: Our findings validate bronchoalveolar lavage fluid exosomal shuttle RNA as a source for understanding the pathophysiology of AR and for biomarker discovery in lung transplantation. PMID:26308930

  17. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Seong Ho; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  18. Genomic and functional analysis of the host response to acute simian varicella infection in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nicole; Girke, Thomas; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Nguyen, Christina; Rais, Maham; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) is the causative agent of varicella and herpes zoster. Although it is well established that VZV is transmitted via the respiratory route, the host-pathogen interactions during acute VZV infection in the lungs remain poorly understood due to limited access to clinical samples. To address these gaps in our knowledge, we leveraged a nonhuman primate model of VZV infection where rhesus macaques are intrabronchially challenged with the closely related Simian Varicella Virus (SVV). Acute infection is characterized by immune infiltration of the lung airways, a significant up-regulation of genes involved in antiviral-immunity, and a down-regulation of genes involved in lung development. This is followed by a decrease in viral loads and increased expression of genes associated with cell cycle and tissue repair. These data provide the first characterization of the host response required to control varicella virus replication in the lung and provide insight into mechanisms by which VZV infection can cause lung injury in an immune competent host. PMID:27677639

  19. The therapeutic effects of tuberostemonine against cigarette smoke-induced acute lung inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Beak, Hyunjung; Park, Soojin; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Jaehoon; Park, Sangwon; Kim, Jinju; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-03-05

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is mainly caused by cigarette smoking and is characterized by the destruction of lung parenchyma, structural alterations of the small airways, and systemic inflammation. Tuberostemonine (TS) is an alkaloid-type phytochemical from Stemona tuberosa. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of TS in a cigarette smoke (CS)-induced mouse model of acute lung inflammation. The mice were whole-body exposed to CS or fresh air for 7 days. TS was administered by an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection 1h before exposure to CS. To test the effects of TS, the numbers of total cells, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were counted. Furthermore, we measured the levels of several chemokines, such as GCP-2, MIP-3α, MCP-1 and KC, in the lung tissue. The cellular profiles and histopathological analysis demonstrated that the infiltration of peribronchial and perivascular inflammatory cells significantly decreased in the TS-treated groups compared with the CS-exposure group. The TS treatment significantly ameliorated the airway epithelial thickness induced by CS exposure and caused a significant decrement in the production of chemokines in the lung. These results suggest that TS has anti-inflammatory effects against CS-induced acute lung inflammation.

  20. Integrating microRNAs into a system biology approach to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tong; Garcia, Joe G N; Zhang, Wei

    2011-04-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), including the ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are common and complex inflammatory lung diseases potentially affected by various genetic and nongenetic factors. Using the candidate gene approach, genetic variants associated with immune response and inflammatory pathways have been identified and implicated in ALI. Because gene expression is an intermediate phenotype that resides between the DNA sequence variation and the higher level cellular or whole-body phenotypes, the illustration of gene expression regulatory networks potentially could enhance understanding of disease susceptibility and the development of inflammatory lung syndromes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a novel class of gene regulators that play critical roles in complex diseases including ALI. Comparisons of global miRNA profiles in animal models of ALI and VILI identified several miRNAs (eg, miR-146a and miR-155) previously implicated in immune response and inflammatory pathways. Therefore, via regulation of target genes in these biological processes and pathways, miRNAs potentially contribute to the development of ALI. Although this line of inquiry exists at a nascent stage, miRNAs have the potential to be critical components of a comprehensive model for inflammatory lung disease built by a systems biology approach that integrates genetic, genomic, proteomic, epigenetic as well as environmental stimuli information. Given their particularly recognized role in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses, miRNAs also serve as novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers for ALI/ARDS or VILI, thus facilitating the realization of personalized medicine for individuals with acute inflammatory lung disease.

  1. NLRP3 inflammasome activation is essential for paraquat-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenning; Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Wei; Li, Tiegang; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Min

    2015-02-01

    The innate immune response is important in paraquat-induced acute lung injury, but the exact pathways involved are not elucidated. The objectives of this study were to determine the specific role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the process. Acute lung injury was induced by administering paraquat (PQ) intraperitoneally. NLRP3 inflammasome including NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 mRNA and protein expression in lung tissue and IL-1β and IL-18 levels in BALF were detected at 4, 8, 24, and 72 h after PQ administration in rats. Moreover, rats were pretreated with 10, 30, and 50 mg/kg NLRP3 inflammasome blocker glybenclamide, respectively, 1 h before PQ exposure. At 72 h after PQ administration, lung histopathology changes, NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 protein expression, as well as secretion of cytokines including IL-1β and IL-18 in BALF were investigated. The NLRP3 inflammasome including NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1 expression, and cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 levels in PQ poisoning rats were significantly higher than that in the control group. NLRP3 inflammasome blocker glybenclamide pretreatment attenuated lung edema, inhibited the NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 activation, and reduced IL-1β and IL-18 levels in BALF. In the in vitro experiments, IL-1β and IL-18 secreted from RAW264.7 mouse macrophages treated with paraquat were attenuated by glybenclamide. In conclusion, paraquat can induce IL-1β/IL-18 secretion via NLRP3-ASC-caspase-1 pathway, and the NLRP3 inflammasome is essential for paraquat-induced acute lung injury.

  2. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): current clinical and pathophysiologic considerations.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Kelly; Dwyre, Denis M; Krochmal, Jessica; Raife, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare transfusion reaction presenting as respiratory distress during or after transfusion of blood products. TRALI varies in severity, and mortality is not uncommon. TRALI reactions have equal gender distributions and can occur in all age groups. All blood products, except albumin, have been implicated in TRALI reactions. TRALI presents as acute respiratory compromise occurring in temporal proximity to a transfusion of a blood product. Other causes of acute lung injury should be excluded in order to definitively diagnose TRALI. Clinically and pathologically, TRALI mimics acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), with neutrophil-derived inflammatory chemokines and cytokines believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of both entities. Anti-HLA and anti-neutrophil antibodies have been implicated in some cases of TRALI. Treatment for TRALI is supportive; prevention is important. It is suspected that TRALI is both underdiagnosed and underreported. One of the difficulties in the evaluation of potential TRALI reactions is, until recently, the lack of diagnostic criteria. A group of transfusion medicine experts, the American-European Consensus Conference (AECC), recently met and developed diagnostic criteria of TRALI, as well as recommendations for management of donors to prevent future TRALI reactions. In light of the AECC consensus recommendations, we report an incident of TRALI in an oncology patient as an example of the potential severity of the lung disease and the clinical and laboratory evaluation of the patient. We also review the literature on this important complication of blood transfusion that internists may encounter.

  3. Fhit loss in lung preneoplasia: relation to DNA damage response checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    Cirombella, Roberto; Montrone, Giuseppe; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Giglio, Simona; Volinia, Stefano; Graziano, Paolo; Huebner, Kay; Vecchione, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity at the FHIT locus is coincident with activation of DNA damage response checkpoint proteins; thus damage at fragile loci may trigger checkpoint activation. We examined preneoplastic lesions adjacent to non-small cell lung carcinomas for alterations to expression of Fhit and activated checkpoint proteins. Expression scores were analyzed for pair-wise associations and correlations among proteins and type of lesion. Hyperplastic and dysplastic lesions were positive for nuclear H2AX expression; 12/20 dysplastic lesions were negative for Fhit expression. Fhit positive lesions showed expression of most checkpoint proteins examined, while Fhit negative lesions showed absence of expression of Chk1 and phosphoChk1. The results show that loss of expression of Fhit is significantly directly correlated with absence of activated Chk1 in dysplasia, and suggest a connection between loss of Fhit and modulation of checkpoint activity. PMID:19931269

  4. Diethylcarbamazine inhibits NF-κB activation in acute lung injury induced by carrageenan in mice.

    PubMed

    Santos, Laise Aline Martins; Ribeiro, Edlene Lima; Barbosa, Karla Patrícia Sousa; Fragoso, Ingrid Tavares; Gomes, Fabiana Oliveira Dos Santos; Donato, Mariana Aragão Matos; Silva, Bruna Santos; Silva, Amanda Karolina Soares; Rocha, Sura Wanessa Santos; França, Maria Eduarda Rocha; Rodrigues, Gabriel Barros; Silva, Teresinha Gonçalves; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2014-11-01

    Diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC) is widely used to treat lymphatic filariasis and Tropical Pulmonary Eosinophilia. A number of studies have reported a possible role in the host immune system, but exactly how DEC exerts this effect is still unknown. The present study reports the effects of DEC pretreatment on NF-κB regulation using the pleurisy model induced by carrageenan. Swiss male mice (Mus musculus) were divided into four experimental groups: control (SAL); carrageenan (CAR); diethylcarbamazine (DEC) and curcumin (CUR). The animals were pretreated with DEC (50mg/kg, v.o), CUR (50mg/kg, i.p) or distilled water for three consecutive days before pleurisy. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed by Tukey post-hoc test, and values were considered statistically significant when p<0.05. DEC pretreatment reduced tissue damage and the production of inflammatory markers, such as NO, iNOS, PGE2, COX-2, and PARP induced by carrageenan. Similarly, a known inhibitor of NF-κB pathway (curcumin) was also able to reduce these parameters. Like curcumin, DEC prevents NF-κB activation by reducing NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and IκBα degradation. DEC prevented NF-κB activation via p38 MAPK, but did not interfere in the ERK pathway in this experimental model. However, further studies should be developed to confirm this hypothesis. These findings suggest that DEC could be a promising drug for inflammatory disorders, especially in pulmonary diseases such as Acute Lung Inflammation, due its high anti-inflammatory potential which prevents NF-κB activation.

  5. Ulinastatin post-treatment attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats and human alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunpeng; Che, Wen; Zhao, Mingyan

    2017-01-01

    Ulinastatin (UTI), a serine protease inhibitor, possesses anti-inflammatory properties and has been suggested to modulate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear DNA-binding protein, plays a key role in the development of ALI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether UTI attenuates ALI through the inhibition of HMGB1 expression and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. ALI was induced in male rats by the intratracheal instillation of LPS (5 mg/kg). UTI was administered intraperitoneally 30 min following exposure to LPS. A549 alveolar epithelial cells were incubated with LPS in the presence or absence of UTI. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the levels of inflammatory cytokines. Western blot analysis was performed to detect the changes in the expression levels of Toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) and the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The results revealed that UTI significantly protected the animals from LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the decrease in the lung wet to dry weight ratio, total cells, neutrophils, macrophages and myeloperoxidase activity, associated with reduced lung histological damage. We also found that UTI post-treatment markedly inhibited the release of HMGB1 and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, UTI significantly inhibited the LPS-induced increase in TLR2/4 protein expression and NF-κB activation in lung tissues. In vitro, UTI markedly inhibited the expression of TLR2/4 and the activation of NF-κB in LPS-stimulated A549 alveolar epithelial cells. The findings of our study indicate that UTI attenuates LPS-induced ALI through the inhibition of HMGB1 expression in rats. These benefits are associated with the inhibition of the activation of the TLR2/4-NF-κB pathway by UTI. PMID:27959396

  6. Potentiating effects of oxygen in lungs damaged by methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl, cadmium chloride, oleic acid, and antitumor drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkinen, P.J.; Morse, C.C.; Martin, F.M.; Dalbey, W.E.; Haschek, W.M.; Witschi, H.R.

    1983-01-01

    The intraperitoneal administration of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) and cyclophosphamide, exposure to an aerosol of cadmium chloride, intravenous administration of oleic acid, and intratracheal instillation of bleomycin to young female BALB/c mice or CD/CR rats result in acute lung injury. Pulmonary morphology and lung collagen content were examined in animals treated with these chemicals alone or in combination with an elevated oxygen concentration (80%) in the inspired air. In mice, the development of fibrosis could be significantly enhanced if animals treated with MMT, cadmium chloride, cyclophosphamide, or bleomycin were exposed to 80% oxygen immediately following exposure to these agents. In rats only cyclophosphamide- and bleomycin-induced acute lung injury was potentiated by hyperoxia, resulting in significant enhancement of lung collagen content. The pathogenesis responsible for this differential species response of pulmonary injury to hyperoxia remains to be investigated.

  7. Cytokine levels in pleural fluid as markers of acute rejection after lung transplantation*

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Priscila Cilene León Bueno; Afonso, José Eduardo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Acencio, Milena Marques Pagliarelli; Antonangelo, Leila; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF, as well as the total and differential cell counts, in the pleural fluid of lung transplant recipients, correlating those levels with the occurrence and severity of rejection. We analyzed pleural fluid samples collected from 18 patients at various time points (up to postoperative day 4). The levels of IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF tended to elevate in parallel with increases in the severity of rejection. Our results suggest that these levels are markers of acute graft rejection in lung transplant recipients. PMID:25210966

  8. Targeting Neutrophils to Prevent Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo V.; Gomes, Eliane; Neto, Antonio Condino; D' Império Lima, Maria R.; Alvarez, José M.; Portugal, Silvia; Epiphanio, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Malaria remains one of the greatest burdens to global health, causing nearly 500,000 deaths in 2014. When manifesting in the lungs, severe malaria causes acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). We have previously shown that a proportion of DBA/2 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) develop ALI/ARDS and that these mice recapitulate various aspects of the human syndrome, such as pulmonary edema, hemorrhaging, pleural effusion and hypoxemia. Herein, we investigated the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of malaria-associated ALI/ARDS. Mice developing ALI/ARDS showed greater neutrophil accumulation in the lungs compared with mice that did not develop pulmonary complications. In addition, mice with ALI/ARDS produced more neutrophil-attracting chemokines, myeloperoxidase and reactive oxygen species. We also observed that the parasites Plasmodium falciparum and PbA induced the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) ex vivo, which were associated with inflammation and tissue injury. The depletion of neutrophils, treatment with AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist), Pulmozyme (human recombinant DNase) or Sivelestat (inhibitor of neutrophil elastase) decreased the development of malaria-associated ALI/ARDS and significantly increased mouse survival. This study implicates neutrophils and NETs in the genesis of experimentally induced malaria-associated ALI/ARDS and proposes a new therapeutic approach to improve the prognosis of severe malaria. PMID:27926944

  9. Platelet Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor is a Potential Mediator of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, James P; Ambruso, Daniel R; Voelkel, Norbert F; Silliman, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    Objective The occurrence of non-hemolytic transfusion reactions is highest with platelet and plasma administration. Some of these reactions are characterized by endothelial leak, especially transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). Elevated concentrations of inflammatory mediators secreted by contaminating leukocytes during blood product storage may contribute to such reactions, but platelet-secreted mediators may also contribute. We hypothesized that platelet storage leads to accumulation of the endothelial permeability mediator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and that intravascular administration of exogenous VEGF leads to extensive binding to its lung receptors. Methods Single donor, leukocyte-reduced apheresis platelet units were sampled over 5 days of storage. VEGF protein content of the centrifuged supernatant was determined by ELISA, and the potential contribution of VEGF from contaminating leukocytes was quantified. Isolated-perfused rat lungs were used to study the uptake of radiolabeled VEGF administered intravascularly, and the effect of unlabeled VEGF on lung leak. Results There was a time-dependent release of VEGF into the plasma fraction of the platelet concentrates (62 ± 9 pg/ml on day one, 149 ± 23 pg/ml on day 5; mean ± SEM, p<0.01, n=8) and a contribution by contaminating leukocytes was excluded. Exogenous 125I-VEGF bound avidly and specifically to the lung vasculature, and unlabeled VEGF in the lung perfusate caused vascular leak. Conclusion Rising concentrations of VEGF occur during storage of single donor platelet concentrates due to platelet secretion or disintegration, but not due to leukocyte contamination. Exogenous VEGF at these concentrations rapidly binds to its receptors in the lung vessels. At higher VEGF concentrations, VEGF causes vascular leak in uninjured lungs. These data provide further evidence that VEGF may contribute to the increased lung permeability seen in TRALI associated with platelet products. PMID

  10. Preventing cleavage of Mer promotes efferocytosis and suppresses acute lung injury in bleomycin treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ye-Ji; Lee, Seung-Hae; Youn, Young-So; Choi, Ji-Yeon; Song, Keung-Sub; Cho, Min-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2012-08-15

    Mer receptor tyrosine kinase (Mer) regulates macrophage activation and promotes apoptotic cell clearance. Mer activation is regulated through proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain. To determine if membrane-bound Mer is cleaved during bleomycin-induced lung injury, and, if so, how preventing the cleavage of Mer enhances apoptotic cell uptake and down-regulates pulmonary immune responses. During bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in mice, membrane-bound Mer expression decreased, but production of soluble Mer and activity as well as expression of disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) were enhanced . Treatment with the ADAM inhibitor TAPI-0 restored Mer expression and diminished soluble Mer production. Furthermore, TAPI-0 increased Mer activation in alveolar macrophages and lung tissue resulting in enhanced apoptotic cell clearance in vivo and ex vivo by alveolar macrophages. Suppression of bleomycin-induced pro-inflammatory mediators, but enhancement of hepatocyte growth factor induction were seen after TAPI-0 treatment. Additional bleomycin-induced inflammatory responses reduced by TAPI-0 treatment included inflammatory cell recruitment into the lungs, levels of total protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in lung tissue. Importantly, the effects of TAPI-0 on bleomycin-induced inflammation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration of specific Mer-neutralizing antibodies. These findings suggest that restored membrane-bound Mer expression by TAPI-0 treatment may help resolve lung inflammation and apoptosis after bleomycin treatment. -- Highlights: ►Mer expression is restored by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►Mer signaling is enhanced by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►TAPI-0 enhances efferocytosis and promotes resolution of lung injury.

  11. Inflammatory potential of the spores of Penicillium spinulosum isolated from indoor air of a moisture-damaged building in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Juha; Komulainen, Hannu; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Pelkonen, Jukka; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2002-10-01

    Excess moisture and microbial growth have been associated with adverse health effects, especially in the airways, of the inhabitants of moisture-damaged buildings. The spores of Penicillium spp. are commonly present in the indoor air, both in moisture-damaged and in reference buildings, though their numbers seem to be significantly higher in the damaged buildings. To assess the potential of Penicillium spinulosum to evoke harmful respiratory effects, mice were exposed via intratracheal instillation to a single dose of the spores of P. spinulosum, isolated from the indoor air of a moisture-damaged building (1×10(5), 1×10(6), 5×10(6), 1×10(7) or 5×10(7) spores). Inflammation and toxicity in lungs were evaluated 24 h later. The time-course of the effects was investigated with the dose of 5×10(6) spores for 28 days. The fungal spores caused mild transient inflammation. The spore exposure transiently increased proinflammatory cytokine (TNFα and IL-6) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The highest concentrations of both cytokines were measured at 6 h after a single dosage. The spore exposure did not cause expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in lavaged cells. Neutrophils were acutely recruited into airways, but the response leveled off in 3 days. Neither cytotoxicity nor major changes in vascular permeability (i.e. increases in albumin, total protein, lactate dehydrogenase or hemoglobin levels in BALF) were observed in the lungs. Considering the profile and magnitude of the changes and the dose of the spores, we conclude that P. spinulosum has a low potential to cause acute respiratory inflammation, nor does it cause direct cytotoxicity.

  12. BURN-INDUCED ACUTE LUNG INJURY REQUIRES A FUNCTIONAL TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Michael; Cheadle, Gerald; Peterson, Carrie; Loomis, William; Putnam, James; Wolf, Paul; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian; Bansal, Vishal; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-01-01

    The role of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a component of the innate immune system, in the development of burn-induced acute lung injury (ALI) has not been completely defined. Recent data suggested that an intact TLR4 plays a major role in the development of organ injury in sterile inflammation. We hypothesized that burn-induced ALI is a TLR4-dependent process. Male C57BL/6J (TLR4 wild-type [WT]) and C57BL/10ScN (TLR4 knockout [KO]) mice were subjected to a 30% total body surface area steam burn. Animals were killed at 6 and 24 h after the insult. Lung specimens were harvested for histological examination after hematoxylin-eosin staining. In addition, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 immunostaining was performed. Lung MPO was measured by an enzymatic assay. Total lung keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant (IL-8) content was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot was performed to quantify phosphorylated IκBα, phosphorylated nuclear factor κB p65 (NF-κBp65), and high mobility group box 1 expression. Acute lung injury, characterized by thickening of the alveolar-capillary membrane, hyaline membrane formation, intraalveolar hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration, was seen in WT but not KO animals at 24 h. Myeloperoxidase and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 immunostaining of KO animals was also similar to sham but elevated in WT animals. In addition, a reduction in MPO enzymatic activity was observed in KO mice as well as a reduction in IL-8 levels compared with their WT counterparts. Burn-induced ALI develops within 24 h after the initial thermal insult in our model. Toll-like receptor 4 KO animals were clearly protected and had a much less severe lung injury. Our data suggest that burn-induced ALI is a TLR4-dependent process. PMID:21330948

  13. Cyclophosphamide-induced lung damage in mice: protection by a small preliminary dose.

    PubMed Central

    Collis, C. H.; Wilson, C. M.; Jones, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Cycylphosphamide (Cy) produces an interstitial pneumonitis in CBA mice. The extent of the lung damage has been quantified by measuring the increase in ventilation rate over 6 weeks after an i.p. injection of Cy 200, 250 and 300 mg/kg. A dose-dependent response was found. When a preliminary ("priming") dose of Cy at 50 mg/kg was given 7, 9 or 14 days before a single large dose of 250 mg/kg, lung damage was reduced, as shown by a smaller increase in ventilation rate than in those receiving 250 mg/kg alone, and this difference was significant (P less than 0.01) in the Day-14-and highly significant (P<0.001) in the Day-7-"primed" groups. When primed less than 7 days before, there was a relative increase in ventilation rate, which was statistically significant (P less than 0.01) in the Day-1-primed group. Similar effects were also seen in the survival of the mice. PMID:7426315

  14. Cytogenetic damage in lymphocytes of patients undergoing therapy for small cell lung cancer and ovarian carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Padjas, Anna; Lesisz, Dominika; Lankoff, Anna; Banasik, Anna; Lisowska, Halina; Bakalarz, Robert; Gozdz, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Andrzej . E-mail: awojcik@pu.kielce.pl

    2005-12-01

    The level of cytogenetic damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients undergoing chemotherapy has been analyzed incisively 20 years ago. The results showed that the highest level of cytogenetic damage was observed at the end of therapy. In recent years, the doses of anticancer drugs were intensified thanks to the discovery of colony stimulating factors. Therefore, it was interesting to analyze the kinetics of micronuclei formation in lymphocytes of patients undergoing modern chemotherapy. The frequencies of micronuclei were measured in lymphocytes of 6 patients with small cell lung cancer treated with a combination of cisplatin and etoposide and 7 patients with ovarian carcinoma treated with a combination of taxol and cisplatin. 3 patients with lung cancer received radiotherapy in addition to chemotherapy. Micronuclei were analyzed in lymphocytes collected before the start of therapy and 1 day before each following cycle of chemotherapy. The micronucleus frequencies were compared with the kinetics of leukocyte counts. The micronucleus frequencies showed an interindividual variability. On average, the frequencies of micronuclei increased during the first half of therapy and declined thereafter, reaching, in some patients with ovarian carcinoma, values below the pre-treatment level. Leukocyte counts decreased strongly at the beginning of therapy with an upward trend at the end. We suggest that the decline of micronuclei was due to repopulation of lymphocytes and acquired drug resistance.

  15. Enrichment of the Lung Microbiome with Gut Bacteria in Sepsis and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P.; Singer, Benjamin H.; Newstead, Michael W.; Falkowski, Nicole R.; Erb-Downward, John R.; Standiford, Theodore J.; Huffnagle, Gary B.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Sepsis and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are major causes of mortality without targeted therapies. Although many experimental and clinical observations have implicated gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of these diseases, culture-based studies have failed to demonstrate translocation of bacteria to the lungs in critically ill patients. Here we report culture-independent evidence that the lung microbiome is enriched with gut bacteria both in a murine model of sepsis and in humans with established ARDS. Following experimental sepsis, lung communities were dominated by viable gut-associated bacteria. Ecologic analysis identified the lower gastrointestinal tract, rather than the upper respiratory tract, as the likely source community of post-sepsis lung bacteria. In bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from humans with ARDS, gut-specific bacteria (Bacteroides spp.) were common and abundant, undetected by culture, and correlated with the intensity of systemic inflammation. Alveolar TNF-α, a key mediator of alveolar inflammation in ARDS, was significantly correlated with altered lung microbiota. Our results demonstrate that the lung microbiome is enriched with gut-associated bacteria in sepsis and ARDS, potentially representing a shared mechanism of pathogenesis in these common and lethal diseases. PMID:27670109

  16. Natural Antioxidant Betanin Protects Rats from Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further. PMID:25861636

  17. Therapeutic Effect of the Tuber of Alisma orientale on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kwun, Min Jung; Choi, Jun-Yong; Ahn, Kyung-Seop; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Lee, Yong Gyu; Christman, John W.; Sadikot, Ruxana T.

    2013-01-01

    Although Alisma orientale, an ethnic herb, has been prescribed for treating various diseases in Asian traditional medicine, experimental evidence to support its therapeutic effects is lacking. Here, we sought to determine whether A. orientale has a therapeutic effect on acute lung injury (ALI). Ethanol extract of the tuber of A. orientale (EEAO) was prepared and fingerprinted by HPLC for its constituents. Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for the induction of ALI. At 2 h after LPS treatment, mice received an intratracheal (i.t.) spraying of various amounts of EEAO to the lung. Bioluminescence imaging of transgenic NF-κB/luciferase reporter mice shows that i.t. EEAO posttreatment suppressed lung inflammation. In similar experiments with C57BL/6 mice, EEAO posttreatment significantly improved lung inflammation, as assessed by H&E staining of lung sections, counting of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and semiquantitative RT-PCR analyses of proinflammatory cytokines and Nrf2-dependent genes in the inflamed lungs. Furthermore, EEAO posttreatment enhanced the survival of mice that received a lethal dose of LPS. Together, our results provide evidence that A. orientale has a therapeutic effect on ALI induced by sepsis. PMID:23983806

  18. Leptin attenuates lipopolysaccharide or oleic acid-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hai-Ying; Xu, Min; Ji, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Yan-Xia; Dong, Ming-Qing; Liu, Man-Ling; Xu, Dun-Quan; Zhao, Peng-Tao; Liu, Yi; Luo, Ying; Niu, Wen; Zhang, Bo; Ye, Jing; Li, Zhi-Chao

    2013-12-01

    Leptin is reported to be involved in acute lung injury (ALI). However, the role and underlying mechanisms of leptin in ALI remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether leptin deficiency promoted the development of ALI. LPS or oleic acid (OA) were administered to wild-type and leptin deficient (ob/ob) mice to induce ALI. Leptin level, survival rate, and lung injury were examined. Results showed that leptin levels were predominantly increased in the lung, but also in the heart, liver, kidney, and adipose tissue after LPS adminiatration. Compared with wild-type mice, LPS- or OA-induced lung injury was worse and the survival rate was lower in ob/ob mice. Moreover, leptin deficiency promoted the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Exogenous administration of leptin reduced lethality in ob/ob mice and ameliorated lung injury partly through inhibiting the activation of NF-κB, p38, and ERK pathways. These results indicated that leptin deficiency contributed to the development of lung injury by enhancing inflammatory response, and a high level of leptin improved survival and protected against ALI.

  19. Natural antioxidant betanin protects rats from paraquat-induced acute lung injury interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Han, Junyan; Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further.

  20. Targeting apoptotic signalling pathway and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression as therapeutic intervention in TPE induced lung damage.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Kishore; Krishnamoorthy, Bhavani; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Balakrishnan, Arun

    2003-01-01

    Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia (TPE) is an occult manifestation of filariasis, brought about by helminth parasites Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi. Treatment of patients suffering from TPE involves the administration of diethyl carbamazine and Ivermectin. Although the drugs are able to block acute inflammation, they are not able to alleviate chronic basal inflammation. We have attempted to examine the disease by targeting two important components; namely filarial parasitic sheath proteins (FPP) induced apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine response in human laryngeal carcinoma cells of epithelial origin (HEp-2) cells an epithelial cell line. Earlier studies by us have shown that FPP exposure induced apoptosis in these cells. In this study with hydrocortisone, calpain inhibitor (ALLN) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treatments we demonstrate that apoptosis is inhibited as shown by [3H] thymidine incorporation studies, propidium iodide staining and Annexin V staining. Hydrocortisone at a dose, which inhibits cell death also down regulated, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings give us insights into the multifaceted approach one may adopt to target critical signalling molecules using appropriate inhibitors, which could eventually be used to reduce lung damage in TPE.

  1. Fatal transfusion related acute lung injury following coronary artery by-pass surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bawany, Fauzia Ahmad; Sharif, Hasanat

    2008-01-01

    Background Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a potentially fatal Acute Lung Injury following transfusion of blood components. Hypotheses implicate donor-derived anti-human leukocyte antigen or granulocyte antibodies reacting with recipients' leukocytes, releasing inflammatory mediators. Lack of agreement on underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms renders improving transfusion safety difficult and expensive. Case Presentation Literature search has not revealed any case of TRALI from Pakistan. We report the case of fatal TRALI in a 68 year old male who received blood products after coronary artery by-pass surgery. Conclusion This article aims to create awareness about this complication and suggests that post transfusion cardiopulmonary instability should alert to the possibility of TRALI. PMID:19055759

  2. Lung Postmortem Autopsy Revealing Extramedullary Involvement in Multiple Myeloma Causing Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ravinet, Aurélie; Perbet, Sébastien; Guièze, Romain; Guérin, Renaud; Gayraud, Guillaume; Aliane, Jugurtha; Tremblay, Aymeric; Pascal, Julien; Ledoux, Albane; Chaleteix, Carine; Dechelotte, Pierre; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma is rare. We report the case of a 61-year-old man with past medical history of chronic respiratory failure with emphysema, and a known multiple myeloma (Durie and Salmon stage III B and t(4;14) translocation). Six months after diagnosis and first line of treatment, he presented acute dyspnea with interstitial lung disease. Computed tomography showed severe bullous emphysema and diffuse, patchy, multifocal infiltrations bilaterally with nodular character, small bilateral pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and a known lytic lesion of the 12th vertebra. He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, oseltamivir, and methylprednisolone. Finally, outcome was unfavourable. Postmortem analysis revealed diffuse and nodular infracentimetric infiltration of the lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Physicians should be aware that acute respiratory distress syndrome not responding to treatment of common causes could be a manifestation of the disease, even with negative BAL or biopsy and could be promptly treated with salvage therapy. PMID:25165587

  3. Analysis of regional compliance in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Czaplik, Michael; Biener, Ingeborg; Dembinski, Rolf; Pelosi, Paolo; Soodt, Thomas; Schroeder, Wolfgang; Leonhardt, Steffen; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf; Bickenbach, Johannes

    2012-10-15

    Lung protective ventilation in acute lung injury (ALI) focuses on using low tidal volumes and adequate levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Identifying optimal pressure is difficult because pressure-volume (PV) relations differ regionally. Precise analysis demands local measurements of pressures and related alveolar morphologies. In a porcine model of surfactant depletion (n=24), we combined measuring static pressures with endoscopic microscopy and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to examine regional PV loops and morphologic heterogeneities between healthy (control group; CON) and ALI lungs ventilated with low (LVT) or high tidal volumes (HVT). Quantification included indices for microscopy (Volume Air Index (VAI), Heterogeneity and Circularity Index), EIT analysis and calculation of regional compliances due to generated PV loops. We found that: (1) VAI decreased in lower lobe after ALI, (2) electrical impedance decreased in dorsal regions and (3) PV loops differed regionally. Further studies should prove the potentials of these techniques on individual respiratory settings and clinical outcome.

  4. IRF5 regulates lung macrophages M2 polarization during severe acute pancreatitis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kang; He, Song-Bing; Qu, Jian-Guo; Dang, Sheng-Chun; Chen, Ji-Xiang; Gong, Ai-Hua; Xie, Rong; Zhang, Jian-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) in reversing polarization of lung macrophages during severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in vitro. METHODS A mouse SAP model was established by intraperitoneal (ip) injections of 20 μg/kg body weight caerulein. Pathological changes in the lung were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Lung macrophages were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The quantity and purity of lung macrophages were detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). They were treated with IL-4/IRF5 specific siRNA (IRF5 siRNA) to reverse their polarization and were evaluated by detecting markers expression of M1/M2 using RT-PCR. RESULTS SAP associated acute lung injury (ALI) was induced successfully by ip injections of caerulein, which was confirmed by histopathology. Lung macrophages expressed high levels of IRF5 as M1 phenotype during the early acute pancreatitis stages. Reduction of IRF5 expression by IRF5 siRNA reversed the action of macrophages from M1 to M2 phenotype in vitro. The expressions of M1 markers, including IRF5 (S + IRF5 siRNA vs S + PBS, 0.013 ± 0.01 vs 0.054 ± 0.047, P < 0.01), TNF-α (S + IRF5 siRNA vs S + PBS, 0.0003 ± 0.0002 vs 0.019 ± 0.018, P < 0.001), iNOS (S + IRF5 siRNA vs S + PBS, 0.0003 ± 0.0002 vs 0.026 ± 0.018, P < 0.001) and IL-12 (S + IRF5 siRNA vs S + PBS, 0.000005 ± 0.00004 vs 0.024 ± 0.016, P < 0.001), were decreased. In contrast, the expressions of M2 markers, including IL-10 (S + IRF5 siRNA vs S + PBS, 0.060 ± 0.055 vs 0.0230 ± 0.018, P < 0.01) and Arg-1 (S + IRF5 siRNA vs S + PBS, 0.910 ± 0.788 vs 0.0036 ± 0.0025, P < 0.001), were increased. IRF5 siRNA could reverse the lung macrophage polarization more effectively than IL-4. CONCLUSION Treatment with IRF5 siRNA can reverse the pancreatitis-induced activation of lung macrophages from M1 phenotype to M2 phenotype in SAP associated with ALI. PMID:27895424

  5. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in graft by blood donor antibodies against host leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Jodi; Tinckam, Kathryn; denHollander, Neal; Haroon, Ayesha; Keshavjee, Shaf; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine M

    2010-09-01

    It is unknown the extent to which transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) contributes to primary graft dysfunction (PGD), the leading cause of death after lung transplantation. In this case of suspected transfusion-associated acute bilateral graft injury in a 61-year-old idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patient, recipient sera from before and after transplantation/transfusion, as well as the sera of 22 of the 24 implicated blood donors, were individually screened by Luminex bead assay for the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies, with recipient and lung donor HLA typing to explore for cognate relationships. A red-cell-unit donor-source anti-Cw6 antibody, cognate with the HLA type of the recipient, was identified. This is the second reported case of TRALI in the setting of lung transplantation, and the first to show an associated interaction between donor antibodies (in a low-plasma volume product) with recipient leukocytes (rather than graft antigens); therefore, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of PGD.

  6. Kallistatin protects against sepsis-related acute lung injury via inhibiting inflammation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Chieh; Chen, Chang-Wen; Huang, Yu-Wen; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie; Lin, Yee-Shin; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-07-22

    Kallistatin, an endogenous plasma protein, exhibits pleiotropic properties in inhibiting inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis, as evidenced in various animal models and cultured cells. Here, we demonstrate that kallistatin levels were positively correlated with the concentration of total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) from patients with sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), indicating a compensatory mechanism. Lower ratio of kallistatin to total protein in BALF showed a significant trend toward elevated neutrophil counts (P = 0.002) in BALF and increased mortality (P = 0.046). In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice, expression of human kallistatin in lung by gene transfer with human kallistatin-encoding plasmid ameliorated acute lung injury (ALI) and reduced cytokine/chemokine levels in BALF. These mice exhibited attenuated lung epithelial apoptosis and decreased Fas/FasL expression compared to the control mice. Mouse survival was improved by kallistatin gene transfer or recombinant human kallistatin treatment after LPS challenge. In LPS-stimulated A549 human lung epithelial cells, kallistatin attenuated apoptosis, down-regulated Fas/FasL signaling, suppressed intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibited ROS-mediated NF-κB activation and inflammation. Furthermore, LPS-induced apoptosis was blocked by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or NF-κB inhibitor via down-regulating Fas expression. These findings suggest the therapeutic potential of kallistatin for sepsis-related ALI/ARDS.

  7. Hemorrhage and resuscitation induce alterations in cytokine expression and the development of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Coulson, W F; Abraham, E

    1994-03-01

    Acute pulmonary injury occurs frequently following hemorrhage and injury. In order to better examine the sequence of events leading to lung injury in this setting, we investigated lung histology as well as in vivo mRNA levels for cytokines with proinflammatory and immunoregulatory properties (IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, IFN-gamma) over the 3 days following hemorrhage and resuscitation. Significant increases in mRNA levels for IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-gamma, but not TNF-alpha, were present among intraparenchymal pulmonary mononuclear cells obtained 1 and 3 days after hemorrhage. Among alveolar macrophages, TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA levels were increased 3 days after hemorrhage. Few changes in cytokine mRNA levels, with the exception of TNF-alpha at 3 days after hemorrhage, were present among peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Histologic examination of lungs from hemorrhaged animals showed no alterations 1 day after hemorrhage, but neutrophil and mononuclear cell infiltrates, edema, intra-alveolar hemorrhage, and fibrin generation were present 3 days after hemorrhage. These results suggest that hemorrhage-induced enhancement of proinflammatory cytokine gene transcription may be an important mechanism contributing to the frequent development of acute lung injury following blood loss and injury.

  8. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidative protection mechanism in rat lungs upon acute and chronic exposure to nitrogen dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Sagai, M; Ichinose, T

    1987-01-01

    This work was done to clarify the relation between the changes of lipid peroxidation and the activities of antioxidative protective enzymes in lungs of rats exposed acutely, subacutely, and chronically to nitrogen dioxide. It was confirmed that the activities of the antioxidative enzymes to protect cells from oxidative stress increased in an early phase, and then the activities decreased gradually. Lipid peroxides increased once in an early phase and then returned to the control level; thereafter, lipid peroxides increased gradually again. Lipid peroxidation as measured by ethane exhalation increased significantly with 0.04, 0.4, and 4 ppm nitrogen dioxide exposure for 9, 18, and 27 months, and a dose-response relationship was clearly observed. The temporal changes of lipid peroxidation varied inversely with that of the activities of antioxidative protective enzymes. From these results, it was suggested that the increments of antioxidative protective enzyme activities in an early phase were complementary effects to protect cells from damage by lipid peroxides which were increased by nitrogen dioxide exposure, and that the complementary effects are lost in later phases of life-span exposure. Finally, loss of such protective complementary effects might relate to some chronic diseases in lungs. Therefore, the temporal changes described above are important characteristics in chronic exposure of air pollutants. PMID:3665862

  9. [Anesthetic management of a patient with transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yuko; Wada, Hiroki; Oshima, Takashi; Aramaki, Yoshihiko; Kikuta, Yoshinori; Iwasaki, Yasuji

    2008-08-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is characterized by pulmonary edema and hypoxemia within 6 hours of transfusion in the absence of other causes of acute lung injury or circulatory overload and is now considered the leading cause of transfusion-related death. We report a female patient who showed hypoxemia after transfusion without any other causes of acute lung injury. The patient is a 43-year-old woman, who received emergency transurethral hemostasis for bladder hemorrhage with hematuria and low hemoglobin concentration (3.2 g x dl(-1)). General anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, remifentanil, and vecuronium. Two units of RBC were transfused during operation. Since she showed high blood pressure, tachycardia, and a painful expression after operation, we extubated her. Although we gave her O2 6 l x min(-1) after extubation, she showed low oxygen saturation (90%), thus we started bag-mask ventilation. However, she complained of dyspnea and the chest X-ray revealed bilateral diffuse pulmonary edema following hypoxemia (80%). Thus we inserted endotracheal tube and started positive pressure assist ventilation. The next day, hypoxemia was improved under PEEP therapy. The anti-HLA antibody in the transfused plasma was positive. We conclude that the early recognition and management of TRALI is essential during and after operation.

  10. Transfusion related acute lung injury--TRALI: an under diagnosed entity.

    PubMed

    Moiz, Bushra; Sharif, Hasanat; Bawany, Fauzia Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening complication of transfusion of blood and its components resembling acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or acute lung injury (ALI). TRALI is a particular form of ARDS that follows blood transfusion and is caused by donor-derived antibodies present in the transfused products, reacting with the recipients' blood cells, inducing release of inflammatory mediators thus compromising lung functions. Anti-HLA antibodies are the most frequently indicted inducers in this category. Literature search has not revealed any documented case of TRALI from Pakistan. This in no way implies that TRALI is non existent in this part of the world but rather indicates that many clinicians may be unaware of the condition or may not recognize transfusion as the cause and like in other parts of the world, is almost certainly under-diagnosed. The lack of agreement on the definite cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of TRALI renders the task of improving the safety of blood transfusion far more complex and potentially quite expensive. This review discusses the modern concepts of pathogenesis of TRALI along with its clinicopathological manifestations and management with the aim to improve awareness of our clinicians towards this dreadful and potentially fatal condition.

  11. Integrative Assessment of Chlorine-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pope-Varsalona, Hannah; Concel, Vincent J.; Liu, Pengyuan; Bein, Kiflai; Berndt, Annerose; Martin, Timothy M.; Ganguly, Koustav; Jang, An Soo; Brant, Kelly A.; Dopico, Richard A.; Upadhyay, Swapna; Di, Y. P. Peter; Hu, Zhen; Vuga, Louis J.; Medvedovic, Mario; Kaminski, Naftali; You, Ming; Alexander, Danny C.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Prows, Daniel R.; Knoell, Daren L.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic basis for the underlying individual susceptibility to chlorine-induced acute lung injury is unknown. To uncover the genetic basis and pathophysiological processes that could provide additional homeostatic capacities during lung injury, 40 inbred murine strains were exposed to chlorine, and haplotype association mapping was performed. The identified single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations were evaluated through transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling. Using ≥ 10% allelic frequency and ≥ 10% phenotype explained as threshold criteria, promoter SNPs that could eliminate putative transcriptional factor recognition sites in candidate genes were assessed by determining transcript levels through microarray and reverse real-time PCR during chlorine exposure. The mean survival time varied by approximately 5-fold among strains, and SNP associations were identified for 13 candidate genes on chromosomes 1, 4, 5, 9, and 15. Microarrays revealed several differentially enriched pathways, including protein transport (decreased more in the sensitive C57BLKS/J lung) and protein catabolic process (increased more in the resistant C57BL/10J lung). Lung metabolomic profiling revealed 95 of the 280 metabolites measured were altered by chlorine exposure, and included alanine, which decreased more in the C57BLKS/J than in the C57BL/10J strain, and glutamine, which increased more in the C57BL/10J than in the C57BLKS/J strain. Genetic associations from haplotype mapping were strengthened by an integrated assessment using transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling. The leading candidate genes associated with increased susceptibility to acute lung injury in mice included Klf4, Sema7a, Tns1, Aacs, and a gene that encodes an amino acid carrier, Slc38a4. PMID:22447970

  12. Effect of Long-Term Antiorthostatic Suspension in a Murine Model of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae Young; Jung, Ah-Yeoun; Kim, Young Hyo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Antiorthostatic suspension (AOS) is ground-based model of simulated microgravity. There is still no study about the effect of long-term microgravity on the clinical course of acute lung injury. We evaluated the effect of simulated microgravity using AOS in a murine model of acute lung injury by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods Thirty BALB/c mice were used. During 4 weeks, mice were equally allocated to control (free movement), restraint (tail suspended, but hindlimbs not unloaded), and AOS group (hindlimb unloaded). After then, mice got intranasal challenge with LPS (20 mg/kg, 50 μL). We measured: weight gain before and after AOS, the number of inflammatory cells and titers of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, titer of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in serum and lung homogenate, and histopathologic examination of lung tissue. Results AOS group had significant weight loss compared to control and restraint group (P<0.001). AOS group also showed significantly decreased lymphocytes (P=0.023) compared to control group. In AOS group, titer for IL-1β in BAL fluid was significantly lower than restraint group (P=0.049). Titer for serum MPO was significantly decreased in AOS group compared to restraint group (P=0.004). However, there was no significant difference of MPO titers in lung tissue between groups. Histopathologic examination of lung tissue revealed no significant difference in the degree of pulmonary infiltration between restraint and AOS group. Conclusion In spite of modest anti-inflammatory effect, prolonged AOS caused no significant change in LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation. PMID:27334509

  13. Conformational Change in Transfer RNA Is an Early Indicator of Acute Cellular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Eikan; Inoue, Chisako; Saigusa, Daisuke; Inoue, Ryusuke; Ito, Koki; Suzuki, Yusuke; Jinno, Daisuke; Tsukui, Yuri; Akamatsu, Yosuke; Araki, Masatake; Araki, Kimi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Shinke, Haruka; Suzuki, Takehiro; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Shima, Hisato; Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Toyohara, Takafumi; Suzuki, Chitose; Saiki, Yoshikatu; Tominaga, Teiji; Miyagi, Shigehito; Kawagisihi, Naoki; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Yamamura, Kenichi; Imai, Yutaka; Masuda, Satohiro; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Ichimura, Takaharu; Mount, David B.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Ito, Sadayoshi; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Itoh, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Tissue damage by oxidative stress is a key pathogenic mechanism in various diseases, including AKI and CKD. Thus, early detection of oxidative tissue damage is important. Using a tRNA-specific modified nucleoside 1-methyladenosine (m1A) antibody, we show that oxidative stress induces a direct conformational change in tRNA structure that promotes subsequent tRNA fragmentation and occurs much earlier than DNA damage. In various models of tissue damage (ischemic reperfusion, toxic injury, and irradiation), the levels of circulating tRNA derivatives increased rapidly. In humans, the levels of circulating tRNA derivatives also increased under conditions of acute renal ischemia, even before levels of other known tissue damage markers increased. Notably, the level of circulating free m1A correlated with mortality in the general population (n=1033) over a mean follow-up of 6.7 years. Compared with healthy controls, patients with CKD had higher levels of circulating free m1A, which were reduced by treatment with pitavastatin (2 mg/d; n=29). Therefore, tRNA damage reflects early oxidative stress damage, and detection of tRNA damage may be a useful tool for identifying organ damage and forming a clinical prognosis. PMID:24833129

  14. Interleukin-22 ameliorates acute severe pancreatitis-associated lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Xu, Chang-Qin; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential protective effect of exogenous recombinant interleukin-22 (rIL-22) on L-arginine-induced acute severe pancreatitis (SAP)-associated lung injury and the possible signaling pathway involved. METHODS: Balb/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with L-arginine to induce SAP. Recombinant mouse IL-22 was then administered subcutaneously to mice. Serum amylase levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung tissue were measured after the L-arginine administration. Histopathology of the pancreas and lung was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. Expression of B cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-xL and IL-22RA1 mRNAs in the lung tissue was detected by real-time PCR. Expression and phosphorylation of STAT3 were analyzed by Western blot. RESULTS: Serum amylase levels and MPO activity in the lung tissue in the SAP group were significantly higher than those in the normal control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the animals in the SAP group showed significant pancreatic and lung injuries. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL mRNAs in the SAP group was decreased markedly, while the IL-22RA1 mRNA expression was increased significantly relative to the normal control group (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with PBS did not significantly affect the serum amylase levels, MPO activity or expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL or IL-22RA1 mRNA (P > 0.05). Moreover, no significant differences in the degrees of pancreatic and lung injuries were observed between the PBS and SAP groups. However, the serum amylase levels and lung tissue MPO activity in the rIL-22 group were significantly lower than those in the SAP group (P < 0.05), and the injuries in the pancreas and lung were also improved. Compared with the PBS group, rIL-22 stimulated the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and IL-22RA1 mRNAs in the lung (P < 0.05). In addition, the ratio of p-STAT3 to STAT3 protein in the rIL-22 group was significantly higher than that in the PBS group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION

  15. Allergic airway inflammation decreases lung bacterial burden following acute Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in a neutrophil- and CCL8-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dulek, Daniel E; Newcomb, Dawn C; Goleniewska, Kasia; Cephus, Jaqueline; Zhou, Weisong; Reiss, Sara; Toki, Shinji; Ye, Fei; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P; Blackwell, Timothy S; Moore, Martin L; Boyd, Kelli L; Kolls, Jay K; Peebles, R Stokes

    2014-09-01

    The Th17 cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-17F, and IL-22 are critical for the lung immune response to a variety of bacterial pathogens, including Klebsiella pneumoniae. Th2 cytokine expression in the airways is a characteristic feature of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. The Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 diminish ex vivo and in vivo IL-17A protein expression by Th17 cells. To determine the effect of IL-4 and IL-13 on IL-17-dependent lung immune responses to acute bacterial infection, we developed a combined model in which allergic airway inflammation and lung IL-4 and IL-13 expression were induced by ovalbumin sensitization and challenge prior to acute lung infection with K. pneumoniae. We hypothesized that preexisting allergic airway inflammation decreases lung IL-17A expression and airway neutrophil recruitment in response to acute K. pneumoniae infection and thereby increases the lung K. pneumoniae burden. As hypothesized, we found that allergic airway inflammation decreased the number of K. pneumoniae-induced airway neutrophils and lung IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 expression. Despite the marked reduction in postinfection airway neutrophilia and lung expression of Th17 cytokines, allergic airway inflammation significantly decreased the lung K. pneumoniae burden and postinfection mortality. We showed that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden was independent of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17A and partially dependent on IL-13 and STAT6. Additionally, we demonstrated that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden associated with allergic airway inflammation was both neutrophil and CCL8 dependent. These findings suggest a novel role for CCL8 in lung antibacterial immunity against K. pneumoniae and suggest new mechanisms of orchestrating lung antibacterial immunity.

  16. Targeting DNA Damage Response in the Radio(Chemo)therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Zhu, Tao; Gao, Yuan-Feng; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Chen-Jing; Xiao, Ling; Huang, Ma-Sha; Yin, Ji-Ye; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide due to its high incidence and mortality. As the most common lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a terrible threat to human health. Despite improvements in diagnosis and combined treatments including surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the overall survival for NSCLC patients still remains poor. DNA damage is considered to be the primary cause of lung cancer development and is normally recognized and repaired by the intrinsic DNA damage response machinery. The role of DNA repair pathways in radio(chemo)therapy-resistant cancers has become an area of significant interest in the clinical setting. Meanwhile, some studies have proved that genetic and epigenetic factors can alter the DNA damage response and repair, which results in changes of the radiation and chemotherapy curative effect in NSCLC. In this review, we focus on the effect of genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors such as miRNA regulation and lncRNA regulation participating in DNA damage repair in response to radio(chemo)therapy in NSCLC. These may provide novel information on the radio(chemo)therapy of NSCLC based on the individual DNA damage response. PMID:27258253

  17. Aminophylline treatment in meconium-induced acute lung injury in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Mokra, D; Mokry, J; Tatarkova, Z; Redfors, B; Petraskova, M; Calkovska, A

    2007-11-01

    Administration of methylxanthines may diminish meconium-induced acute lung injury. Meconium-instilled rabbits intravenously received aminophylline (2.0 mg/kg) at two doses 0.5 h and 2.5 h after meconium instillation or were left without treatment, and were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 h. At the end of experiment, lungs and trachea were excised. Within 5 h after the first dose of treatment, aminophylline significantly improved gas exchange and decreased right-to-left pulmonary shunts, central venous pressure, and ventilatory pressures. Moreover, aminophylline reduced meconium-induced lung edema formation, airway hyperreactivity to histamine, count of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid associated with higher total white blood cells and neutrophils in the blood, and diminished oxidative modifications of proteins and lipids in lung tissue compared with the non-treated meconium-instilled group. In a rabbit model of the meconium aspiration syndrome, aminophylline treatment enhanced pulmonary functions and alleviated oxidative injury and changes in airway reactivity related to lung inflammation.

  18. Soluble transition metals mediate residual oil fly ash induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Dreher, K L; Jaskot, R H; Lehmann, J R; Richards, J H; McGee, J K; Ghio, A J; Costa, D L

    1997-02-21

    Identification of constituents responsible for the pulmonary toxicity of fugitive combustion emission source particles may provide insight into the adverse health effects associated with exposure to these particles as well as ambient air particulate pollution. Herein, we describe results of studies conducted to identify constituents responsible for the acute lung injury induced by residual oil fly ash (ROFA) and to assess physical-chemical factors that influence the pulmonary toxicity of these constituents. Biochemical and cellular analyses performed on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from rats following intratracheal instillation of ROFA suspension demonstrated the presence of severe inflammation, an indicator of pulmonary injury, which included recruitment of neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes into the airway. A leachate prepared from ROFA, containing predominantly Fe, Ni, V, Ca, Mg, and sulfate, produced similar lung injury to that induced by ROFA suspension. Depletion of Fe, Ni, and V from the ROFA leachate abrogated its pulmonary toxicity. Correspondingly, minimal lung injury was observed in animals exposed to saline-washed ROFA particles. A surrogate transition metal sulfate solution containing Fe, V, and Ni largely reproduced the lung injury induced by ROFA. Metal interactions and pH were found to influence the severity and kinetics of lung injury induced by ROFA and soluble transition metals. These findings provide direct evidence for the role of soluble transition metals in the pulmonary injury induced by the combustion emission source particulate, ROFA.

  19. RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lidocaine against sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Zhou, Jie; Liao, Changli; Li, Xiaobing; Liu, Minghua; Song, Daqiang; Jiang, Xian

    2017-04-01

    Lidocaine (Lido) is reported to suppress inflammatory responses and exhibit a therapeutic effect in models of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). The receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) exerts pro-inflammatory effects by enhancing pro-inflammatory cytokine production. However, the precise mechanism by which Lido confers protection against ALI is not clear. ALI was induced in RAGE WT and RAGE knockout (KO) rats using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) operations for 24 h. The results showed that Lido significantly inhibited CLP-induced lung inflammation and histopathological lung injury. Furthermore, Lido significantly reduced CLP-induced upregulation of HMGB1 and RAGE expression and activation of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. With the use of RAGE KO rats, we demonstrate here that RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lido against CLP-induced lung inflammatory cell infiltration and histopathological lung injury. These results suggest that RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lido against CLP-induced ALI by attenuating the pro-inflammatory cytokines production.

  20. [Role of polymorphonuclear neutrophil in exogenous hydrogen sulfide attenuating endotoxin-induced acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Zhou, Jun-Lin; Ding, Chun-Hua; Xian, Xiao-Hui

    2009-08-25

    The animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) caused by intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and cultured human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) were used to study the effects of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor, on LPS-induced PMN accumulation, microvascular permeability and PMN apoptosis. Control group, NaHS group, LPS group and LPS + NaHS group were established both in in vivo and in vitro studies. Microvascular permeability, PMN accumulation in lung and apoptosis of PMN were detected. The results showed that: (1) In in vivo study, PMN accumulation in lung, the protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the Evans blue dye in lung tissue of LPS group were markedly higher than those of both sham operation group and LPS + NaHS group (P<0.05, P<0.01); (2) In in vitro study, the apoptotic rates of PMN in LPS group and NaHS group were significantly higher than that in control group (P<0.01), while compared with LPS group, LPS + NaHS group showed significantly higher apoptotic rate (P<0.01). These results suggest that NaHS attenuates LPS-induced microvascular permeability and alleviates ALI. PMN apoptosis induced by NaHS is possibly one of the potential mechanisms underlying the decrease of PMN accumulation in lung tissue.

  1. Involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinases in neutrophil activation and the development of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yum, H K; Arcaroli, J; Kupfner, J; Shenkar, R; Penninger, J M; Sasaki, T; Yang, K Y; Park, J S; Abraham, E

    2001-12-01

    Activated neutrophils contribute to the development and severity of acute lung injury (ALI). Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3-K) and the downstream serine/threonine kinase Akt/protein kinase B have a central role in modulating neutrophil function, including respiratory burst, chemotaxis, and apoptosis. In the present study, we found that exposure of neutrophils to endotoxin resulted in phosphorylation of Akt, activation of NF-kappaB, and expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha through PI3-K-dependent pathways. In vivo, endotoxin administration to mice resulted in activation of PI3-K and Akt in neutrophils that accumulated in the lungs. The severity of endotoxemia-induced ALI was significantly diminished in mice lacking the p110gamma catalytic subunit of PI3-K. In PI3-Kgamma(-/-) mice, lung edema, neutrophil recruitment, nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB, and pulmonary levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha were significantly lower after endotoxemia as compared with PI3-Kgamma(+/+) controls. Among neutrophils that did accumulate in the lungs of the PI3-Kgamma(-/-) mice after endotoxin administration, activation of NF-kappaB and expression of proinflammatory cytokines was diminished compared with levels present in lung neutrophils from PI3-Kgamma(+/+) mice. These results show that PI3-K, and particularly PI3-Kgamma, occupies a central position in regulating endotoxin-induced neutrophil activation, including that involved in ALI.

  2. Ukrain (NSC 631570) ameliorates intestinal ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute lung injury by reducing oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Kocak, Cengiz; Kocak, Fatma Emel; Akcilar, Raziye; Akcilar, Aydin; Savran, Bircan; Zeren, Sezgin; Bayhan, Zulfu; Bayat, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) causes severe destruction in remote organs. Lung damage is a frequently seen complication after intestinal I/R. Ukrain (NSC 631570) is a synthetic thiophosphate derivative of alkaloids from the extract of the celandine (Chelidonium majus L.) plant. We investigated the effect of Ukrain in animals with lung injury induced by intestinal I/R. Adult male Spraque-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, Ukrain, I/R, I/R with Ukrain. Before intestinal I/R was induced, Ukrain was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 7.0 mg/body weight. After 1 h ischemia and 2 h reperfusion period, lung tissues were excised. Tissue levels of total oxidative status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured and oxidative stress indices (OSI) were calculated. Lung tissues were also examined histopathologically. TOS and OSI levels markedly increased and TAS levels decreased in the I/R group compared to the control group (P < 0.05). TOS and OSI levels markedly decreased and TAS levels increased in the I/R with Ukrain group compared with the group subjected to IR only (P < 0.05). Severe hemorrhage, alveolar septal thickening, and leukocyte infiltration were observed in the I/R group. In the I/R with Ukrain group, morphologic changes occurring as a result of lung damage attenuated and histopathological scores reduced compared to the I/R group (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that Ukrain pretreatment could reduce lung injury induced by intestinal I/R induced via anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. PMID:26773189

  3. An acute adrenal insufficiency revealing pituitary metastases of lung cancer in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Marmouch, Hela; Arfa, Sondes; Mohamed, Saoussen Cheikh; Slim, Tensim; Khochtali, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Metastases of solid tumors to the pituitary gland are often asymptomatic or appereas as with diabetes insipid us. Pituitary metastases more commonly affect the posterior lobe and the infundibulum than the anterior lobe. The presentation with an acute adrenal insufficiency is a rare event. A 69-year-old men presented with vomiting, low blood pressure and hypoglycemia. Hormonal exploration confirmed a hypopituitarism. Appropriate therapy was initiated urgently. The hypothalamic-pituitary MRI showed a pituitary hypertrophy, a nodular thickening of the pituitary stalk. The chest X Rays revealed pulmonary opacity. Computed tomography scan of the chest showed a multiples tumors with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Bronchoscopy and biopsy demonstrated a pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Hence we concluded to a lung cancer with multiple pituitary and adrenal gland metastases. This case emphasizes the need for an etiological investigation of acute adrenal insufficiency after treatment of acute phase. PMID:27200139

  4. Type 2 Deiodinase and Host Responses of Sepsis and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shwu-Fan; Xie, Lishi; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Sammani, Saad; Wade, Michael S.; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Siegler, Jessica; Wang, Ting; Infusino, Giovanni; Kittles, Rick A.; Flores, Carlos; Zhou, Tong; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Villar, Jesus; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Dudek, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    The role of thyroid hormone metabolism in clinical outcomes of the critically ill remains unclear. Using preclinical models of acute lung injury (ALI), we assessed the gene and protein expression of type 2 deiodinase (DIO2), a key driver for synthesis of biologically active triiodothyronine, and addressed potential association of DIO2 genetic variants with ALI in a multiethnic cohort. DIO2 gene and protein expression levels in murine lung were validated by microarrays and immunoblotting. Lung injury was assessed by levels of bronchoalveolar lavage protein and leukocytes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped and ALI susceptibility association assessed. Significant increases in both DIO2 gene and D2 protein expression were observed in lung tissues from murine ALI models (LPS- and ventilator-induced lung injury), with expression directly increasing with the extent of lung injury. Mice with reduced levels of DIO2 expression (by silencing RNA) demonstrated reduced thyroxine levels in plasma and increased lung injury (increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and leukocytes), suggesting a protective role for DIO2 in ALI. The G (Ala) allele of the Thr92Ala coding single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs225014) was protective in severe sepsis and severe sepsis–associated ALI after adjustments for age, sex, and genetic ancestry in a logistic regression model in European Americans. Our studies indicate that DIO2 is a novel ALI candidate gene, the nonsynonymous Thr92Ala coding variant of which confers ALI protection. Increased DIO2 expression may dampen the ALI inflammatory response, thereby strengthening the premise that thyroid hormone metabolism is intimately linked to the integrated response to inflammatory injury in critically ill patients. PMID:21685153

  5. Acute ozone-induced lung injury in rats: Structural-functional relationships of developing alveolar edema

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.F.; Hammond, M.D.; Montgomery, M.R.; Sharp, J.T.; Farrier, S.E.; Balis, J.U. )

    1992-11-01

    As part of a study on the effects of acute ozone stress on the lung surfactant system, we correlated morphometric, biochemical, and functional indices of lung injury using male rats exposed to 3 ppm ozone for 1, 2, 4, and 8 hr. Evaluation of lung mechanics, using the Pulmonary Evaluation and Diagnostic Laboratory System, revealed a significant decrease in dynamic lung compliance (ml/cmH[sub 2]O/kg) from a control value of 0.84 [plus minus] 0.02 (SEM) to 0.72 [plus minus] 0.04 and 0.57 [plus minus] 0.06 at 4 and 8 hr, respectively. At 2 hr there was a transient increase in PaO[sub 2] to 116 torr (control = 92 torr) followed by a decrease at 4 hr (65 torr) and 8 hr (55 torr). Morphometry of lung tissue, fixed by perfusion of fixative via the pulmonary artery at 12 cm H[sub 2]O airway distending pressure, demonstrated an increase in the area of the intravascular compartment at 8 hr, in association with a 65 and 39% replacement of the alveolar area by fluid in ventral and dorsal lung regions, respectively. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.966) between alveolar edema and transudated proteins in lavage fluid. A stepwise multiple regression model, with edema as the dependent variable, suggested that pulmonary vasodilatation, hypoxemia, and depletion of surfactant tubular myelin in lavage fluid were indices for predicting alveolar edema. In a second model, with lavage protein concentration as the dependent variable, decreasing dynamic compliance and hypoxemia were predictors of progressive, intraalveolar transudation of plasma proteins. The above structural-functional relationships support the concept that ozone-induced high-protein alveolar edema is pathogenetically linked to pulmonary hyperemia, deficiency of surfactant tubular myelin, and associated lung dysfunctions.

  6. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Michalick, Laura; Tang, Christine; Tabuchi, Arata; Goldenberg, Neil; Dan, Qinghong; Awwad, Khader; Wang, Liming; Erfinanda, Lasti; Nouailles, Geraldine; Witzenrath, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Lv, Lu; Lee, Warren L; Zhang, Haibo; Rotstein, Ori; Kapus, Andras; Szaszi, Katalin; Fleming, Ingrid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B; Kuppe, Hermann; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2016-03-01

    The cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is expressed in endothelial and immune cells; however, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. The functional relevance of TRPV4 was assessed in vivo, in isolated murine lungs, and in isolated neutrophils. Genetic deficiency of TRPV4 attenuated the functional, histological, and inflammatory hallmarks of acid-induced ALI. Similar protection was obtained with prophylactic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, GSK2193874; however, therapeutic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, HC-067047, after ALI induction had no beneficial effect. In isolated lungs, platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased vascular permeability in lungs perfused with trpv4(+/+) more than with trpv4(-/-) blood, independent of lung genotype, suggesting a contribution of TRPV4 on blood cells to lung vascular barrier failure. In neutrophils, TRPV4 inhibition or deficiency attenuated the PAF-induced increase in intracellular calcium. PAF induced formation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by neutrophils, which, in turn, stimulated TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, whereas inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation inhibited the Ca(2+) response to PAF. TRPV4 deficiency prevented neutrophil responses to proinflammatory stimuli, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, neutrophil adhesion, and chemotaxis, putatively due to reduced activation of Rac. In chimeric mice, however, the majority of protective effects in acid-induced ALI were attributable to genetic deficiency of TRPV4 in parenchymal tissue, whereas TRPV4 deficiency in circulating blood cells primarily reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Our findings identify TRPV4 as novel regulator of neutrophil activation and suggest contributions of both parenchymal and neutrophilic TRPV4 in the pathophysiology of ALI.

  7. Kidney-lung connections in acute and chronic diseases: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Luca; Santoro, Domenico; Cernaro, Valeria; Buemi, Michele; Lacquaniti, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Lung and kidney functions are intimately related in both health and disease. The regulation of acid-base equilibrium, modification of partial pressure of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate concentration, and the control of blood pressure and fluid homeostasis all closely depend on renal and pulmonary activities. These interactions begin in fetal age and are often responsible for the genesis and progression of diseases. In gestational age, urine is a fundamental component of the amniotic fluid, acting on pulmonary maturation and growth. Moreover, in the first trimester of pregnancy, kidney is the main source of proline, contributing to collagen synthesis and lung parenchyma maturation. Pathologically speaking, the kidneys could become damaged by mediators of inflammation or immuno-mediated factors related to a primary lung pathology or, on the contrary, it could be the renal disease that determines a consecutive pulmonary damage. Furthermore, non immunological mechanisms are frequently involved in renal and pulmonary diseases, as observed in chronic pathologies such as sleep apnea syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, progressive renal disease and hemodialysis. Kidney damage has also been related to mechanical ventilation. The aim of this review is to describe pulmonary-renal interactions and their related pathologies, underscoring the need for a close collaboration between intensivists, pneumologists and nephrologists.

  8. Bench-to-bedside review: Adenosine receptors – promising targets in acute lung injury?

    PubMed Central

    Schepp, Carsten P; Reutershan, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are life-threatening disorders that have substantial adverse effects on outcomes in critically ill patients. ALI/ARDS develops in response to pulmonary or extrapulmonary injury and is characterized by increased leakage from the pulmonary microvasculature and excessive infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells into the lung. Currently, no therapeutic strategies are available to control these fundamental pathophysiological processes in human ALI/ARDS. In a variety of animal models and experimental settings, the purine nucleoside adenosine has been demonstrated to regulate both endothelial barrier integrity and polymorphonuclear cell trafficking in the lung. Adenosine exerts its effects through four G-protein-coupled receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) that are expressed on leukocytes and nonhematopoietic cells, including endothelial and epithelial cells. Each type of adenosine receptor (AR) is characterized by a unique pharmacological and physiological profile. The development of selective AR agonists and antagonists, as well as the generation of gene-deficient mice, has contributed to a growing understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that are critically involved in the development of ALI/ARDS. Adenosine-dependent pathways are involved in both protective and proinflammatory effects, highlighting the need for a detailed characterization of the distinct pathways. This review summarizes current experimental observations on the role of adenosine signaling in the development of acute lung injury and illustrates that adenosine and ARs are promising targets that may be exploited in the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:18828873

  9. An automated method for measuring static pressure-volume curves of the respiratory system and its application in healthy lungs and after lung damage by oleic acid infusion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Rees, S E; Kjaergaard, S; Smith, B W; Larsson, A; Andreassen, S

    2007-03-01

    Elastic pressure/volume (PV) curves of the respiratory system have attracted increasing interest, because they may be helpful to optimize ventilator settings in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. Clinically applicable methods need to be fast, use routinely available equipment, draw the inspiratory and expiratory PV curve limbs, separate the resistive and viscoelastic properties of the respiratory system from the elastic properties, and provide reproducible measurements. This paper presents a computer-controlled method for rapid measurements of static PV curves using a long inflation-deflation with pauses, and its evaluation in six pigs before and after lung damage caused by oleic acid. The method is fast, i.e. 20.5 +/- 1.9 s (mean +/- SD) in healthy lungs and 17.7 +/- 4.1 s in diseased lungs, this including inspiratory and expiratory pauses of 1.1 s duration. In addition the only equipment used was a clinical ventilator and a PC. For healthy and damaged lungs expiratory PV curve limbs were very reproducible and were at higher volume than the inspiratory limbs, indicating hysteresis. For damaged lungs inspiratory PV limbs were reproducible. For healthy lungs the inspiratory limbs were reproducible but only after the first inflation-deflation. It is possible that during the first inflation alveoli are recruited which are not derecruited on deflation, shifting the inspiratory limb of the PV curve. The paused long inflation-deflation technique provides a quick, automated measurement of static PV curves on both inspiratory and expiratory limbs using routinely available equipment in the intensive care unit.

  10. The role of leptin in the development of pulmonary neutrophilia in infection and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ubags, Niki D.; Vernooy, Juanita H.; Burg, Elianne; Hayes, Catherine; Bement, Jenna; Dilli, Estee; Zabeau, Lennart; Abraham, Edward; Poch, Katie R.; Nick, Jerry A.; Dienz, Oliver; Zuñiga, Joaquin; Wargo, Matthew J.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.; Tavernier, Jan; Rincón, Mercedes; Poynter, Matthew E.; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Suratt, Benjamin T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective One of the hallmarks of severe pneumonia and associated Acute Lung Injury (ALI) is neutrophil recruitment to the lung. Leptin is thought to be up-regulated in the lung following injury and to exert diverse effects on leukocytes, influencing both chemotaxis and survival. We hypothesized that pulmonary leptin contributes directly to the development of pulmonary neutrophilia during pneumonia and ALI. Design Controlled human and murine in vivo and ex vivo experimental studies. Settings Research laboratory of a university hospital. Subjects Healthy human volunteers and subjects hospitalized with bacterial and H1N1 pneumonia. C57Bl/6 and db/db mice were also used. Interventions Lung samples from patients and mice with either bacterial or H1N1 pneumonia and associated ALI were immunostained for leptin. Human bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL) samples obtained after lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury were assayed for leptin. C57Bl/6 mice were examined after oropharyngeal aspiration of recombinant leptin alone or in combination with E.coli- or K.pneumonia-induced pneumonia. Leptin-resistant (db/db) mice were also examined using the E.coli model. BAL neutrophilia and cytokine levels were measured. Leptin-induced chemotaxis was examined in human blood- and murine marrow-derived neutrophils in vitro. Measurements and Main Results Injured human and murine lung tissue showed leptin induction compared to normal lung, as did human BAL following LPS instillation. BAL neutrophilia in uninjured and infected mice was increased and lung bacterial-load decreased by airway leptin administration, whereas BAL neutrophilia in infected leptin-resistant mice was decreased. In sterile lung injury by LPS, leptin also appeared to decrease airspace neutrophil apoptosis. Both human and murine neutrophils migrated towards leptin in vitro, and this required intact signaling through the JAK2/PI3K pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that pulmonary leptin is induced in injured human and

  11. Mechanism of Action of Lung Damage Caused by a Nanofilm Spray Product

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Søren T.; Dallot, Constantin; Larsen, Susan W.; Rose, Fabrice; Poulsen, Steen S.; Nørgaard, Asger W.; Hansen, Jitka S.; Sørli, Jorid B.; Nielsen, Gunnar D.; Foged, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of waterproofing spray products has on several occasions caused lung damage, which in some cases was fatal. The present study aims to elucidate the mechanism of action of a nanofilm spray product, which has been shown to possess unusual toxic effects, including an extremely steep concentration-effect curve. The nanofilm product is intended for application on non-absorbing flooring materials and contains perfluorosiloxane as the active film-forming component. The toxicological effects and their underlying mechanisms of this product were studied using a mouse inhalation model, by in vitro techniques and by identification of the binding interaction. Inhalation of the aerosolized product gave rise to increased airway resistance in the mice, as evident from the decreased expiratory flow rate. The toxic effect of the waterproofing spray product included interaction with the pulmonary surfactants. More specifically, the active film-forming components in the spray product, perfluorinated siloxanes, inhibited the function of the lung surfactant due to non-covalent interaction with surfactant protein B, a component which is crucial for the stability and persistence of the lung surfactant film during respiration. The active film-forming component used in the present spray product is also found in several other products on the market. Hence, it may be expected that these products may have a toxicity similar to the waterproofing product studied here. Elucidation of the toxicological mechanism and identification of toxicological targets are important to perform rational and cost-effective toxicological studies. Thus, because the pulmonary surfactant system appears to be an important toxicological target for waterproofing spray products, study of surfactant inhibition could be included in toxicological assessment of this group of consumer products. PMID:24863969

  12. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses. PMID:25978669

  13. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  14. Acute Inhalation Exposure to Vaporized Methamphetamine Causes Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Sandra M.; Buford, Mary C.; Braseth, Sarah N.; Hutchison, James D.; Holian, Andrij

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is currently the most widespread illegally used stimulant in the United States. Use of MA by smoking is the fastest growing mode of administration, which increases concerns about potential pulmonary and other medical complications. A murine exposure system was developed to study the pulmonary affects of inhaled MA. Mice were exposed to 25–100 mg vaporized MA and assessments were made 3 h following initiation of exposure to model acute lung injury. Inhalation of MA vapor resulted in dose-dependent increases in MA plasma levels that were in the range of those experienced by MA users. At the highest MA dose, histological changes were observed in the lung and small but significant increases in lung wet weight to body weight ratios (5.656 ± 0.176 mg/g for the controls vs. 6.706± 0.135 mg/g for the 100 mg MA-exposed mice) were found. In addition, there was 53% increase in total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, greater than 20% increase in albumin levels in the BAL fluid, greater than 2.5-fold increase in lactate dehydrogenase levels in the BAL fluid, and reduced total BAL cell numbers (approximately 77% of controls). Levels of the early response cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 were dose-dependently increased in BAL fluid of MA-exposed mice. Exposure to 100 mg MA significantly increased free radical generation in the BAL cells to 107–146% of controls and to approximately 135% of the controls in lung tissue in situ. Together, these data show that acute inhalation exposure to relevant doses of volatilized MA is associated with elevated free radical formation and significant lung injury. PMID:18645723

  15. Brain damage complicating septic shock: acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis as a complication of the generalised Shwartzman reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, D I; Behan, P O; More, I A

    1979-01-01

    The neuropathological findings in six patients who developed neurological signs after the onset of "septic shock" caused by Gram-negative septicaemia are described. The changes in the brains were characteristic of acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis, and there was evidence, particularly in the kidneys, of disseminated intravascular coagulation with tubular necrosis and, in some, appearances indistinguishable from membrano-proliferative glomerulonephritis. It is agreed that acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis is another manifestation of a generalised Shwartzman reaction, and it is suggested that activation of complement is the final common pathway that produces tissue damage in the brain and kidney. Images PMID:762582

  16. Protective effect of Xuebijing injection against acute lung injury induced by left ventricular ischemia/reperfusion in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    JI, MINGLI; WANG, YUXIA; WANG, LEI; CHEN, LIPING; LI, JING

    2016-01-01

    Xuebijing (XBJ) is a Chinese herbal preparation. Previous studies have demonstrated that XBJ injection is able to inhibit the uncontrolled release of endogenous inflammatory mediators, attenuate inflammation, and alleviate organ damage. However, there are no relevant reports on the protective effect of XBJ against left ventricular ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of XBJ on ALI induced by left ventricular I/R, and provide evidence for the clinical application of XBJ. In the present study, 120 healthy rabbits of mixed gender were randomly assigned to a normal control group, ischemia group, I/R group (I/RG) and XBJ-injection treatment group (TG). In addition, each group was further divided into three subgroups (n=10/subgroup), namely, 30 min pre-ischemia, 30 min post-ischemia and 30 min post-reperfusion subgroups. Blood samples (5 ml) were collected from the jugularis externa and carotis communis of the rabbits at the three time points, and a blood gas analyzer was used to measure the arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and carbon dioxide (PaCO2). Following sacrifice, the lungs of the rabbits were removed and a bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was immediately performed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the BAL fluid (BALF) and peripheral blood. In addition, the lower lobe of the right lung was removed in order to measure the protein expression levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and TNF-α. The results demonstrated that in the rabbits of the TG PaO2 was increased, PaCO2 was decreased, the lung tissue congestion edema was attenuated, the expression levels of TNF-α in the peripheral blood and BALF were reduced and the protein expression levels of ICAM-1 and TNF-α in the lung tissue samples were decreased, as compared with those in the I/RG rabbits. These

  17. Therapeutic inhibition of TRF1 impairs the growth of p53-deficient K-RasG12V-induced lung cancer by induction of telomeric DNA damage.

    PubMed

    García-Beccaria, María; Martínez, Paula; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Martínez, Sonia; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Cañamero, Marta; Mulero, Francisca; Ambrogio, Chiara; Flores, Juana M; Megias, Diego; Barbacid, Mariano; Pastor, Joaquín; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-07-01

    Telomeres are considered anti-cancer targets, as telomere maintenance above a minimum length is necessary for cancer growth. Telomerase abrogation in cancer-prone mouse models, however, only decreased tumor growth after several mouse generations when telomeres reach a critically short length, and this effect was lost upon p53 mutation. Here, we address whether induction of telomere uncapping by inhibition of the TRF1 shelterin protein can effectively block cancer growth independently of telomere length. We show that genetic Trf1 ablation impairs the growth of p53-null K-Ras(G12V)-induced lung carcinomas and increases mouse survival independently of telomere length. This is accompanied by induction of telomeric DNA damage, apoptosis, decreased proliferation, and G2 arrest. Long-term whole-body Trf1 deletion in adult mice did not impact on mouse survival and viability, although some mice showed a moderately decreased cellularity in bone marrow and blood. Importantly, inhibition of TRF1 binding to telomeres by small molecules blocks the growth of already established lung carcinomas without affecting mouse survival or tissue function. Thus, induction of acute telomere uncapping emerges as a potential new therapeutic target for lung cancer.

  18. Potential role of Saudi red propolis in alleviating lung damage induced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus virulence in rats.

    PubMed

    Saddiq, Amna Ali; Mohamed, Azza Mostafa

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the protective impact of aqueous extract of Saudi red propolis against rat lung damage induced by the pathogenic bacteria namely methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ATCC 6538 strain. Infected rats were received a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of bacterial suspension at a dose of 1 X 10(6) CFU / 100g body weight. Results showed that oral administration of an aqueous extract of propolis (50mg/100g body weight) daily for two weeks to infected rats simultaneously with bacterial infection, effectively ameliorated the alteration of oxidative stress biomarker, malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as the antioxidant markers, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), in lungs of infected rats compared with infected untreated ones. Also, the used propolis extract successfully modulated the alterations in proinflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in serum. In addition, the propolis extract successfully modulated the oxidative DNA damage and the apoptosis biomarker, caspase 3, in lungs of S aureus infected rats compared with infected untreated animals. The biochemical results were supported by histo-pathological observation of lung tissues. In conclusion, the beneficial prophylactic role of the aqueous extract of Saudi red propolis against lung damage induced by methicillin resistant S aureus may be related to the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and antiapoptosis of its active constituents.

  19. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B negatively regulates S100A9-mediated lung damage during respiratory syncytial virus exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Foronjy, Robert F.; Ochieng, Pius O.; Salathe, Matthias A.; Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Eden, Edward; Baumlin, Nathalie; Cummins, Neville; Barik, Sailen; Campos, Michael; Thorp, Edward B.; Geraghty, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has anti-inflammatory potential but PTP1B responses are desensitized in the lung by prolonged cigarette smoke exposure. Here we investigate whether PTP1B expression impacts lung disease severity during respiratory syncytial viral (RSV) exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Ptp1b-/- mice infected with RSV exhibit exaggerated immune cell infiltration, damaged epithelial cell barriers, cytokine production and increased apoptosis. Elevated expression of S100A9, a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, was observed in the lungs of Ptp1b-/- mice during RSV infection. Utilizing a neutralizing anti-S100A9 IgG antibody, it was determined that extracellular S100A9 signaling significantly impacts lung damage during RSV infection. Pre-exposure to cigarette smoke desensitized PTP1B activity, which coincided with enhanced S100A9 secretion and inflammation in wild type animals during RSV infection. S100A9 levels in human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid had an inverse relationship with lung function in healthy subjects, smokers and COPD subjects. Fully differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells isolated from COPD donors cultured at the air liquid interface secreted more S100A9 than cells from healthy donors or smokers following RSV infection. Together, these findings show that reduced PTP1B responses contribute to disease symptoms in part by enhancing S100A9 expression during viral-associated COPD exacerbations. PMID:26813343

  20. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B negatively regulates S100A9-mediated lung damage during respiratory syncytial virus exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Foronjy, R F; Ochieng, P O; Salathe, M A; Dabo, A J; Eden, E; Baumlin, N; Cummins, N; Barik, S; Campos, M; Thorp, E B; Geraghty, P

    2016-09-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has anti-inflammatory potential but PTP1B responses are desensitized in the lung by prolonged cigarette smoke exposure. Here we investigate whether PTP1B expression affects lung disease severity during respiratory syncytial viral (RSV) exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Ptp1b(-/-) mice infected with RSV exhibit exaggerated immune cell infiltration, damaged epithelial cell barriers, cytokine production, and increased apoptosis. Elevated expression of S100A9, a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, was observed in the lungs of Ptp1b(-/-) mice during RSV infection. Utilizing a neutralizing anti-S100A9 IgG antibody, it was determined that extracellular S100A9 signaling significantly affects lung damage during RSV infection. Preexposure to cigarette smoke desensitized PTP1B activity that coincided with enhanced S100A9 secretion and inflammation in wild-type animals during RSV infection. S100A9 levels in human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid had an inverse relationship with lung function in healthy subjects, smokers, and COPD subjects. Fully differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells isolated from COPD donors cultured at the air liquid interface secreted more S100A9 than cells from healthy donors or smokers following RSV infection. Together, these findings show that reduced PTP1B responses contribute to disease symptoms in part by enhancing S100A9 expression during viral-associated COPD exacerbations.

  1. TLR4 signaling induces TLR3 up-regulation in alveolar macrophages during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xibing; Jin, Shuqing; Tong, Yao; Jiang, Xi; Chen, Zhixia; Mei, Shuya; Zhang, Liming; Billiar, Timothy R.; Li, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening inflammatory response caused by severe infection. Toll-like receptors in alveolar macrophages (AMΦ) recognize the molecular constituents of pathogens and activate the host’s innate immune responses. Numerous studies have documented the importance of TLR-TLR cross talk, but few studies have specifically addressed the relationship between TLR4 and TLR3. We explored a novel mechanism of TLR3 up-regulation that is induced by LPS-TLR4 signaling in a dose- and time-dependent manner in AMΦ from C57BL/6 mice, while the LPS-induced TLR3 expression was significantly reduced in TLR4−/− and Myd88−/− mice and following pretreatment with a NF-κB inhibitor. The enhanced TLR3 up-regulation in AMΦ augmented the expression of cytokines and chemokines in response to sequential challenges with LPS and Poly I:C, a TLR3 ligand, which was physiologically associated with amplified AMΦ-induced PMN migration into lung alveoli. Our study demonstrates that the synergistic effect between TLR4 and TLR3 in macrophages is an important determinant in acute lung injury and, more importantly, that TLR3 up-regulation is dependent on TLR4-MyD88-NF-κB signaling. These results raise the possibility that bacterial infections can induce sensitivity to viral infections, which may have important implications for the therapeutic manipulation of the innate immune system. PMID:28198368

  2. Melatonin alleviates acute lung injury through inhibiting the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Xiru; Grailer, Jamison J; Wang, Na; Wang, Mingming; Yao, Jianfei; Zhong, Rui; Gao, George F; Ward, Peter A; Tan, Dun-Xian; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are clinically severe respiratory disorders, and there are currently no Food and Drug Administration-approved drug therapies. Melatonin is a well-known anti-inflammatory molecule, which has proven to be effective in ALI induced by many conditions. Emerging studies suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role during ALI. How melatonin directly blocks activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in ALI remains unclear. In this study, using an LPS-induced ALI mouse model, we found intratracheal (i.t.) administration of melatonin markedly reduced the pulmonary injury and decreased the infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into lung. During ALI, the NLRP3 inflammasome is significantly activated with a large amount of IL-1β and the activated caspase-1 occurring in the lung. Melatonin inhibits the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by both suppressing the release of extracellular histones and directly blocking histone-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Notably, i.t. route of melatonin administration opens a more efficient therapeutic approach for treating ALI.

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Adrenomedullin on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Carrageenan in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Talero; Rosanna, Di Paola; Emanuela, Mazzon; Esposito, Emanuela; Virginia, Motilva; Salvatore, Cuzzocrea

    2012-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52 amino acid peptide that has shown predominant anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we evaluated the possible therapeutic effect of this peptide in an experimental model of acute inflammation, the carrageenan- (CAR-) induced pleurisy. Pleurisy was induced by injection of CAR into the pleural cavity of mice. AM (200 ng/kg) was administered by intraperitoneal route 1 h after CAR, and the animals were sacrificed 4 h after that. AM treatment attenuated the recruitment of leucocytes in the lung tissue and the generation and/or the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines as well as the expression of the intercellular cell adhesion molecules. Moreover, AM inhibited the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), thereby abating the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and prevented the oxidative and nitroxidative lung tissue injury, as shown by the reduction of nitrotyrosine, malondialdehyde (MDA), and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) levels. Finally, we demonstrated that these anti-inflammatory effects of AM were associated with the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. All these parameters were markedly increased by intrapleural CAR in the absence of any treatment. We report that treatment with AM significantly reduces the development of acute lung injury by downregulating a broad spectrum of inflammatory factors. PMID:22685374

  4. Effects of Liver × receptor agonist treatment on signal transduction pathways in acute lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Liver × receptor α (LXRα) and β (LXRβ) are members of the nuclear receptor super family of ligand-activated transcription factors, a super family which includes the perhaps better known glucocorticoid receptor, estrogen receptor, thyroid receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. There is limited evidence that LXL activation may reduces acute lung inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of T0901317, a potent LXR receptor ligand, in a mouse model of carrageenan-induced pleurisy. Methods Injection of carrageenan into the pleural cavity of mice elicited an acute inflammatory response characterized by: accumulation of fluid containing a large number of neutrophils (PMNs) in the pleural cavity, infiltration of PMNs in lung tissues and subsequent lipid peroxidation, and increased production of nitrite/nitrate (NOx), tumor necrosis factor-α, (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Furthermore, carrageenan induced the expression of iNOS, nitrotyrosine and PARP, as well as induced apoptosis (TUNEL staining and Bax and Bcl-2 expression) in the lung tissues. Results Administration of T0901317, 30 min after the challenge with carrageenan, caused a significant reduction in a dose dependent manner of all the parameters of inflammation measured. Conclusions Thus, based on these findings we propose that LXR ligand such as T0901317, may be useful in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. PMID:20175894

  5. Pulmonary circulatory parameters as indices for the early detection of acute rejection after single lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Okada, M; Tobe, S; Tsuji, F; Ohbo, H; Nakamura, H; Yamashita, C

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the changes in the pulmonary blood flow and histology during acute rejection following single lung transplantation. In single lung transplantation using adult mongrel dogs, immunosuppression with cyclosporine and azathioprine was discontinued after postoperative day 14 to induce rejection. Doppler flow probes were placed adjacent to the ascending aorta and the left pulmonary artery to measure the blood flow on a daily basis. In addition, chest roentgenograms were also examined daily. The pulmonary pressure was measured using a Swan-Ganz catheter prior to and following the induction of rejection. Open lung biopsies were performed when the left pulmonary artery flow decreased to half of the prerejection value. The pulmonary artery flow decreased to 14.3% of the aortic flow 5 days after the discontinuation of immunosuppression. The graft pulmonary vascular resistance increased significantly compared to the prerejection values (P < 0.001). This was not accompanied by any abnormalities on chest roentgenography. The histology was consistent, with marked perivascular lymphocytic infiltration with little alveolar or interstitial changes. During rejection, the increased pulmonary vascular resistance in the graft was probably the result of perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration, which was seen prior to changes on chest roentgenography. Changes in the left pulmonary artery flow and histology thus appear to be closely correlated in the early stages of acute rejection.

  6. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: current concepts for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Triulzi, Darrell J

    2009-03-01

    The leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality in the United States is transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Diagnostic criteria for TRALI have recently been developed and primarily consist of hypoxia and bilateral pulmonary edema occurring during or within 6 h of a transfusion in the absence of cardiac failure or intravascular volume overload. The primary differential diagnosis is transfusion-associated circulatory overload and differentiation can be difficult. Treatment is supportive with oxygen and mechanical ventilation. Diuresis is not indicated and the role of steroids is unproven. Patients typically recover within a few days. All types of blood products have been associated with TRALI, however, the plasma-rich components, such as fresh frozen plasma and apheresis platelets, have been most frequently implicated. The pathogenesis of TRALI is not completely understood. Leukocyte antibodies in donor plasma have been implicated in most cases with antibodies directed at human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, HLA class II or neutrophil-specific antigens, particularly HNA-3a. Activation of pulmonary endothelium is important in the development of TRALI and may account for most cases being observed in surgical or intensive care unit patients. Transfused leukoagglutinating antibodies bind to recipients' neutrophils localized to pulmonary endothelium resulting in activation and release of oxidases and other damaging biologic response modifiers that cause capillary leak. In a minority of TRALI cases, no antibodies are identified and it is postulated that neutrophil priming factors in the transfused component can mediate TRALI in a patient with pulmonary endothelial activation, the so called "two hit" mechanism. Recognition of the role of anti-leukocyte antibodies has led to new strategies to reduce the risk of TRALI. Female blood donors with a previous pregnancy frequently have HLA antibodies with an overall prevalence of 24% and increasing

  7. [Using non-invasive mask lung ventilation in cardiosurgical patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Eremenko, A A; Levikov, D I; Egorov, V M; Zorin, D E; Kolomiets, V Ia

    2004-01-01

    Twenty patients aged 33 to 71 (54 +/- 6) years (male - 13, female - 7) operated on the heart and main vessels were included in the case study. I.e. those patient were investigated, whose immediate postoperative results were complicated by the syndrome of multiple organ failure (SMOF) that developed due to different-etiology shock, huge blood loss and hemotransfusion or to the syndrome of acute postperfusion lung damage. NIMLV was made at the resolution stage of SMOF and ARDS after artificial pulmonary ventilation (APL) for as long as 5-7 days. The indications for extubation of patients were as follows: PaO2/FiO2 of 200 and more mm Hg, respiratory rate (RR) of less than 30 per min, respiratory volume of more than 6 ml/kg with pressure support at inspiration of less than 5 cm H2O and with the total pressure at the exhalation end of no more than 3 cm H2O. Mask ventilation sessions were started in a growing dyspnea of more than 26 per min, a decreased content of oxyhemoglobin in arterial blood (below 95% at oxygen inhalation of 10-15 l/min), involvement of auxiliary muscles in breathing and at subjective complaints of patients related with complicated breathing and with being short of air. The mask SIMV ventilation with a preset apparatus-aided rate of inhales of 2-6/min, with Bi-PAP and PSV inhale pressure of 15 cm/ H2O and with PEEP of 3-5 cm/ H2O was made by 40-120 min sessions; the number of IFMLV sessions ranged from 6 to 22/patient, mean - 11 +/- 1.1 h. The total IFMLV duration was 10.7 +/- 1.1 h. The need for respiratory support persisted for 4-6 days after extubation. In 18 (90%) of 20 patients, the mask pulmonary ventilation resolved the respiratory insufficiency. Two (10%) patients were reintubated because of progressing multiorgan failure and because of obturation of the left main bronchus. A questioning of patients on the comfort degree of mask ventilation denoted the Flow-by triggering to be by far better tolerated by patients versus the pressure

  8. Damage to pancreatic acinar cells and preservation of islets of Langerhans in a rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by Karwinskia humboldtiana (buckthorn).

    PubMed

    Carcano-Diaz, Katya; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Segoviano-Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Loera-Arias, Maria de Jesus; Garcia-Juarez, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Karwinskia humboldtiana (Kh) is a poisonous plant that grows in some regions of the American continent. Consuming large amounts of Kh fruit results in acute intoxication leading to respiratory failure, culminating in death within days. There is evidence of histological damage to the lungs, liver, and kidneys following accidental and experimental Kh intoxication. To date, the microscopic effect of Kh consumption on the pancreas has not been described. We examined the early effects of Kh fruit on pancreatic tissue at different stages of acute intoxication in the Wistar rat. We found progressive damage confined to the exocrine pancreas, starting with a reduction in the number of zymogen granules, loss of acinar architecture, the presence of autophagy-like vesicles, apoptosis and inflammatory infiltrate. The pancreatic pathology culminated in damaged acini characterized by necrosis and edema, with a complete loss of lobular architecture. Interestingly, the morphology of the islets of Langerhans was conserved throughout our evaluations. Taken together, our results indicate the damage induced by a high dose of Kh fruit in the Wistar rat is consistent with an early acute necrotizing pancreatitis that exclusively affects the exocrine pancreas. Therefore, this system might be useful as an animal model to study the treatment of pancreatic diseases. More importantly, as the islets of Langerhans were preserved, the active compounds of Kh fruit could be utilized for the treatment of acinar pancreatic cancer. Further studies might provide insight into the severity of acute Kh intoxication in humans and influence the design of treatments for pancreatic diseases and acinar pancreatic cancer.

  9. DIVALENT METAL TRANSPORTER-1 REGULATION BY IRON AND VANADIUM MODULATES HYDROGEN PEROXIDE-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE IN LUNG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) participates in the detoxification of metals that can damage lung epithelium. Elevated iron levels increase the expression of DMT1 in bronchial epithelial cells stimulating its uptake and storage in ferritin, thus making iron unavailable t...

  10. Protective Role of Liriodendrin in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Li, Dihua; Zhuo, Yuzhen; Zhang, Shukun; Wang, Ximo; Gao, Hongwei

    2016-10-01

    In current study, we investigated the role of liriodendrin, a constituent isolated from Sargentodoxa cuneata (Oliv.) Rehd. Et Wils (Sargentodoxaceae), in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced acute lung inflammatory response and injury (ALI). The inflammatory mediator levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Pathologic changes in lung tissues were evaluated via pathological section with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. To investigate the mechanism whereby liriodendrin regulates lung inflammation, the phosphorylation of the NF-kB (p65) and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined by western blot assay. We show that liriodendrin treatment significantly improved the survival rate of mice with CLP-induced sepsis. Pulmonary histopathologic changes, alveolar hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration were markedly decreased by liriodendrin. In addition, liriodendrin decreased the production of the proinflammatory mediators including (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, and IL-6) in lung tissues. Vascular permeability and lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) accumulation in the liriodendrin-treated mice were substantially reduced. Moreover, liriodendrin treatment significantly suppressed the expression of VEGF and activation of NF-kB in the lung. We further show that liriodendrin significantly reduced the production of proinflammatory mediators and downregulated NF-kB signaling in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Moreover, liriodendrin prevented the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by upregulating the expression of SIRT1 in RAW 264.7 cells. These findings provide a novel theoretical basis for the possible application of liriodendrin in clinic.

  11. Regulatory T cells reduce acute lung injury fibroproliferation by decreasing fibrocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Brian T; D'Alessio, Franco R; Mock, Jason R; Files, D Clark; Chau, Eric; Eto, Yoshiki; Drummond, M Bradley; Aggarwal, Neil R; Sidhaye, Venkataramana; King, Landon S

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Fibroproliferation in ALI results in worse outcomes, but the mechanisms governing fibroproliferation remain poorly understood. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important in lung injury resolution. Their role in fibroproliferation is unknown. We sought to identify the role of Tregs in ALI fibroproliferation, using a murine model of lung injury. Wild-type (WT) and lymphocyte-deficient Rag-1(-/-) mice received intratracheal LPS. Fibroproliferation was characterized by histology and the measurement of lung collagen. Lung fibrocytes were measured by flow cytometry. To dissect the role of Tregs in fibroproliferation, Rag-1(-/-) mice received CD4(+)CD25(+) (Tregs) or CD4(+)CD25(-) Tcells (non-Tregs) at the time of LPS injury. To define the role of the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12)-CXCR4 pathway in ALI fibroproliferation, Rag-1(-/-) mice were treated with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 to block fibrocyte recruitment. WT and Rag-1(-/-) mice demonstrated significant collagen deposition on Day 3 after LPS. WT mice exhibited the clearance of collagen, but Rag-1(-/-) mice developed persistent fibrosis. This fibrosis was mediated by the sustained epithelial expression of CXCL12 (or stromal cell-derived factor 1 [SDF-1]) that led to increased fibrocyte recruitment. The adoptive transfer of Tregs resolved fibroproliferation by decreasing CXCL12 expression and subsequent fibrocyte recruitment. Blockade of the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis with AMD3100 also decreased lung fibrocytes and fibroproliferation. These results indicate a central role for Tregs in the resolution of ALI fibroproliferation by reducing fibrocyte recruitment along the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis. A dissection of the role of Tregs in ALI fibroproliferation may inform the design of new therapeutic tools for patients with ALI.

  12. Ketamine effect on HMGB1 and TLR4 expression in rats with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ming-Zhe; Gu, Qiu-Han; Tao, Jun; Song, Xiao-Yang; Gan, Guo-Sheng; Luo, Zhong-Bin; Li, Bi-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common emergency and severe case in clinic. High mobility group protein box 1 (HMGB1) can be treated as a new anti-inflammatory treatment target. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important receptor of HMGB1. Ketamine is a widely used intravenous anesthetic with good anti-inflammatory and immune regulating function. Whether it can protect ALI through inhibiting HMGB1 and TLR4 expression in lung tissue still needs further investigation. Male SD rats were randomly divided into control, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group and ketamine intervention group with 15 rats in each group. The rats were euthanatized at 24 h after modeling and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected for HMGB1 and TLR4 level detection. Western Blot was applied to analyze HMGB1 and TLR4 protein expression in the lung tissue. HMGB1 and TLR4 concentration in BALF were 5.369 ± 1.564 ng/ml and 43.980 ± 7.524 pg/ml in the control, respectively. They were 12.358 ± 4.681 ng/ml and 102.538 ± 8.412 pg/ml in LPS group, and 7.399 ± 2.346 ng/ml and 87.208 ± 7.558 pg/ml in ketamine intervention group, respectively. Their levels increased significantly in LPS group and down-regulated after ketamine intervention. HMGB1 and TLR4 protein expression in lung tissue elevated obviously in LPS group, and decreased after ketamine treatment. HMGB1 and TLR4 protein level showed positive correlation in lung tissue (r = 0.921, P < 0.001). Ketamine can inhibit HMGB1 and TLR4 expression in ALI, and alleviate LPS induced rat lung injury.

  13. MicroRNA-7 Deficiency Ameliorates the Pathologies of Acute Lung Injury through Elevating KLF4.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juanjuan; Chen, Chao; Guo, Mengmeng; Tao, Yijin; Cui, PanPan; Zhou, Ya; Qin, Nalin; Zheng, Jing; Zhang, Jidong; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence showed that microRNA-7 (miR-7) played an important role in the pathologies of lung-related diseases. However, the potential role of miR-7 in acute lung injury (ALI) still remains poorly understood. Here, we assessed the effect of miR-7 deficiency on the pathology of ALI. We, first, found that the expression of miR-7 was upregulated in lung tissue in murine LPS-induced ALI model. Notably, we generated miR-7 knock down mice by using miRNA-Sponge technique and found that miR-7 deficiency could ameliorate the pathologies of lung as evidenced by accelerated body weight recovery, reduced level of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) proinflammatory cytokines and decreased number of BAL cells in ALI mice. Moreover, the proportion and number of various immune cells in BAL, including innate immune cell F4/80(+) macrophages, γδT cells, NK1.1(+) T cells, and CD11c(+)DCs, as well as adaptive immune cell CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells, also significantly changed, respectively. Mechanistic evidence showed that KLF4, a target molecule of miR-7, was upregulated in lung tissues in ALI model, accompanied by altered transduction of NF-κB, AKT, and ERK pathway. These data provided a previously unknown role of miR-7 in pathology of ALI, which could ultimately aid the understanding of development of ALI and the development of new therapeutic strategies against clinical inflammatory lung diseases.

  14. The anesthetic agent sevoflurane attenuates pulmonary acute lung injury by modulating apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L.; Ye, Y.; Su, H.B.; Yang, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate lung protection by the volatile anesthetic sevoflurane (SEVO), which inhibits apoptosis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–280 g; n=18) were randomly divided into three groups. The LPS group received 5 mg/kg endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), which induced acute lung injury (ALI). The control (CTRL) group received normal saline and the SEVO group received sevoflurane (2.5%) for 30 min after ALI was induced by 5 mg/kg LPS. Samples were collected for analysis 12 h after LPS. Lung injury was assessed by pathological observations and tissue wet to dry weight (W/D) ratios. Apoptotic index (AI) was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and electron microscopy. Caspase-3 and cleaved-caspase-3 protein levels were determined by immunocytochemistry and western blotting, respectively. Bcl-xl levels were measured by western blotting and Bcl-2 levels by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. In the LPS group, W/D ratios, AI values, caspase-3 and cleaved-caspase-3 levels were significantly higher than in the CTRL group and lung injury was more severe. In the SEVO group, W/D ratios, AI, caspase-3 and cleaved-caspase-3 were lower than in the LPS group. Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl expression were higher than in the LPS group and lung injury was attenuated. Sevoflurane inhalation protected the lungs from injury by regulating caspase-3 activation and Bcl-xl and Bcl-2 expression to inhibit excessive cell apoptosis, and such apoptosis might be important in the pathogenesis of LPS-induced ALI. PMID:28225890

  15. MicroRNA-7 Deficiency Ameliorates the Pathologies of Acute Lung Injury through Elevating KLF4

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juanjuan; Chen, Chao; Guo, Mengmeng; Tao, Yijin; Cui, PanPan; Zhou, Ya; Qin, Nalin; Zheng, Jing; Zhang, Jidong; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence showed that microRNA-7 (miR-7) played an important role in the pathologies of lung-related diseases. However, the potential role of miR-7 in acute lung injury (ALI) still remains poorly understood. Here, we assessed the effect of miR-7 deficiency on the pathology of ALI. We, first, found that the expression of miR-7 was upregulated in lung tissue in murine LPS-induced ALI model. Notably, we generated miR-7 knock down mice by using miRNA-Sponge technique and found that miR-7 deficiency could ameliorate the pathologies of lung as evidenced by accelerated body weight recovery, reduced level of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) proinflammatory cytokines and decreased number of BAL cells in ALI mice. Moreover, the proportion and number of various immune cells in BAL, including innate immune cell F4/80+ macrophages, γδT cells, NK1.1+ T cells, and CD11c+DCs, as well as adaptive immune cell CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells, also significantly changed, respectively. Mechanistic evidence showed that KLF4, a target molecule of miR-7, was upregulated in lung tissues in ALI model, accompanied by altered transduction of NF-κB, AKT, and ERK pathway. These data provided a previously unknown role of miR-7 in pathology of ALI, which could ultimately aid the understanding of development of ALI and the development of new therapeutic strategies against clinical inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27774091

  16. The role of C5a in acute lung injury induced by highly pathogenic viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renxi; Xiao, He; Guo, Renfeng; Li, Yan; Shen, Beifen

    2015-01-01

    The complement system, an important part of innate immunity, plays a critical role in pathogen clearance. Unregulated complement activation is likely to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by highly pathogenic virus including influenza A viruses H5N1, H7N9, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus. In highly pathogenic virus-induced acute lung diseases, high levels of chemotactic and anaphylatoxic C5a were produced as a result of excessive complement activaiton. Overproduced C5a displays powerful biological activities in activation of phagocytic cells, generation of oxidants, and inflammatory sequelae named “cytokine storm”, and so on. Blockade of C5a signaling have been implicated in the treatment of ALI induced by highly pathogenic virus. Herein, we review the literature that links C5a and ALI, and review our understanding of the mechanisms by which C5a affects ALI during highly pathogenic viral infection. In particular, we discuss the potential of the blockade of C5a signaling to treat ALI induced by highly pathogenic viruses. PMID:26060601

  17. Down-regulation of let-7 microRNA increased K-ras expression in lung damage induced by radon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihai; Wang, Dapeng; Gu, Chao; Liu, Xing; Pei, Weiwei; Li, Jianxiang; Cao, Yi; Jiao, Yang; Tong, Jian; Nie, Jihua

    2015-09-01

    Radon has long been recognized as a human carcinogen leading to lung cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Recent studies have shown that the let-7 microRNA and K-ras play an important role in the development of various cancers. However, the exact role between let-7 and K-ras in radon induced lung damage has not been explored so far. In the present study, wistar rats and human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells were long-term exposed to radon, and then alterations in histological pathology of rat lung tissue, ROS, antioxidant enzymes activities and clonogenic formation in HBE cells, as well as changes in let-7 and K-ras expression were determined to observe the adverse effects induced by radon. The results showed that long-term exposure to radon produced severe lung damage in rats, significantly increased ROS production and clonogenic formation ratios and decreased SOD activities in HBE cells. In addition, an obvious down-regulation of let-7 and up-regulation of K-ras were also revealed both in mRNA and in protein level in lung tissue of rats and HBE cells exposed to radon. Furthermore, a significant down-regulation of K-ras was then confirmed in both let-7b-3p and let-7a-2-3p transfected HBE cells. Taken together, the present results propose an involvement of let-7 microRNA and K-ras in radon induced lung damage both in vivo and in vitro, which may thus be of potential value in early diagnosis and therapy of radon-induced lung tumorgenesis.

  18. Protective Effects of Apigenin Against Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Luan, Rui-Ling; Meng, Xiang-Xi; Jiang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of apigenin against paraquat (PQ)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Male Kunming mice were randomly divided into five groups: group 1 (control), group 2 (PQ), group 3 (PQ + apigenin 25 mg/kg), group 4 (PQ + apigenin 50 mg/kg), and group 5 (PQ + apigenin 100 mg/kg). The PQ + apigenin group received apigenin by gavage daily for consecutive 7 days, respectively, while the mice in control and PQ groups were given an equivalent volume of saline. We detected the lung wet/dry weight ratios and the histopathology of the lung. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB was also determined. The results indicated that apigenin administration decreased biochemical parameters of inflammation and oxidative stress, and improved oxygenation and lung edema in a dose-dependent manner. These protective effects of apigenin were associated with inhibition of NF-κB. In conclusion, apigenin reduces PQ-induced ALI by inhibition of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  19. Simvastatin Reduces Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Decreasing Neutrophil Recruitment and Radical Formation

    PubMed Central

    Grommes, Jochen; Vijayan, Santosh; Drechsler, Maik; Hartwig, Helene; Mörgelin, Matthias; Dembinski, Rolf; Jacobs, Michael; Koeppel, Thomas Andreas; Binnebösel, Marcel; Weber, Christian; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) remains an unsolved problem in intensive care medicine. As simvastatin exerts protective effects in inflammatory diseases we explored its effects on development of ALI and due to the importance of neutrophils in ALI also on neutrophil effector functions. Methods C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to aerosolized LPS (500 µg/ml) for 30 min. The count of alveolar, interstitial, and intravasal neutrophils were assessed 4 h later by flow cytometry. Lung permeability changes were assessed by FITC-dextran clearance and albumin content in the BAL fluid. In vitro, we analyzed the effect of simvastatin on neutrophil adhesion, degranulation, apoptosis, and formation of reactive oxygen species. To monitor effects of simvastatin on bacterial clearance we performed phagocytosis and bacterial killing studies in vitro as well as sepsis experiments in mice. Results Simvastatin treatment before and after onset of ALI reduces neutrophil influx into the lung as well as lung permeability indicating the protective role of simvastatin in ALI. Moreover, simvastatin reduces the formation of ROS species and adhesion of neutrophils without affecting apoptosis, bacterial phagocytosis and bacterial clearance. Conclusion Simvastatin reduces recruitment and activation of neutrophils hereby protecting from LPS-induced ALI. Our results imply a potential role for statins in the management of ALI. PMID:22701728

  20. Thromboxane A2 exacerbates acute lung injury via promoting edema formation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koji; Horikami, Daiki; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Arisa; Maeda, Shingo; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is produced in the lungs of patients suffering from acute lung injury (ALI). We assessed its contribution in disease progression using three different ALI mouse models. The administration of hydrochloric acid (HCl) or oleic acid (OA)+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused tissue edema and neutrophil infiltration with TXA2 production in the lungs of the experimental mice. The administration of LPS induced only neutrophil accumulation without TXA2 production. Pretreatment with T prostanoid receptor (TP) antagonist attenuated the tissue edema but not neutrophil infiltration in these models. Intravital imaging and immunostaining demonstrated that administration of TP agonist caused vascular hyper-permeability by disrupting the endothelial barrier formation in the mouse ear. In vitro experiments showed that TP-stimulation disrupted the endothelial adherens junction, and it was inhibited by Ca2+ channel blockade or Rho kinase inhibition. Thus endogenous TXA2 exacerbates ALI, and its blockade attenuates it by modulating the extent of lung edema. This can be explained by the endothelial hyper-permeability caused by the activation of TXA2-TP axis, via Ca2+- and Rho kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:27562142

  1. Effects of methylene blue in acute lung injury induced by oleic acid in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cassiano Silveira, Ana Paula; Vento, Daniella Alves; Albuquerque, Agnes Afrodite Sumarelli; Celotto, Andrea Carla; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Rubens de Nadai, Tales; Rodrigues, Alfredo José; Poli-Neto, Omero Benedicto

    2016-01-01

    Background In acute lung injury (ALI), rupture of the alveolar-capillary barrier determines the protein-rich fluid influx into alveolar spaces. Previous studies have reported that methylene blue (MB) attenuates such injuries. This investigation was carried out to study the MB effects in pulmonary capillary permeability. Methods Wistar rats were divided into five groups: (I) Sham: saline bolus; (II) MB, MB infusion for 2 h; (III) oleic acid (OA), OA bolus; (IV) MB/OA, MB infusion for 2 h, and at 5 min after from the beginning, concurrently with an OA bolus; and (V) OA/MB, OA bolus, and after 2 h, MB infusion for 2 h. After 4 h, blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and lung tissue were collected from all groups for analysis of plasma and tissue nitric oxide, calculation of the wet weight to dry weight ratio (WW/DW), and histological examination of lung tissue. Statistical analysis was performed using nonparametric test. Results Although favourable trends have been observed for permeability improvement parameters (WW/WD and protein), the results were not statistically significant. However, histological analysis of lung tissue showed reduced lesion areas in both pre- and post-treatment groups. Conclusions The data collected using this experimental model was favourable only through macroscopic and histological analysis. These observations are valid for both MB infusions before or after induction of ALI. PMID:26855944

  2. Acute effects of volcanic ash from Mount Saint Helens on lung function in children.

    PubMed

    Buist, A S; Johnson, L R; Vollmer, W M; Sexton, G J; Kanarek, P H

    1983-06-01

    To evaluate the acute effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens on the lung function of children, we studied 101 children 8 to 13 yr of age who were attending a 2-wk summer camp for children with diabetes mellitus in an area where about 1.2 cm of ash had fallen after the June 12, 1980, eruption. The outcome variables used were forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, their ratio and mean transit time. Total and respirable dust levels were measured using personal sampling pumps. The children were tested on arrival and twice (early morning [A.M.] and late afternoon [P.M.]) every second or third day during the session. A within-day effect was measured by the P.M./A.M. ratio for the lung function variables; a between-day effect was measured by the change in the P.M. measurements over the 2 wk of camp. We found no strong evidence of either a within-day or a between-day effect on lung function, even in a subgroup of children who had preexisting lung disease or symptoms, despite daytime dust/ash levels that usually exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency's significant harm level for particulate matter.

  3. Endothelial Semaphorin 7A Promotes Inflammation in Seawater Aspiration-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minlong; Wang, Li; Dong, Mingqing; Li, Zhichao; Jin, Faguang

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of seawater aspiration-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Although several studies have shown that Semaphorin 7A (SEMA7A) promotes inflammation, there are limited reports regarding immunological function of SEMA7A in seawater aspiration-induced ALI. Therefore, we investigated the role of SEMA7A during seawater aspiration-induced ALI. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were underwent seawater instillation. Then, lung samples were collected at an indicated time for analysis. In addition, rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (RPMVECs) were cultured and then stimulated with 25% seawater for indicated time point. After these treatments, cells samples were collected for analysis. In vivo, seawater instillation induced lung histopathologic changes, pro-inflammation cytokines release and increased expression of SEMA7A. In vitro, seawater stimulation led to pro-inflammation cytokine release, cytoskeleton remodeling and increased monolayer permeability in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α inhibited the seawater induced increase expression of SEMA7A. Meanwhile, knockdown of SEMA7A by specific siRNA inhibited the seawater induced aberrant inflammation, endothelial cytoskeleton remodeling and endothelial permeability. These results suggest that SEMA7A is critical in the development of lung inflammation and pulmonary edema in seawater aspiration-induced ALI, and may be a therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:25353180

  4. Evaluation of plasma von Willebrand factor as a biomarker for acute arterial damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Newsholme, S J; Thudium, D T; Gossett, K A; Watson, E S; Schwartz, L W

    2000-01-01

    Plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) was evaluated as a potential biomarker of acute arterial damage in rats after a vasotoxic dose of the dopaminergic vasodilator, fenoldopam (FP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given FP or isotonic saline by subcutaneous injection, and plasma vWF was measured at 2, 6, and 24 hours after challenge. Mean plasma vWF values increased in FP-treated rats compared to controls at 2 hours (167 vs 122%; p < 0.05) and 6 hours postdose (172 vs 130%; p < 0.01) but were comparable to control values after 24 hours. Mesenteric arterial lesions were observed microscopically in all FP-treated rats 24 hours postdose but were not present in rats at 1, 2, 4, 6, or 8 hours after FP challenge. Further, plasma vWF concentrations increased in saline-treated rats after only the minimal perturbation of repeated venipuncture. These results indicate an early, minimal, and transient release of vWF that precedes the onset of morphologically evident vascular damage. The minimal increases in plasma vWF concentrations were of limited predictive value, may be more reflective of an acute-phase reactant response, and were not considered a reliable biomarker of acute FP-induced arterial damage in the rat.

  5. Reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase and mitochondrial dysfunction in lung after an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Magnani, Natalia D.; Marchini, Timoteo; Vanasco, Virginia; Tasat, Deborah R.; Alvarez, Silvia; Evelson, Pablo

    2013-07-01

    Reactive O{sub 2} species production triggered by particulate matter (PM) exposure is able to initiate oxidative damage mechanisms, which are postulated as responsible for increased morbidity along with the aggravation of respiratory diseases. The aim of this work was to quantitatively analyse the major sources of reactive O{sub 2} species involved in lung O{sub 2} metabolism after an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ashes (ROFAs). Mice were intranasally instilled with a ROFA suspension (1.0 mg/kg body weight), and lung samples were analysed 1 h after instillation. Tissue O{sub 2} consumption and NADPH oxidase (Nox) activity were evaluated in tissue homogenates. Mitochondrial respiration, respiratory chain complexes activity, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and ATP production rates, mitochondrial membrane potential and oxidative damage markers were assessed in isolated mitochondria. ROFA exposure was found to be associated with 61% increased tissue O{sub 2} consumption, a 30% increase in Nox activity, a 33% increased state 3 mitochondrial O{sub 2} consumption and a mitochondrial complex II activity increased by 25%. During mitochondrial active respiration, mitochondrial depolarization and a 53% decreased ATP production rate were observed. Neither changes in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production rate, nor oxidative damage in isolated mitochondria were observed after the instillation. After an acute ROFA exposure, increased tissue O{sub 2} consumption may account for an augmented Nox activity, causing an increased O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The mitochondrial function modifications found may prevent oxidative damage within the organelle. These findings provide new insights to the understanding of the mechanisms involving reactive O{sub 2} species production in the lung triggered by ROFA exposure. - Highlights: • Exposure to ROFA alters the oxidative metabolism in mice lung. • The augmented Nox activity contributes to the high tissue O{sub 2} consumption. • Exposure to ROFA

  6. Mechanisms and Treatment of Lung Lesions and Associated Surfactant Damage in Shock.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-17

    the role of proteins associated with the surfactant system...Isolation and characterization of proteins associated with the lung surfactant system. F— Rabbit lung washings and purified lung surf actan t were...the unfractionated lung washings confirming our previous study which indicated that there is no specific protein associated with sur— factant

  7. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production.

  8. Sesamin Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Inhibition of TLR4 Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Li; Yuan, Jiang; Shouyin, Jiang; Yulin, Li; Libing, Jiang; Jian-An, Wang

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies suggested that TLR4 signaling pathways played an important role in the development of LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Sesamin, a sesame lignan exacted from sesame seeds, has been shown to exhibit significant anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of sesamin on LPS-induced ALI in mice. Mice ALI model was induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS. Sesamin was given 1 h after LPS challenge. Our results showed that sesamin inhibited LPS-induced lung pathological change, edema, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Sesamin suppressed LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production. Furthermore, sesamin inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation. In conclusion, the results of this study indicated that sesamin protected against LPS-induced ALI by inhibition of TLR4 signaling pathways.

  9. Involvement of Protein Kinase C-δ in Vascular Permeability in Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jong J; Jung, Jong P; Park, Soon E; Lee, Minhyun; Kwon, Byungsuk; Cho, Hong R

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary edema is a major cause of mortality due to acute lung injury (ALI). The involvement of protein kinase C-δ (PKC-δ) in ALI has been a controversial topic. Here we investigated PKC-δ function in ALI using PKC-δ knockout (KO) mice and PKC inhibitors. Our results indicated that although the ability to produce proinflammatory mediators in response to LPS injury in PKC-δ KO mice was similar to that of control mice, they showed enhanced recruitment of neutrophils to the lung and more severe pulmonary edema. PKC-δ inhibition promoted barrier dysfunction in an endothelial cell layer in vitro, and administration of a PKC-δ-specific inhibitor significantly increased steady state vascular permeability. A neutrophil transmigration assay indicated that the PKC-δ inhibition increased neutrophil transmigration through an endothelial monolayer. This suggests that PKC-δ inhibition induces structural changes in endothelial cells, allowing extravasation of proteins and neutrophils.

  10. Rosiglitazone dampens pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mirakaj, Valbona; Mutz, Christian; Vagts, Dierk; Henes, Janek; Haeberle, Helene A; Husung, Susanne; König, Tony; Nöldge-Schomburg, Gabriele; Rosenberger, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The hallmarks of acute lung injury (ALI) are the compromised alveolar-capillary barrier and the extravasation of leukocytes into the alveolar space. Given the fact that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist rosiglitazone holds significant anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone could dampen these hallmarks of local pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of lung injury. For this purpose, we used a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 μg/kg)-induced ALI. One hundred twenty minutes following the infusion of LPS, we started the exposure to rosiglitazone through inhalation or infusion. We found that intravenous rosiglitazone significantly controlled local pulmonary inflammation as determined through the expression of cytokines within the alveolar compartment. Furthermore, we found a significant reduction of the protein concentration and neutrophil activity within the alveolar space. In summary, we therefore conclude that the treatment with rosiglitazone might dampen local pulmonary inflammation during the initial stages of ALI.

  11. TGF-β is a critical mediator of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, Jean-Francois; Griffiths, Mark J.D.; Geiser, Tom; Kaminski, Naftali; Dalton, Stephen L.; Huang, Xiaozhu; Brown, Lou Anne S.; Gotwals, Phillip J.; Koteliansky, Victor E.; Matthay, Michael A.; Sheppard, Dean

    2001-01-01

    We have shown that the integrin αvβ6 activates latent TGF-β in the lungs and skin. We show here that mice lacking this integrin are completely protected from pulmonary edema in a model of bleomycin-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Pharmacologic inhibition of TGF-β also protected wild-type mice from pulmonary edema induced by bleomycin or Escherichia coli endotoxin. TGF-β directly increased alveolar epithelial permeability in vitro by a mechanism that involved depletion of intracellular glutathione. These data suggest that integrin-mediated local activation of TGF-β is critical to the development of pulmonary edema in ALI and that blocking TGF-β or its activation could be effective treatments for this currently untreatable disorder. PMID:11413161

  12. Antibiotic drug levofloxacin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of lung cancer cells through inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Song, Meijun; Wu, Hongcheng; Wu, Shibo; Ge, Ting; Wang, Guoan; Zhou, Yingyan; Sheng, Shimo; Jiang, Jingbo

    2016-12-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and its clinical management remains challenge. Here, we repurposed antibiotic levofloxacin for lung cancer treatment. We show that levofloxacin is effectively against a panel of lung cancer cell lines via inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis, regardless of cellular origin and genetic pattern, in in vitro cell culture system and in vivo xenograft lung tumor model. Mechanistically, levofloxacin inhibits activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I and III, leading to inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and reduction of ATP production. In addition, levofloxacin significantly increases levels of ROS, mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in vitro and oxidative stress markers (HEL and 4-HNE) in vivo. Antioxidants, such as NAC and vitamin C, prevent the inhibitory effects of levofloxacin, confirming the induction of oxidative damage as the mechanism of its action in lung cancer cells. Our work demonstrates that levofloxacin is a useful addition to the treatment of lung cancer. Our work also suggests that targeting mitochondria may be an alternative therapeutic strategy for lung cancer treatment.

  13. Activation of adherent vascular neutrophils in the lung during acute endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Vasanthi R; Connor, Agnieszka J; Zhou, Peihong; Gordon, Marion K; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2002-01-01

    Background Neutrophils constitute the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Whereas these cells readily undergo apoptosis under homeostatic conditions, their survival is prolonged during inflammatory reactions and they become biochemically and functionally activated. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of acute endotoxemia on the response of a unique subpopulation of neutrophils tightly adhered to the lung vasculature. Methods Rats were treated with 5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (i.v.) to induce acute endotoxemia. Adherent neutrophils were isolated from the lung vasculature by collagenase digestion and sequential filtering. Agarose gel electrophoresis, RT-PCR, western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to evaluate neutrophil activity. Results Adherent vascular neutrophils isolated from endotoxemic animals exhibited decreased apoptosis when compared to cells from control animals. This was associated with a marked increase in expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. Cells isolated 0.5–2 hours after endotoxin administration were more chemotactic than cells from control animals and expressed increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and protein, demonstrating that they are functionally activated. Endotoxin treatment of the animals also induced p38 and p44/42 mitogen activated protein kinases in the adherent lung neutrophils, as well as nuclear binding activity of the transcription factors, NF-κB and cAMP response element binding protein. Conclusion These data demonstrate that adherent vascular lung neutrophils are highly responsive to endotoxin and that pathways regulating apoptosis and cellular activation are upregulated in these cells. PMID:12204102

  14. State of the art management of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Andrew D; Kor, Daryl J

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality in most developed countries. Despite this fact, well-designed investigations on specific management strategies for TRALI are lacking. Indeed, current recommendations are primarily based on data extrapolated from trials of the histo-pathologically similar Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndromes. The cornerstone of TRALI management is supportive care with oxygen supplementation and ventilatory assistance when needed. When mechanical ventilation is required, attenuating additional ventilator-induced lung injury through the avoidance of high tidal volumes and elevated airway pressures, with additional measures such as positive end-expiratory pressure to prevent low-volume shear stress injury, are recommended. The literature is not currently sufficient to support either corticosteroids or statins as effective therapies in TRALI. Conservative fluid practices are desirable, provided care is taken to avoid hypotension. Preventative strategies have shown the most promise in mitigating this transfusion-related pulmonary complication. Specifically, conservative transfusion practices and deferral of high-plasma component donors who have, or at high risk of having, anti-human leukocyte antigen and/or anti-human neutrophil antigen antibodies have meaningfully impacted the incidence of TRALI. Future considerations for patients who are at increased risk for developing TRALI may include therapies such as anti-platelet agents and alternatives to traditional blood components such as prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC). However, these potential TRALI prevention strategies are insufficiently studied, have unclear risk/benefit profiles and cannot be currently recommended.

  15. Hydrogen Gas Inhalation Attenuates Seawater Instillation-Induced Acute Lung Injury via the Nrf2 Pathway in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Diao, Mengyuan; Zhang, Sheng; Wu, Lifeng; Huan, Le; Huang, Fenglou; Cui, Yunliang; Lin, Zhaofen

    2016-12-01

    Seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury involves oxidative stress and apoptosis. Although hydrogen gas inhalation is reportedly protective in multiple types of lung injury, the effect of hydrogen gas inhalation on seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of hydrogen gas on seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury and explored the mechanisms involved. Rabbits were randomly assigned to control, hydrogen (2 % hydrogen gas inhalation), seawater (3 mL/kg seawater instillation), and seawater + hydrogen (3 mL/kg seawater instillation + 2 % hydrogen gas inhalation) groups. Arterial partial oxygen pressure and lung wet/dry weight ratio were detected. Protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 levels were determined. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used to monitor changes in lung specimens, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assayed. In addition, NF-E2-related factor (Nrf) 2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein expression were measured, and apoptosis was assessed by measuring caspase-3 expression and using terminal deoxy-nucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining. Hydrogen gas inhalation markedly improved lung endothelial permeability and decreased both MDA content and MPO activity in lung tissue; these changes were associated with decreases in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in BALF. Hydrogen gas also alleviated histopathological changes and cell apoptosis. Moreover, Nrf2 and HO-1 expressions were significantly activated and caspase-3 expression was inhibited. These results demonstrate that hydrogen gas inhalation attenuates seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury in rabbits and that the protective effects observed may be related to the activation of the Nrf2 pathway.

  16. Transfusion-related acute lung injury in an era of TRALI risk mitigation.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, John C; Grant, Michelle L; Karp, Julie K

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare complication of transfusion, for which the true incidence remains obscure, since there are a number of factors that may lead to misdiagnosis. Despite this, it continues to be the leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality. Here we present a historical case of TRALI in an elderly female who received group AB plasma and discuss how current mitigation strategies would likely have prevented its occurrence. It is important to remember that both immune and non-immune factors play a role in TRALI pathogenesis, and although current preventative strategies may decrease TRALI's incidence, they likely will not eliminate it.

  17. [Acute effect of ambient air pollution on small airway lung functions among school children in Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Zhang, L J; Guo, C Y; Xu, H H; Xu, D; Shen, X B; Du, X Y; Zhang, M H; Tan, J G; Zhang, J H; Dong, C Y; Qian, H L; Shi, Y W; Pan, M Z; Zhou, X D

    2017-02-10

    Objective: To study the acute effects of compound ambient air pollution on small airway lung functions among school children in Shanghai. Method: A longitudinal survey on lung functions was conducted among 233 school-children from three schools (A, B and C, located in innerring, mid-ring and outer-ring areas). Lung function test was performed once a week for 3 times respectively, among children in school A and B in Dec. 2013 and in school C in Dec. 2014. The fourth lung function test was tested in Jun. 2014 and May 2015 in the respective schools. Results: from the lung function would include items as: forced mid-expiratory flow at 25% of forced vital capacity (MEF(25%)), mid-expiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity (MEF(50%)), mid-expiratory flow at 75% of forced vital capacity (MEF(75%)) and mid-expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of the forced vital capacity (FEF(25%-75%)). Data regarding the daily air quality real-time of PM(2.5), PM(10), SO(2) and NO(2) in Dec. 2013, Dec. 2014, Jun. 2014 and May. 2015 from the three environmental monitoring spots and meteorological data from the Shanghai Meteorological Service system which were physically close to the three schools, were collected simultaneously. Linear mixed effect model was used to examine the levels of correlation between lung function indicators and ambient air pollutants. Results When confounding factors on meteorology and individuals were controlled, the lag effects and accumulated lag effects were found to have existed between the internal quarter rang (IQR) concentration of PM(2.5) and PM(10) in lag2 day and lag02 days, IQR concentration of SO(2) in lag02 day and IQR concentration of NO(2) lag0 day, when small airway lung functions like MEF(25%), MEF(50%), MEF(75%) and FEF(25%-75%)(P<0.05) were inspected. Results from the two air pollutants model analysis showed that SO(2) and NO(2) presenting interactive effects with PM(2.5), PM(10) and lag effects more significant than the individual SO(2) and

  18. Stem cell conditioned medium improves acute lung injury in mice: in vivo evidence for stem cell paracrine action

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Lavinia; Byrne, Roisin N.; van Haaften, Tim; Vadivel, Arul; Alphonse, Rajesh S.; Rey-Parra, Gloria J.; Weissmann, Gaia; Hall, Adam; Eaton, Farah

    2012-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome remain high because of the lack of pharmacological therapies to prevent injury or promote repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) prevent lung injury in various experimental models, despite a low proportion of donor-derived cell engraftment, suggesting that MSCs exert their beneficial effects via paracrine mechanisms. We hypothesized that soluble factors secreted by MSCs promote the resolution of lung injury in part by modulating alveolar macrophage (AM) function. We tested the therapeutic effect of MSC-derived conditioned medium (CdM) compared with whole MSCs, lung fibroblasts, and fibroblast-CdM. Intratracheal MSCs and MSC-CdM significantly attenuated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung neutrophil influx, lung edema, and lung injury as assessed by an established lung injury score. MSC-CdM increased arginase-1 activity and Ym1 expression in LPS-exposed AMs. In vivo, AMs from LPS-MSC and LPS-MSC CdM lungs had enhanced expression of Ym1 and decreased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase compared with untreated LPS mice. This suggests that MSC-CdM promotes alternative macrophage activation to an M2 “healer” phenotype. Comparative multiplex analysis of MSC- and fibroblast-CdM demonstrated that MSC-CdM contained several factors that may confer therapeutic benefit, including insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Recombinant IGF-I partially reproduced the lung protective effect of MSC-CdM. In summary, MSCs act through a paracrine activity. MSC-CdM promotes the resolution of LPS-induced lung injury by attenuating lung inflammation and promoting a wound healing/anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype in part via IGF-I. PMID:23023971

  19. Crystal amphetamine smoking-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia and diffuse alveolar damage: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Sen; Chen, Yu-Ching; Chang, Yih-Leong; Yeh, Diana Yu-Wung; Lin, Chen-Chun

    2014-10-31

    Eosinophilic pneumonia (EP) is a disease characterized by prominent infiltration of lung structures by eosinophils. The lung interstitium is infiltrated by eosinophils, and essentially the alveolar spaces are filled with eosinophils and a fibrinous exudate, with conservation of the global architecture of the lung. Diagnosis of EP relies on pathological demonstration of alveolar eosinophilia along with characteristic clinical manifestations of nonproductive cough, dyspnea, chest pain and/or unique imaging features. EP may be categorized according to the origin: EP of undetermined origin may overlap with well-individualized syndromes, while EP with a definite cause are mainly due to infections or drug abuse. Here, we report a case of an amphetamine abuser who developed acute EP and acute respiratory distress syndrome after amphetamine inhalation. Related studies on the pathogenesis of stimulant-related lung injury and treatment strategies are also discussed.

  20. Temporal relationship of serum markers and tissue damage during acute intestinal ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    la Garza, Francisco Javier Guzmán-de; Ibarra-Hernández, Juan Manuel; Cordero-Pérez, Paula; Villegas-Quintero, Pablo; Villarreal-Ovalle, Claudia Ivette; Torres-González, Liliana; Oliva-Sosa, Norma Edith; Alarcón-Galván, Gabriela; Fernández-Garza, Nancy Esthela; Muñoz-Espinosa, Linda Elsa; Cámara-Lemarroy, Carlos Rodrigo; Carrillo-Arriaga, José Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It is essential to identify a serological marker of injury in order to study the pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia reperfusion. In this work, we studied the evolution of several serological markers after intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats. The markers of non-specific cell damage were aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase, the markers of inflammation were tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1 beta, and the markers of intestinal mucosal damage were intestinal fatty acid binding protein and D-lactate. We used Chiús classification to grade the histopathological damage. METHODS: We studied 35 Wistar rats divided into groups according to reperfusion time. The superior mesenteric artery was clamped for 30 minutes, and blood and biopsies were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after reperfusion. We plotted the mean ± standard deviation and compared the baseline and maximum values for each marker using Student's t-test. RESULTS: The maximum values of interleukin-1 beta and lactic dehydrogenase were present before the maximal histopathological damage. The maximum tumor necrosis factor alpha and D-lactate expressions coincided with histopathological damage. Alanine aminotransaminase and aspartate aminotransferase had a maximum expression level that increased following the histopathological damage. The maximum expressions of interluken-6 and intestinal fatty acid binding protein were not significantly different from the Sham treated group. CONCLUSION: For the evaluation of injury secondary to acute intestinal ischemia reperfusion with a 30 minute ischemia period, we recommend performing histopathological grading, quantification of D-lactate, which is synthesized by intestinal bacteria and is considered an indicator of mucosal injury, and quantification of tumor necrosis factor alpha as indicators of acute inflammation three hours after reperfusion. PMID:23917671

  1. Time-dependent expression of endothelin-1 in lungs and the effects of TNF-α blocking peptide on acute lung injury in an endotoxemic rat model.

    PubMed

    Jesmin, Subrina; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Zaedi, Sohel; Nusrat Sultana, Sayeeda; Iwashima, Yoshio; Sawamura, Atsushi; Gando, Satoshi

    2011-02-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1 is a potent vasoconstrictor that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, and some studies suggest that circulating ET-1 is elevated in sepsis. The present study investigated whether ET plays a role in sepsis-mediated acute lung injury and whether its expression could be down regulated by blockade of TNF-α in septic lung. Male Wistar rats at 8 weeks of age were administered with either saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at different time points (1, 3, 6 and 10 h) and various tests were then performed. The features of acute lung injury were observed at 1 h after LPS administration, which gradually became severe with time. Systolic and diastolic pressures were reduced just about one hour after LPS administration, whereas pulmonary TNF-α levels were significantly increased at various time points after LPS administration. LPS induced a time-dependent expression of ET-1 and ET(A) receptor in the lungs compared to control, peaking and increasing by 3 fold at 6 h after induction of endotoxemia, whereas levels of ET(B) receptor, which has vasodilating effects, were remarkably down regulated time-dependently. We conclude that time-dependent increase of ET-1 and ET(A) receptor with the down regulation of ET(B) receptor may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in endotoxemia. Finally, treatment of LPS-administered rats with TNF-α blocking peptide for three hours significantly suppressed levels of pulmonary ET-1. These data taken together, led us to conclude that differential alteration in ET expression and its receptors may be mediated by TNF-α and may, in part, account for the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in endotoxemia.

  2. Development of a Multicomponent Prediction Model for Acute Esophagitis in Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    De Ruyck, Kim; Sabbe, Nick; Oberije, Cary; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Thas, Olivier; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Phillipe; Van Meerbeeck, Jan; De Neve, Wilfried; Thierens, Hubert

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To construct a model for the prediction of acute esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy by combining clinical data, treatment parameters, and genotyping profile. Patients and Methods: Data were available for 273 lung cancer patients treated with curative chemoradiotherapy. Clinical data included gender, age, World Health Organization performance score, nicotine use, diabetes, chronic disease, tumor type, tumor stage, lymph node stage, tumor location, and medical center. Treatment parameters included chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy technique, tumor dose, mean fractionation size, mean and maximal esophageal dose, and overall treatment time. A total of 332 genetic polymorphisms were considered in 112 candidate genes. The predicting model was achieved by lasso logistic regression for predictor selection, followed by classic logistic regression for unbiased estimation of the coefficients. Performance of the model was expressed as the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic and as the false-negative rate in the optimal point on the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: A total of 110 patients (40%) developed acute esophagitis Grade {>=}2 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0). The final model contained chemotherapy treatment, lymph node stage, mean esophageal dose, gender, overall treatment time, radiotherapy technique, rs2302535 (EGFR), rs16930129 (ENG), rs1131877 (TRAF3), and rs2230528 (ITGB2). The area under the curve was 0.87, and the false-negative rate was 16%. Conclusion: Prediction of acute esophagitis can be improved by combining clinical, treatment, and genetic factors. A multicomponent prediction model for acute esophagitis with a sensitivity of 84% was constructed with two clinical parameters, four treatment parameters, and four genetic polymorphisms.

  3. Artificial lung: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Go, T; Macchiarini, P

    2008-10-01

    While the number of the patients suffering from end-stage pulmonary disease has been increasing, the most common treatment for this entity remains mechanical ventilation that entails the risks of lung damage by itself. Although the lung protective strategy for the prevention of further damage to the lung tissue has been elucidated and performed, mechanical ventilation alone as the management tactic coping with the patients of acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic respiratory failure and lung transplantations has been a frustrated scenario. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or extracorporeal lung assist have been applied to these patients with occasional success, but it always accompanies difficulties such as multiple blood transfusion, labor intensity, technically complexity and tendency to infection. In contrast to advances in the development of cardiac or renal support systems for adults, the development of extra-, para- and intracorporeal mechanical systems for acute or chronic lung respiratory failure has logged far behind. It has been mostly due to the lack of the capable technologies. Entering 21st century with advent of new technology especially invention of the low resistance oxygenator, the developments of artificial lungs have entered the new stage. In this report current status of the artificial lungs will be reviewed.

  4. Characterization of a nose-only inhaled phosgene acute lung injury mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Plahovinsak, Jennifer L.; Perry, Mark R.; Knostman, Katherine A.; Segal, Robert; Babin, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Context Phosgene’s primary mode of action is as a pulmonary irritant characterized by its early latent phase where life-threatening, non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is typically observed 6–24 h post-exposure. Objective To develop an inhaled phosgene acute lung injury (ALI) model in C57BL/6 mice that can be used to screen potential medical countermeasures. Methods A Cannon style nose-only inhalation exposure tower was used to expose mice to phosgene (8 ppm) or air (sham). An inhalation lethality study was conducted to determine the 8 ppm median lethal exposure (LCt50) at 24 and 48 h post-exposure. The model was then developed at 1.2 times the 24 h LCt50. At predetermined serial sacrifice time points, survivors were euthanized, body and lung weights collected, and lung tissues processed for histopathology. Additionally, post-exposure clinical observations were used to assess quality of life. Results and discussion The 24-hour LCt50 was 226ppm*min (8 ppm for 28.2 min) and the 48-hour LCt50 was 215ppm*min (8 ppm for 26.9 min). The phosgene exposed animals had a distinct progression of clinical signs, histopathological changes and increased lung/body weight ratios. Early indicators of a 1.2 times the 24-hour LCt50 phosgene exposure were significant changes in the lung-to-body weight ratios by 4 h post-exposure. The progression of clinical signs and histopathological changes were important endpoints for characterizing phosgene-induced ALI for future countermeasure studies. Conclusion An 8 ppm phosgene exposure for 34 min (1.2 × LCt50) is the minimum challenge recommended for evaluating therapeutic interventions. The predicted higher mortality in the phosgene-only controls will help demonstrate efficacy of candidate treatments and increase the probability that a change in survival rate is statistically significant PMID:26671199

  5. Edaravone attenuates brain damage in rats after acute CO poisoning through inhibiting apoptosis and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Bi, Ming Jun; Bi, Wei Kang; Kang, Hai; Yan, Le Jing; Guo, Yun-Liang

    2016-03-01

    Acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is the most common cause of death from poisoning all over the world and may result in neuropathologic and neurophysiologic changes. Acute brain damage and delayed encephalopathy are the most serious complication, yet their pathogenesis is poorly understood. The present study aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of Edaravone against apoptosis and oxidative stress after acute CO poisoning. The rat model of CO poisoning was established in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber by exposed to CO. Ultrastructure changes were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TUNEL stain was used to assess apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence double stain were used to evaluate the expression levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) protein and their relationship. By dynamically monitored the carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) level in blood, we successfully established rat model of severe CO poisoning. Ultrastructure changes, including chromatin condensation, cytoplasm dissolution, vacuoles formation, nucleus membrane and cell organelles decomposition, could be observed after CO poisoning. Edaravone could improve the ultrastructure damage. CO poisoning could induce apoptosis. Apoptotic cells were widely distributed in cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Edaravone treatment attenuated neuronal apoptosis as compared with the poisoning group (P < 0.01). Basal expressions of HO-1 and Nrf-2 proteins were found in normal brain tissue. CO poisoning could activate HO-1/Nrf-2 pathway, start oxidative stress response. After the administration of Edaravone, the expression of HO-1 and Nrf-2 significantly increased (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that Edaravone may inhibit apoptosis, activate the Keapl-Nrf/ARE pathway, and thus improve the ultrastructure damage and neurophysiologic changes following acute CO poisoning.

  6. Blood Aggravates Histological and Functional Damage after Acute Subdural Hematoma in Rats.

    PubMed

    Jussen, Daniel; Krenzlin, Harald; Papaioannou, Chrysostomos; Ens, Swetlana; Kempski, Oliver; Alessandri, Beat

    2017-02-15

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Whether the volume effect of the hematoma and increase of intracranial pressure (ICP) or the local effect of blood are responsible for this severe pathophysiology is unclear. Therefore, we compared subdural infusion of autologous blood and paraffin oil in a rat model of ASDH. In a histological study, we investigated the effects on acute ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), cerebral blood flow (CBF), tissue oxygen changes, and brain damage at 2, 24, and 96 h post-infusion. Inflammatory reaction was analyzed by immuno-staining for microglia (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 [Iba1]) and activated astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]). Besides acute ICP and CBF changes, we investigated the development of behavior (neuroscore and beamwalk test) for up to 4 days after injury in a behavioral study. Despite comparably increased ICP, there was a more pronounced lesion growth in the blood infusion group during the first 96 h. Further, there was an increased peri-lesional immunoreactive area of Iba1 and GFAP 96 h post-infusion, primarily in the blood infusion group, whereas hippocampal damage was comparable in both infusion groups. In the behavioral evaluation, paraffin-infused animals showed a better recovery, compared with the blood infusion group. In conclusion, comparable acute time-course of ICP, CPP, and CBF clearly indicates that the differences in lesion size, inflammatory reaction, and behavioral deficits after blood- and paraffin oil-induced ASDH are partially due to blood constituents. Therefore, current data suggest that subdural hematomas should be completely removed as quickly as possible; decompression alone may not be sufficient to prevent secondary brain damage.

  7. Bisdemethoxycurcumin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Su-Tso; Huang, Wen-Wen; Peng, Shu-Fen; Huang, An-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Mei-Due; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-08-30

    Nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a devastating primary lung tumor resistant to conventional therapies. Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) is one of curcumin derivate from Turmeric and has been shown to induce NSCLC cell death. Although there is one report to show BDMC induced DNA double strand breaks, however, no available information to show BDMC induced DNA damage action with inhibited DNA repair protein in lung cancer cells in detail. In this study, we tested BDMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively and we found BDMC induced DNA damage and condension. Western blotting was used to examine the effects of BDMC on protein expression associated with DNA damage and repair and results indicated that BDMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DDR), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 but activate phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Confocal laser systems microscopy was used for examining the protein translocation and results show that BDMC increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) from cytosol to nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, BDMC induced DNA damage and condension and affect DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2015.

  8. Post-irradiation dietary vitamin E does not affect the development of radiation-induced lung damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Wiegman, Erwin M; van Gameren, Mieke M; Kampinga, Harm H; Szabó, Ben G; Coppes, Rob P

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether application of post-irradiation vitamin E, an anti-oxidant, could prevent the development of radiation induced lung damage. Wistar rats were given vitamin E enriched or vitamin E deprived food starting from 4 weeks after 18Gy single dose irradiation of the right thorax. Neither breathing frequencies nor CT density measurements revealed differences between the groups. It is concluded that post-irradiation vitamin E does not influence radiation-induced fibrosis to the lung.

  9. Effects of Nigella sativa seed extract on ameliorating lung tissue damage in rats after experimental pulmonary aspirations.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Aspiration of gastric contents can cause serious lung injury, although the mechanisms of pulmonary damage are still not clear and means of amelioration of the pulmonary damage have been little investigated. The black cumin seed, Nigella sativa L. (NS) has been shown to have specific health benefits and the aim of the current study was to investigate the possible beneficial effects of NS on experimental lung injury in male Wistar rats after pulmonary aspiration of different materials. The rats were randomly allotted into one of six experimental groups (n=7 per group): (1) saline control, (2) saline+NS treated, (3) Pulmocare (a specialized nutritional supplement given to pulmonary patients), (4) Pulmocare+NS treated, (5) hydrochloric acid, (6) hydrochloric acid+NS treated. The saline, Pulmocare and hydrochloric acid were injected into the lungs in a volume of 2 ml/kg. The rats received daily oral doses of NS volatile oil (400mg/kg body weight) by means of intragastric intubation for 7 days starting immediately after the pulmonary aspiration of the materials. After 7 days, the rats were sacrificed and tissue samples from both lungs were taken for histopathological investigation. To date, no similar study investigating the potential for NS treatment to protect against lung injury after pulmonary aspiration of materials has been reported. Our study showed that NS treatment inhibits the inflammatory pulmonary responses, reducing significantly (p<0.05) peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar septal infiltration, alveolar edema, alveolar exudate, alveolar macrophages, interstitial fibrosis, granuloma and necrosis formation in different pulmonary aspiration models. Our data indicate a significant reduction in the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and a rise in surfactant protein D in lung tissue of different pulmonary aspiration models after NS therapy. Based on our results, we conclude that NS treatment might be beneficial in lung injury and

  10. The association between red blood cell distribution width and acute pancreatitis associated lung injury in patients with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, You-Fan; Zhang, Zhao-Xia; Cao, Wei; Meng, Cun-Ren; Xu, Shen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) that describes red blood cell volume heterogeneity is a common laboratory test. Our aim was to focus on the association between RDW and acute pancreatitis associated lung injury (APALI). Methodology A total of 152 acute pancreatitis (AP) patients who conformed to the criteria were included in this study. The demographic data, medical histories and laboratory measures was obtained from each patient on admission, further, the medical histories and biological data were analyzed, retrospectively. Results Increased RDW at admission was observed in patients with APALI compared with the non-APALI groups. Our results exhibited that RDW was an independent risk factor for APALI after adjusting leukocyte, neutrophil percentage, random blood glucose (RBG), total bilirubin (TB) and total bile acid (TBA) (Crude model) (OR=2.671;CI 95% 1.145–6.230; P=0.023), further adjustment based on Crude model for sex and age did not attenuate the significantly high risk of APALI in patients with AP, RWD still remained a roles as an independent risk factor for APALI (OR=2.653;CI95 % 1.123–6.138; P=0.026). Conclusions Our study demonstrate that RDW at admission is associated with APALI and should be considered as an underlying risk factor of APALI. PMID:28352692

  11. Lung damage following bone marrow transplantation. II. The contribution of cyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Varekamp, A.E.; de Vries, A.J.; Zurcher, C.; Hagenbeek, A.

    1987-10-01

    The effect of high-dose cyclophosphamide (Cy), either alone or in combination with irradiation, upon the development of interstitial pneumonitis (IP) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was investigated in a Brown Norway rat model. The parameters that were examined included ventilation rate, mortality, and histopathology. No damage to the lungs was observed in rats given Cy alone in supralethal dosages plus BMT, and mortality resulted from severe aplasia of hemopoietic and lymphoid tissues with multifocal hemorrhages, secondary infections, and sepsis. Two separate periods of mortality were observed within the first 180 days following whole thorax irradiation with a high dose rate (HDR; 0.8 Gy/min) or a low dose rate (LDR; 0.05 Gy/min). The addition of Cy prior to irradiation resulted in an increased mortality in the first period (before day 100) in all experimental groups. The influence of Cy on mortality at 180 days however, was different for the HDR and LDR experiments. The LD50-180 after HDR irradiation, dose range 8 to 18 Gy, was not significantly altered by the addition of Cy (100 mg/kg) 1 day prior to irradiation, whereas Cy (100 mg/kg) 1 day prior to LDR irradiation, dose range: 16 to 24 Gy, caused an enhancement of radiation damage with a decrease of the LD50-180 by 1.33 Gy. The dose modification factor (DMF) was 1.07. This enhancement was no longer significant after splitting up the dose of Cy in two dosages of 50 mg/kg given on 2 consecutive days prior to irradiation with a LDR. The extrapolation of the data in this rat model to available dose-response curves on IP after BMT and radiation pneumonitis in humans, implied that non-infectious IP is a radiation pneumonitis that is only slightly enhanced by Cy.

  12. Mechanism investigation of dioscin against CCl4-induced acute liver damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Binan; Xu, Yousong; Xu, Lina; Cong, Xiaonan; Yin, Lianhong; Li, Hua; Peng, Jinyong

    2012-09-01

    The mechanisms of the ameliorating effects of dioscin against CCl(4) induced acute liver damage are investigated in this study. Dioscin significantly inhibited (p<0.01) the increases of serum ALT and AST activities compared with the CCl(4)-treated animals. The hepatic lipid peroxidation formation and, concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 were also decreased. Liver histopathologic studies and a DNA laddering assay indicated that dioscin protected hepatocytes against CCl(4)-induced apoptosis and necrosis. Furthermore, dioscin decreased the protein expressions of Fas/FasL, increased Bcl-2/Bax ratio, inhibited the release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion to cytosol and attenuated CCl(4)-induced caspase-3 and -8 activities. The expressions of ICAM-1, vimentin, prohibitin, HGF, c-MET and GSTA1 were also regulated by dioscin and iNOS was also involved in the effects of this agent. These protective effects against CCl(4) induced acute liver damage might be through inhibiting lipid peroxidation, inflammatory cytokines, necrosis and apoptosis, and dioscin shows promise for development toward the treatment of acute chemically mediated liver injury.

  13. Erythrocyte membrane fluidity and indices of plasmatic oxidative damage after acute physical exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Berzosa, C; Gómez-Trullén, E M; Piedrafita, E; Cebrián, I; Martínez-Ballarín, E; Miana-Mena, F J; Fuentes-Broto, L; García, J J

    2011-06-01

    Optimal levels of membrane fluidity are essential for numerous cell functions including cell growth, solute transport and signal transduction. Since exercise enhances free radical production, our aim was to evaluate in healthy male subjects the effects of an acute bout of maximal and submaximal exercise on the erythrocyte membrane fluidity and its possible relation to the oxidative damage overproduction due to exercise. Subjects (n = 34) performed three cycloergometric tests: a continuous progressive exercise, a strenuous exercise until exhaustion and an acute bout of exercise at an intensity corresponding to 70% of maximal work capacity for 30 min. Venous blood samples were collected before and immediately after these exercises. Erythrocyte membrane fluidity was assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxyalkenals (4-HDA) concentrations and carbonyl content of plasmatic proteins were used as an index of lipid and protein oxidation, respectively. Exercise produced a dramatic drop in the erythrocyte membrane fluidity as compared to resting time, but this was not accompanied by significant changes in the plasmatic MDA and 4-HDA concentrations. The highest erythrocyte membrane rigidity was detected immediately after strenuous exercise until exhaustion was performed. Protein carbonyl levels were higher after exhaustive exercises than at rest. Continuous progressive and strenuous exercises until exhaustion, but not submaximal workload, resulted in a significant enhanced accumulation of carbonylated proteins in the plasma. These findings are consistent with the idea that exercise exaggerates oxidative damage, which may contribute, at least partially, to explain the rigidity in the membrane of the erythrocytes due to acute exercise.

  14. Therapeutic Effects of Human Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Acute Lung Injury Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hua; Xiong, Yi; Xia, Yunqiu; Zhang, Rong; Tian, Daiyin; Wang, Ting; Dai, Jihong; Wang, Lijia; Yao, Hongbing; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Ke; Liu, Enmei; Shi, Yujun; Fu, Zhou; Gao, Li; Zou, Lin

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are still very high, but stem cells show some promise for its treatment. Here we found that intratracheal administration of human umbilical cord-mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) significantly improved survival and attenuated the lung inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI mice. We also used the proteins-chip and bioinformatics to analyze interactions between UC-MSCs treatment and immune-response alternations of ALI mice. Then we demonstrated that UC-MSCs could inhibit the inflammatory response of mouse macrophage in ALI mice, as well as enhance its IL-10 expression. We provide data to support the concept that the therapeutic capacity of UC-MSCs for ALI was primarily through paracrine secretion, particularly of prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2). Furthermore, we showed that UC-MSCs might secrete a panel of factors including GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-13 to ameliorate ALI. Our study suggested that UC-MSCs could protect LPS-induced ALI model by immune regulation and paracrine factors, indicating that UC-MSCs should be a promising strategy for ALI/ARDS. PMID:28051154

  15. In vivo microscopy in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Johannes; Czaplik, Michael; Dembinski, Rolf; Pelosi, Paolo; Schroeder, Wolfgang; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf

    2010-07-31

    Regional inhomogeneity and alveolar mechanics in a porcine model of acute lung injury (ALI) was evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM was performed through thoracic windows of the upper and lower lobes. Image quantification was conducted by use of a volume air index (VAI). Twelve anesthetized, mechanically ventilated pigs were randomized to non-injury (control group, n = 6) or ALI induced by surfactant depletion (ALI group, n = 6). CLSM was performed at baseline, after 1 h at 5 mbar and after 2 h at 15 mbar positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Haemodynamics, respiratory mechanics and calculation of pulmonary ventilation-perfusion distribution by MIGET were determined. At baseline, VAI was not different. In the upper lobes, VAI significantly decreased in ALI compared to control group, with no changes after PEEP application. In the lower lobes, VAI significantly decreased in ALI compared to control group. Incremental PEEP significantly increased VAI in ALI, but not in control group. Haemodynamics were significantly compromised in the ALI group. A significant deterioration in oxygenation and ventilation-perfusion distribution could be seen being restored after PEEP adjustment. The VAI may help to assess regional inhomogeneity of the acutely injured lung.

  16. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): clinical presentation, treatment, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Moore, S Breanndan

    2006-05-01

    The term transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was coined in 1983 to describe a constellation of clinical and laboratory features seen within 6 hrs of the transfusion of plasma-containing blood products. These products contain antibodies directed to human leukocyte antigens (and subsequently described to nonhuman leukocyte antigens) found on white blood cells. In the intervening 2 decades, other cases not associated with antibodies have been reported as TRALI and an association with passive infusion of lipids accumulated in stored cellular blood products has been made in those cases. This has led to confusion as to what should be considered to constitute TRALI. Therefore, the true incidence of this pulmonary reaction to blood products is currently conjectural at best. Recent consensus development conferences have been held to develop and standardize definitions of TRALI so that epidemiologic and research aspects of this condition can be explored in a scientific manner. These conferences have set out criteria by which TRALI is distinguished from other causes of acute lung injury. This review outlines the widely accepted clinical (mainly pulmonary) features of TRALI, the treatment options, and the excellent long-term prognosis for patients who survive the initial pulmonary insult.

  17. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO)].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hitoshi

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to respiratory complications of transfusion. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined as an acute lung injury that is temporally associated with blood transfusion. TRALI is one of the leading causes of mortality. Although the etiology of TRALI is not fully understood, one of its main causes is thought to be anti-leukocyte antibodies, such as HLA antibody or HNA antibody. A precautionary male-predominant plasma strategy has been implemented in many developed countries, which has resulted in considerable achievements in reducing the incidence of TRALI. Meanwhile, transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) has emerged as a major differential diagnosis of TRALI. TACO is a well-known complication of transfusion, which has been considered not as a side effect of transfusion but a result of erroneous medical practice. It has long been an under-reported complication of transfusion and has not been investigated scientifically. Recent data on transfusion mortality from the Food and Drug Administration revealed that TACO was the second highest cause of death in the United States. Our data also suggested a steep increase in the reported cases of TACO in Japan. Precautionary measures should also be implemented for this emerging complication.

  18. Mechanical ventilation-associated lung fibrosis in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a significant contributor to poor outcome.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Benitez, Nuria E; Laffey, John G; Parotto, Matteo; Spieth, Peter M; Villar, Jesús; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S

    2014-07-01

    One of the most challenging problems in critical care medicine is the management of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Increasing evidence from experimental and clinical studies suggests that mechanical ventilation, which is necessary for life support in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, can cause lung fibrosis, which may significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality. The role of mechanical stress as an inciting factor for lung fibrosis versus its role in lung homeostasis and the restoration of normal pulmonary parenchymal architecture is poorly understood. In this review, the authors explore recent advances in the field of pulmonary fibrosis in the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome, concentrating on its relevance to the practice of mechanical ventilation, as commonly applied by anesthetists and intensivists. The authors focus the discussion on the thesis that mechanical ventilation-or more specifically, that ventilator-induced lung injury-may be a major contributor to lung fibrosis. The authors critically appraise possible mechanisms underlying the mechanical stress-induced lung fibrosis and highlight potential therapeutic strategies to mitigate this fibrosis.

  19. Identification and examination of a novel 9-bp insert/deletion polymorphism on porcine SFTPA1 exon 2 associated with acute lung injury using an oleic acid-acute lung injury model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuebo; Zhang, Longchao; Wang, Ligang; Qiao, Lijuan; Liang, Jing; Yan, Hua; Zhao, Kebin; Liu, Xin; Wang, Lixian

    2015-06-01

    The pulmonary surfactant-associated protein (SFTPA1, SP-A) gene has been studied as a candidate gene for lung disease resistance in humans and livestock. The objective of the present study was to identify polymorphisms of the porcine SFTPA1 gene coding region and its association with acute lung injury (ALI). Through DNA sequencing and the PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism method, a novel 9-bp nucleotide insertion (+) or deletion (-) was detected on exon 2 of SFTPA1, which causes a change in three amino acids, namely, alanine (Ala), glycine (Gly) and proline (Pro). Individuals of three genotypes (-/-, +/- and +/+) were divided into equal groups from 60 Rongchang pigs that were genotyped. These pigs were selected for participation in the oleic acid (OA)-ALI model by 1-h and 3-h injections of OA, and there were equal numbers of pigs in the control and injection groups. The lung water content, a marker for acute lung injury, was measured in this study; there is a significant correlation between high lung water content and the presence of the 9-bp indel polymorphism (P < 0.01). The lung water content of the OA injection group was markedly higher than that of the control group and lung water content for the +/+ genotype was significantly higher than that of the others in the 1-h group (P < 0.01). No differences in the expression of the SFTPA1 gene were found among individuals with different SFTPA1 genotypes, indicating that the trait is not caused by a linked polymorphism causing altered expression of the gene. The individuals with the -/- genotype showed lower lung water content than the +/+ genotype pigs, which suggests that polymorphism could be a potential marker for lung disease-resistant pig breeding and that pig can be a potential animal model for human lung disease resistance in future studies.

  20. DNA damage response (DDR) pathway engagement in cisplatin radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sears, Catherine R; Cooney, Sean A; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Mendonca, Marc S; Turchi, John J

    2016-04-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are commonly treated with a platinum-based chemotherapy such as cisplatin (CDDP) in combination with ionizing radiation (IR). Although clinical trials have demonstrated that the combination of CDDP and IR appear to be synergistic in terms of therapeutic efficacy, the mechanism of synergism remains largely uncharacterized. We investigated the role of the DNA damage response (DDR) in CDDP radiosensitization using two NSCLC cell lines. Using clonogenic survival assays, we determined that the cooperative cytotoxicity of CDDP and IR treatment is sequence dependent, requiring administration of CDDP prior to IR (CDDP-IR). We identified and interrogated the unique time and agent-dependent activation of the DDR in NSCLC cells treated with cisplatin-IR combination therapy. Compared to treatment with CDDP or IR alone, CDDP-IR combination treatment led to persistence of γH2Ax foci, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), for up to 24h after treatment. Interestingly, pharmacologic inhibition of DDR sensor kinases revealed the persistence of γ-H2Ax foci in CDDP-IR treated cells is independent of kinase activation. Taken together, our data suggest that delayed repair of DSBs in NSCLC cells treated with CDDP-IR contributes to CDDP radiosensitization and that alterations of the DDR pathways by inhibition of specific DDR kinases can augment CDDP-IR cytotoxicity by a complementary mechanism.

  1. Simple plethysmograph for measuring respiration rates in rats with lung damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feaster, Gene R.; Kimler, Bruce F.; Henderson, Sheri D.; Mansfield, Carl M.

    1984-07-01

    In order to measure respiration rates in rats irradiated to the whole thorax, a plethysmograph involving a microphone with extended low-frequency response and an airtight, whole-body chamber has been constructed. The microphone response to the respiration pressure waves created by the rats placed in the chamber is markedly greater in amplitude than the response to laboratory sounds and animal noises; thereby filtering complexities are avoided. The output from the microphone went to a frequency counter for measurement of the number of pressure waves per unit time. Control, unirradiated rats, between the ages of 3 and 18 months, demonstrated a respiration rate in the range of 130-160 breaths per minute. Rats that received thoracic radiation doses greater than 12 Gy displayed increased respiration rates and occasional abnormal respiration patterns. These results demonstrate that this whole-body plethysmograph incorporating a sensitive microphone and simple electronics can be used for the measurement of respiration functions in rats with lung damage.

  2. VEGF‐D promotes pulmonary oedema in hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Teruhiko; Paquet‐Fifield, Sophie; Harris, Nicole C; Roufail, Sally; Turner, Debra J; Yuan, Yinan; Zhang, You‐Fang; Fox, Stephen B; Hibbs, Margaret L; Wilkinson‐Berka, Jennifer L; Williams, Richard A; Stacker, Steven A; Sly, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Leakage of fluid from blood vessels, leading to oedema, is a key feature of many diseases including hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI), which can occur when patients are ventilated with high concentrations of oxygen (hyperoxia). The molecular mechanisms driving vascular leak and oedema in HALI are poorly understood. VEGF‐D is a protein that promotes blood vessel leak and oedema when overexpressed in tissues, but the role of endogenous VEGF‐D in pathological oedema was unknown. To address these issues, we exposed Vegfd‐deficient mice to hyperoxia. The resulting pulmonary oedema in Vegfd‐deficient mice was substantially reduced compared to wild‐type, as was the protein content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, consistent with reduced vascular leak. Vegf‐d and its receptor Vegfr‐3 were more highly expressed in lungs of hyperoxic, versus normoxic, wild‐type mice, indicating that components of the Vegf‐d signalling pathway are up‐regulated in hyperoxia. Importantly, VEGF‐D and its receptors were co‐localized on blood vessels in clinical samples of human lungs exposed to hyperoxia; hence, VEGF‐D may act directly on blood vessels to promote fluid leak. Our studies show that Vegf‐d promotes oedema in response to hyperoxia in mice and support the hypothesis that VEGF‐D signalling promotes vascular leak in human HALI. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:26924464

  3. Identification and partial characterization of angiogenesis bioactivity in the lower respiratory tract after acute lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Henke, C; Fiegel, V; Peterson, M; Wick, M; Knighton, D; McCarthy, J; Bitterman, P

    1991-01-01

    Survival after acute lung injury (ALI) depends on prompt alveolar repair, a process frequently subverted by the development of granulation tissue within the alveolar airspace. Immunohistochemical examination of the intraalveolar granulation tissue confirmed that capillaries as well as myofibroblasts were the principal cellular constituents. We therefore hypothesized that angiogenesis factors would be present on the air-lung interface after ALI. To evaluate this hypothesis, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with ALI (n = 25) and patient controls (n = 8) was examined for angiogenesis bioactivity by its ability of induce endothelial cell migration. While lavage fluid from controls had no bioactivity, lavage fluid from 72% of patients with ALI promoted endothelial cell migration. Heparin affinity, ion exchange, and gel filtration chromatography resolved the bioactivity into at least two moieties. One appeared identical to the well characterized endothelial cell growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor. The other was a 150-kD non-heparin binding protein that mediated endothelial cell migration and attachment in vitro, and the growth of new vessels in vivo. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the growth of capillaries into the alveolar airspace results from angiogenesis factors present on the alveolar surface of the lung after ALI. Images PMID:1717512

  4. On the significance of estimating thallium lung uptake images in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Kimata, S.; Hirosawa, K.; Kusakabe, K.; Shigeta, T.; Ito, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Abe, M.; Matsuda, M.

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether thallium lung uptake images (TLI) can be used as a noninvasive method to estimate any of hemodynamic changes in patients (pts) with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) TLI were evaluated in 23 pts with AMI. All pts underwent multigated blood pool imaging and cardiac catheterization. TLI were estimated by comparing the intensity of T1-201 activity in the lower right lung with maximal myocardial count (thallium lung heart ratio; LHR). Pts with AMI were classified to 3 grades according to LHR. The classifications were hemodynamically significant. The specificity of LHR <0.6 for mPw <18mmHg was 100% (10/10). The specificity of LHR greater than or equal to 0.8 for mPw greater than or equal to 18mmHg was 85% (11/13) and for EF greater than or equal to 30% was 100% (13/13). The pts with LHR 0.8 showed high mortality (4/9) and high morbidity (all survivors were in NYHA class 2-3 and receiving digitalis and diuretics). TLI were easily obtained after routine T1-myocardial imaging, i.e. another 5 minutes imaging yielded clinically useful information for separating high and low-risk groups of pts with AMI.

  5. Effects of SDF-1/CXCR4 on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai; Lu, Rujian; Wang, Shuo; Chen, Honglin; Wang, Fei; Liu, Kun

    2017-03-11

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is one of the most important complications after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and the complex pathophysiology remains to be resolved incomplete. SDF-1/CXCR4 chemokine axis can chemotactically accumulate inflammatory cell to local tissue and regulate the release of inflammatory factors, and SDF-1 has a strong chemotaxis effect on neutrophils with CXCR4. Since CPB animal model was difficult to establish, there was still no report about the effect of SDF-1/CXCR4 on neutrophil chemotaxis in ALI after CPB. Here, a stable CPB rat model was constructed to clarify the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in the CPB-induced ALI. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), Western blot analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to detect the changes of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in lung tissues, blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF), and/or isolated neutrophils. SDF-1/CXCR4 was increased after CPB, both of that were increased in blood; CXCR4 was increased in neutrophils; SDF-1/CXCR4 was also increased in BALF of CPB model. Results indicated that SDF-1/CXCR4 axis played a key role in the process of early ALI after CPB, also showed that lung injury was significantly reduce after blocking SDF-1/CXCR4 axis, suggest that CXCR4 might be a new target for ALI treatment.

  6. Eupatorium lindleyanum DC. flavonoids fraction attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chunjun; Yao, Shi; Chen, Jinglei; Wei, Xiaochen; Xia, Long; Chen, Daofeng; Zhang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Eupatorium lindleyanum DC., "Ye-Ma-Zhui" called by local residents in China, showed anti-inflammatory activity and is used to treat tracheitis. We had isolated and identified the flavonoids, diterpenoids and sesquiterpenes compounds from the herb. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of the flavonoids fraction of E. lindleyanum (EUP-FLA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice and the possible underlying mechanisms of action. EUP-FLA could significantly decrease lung wet-to-dry weight (W/D) ratio, nitric oxide (NO) and protein concentration in BALF, lower myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and down-regulate the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Additionally, EUP-FLA attenuated lung histopathological changes and significantly reduced complement deposition with decreasing the levels of Complement 3 (C3) and Complement 3c (C3c) in serum. These results demonstrated that EUP-FLA may attenuate LPS-induced ALI via reducing productions of pro-inflammatory mediators, decreasing the level of complement and affecting the NO, SOD and MPO activity.

  7. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. S100A8 induces IL-10 and protects against acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yuka; Hsu, Kenneth; Tedla, Nicodemus; Chung, Yuen Ming; Chow, Sharron; Herbert, Cristan; Geczy, Carolyn L

    2014-03-15

    S100A8 is considered proinflammatory by activating TLR4 and/or the receptor for advanced glycation end products. The aim was to investigate inflammatory effects of S100A8 in murine lung. S100A8 was administered to BALB/c mice by nasal inhalation and genes induced over a time-course assessed. LPS was introduced intranasally either alone or 2 h after pretreatment of mice with intranasal application of S100A8 or dexamethasone. A Cys(42)-Ala(42) mutant S100A8 mutant was used to assess whether S100A8's effects were via pathways that were dependent on reactive oxygen species. S100A8 induced IL-10 mRNA, and expression was apparent only in airway epithelial cells. Importantly, it suppressed acute lung injury provoked by LPS inhalation by suppressing mast-cell activation and induction of mediators orchestrating leukocyte recruitment, possibly by reducing NF-κB activation via an IκBα/Akt pathway and by downmodulating pathways generating oxidative stress. The Cys(42)-Ala(42) S100A8 mutant did not induce IL-10 and was less immunosuppressive, indicating modulation by scavenging oxidants. S100A8 inhibition of LPS-mediated injury was as potent, and outcomes were remarkably similar to immunosuppression by dexamethasone. We challenge the notion that S100A8 is an agonist for TLR4 or the receptor for advanced glycation end products. S100A8 induced IL-10 in vivo and initiates a feedback loop that attenuates acute lung injury.

  9. Activation of TRPV1-dependent calcium oscillation exacerbates seawater inhalation-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    LI, CONGCONG; BO, LIYAN; LIU, QINGQING; LIU, WEI; CHEN, XIANGJUN; XU, DUNQUAN; JIN, FAGUANG

    2016-01-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger and it is widely recognized that acute lung injury (ALI) is often caused by oscillations of cytosolic free Ca2+. Previous studies have indicated that the activation of transient receptor potential-vanilloid (TRPV) channels and subsequent Ca2+ entry initiates an acute calcium-dependent permeability increase during ALI. However, whether seawater exposure induces such an effect through the activation of TRPV channels remains unknown. In the current study, the effect of calcium, a component of seawater, on the inflammatory reactions that occur during seawater drowning-induced ALI, was examined. The results demonstrated that a high concentration of calcium ions in seawater increased lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity and the secretion of inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. Further study demonstrated that the seawater challenge elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, indicated by [Ca2+]c, by inducing calcium influx from the extracellular medium via TRPV1 channels. The elevated [Ca2+c] may have resulted in the increased release of TNF-α and IL-1β via increased phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). It was concluded that a high concentration of calcium in seawater exacerbated lung injury, and TRPV1 channels were notable mediators of the calcium increase initiated by the seawater challenge. Calcium influx through TRPV1 may have led to greater phosphorylation of NF-κB and increased release of TNF-α and IL-1β. PMID:26796050

  10. Protective Effects of Dioscin against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury through Inhibition of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hong; Sun, Yiping; Song, Shasha; Qi, Yan; Tao, Xufeng; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Han, Xu; Xu, Youwei; Li, Hua; Sun, Huijun; Peng, Jinyong

    2017-01-01

    The protective effects of dioscin, a natural steroidal saponin from some medicinal plants including Dioscorea nipponica Makino, against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- induced acute liver and renal damages have been reported in our previous works. However, the actions of dioscin against LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of dioscin against LPS-induced ALI in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that dioscin obviously inhibited cell proliferation and markedly decreased reactive oxidative species level in 16HBE cells treated by LPS. In addition, dioscin significantly protected LPS-induced histological changes, inhibited the infiltration of inflammatory cells, as well as decreased the levels of MDA, SOD, NO and iNOS in mice and rats (p < 0.05). Mechanistically, dioscin significantly decreased the protein levels of TLR4, MyD88, TRAF6, TKB1, TRAF3, phosphorylation levels of PI3K, Akt, IκBα, NF-κB, and the mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α against oxidative stress and inflammation (p < 0.05). Dioscin significantly reduced the overexpression of TLR4, and obviously down-regulated the levels of MyD88, TRAF6, TKB1, TRAF3, p-PI3K, p-Akt, p-IκBα, and p-NF-κB. These findings provide new perspectives for the study of ALI. Dioscin has protective effects on LPS-induced ALI via adjusting TLR4/MyD88- mediated oxidative stress and inflammation, which should be a potent drug in the treatment of ALI. PMID:28377715

  11. The impact of recurrent acute chest syndrome on the lung function of young adults with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Knight-Madden, Jennifer M; Forrester, Terrence S; Lewis, Norma A; Greenough, Anne

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS) episodes on the lung function of young adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Our prospective study included 80 SCD adults [26 with recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS)] and 80 ethnically matched controls aged between 18 and 28 years. Lung function (spirometry and lung volumes) was measured and the results were expressed as the percentage predicted for height. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) was assessed by the response to either a bronchodilator or an exercise challenge. The adults with recurrent ACS (two or more ACS episodes) had lower median forced vital capacity (74 vs. 83%, p = 0.03), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (79 vs. 90%, p < 0.03), and total lung capacity (69 vs. 81%, p = 0.04) than SCD adults who had one or no ACS episodes. The greater the number of ACS episodes, the greater the reduction in lung function (p = 0.001). The adults with SCD had lower median forced vital capacity (81 vs. 106%), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (85 vs. 107%), and total lung capacity (80 vs. 87%) than the controls (p < 0.001). Similar numbers in each group had BHR (p = 0.2). The prevalence of restrictive ventilatory defect in the patients with SCD was almost double that of the controls (p = 0.004). Young adults with SCD have worse lung function than ethnically matched controls, particularly if they have suffered recurrent ACS episodes.

  12. Targeting the Renin–Angiotensin System Combined With an Antioxidant Is Highly Effective in Mitigating Radiation-Induced Lung Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Javed; Jelveh, Salomeh; Zaidi, Asif; Doctrow, Susan R.; Medhora, Meetha; Hill, Richard P.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the outcome of suppression of the renin angiotensin system using captopril combined with an antioxidant (Eukarion [EUK]-207) for mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage in rats. Methods and Materials: The thoracic cavity of female Sprague-Dawley rats was irradiated with a single dose of 11 Gy. Treatment with captopril at a dose of 40 mg/kg/d in drinking water and EUK-207 given by subcutaneous injection (8 mg/kg daily) was started 1 week after irradiation (PI) and continuing until 14 weeks PI. Breathing rate was monitored until the rats were killed at 32 weeks PI, when lung fibrosis was assessed by lung hydroxyproline content. Lung levels of the cytokine transforming growth factor-β1 and macrophage activation were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Oxidative DNA damage was assessed by 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine levels, and lipid peroxidation was measured by a T-BARS assay. Results: The increase in breathing rate in the irradiated rats was significantly reduced by the drug treatments. The drug treatment also significantly decreased the hydroxyproline content, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde levels, and levels of activated macrophages and the cytokine transforming growth factor-β1 at 32 weeks. Almost complete mitigation of these radiation effects was observed by combining captopril and EUK-207. Conclusion: Captopril and EUK-207 can provide mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage out to at least 32 weeks PI after treatment given 1-14 weeks PI. Overall the combination of captopril and EUK-207 was more effective than the individual drugs used alone.

  13. Oxidative damage and histopathological changes in lung of rat chronically exposed to nicotine alone or associated to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Dhouib, H; Jallouli, M; Draief, M; Bouraoui, S; El-Fazâa, S

    2015-12-01

    Smoking is the most important preventable risk factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. This study was designed to investigate oxidative damage and histopathological changes in lung tissue of rats chronically exposed to nicotine alone or supplemented with ethanol. Twenty-four male Wistar rats divided into three groups were used for the study. The nicotine group received nicotine (2.5mg/kg/day); the nicotine-ethanol group was given simultaneously same dose of nicotine plus ethanol (0.2g/kg/day), while the control group was administered only normal saline (1 ml/kg/day). The treatment was administered by subcutaneous injection once daily for a period of 18 weeks. Chronic nicotine administration alone or combined to ethanol caused a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and catalase (CAT) activity in lung tissue compared to control rats suggesting an oxidative damage. However, these increases were mostly prominent in nicotine group. The histopathological examination of lung tissue of rats in both treated groups revealed many alterations in the pulmonary structures such as emphysema change (disappearance of the alveolar septa, increased irregularity and size of air sacs) and marked lymphocytic infiltration in perivascular and interstitial areas. However, the changes characterized in the nicotine group (pulmonary congestion, hemorrhage into alveoli and interstitial areas, edema) were more drastic than those observed in the nicotine-ethanol group, and they can be attributed to a significant degree of capillary endothelial permeability and microvascular leak. Conversely, the ethanol supplementation caused an appearance of fatty change and fibrosis in pulmonary tissue essentially due to a metabolism of ethanol. Finally, the lung damage illustrated in nicotine group was more severe than that observed in the nicotine-ethanol group. We conclude that the combined administration of nicotine and ethanol

  14. Myeloid depletion of SOCS3 enhances LPS-induced acute lung injury through CCAAT/enhancer binding protein δ pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunguang; Ward, Peter A.; Wang, Ximo; Gao, Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    Although uncontrolled inflammatory response plays a central role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI), the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the development of this disorder remain poorly understood. SOCS3 is an important negative regulator of IL-6-type cytokine signaling. SOCS3 is induced in lung during LPS-induced lung injury, suggesting that generation of SOCS3 may represent a regulatory product during ALI. In the current study, we created mice lacking SOCS3 expression in macrophages and neutrophils (LysM-cre SOCS3fl/fl). We evaluated the lung inflammatory response to LPS in both LysM-cre SOCS3fl/fl mice and the wild-type (WT) mice (SOCS3fl/fl). LysM-cre SOCS3fl/fl mice displayed significant increase of the lung permeability index (lung vascular leak of albumin), neutrophils, lung neutrophil accumulation (myeloperoxidase activity), and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in bronchial alveolar lavage fluids compared to WT mice. These phenotypes were consistent with morphological evaluation of lung, which showed enhanced inflammatory cell influx and intra-alveolar hemorrhage. We further identify the transcription factor, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) δ as a critical downstream target of SOCS3 in LPS-induced ALI. These results indicate that SOCS3 has a protective role in LPS-induced ALI by suppressing C/EBPδ activity in the lung. Elucidating the function of SOCS3 would represent prospective targets for a new generation of drugs needed to treat ALI.—Yan, C., Ward, P. A., Wang, X., Gao, H. Myeloid depletion of SOCS3 enhances LPS-induced acute lung injury through CCAAT/enhancer binding protein δ pathway. PMID:23585399

  15. Acute lung injury following inhalation exposure to nerve agent VX in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wright, Benjamin S; Rezk, Peter E; Graham, Jacob R; Steele, Keith E; Gordon, Richard K; Sciuto, Alfred M; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2006-05-01

    A microinstillation technique of inhalation exposure was utilized to assess lung injury following chemical warfare nerve agent VX [methylphosphonothioic acid S-(2-[bis(1-methylethyl)amino]ethyl) O-ethyl ester] exposure in guinea pigs. Animals were anesthetized using Telazol-meditomidine, gently intubated, and VX was aerosolized using a microcatheter placed 2 cm above the bifurcation of the trachea. Different doses (50.4 microg/m3, 70.4 micro g/m(m3), 90.4 microg/m(m3)) of VX were administered at 40 pulses/min for 5 min. Dosing of VX was calculated by the volume of aerosol produced per 200 pulses and diluting the agent accordingly. Although the survival rate of animals exposed to different doses of VX was similar to the controls, nearly a 20% weight reduction was observed in exposed animals. After 24 h of recovery, the animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed with oxygen free saline. BAL was centrifuged and separated into BAL fluid (BALF) and BAL cells (BALC) and analyzed for indication of lung injury. The edema by dry/wet weight ratio of the accessory lobe increased 11% in VX-treated animals. BAL cell number was increased in VX-treated animals compared to controls, independent of dosage. Trypan blue viability assay indicated an increase in BAL cell death in 70.4 microg/m(m3) and 90.4 microg/m(m3) VX-exposed animals. Differential cell counting of BALC indicated a decrease in macrophage/monocytes in VX-exposed animals. The total amount of BAL protein increased gradually with the exposed dose of VX and was highest in animals exposed to 90.4 microg/m(m3), indicating that this dose of VX caused lung injury that persisted at 24 h. In addition, histopathology results also suggest that inhalation exposure to VX induces acute lung injury.

  16. S100A8/A9 and S100A9 reduce acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yuka; Hsu, Kenneth; Tedla, Nicodemus; Wong, Sze Wing; Chow, Sharron; Kawaguchi, Naomi; Geczy, Carolyn L

    2017-01-31

    S100A8 and S100A9 are myeloid cell-derived proteins that are elevated in several types of inflammatory lung disorders. Pro- and anti-inflammatory properties are reported and these proteins are proposed to activate TLR4. S100A8 and S100A9 can function separately, likely through distinct receptors but a systematic comparison of their effects in vivo are limited. Here we assess inflammation in murine lung following S100A9 and S100A8/A9 inhalation. Unlike S100A8, S100A9 promoted mild neutrophil and lymphocyte influx, possibly mediated in part, by increased mast cell degranulation and selective upregulation of some chemokine genes, particularly CXCL-10. S100 proteins did not significantly induce proinflammatory mediators including TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 or serum amyloid A3 (SAA3). In contrast to S100A8, neither preparation induced S100A8 or IL-10 mRNA/protein in airway epithelial cells, or in tracheal epithelial cells in vitro. Like S100A8, S100A9 and S100A8/A9 reduced neutrophil influx in acute lung injury provoked by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge but were somewhat less inhibitory, possibly because of differential effects on expression of some chemokines, IL-1β, SAA3 and IL-10. Novel common pathways including increased induction of an NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase sirtuin-1 that may reduce NF-κB signalling, and increased STAT3 activation may reduce LPS activation. Results suggest a role for these proteins in normal homeostasis and protective mechanisms in the lung.Immunology and Cell Biology advance online publication, 31 January 2017; doi:10.1038/icb.2017.2.

  17. Activation of MTOR in pulmonary epithelium promotes LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Lou, Jian; Mao, Yuan-Yuan; Lai, Tian-Wen; Liu, Li-Yao; Zhu, Chen; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Juan; Li, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Fan; Li, Wen; Ying, Song-Min; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-12-01

    MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin [serine/threonine kinase]) plays a crucial role in many major cellular processes including metabolism, proliferation and macroautophagy/autophagy induction, and is also implicated in a growing number of proliferative and metabolic diseases. Both MTOR and autophagy have been suggested to be involved in lung disorders, however, little is known about the role of MTOR and autophagy in pulmonary epithelium in the context of acute lung injury (ALI). In the present study, we observed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation induced MTOR phosphorylation and decreased the expression of MAP1LC3B/LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 β)-II, a hallmark of autophagy, in mouse lung epithelium and in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. The activation of MTOR in HBE cells was mediated by TLR4 (toll-like receptor 4) signaling. Genetic knockdown of MTOR or overexpression of autophagy-related proteins significantly attenuated, whereas inhibition of autophagy further augmented, LPS-induced expression of IL6 (interleukin 6) and IL8, through NFKB signaling in HBE cells. Mice with specific knockdown of Mtor in bronchial or alveolar epithelial cells exhibited significantly attenuated airway inflammation, barrier disruption, and lung edema, and displayed prolonged survival in response to LPS exposure. Taken together, our results demonstrate that activation of MTOR in the epithelium promotes LPS-induced ALI, likely through downregulation of autophagy and the subsequent activation of NFKB. Thus, inhibition of MTOR in pulmonary epithelial cells may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing ALI induced by certain bacteria.

  18. Dimethyl silicone dry nanoemulsion inhalations: Formulation study and anti-acute lung injury effect.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lifei; Li, Miao; Dong, Junxing; Jin, Yiguang

    2015-08-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe disease, leading to death if not treated quickly. An emergency medicine is necessary for ALI therapy. Dimethyl silicone (DMS) is an effective agent to defoam the bubbles in the lung induced by ALI. However, DMS aerosols, a marketed formulation of DMS, affect environments and will be limited in the future. Here we firstly report a dry nanoemulsion inhalation for pulmonary delivery. Novel DMS dry nanoemulsion inhalations (DSNIs) were developed in this study. The optimal formulation of stable and homogenous DMS nanoemulsions (DSNs) was composed of Cremophor RH40/PEG 400/DMS (4:4:2, w/w/w) and water. The DSNs showed the tiny size of 19.8 nm, the zeta potential of -9.66 mV, and the low polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.37. The type of DSNs was identified as oil-in-water. The DSNs were added with mannitol followed by freeze-drying to obtain the DSNIs that were loose white powders, showed good fluidity, and were capable of rapid reconstitution to DSNs. The DSNs could adhere on the surfaces of lyophilized mannitol crystals. The aerodynamic diameter of DSNIs was 4.82 μm, suitable for pulmonary inhalation. The in vitro defoaming rate of DSNIs was 1.25 ml/s, much faster than those of the blank DSNIs, DMS, and DMS aerosols. The DSNIs showed significantly higher anti-ALI effect on the ALI rat models than the blank DSNIs and the DMS aerosols according to lung appearances, histological sections, and lung wet weight/dry weight ratios. The DSNIs are effective anti-ALI nanomedicines. The novel DMS formulation is a promising replacement of DMS aerosols.

  19. Stimulation of Brain AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mulchandani, Nikhil; Yang, Weng-Lang; Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Zhang, Fangming; Marambaud, Philippe; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are enormous public health problems with astronomical financial repercussions on health systems worldwide. The central nervous system (CNS) is closely intertwined in the septic process but the underlying mechanism is still obscure. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a ubiquitous energy sensor enzyme and plays a key role in regulation of energy homeostasis and cell survival. In this study, we hypothesized that activation of AMPK in the brain would attenuate inflammatory responses in sepsis, particularly in the lungs. Adult C57BL/6 male mice were treated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR, 20 ng), an AMPK activator, or vehicle (normal saline) by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection, followed by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) at 30 min post-ICV. The septic mice treated with AICAR exhibited elevated phosphorylation of AMPKα in the brain along with reduced serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), compared with the vehicle. Similarly, the expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β, keratinocyte-derived chemokine and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 as well as myeloperoxidase activity in the lungs of AICAR-treated mice were significantly reduced. Moreover, histological findings in the lungs showed improvement of morphologic features and reduction of apoptosis with AICAR treatment. We further found that the beneficial effects of AICAR on septic mice were diminished in AMPKα2 deficient mice, showing that AMPK mediates these effects. In conclusion, our findings reveal a new functional role of activating AMPK in the CNS to attenuate inflammatory responses and acute lung injury in sepsis. PMID:26252187

  20. Acute and chronic administration of gold nanoparticles cause DNA damage in the cerebral cortex of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Eria; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza; Zanoni, Elton Torres; de Souza Notoya, Frederico; Leffa, Daniela Dimer; Damiani, Adriani Paganini; Daumann, Francine; Rodriguez, Juan Carlos Ortiz; Benavides, Roberto; da Silva, Luciano; Andrade, Vanessa M; da Silva Paula, Marcos Marques

    2014-01-01

    The use of gold nanoparticles is increasing in medicine; however, their toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Studies show that gold nanoparticles can cross the blood-brain barrier, as well as accumulate in the brain. Therefore, this study was undertaken to better understand the effects of gold nanoparticles on rat brains. DNA damage parameters were evaluated in the cerebral cortex of adult rats submitted to acute and chronic administration of gold nanoparticles of two different diameters: 10 and 30nm. During acute administration, adult rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of either gold nanoparticles or saline solution. During chronic administration, adult rats received a daily single injection for 28 days of the same gold nanoparticles or saline solution. Twenty-four hours after either single (acute) or last injection (chronic), the rats were euthanized by decapitation, their brains removed, and the cerebral cortices isolated for evaluation of DNA damage parameters. Our study showed that acute administration of gold nanoparticles in adult rats presented higher levels of damage frequency and damage index in their DNA compared to the control group. It was also observed that gold nanoparticles of 30nm presented higher levels of damage frequency and damage index in the DNA compared to the 10nm ones. When comparing the effects of chronic administration of gold nanoparticles of 10 and 30nm, we observed that occurred significant different index and frequency damage, comparing with control group. However, there is no difference between the 10 and 30nm groups in the levels of DNA damage for both parameters of the Comet assay. Results suggest that gold nanoparticles for both sizes cause DNA damage for chronic as well as acute treatments, although a higher damage was observed for the chronic one.

  1. Torsade de pointes indicates early neurologic damage in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Yen; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Lin, Wen-Yu; Cheng, Cheng-Chung; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Tsai, Tsung-Neng

    2013-12-01

    Torsade de pointes (TdP) is a life-threatening polymorphic ventricular tachycardia that is related to QT prolongation. Although QT prolongation is commonly seen in acute stroke, TdP is rare. We report the case of a 78-year-old woman with ischemic stroke who presented with TdP as the initial manifestation of early neurologic deterioration. We hypothesized that an increase in intracranial pressure may result in neurohormonal activation, QT prolongation, and then myocardial damage, leading to TdP. We highlight that new onset of TdP in a patient with stroke may reflect neurologic deterioration, requiring further evaluation and specific intervention.

  2. Selenium Alleviates Oxidative Stress and Lung Damage Induced by Aluminum Chloride in Adult Rats: Biochemical and Histological Approach.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Imen; Elwej, Awatef; Chaabane, Mariem; Jamoussi, Kamel; Mnif, Hela; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2017-03-01

    Our study pertains to the potential ability of selenium, used as a nutritional supplement, to alleviate oxidative stress induced by aluminum chloride in the lung tissue. Rats have received during 21 days either aluminum chloride (AlCl3) (400 ppm) via drinking water, AlCl3 associated with Na2SeO3 (0.5 mg/kg of diet), or only Na2SeO3. Exposure of rats to AlCl3 induced lung oxidative stress with an increase of malondialdehyde, hydrogen peroxide, and protein carbonyls levels. An alteration of lactate dehydrogenase activities and antioxidant redox status, enzymatic (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase), and non-enzymatic (non-protein thiols, glutathione, metallothionein, and vitamin C) was also observed. These biochemical modifications were substantiated by histopathological data showing alveolar edema, a large number of hemosiderin-laden macrophages, and emphysema. Se supplementation attenuated the levels of oxidative stress by restoring antioxidant state and improved lung histological damage. Our results revealed that Se, a trace element with antioxidant properties, was effective in preventing lung damage.

  3. Enhanced Resolution of Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury as a result of Aspirin Triggered Resolvin D1 Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Ruan; Phillips, Oluwakemi; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Fukumoto, Itsuko; Parthasarathy, Prasanna Tamarapu; Arias, Stephen; Cho, Young; Lockey, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), which presents as acute respiratory failure, is a major clinical problem that requires aggressive care, and patients who require prolonged oxygen exposure are at risk of developing this disease. Although molecular determinants of ALI have been reported, the molecules involved in disease catabasis associated with oxygen toxicity have not been well studied. It has been reported that lung mucosa is rich in omega-3 fatty acid dicosahexanoic acid (DHA), which has antiinflammatory properties. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) is a potent proresolution metabolite of DHA that can curb the inflammatory effects in various acute injuries, yet the effect of AT-RvD1 on hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) or in the oxygen toxicity setting in general has not been investigated. The effects of AT-RvD1 on HALI were determined for the first time in 8- to 10-week-old C57BL/6 mice that were exposed to hyperoxia (≥95% O2) for 48 hours. Mice were given AT-RvD1 (100 ng) in saline or a saline vehicle for 24 hours in normoxic (≈21% O2) conditions after hyperoxia. Lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were collected for analysis associated with proinflammatory signaling and lung inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment resulted in reduced oxidative stress, increased glutathione production, and significantly decreased tissue inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment also significantly reduced the lung wet/dry ratio, protein in BAL fluid, and decreased apoptotic and NF-κB signaling. These results show that AT-RvD1 curbs oxygen-induced lung edema, permeability, inflammation, and apoptosis and is thus an effective therapy for prolonged hyperoxia exposure in this murine model. PMID:25647402

  4. Extracorporeal gas exchange in acute lung injury: step by step towards expanded indications?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is widely accepted as a rescue therapy in patients with acute life-threatening hypoxemia in the course of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, possible side effects and complications are considered to limit beneficial outcome effects. Therefore, widening indications with the aim of reducing ventilator induced lung injury (VILI) is still controversial. Consequently, technological progress is an important strategy. Miniaturized ECMO systems are believed to simplify handling and reduce side effects and complications. Mueller and co-workers evaluated such a small-sized device in 60 patients with severe ARDS. They accomplished both the treatment of severe hypoxemia and reduction of VILI, demonstrating feasibility, a moderate rate of severe complications, and a 45% intensive care survival rate. Although neither randomized nor controlled, this study should encourage others to implement such systems in clinical practice. From a strategic perspective, this is another small but useful step towards implementing extracorporeal gas exchange for the prevention of VILI. It is already common sense that the prevention of acute life-threatening hypoxemia usually outweighs the risks of this technique. The next step should be to prove that prevention of life-threatening VILI balances the risks too. PMID:20236482

  5. Extracorporeal gas exchange in acute lung injury: step by step towards expanded indications?

    PubMed

    Dembinski, Rolf; Kuhlen, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is widely accepted as a rescue therapy in patients with acute life-threatening hypoxemia in the course of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, possible side effects and complications are considered to limit beneficial outcome effects. Therefore, widening indications with the aim of reducing ventilator induced lung injury (VILI) is still controversial. Consequently, technological progress is an important strategy. Miniaturized ECMO systems are believed to simplify handling and reduce side effects and complications. Mueller and co-workers evaluated such a small-sized device in 60 patients with severe ARDS. They accomplished both the treatment of severe hypoxemia and reduction of VILI, demonstrating feasibility, a moderate rate of severe complications, and a 45% intensive care survival rate. Although neither randomized nor controlled, this study should encourage others to implement such systems in clinical practice. From a strategic perspective, this is another small but useful step towards implementing extracorporeal gas exchange for the prevention of VILI. It is already common sense that the prevention of acute life-threatening hypoxemia usually outweighs the risks of this technique. The next step should be to prove that prevention of life-threatening VILI balances the risks too.

  6. Elevation of C-reactive protein levels in patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Rick; Kim, Michael; Rondina, Matthew T.; Porcelijn, Leendert; Semple, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related fatalities and is characterized by the onset of acute respiratory distress within six hours following blood transfusion. In most cases, donor antibodies are suggested to be involved, however, the pathogenesis is poorly understood. A two-hit model is generally assumed to underlie TRALI pathogenesis where the first hit consists of a patient predisposing factor such as inflammation and the second hit is due to donor antibodies present in the transfused blood. We recently demonstrated that the acute phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) could enhance murine anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-mediated TRALI. Whether CRP is increased in human TRALI patients which would support its role as a risk factor for human TRALI, is currently unknown. For that purpose, we measured CRP levels in the plasma of human TRALI patients and found CRP levels to be significantly elevated compared to transfused control patients. These data support the notion that CRP may be a novel first hit risk factor in human TRALI and that modulation of CRP levels could be an effective therapeutic strategy for this serious adverse event of transfusion. PMID:27793007

  7. Impact of acute exposure to WTC dust on ciliated and goblet cells in lungs of rats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell D; Vaughan, Joshua M; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Ghio, Andrew; Zelikoff, Judith; Lung-chi, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies and the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry have revealed increases in the incidence of chronic (non-cancer) lung disorders among first responders (FR) who were at Ground Zero during the initial 72 h after the collapse. Our previous analyses of rats exposed to building-derived WTC dusts using exposure scenarios/levels that mimicked FR mouth-breathing showed that a single WTC dust exposure led to changes in expression of genes whose products could be involved in the lung ailments, but few other significant pathologies. We concluded that rather than acting as direct inducers of many of the FR health effects, it was more likely inhaled WTC dusts instead may have impacted on toxicities induced by other rescue-related co-pollutants present in Ground Zero air. To allow for such effects to occur, we hypothesized that the alkaline WTC dusts induced damage to the normal ability of the lungs to clear inhaled particles. To validate this, rats were exposed on two consecutive days (2 h/d, by intratracheal inhalation) to WTC dust (collected 12-13 September 2001) and examined over a 1-yr period thereafter for changes in the presence of ciliated cells in the airways and hyperplastic goblet cells in the lungs. WTC dust levels in the lungs were assessed in parallel to verify that any changes in levels of these cells corresponded with decreases in host ability to clear the particles themselves. Image analyses of the rat lungs revealed a significant decrease in ciliated cells and increase in hyperplastic goblet cells due to the single series of WTC dust exposures. The study also showed there was only a nominal non-significant decrease (6-11%) in WTC dust burden over a 1-yr period after the final exposure. These results provide support for our current hypothesis that exposure to WTC dusts caused changes in airway morphology/cell composition; such changes could, in turn, have led to potential alterations in the clearance/toxicities of other pollutants inhaled

  8. Impact of acute exposure to WTC dust on ciliated and goblet cells in lungs of rats

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mitchell D.; Vaughan, Joshua M.; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Ghio, Andrew; Zelikoff, Judith; Lung-chi, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies and the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry have revealed increases in the incidence of chronic (non-cancer) lung disorders among first responders (FR) who were at Ground Zero during the initial 72 h after the collapse. Our previous analyses of rats exposed to building-derived WTC dusts using exposure scenarios/levels that mimicked FR mouth-breathing showed that a single WTC dust exposure led to changes in expression of genes whose products could be involved in the lung ailments, but few other significant pathologies. We concluded that rather than acting as direct inducers of many of the FR health effects, it was more likely inhaled WTC dusts instead may have impacted on toxicities induced by other rescue-related co-pollutants present in Ground Zero air. To allow for such effects to occur, we hypothesized that the alkaline WTC dusts induced damage to the normal ability of the lungs to clear inhaled particles. To validate this, rats were exposed on two consecutive days (2 h/d, by intratracheal inhalation) to WTC dust (collected 12–13 September 2001) and examined over a 1-yr period thereafter for changes in the presence of ciliated cells in the airways and hyperplastic goblet cells in the lungs. WTC dust levels in the lungs were assessed in parallel to verify that any changes in levels of these cells corresponded with decreases in host ability to clear the particles themselves. Image analyses of the rat lungs revealed a significant decrease in ciliated cells and increase in hyperplastic goblet cells due to the single series of WTC dust exposures. The study also showed there was only a nominal non-significant decrease (6–11%) in WTC dust burden over a 1-yr period after the final exposure. These results provide support for our current hypothesis that exposure to WTC dusts caused changes in airway morphology/cell composition; such changes could, in turn, have led to potential alterations in the clearance/toxicities of other pollutants inhaled

  9. Silencing of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation through the abrogation of DNA damage checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Nakadate, Yusuke; Kodera, Yasuo; Kitamura, Yuka; Tachibana, Taro; Tamura, Tomohide; Koizumi, Fumiaki

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Radiosensitization by PARG silencing was observed in multiple lung cancer cells. •PAR accumulation was enhanced by PARG silencing after DNA damage. •Radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation were impaired by PARG siRNA. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is a major enzyme that plays a role in the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). PARG deficiency reportedly sensitizes cells to the effects of radiation. In lung cancer, however, it has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether PARG siRNA contributes to an increased radiosensitivity using 8 lung cancer cell lines. Among them, the silencing of PARG induced a radiosensitizing effect in 5 cell lines. Radiation-induced G2/M arrest was largely suppressed by PARG siRNA in PC-14 and A427 cells, which exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity in response to PARG knockdown. On the other hand, a similar effect was not observed in H520 cells, which did not exhibit a radiosensitizing effect. Consistent with a cell cycle analysis, radiation-induced checkpoint signals were not well activated in the PC-14 and A427 cells when treated with PARG siRNA. These results suggest that the increased sensitivity to radiation induced by PARG knockdown occurs through the abrogation of radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation in lung cancer cells. Our findings indicate that PARG could be a potential target for lung cancer treatments when used in combination with radiotherapy.

  10. Partial Ventilatory Support Modalities in Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Sarah M.; Meade, Maureen; Rose, Louise; Burns, Karen; Mehta, Sangeeta; Doyle, Robert; Henzler, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of partial ventilatory support modes that allow spontaneous breathing in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is unclear. The objective of this scoping review was to assess the effects of partial ventilatory support on mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, and both hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) lengths of stay (LOS) for patients with ALI and ARDS; the secondary objective was to describe physiologic effects on hemodynamics, respiratory system and other organ function. Methods MEDLINE (1966–2009), Cochrane, and EmBase (1980–2009) databases were searched using common ventilator modes as keywords and reference lists from retrieved manuscripts hand searched for additional studies. Two researchers independently reviewed and graded the studies using a modified Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine grading system. Studies in adult ALI/ARDS patients were included for primary objectives and pre-clinical studies for supporting evidence. Results Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified, in addition to six prospective cohort studies, one retrospective cohort study, one case control study, 41 clinical physiologic studies and 28 pre-clinical studies. No study was powered to assess mortality, one RCT showed shorter ICU length of stay, and the other demonstrated more ventilator free days. Beneficial effects of preserved spontaneous breathing were mainly physiological effects demonstrated as improvement of gas exchange, hemodynamics and non-pulmonary organ perfusion and function. Conclusions The use of partial ventilatory support modalities is often feasible in patients with ALI/ARDS, and may be associated with short-term physiological benefits without appreciable impact on clinically important outcomes. PMID:22916094

  11. DO ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS REFLECT SEVERITY OF INFLAMMATION IN RAT MODELS OF POLLUTANT-INDUCED LUNG INJURY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title: DO ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS REFLECT THE SEVERITY OF INFLAMMATION IN RAT MODELS OF POLLUTANT-INDUCED LUNG INJURY?

    M. C. Schladweiler, BS 1, P. S. Gilmour, PhD 2, D. L. Andrews, BS 1, D. L. Costa, ScD 1, A. D. Ledbetter, BS 1, K. E. Pinkerton, PhD 3 and U. P. Kodavanti, ...

  12. Always expect the unexpected: lung abscess due to pseudomonas aeruginosa mimicking pulmonary aspergilloma in acute B-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dieks, J-K; von Bueren, A O; Schaefer, I-M; Menke, J; Lex, C; Krause, U; Zenker, D; Kühnle, I; Kramm, C M

    2013-11-01

    We report on a case of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis and consecutive lung abscess in a 13-year-old patient with acute B-cell leukemia. At first, radiographic findings strongly suggested presence of pulmonary aspergilloma and only microbiological testing of the surgically enucleated mass revealed the correct underlying pathogen and confirmed final diagnosis.

  13. [Role of biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure in the immediate postoperative period of lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ruano, L; Sacanell, J; Roman, A; Rello, J

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients are at high risk of suffering many complications during the immediate postoperative period, such as primary graft dysfunction, acute graft rejection or infection. The most common symptom is the presence of acute respiratory failure, and the use of biomarkers could be useful for establishing an early diagnosis of these conditions. Different biomarkers have been studied, but none have proven to be the gold standard in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. This paper offers a review of the different biomarkers that have been studied in this field.

  14. Successful retreatment with osimertinib after osimertinib-induced acute pulmonary embolism in a patient with lung adenocarcinoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shiroyama, Takayuki; Hayama, Manabu; Satoh, Shingo; Nasu, Shingo; Tanaka, Ayako; Morita, Satomu; Morishita, Naoko; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Okamoto, Norio; Hirashima, Tomonori

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) can be life-threatening, and it is challenging to diagnose because of its nonspecific signs and symptoms. PE is also an important potential risk of osimertinib treatment, however, clinical courses regarding retreatment after osimertinib-induced acute pulmonary embolism remain unclear. We described a 77-year-old woman with postoperative recurrent lung adenocarcinoma who developed osimertinib-induced acute PE. She received apixaban and was later successfully retreated with osimertinib. This case suggests that retreatment with osimertinib after osimertinib-induced acute PE may be a treatment option when alternative therapeutic options are limited.

  15. Blocking triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian; Zhou, Yong; Li, Ping; Duan, Jia-Xi; Liu, Yong-Ping; Sun, Guo-Ying; Wan, Li; Dong, Liang; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Guan, Cha-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is associated with high mortality and uncontrolled inflammation plays a critical role in ALI. TREM-1 is an amplifier of inflammatory response, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many infectious diseases. NLRP3 inflammasome is a member of NLRs family that contributes to ALI. However, the effect of TREM-1 on NLRP3 inflammasome and ALI is still unknown. This study aimed to determine the effect of TREM-1 modulation on LPS-induced ALI and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. We showed that LR12, a TREM-1 antagonist peptide, significantly improved survival of mice after lethal doses of LPS. LR12 also attenuated inflammation and lung tissue damage by reducing histopathologic changes, infiltration of the macrophage and neutrophil into the lung, and production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, and oxidative stress. LR12 decreased expression of the NLRP3, pro-caspase-1 and pro-IL-1β, and inhibited priming of the NLRP3 inflammasome by inhibiting NF-κB. LR12 also reduced the expression of NLRP3 and caspase-1 p10 protein, and secretion of the IL-1β, inhibited activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by decreasing ROS. For the first time, these data show that TREM-1 aggravates inflammation in ALI by activating NLRP3 inflammasome, and blocking TREM-1 may be a potential therapeutic approach for ALI. PMID:28004759

  16. Protective effect of magnolol-loaded polyketal microparticles on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsuimin; Kao, Chen-Yu; Chou, Chun-Liang; Liu, Lu-Chun; Chou, Tz-Chong

    2016-08-01

    Magnolol has shown inhibitory effects on NO production and TNF-alpha production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages and LPS-induced acute lung injury; however, the poor solubility of magnolol has hindered its clinical success. In this study, magnolol-loaded microparticles were prepared via single emulsion method from a polyketal polymer, termed PK3. The particle sizes of magnolol-loaded PK3 microparticle is 3.73 ± 0.41 μm, and was suitable for phagocytosis by macrophages and pulmonary drug delivery. PK3 microparticles exhibited excellent biocompatibility both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, intratracheal delivery of these magnolol-loaded microparticles significantly reduced the lung inflammatory responses at low dosage of magnolol (0.5 mg/kg), and have great clinical potential in treating acute lung injury.

  17. Anti-inflammatory and Anti-oxidative Effects of Dexpanthenol on Lipopolysaccharide Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li-Mei, Wan; Jie, Tan; Shan-He, Wan; Dong-Mei, Meng; Peng-Jiu, Yu

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of dexpanthenol in a model of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Lung injury was induced by exposure to atomized LPS. Mice were randomly divided into four groups: control group; Dxp (500 mg/kg) group; LPS group; LPS + Dxp (500 mg/kg) group. The effects of dexpanthenol on LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment, cytokine levels, total protein concentration, myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione (GSH) contents were examined. Additionally, lung tissue was examined by histology to investigate the changes in pathology in the presence and absence of dexpanthenol. In LPS-challenged mice, dexpanthenol significantly improved lung edema. Dexpanthenol also markedly inhibited the LPS-induced neutrophiles influx, protein leakage, and release of TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Furthermore, dexpanthenol attenuated MPO activity and MDA contents and increased SOD and GSH activity in the LPS-challenged lung tissue. These data suggest that dexpanthenol protects mice from LPS-induced acute lung injury by its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities.

  18. Imatinib attenuates inflammation and vascular leak in a clinically relevant two-hit model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Alicia N; Sammani, Saad; Esquinca, Adilene E; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Garcia, Joe G N; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Dudek, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), an illness characterized by life-threatening vascular leak, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Recent preclinical studies and clinical observations have suggested a potential role for the chemotherapeutic agent imatinib in restoring vascular integrity. Our prior work demonstrates differential effects of imatinib in mouse models of ALI, namely attenuation of LPS-induced lung injury but exacerbation of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Because of the critical role of mechanical ventilation in the care of patients with ARDS, in the present study we pursued an assessment of the effectiveness of imatinib in a "two-hit" model of ALI caused by combined LPS and VILI. Imatinib significantly decreased bronchoalveolar lavage protein, total cells, neutrophils, and TNF-α levels in mice exposed to LPS plus VILI, indicating that it attenuates ALI in this clinically relevant model. In subsequent experiments focusing on its protective role in LPS-induced lung injury, imatinib attenuated ALI when given 4 h after LPS, suggesting potential therapeutic effectiveness when given after the onset of injury. Mechanistic studies in mouse lung tissue and human lung endothelial cells revealed that imatinib inhibits LPS-induced NF-κB expression and activation. Overall, these results further characterize the therapeutic potential of imatinib against inflammatory vascular leak.

  19. OXIDATIVE DAMAGE-RELATED GENES AKR1C3 AND OGG1 MODULATE RISKS FOR LUNG CANCER DUE TO EXPOSURE TO PAH-RICH COAL COMBUSTION EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We studied polymorphisms in genes that generate, prevent, or repair oxidative damage and lung cancer risk among 118 cases and 113 controls in Xuan Wei China, where extremely high lung cancer rates are caused by indoor exposure to smoky coal. SOD2-Vak16Ala and NQO1-Pro 187Ser were...

  20. Indoxyl Sulfate as a Mediator Involved in Dysregulation of Pulmonary Aquaporin-5 in Acute Lung Injury Caused by Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yabuuchi, Nozomi; Sagata, Masataka; Saigo, Chika; Yoneda, Go; Yamamoto, Yuko; Nomura, Yui; Nishi, Kazuhiko; Fujino, Rika; Jono, Hirofumi; Saito, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    High mortality of acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with acute lung injury (ALI), which is a typical complication of AKI. Although it is suggested that dysregulation of lung salt and water channels following AKI plays a pivotal role in ALI, the mechanism of its dysregulation has not been elucidated. Here, we examined the involvement of a typical oxidative stress-inducing uremic toxin, indoxyl sulfate (IS), in the dysregulation of the pulmonary predominant water channel, aquaporin 5 (AQP-5), in bilateral nephrectomy (BNx)-induced AKI model rats. BNx evoked AKI with the increases in serum creatinine (SCr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum IS levels and exhibited thickening of interstitial tissue in the lung. Administration of AST-120, clinically-used oral spherical adsorptive carbon beads, resulted in a significant decrease in serum IS level and thickening of interstitial tissue, which was accompanied with the decreases in IS accumulation in various tissues, especially lung. Interestingly, a significant decrease in AQP-5 expression of lung was observed in BNx rats. Moreover, the BNx-induced decrease in pulmonary AQP-5 protein expression was markedly restored by oral administration of AST-120. These results suggest that BNx-induced AKI causes dysregulation of pulmonary AQP-5 expression, in which IS could play a toxico-physiological role as a mediator involved in renopulmonary crosstalk. PMID:28025487

  1. Indoxyl Sulfate as a Mediator Involved in Dysregulation of Pulmonary Aquaporin-5 in Acute Lung Injury Caused by Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, Nozomi; Sagata, Masataka; Saigo, Chika; Yoneda, Go; Yamamoto, Yuko; Nomura, Yui; Nishi, Kazuhiko; Fujino, Rika; Jono, Hirofumi; Saito, Hideyuki

    2016-12-23

    High mortality of acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with acute lung injury (ALI), which is a typical complication of AKI. Although it is suggested that dysregulation of lung salt and water channels following AKI plays a pivotal role in ALI, the mechanism of its dysregulation has not been elucidated. Here, we examined the involvement of a typical oxidative stress-inducing uremic toxin, indoxyl sulfate (IS), in the dysregulation of the pulmonary predominant water channel, aquaporin 5 (AQP-5), in bilateral nephrectomy (BNx)-induced AKI model rats. BNx evoked AKI with the increases in serum creatinine (SCr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum IS levels and exhibited thickening of interstitial tissue in the lung. Administration of AST-120, clinically-used oral spherical adsorptive carbon beads, resulted in a significant decrease in serum IS level and thickening of interstitial tissue, which was accompanied with the decreases in IS accumulation in various tissues, especially lung. Interestingly, a significant decrease in AQP-5 expression of lung was observed in BNx rats. Moreover, the BNx-induced decrease in pulmonary AQP-5 protein expression was markedly restored by oral administration of AST-120. These results suggest that BNx-induced AKI causes dysregulation of pulmonary AQP-5 expression, in which IS could play a toxico-physiological role as a mediator involved in renopulmonary crosstalk.

  2. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Olívia Meira; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Costa, André Nathan; Athanazio, Rodrigo Abensur; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD. PMID:24626274

  3. Mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome: The open lung revisited.

    PubMed

    Amado-Rodríguez, L; Del Busto, C; García-Prieto, E; Albaiceta, G M

    2017-02-23

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is still related to high mortality and morbidity rates. Most patients with ARDS will require ventilatory support. This treatment has a direct impact upon patient outcome and is associated to major side effects. In this regard, ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI) is the main concern when this technique is used. The ultimate mechanisms of VALI and its management are under constant evolution. The present review describes the classical mechanisms of VALI and how they have evolved with recent findings from physiopathological and clinical studies, with the aim of analyzing the clinical implications derived from them. Lastly, a series of knowledge-based recommendations are proposed that can be helpful for the ventilator assisted management of ARDS at the patient bedside.

  4. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): a clinical review with emphasis on the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Benson, Alexander B; Moss, Marc; Silliman, Christopher C

    2009-11-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality world-wide. Although first described in 1983, it took two decades to develop consensus definitions, which remain controversial. The pathogenesis of TRALI is related to the infusion of donor antibodies that recognize leucocyte antigens in the transfused host or the infusion of lipids and other biological response modifiers that accumulate during the storage or processing of blood components. TRALI appears to be the result of at least two sequential events and treatment is supportive. This review demonstrates that critically ill patients are more susceptible to TRALI and require special attention by critical care specialists, haematologists and transfusion medicine experts. Further research is required into TRALI and its pathogenesis so that transfusions are safer and administered appropriately. Avoidance including male-only transfusion practises, the use of leucoreduced components, fresher blood/blood components and solvent detergent plasma are also discussed.

  5. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): A Canadian blood services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Saidenberg, Elianna; Petraszko, Tanya; Semple, Elisabeth; Branch, Donald R

    2010-10-01

    Since the first description of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) more than 2 decades ago, we have only recently begun to learn how this disorder may occur and how to prevent it. Scientists from around the world have made great strides in identifying the possible causes of this condition. Blood banks and transfusion services have risen to the challenges of prevention. Recent introduction of restricting most plasma products to those obtained from male donors only has greatly reduced the incidence of TRALI worldwide. Scientists have recently identified the gene and protein for the human neutrophil antigen-3a associated with most mortality due to TRALI, and this presents an opportunity for a screening assay to prevent future TRALI-associated deaths. Finally, animal models of TRALI have provided insight into the possible mechanisms of this disorder and can be used to explore potential treatment modalities.

  6. [The immunological conflict in the transfusion-related acute lung injury or TRALI].

    PubMed

    Drouet, C; Khoy, K; Masson, D; Bardy, B; Giannoli, C; Dubois, V

    2011-04-01

    Despite its underrated incidence, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pulmonary edema in TRALI occurs in the course of the transfusion of apheresis products or erythrocyte concentrates. Its pathogenesis is attributed to the infusion of donor antibodies that recognize leucocyte antigens in the transfused host, with subsequent sequestration of leucocytes in the pulmonary vessels. It is also associated with the passive transfer of lipids and other biological response modifiers that accumulate during the storage or processing of blood components. The innate immunity and inflammatory kinins are key components. The knowledge of its etiopathogenesis must come into play for improving prevention and diagnosis and for application of adapted care of the patient.

  7. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): current concepts and misconceptions.

    PubMed

    Silliman, Christopher C; Fung, Yoke Lin; Ball, J Bradley; Khan, Samina Y

    2009-11-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the most common cause of serious morbidity and mortality due to hemotherapy. Although the pathogenesis has been related to the infusion of donor antibodies into the recipient, antibody negative TRALI has been reported. Changes in transfusion practices, especially the use of male-only plasma, have decreased the number of antibody-mediated cases and deaths; however, TRALI still occurs. The neutrophil appears to be the effector cell in TRALI and the pathophysiology is centered on neutrophil-mediated endothelial cell cytotoxicity resulting in capillary leak and ALI. This review will detail the pathophysiology of TRALI including recent pre-clinical data, provide insight into newer areas of research, and critically assess current practices to decrease it prevalence and to make transfusion safer.

  8. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury after Cesarean Section in a Patient with HELLP Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Min; Rim, Ch'ang Bum; Kim, So Ri; Shin, Sang Ho; Kang, Min Seok; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Sang Il

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious adverse reaction of transfusion, and presents as hypoxemia and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema within 6 hours of transfusion. A 14-year-old primigravida woman at 34 weeks of gestation presented with upper abdominal pain without dyspnea. Because she showed the syndrome of HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count), an emergency cesarean section delivery was performed, and blood was transfused. In the case of such patients, clinicians should closely observe the patient's condition at least during the 6 hours while the patient receives blood transfusion, and should suspect TRALI if the patient complains of respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea. Furthermore, echocardiography should be performed to distinguish between the different types of transfusion-related adverse reactions. PMID:26885326

  9. Effects of inhaled CO administration on acute lung injury in baboons with pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fredenburgh, Laura E; Kraft, Bryan D; Hess, Dean R; Harris, R Scott; Wolf, Monroe A; Suliman, Hagir B; Roggli, Victor L; Davies, John D; Winkler, Tilo; Stenzler, Alex; Baron, Rebecca M; Thompson, B Taylor; Choi, Augustine M; Welty-Wolf, Karen E; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2015-10-15

    Inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) gas has therapeutic potential for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome if a safe, evidence-based dosing strategy and a ventilator-compatible CO delivery system can be developed. In this study, we used a clinically relevant baboon model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia to 1) test a novel, ventilator-compatible CO delivery system; 2) establish a safe and effective CO dosing regimen; and 3) investigate the local and systemic effects of CO therapy on inflammation and acute lung injury (ALI). Animals were inoculated with S. pneumoniae (10(8)-10(9) CFU) (n = 14) or saline vehicle (n = 5); in a subset with pneumonia (n = 5), we administered low-dose, inhaled CO gas (100-300 ppm × 60-90 min) at 0, 6, 24, and/or 48 h postinoculation and serially measured blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels. We found that CO inhalation at 200 ppm for 60 min is well tolerated and achieves a COHb of 6-8% with ambient CO levels ≤ 1 ppm. The COHb level measured at 20 min predicted the 60-min COHb level by the Coburn-Forster-Kane equation with high accuracy. Animals given inhaled CO + antibiotics displayed significantly less ALI at 8 days postinoculation compared with antibiotics alone. Inhaled CO was associated with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in the lung and with augmentation of renal antioxidative programs. These data support the feasibility of safely delivering inhaled CO gas during mechanical ventilation and provide preliminary evidence that CO may accelerate the resolution of ALI in a clinically relevant nonhuman primate pneumonia model.

  10. Lung volume recruitment acutely increases respiratory system compliance in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Hannan, Liam M.; Dominelli, Paolo B.; Peters, Carli M.; Fougere, Renee J.; McKim, Douglas A.; Sheel, A. William

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether lung volume recruitment (LVR) acutely increases respiratory system compliance (Crs) in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness (RMW). Individuals with RMW resulting from neuromuscular disease or quadriplegia (n=12) and healthy controls (n=12) underwent pulmonary function testing and the measurement of Crs at baseline, immediately after, 1 h after and 2 h after a single standardised session of LVR. The LVR session involved 10 consecutive supramaximal lung inflations with a manual resuscitation bag to the highest tolerable mouth pressure or a maximum of 50 cmH2O. Each LVR inflation was followed by brief breath-hold and a maximal expiration to residual volume. At baseline, individuals with RMW had lower Crs than controls (37±5 cmH2O versus 109±10 mL·cmH2O−1, p<0.001). Immediately after LVR, Crs increased by 39.5±9.8% to 50±7 mL·cmH2O−1 in individuals with RMW (p<0.05), while no significant change occurred in controls (p=0.23). At 1 h and 2 h post-treatment, there were no within-group differences in Crs compared to baseline (all p>0.05). LVR had no significant effect on measures of pulmonary function at any time point in either group (all p>0.05). During inflations, mean arterial pressure decreased significantly relative to baseline by 10.4±2.8 mmHg and 17.3±3.0 mmHg in individuals with RMW and controls, respectively (both p<0.05). LVR acutely increases Crs in individuals with RMW. However, the high airway pressures during inflations cause reductions in mean arterial pressure that should be considered when applying this technique. PMID:28326313

  11. Effects of inhaled CO administration on acute lung injury in baboons with pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Bryan D.; Hess, Dean R.; Harris, R. Scott; Wolf, Monroe A.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Roggli, Victor L.; Davies, John D.; Winkler, Tilo; Stenzler, Alex; Baron, Rebecca M.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Choi, Augustine M.; Welty-Wolf, Karen E.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) gas has therapeutic potential for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome if a safe, evidence-based dosing strategy and a ventilator-compatible CO delivery system can be developed. In this study, we used a clinically relevant baboon model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia to 1) test a novel, ventilator-compatible CO delivery system; 2) establish a safe and effective CO dosing regimen; and 3) investigate the local and systemic effects of CO therapy on inflammation and acute lung injury (ALI). Animals were inoculated with S. pneumoniae (108-109 CFU) (n = 14) or saline vehicle (n = 5); in a subset with pneumonia (n = 5), we administered low-dose, inhaled CO gas (100–300 ppm × 60–90 min) at 0, 6, 24, and/or 48 h postinoculation and serially measured blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels. We found that CO inhalation at 200 ppm for 60 min is well tolerated and achieves a COHb of 6–8% with ambient CO levels ≤ 1 ppm. The COHb level measured at 20 min predicted the 60-min COHb level by the Coburn-Forster-Kane equation with high accuracy. Animals given inhaled CO + antibiotics displayed significantly less ALI at 8 days postinoculation compared with antibiotics alone. Inhaled CO was associated with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in the lung and with augmentation of renal antioxidative programs. These data support the feasibility of safely delivering inhaled CO gas during mechanical ventilation and provide preliminary evidence that CO may accelerate the resolution of ALI in a clinically relevant nonhuman primate pneumonia model. PMID:26320156

  12. β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase gene therapy upregulates tight junctions to rescue lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Barravecchia, M; Kothari, P; Young, J L; Dean, D A

    2016-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are associated with diverse disorders and characterized by disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leakage of edema fluid into the lung, and substantial inflammation leading to acute respiratory failure. Gene therapy is a potentially powerful approach to treat ALI/ARDS through repair of alveolar epithelial function. Herein, we show that delivery of a plasmid expressing β1-subunit of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase) alone or in combination with epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) α1-subunit using electroporation not only protected from subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated lung injury, but also treated injured lungs. However, transfer of α1-subunit of ENaC (α1-ENaC) alone only provided protection benefit rather than treatment benefit although alveolar fluid clearance had been remarkably enhanced. Gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, but not α1-ENaC, not only enhanced expression of tight junction protein zona occludins-1 (ZO-1) and occludin both in cultured cells and in mouse lungs, but also reduced pre-existing increase of lung permeability in vivo. These results demonstrate that gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase upregulates tight junction formation and therefore treats lungs with existing injury, whereas delivery of α1-ENaC only maintains pre-existing tight junction but not for generation. This indicates that the restoration of epithelial/endothelial barrier function may provide better treatment of ALI/ARDS.

  13. Early peritoneal dialysis reduces lung inflammation in mice with ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Chris; Ahuja, Nilesh; Kiekhaefer, Carol M; Andres Hernando, Ana; Okamura, Kayo; Bhargava, Rhea; Duplantis, Jane; Kirkbride-Romeo, Lara A; Huckles, Jill; Fox, Benjamin M; Kahn, Kashfi; Soranno, Danielle; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Teitelbaum, Isaac; Faubel, Sarah

    2017-03-16

    Although dialysis has been used in the care of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) for over 50 years, very little is known about the potential benefits of uremic control on systemic complications of AKI. Since the mortality of AKI requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) is greater than half in the intensive care unit, a better understanding of the potential of RRT to improve outcomes is urgently needed. Therefore, we sought to develop a technically feasible and reproducible model of RRT in a mouse model of AKI. Models of low- and high-dose peritoneal dialysis (PD) were developed and their effect on AKI, systemic inflammation, and lung injury after ischemic AKI was examined. High-dose PD had no effect on AKI, but effectively cleared serum IL-6, and dramatically reduced lung inflammation, while low-dose PD had no effect on any of these three outcomes. Both models of RRT using PD in AKI in mice reliably lowered urea in a dose-dependent fashion. Thus, use of these models of PD in mice with AKI has great potential to unravel the mechanisms by which RRT may improve the systemic complications that have led to increased mortality in AKI. In light of recent data demonstrating reduced serum IL-6 and improved outcomes with prophylactic PD in children, we believe that our results are highly clinically relevant.

  14. L-arginine attenuates acute lung injury after smoke inhalation and burn injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kazunori; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Yu, Yong-Ming; Traber, Lillian D; Cox, Robert A; Hawkins, Hal K; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David; Traber, Daniel L

    2007-10-01

    Thermal injury results in reduced plasma levels of arginine (Arg). With reduced Arg availability, NOS produces superoxide instead of NO. We hypothesized that Arg supplementation after burn and smoke inhalation (B + S) injury would attenuate the acute insult to the lungs and, thus, protect pulmonary function. Seventeen Suffolk ewes (n = 17) were randomly divided into three groups: (1) sham injury group (n = 6), (2) B + S injury plus saline treatment (n = 6), and (3) B + S injury plus L-ARG infusion at 57 mg.kg(-1).h(-1) (n = 5). Burn and smoke inhalation injury was induced by standardized procedures, including a 40% area full thickness flame burn combined with 48 breaths of smoke from burning cottons. All animals were immediately resuscitated by Ringer solution and supported by mechanical ventilation for 48 h, during which various variables of pulmonary function were monitored. The results demonstrated that Arg treatment attenuated the decline of plasma Arg concentration after B + S injury. A higher plasma Arg concentration was associated with a less decline in Pao2/Fio2 ratio and a reduced extent of airway obstruction after B + S injury. Histopathological examinations also indicated a remarkably reduced histopathological scores associated with B + S injury. Nitrotyrosine stain in lung tissue was positive after B + S injury, but was significantly reduced in the group with Arg. Therefore, L-Arg supplementation improved gas exchange and pulmonary function in ovine after B + S injury via its, at least in part, effect on reduction of oxidative stress through the peroxynitrite pathway.

  15. Lethal acute lung injury and hypoglycemia after subcutaneous administration of monochloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Kato, Junko; Dote, Tomotaro; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Shimbo, Yukari; Fujihara, Michiko; Kono, Koichi

    2006-06-01

    Hypoglycemia is suspected in the acute lethal toxicity induced by cutaneous exposure to monochloroacetic acid (MCA). Although it has been shown that hepato-renal dysfunction is involved, the mechanism and the target organs that directly affect mortality remain to be determined. We suspected respiratory failure as a main cause of death in some reported cases. We investigated dose-response effects, hypoglycemia, and lung injury in rats exposed to MCA. Serum glucose, blood gases, and parameters of alveolar injury in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analysed 2 and 4 h after subcutaneous administration of MCA (108, 135 or 163 mg/kg). Apparent pulmonary injury and hypoglycemia were not identified 2 h after administration, but lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and total cells in BALF were dose-dependently increased; and severe hypoglycemia was identified 4 h after administration. Blood gas analysis showed remarkable alveolar gas dysfunction as exchange in the 163 mg/kg group. Thus, hypoglycemia and lung injury appear to cause death in response to MCA exposure.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinases and protein tyrosine kinases: potential novel targets in acute lung injury and ARDS.

    PubMed

    Aschner, Yael; Zemans, Rachel L; Yamashita, Cory M; Downey, Gregory P

    2014-10-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS fall within a spectrum of pulmonary disease that is characterized by hypoxemia, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, and dysregulated and excessive inflammation. While mortality rates have improved with the advent of specialized ICUs and lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies, few other therapies have proven effective in the management of ARDS, which remains a significant clinical problem. Further development of biomarkers of disease severity, response to therapy, and prognosis is urgently needed. Several novel pathways have been identified and studied with respect to the pathogenesis of ALI and ARDS that show promise in bridging some of these gaps. This review will focus on the roles of matrix metalloproteinases and protein tyrosine kinases in the pathobiology of ALI in humans, and in animal models and in vitro studies. These molecules can act independently, as well as coordinately, in a feed-forward manner via activation of tyrosine kinase-regulated pathways that are pivotal in the development of ARDS. Specific signaling events involving proteolytic processing by matrix metalloproteinases that contribute to ALI, including cytokine and chemokine activation and release, neutrophil recruitment, transmigration and activation, and disruption of the intact alveolar-capillary barrier, will be explored in the context of these novel molecular pathways.

  17. Dexmedetomidine attenuates acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mouse through inhibition of MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingzhen; Zhang, Ruyi; Li, Chunli; Yin, Xue; Lv, Changjun; Wang, Yaoqi; Zhao, Wenxiang; Zhang, Xiuli

    2015-10-01

    Dexmedetomidine (Dex) is widely used for sedation in intensive care units and can be used as an adjunct to anesthetics. Previous studies have demonstrated that Dex has anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we aim to explore the potential therapeutic effects and mechanisms of Dex on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. To induce ALI, mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS, while Dex was treated 1 h before LPS injection. The inflammation of lung tissues was evaluated by HE stain, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained after 6 h to measure protein concentrations. We also used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect the secretion levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the serum. Western blotting method was adopted to observe changes in mitogen-activated protein kinases and downstream nuclear transcription factors. The results showed that pretreatment with Dex considerably reduced neutrophil infiltration and pulmonary edema, and significantly reduced protein concentrations in the BALF, as well as suppressed LPS-induced elevation of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) in the serum. In addition, we observed that the molecular mechanism of Dex-mediated anti-inflammation is associated with decreasing phosphorylation of MKK4, MMK3/6, ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and JNK, and diminishing activation of Elk-1, c-Jun, and ATF-2. Dex could attenuate ALI induced by LPS in mice, and this effect may be mediated through the inhibition of MAPK pathway.

  18. Bufexamac ameliorates LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice by targeting LTA4H

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qiang; Dong, Ningning; Yao, Xue; Wu, Dang; Lu, Yanli; Mao, Fei; Zhu, Jin; Li, Jian; Huang, Jin; Chen, Aifang; Huang, Lu; Wang, Xuehai; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan; Xu, Yong; Lu, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in the occurrence and development of acute lung injury (ALI). Leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a hydrolysis product of epoxide leukotriene A4 (LTA4) catalyzed by LTA4 hydrolase (LTA4H), is one of the most potent chemoattractants for neutrophil. Bufexamac is a drug widely used as an anti-inflammatory agent on the skin, however, the mechanism of action is still not fully understood. In this study, we found bufexamac was capable of specifically inhibiting LTA4H enzymatic activity and revealed the mode of interaction of bufexamac and LTA4H using X-ray crystallography. Moreover, bufexamac significantly prevented the production of LTB4 in neutrophil and inhibited the fMLP-induced neutrophil migration through inhibition of LTA4H. Finally, bufexamac significantly attenuated lung inflammation as reflected by reduced LTB4 levels and weakened neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from a lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI mouse model. In summary, our study indicates that bufexamac acts as an inhibitor of LTB4 biosynthesis and may have potential clinical applications for the treatment of ALI. PMID:27126280

  19. Mast cells modulate acute ozone-induced inflammation of the murine lung

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeberger, S.R.; Seiden, J.E.; Levitt, R.C.; Zhang, L.Y. )

    1993-11-01

    We hypothesized that mast cells modulate lung inflammation that develops after acute ozone (O3) exposure. Two tests were done: (1) genetically mast-cell-deficient (WBB6F1-W/Wv, WCB6F1-SI/SId) and bone-marrow-transplanted W/Wv mice were exposed to O3 or filtered air, and the inflammatory responses were compared with those of mast-cell-sufficient congenic mice (WBB6F1-(+)/+, WCB6F1-(+)/+); (2) genetically O3-susceptible C57BL/6J mice were treated pharmacologically with putative mast-cell modulators or vehicle, and the O3-induced inflammatory responses were compared. Mice were exposed to 1.75 ppm O3 or air for 3 h, and lung inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 6 and 24 h after exposure. Relative to O3-exposed W/Wv and SI/SId mice, the mean numbers of lavageable polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and total BAL protein concentration (a marker of permeability) were significantly greater in the respective O3-exposed normal congenic +/+ mice (p < 0.05). Mast cells were reconstituted in W/Wv mice by transplantation of bone marrow cells from congenic +/+ mice, and O3-induced lung inflammation was assessed in the mast-cell-replete W/Wv mice. After O3 exposure, the changes in lavageable PMNs and total protein of mast-cell-replete W/Wv mice were not different from age-matched normal +/+ control mice, and they were significantly greater than those of sham-transplanted W/Wv mice (p < 0.05). Genetically susceptible C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with a mast-cell stabilizer (nedocromil sodium), secretagogue (compound 48/80), or vehicle, and the mice were exposed to O3.

  20. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  1. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) for Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Paolone, Summer

    2016-11-10

    Despite advances in mechanical ventilation, severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates ranging from 26% to 58%. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a modified cardiopulmonary bypass circuit that serves as an artificial membrane lung and blood pump to provide gas exchange and systemic perfusion for patients when their own heart and lungs are unable to function adequately. ECMO is a complex network that provides oxygenation and ventilation and allows the lungs to rest and recover from respiratory failure while minimizing iatrogenic ventilator-induced lung injury. In critical care settings, ECMO is proven to improve survival rates and outcomes in patients with severe ARDS. This review defines severe ARDS; describes the ECMO circuit; and discusses recent research, optimal use of the ECMO circuit, limitations of therapy including potential complications, economic impact, and logistical factors; and discusses future research considerations.

  2. Mycobacterium terrae isolated from indoor air of a moisture-damaged building induces sustained biphasic inflammatory response in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Juha; Komulainen, Hannu; Huttunen, Kati; Roponen, Marjut; Iivanainen, Eila; Torkko, Pirjo; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Pelkonen, Jukka; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2002-11-01

    Occupants in moisture-damaged buildings suffer frequently from respiratory symptoms. This may be partly due to the presence of abnormal microbial growth or the altered microbial flora in the damaged buildings. However, the specific effects of the microbes on respiratory health and the way they provoke clinical manifestations are poorly understood. In the present study, we exposed mice via intratracheal instillation to a single dose of Mycobacterium terrae isolated from the indoor air of a moisture-damaged building (1 X 10(7), 5 X 10(7), or 1 X 10(8) microbes). Inflammation and toxicity in lungs were evaluated 2 hr later. The time course of the effects was assessed with the dose of 1 X 10(8) bacterial cells for up to 28 days. M. terrae caused a sustained biphasic inflammation in mouse lungs. The characteristic features for the first phase, which lasted from 6 hr to 3 days, were elevated proinflammatory cytokine [i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)] levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). TNF-alpha was produced in the lungs more intensively than was IL-6. Neutrophils were the most abundant cells in the airways during the first phase, although their numbers in BALF remained elevated up to 21 days. The characteristics of the second phase, which lasted from 7 to 28 days, were elevated TNF-alpha levels in BALF, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in BAL cells, and recruitment of mononuclear cells such as lymphocytes and macrophages into the airways. Moreover, total protein, albumin, and lactate dehydrogenase concentrations were elevated in both phases in BALF. The bacteria were detected in lungs up to 28 days. In summary, these observations indicate that M. terrae is capable of provoking a sustained, biphasic inflammation in mouse lungs and can cause a moderate degree of cytotoxicity. Thus, M. terrae can be considered a species with potential to adversely affect the health of the occupants of moisture-damaged

  3. Early-Age-Related Changes in Proteostasis Augment Immunopathogenesis of Sepsis and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bodas, Manish; Min, Taehong; Vij, Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Background The decline of proteasomal activity is known to be associated with the age-related disorders but the early events involved in this process are not apparent. To address this, we investigated the early-age-related (pediatric vs. adult) mechanisms that augment immunopathogenesis of sepsis and acute lung injury. Methodology/Principal Findings The 3-weeks (pediatric) and 6-months (adult) old C57BL/6 mice were selected as the study groups. Mice were subjected to 1×20 cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) mediated sepsis or intratracheal Psuedomonas aeruginosa (Pa)-LPS induced acute lung injury (ALI).We observed a significant increase in basal levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-6 and neutrophil activity marker, myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the adult mice compared to the pediatric indicating the age-related constitutive increase in inflammatory response. Next, we found that age-related decrease in PSMB6 (proteasomal subunit) expression in adult mice results in accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins that triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR). We identified that Pa-LPS induced activation of UPR modifier, p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein) in the adult mice lungs correlates with increase in Pa-LPS induced NFκB levels. Moreover, we observed a constitutive increase in p-eIF2α indicating a protective ER stress response to accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins. We used MG-132 treatment of HBE cells as an in vitro model to standardize the efficacy of salubrinal (inhibitor of eIF2α de-phosphorylation) in controlling the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the NFκB levels. Finally, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of salubrinal to correct proteostasis-imbalance in the adult mice based on its ability to control CLP induced IL-6 secretion or recruitment of pro-inflammatory cells. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate the critical role of early-age-related proteostasis-imbalance as a novel mechanism that augments the NFκB mediated

  4. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Donelan, Kent J; Anderson, Keith A

    2011-03-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), a previously ill-defined transfusion reaction, has emerged as the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A 3-year-old male with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) developed TRALI after receiving three units of platelets and a partial unit of packed red cells. He recovered after 24 hours in the pediatric intensive care unit. Laboratory investigation revealed that two of the four blood donors, from which the platelets and packed red cells had derived, had positive human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibody screens. Further testing of these two donors revealed that one had a specific HLA antibody matching an antigen of the patient. This donor was implicated in the TRALI reaction. TRALI is often mistaken for other transfusion reactions, most notably pulmonary edema caused by circulatory overload or congestive heart failure. It is difficult to gauge which transfusion recipients are at risk for TRALI. Good judgment and transfusion practices when ordering blood products and recognition of the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of TRALI is critical.

  5. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE) particles, such as oxygen (16O), carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n) irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB) cells, and bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the hematopoietic

  6. Implementation and results of a new ECMO program for lung transplantation and acute respiratory distress

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Eduardo San; Venuti, María Sofía; Ciarrocchi, Nicolás Marcelo; Ceballos, Ignacio Fernández; Gogniat, Emiliano; Villarroel, Sonia; Carini, Federico Carlos; Giannasi, Sergio Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective The development of the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in Latin America represents a challenge in this specialty field. The objective of this article was to describe the results of a new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation program in an intensive care unit. Methods This retrospective cohort study included 22 patients who required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and were treated from January 2011 to June 2014. The baseline characteristics, indications, duration of the condition, days on mechanical ventilation, days in the intensive care unit, complications, and hospital mortality were evaluated. Results Fifteen patients required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation after lung transplantation, and seven patients required oxygenation due to acute respiratory distress. All transplanted patients were weaned from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with a median duration of 3 days (Interquartile range - IQR: 2 - 5), were on mechanical ventilation for a median of 15.5 days (IQR: 3 - 25), and had an intensive care unit stay of 31.5 days (IQR: 19 - 53) and a median hospital stay of 60 days (IQR: 36 - 89) with 20% mortality. Patients with acute respiratory distress had a median oxygenation membrane duration of 9 days (IQR: 3 - 14), median mechanical ventilation time of 25 days (IQR: 13 - 37), a 31 day stay in therapy (IQR: 11 - 38), a 32 day stay in the hospital (IQR: 11 - 41), and 57% mortality. The main complications were infections (80%), acute kidney failure (43%), bleeding at the surgical site and at the site of cannula placement (22%), plateletopenia (60%), and coagulopathy (30%). Conclusion In spite of the steep learning curve, we considered this experience to be satisfactory, with results and complications comparable to those reported in the literature. PMID:26340153

  7. Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 (FGF-10) Mobilizes Lung-resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Protects Against Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lin; Zhou, Jian; Rong, Linyi; Seeley, Eric J; Pan, Jue; Zhu, Xiaodan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Qin; Tang, Xinjun; Qu, Jieming; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-02-12

    FGF-10 can prevent or reduce lung specific inflammation due to traumatic or infectious lung injury. However, the exact mechanisms are poorly characterized. Additionally, the effect of FGF-10 on lung-resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) has not been studied. To better characterize the effect of FGF-10 on LR-MSCs, FGF-10 was intratracheally delivered into the lungs of rats. Three days after instillation, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and plastic-adherent cells were cultured, characterized and then delivered therapeutically to rats after LPS intratracheal instillation. Immunophenotyping analysis of FGF-10 mobilized and cultured cells revealed expression of the MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the absence of the hematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Delivery of LR-MSCs into the lungs after LPS injury reduced the inflammatory response as evidenced by decreased wet-to-dry ratio, reduced neutrophil and leukocyte recruitment and decreased inflammatory cytokines compared to control rats. Lastly, direct delivery of FGF-10 in the lungs of rats led to an increase of LR-MSCs in the treated lungs, suggesting that the protective effect of FGF-10 might be mediated, in part, by the mobilization of LR-MSCs in lungs.

  8. Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 (FGF-10) Mobilizes Lung-resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Protects Against Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Lin; Zhou, Jian; Rong, Linyi; Seeley, Eric J.; Pan, Jue; Zhu, Xiaodan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Qin; Tang, Xinjun; Qu, Jieming; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    FGF-10 can prevent or reduce lung specific inflammation due to traumatic or infectious lung injury. However, the exact mechanisms are poorly characterized. Additionally, the effect of FGF-10 on lung-resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) has not been studied. To better characterize the effect of FGF-10 on LR-MSCs, FGF-10 was intratracheally delivered into the lungs of rats. Three days after instillation, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and plastic-adherent cells were cultured, characterized and then delivered therapeutically to rats after LPS intratracheal instillation. Immunophenotyping analysis of FGF-10 mobilized and cultured cells revealed expression of the MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the absence of the hematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Delivery of LR-MSCs into the lungs after LPS injury reduced the inflammatory response as evidenced by decreased wet-to-dry ratio, reduced neutrophil and leukocyte recruitment and decreased inflammatory cytokines compared to control rats. Lastly, direct delivery of FGF-10 in the lungs of rats led to an increase of LR-MSCs in the treated lungs, suggesting that the protective effect of FGF-10 might be mediated, in part, by the mobilization of LR-MSCs in lungs. PMID:26869337

  9. Ultrastructure damage of oviduct telocytes in rat model of acute salpingitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Chi, Chi; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Gang; Shen, Zong-Ji; Yang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Acute salpingitis (AS) is an inflammatory disease which causes severe damage to a subset of classically described cells lining in oviduct wall and contributes to interstitial fibrosis and fertility problems. Telocytes (TCs), a newly discovered peculiar type of stromal cells, have been identified in many organs, including oviduct, with proposed multiple potential bio-functions. However, with recent increasing reports regarding TCs alterations in disease-affected tissues, there is still lack of evidence about TCs involvement in AS-affected oviduct tissues and potential pathophysiological roles. We presently identified normal TCs by their characteristic ultrastructural features and immunophenotype. However, in AS-affected oviduct tissues, TCs displayed multiple ultrastructural damage both in cellular body and prolongations, with obvious loss of TCs and development of tissue fibrosis. Furthermore, TCs lose their interstitial 3-D network connected by homocellular or heterocellular junctions between TCs and adjacent cells. And especially, TCs connected to the activated immunocytes (mononuclear cells, eosinophils) and affected local immune state (repression or activation). Meanwhile, massive neutrophils infiltration and overproduced Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS), COX-2, suggested mechanism of inflammatory-induced TCs damage. Consequently, TCs damage might contribute to AS-induced structural and reproductive functional abnormalities of oviduct, probably via: (i) substances, energy and functional insufficiency, presumably, e.g. TC-specific genetic material profiles, ion channels, cytoskeletal elements, Tps dynamics, etc., (ii) impaired TCs-mediated multicellular signalling, such as homeostasis/angiogenesis, tissue repair/regeneration, neurotransmission, (iii) derangement of 3-D network and impaired mechanical support for TCs-mediated multicellular signals within the stromal compartment, consequently induced interstitial fibrosis, (iv) involvement in local

  10. A coin-like peripheral small cell lung carcinoma associated with acute paraneoplastic axonal Guillain-Barre-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ioan; Gurzu, Simona; Balasa, Rodica; Motataianu, Anca; Contac, Anca Otilia; Halmaciu, Ioana; Popescu, Septimiu; Simu, Iunius

    2015-06-01

    A 65-year-old previously healthy male heavy smoker was hospitalized with a 2-week history of progressive muscle weakness in the lower and upper extremities. After 10 days of hospitalization, urinary sphincter incompetence and fecal incontinence were added and tetraparesis was established. The computer-tomography scan examination revealed a massive right hydrothorax and multifocal solid acinar structures with peripheral localization in the left lung, which suggested pulmonary cancer. Bone marrow metastases were also suspected. Based on the examination results, the final diagnosis was acute paraneoplastic axonal Guillain-Barre-like syndrome. The patient died 3 weeks after hospitalization. At autopsy, bronchopneumonia and a right hydrothorax were confirmed. Several 4 to 5-mm-sized round peripherally located white nodules were identified in the left lung, without any central tumor mass. Under microscope, a coin-shaped peripheral/subpleural small cell carcinoma was diagnosed, with generalized bone metastases. A huge thrombus in the abdominal aorta and acute pancreatitis was also seen at autopsy. This case highlights the difficulty of diagnosis of lung carcinomas and the necessity of a complex differential diagnosis of severe progressive ascending neuropathies. This is the 6th reported case of small cell lung cancer-associated acute Guillain-Barre-like syndrome and the first report about an association with a coin-like peripheral pattern.

  11. Oxidative lipidomics of hyperoxic acute lung injury: mass spectrometric characterization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kaynar, A. Murat; Kapralova, Valentyna I.; Wasserloos, Karla; Li, Jin; Mosher, Mackenzie; Wright, Lindsay; Wipf, Peter; Watkins, Simon; Pitt, Bruce R.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been shown to play a significant role in hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury, in part, by inducing apoptosis of pulmonary endothelium. However, the signaling roles of phospholipid oxidation products in pulmonary endothelial apoptosis have not been studied. Using an oxidative lipidomics approach, we identified individual molecular species of phospholipids involved in the apoptosis-associated peroxidation process in a hyperoxic lung. C57BL/6 mice were killed 72 h after exposure to hyperoxia (100% oxygen). We found that hyperoxia-induced apoptosis (documented by activation of caspase-3 and -7 and histochemical terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-mediated nick-end labeling staining of pulmonary endothelium) was accompanied by nonrandom oxidation of pulmonary lipids. Two anionic phospholipids, mitochondria-specific cardiolipin (CL) and extramitochondrial phosphatidylserine (PS), were the two major oxidized phospholipids in hyperoxic lung. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, we identified several oxygenation products in CL and PS. Quantitative assessments revealed a significant decrease of CL and PS molecular species containing C18:2, C20:4, C22:5, and C22:6 fatty acids. Similarly, exposure of mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (MLEC) to hyperoxia (95% oxygen; 72 h) resulted in activation of caspase-3 and -7 and significantly decreased the content of CL molecular species containing C18:2 and C20:4 as well as PS molecular species containing C22:5 and C22:6. Oxygenated molecular species were found in the same two anionic phospholipids, CL and PS, in MLEC exposed to hyperoxia. Treatment of MLEC with a mitochondria-targeted radical scavenger, a conjugate of hemi-gramicidin S with nitroxide, XJB-5-131, resulted in significantly lower oxidation of both CL and PS and a decrease in hyperoxia-induced changes in caspase-3 and -7 activation. We speculate that cytochrome c driven oxidation of CL and PS is associated with the signaling

  12. Acute O 3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment.

    PubMed

    Darbah, Joseph N T; Jones, Wendy S; Burton, Andrew J; Nagy, John; Kubiske, Mark E

    2011-09-01

    We studied the effect of high ozone (O(3)) concentration (110-490 nmol mol(-1)) on regenerating aspen (Populus tremuloides) and maple (Acer saccharum) trees at an open-air O(3) pollution experiment near Rhinelander WI USA. This study is the first of its kind to examine the effects of acute O(3) exposure on aspen and maple sprouts after the parent trees, which were grown under elevated O(3) and/or CO(2) for 12 years, were harvested. Acute O(3) damage was not uniform within the crowns of aspen suckers; it was most severe in the mature, fully expanded photosynthesizing leaves. Young expanding leaves showed no visible signs of acute O(3) damage contrary to expectations. Stomatal conductance played a primary role in the severity of acute O(3) damage as it directly controlled O(3) uptake. Maple sprouts, which had lower stomatal conductance, smaller stomatal aperture, higher stomatal density and larger leaf surface area, were tolerant of acute O(3) exposure. Moreover, elevated CO(2) did not ameliorate the adverse effects of acute O(3) dose on aspen and maple sprouts, in contrast to its ability to counteract the effects of long-term chronic exposure to lower O(3) levels.

  13. Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Darbah, J.N.; Nagy, J.; Jones, W. S.; Burton, A. J.; Kubiske, M. E.

    2011-10-01

    We studied the effect of high ozone (O{sub 3}) concentration (110-490 nmol mol{sup -1}) on regenerating aspen (Populus tremuloides) and maple (Acer saccharum) trees at an open-air O{sub 3} pollution experiment near Rhinelander WI USA. This study is the first of its kind to examine the effects of acute O{sub 3} exposure on aspen and maple sprouts after the parent trees, which were grown under elevated O{sub 3} and/or CO{sub 2} for 12 years, were harvested. Acute O{sub 3} damage was not uniform within the crowns of aspen suckers; it was most severe in the mature, fully expanded photosynthesizing leaves. Young expanding leaves showed no visible signs of acute O{sub 3} damage contrary to expectations. Stomatal conductance played a primary role in the severity of acute O{sub 3} damage as it directly controlled O{sub 3} uptake. Maple sprouts, which had lower stomatal conductance, smaller stomatal aperture, higher stomatal density and larger leaf surface area, were tolerant of acute O{sub 3} exposure. Moreover, elevated CO{sub 2} did not ameliorate the adverse effects of acute O{sub 3} dose on aspen and maple sprouts, in contrast to its ability to counteract the effects of long-term chronic exposure to lower O{sub 3} levels.

  14. Fisetin Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury via TLR4-Mediated NF-κB Signaling Pathway in Rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guang; Jiang, Ze-yu; Sun, Bo; Fu, Jie; Li, Tian-zuo

    2016-02-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), a common component of systemic inflammatory disease, is a life-threatening condition without many effective treatments. Fisetin, a natural flavonoid from fruits and vegetables, was reported to have wide pharmacological properties such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. The aim of this study was to detect the effects of fisetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury and investigate the potential mechanism. Fisetin was injected (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg, i.v.) 30 min before LPS administration (5 mg/kg, i.v.). Our results showed that fisetin effectively reduced the inflammatory cytokine release and total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF), decreased the lung wet/dry ratios, and obviously improved the pulmonary histology in LPS-induced ALI. Furthermore, fisetin inhibited LPS-induced increases of neutrophils and macrophage infiltration and attenuated MPO activity in lung tissues. Additionally, fisetin could significantly inhibit the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and the activation of NF-κB in lung tissues. Our data indicates that fisetin has a protective effect against LPS-induced ALI via suppression of TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways, and fisetin may be a promising candidate for LPS-induced ALI treatment.

  15. Changes in the biophysical properties and ultrastructure of lungs, and intrapulmonary fibrin deposition in experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, A R; Davies, G C; Millar, A M; Taylor, T V

    1983-01-01

    Using an experimental model of acute pancreatitis in the rat, we have studied changes in the biophysical properties of lungs and intrapulmonary fibrin deposition in this condition. Acute pancreatitis is associated with a significant decrease in pulmonary compliance (p less than 0.01) and a significant increase in lung weight (p less than 0.01) compared with a control sham operation group. These changes are associated with a 24% increase in intrapulmonary 125I fibrinogen deposition (p less than 0.01), and an 18% increase in 125I fibrinogen deposition per gram of lung tissue (p less than 0.05) in acute pancreatitis, compared with a control sham operation group. The increased fibrinogen deposition is abolished by treatment with low dose heparin. Using the same animal model changes in pulmonary ultrastructure are shown using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that pulmonary abnormalities are associated with intrapulmonary fibrin deposition in experimental acute pancreatitis and these findings may be relevant to the well described respiratory complications of the condition in man. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 PMID:6618271

  16. Acute MUS81 depletion leads to replication fork slowing and a constitutive DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Meichun; Wang, Xiaohui; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Shen, Huahao; Helleday, Thomas; Hickson, Ian D.; Ying, Songmin

    2015-01-01

    The MUS81 protein belongs to a conserved family of DNA structure-specific nucleases that play important roles in DNA replication and repair. Inactivation of the Mus81 gene in mice has no major deleterious consequences for embryonic development, although cancer susceptibility has been reported. We have investigated the role of MUS81 in human cells by acutely depleting the protein using shRNAs. We found that MUS81 depletion from human fibroblasts leads to accumulation of ssDNA and a constitutive DNA damage response that ultimately activates cellular senescence. Moreover, we show that MUS81 is required for efficient replication fork progression during an unperturbed S-phase, and for recovery of productive replication following replication stalling. These results demonstrate essential roles for the MUS81 nuclease in maintenance of replication fork integrity. PMID:26415217

  17. Methanol exposure does not produce oxidatively damaged DNA in lung, liver or kidney of adult mice, rabbits or primates

    SciTech Connect

    McCallum, Gordon P.; Siu, Michelle; Sweeting, J. Nicole; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-01-15

    In vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests indicate methanol (MeOH) is not mutagenic, but carcinogenic potential has been claimed in one controversial long-term rodent cancer bioassay that has not been replicated. To determine whether MeOH could indirectly damage DNA via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanisms, we treated male CD-1 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys with MeOH (2.0 g/kg ip) and 6 h later assessed oxidative damage to DNA, measured as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) by HPLC with electrochemical detection. We found no MeOH-dependent increases in 8-oxodG in lung, liver or kidney of any species. Chronic treatment of CD-1 mice with MeOH (2.0 g/kg ip) daily for 15 days also did not increase 8-oxodG levels in these organs. These results were corroborated in DNA repair-deficient oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) knockout (KO) mice, which accumulated 8-oxodG in lung, kidney and liver with age, but exhibited no increase following MeOH, despite a 2-fold increase in renal 8-oxodG in Ogg1 KO mice following treatment with a ROS-initiating positive control, the renal carcinogen potassium bromate (KBrO{sub 3}; 100 mg/kg ip). These observations suggest that MeOH exposure does not promote the accumulation of oxidatively damaged DNA in lung, kidney or liver, and that environmental exposure to MeOH is unlikely to initiate carcinogenesis in these organs by DNA oxidation.

  18. Correlation among lung damage after radiation, amount of lipid peroxides, and antioxidant enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    Nozue, M.; Ogata, T.

    1989-04-01

    The correlation between lipid peroxidation and morphologic changes was examined in Sprague-Dawley rat lungs after 30 Gy single thoracic radiation. The rats were sacrificed every week until the end of the fifth week after radiation. The left lungs were used for the measurement of lipid peroxides and antioxidant enzymes activities. The right lungs were examined by light and electron microscopy. Amounts of lung lipid peroxides were within normal limits, and no cellular degenerative changes were observed in the lungs except for subendothelial and interstitial edema 2 weeks after radiation. Lipid peroxides drastically increased and marked degenerative cellular changes such as edematous swelling, vacuolation, and destruction of cell membranes occurred in the alveolar septa following the third week after radiation. The activities of catalase were significantly higher during the period from the second to the fifth week and those of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase increased at the end of the fifth week. Our results demonstrated that the acceleration of lipid peroxidation was well correlated with the morphologic expression of cell injury in the irradiated lungs.

  19. Acute DNA damage activates the tumour suppressor p53 to promote radiation-induced lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Castle, Katherine D.; Moding, Everett J.; Blum, Jordan M.; Williams, Nerissa; Luo, Lixia; Ma, Yan; Borst, Luke B.; Kim, Yongbaek; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic cancer therapies, such as chemoradiation, cause haematological toxicity primarily by activating the tumour suppressor p53. While inhibiting p53-mediated cell death during cancer therapy ameliorates haematologic toxicity, whether it also impacts carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here we utilize a mouse model of inducible p53 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to show that temporarily blocking p53 during total-body irradiation (TBI) not only ameliorates acute toxicity, but also improves long-term survival by preventing lymphoma development. Using KrasLA1 mice, we show that TBI promotes the expansion of a rare population of thymocytes that express oncogenic KrasG12D. However, blocking p53 during TBI significantly suppresses the expansion of KrasG12D-expressing thymocytes. Mechanistically, bone marrow transplant experiments demonstrate that TBI activates p53 to decrease the ability of bone marrow cells to suppress lymphoma development through a non-cell-autonomous mechanism. Together, our results demonstrate that the p53 response to acute DNA damage promotes the development of radiation-induced lymphoma. PMID:26399548

  20. First case of atypical takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a bilateral lung-transplanted patient due to acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Ghadri, Jelena R; Bataisou, Roxana D; Diekmann, Johanna; Lüscher, Thomas F; Templin, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy which is characterised by a transient left ventricular wall motion abnormality was first described in 1990. The disease is still not well known, and as such it is suggested that an emotional trigger is mandatory in this disease. We present the case of a 51-year old female patient seven years after bilateral lung transplantation, who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome and subsequently suffered from atypical takotsubo cardiomyopathy with transient severe reduction of ejection fraction and haemodynamic instability needing acute intensive care treatment. Acute respiratory failure has emerged as an important physical trigger factor in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Little is known about the association of hypoxia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy which can elicit a life-threatening condition requiring acute intensive care. Therefore, experimental studies are needed to investigate the role of hypoxia in takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  1. Maltol, a Food Flavoring Agent, Attenuates Acute Alcohol-Induced Oxidative Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Xu, Qi; Hu, Jiang-ning; Han, Xin-yue; Li, Wei; Zhao, Li-chun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of maltol, a food-flavoring agent, on alcohol-induced acute oxidative damage in mice. Maltol used in this study was isolated from red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A Meyer) and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. For hepatoprotective activity in vivo, pretreatment with maltol (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg; 15 days) drastically prevented the elevated activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and triglyceride (TG) in serum and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in liver tissue (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, the levels of hepatic antioxidant, such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were elevated by maltol pretreatment, compared to the alcohol group (p < 0.05). Histopathological examination revealed that maltol pretreatment significantly inhibited alcohol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and fatty degeneration. Interestingly, pretreatment of maltol effectively relieved alcohol-induced oxidative damage in a dose-dependent manner. Maltol appeared to possess promising anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacities. It was suggested that the hepatoprotective effect exhibited by maltol on alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury may be due to its potent antioxidant properties. PMID:25608939

  2. Ca2+ toxicity and mitochondrial damage in acute pancreatitis: translational overview

    PubMed Central

    Maléth, József; Hegyi, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a leading cause of hospitalization among non-malignant gastrointestinal disorders. The mortality of severe AP can reach 30–50%, which is most probably owing to the lack of specific treatment. Therefore, AP is a major healthcare problem, which urges researchers to identify novel drug targets. Studies from the last decades highlighted that the toxic cellular Ca2+ overload and mitochondrial damage are key pathogenic steps in the disease development affecting both acinar and ductal cell functions. Moreover, recent observations showed that modifying the cellular Ca2+ signalling might be beneficial in AP. The inhibition of Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum or the activity of plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels decreased the severity of AP in experimental models. Similarly, inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening also seems to improve the outcome of AP in in vivo animal models. At the moment MPTP blockers are under detailed clinical investigation to test whether interventions in MPTP openings and/or Ca2+ homeostasis of the cells can be specific targets in prevention or treatment of cell damage in AP. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377719

  3. Functional Genomic Assessment of Phosgene-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Concel, Vincent J.; Bein, Kiflai; Liu, Pengyuan; Berndt, Annerose; Martin, Timothy M.; Ganguly, Koustav; Jang, An Soo; Brant, Kelly A.; Dopico, Richard A.; Upadhyay, Swapna; Cario, Clinton; Di, Y. P. Peter; Vuga, Louis J.; Kostem, Emrah; Eskin, Eleazar; You, Ming; Kaminski, Naftali; Prows, Daniel R.; Knoell, Daren L.; Fabisiak, James P.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a genetically diverse panel of 43 mouse strains was exposed to phosgene and genome-wide association mapping performed using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assembly. Transcriptomic analysis was also used to improve the genetic resolution in the identification of genetic determinants of phosgene-induced acute lung injury (ALI). We prioritized the identified genes based on whether the encoded protein was previously associated with lung injury or contained a nonsynonymous SNP within a functional domain. Candidates were selected that contained a promoter SNP that could alter a putative transcription factor binding site and had variable expression by transcriptomic analyses. The latter two criteria also required that ≥10% of mice carried the minor allele and that this allele could account for ≥10% of the phenotypic difference noted between the strains at the phenotypic extremes. This integrative, functional approach revealed 14 candidate genes that included Atp1a1, Alox5, Galnt11, Hrh1, Mbd4, Phactr2, Plxnd1, Ptprt, Reln, and Zfand4, which had significant SNP associations, and Itga9, Man1a2, Mapk14, and Vwf, which had suggestive SNP associations. Of the genes with significant SNP associations, Atp1a1, Alox5, Plxnd1, Ptprt, and Zfand4 could be associated with ALI in several ways. Using a competitive electrophoretic mobility shift analysis, Atp1a1 promoter (rs215053185) oligonucleotide containing the minor G allele formed a major distinct faster-migrating complex. In addition, a gene with a suggestive SNP association, Itga9, is linked to transforming growth factor β1 signaling, which previously has been associated with the susceptibility to ALI in mice. PMID:23590305

  4. Salidroside alleviates paraquat-induced rat acute lung injury by repressing TGF-β1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoyi; Ding, Limin; Wu, Liqun; Xu, Liying; Zheng, Lanzhi; Huang, Xiaomin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of salidroside (SDS) via suppressing the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in rat acute lung injury (ALI) induced by paraquat (PQ) and to explore the potential molecular mechanisms. Methods: A total of 90 male rats (190-210 g) were randomly and evenly divided into 9 groups: control group, PQ groups (4 groups), and PQ + SDS groups (4 groups). The rats in control group were treated with equal volume of saline intraperitoneally. The rats in PQ groups were exposed to PQ solution (20 mg/kg) by gastric gavage for 1, 6, 24, and 72 hours, respectively. The rats in PQ + SDS groups were intraperitoneally injected once with SDS (10 mg/kg) every 12 hours after PQ perfusion. Pulmonary pathological changes were observed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The expression of TGF-β1 and the mRNA were evaluated by immunohistochemical (IHC) scoring and real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time qRT-PCR), respectively. Results: SDS alleviated the symptoms of PQ induced ALI. Moreover, SDS reduced the expression of the inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 including TGF-β1 IHC scores (at each time point from 6 to 72 hours after PQ perfusion) and mRNA level (at each time point from 1 to 72 hours after PQ perfusion) compared with PQ groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: SDS alleviated the pulmonary symptoms of PQ-induced ALI, at least partially, by repressing inflammatory cell infiltration and the expression of TGF-β1 resulting in delayed lung fibrosis. PMID:25674253

  5. Clausena anisata-mediated protection against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chan-Mi; Shin, In-Sik; Shin, Na-Rae; Hong, Ju-Mi; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Bach, Tran-The; Hai, Do-Van; Quang, Bui-Hong; Choi, Sang-Ho; Lee, Joongku; Myung, Pyung-Keun; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2016-04-01

    Clausena anisata (Willd.) Hook.f. ex Benth. (CA), which is widely used in traditional medicine, reportedly exerts antitumor, anti-inflammatory and other important therapeutic effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential therapeutic effects of CA in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) and in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered treatments for 3 days by oral gavage. On day 3, the mice were instilled intranasally with LPS or PBS followed 3 h later by oral CA (30 mg/kg) or vehicle administration. In vitro, CA decreased nitric oxide (NO) production and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. CA also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenase-2. In vivo, CA administration significantly reduced inflammatory cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, and IL-1β, as well as reactive oxygen species production in the BALF. CA also effectively reduced airway inflammation in mouse lung tissue of an LPS-induced ALI mouse model, in addition to decreasing inhibitor κB (IκB) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 phosphorylation. Taken together, the findings demonstrated that CA inhibited inflammatory responses in a mouse model of LPS-induced ALI and in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Thus, CA is a potential candidate for development as an adjunctive treatment for inflammatory disorders, such as ALI.

  6. Mesenteric lymph duct drainage attenuates acute lung injury in rats with severe intraperitoneal infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhang, Shukun; Tsui, Naiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the hypothesis that the mesenteric lymphatic system plays an important role in acute lung injury in a rat model induced by severe intraperitoneal infection. Male Wistar rats weighing 250∼300 g were randomly divided into 3 groups and subjected to sham operation, intraperitoneal infection, or mesenteric lymphatic drainage. The activity of diamine oxidase (DAO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured by enzymatic assay. The endotoxin levels in plasma, lymph, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated using the limulus amoebocyte lysate reagent. The cytokines, adhesion factors, chemokines, and inflammatory factors were detected by ELISA. TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 were analyzed by Western blotting. Compared with sham-operated rats, rats with intraperitoneal infection had increased MPO and decreased DAO activity in intestinal tissues. Mesenteric lymph drainage reduced the alterations in MPO and DAO activity induced by intraperitoneal infection. The MPO activity in pulmonary tissue and the permeability of pulmonary blood vessels were also increased, which were partially reversed by mesenteric lymph drainage. The endotoxin levels in lymphatic fluid and alveolar perfusion fluid were elevated after intraperitoneal infection but decreased to control levels after lymph drainage. No alterations in the levels of plasma endotoxin were observed. The number of neutrophils was increased in BALF and lymph in the infected rats, and was also reduced after drainage. Lymph drainage also decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion factors in the plasma, lymph, and BALF, as well as the levels of TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 in pulmonary and intestinal tissues. The mesenteric lymphatic system is the main pathway involved in early lung injury caused by severe intraperitoneal infection, in which activation of the TLR-4 signal pathway may play a role.

  7. The role of iron in Libby amphibole-induced acute lung injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shannahan, Jonathan H; Ghio, Andrew J; Schladweiler, Mette C; McGee, John K; Richards, Judy H; Gavett, Stephen H; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2011-05-01

    Complexation of host iron (Fe) on the surface of inhaled asbestos fibers has been postulated to cause oxidative stress contributing to in vivo pulmonary injury and inflammation. We examined the role of Fe in Libby amphibole (LA; mean length 4.99 µm ± 4.53 and width 0.28 µm ± 0.19) asbestos-induced inflammogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. LA contained acid-leachable Fe and silicon. In a cell-free media containing FeCl(3), LA bound #17 µg of Fe/mg of fiber and increased reactive oxygen species generation #3.5 fold, which was reduced by deferoxamine (DEF) treatment. In BEAS-2B cells exposure to LA, LA loaded with Fe (FeLA), or LA with DEF did not increase HO-1 or ferritin mRNA expression. LA increased IL-8 expression, which was reduced by Fe loading but increased by DEF. To determine the role of Fe in LA-induced lung injury in vivo, spontaneously hypertensive rats were exposed intratracheally to either saline (300 µL), DEF (1 mg), FeCl(3) (21 µg), LA (0.5 mg), FeLA (0.5 mg), or LA + DEF (0.5 mg). LA caused BALF neutrophils to increase 24 h post-exposure. Loading of Fe on LA but not chelation slightly decreased neutrophilic influx (LA + DEF > LA > FeLA). At 4 h post-exposure, LA-induced lung expression of MIP-2 was reduced in rats exposed to FeLA but increased by LA + DEF (LA + DEF > LA > FeLA). Ferritin mRNA was elevated in rats exposed to FeLA compared to LA. In conclusion, the acute inflammatory response to respirable fibers and particles may be inhibited in the presence of surface-complexed or cellular bioavailable Fe. Cell and tissue Fe-overload conditions may influence the pulmonary injury and inflammation caused by fibers.

  8. Lung imaging during acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: computed tomography patterns and diagnostic accuracy of bedside chest radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Mekontso Dessap, Armand; Deux, Jean-François; Habibi, Anoosha; Abidi, Nour; Godeau, Bertrand; Adnot, Serge; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Rahmouni, Alain; Galacteros, Frederic; Maitre, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The lung computed tomography (CT) features of acute chest syndrome (ACS) in sickle cell disease patients is not well described and the diagnostic performance of bedside chest radiograph (CR) has not been tested. Our objectives were to describe CT features of ACS and evaluate the reproducibility and diagnostic performance of bedside CR. Methods We screened 127 consecutive patients during 166 ACS episodes and 145 CT scans (in 118 consecutive patients) were included in the study. Results Among the 145 CT scans, 139 (96%) exhibited a new pulmonary opacity and 84 (58%) exhibited at least one complete lung segment consolidation. Consolidations were predominant as compared to ground-glass opacities and atelectasis. Lung parenchyma was increasingly consolidated from apex to base; the right and left inferior lobes were almost always involved in patients with a new complete lung segment consolidation on CT scan (98% and 95% of cases respectively). Patients with a new complete lung segment consolidation on CT scan had a more severe presentation and course as compared to others. The sensitivity of bedside CR for the diagnosis of ACS using CT as a reference was good (>85%) whereas the specificity was weak (<60%). Conclusion ACS more frequently presented on CT as a consolidation pattern, predominating in lung bases. The reproducibility and diagnostic capacity of bedside CR were far from perfect. These findings may help improve the bedside imaging diagnosis of ACS. PMID:23925645

  9. Roger S. Mitchell lecture. Uses of expression microarrays in studies of pulmonary fibrosis, asthma, acute lung injury, and emphysema.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Dean

    2002-03-01

    Expression microarrays are a powerful tool that could provide new information about the molecular pathways regulating common lung diseases. To exemplify how this tool can be useful, selected examples of informative experiments are reviewed. In studies relevant to asthma, the cytokine interleukin-13 has been shown to produce many of the phenotypic features of this disease, but the cellular targets in the airways and the molecular pathways activated are largely unknown. We have used microarrays to begin to dissect the different transcriptional responses of primary lung cells to this cytokine. In experiments designed to identify global transcriptional programs responsible for regulating lung inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis, we performed microarray experiments on lung tissue from wild-type mice and mice lacking a member of the integrin family know to be involved in activation of latent transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. In addition to identifying distinct cluster of genes involved in each of these processes, these studies led to the identification of novel pathways by which TGF-beta can regulate acute lung injury and emphysema. Together, these examples demonstrate how careful application and thorough analysis of expression microarrays can facilitate the discovery of novel molecular targets for intervening in common lung diseases.

  10. Oxidative damage and TGF-β differentially induce lung epithelial cell sonic hedgehog and tenascin-C expression: implications for the regulation of lung remodelling in idiopathic interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Paul M; Howie, Sarah E M; Wallace, William A H

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic interstitial lung diseases (iILDs) are characterized by inflammation, hyperplasia of Type-II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and lung remodelling often with progressive fibrosis. It remains unclear which signals initiate iILD and/or maintain the disease processes. Using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry on archival biopsies of three patterns of iILD (usual interstitial pneumonitis/UIP, non-specific interstitial pneumonitis/NSIP and cryptogenic organizing pneumonia/COP) we investigated whether hedgehog signalling (previously associated with lung damage and repair) was functional and whether the damage associated extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C was present in activated Type-II AECs in all three iILDs. Using tissue culture, protein and mRNA detection we also determined how two signals (oxidative damage and TGF-β) associated with iILD pathogenesis affected Sonic hedgehog (SHH) and tenascin-C production by a Type-II AEC cell line. We report that SHH pathway and tenascin-C mRNA and proteins were found in UIP, NSIP and COP. SHH signalling was most active at sites of immature organizing fibrous tissue (fibroblastic foci) in UIP. In vitro Type-II AECs constitutively secrete SHH but not tenascin-C. Oxidative injury stimulated SHH release whereas TGF-β inhibited it. TGF-β and oxidative damage both upregulated tenascin-C mRNA but only TGF-β induced synthesis and release of a distinct protein isoform. SHH signalling is active in Type-II AECs from three types of ILD and all three express tenascin-C. PMID:21039988

  11. Bronchoscopy-Derived Correlates of Lung Injury Following Inhalational Injuries: A Prospective Obervational Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major factor determining morbidity following burns and inhalational injury. In experimental models, factors potentially contributing to ALI risk include inhalation of toxins directly causing cell damage; inflammation; and infection. However, few studi...

  12. Acute protease supplementation effects on muscle damage and recovery across consecutive days of cycle racing.

    PubMed

    Shing, Cecilia M; Chong, Suzzen; Driller, Matthew W; Fell, James W

    2016-01-01

    Bromelain, a mixture of proteases obtained from pineapples, has been demonstrated to reduce exercise-induced muscle damage and inflammation, enhancing recovery. This