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Sample records for acute lung failure

  1. Acute Lung Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mac Sweeney, Rob; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung failure is the most common organ failure seen in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure (ARF) can be classified as (1) neuromuscular in origin, (2) secondary to acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases, (3) alveolar processes such as cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and pneumonia, and (4) vascular diseases such as acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. This article reviews the more common causes of ARF from each group, including the pathological mechanisms and the principles of critical care management, focusing on the supportive, specific, and adjunctive therapies for each condition. PMID:21989697

  2. [Continuously alternating prone and supine positioning in acute lung failure].

    PubMed

    Walz, M; Muhr, G

    1992-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure is still one the main problems in surgical intensive care. Unknown pathophysiological mechanisms permit only symptomatic therapy. Today ventilatory strategies by using PEEP und IRV are established to improve gas exchange and FRC by recruiting collapsed alveoli, decreasing intrapulmonary shunting and returning V/Q matching to normal. Furthermore different studies have shown the effects of supine and lateral decubitus posture in patients with acute respiratory failure. There are only rare reports on using the prone position, which doesn't require two-lung ventilation in difference to lateral position. We have studied 16 patients with acute respiratory failure by using continuous changing between prone and supine position under mechanical ventilation. All were male, aged 41.3 years in the middle and showed an average "Injury Severity Score" of 30 (13-50). 15 were trauma patients with blunt chest trauma in 11 cases. We have used prone position on threatening or manifest ARDS. In all patients we observed an increment of PaO2 during prone position on to 48 mmHg so that FiO2 could be reduced on an average of 0.2 within the first 48 h since changing patient's position. Posture changing depends on blood gas analysis, specifically on decreasing PaO2 after previous increment. Patients remained in prone and supine position at a mean of 6.3 (4.5-20) h and posture changing was proceeded over a period of 15.4 (7-32) days. No problems recording to blood pressure or mechanical ventilation appeared during prone position. 11 of 16 patients survived (68.8%), 5 died of cardiac (2) and multi organic failure (3) in connection with sepsis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1458988

  3. [Hypoxic lung failure].

    PubMed

    David, S; Wiesner, O

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxic lung failure is among the major indications for patients' referral to intensive care units either for surveillance or if necessary therapy. There are a vast number of pathophysiological causes of lung failure and the optimal treatment highly depends on the underlying pathology; therefore, no standard algorithm exists. So-called acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents a very severe manifestation of hypoxemic lung failure that is of particular relevance for intensivists and is therefore the focus of this review. In addition to fundamental pathophysiology of lung injury, the article also focuses on established and modern treatment strategies. Moreover, we will briefly highlight innovative concepts of ARDS treatment that might become relevant in the future. PMID:27084180

  4. Bedside lung ultrasound in the evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Leidi, Federica; Casella, Francesco; Cogliati, Chiara

    2016-06-01

    Dyspnea is a common presenting complaint in the emergency department (ED) and a leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) and medical wards. Ultrasound (US) has traditionally been considered inadequate to explore the aerated lung. However, in the past 15 years LUS gained broader application, at least in part thanks to the interpretation of the artefacts generated by the interaction of US and lung structures/content. The total reflection of US beam occurring at the pleural level determines the artefactual image of the aerated lung: an homogenous 'foggy-like' picture under the pleural line. As the air content of the lungs decreases due to interstitial imbibition, deposition of collagen or presence of blood, vertical artefacts -arising from the pleural line and moving synchronously with the respiration- called B-lines appear. Multiple and bilateral B-lines identify the alveolar-interstitial syndrome (AIS). The most common cause of AIS is the wet lung: the more the congestion burden, the more the extent of the B-lines, which become confluent until the so-called white lung in case of pulmonary edema. Many studies showed a higher accuracy of LUS in diagnosing acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) as compared to chest X-ray As recently shown, the integration of LUS to clinical assessment allow to differentiate cardiogenic dyspnea with sensitivity and specificity greater than 95 %. Moreover, LUS can easily detect pleural effusion -frequently present in ADHF-appearing as an anechoic area in the recumbent area of the thorax, delimited inferiorly by the diaphragmatic dome and superiorly by the aerated lung. PMID:26885846

  5. [From isoflurane to perfluorohexane? Perfluorocarbons--therapeutic strategies in acute lung failure].

    PubMed

    Ragaller, M; Bleyl, J U; Koch, T; Albrecht, D M

    2000-04-01

    The introduction of Perfluorochemicals into medicine and especially into the treatment of severe lung injury is a fascinating scientific task. Many recall the famous experiments from Clark et al. in 1966 when he demonstrated "liquidventilation with perfluorocarbons" in the mammal species for the first time. After this hallmark, perfluorocarbons were subsequently introduced in research of acute lung injury by the techniques of Total- and Partial-Liquid-Ventilation (TLV; PLV). Perfluorocarbons (saturated organofluorids) have unique chemical and physical properties which made them attractive substances for intraalveolar application. The strong C-F bindings in the perfluorocarbon molecules are responsible for their chemical stability, biochemical inertness, high capacity to dissolve respiratory gases, low surface tension and high vapor pressures. Furthermore, the high density of the PFC lead to radio-opacity and their distribution to dependent lung areas. The efficacy of PFC liquid, applied by TLV/PLV has been demonstrated in numerous animal studies using different models of acute lung injury. Currently, several mechanisms of action of perfluorocarbon fluids in acute lung injury are discussed: recruitment of atelectatic alveoli, prevention of endexpiratory collapse of alveoli ("liquid PEEP"), redistribution of perfusion, oxygen transport, surfactant like effects and decrease of inflammation. Since total liquid ventilation has been used only in experimental models of lung injury, partial liquid ventilation has been introduced successfully into clinical trials (phase I-II). However, the results of the first randomised, controlled study of PLV in 90 adult patients suffering from severe respiratory failure (ALI/ARDS) showed no differences between PLV and conventional treatment. Furthermore, the instillation of relatively large amounts of liquid into the lungs poses several technical challenges and may be associated with complications such as liquithoraces, pneumothoraces

  6. [Role of biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure in the immediate postoperative period of lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ruano, L; Sacanell, J; Roman, A; Rello, J

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients are at high risk of suffering many complications during the immediate postoperative period, such as primary graft dysfunction, acute graft rejection or infection. The most common symptom is the presence of acute respiratory failure, and the use of biomarkers could be useful for establishing an early diagnosis of these conditions. Different biomarkers have been studied, but none have proven to be the gold standard in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. This paper offers a review of the different biomarkers that have been studied in this field. PMID:23462428

  7. Acute Respiratory Failure in Critically Ill Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zafrani, Lara; Lemiale, Virginie; Lapidus, Nathanael; Lorillon, Gwenael; Schlemmer, Benoît; Azoulay, Elie

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic known or unknown interstitial lung disease (ILD) may present with severe respiratory flares that require intensive management. Outcome data in these patients are scarce. Patients and Methods Clinical and radiological features were collected in 83 patients with ILD-associated acute respiratory failure (ARF). Determinants of hospital mortality and response to corticosteroid therapy were identified by logistic regression. Results Hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 41% and 54% respectively. Pulmonary hypertension, computed tomography (CT) fibrosis and acute kidney injury were independently associated with mortality (odds ratio (OR) 4.55; 95% confidence interval (95%CI) (1.20–17.33); OR, 7.68; (1.78–33.22) and OR 10.60; (2.25–49.97) respectively). Response to steroids was higher in patients with shorter time from hospital admission to corticosteroid therapy. Patients with fibrosis on CT had lower response to steroids (OR, 0.03; (0.005–0.21)). In mechanically ventilated patients, overdistension induced by high PEEP settings was associated with CT fibrosis and hospital mortality. Conclusion Mortality is high in ILD-associated ARF. CT and echocardiography are valuable prognostic tools. Prompt corticosteroid therapy may improve survival. PMID:25115557

  8. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  9. Acute liver failure due to Varicella zoster virus infection after lung transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Verleden, G M; Vos, R; Van Raemdonck, D E; Laleman, W; Vanaudenaerde, B M

    2012-06-01

    Most adults are Varicella zoster virus (VZV)-positive at the age of 20 years. Some, however, remain antibody-negative and may develop primary chicken pox during adulthood. We report a patient with Williams-Campbell syndrome who underwent double-lung transplantation while being VZV-negative. One year after the successful procedure, he was admitted with fulminant hepatic failure and some cutaneous vesicles in his face. Despite a rapid diagnosis of VZV infection and treatment with acyclovir, his situation deteriorated within 24 hours and while awaiting an urgent liver transplantation, he developed multiple organ failure and died. PMID:22664036

  10. [Etiology and pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Ziliene, Violeta; Kondrotas, Anatolijus Juozas; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine factors influencing acute respiratory failure and pathogenesis according to literature and clinical findings in critically ill patients. The term "respiratory failure" implies the inability to maintain either the normal delivery of oxygen to tissues and release or the normal removal of carbon dioxide from the tissues. There are many patients suffering from acute respiratory failure caused by nosocomial pneumonia, septic syndrome, aspiration, interstitial or alveolar lung edema, thromboembolism of a. pulmonalis, polytrauma and lung contusion, acute respiratory distress syndrome, long-term mechanical ventilation of the lungs, acute lung injury, status asthmaticus, rather massive transfusions of blood products, and lipid embolism in the intensive care unit. There are actually three processes involved: the transfer of oxygen across the alveolus, the transport to the tissues (by cardiac output), and the removal of carbon dioxide from blood into the alveolus with subsequent exhalation into the environment. Failure of any step in this process can lead to respiratory failure. Long-term hypoxia causes ischemic changes and dysfunction of brain, heart, kidney, lungs and can worsen the course of disease or cause higher mortality. It is important to determine the pathogenetic mechanisms of acute respiratory failure, estimate the main parameters and their interrelations and prescribe proper treatment. PMID:15064552

  11. Acute Heart Failure Treatment.

    PubMed

    Levy, Phillip D; Bellou, Abdel

    2013-06-01

    Dyspnea is the predominant symptom for patients with acute heart failure and initial treatment is largely directed towards the alleviation of this. Contrary to conventional belief, not all patients present with fluid overload and the approach to management is rapidly evolving from a solitary focus on diuresis to one that more accurately reflects the complex interplay of underlying cardiac dysfunction and acute precipitant. Effective treatment thus requires an understanding of divergent patient profiles and an appreciation of various therapeutic options for targeted patient stabilization. The key principle within this paradigm is directed management that aims to diminish the work of breathing through situation appropriate ventillatory support, volume reduction and hemodynamic improvement. With such an approach, clinicians can more efficiently address respiratory discomfort while reducing the likelihood of avoidable harm. PMID:24223323

  12. Tumor-Like Liver Abscess Mimicking Malignancy With Lung Metastases in a Patient With Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih Hsin; Sun, Cheuk-Kay; Jiang, Jiunn-Song; Tsai, Ming Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The worldwide incidence of Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess (KLA) is increasing. It is important to accurately diagnose this life-threatening disease to provide timely and appropriate treatment. Here we report the case of a 38-year-old man with acute renal failure and a tumor-like liver abscess and septic pulmonary embolism. Initially, his clinical symptoms, laboratory tests, and radiological findings presented equivocal results of malignancy with metastases. Fine needle aspiration of liver tumor was performed, which showed purulent material with a culture positive for K pneumoniae. KLA symptoms are atypical, and radiological findings may mimic a malignancy with tumor necrosis. In some circumstances, liver aspiration biopsy may be necessary to confirm the real etiology, leading to prompt and timely treatment. Moreover, we should be alert for the impression of KLA when facing a diabetic patient with liver mass lesion and acute renal failure. PMID:26986170

  13. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:25911167

  14. Acute lung injury review.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Kenji; King, Landon S; Aggarwal, Neil R; De Gorordo, Antonio; D'Alessio, Franco R; Kubo, Keishi

    2009-01-01

    The first report of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was published in 1967, and even now acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS are severe forms of diffuse lung disease that impose a substantial health burden all over the world. Recent estimates indicate approximately 190,000 cases per year of ALI in the United States each year, with an associated 74,500 deaths per year. Common causes of ALI/ARDS are sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, aspiration pneumonia, pancreatitis, and so on. Several pathologic stages of ALI/ARDS have been described: acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, fibroproliferative phase with hyaline membranes, with varying degrees of interstitial fibrosis, and resolution phase. There has been intense investigation into the pathophysiologic events relevant to each stage of ALI/ARDS, and much has been learned in the alveolar epithelial, endobronchial homeostasis, and alveolar cell immune responses, especially neutrophils and alveolar macrophages in an animal model. However, these effective results in the animal models are not equally adoptive to those in randomized, controlled trials. The clinical course of ALI/ARDS is variable with the likely pathophysiologic complexity of human ALI/ARDS. In 1994, the definition was recommended by the American-European Consensus Conference Committee, which facilitated easy nomination of patients with ALI/ARDS for a randomized, clinical trial. Here, we review the recent randomized, clinical trials of ALI/ARDS. PMID:19420806

  15. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome in nonhuman primates culminating in multiple organ failure, acute lung injury, and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Hukkanen, Renee R; Liggitt, H Denny; Murnane, Robert D; Frevert, Charles W

    2009-10-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a clinicopathological manifestation of overexuberant acute-phase inflammation caused by infectious or noninfectious etiologies. The systemic release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and lipid and vasoactive mediators induces endothelial damage and microvascular thrombosis, potentially culminating in disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) or failure (MOF). We present five cases in the pig-tailed macaque and olive baboon where SIRS resulted in MOF, ARDS, DIC, and the Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome; each with gross and histological elements manifested as edema, deposition of fibrin, hemorrhage, and thrombosis. In the described cases, SIRS was the end-common pathway for multiple risk factors that parallel those documented in humans: major surgery, obstetric complications, and infection. The diagnosis of SIRS should be considered when evaluating nonhuman primate (NHP) cases of MOF manifesting with histological evidence of vascular leakage. Experimental manipulation of NHP models may be complicated by SIRS and accompanying rapid clinical decompensation. Such adverse events may compromise toxicological studies and should be avoided when possible. PMID:19773593

  16. Severe acute respiratory failure managed with continuous positive airway pressure and partial extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal by an artificial membrane lung. A controlled, randomized animal study.

    PubMed

    Borelli, M; Kolobow, T; Spatola, R; Prato, P; Tsuno, K

    1988-12-01

    Using an animal model of acute respiratory failure (ARF), we evaluated two treatments: conventional mechanical pulmonary ventilation (MV) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with extracorporeal removal of CO2 by an artificial membrane lung. We developed a model of "mild" ARF and a model of "severe" ARF after ventilating healthy sheep at a peak inspiratory pressure of 50 cm H2O for various lengths of time. Sheep from either injury models were randomly assigned to one of the above treatment groups. All 16 sheep from the model with "severe" ARF died, with progressive deterioration in pulmonary function and multiorgan failure irrespective of the treatment. Of 11 sheep from the model with "mild" ARF treated by MV, only three survived, whereas all 11 sheep from the model with "mild" ARF treated with CPAP and extracorporeal removal of CO2 responded well, and nine sheep ultimately recovered. We conclude that CPAP with extracorporeal removal of CO2 provided a better environment for the recovery in our model with "mild" ARF than the conventional arrangement centered on MV alone. Our studies also suggest that lung injury can progress (i.e., model with "severe" ARF) to where neither of the two treatments can succeed. PMID:3144216

  17. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  18. Managing acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Daniel F

    2014-02-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure may occur de novo, but it most often occurs as an exacerbation of underlying chronic heart failure. Hospitalization for heart failure is usually a harbinger of a chronic disease that will require long-term, ongoing medical management. Leaders in the field generally agree that repeated inpatient admissions for treatment reflect a failure of the health care delivery system to manage the disease optimally. Newer management strategies focus on ameliorating symptoms by optimizing the hemodynamics, restoring neurohormonal balance, and making frequent outpatient adjustments when needed. PMID:24286585

  19. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group.

  20. Combination of lung ultrasound (a comet-tail sign) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in differentiating acute heart failure from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma as cause of acute dyspnea in prehospital emergency setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We studied the diagnostic accuracy of bedside lung ultrasound (the presence of a comet-tail sign), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and clinical assessment (according to the modified Boston criteria) in differentiating heart failure (HF)-related acute dyspnea from pulmonary (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma)-related acute dyspnea in the prehospital setting. Methods Our prospective study was performed at the Center for Emergency Medicine, Maribor, Slovenia, between July 2007 and April 2010. Two groups of patients were compared: a HF-related acute dyspnea group (n = 129) and a pulmonary (asthma/COPD)-related acute dyspnea group (n = 89). All patients underwent lung ultrasound examinations, along with basic laboratory testing, rapid NT-proBNP testing and chest X-rays. Results The ultrasound comet-tail sign has 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 100% negative predictive value (NPV) and 96% positive predictive value (PPV) for the diagnosis of HF. NT-proBNP (cutoff point 1,000 pg/mL) has 92% sensitivity, 89% specificity, 86% NPV and 90% PPV. The Boston modified criteria have 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 80% NPV and 90% PPV. In comparing the three methods, we found significant differences between ultrasound sign and (1) NT-proBNP (P < 0.05) and (2) Boston modified criteria (P < 0.05). The combination of ultrasound sign and NT-proBNP has 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% NPV and 100% PPV. With the use of ultrasound, we can exclude HF in patients with pulmonary-related dyspnea who have positive NT-proBNP (> 1,000 pg/mL) and a history of HF. Conclusions An ultrasound comet-tail sign alone or in combination with NT-proBNP has high diagnostic accuracy in differentiating acute HF-related from COPD/asthma-related causes of acute dyspnea in the prehospital emergency setting. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01235182. PMID:21492424

  1. Acute hepatic failure in children.

    PubMed Central

    Riely, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Many diseases may present as acute hepatic failure in the pediatric age group, including viral hepatitis A and B, adverse drug reactions, both toxic and "hepatitic," and inherited metabolic disorders such as tyrosinemia, alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency, and Wilson's disease. Management is primarily supportive, with care taken to anticipate the known complications of hepatic failure. Few "curative" therapies are known, although attempts at stimulating hepatic regeneration may be helpful. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:6433587

  2. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript. PMID:27524204

  3. Treatment of acute silicoproteinosis by whole-lung lavage.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Marshall; Cappa, Anthony; Weyant, Michael; Lara, Abigail; Ellis, James; Weitzel, Nathaen S; Puskas, Ferenc

    2013-06-01

    Acute silicoproteinosis is a rare disease that occurs following a heavy inhalational exposure to silica dusts. Clinically, it resembles pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP); silica exposure is thought to be a cause of secondary PAP. We describe a patient with biopsy-confirmed acute silicoproteinosis whose course was complicated by acute hypoxemic respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Without clinical improvement despite antibiotic and steroid treatment, the patient was scheduled for whole-lung lavage under general anesthesia. Anesthetic challenges included double-lumen tube placement and single-lung ventilation in a hypoxic patient, facilitating lung lavage, and protecting the contralateral lung from catastrophic spillage. PMID:23632425

  4. [Positioning of patients with acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Bein, T

    2012-11-01

    The collapse of lung tissue, edema and intrapulmonary shunt are the main symptoms in patients with acute respiratory insufficiency. The techniques of ventilation in a prone position and continuous lateral rotational therapy (CLRT) are based on these pathophysiological changes. Ventilation in a prone position was found to improve ventilation and perfusion relationships and reduction in the pleural pressure gradient. In hypoxemic lung failure (PaO(2)/FIO(2) <100) a prone position was found to improve oxygenation as a rescue measure and to improve survival. In contrast CLRT is considered to be an early therapeutic or prophylactic measure aimed at prevention of ventilation-associated complications. In trauma patients these beneficial effects were demonstrated in several studies. Positioning therapy can be accompanied by potentially serious complications (e.g. face and skin ulceration, accidental loss of tubes and catheters and cardiac arrhythmias) and its use requires routine management and exact knowledge of indications and risks. PMID:23086293

  5. Management of acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Fry, A C; Farrington, K

    2006-01-01

    Acute renal failure is a common condition, frequently encountered in both community practice and hospital inpatients. While it remains a heterologous condition, following basic principles makes investigation straightforward, and initial management follows a standard pathway in most patients. This article shows this, advises on therapeutic strategies, including those in special situations, and should help the clinician in deciding when to refer to a nephrologist, and when to consider renal replacement therapy. PMID:16461473

  6. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Update

    PubMed Central

    Teerlink, John R; Alburikan, Khalid; Metra, Marco; Rodgers, Jo E

    2015-01-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) continues to increase in prevalence and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity including frequent hospitalizations. The American Heart Association is predicting that more than eight million Americans will have heart failure by 2030 and that the total direct costs associated with the disease will rise from $21 billion in 2012 to $70 billion in 2030. The increase in the prevalence and cost of HF is primarily the result of shifting demographics and a growing population. Although many large, randomized, controlled clinical trials have been conducted in patients with chronic heart failure, it was not until recently that a growing number of studies began to address the management of ADHF. It is the intent of this review to update the clinician regarding the evaluation and optimal management of ADHF. PMID:24251454

  7. Fluid administration limited by lung sonography: the place of lung ultrasound in assessment of acute circulatory failure (the FALLS-protocol).

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    The FALLS-protocol is included in a limited investigation to diagnose the cause of shock. After simple echocardiography has ruled out obstructive shock (tamponade, pulmonary embolism), the lung is investigated. Absence of disseminated lung rockets rules out cardiogenic shock. At this point, hypovolemic and septic shock are differential diagnoses (rarities apart), and the FALLS-protocol provides fluid therapy with constant monitoring of lung artifacts. Hypovolemic shock will eventually improve - septic shock will not, and the slight excess fluid creates an early, silent stage of interstitial edema, demonstrated by B-lines, demanding interruption of fluid therapy. This sequential approach, combined with the usual, clinical, biochemical and echocardiographic parameters, must be evaluated in multicenter studies. PMID:22455488

  8. [Diagnosis of acute respiratory failure and nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ziliene, Violeta; Reingardiene, Dagmara; Tereseviciūte, Neringa; Slavinskas, Ricardas

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine diagnosis and factors influencing acute respiratory failure and nosocomial pneumonia according to literature and clinical findings in critically ill patients. The term "respiratory failure" implies the inability to maintain either normal delivery of oxygen to tissues or normal removal of carbon dioxide from the tissues. There are many patients suffering from acute respiratory failure caused by nosocomial pneumonia, septic syndrome, aspiration, interstitial or alveolar lung edema, thromboembolism of a. pulmonalis, polytrauma and contusion of the lungs, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute lung injury, status asthmaticus, rather massive transfusions of blood products, and lipid embolism in the intensive care unit. There are actually three processes involved: transfer of oxygen across the alveolus, transport to the tissues (by cardiac output), and removal of carbon dioxide from the blood into the alveolus with subsequent exhalation into the environment. Failure of any step in this process can lead to respiratory failure. Long-term hypoxia causes ischemic changes and dysfunction of brain, heart, kidney, lungs and can worsen the outcome of disease or can cause higher mortality. PMID:15547315

  9. [Acute respiratory failure in neuromuscular disease].

    PubMed

    Damak, H; Décosterd, D

    2015-09-30

    Neuromuscular diseases can affect all respiratory muscles, leading to acute respiratory failure, which is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in those patients. Two situations must be distinguished. 1) Acute respiratory failure as part of a neuromuscular disorder of acute onset and possibly reversible (Guillain-Barre syndrome, myasthenic crisis...). 2) Acute respiratory failure occurring in a patient with an already advanced neuromuscular disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy...). This article describes the neuromuscular acute respiratory failure in these different aspects, discusses its initial management in the emergency department and identifies the parameters that have to be monitored. PMID:26619704

  10. [Perioperative acute kidney injury and failure].

    PubMed

    Chhor, Vibol; Journois, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Perioperative period is very likely to lead to acute renal failure because of anesthesia (general or perimedullary) and/or surgery which can cause acute kidney injury. Characterization of acute renal failure is based on serum creatinine level which is imprecise during and following surgery. Studies are based on various definitions of acute renal failure with different thresholds which skewed their comparisons. The RIFLE classification (risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage kidney disease) allows clinicians to distinguish in a similar manner between different stages of acute kidney injury rather than using a unique definition of acute renal failure. Acute renal failure during the perioperative period can mainly be explained by iatrogenic, hemodynamic or surgical causes and can result in an increased morbi-mortality. Prevention of this complication requires hemodynamic optimization (venous return, cardiac output, vascular resistance), discontinuation of nephrotoxic drugs but also knowledge of the different steps of the surgery to avoid further degradation of renal perfusion. Diuretics do not prevent acute renal failure and may even push it forward especially during the perioperative period when venous retourn is already reduced. Edema or weight gain following surgery are not correlated with the vascular compartment volume, much less with renal perfusion. Treatment of perioperative acute renal failure is similar to other acute renal failure. Renal replacement therapy must be mastered to prevent any additional risk of hemodynamic instability or hydro-electrolytic imbalance. PMID:24656890

  11. Giant pulmonary hamartoma causing acute right heart failure.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Heman M N; Page, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Giant pulmonary hamartomas are rare. We describe a case of a 59-year-old female patient with a giant chondroid hamartoma in the lower lobe of the right lung presenting with acute right heart failure. To the best of our knowledge such a unique presentation has not been previously described in the literature. PMID:24384217

  12. Management of acute ventilatory failure

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, B; Calverley, P M A

    2006-01-01

    Acute ventilatory failure is a challenging yet increasingly common medical emergency reflecting the growing burden of respiratory disease. It is not a diagnosis in itself but the end result of a diversity of disease processes culminating in arterial hypoxaemia and hypercapnia. This review focuses on key management issues including giving appropriate oxygen therapy, treatment of the underlying aetiology as well as any precipitant factors and provision of assisted ventilation if required. Ventilatory assistance can be provided both invasively and non‐invasively and the indications for either or both forms of assisted ventilation are discussed. Further emphasis is needed regarding advanced directives of care and clinicians should be aware of ethical issues regarding assisted ventilation. PMID:16822920

  13. Safety and efficacy of bronchoalveolar lavage using a laryngeal mask airway in cases of acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure with diffuse lung infiltrates.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takafumi; Sato, Yoko; Fukuda, Satoshi; Katayama, Shinshu; Miyazaki, Yuya; Ozaki, Makoto; Kotani, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibre-optic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (FOB-BAL) is an important tool for diagnosing and selecting treatment for acutely hypoxaemic patients with diffuse lung infiltrates. However, FOB-BAL carries a risk of significant hypoxaemia and subsequent tracheal intubation during and after the procedure. The application of FOB-BAL using a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in combination with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may minimize the incidence of hypoxaemia; however, the safety and efficacy of this procedure have not been investigated. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed from April to September 2013. Data regarding the recovered volume of BAL fluid, incidence of tracheal intubation within eight hours after the completion of FOB-BAL, respiratory and haemodynamic parameters and treatment modifications were collected for the evaluation. Results Ten trials of FOB-BAL using an LMA and CPAP were performed in nine patients with severe acute hypoxaemia associated with diffuse lung infiltrates. The BAL fluid recovery rate was 56%, and the procedure was completed without subsequent complications. In addition, the percutaneous arterial oxygen saturation decreased to 95.7%±3.8%, although it was never lower than 90.0% during the procedure, and no patients required intubation. Furthermore, the arterial blood pressure significantly but transiently decreased due to sedation, and the procedure yielded diagnostic information in all nine patients. Conclusion FOB-BAL using LMA and CPAP appears to be safe and effective in patients who develop severe acute hypoxaemia. PMID:25832933

  14. Liver transplantation in acute-on-chronic liver failure: lessons learnt from acute liver failure setting.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Mettu Srinivas; Rajalingam, Rajesh; Rela, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure is a clinical entity with high risk of mortality. These patients can have severe liver dysfunction complicated with multiple organ failure. Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for these patients. Literature regarding management of acute liver failure with special emphasis on liver transplantation was reviewed. Lessons learnt from the management of patients with acute liver failure which could be extrapolated to the management of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure are discussed. Significant improvement in outcomes of acute liver failure has been reported across the world. Several aspects in transplantation for acute liver failure were found to be relevant to the management of acute-on-chronic liver failure. These include defining criteria to identify patients needing early liver transplantation, prioritizing patients with acute liver failure on the waiting list, defining when to abandon transplantation in acute liver failure, emphasis on graft quality and the need for a multi-disciplinary approach to manage multiple organ dysfunction. Useful lessons can be learnt from the progress made in the management of acute liver failure and these can be extrapolated to the management of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. PMID:25788191

  15. Acute Renal Failure after Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, Sachin; Wu, Yu-Hsin; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D.; Stavropoulos, S. William

    2004-09-15

    Renal failure is a potential complication of any endovascular procedure using iodinated contrast, including uterine artery embolization (UAE). In this report we present a case of acute renal failure (ARF) following UAE performed as a treatment for uterine fibroids. The likely causes of ARF in this patient are explored and the possible etiologies of renal failure in patients undergoing UAE are reviewed.

  16. Acute Cardiac Tamponade: An Unusual Cause of Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Gautam; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Markley, John; Rich, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting a case of acute renal failure after cardiac surgery due to acute pericardial effusion. The patient had normal baseline renal function but developed acute oliguric renal failure with a significant increase in serum creatinine postoperatively. Pericardiotomy led to an improvement in blood pressure, immediate diuresis and quick recovery of renal function back to baseline. Pericardial tamponade should be included in the consideration of causes of the cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:22619656

  17. Management in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shalimar; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare, potentially fatal complication of severe hepatic illness resulting from various causes. In a clinical setting, severe hepatic injury is usually recognised by the appearance of jaundice, encephalopathy and coagulopathy. The central and most important clinical event in ALF is occurrence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and cerebral edema which is responsible for most of the fatalities in this serious clinical syndrome. The pathogenesis of encephalopathy and cerebral edema in ALF is unique and multifactorial. Ammonia plays a central role in the pathogenesis. The role of newer ammonia lowering agents is still evolving. Liver transplant is the only effective therapy that has been identified to be of promise in those with poor prognostic factors, whereas in the others, aggressive intensive medical management has been documented to salvage a substantial proportion of patients. A small fraction of patients undergo liver transplant and the remaining are usually treated with medical therapy. Therefore, identification of the complications and causes of death in such patients, and use of appropriate prognostic models to identify those who need liver transplant and those who can be managed with medical treatment is a vital component of therapeutic strategy. In this review, we discuss the various pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment options available. PMID:26041950

  18. Race and mortality after acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Waikar, Sushrut S; Curhan, Gary C; Ayanian, John Z; Chertow, Glenn M

    2007-10-01

    Black patients receiving dialysis for end-stage renal disease in the United States have lower mortality rates than white patients. Whether racial differences exist in mortality after acute renal failure is not known. We studied acute renal failure in patients hospitalized between 2000 and 2003 using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and found that black patients had an 18% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16 to 21%) lower odds of death than white patients after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidity, and the need for mechanical ventilation. Similarly, among those with acute renal failure requiring dialysis, black patients had a 16% (95% CI 10 to 22%) lower odds of death than white patients. In stratified analyses of patients with acute renal failure, black patients had significantly lower adjusted odds of death than white patients in settings of coronary artery bypass grafting, cardiac catheterization, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, pneumonia, sepsis, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Black patients were more likely than white patients to be treated in hospitals that care for a larger number of patients with acute renal failure, and black patients had lower in-hospital mortality than white patients in all four quartiles of hospital volume. In conclusion, in-hospital mortality is lower for black patients with acute renal failure than white patients. Future studies should assess the reasons for this difference. PMID:17855647

  19. Drug Therapy for Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Magrini, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is globally one of most frequent reasons for hospitalization and still represents a challenge for the choice of the best treatment to improve patient outcome. According to current international guidelines, as soon as patients with acute heart failure arrive at the emergency department, the common therapeutic approach aims to improve their signs and symptoms, correct volume overload, and ameliorate cardiac hemodynamics by increasing vital organ perfusion. Recommended treatment for the early management of acute heart failure is characterized by the use of intravenous diuretics, oxygen, and vasodilators. Although these measures ameliorate the patient's symptoms, they do not favorably impact on short- and long-term mortality. Consequently, there is a pressing need for novel agents in acute heart failure treatment with the result that research in this field is increasing worldwide. PMID:26088867

  20. Update: Acute Heart Failure (VII): Nonpharmacological Management of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Plácido, Rui; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    Acute heart failure is a major and growing public health problem worldwide with high morbidity, mortality, and cost. Despite recent advances in pharmacological management, the prognosis of patients with acute decompensated heart failure remains poor. Consequently, nonpharmacological approaches are being developed and increasingly used. Such techniques may include several modalities of ventilation, ultrafiltration, mechanical circulatory support, myocardial revascularization, and surgical treatment, among others. This document reviews the nonpharmacological approach in acute heart failure, indications, and prognostic implications. PMID:26169327

  1. Acute renal failure in general surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Slapak, M

    1996-01-01

    The high mortality and morbidity can be significantly reduced by three cardinal steps: 1. Early diagnosis of intrinsic renal failure 2. Early institution of fluid restriction and dialysis 3. The identification of patients who are likely to be at high risk from acute renal failure, and the careful planning and institution of available therapeutic measures to prevent it. PMID:9155748

  2. [Acute heart failure: precipitating factors and prevention].

    PubMed

    Aramburu Bodas, Oscar; Conde Martel, Alicia; Salamanca Bautista, Prado

    2014-03-01

    Acute heart failure episodes, whether onset or decompensation of a chronic form, are most often precipitated by a concurrent process or disease, described as precipitating factors of heart failure. In this article, we review these precipitating factors, their proportions and clinical relevance in general and in subgroups of patients, their relationship with prognosis, and their possible prevention. PMID:24930077

  3. Association between β-blocker therapy and outcomes in patients hospitalised with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive lung disease with underlying ischaemic heart disease, heart failure or hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, Mihaela S; Rothberg, Michael B; Priya, Aruna; Pekow, Penelope S; Au, David H; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2015-01-01

    Background β-Blocker therapy has been shown to improve survival among patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and congestive heart failure (CHF) and is underused among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Evidence regarding the optimal use of β-blocker therapy during an acute exacerbation of COPD is particularly weak. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients aged ≥40 years with IHD, CHF or hypertension who were hospitalised for an acute exacerbation of COPD from 1 January 2006 to 1 December 2007 at 404 acute care hospitals throughout the USA. We examined the association between β-blocker therapy and in-hospital mortality, initiation of mechanical ventilation after day 2 of hospitalisation, 30-day all-cause readmission and length of stay. Results Of 35 082 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 29% were treated with β blockers in the first two hospital days, including 22% with β1-selective and 7% with non-selective β blockers. In a propensity-matched analysis, there was no association between β-blocker therapy and in-hospital mortality (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.09), 30-day readmission (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.03) or late mechanical ventilation (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.24). However, when compared with β1 selective β blockers, receipt of non-selective β blockers was associated with an increased risk of 30-day readmission (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.44). Conclusions Among patients with IHD, CHF or hypertension, continuing β1-selective β blockers during hospitalisation for COPD appears to be safe. Until additional evidence becomes available, β1-selective β blockers may be superior to treatment with a non-selective β blocker. PMID:22941975

  4. Pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Price, Laura C.; McAuley, Danny F.; Marino, Philip S.; Finney, Simon J.; Griffiths, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome are characterized by protein rich alveolar edema, reduced lung compliance, and acute severe hypoxemia. A degree of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is also characteristic, higher levels of which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The increase in right ventricular (RV) afterload causes RV dysfunction and failure in some patients, with associated adverse effects on oxygen delivery. Although the introduction of lung protective ventilation strategies has probably reduced the severity of PH in ALI, a recent invasive hemodynamic analysis suggests that even in the modern era, its presence remains clinically important. We therefore sought to summarize current knowledge of the pathophysiology of PH in ALI. PMID:22246001

  5. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication. PMID:12046971

  6. [Epidemiology of acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Montes-Santiago, Julio; Arévalo Lorido, José Carlos; Cerqueiro González, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    In Spain, as in all other developed countries, heart failure is a colossal healthcare challenge. It is estimated that more than 1,300,000 people have heart failure in Spain. Each year, there are more than 100,000 hospital admissions for this process and the numbers are progressively increasing. Approximately 2% of emergency visits are related to this condition. Nearly 50% of inpatients are older than 75 years and have multiple comorbidities. Readmissions are common. Mortality at 1 year is around 16% after discharge but is close to 60% at 10 years. The associated annual overall costs are around 2,500 million euros. Every year more than 17,000 people die from heart failure, which is the fourth most frequent cause of death in Spain. Mortality rates have been reduced but, because of more advanced age at admission and the associated multiple comorbidities, in-hospital mortality has remained largely unchanged during the last 12 years and is nearly 10%. De novo heart failure causes greater morbidity and mortality and consequently there is a need for early identification and treatment. Strategies to coordinate healthcare levels and develop effective preventive programs are needed to tackle this formidable problem. PMID:24930076

  7. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Tank, S; Sputtek, A; Kiefmann, R

    2013-04-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) developed into the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality after the first description by Popovsky et al. approximately three decades ago. It was the most frequent reason for transfusion-related fatalities worldwide before implementation of risk minimization strategies by donor selection. Plasma-rich blood products, such as fresh frozen plasma and apheresis platelets seem to be the leading triggers of TRALI. Hypoxemia and development of pulmonary edema within 6 h of transfusion are the diagnostic criteria for TRALI. The differentiation between cardiac failure and other transfusion-related lung injuries, such astransfusion-associated circulatory overload ( TACO) is difficult and causal treatment is not available. Therapy is based on supportive measures, such as oxygen insufflationor mechanical ventilation. The exactly pathogenesis is still unknown but the most propagated hypothesis is the two-event-model. Neutrophils are primed by the underlying condition, e.g. sepsis or trauma during the first event and these primed neutrophils are activated by transfused leukoagglutinating antibodies (immunogen) or bioreactive mediators (non-immunogen) during the second-event. Transfusion of leukoagglutinating antibodies from female donors with one or more previous pregnancies is the most frequent reason. No more TRALI fatalities were reported after implementation of the donor selection in Germany in 2009. PMID:23558721

  8. Acute renal failure due to falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Habte, B

    1990-01-01

    Seventy-two patients with severe falciparum malaria are described. Twenty-four (33.3%) were complicated by acute renal failure. Comparing patients with renal failure and those without, statistically significant differences occurred regarding presence of cerebral malaria (83% vs 46%), jaundice (92% vs 33%), and death (54% vs 17%). A significantly higher number of patients with renal failure were nonimmune visitors to malaria endemic regions. Renal failure was oliguric in 45% of cases. Dialysis was indicated in 38%, 29% died in early renal failure, and 33% recovered spontaneously. It is concluded that falciparum malaria is frequently complicated by cerebral malaria and renal failure. As nonimmune individuals are prone to develop serious complications, malaria prophylaxis and vigorous treatment of cases is mandatory. PMID:2236718

  9. Acute respiratory failure in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2015-09-01

    Respiratory failure affects up to 0.2% of pregnancies, more commonly in the postpartum period. Altered maternal respiratory physiology affects the assessment and management of these patients. Respiratory failure may result from pregnancy-specific conditions such as preeclampsia, amniotic fluid embolism or peripartum cardiomyopathy. Pregnancy may increase the risk or severity of other conditions, including thromboembolism, asthma, viral pneumonitis, and gastric acid aspiration. Management during pregnancy is similar to the nonpregnant patient. Endotracheal intubation in pregnancy carries an increased risk, due to airway edema and rapid oxygen desaturation following apnea. Few data are available to direct prolonged mechanical ventilation in pregnancy. Chest wall compliance is reduced, perhaps permitting slightly higher airway pressures. Optimizing oxygenation is important, but data on the use of permissive hypercapnia are limited. Delivery of the fetus does not always improve maternal respiratory function, but should be considered if benefit to the fetus is anticipated. PMID:27512467

  10. Acute liver failure and self-medication

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, André Vitorio Câmara; ROCHA, Frederico Theobaldo Ramos; ABREU, Sílvio Romero de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Not responsible self-medication refers to drug use in high doses without rational indication and often associated with alcohol abuse. It can lead to liver damage and drug interactions, and may cause liver failure. Aim To warn about how the practice of self-medication can be responsible for acute liver failure. Method Were used the Medline via PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO and Lilacs, and additional information on institutional sites of interest crossing the headings acute liver failure [tiab] AND acetaminophen [tiab]; self-medication [tiab] AND acetaminophen [tiab]; acute liver failure [tiab] AND dietary supplements [tiab]; self-medication [tiab] AND liver failure [tiab] and self-medication [tiab] AND green tea [tiab]. In Lilacs and SciELO used the descriptor self medication in Portuguese and Spanish. From total surveyed were selected 27 articles and five sites specifically related to the purpose of this review. Conclusions Legislation and supervision disabled and information inaccessible to people, favors the emergence of cases of liver failure drug in many countries. In the list of released drugs that deserve more attention and care, are some herbal medicines used for the purpose of weight loss, and acetaminophen. It is recommended that institutes of health intensify supervision and better orient their populations on drug seemingly harmless, limiting the sale of products or requiring a prescription for release them. PMID:25626943

  11. Glucagonoma-induced acute heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Lukas J; Praeger, Damaris; Baumann, Gert; Knebel, Fabian; Quinkler, Marcus; Roepke, Torsten K

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) represent a broad spectrum of tumours, of which the serotonin-producing carcinoid is the most common and has been shown to cause right ventricular heart failure. However, an association between heart failure and NETs other than carcinoid has not been established so far. In this case report, we describe a 51-year-old patient with a glucagon-producing NET of the pancreas who developed acute heart failure and even cardiogenic shock despite therapy. Heart failure eventually regressed after initialising i.v. treatment with the somatostatin analogue octreotide. Chromogranin A as a tumour marker was shown to be significantly elevated, and it decreased with clinical improvement of the patient. The effects of long-time stimulation of glucagon on the myocardium have not been studied yet; however, sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak can be discussed as a possible mechanism for glucagon-induced heart failure. Learning points Glucagonoma can be a cause for heart failure. i.v. infusion of octreotide can be successfully used to treat glucagonoma-induced acute heart failure. We suggest that cardiac function should be monitored in all NET patients. PMID:25520848

  12. [Effects of oxygen and nikethamide on central drive, ventilation and blood gases of patients with obstructive lung disease in acute exacerbation of respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Ren, X H; Ding, D J; Chen, E Z

    1993-12-01

    Twelve subjects with COPD in acute exacerbation of respiratory failure were studied. The experiment of each subject was divided into three steps: room air breathing, 35% O2 inhalation for one hour, and then intravenous drip of nikethamide (1.875g) for two hours with 35% oxygen inhalation at the same time. At the end of each step, mouth occlusion pressure (P0.1), VT, VE, VA, VCO2, VD and PaO2, PaCO2 were measured respectively. The results showed that, when breathing air, all the patients presented significant higher P0.1 than normal subjects, indicated higher central drive. After oxygen inhalation, P0.1 decreased markedly, but still higher than normal. No correlation was found between delta P0.1 and delta PaO2. VE declined with the drop of P0.1, but this was due to a decrease of respiratory frequency, while VA remained unchanged (P > 0.05). The increase of PaCO2 was unremarkable. Neither correlation was found between delta VA and delta P0.1, nor between delta VA and delta PaCO2. However, a close correlation existed between delta VCO2/VCO2 and delta VE/VE. The result of our study is not consistent with the postulation, the removal of the hypoxic stimulate after oxygen administration results in a decrease of ventilation and CO2 retention. After nikethamide administration, P0.1 increased as well as VE while VA and PaCO2 remained unchanged. The increase of VE was caused by the increase of respiratory rate. Furthermore, PaO2 decreased in some patients. All of the changes demonstrated that nothing is worthwhile with the treatment of nikethamide, but a side effect from increasing work of breathing and consumption of oxygen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8033228

  13. Pathophysiology of acute heart failure: a world to know.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Marteles, M; Rubio Gracia, J; Giménez López, I

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of heart failure (HF) has changed considerably in recent years, progressing from a merely haemodynamic viewpoint to a concept of systemic and multifactorial involvement in which numerous mechanisms interact and concatenate. The effects of these mechanisms go beyond the heart itself, to other organs of vital importance such as the kidneys, liver and lungs. Despite this, the pathophysiology of acute HF still has aspects that elude our deeper understanding. Haemodynamic overload, venous congestion, neurohormonal systems, natriuretic peptides, inflammation, oxidative stress and its repercussion on cardiac and vascular remodelling are currently considered the main players in acute HF. Starting with the concept of acute HF, this review provides updates on the various mechanisms involved in this disease. PMID:26541707

  14. Imaging Techniques in Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Pérez del Villar, Candelas; Yotti, Raquel; Bermejo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnosis of heart failure. In patients with a clinical picture of acute decompensation, prognosis is largely determined by early implementation of general measures and treatment of the underlying cause. Given its diagnostic yield and portability, ultrasound has become an essential tool in the setting of acute heart failure, and is currently found in all medical departments involved in the care of the critically ill patient. Cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography allow detailed characterization of multiple aspects of cardiac structure and function that were previously unavailable. This helps guide and monitor many of the treatment decisions in the acute heart failure population in an entirely noninvasive way. This article aims to review the usefulness of the imaging techniques that are clinically relevant in the context of an episode of acute heart failure. We discuss the indications and limitations of these techniques in detail and describe the general principles for the appropriate interpretation of results. PMID:26002273

  15. Influence of acute renal failure on the mononuclear phagocytic system.

    PubMed

    Sousa, V R; Sousa, A A; Petroianu, A; Simal, C J; Barbosa, A J

    2001-09-01

    Several studies show the ability of macrophages to remove particles injected into the bloodstream. This function seems to be increased in the presence of acute renal failure. The objective of the present study was to assess the phagocytic function of the main organs (spleen, liver and lung) of the mononuclear phagocytic system in renal and postrenal failures. Fifteen rats (250-350 g) were divided into three groups (N = 5): group I - control; group II - ligature of both ureters, and group III - bilateral nephrectomy. On the third postoperative day, all animals received an iv injection of 1 ml/kg 99mTc sulfur colloid. Blood samples were collected for the assessment of plasma urea, creatinine, sodium, and potassium concentrations and arterial gasometry. Samples of liver, spleen, lung and blood clots were obtained and radioactivity was measured. Samples of liver, spleen, lung and kidney were prepared for routine histopathological analysis. Plasma urea, creatinine and potassium concentrations in groups II and III were higher than in group I (P<0.05). Plasma sodium concentrations in groups II and III were lower than in group I (P<0.05). Compensated metabolic acidosis was observed in the presence of postrenal failure. Group II animals showed a lower level of radioactivity in the spleen (0.98) and lung (2.63), and a higher level in the liver (105.51) than control. Group III animals showed a lower level of radioactivity in the spleen (11.94) and a higher level in the liver (61.80), lung (11.30) and blood clot (5.13) than control. In groups II and III liver steatosis and bronchopneumonia were observed. Renal and postrenal failures seem to interfere with blood clearance by the mononuclear phagocytic system. PMID:11514841

  16. Resolution of Acute Inflammation In The Lung

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Bruce D.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized pro-resolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung. PMID:24313723

  17. Resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce D; Serhan, Charles N

    2014-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli, or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized proresolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung. PMID:24313723

  18. Prognostic factors in neonatal acute renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, R.L.; Campbell, F.; Brenbridge, A.N.

    1984-08-01

    Sixteen infants, 2 to 35 days of age, had acute renal failure, a diagnosis based on serum creatinine concentrations greater than 1.5 mg/dL for at least 24 hours. Eight infants were oliguric (urine flow less than 1.0 mL/kg/h) whereas the remainder were nonoliguric. To determine clinical parameters useful in prognosis, urine flow rate, duration of anuria, peak serum creatinine, urea (BUN) concentration, and nuclide uptake by scintigraphy were correlated with recovery. Nine infants had acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia, three had acute renal failure as a result of congenital cardiovascular disease, and four had major renal anomalies. Four oliguric patients died: three of renal failure and one of heart failure. All nonoliguric infants survived with mean follow-up serum creatinine concentration of 0.8 +/- 0.5 (SD) mg/dL whereas that of oliguric survivors was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Peak serum creatinine concentration did not differ between those patients who were dying and those recovering. All infants who were dying remained anuric at least four days and revealed no renal uptake of nuclide. Eleven survivors were anuric three days or less, and renal perfusion was detectable by scintigraphy in each case. However, the remaining survivor (with bilateral renal vein thrombosis) recovered after 15 days of anuria despite nonvisualization of kidneys by scintigraphy. In neonates with ischemic acute renal failure, lack of oliguria and the presence of identifiable renal uptake of nuclide suggest a favorable prognosis.

  19. Prognostic factors in neonatal acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, R L; Campbell, F; Brenbridge, A N

    1984-08-01

    Sixteen infants, 2 to 35 days of age, had acute renal failure, a diagnosis based on serum creatinine concentrations greater than 1.5 mg/dL for at least 24 hours. Eight infants were oliguric (urine flow less than 1.0 mL/kg/h) whereas the remainder were nonoliguric. To determine clinical parameters useful in prognosis, urine flow rate, duration of anuria, peak serum creatinine, urea (BUN) concentration, and nuclide uptake by scintigraphy were correlated with recovery. Nine infants had acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia, three had acute renal failure as a result of congenital cardiovascular disease, and four had major renal anomalies. Four oliguric patients died: three of renal failure and one of heart failure. All nonoliguric infants survived with mean follow-up serum creatinine concentration of 0.8 +/- 0.5 (SD) mg/dL whereas that of oliguric survivors was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Peak serum creatinine concentration did not differ between those patients who were dying and those recovering. All infants who were dying remained anuric at least four days and revealed no renal uptake of nuclide. Eleven survivors were anuric three days or less, and renal perfusion was detectable by scintigraphy in each case. However, the remaining survivor (with bilateral renal vein thrombosis) recovered after 15 days of anuria despite nonvisualization of kidneys by scintigraphy. In neonates with ischemic acute renal failure, lack of oliguria and the presence of identifiable renal uptake of nuclide suggest a favorable prognosis. PMID:6462825

  20. Oxidants in Acute and Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mannam, Praveen; Srivastava, Anup; Sugunaraj, Jaya Prakash; Lee, Patty J; Sauler, Maor

    2015-01-01

    Oxidants play an important role in homeostatic function, but excessive oxidant generation has an adverse effect on health. The manipulation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) can have a beneficial effect on various lung pathologies. However indiscriminate uses of anti-oxidant strategies have not demonstrated any consistent benefit and may be harmful. Here we propose that nuanced strategies are needed to modulate the oxidant system to obtain a beneficial result in the lung diseases such as Acute Lung Injury (ALI) and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). We identify novel areas of lung oxidant responses that may yield fruitful therapies in the future. PMID:25705575

  1. The pathophysiology of hypertensive acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Viau, David M; Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Spranger, Marty D; O'Leary, Donal S; Levy, Phillip D

    2015-12-01

    While acute heart failure (AHF) is often regarded as a single disorder, an evolving understanding recognises the existence of multiple phenotypes with varied pathophysiological alterations. Herein we discuss hypertensive AHF and provide insight into a mechanism where acute fluid redistribution is caused by a disturbance in the ventricular-vascular coupling relationship. In this relationship, acute alterations in vascular elasticity, vasoconstriction and reflected pulse waves lead to increases in cardiac work and contribute to decompensated LV function with associated subendocardial ischaemia and end-organ damage. Chronic predisposing factors (neurohormonal activity, nitric oxide insensitivity, arterial stiffening) and physiological stressors (sympathetic surge, volume overload, physical exertion) that are causally linked to acute symptom onset are discussed. Lastly, we review treatment options including both nitrovasodilators and promising novel therapeutics, and discuss future directions in the management of this phenotypic variant. PMID:26123135

  2. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease. PMID:24930078

  3. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Arantxa; Masip, Josep

    2014-01-01

    After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. PMID:25143721

  4. Animal models of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Frevert, Charles W.; Martin, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury in humans is characterized histopathologically by neutrophilic alveolitis, injury of the alveolar epithelium and endothelium, hyaline membrane formation, and microvascular thrombi. Different animal models of experimental lung injury have been used to investigate mechanisms of lung injury. Most are based on reproducing in animals known risk factors for ARDS, such as sepsis, lipid embolism secondary to bone fracture, acid aspiration, ischemia-reperfusion of pulmonary or distal vascular beds, and other clinical risks. However, none of these models fully reproduces the features of human lung injury. The goal of this review is to summarize the strengths and weaknesses of existing models of lung injury. We review the specific features of human ARDS that should be modeled in experimental lung injury and then discuss specific characteristics of animal species that may affect the pulmonary host response to noxious stimuli. We emphasize those models of lung injury that are based on reproducing risk factors for human ARDS in animals and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each model and the extent to which each model reproduces human ARDS. The present review will help guide investigators in the design and interpretation of animal studies of acute lung injury. PMID:18621912

  5. Impact of Preexisting Interstitial Lung Disease on Acute, Extensive Radiation Pneumonitis: Retrospective Analysis of Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yuichi; Abe, Takefumi; Omae, Minako; Matsui, Takashi; Kato, Masato; Hasegawa, Hirotsugu; Enomoto, Yasunori; Ishihara, Takeaki; Inui, Naoki; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the clinical characteristics and predictive factors for developing acute extended radiation pneumonitis with a focus on the presence and radiological characteristics of preexisting interstitial lung disease. Methods Of 1429 irradiations for lung cancer from May 2006 to August 2013, we reviewed 651 irradiations involving the lung field. The presence, compatibility with usual interstitial pneumonia, and occupying area of preexisting interstitial lung disease were retrospectively evaluated by pretreatment computed tomography. Cases of non-infectious, non-cardiogenic, acute respiratory failure with an extended bilateral shadow developing within 30 days after the last irradiation were defined as acute extended radiation pneumonitis. Results Nine (1.4%) patients developed acute extended radiation pneumonitis a mean of 6.7 days after the last irradiation. Although preexisting interstitial lung disease was found in 13% of patients (84 patients), 78% of patients (7 patients) with acute extended radiation pneumonitis cases had preexisting interstitial lung disease, which resulted in incidences of acute extended radiation pneumonitis of 0.35 and 8.3% in patients without and with preexisting interstitial lung disease, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that the presence of preexisting interstitial lung disease (odds ratio = 22.6; 95% confidence interval = 5.29–155; p < 0.001) and performance status (≥2; odds ratio = 4.22; 95% confidence interval = 1.06–20.8; p = 0.049) were significant predictive factors. Further analysis of the 84 patients with preexisting interstitial lung disease revealed that involvement of more than 10% of the lung field was the only independent predictive factor associated with the risk of acute extended radiation pneumonitis (odds ratio = 6.14; 95% confidence interval = 1.0–37.4); p = 0.038). Conclusions Pretreatment computed tomography evaluations of the presence of and area size occupied

  6. Efficacy of noninvasive CPAP in COPD with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, P; Reissmann, H; Maltais, F; Ranieri, M; Gottfried, S B

    1995-11-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation and the development of intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEPi) are commonly observed in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in acute respiratory failure. Previous studies have shown that externally applied PEEP reduces PEEPi and its adverse effects in mechanically-ventilated COPD patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of graded amounts of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the degree of inspiratory effort, pattern of breathing, gas exchange, and level of dyspnoea in a group of spontaneously breathing, nonintubated COPD patients in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Ten COPD patients admitted to the intensive care unit in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure were studied. Inspiratory effort was measured by the tidal excursions of oesophageal (Poes) and transdiaphragmatic (Pdi) pressure. Inspiratory effort and both the pressure-time product for the diaphragm (integral of Pdi-dt) and for the inspiratory muscles (integral of Poes.dt) were measured during the application of 5, 7.5, and 10 cmH2O of CPAP. Dyspnoea, gas exchange and pattern of breathing were also assessed. Inspiratory effort and the pressure-time product both for the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscles fell significantly with CPAP in a dose-dependent fashion. Both the pattern of breathing and level of dyspnoea improved with CPAP. End-expiratory lung volume remained stable at the lower levels of CPAP, with only modest increases at the higher levels. Arterial oxygen tension (Pa,O2) and arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa,CO2) either improved or remained stable with CPAP. We conclude that the noninvasive application of CPAP to spontaneously breathing patients with severe COPD in acute respiratory failure decreases inspiratory effort and dyspnoea whilst improving breathing pattern. It is conceivable that the early institution of CPAP in this setting may obviate the need for intubation and conventional

  7. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hodder, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1) an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2) a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician. PMID:27147862

  8. Organ protection possibilities in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M; Morales-Rull, J L

    2016-04-01

    Unlike chronic heart failure (HF), the treatment for acute HF has not changed over the last decade. The drugs employed have shown their ability to control symptoms but have not achieved organ protection or managed to reduce medium to long-term morbidity and mortality. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute HF suggest that treatment should be directed not only towards correcting the haemodynamic disorders and achieving symptomatic relief but also towards preventing organ damage, thereby counteracting myocardial remodelling and cardiac and extracardiac disorders. Compounds that exert vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory action in the acute phase of HF and can stop cell death, thereby boosting repair mechanisms, could have an essential role in organ protection. PMID:26896381

  9. Tsutsugamushi infection-associated acute rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Young, Park Chi; Hae, Chung Choon; Lee, Kim Hyun; Hoon, Chung Jong

    2003-12-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication that emerges in a variety of infectious diseases, such as tsutsugamushi infection. In this study, we report a 71-year-old female patient with tsutsugamushi infection who exhibiting rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. On admission, an eschar, which is characteristic of tsutsugamushi infection, was found on her right flank area. Moreover, her tsutsugamushi antibody titer was 1:40960. The elevated values of serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), aldolase, creatinine and dark brown urine secondary to myoglobinuria are consistent with indications of rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure due to tsutsugamushi infection. Her health improved without any residual effects after treatment with doxycyclin and hydration with normal saline. PMID:14717236

  10. Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure after gardening.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Acute nontraumatic exertional rhabdomyolysis may arise when the energy supply to muscle is insufficient to meet demands, particularly in physically untrained individuals. We report on a psychiatric patient who developed large bruises and hemorrhagic blisters on both hands and arms, rhabdomyolysis of both forearm muscles with a moderate compartment syndrome, and consecutive acute renal failure following excessive work in the garden. Although specifically asked, the patient denied any hard physical work or gardening, and heteroanamnestic data were not available. The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was easy to establish, but until reliable anamnestic data were obtained, the etiology remained uncertain. Four days after arrival, the patient recalled working hard in the garden. The etiology of rhabdomyolysis was finally reached, and the importance of anamnestic data was once more confirmed. PMID:25954536

  11. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Renal Failure after Gardening

    PubMed Central

    Vucicevic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Acute nontraumatic exertional rhabdomyolysis may arise when the energy supply to muscle is insufficient to meet demands, particularly in physically untrained individuals. We report on a psychiatric patient who developed large bruises and hemorrhagic blisters on both hands and arms, rhabdomyolysis of both forearm muscles with a moderate compartment syndrome, and consecutive acute renal failure following excessive work in the garden. Although specifically asked, the patient denied any hard physical work or gardening, and heteroanamnestic data were not available. The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was easy to establish, but until reliable anamnestic data were obtained, the etiology remained uncertain. Four days after arrival, the patient recalled working hard in the garden. The etiology of rhabdomyolysis was finally reached, and the importance of anamnestic data was once more confirmed. PMID:25954536

  12. Acute renal failure in the Armenian earthquake.

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, G

    1992-01-01

    A destructive earthquake devastated northwestern Armenia on December 7, 1988. The size of the affected area (radius of 50 miles), the time of the day when it occurred (11:41 a.m.), deficiencies in the design and construction of buildings, and inadequate initial rescue and relief capabilities resulted in one of the most lethal and traumatic natural disasters of the century. A large but unknown number (estimated at 225 to 385) of the extricated victims who had sustained crush injury developed myoglobinuric acute renal failure requiring dialytic support. The limited number (8-10 dialysis machines) of antiquated dialysis facilities available locally were overwhelmed. International dialysis relief efforts resulted in meeting the immediate acute needs and provided the motivation and elements of the more efficient system for the future delivery of maintenance dialysis. PMID:1509155

  13. Acute Liver Failure including Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Acute liver failure (ALF) is a dramatic and highly unpredictable clinical syndrome defined by the sudden onset of coagulopathy and encephalopathy. Although many disease processes can cause ALF, acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause in the United States, and has a 66% chance of recovery with early N-acetylcysteine treatment and supportive care. Cerebral edema and infectious complications are notoriously difficult to detect and treat in ALF patients and may lead to irreversible brain damage and multi-organ failure. Emergency liver transplantation is associated with a 70% 1-year patient survival but 20% of listed patients die, highlighting the importance of early referral of ALF patients with a poor prognosis to a liver transplant center. PMID:18570942

  14. Renal Dysfunction in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong Woo

    2011-01-01

    During treatment of acute heart failure (AHF), worsening renal function is often complicated and results in a complex clinical course. Furthermore, renal dysfunction is a strong independent predictor of long-term adverse outcomes in patients with AHF. Traditionally, the predominant cause of renal dysfunction has been attributed to impairment of cardiac output and relative underfilling of arterial perfusion. Recently, emerging data have led to the importance of venous congestion and elevated intra-abdominal pressure rather than confining it to impaired forward cardiac output as the primary driver of renal impairment. Relief of congestion is a major objective of AHF treatment but therapy is still based on the administration of loop diuretics. The results of the recently performed controlled studies for the assessment of new treatments to overcome resistance to diuretic treatment to protect kidneys from untoward effects have been mostly neutral. Better treatment of congestion in heart failure remains a major problem. PMID:22125554

  15. Acute renal failure due to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Allon, M; Lopez, E J; Min, K W

    1990-10-01

    Acute renal failure developed in three patients within a few days of starting ciprofloxacin hydrochloride therapy. An allergic interstitial nephritis was suggested by fever and eosinophiluria in one patient and by erythema multiforme in another. A kidney biopsy specimen confirmed this diagnosis in one patient. Renal function improved shortly after withdrawal of the drug in all three patients. Literature survey revealed an additional three patients with a similar complication. Allergic manifestations, such as fever or rash, were a feature in most reported cases. In view of this potential complication, renal function should be closely monitored in patients receiving ciprofloxacin therapy, especially if other potentially nephrotoxic drugs are prescribed concomitantly. PMID:2222106

  16. The Pathology of Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Lefkowitch, Jay H

    2016-05-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare and severe liver disease that usually develops in 8 weeks or less in individuals without preexisting liver disease. Its chief causes worldwide are hepatitis virus infections (hepatitis A, B, and E) and drug hepatotoxicity (particularly intentional or unintentional acetaminophen toxicity). Massive hepatic necrosis is often seen in liver specimens in ALF and features marked loss of hepatocytes, variable degrees of inflammation, and a stereotypic proliferation of bile ductular structures (neocholangioles) derived from activated periportal hepatic progenitor cells. This paper reviews the liver pathology in ALF, including forms of zonal necrosis and their etiologies. PMID:27058243

  17. Diagnosis and management of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ural, Dilek; Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Eren, Mehmet; Karaüzüm, Kurtuluş; Temizhan, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Ramassubu, Kumudha; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2015-11-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a life threatening clinical syndrome with a progressively increasing incidence in general population. Turkey is a country with a high cardiovascular mortality and recent national statistics show that the population structure has turned to an 'aged' population.As a consequence, AHF has become one of the main reasons of admission to cardiology clinics. This consensus report summarizes clinical and prognostic classification of AHF, its worldwide and national epidemiology, diagnostic work-up, principles of approach in emergency department,intensive care unit and ward, treatment in different clinical scenarios and approach in special conditions and how to plan hospital discharge. PMID:26574757

  18. Lethal acute liver failure in a patient treated with sunitinib.

    PubMed

    Guillen, S S; Meijer, M; de Jongh, F E

    2016-01-01

    Sunitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used as an anticancer drug in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNETs) and gastrointestinal stromal tumour. Elevated liver enzymes are frequently observed during treatment but acute liver failure is uncommon. We describe a case of fulminant acute liver failure and acute kidney injury during treatment with sunitinib for metastatic RCC. PMID:26933184

  19. Management of acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Dec, G William

    2007-06-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is the most common cause for hospitalization among patients over 65 years of age. It may result from new onset of ventricular dysfunction or, more typically, exacerbation of chronic heart failure symptoms. In-hospital mortality remains high for both systolic and diastolic forms of the disease. Therapy is largely empirical as few randomized, controlled trials have focused on this population and consensus practice guidelines are just beginning to be formulated. Treatment should be focused upon correction of volume overload, identifying potential precipitating causes, and optimizing vasodilator and beta-adrenergic blocker therapy. The majority of patients (>90%) will improve without the use of positive inotropic agents, which should be reserved for patients with refractory hypotension, cardiogenic shock, end-organ dysfunction, or failure to respond to conventional oral and/or intravenous diuretics and vasodilators. The role of aldosterone antagonists, biventricular pacing, and novel pharmacological agents including vasopressin antagonists, endothelin blockers, and calcium-sensitizing agents is also reviewed. PMID:17531903

  20. Modulation of acute lung injury by integrins.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Dean

    2012-07-01

    Acute lung injury is a common disorder with a high mortality rate, but previous efforts to develop drugs to treat this disorder have been unsuccessful. In an effort to develop more effective treatments, we have been studying the molecular pathways that regulate the dysfunction of alveolar epithelial cells and endothelial cells that serve as a final common pathway leading to alveolar flooding. Using integrin subunit knockout mice and antibodies we developed by immunizing these mice, we have found important and distinct roles for the αvβ6 integrin on epithelial cells and the αvβ5 integrin on endothelial cells in mediating increases in alveolar permeability in multiple models of acute lung injury. We have also found therapeutic effects of αvβ5 inhibition in two models of septic shock even when the antibody was administered to animals that were obviously ill. These results identify αvβ6 and αvβ5 as promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of acute lung injury and septic shock. PMID:22802286

  1. Steroid use in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Karkhanis, Jamuna; Verna, Elizabeth C.; Chang, Matthew S.; Stravitz, R. Todd; Schilsky, Michael; Lee, William M; Brown, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Drug-induced and indeterminate Acute Liver Failure (ALF) might be due to an autoimmune-like hepatitis that is responsive to corticosteroid therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether corticosteroids improve survival in fulminant autoimmune hepatitis, drug-induced or indeterminate ALF, and whether this benefit varies according to the severity of illness. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of autoimmune, indeterminate and drug-induced ALF patients in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group from 1998-2007. The primary endpoints were overall and spontaneous survival (SS, survival without transplant). Results 361 ALF patients were studied, 66 with autoimmune (25 steroids, 41 no steroids), 164 with indeterminate (21 steroids, 143 no steroids), and 131 with drug-induced (16 steroids, 115 no steroids) ALF. Steroid use was not associated with improved overall survival (61% vs. 66%, p=0.41), nor with improved survival in any diagnosis category. Steroid use was associated with diminished survival in certain subgroups of patients, including those with the highest quartile of MELD (MELD > 40, survival 30% vs. 57%, p=0.03). In multivariable analysis controlling for steroid use and diagnosis, age (OR 1.37 per decade), coma grade (OR 2.02 grade 2, 2.65 grade 3, 5.29 grade 4), MELD (OR 1.07) and pH<7.4 (OR 3.09) were significantly associated with mortality. Though steroid use was associated with a marginal benefit in SS overall (35% v. 23%, p=0.047), this benefit did not persistent in multivariable analysis; mechanical ventilation (OR 0.24), MELD (OR 0.93), and ALT (1.02) were the only significant predictors of SS. Conclusions Corticosteroids did not improve overall survival or SS in drug-induced, indeterminate or autoimmune ALF and were associated with lower survival in patients with the highest MELD scores. PMID:23929808

  2. Oxygen derived variables in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Covelli, H D; Nessan, V J; Tuttle, W K

    1983-08-01

    The clinical course of 33 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was monitored by noninvasive oxygen derived variables and compared to data obtained by invasive monitoring. A total of 350 data points were used to compare the physiologic shunt fraction (Qsp/Qt) with the ratio of arterial oxygen to inspired oxygen concentration (PaO2/FIO2), the alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure difference [P(A-a)O2], the respiratory index (RI)-[P(A-a)O2/PaO2], and the ratio of arterial oxygen to alveolar oxygen (a/A). The PaO2/FIO2 ratio, the RI and the aA ratio correlated well with Qsp/Qt (r = 0.87 to 0.94). The P(A-a)O2 correlated less well (r = 0.68). Changes in the cardiac index (CI) and the arteriovenous oxygen content difference C(a-v)O2 had only a minimal effect on the correlation of the oxygen derived variables with Qsp/Qt, although a higher correlation resulted when these extrapulmonary factors were within normal range. We conclude that a number of oxygen derived variables may accurately reflect the degree of Qsp/Qt. The PaO2/FIO2 ratio is the easiest of these variables to calculate, yet accurately predicts the degree of Qsp/Qt throughout a course of acute respiratory failure. PMID:6409506

  3. [Diuretic therapy in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luis; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-03-01

    Diuretics are widely recommended in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Unfortunately, despite their widespread use, limited data are available from randomized clinical trials to guide clinicians on the appropriate management of diuretic therapy. Loop diuretics are considered the first-line diuretic therapy, especially intravenous furosemide, but the best mode of administration (high-dose versus low-dose and continuous infusion versus bolus) is unclear. When diuretic resistance develops, different therapeutic strategies can be adopted, including combined diuretic therapy with thiazide diuretics and/or aldosterone antagonists. Low or "non-diuretic" doses (25-50mg QD) of aldosterone antagonists have been demonstrated to confer a survival benefit in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction and consequently should be prescribed in all such patients, unless contraindicated by potassium and/or renal function values. There is less evidence on the use of aldosterone antagonists at higher or "diuretic" doses (≥ 100mg QD) but these drugs could be useful in relieving congestive symptoms in combination with furosemide. Thiazide diuretics can also be helpful as they have synergic effects with loop diuretics by inhibiting sodium reabsorption in distal parts of the nephron. The effect of diuretic therapy in AHF should be monitored with careful observation of clinical signs and symptoms of congestion. Serum electrolytes and kidney function should also be monitored during the use of intravenous diuretics. PMID:24930082

  4. Challenging immunosuppression treatment in lung transplant recipients with kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Högerle, Benjamin A; Kohli, Neeraj; Habibi-Parker, Kirsty; Lyster, Haifa; Reed, Anna; Carby, Martin; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Weymann, Alexander; Simon, André R; Sabashnikov, Anton; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Soresi, Simona

    2016-03-01

    Kidney failure after lung transplantation is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Calcineurin inhibitors are immunosuppressants which play a major role in terms of postoperative kidney failure after lung transplantation. We report our preliminary experience with the anti-interleukin-2 monoclonal antibody Basiliximab utilized as a "calcineurin inhibitor-free window" in the setting of early postoperative kidney failure after lung transplantation. Between 2012 and 2015 nine lung transplant patients who developed kidney failure for more than 14 days were included. Basiliximab was administrated in three doses (Day 0, 4, and 20) whilst Tacrolimus was discontinued or reduced to maintain a serum level between 2 and 4 ng/mL. Baseline glomerular filtration rate pre transplant was normal for all patients. Seven patients completely recovered from kidney failure (67%, mean eGFR pre and post Basiliximab: 42.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and 69 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and were switched back on Tacrolimus. Only one of these patients still needs ongoing renal replacement therapy. Two patients showed no recovery from kidney failure and did not survive. Basiliximab might be a safe and feasible therapeutical option in patients which are affected by calcineurin inhibitor-related kidney failure in the early post lung transplant period. Further studies are necessary to confirm our preliminary results. PMID:26892232

  5. Human models of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, Alastair G.; McAuley, Danny F.; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Hind, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a syndrome that is characterised by acute inflammation and tissue injury that affects normal gas exchange in the lungs. Hallmarks of ALI include dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary membrane resulting in increased vascular permeability, an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung and a local pro-coagulant state. Patients with ALI present with severe hypoxaemia and radiological evidence of bilateral pulmonary oedema. The syndrome has a mortality rate of approximately 35% and usually requires invasive mechanical ventilation. ALI can follow direct pulmonary insults, such as pneumonia, or occur indirectly as a result of blood-borne insults, commonly severe bacterial sepsis. Although animal models of ALI have been developed, none of them fully recapitulate the human disease. The differences between the human syndrome and the phenotype observed in animal models might, in part, explain why interventions that are successful in models have failed to translate into novel therapies. Improved animal models and the development of human in vivo and ex vivo models are therefore required. In this article, we consider the clinical features of ALI, discuss the limitations of current animal models and highlight how emerging human models of ALI might help to answer outstanding questions about this syndrome. PMID:21357760

  6. Clinical management of patients with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Joseph W

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is a common and serious complication of congenital and acquired heart disease, and it is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. When a patient is admitted to the hospital with acute heart failure, there are several important goals for the hospital admission, including maintaining adequate perfusion, establishing the underlying aetiology for the heart failure, patient and family education, and discharge from the hospital in a stable condition. The pathway to home discharge is variable and may include inotropic therapy, mechanical circulatory support, and/or heart transplantation. This review will cover the epidemiology, presentation, and management of acute heart failure in children. PMID:26377712

  7. Synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis resulting in rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Argamany, Jacqueline R; Reveles, Kelly R; Duhon, Bryson

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid usage has increased in the past decade. Concurrently, emergency management of associated adverse effects due to synthetic cannabinoid usage has also risen. Reported toxicities include psychosis, seizures, cardiotoxicity, acute kidney injury, and death. While cannabis was first described as a cause of acute hyperemesis in 2004, a more recent case series also describes the association between cannabinoid hyperemesis and risk of acute renal failure. Synthetic cannabinoids have also been reported to cause acute hyperemesis and acute renal failure; however, the risk of rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure has yet to be elucidated. In this article, we report the first known case of synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis leading to rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. PMID:26422191

  8. Acute renal failure in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D J; Sherman, W H; Osserman, E F; Appel, G B

    1984-02-01

    In the past, patients with multiple myeloma and acute renal failure have had a poor prognosis. Few patients recovered renal function and fewer still survived for prolonged time periods. This report describes the course of 10 patients with multiple myeloma and true acute renal failure treated during the decade 1970 to 1980, and reviews recent reports concerning this association. The use of radiographic contrast agents is no longer the primary predisposing factor to acute renal failure in the myeloma population. Rather, infection, hypercalcemia, and dehydration in the presence of light chain excretion are the major conditions precipitating the renal failure. Despite severe renal failure requiring dialysis, many patients may regain good renal function. Factors associated with a good or poor prognosis in this population are reviewed. The prognosis in patients with myeloma and acute renal failure has greatly improved in recent years, and prolonged survival may occur. PMID:6695948

  9. Carbon monoxide poisoning and nonoliguric acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Bessoudo, R.; Gray, J.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning in a 37-year-old man was complicated by neurologic damage, skin changes, muscle necrosis and nonoliguric renal failure. The relation between nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in carbon monoxide poisoning is reviewed. Recognition of the acute renal failure in such cases is important, for this complication can be fatal; the prognosis is excellent, however, if proper medical management is provided. PMID:679099

  10. Atrial natriuretic factor in oliguric acute renal failure. Anaritide Acute Renal Failure Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J; Salem, M M; Chertow, G M; Weisberg, L S; McGrew, F; Marbury, T C; Allgren, R L

    2000-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), an endogenous hormone synthesized by the cardiac atria, has been shown to improve renal function in multiple animal models of acute renal failure. In a recent multicenter clinical trial of 504 patients with acute tubular necrosis (oliguric and nonoliguric), ANP decreased the need for dialysis only in the oliguric patients. In the present study, 222 patients with oliguric acute renal failure were enrolled into a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to assess prospectively the safety and efficacy of ANP compared with placebo. Subjects were randomized to treatment with a 24-hour infusion of ANP (anaritide, 0.2 microgram/kg/min; synthetic form of human ANP) or placebo. Dialysis and mortality status were followed up for 60 days. The primary efficacy end point was dialysis-free survival through day 21. Dialysis-free survival rates were 21% in the ANP group and 15% in the placebo group (P = 0.22). By day 14 of the study, 64% and 77% of the ANP and placebo groups had undergone dialysis, respectively (P = 0.054), and 9 additional patients (7 patients, ANP group; 2 patients, placebo group) needed dialysis but did not receive it. Although a trend was present, there was no statistically significant beneficial effect of ANP in dialysis-free survival or reduction in dialysis in these subjects with oliguric acute renal failure. Mortality rates through day 60 were 60% versus 56% in the ANP and placebo groups, respectively (P = 0.541). One hundred two of 108 (95%) versus 63 of 114 (55%) patients in the ANP and placebo groups had systolic blood pressures less than 90 mm Hg during the study-drug infusion (P < 0.001). The maximal absolute decrease in systolic blood pressure was significantly greater in the anaritide group than placebo group (33.6 versus 23.9 mm Hg; P < 0.001). This well-characterized population with oliguric acute renal failure had an overall high morbidity and mortality. PMID:11007679

  11. Acute liver failure and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2013-08-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is defined by the presence of coagulopathy (International Normalized Ratio ≥ 1.5) and hepatic encephalopathy due to severe liver damage in patients without pre-existing liver disease. Although the mortality due to ALF without liver transplantation is over 80%, the survival rates of patients have considerably improved with the advent of liver transplantation, up to 60% to 90% in the last two decades. Recent large studies in Western countries reported 1, 5, and 10-year patient survival rates after liver transplantation for ALF of approximately 80%, 70%, and 65%, respectively. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), which has mainly evolved in Asian countries where organ availability from deceased donors is extremely scarce, has also improved the survival rate of ALF patients in these regions. According to recent reports, the overall survival rate of adult ALF patients who underwent LDLT ranges from 60% to 90%. Although there is still controversy regarding the graft type, optimal graft volume, and ethical issues, LDLT has become an established treatment option for ALF in areas where the use of deceased donor organs is severely restricted. PMID:25343108

  12. [Acute renal failure caused by phenazopyridine].

    PubMed

    Vega, Jorge

    2003-05-01

    A 27 years old woman was admitted due to abdominal cramps, jaundice and oligoanuria, starting 48 hours after eating Chinese food. Hepatic biochemical tests, abdominal ultrasound and retrograde pyelography were normal. The urine was intensely orange colored and microscopic analysis was normal. The serum creatinine and urea nitrogen on admission were 4.59 and 42.5 mg/dl and rose to 13.5 and 72.4 mg/dl, respectively, at the 6th hospital day. Oliguria lasted only 48 hours. Dialysis was not used, since the patient was in good general condition and uremic symptoms were absent. On the 7th day, azotemia began to subside and at the 14th day, serum creatinine was 1.0 mg/dl. Before hospital discharge, she confessed the ingestion of 2.000 mg of phenazopyridine, during a nervous breakdown, aiming to sleep deeply. Remarkable was the persistence of the orange color of her urine during several days and the dissociation between the rate of increase of serum creatinine with respect to urea nitrogen. This is an unusual case of acute renal failure caused by an overdose of a drug, commonly prescribed for urinary tract infections. PMID:12879816

  13. Acute Liver Failure: Summary of a Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Lee, William M.; Squires, Robert H.; Nyberg, Scott L.; Doo, Edward; Hoofnagle, Jay H.

    2011-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare but challenging clinical syndrome with multiple causes; a specific etiology cannot be identified in 15% of adult and 50% of pediatric cases. The course of ALF is variable and the mortality rate is high. Liver transplantation is the only therapy of proven benefit, but the rapidity of progression and the variable course of ALF limit its use. Currently in the United States, spontaneous survival occurs in approximately 45%, liver transplantation in 25%, and death without transplantation in 30% of adults with ALF. Higher rates of spontaneous recovery (56%) and transplantation (31%) with lower rates of death (13%) occur in children. The outcome of ALF varies by etiology, favorable prognoses being found with acetaminophen overdose, hepatitis A, and ischemia (≈60% spontaneous survival), and poor prognoses with drug-induced ALF, hepatitis B, and indeterminate cases (≈25% spontaneous survival). Excellent intensive care is critical in management of patients with ALF. Nonspecific therapies are of unproven benefit. Future possible therapeutic approaches include N-acetylcysteine, hypothermia, liver assist devices, and hepatocyte transplantation. Advances in stem cell research may allow provision of cells for bioartificial liver support. ALF presents many challenging opportunities in both clinical and basic research. PMID:18318440

  14. Survival from acute renal failure after severe burns.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Y; Momma, S; Takamizawa, A; Nishida, S

    1984-12-01

    We describe a patient with 50 per cent, third degree flame burns who had a history of paint thinner inhalation for over 10 years. Moreover, chlorpromazine had been administered for the treatment of insomnia caused by chronic thinner intoxication. He developed oliguric acute renal failure soon after the burn injury, although adequate resuscitation therapy was given, and survived following frequent haemodialysis. Although survival from acute renal failure after severe burns is rare, once the diagnosis of acute renal failure has been made, haemodialysis should be instituted as early as possible. Furthermore, in a severely burnt patient with episodes of chronic and acute intoxication from organic chemicals or drugs which may have caused renal damage, acute renal failure may occur, so that careful observation is advised. PMID:6525538

  15. Inconsequence of membrane choice in acute renal failure?

    PubMed

    Mujais, S K; Ivanavich, P

    1996-05-01

    The choice of hemodialysis membrane in acute renal failure has caused a heated debate, principally because of the dogmatism with which the results of preliminary clinical studies have been translated into prescription dictum. The issue, however, is not merely the limitations of these two studies, but rather the shift in emphasis they may have engendered in the approach to dialytic therapy in acute renal failure. Dogmatism based on limited or flawed data does not serve the interests of our patients, and the issue of hemodialysis in acute renal failure is far more complex than the exaggerated importance of membrane choice. PMID:8725627

  16. Acute renal failure in the "Comrades Marathon" runners.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Y K; Aboo, N; Naicker, S; Parsoo, I

    This study investigated the clinical and biochemical features of acute renal failure in marathon runners. Over a period of 18 years (1969-1986), 19 patients were admitted to the renal unit. The histories and biochemical data of 4 patients seen in 1986 are described. The pathophysiology of acute renal failure is multifactorial and is the combined effect of rhabdomyolysis, dehydration, hypotension, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and hyperuricaemia. Efforts to correct dehydration have resulted in a decrease in the incidence of acute renal failure. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is to be deprecated and efforts should be made to publicize this harmful effect. PMID:2485484

  17. Nonobstructive Acute Renal Failure with a Large Solitary Fibroid

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Blakele; Yilmaz, Ali; DePasquale, Stephen; Boren, Todd

    2016-01-01

    A 38-year-old African American woman presenting with acute abdominal pain and nonobstructive renal failure was found to have an enlarged fibroid uterus. A differential for sepsis was considered. Lab evaluation revealed an elevated creatinine and myoglobin level at 3.9 mg/dL and 2140 ng/mL, respectively. Ongoing hemodynamic instability mandated surgery for acute abdomen. A 25 cm fibroid uterus was extirpated through a total abdominal hysterectomy. Immediate improvement of acute nephropathy mirrored the postoperative decline in serum myoglobin levels. Myoglobinemia from a massive degenerating fibroid is associated with nonobstructive acute renal failure. PMID:27375910

  18. Ventilator Strategies and Rescue Therapies for Management of Acute Respiratory Failure in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Jarrod M; Hypes, Cameron; Joshi, Raj; Whitmore, Sage; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Cairns, Charles B

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure is commonly encountered in the emergency department (ED), and early treatment can have effects on long-term outcome. Noninvasive ventilation is commonly used for patients with respiratory failure and has been demonstrated to improve outcomes in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive lung disease and congestive heart failure, but should be used carefully, if at all, in the management of asthma, pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Lung-protective tidal volumes should be used for all patients receiving mechanical ventilation, and FiO2 should be reduced after intubation to achieve a goal of less than 60%. For refractory hypoxemia, new rescue therapies have emerged to help improve the oxygenation, and in some cases mortality, and should be considered in ED patients when necessary, as deferring until ICU admission may be deleterious. This review article summarizes the pathophysiology of acute respiratory failure, management options, and rescue therapies including airway pressure release ventilation, continuous neuromuscular blockade, inhaled nitric oxide, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:26014437

  19. Heart Failure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Ois, Angel; Roquer, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill with or eject blood. Due to the aging of the population it has become a growing public health problem in recent decades. Diagnosis of HF is clinical and there is no diagnostic test, although some basic complementary testing should be performed in all patients. Depending on the ejection fraction (EF), the syndrome is classified as HF with low EF or HF with normal EF (HFNEF). Although prognosis in HF is poor, HFNEF seems to be more benign. HF and ischemic stroke (IS) share vascular risk factors such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. Persons with HF have higher incidence of IS, varying from 1.7% to 10.4% per year across various cohort studies. The stroke rate increases with length of follow-up. Reduced EF, independent of severity, is associated with higher risk of stroke. Left ventricular mass and geometry are also related with stroke incidence, with concentric hypertrophy carrying the greatest risk. In HF with low EF, the stroke mechanism may be embolism, cerebral hypoperfusion or both, whereas in HFNEF the mechanism is more typically associated with chronic endothelial damage of the small vessels. Stroke in patients with HF is more severe and is associated with a higher rate of recurrence, dependency, and short term and long term mortality. Cardiac morbidity and mortality is also high in these patients. Acute stroke treatment in HF includes all the current therapeutic options to more carefully control blood pressure. For secondary prevention, optimal control of all vascular risk factors is essential. Antithrombotic therapy is mandatory, although the choice of a platelet inhibitor or anticoagulant drug depends on the cardiac disease. Trials are ongoing to evaluate anticoagulant therapy for prevention of embolism in patients with low EF who are at

  20. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  1. Vasodilators in Acute Heart Failure: Review of the Latest Studies

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Phillip D.; Laribi, Said; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Vasodilators play an important role in the management of acute heart failure, particularly when increased afterload is the precipitating cause of decompensation. The time-honored approach to afterload reduction has been largely focused on use of intravenous nitrovasodilators and, when properly dosed, this class of agents does provide substantial symptom relief for patients with acute hypertensive heart failure. Despite this, nitrovasodilators have never been shown to diminish mortality or provide any post-discharge outcome benefit leading to an on-going search for viable and more effective alternatives. While no new vasodilators have been approved for use in acute heart failure since nesiritide more than a decade ago, a number of novel agents have been developed, with some showing significant promise in recent clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the latest study data as it relates to vasodilator therapy and provide a glimpse into the not too distant future state of acute heart failure care. PMID:24855585

  2. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. PMID:26631581

  3. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. PMID:26631581

  4. Nuclear medicine in acute and chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, R.A.; Byun, K.J.

    1982-07-01

    The diagnostic value of renal scintiscans in patients with acute or chronic renal failure has not been emphasized other than for the estimation of renal size. /sup 131/I OIH, /sup 67/gallium, /sup 99m/TcDTPA, glucoheptonate and DMSA all may be valuable in a variety of specific settings. Acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephritis, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may help make apparent such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis or lymphomatous kidney infiltration. Future correlation of scanning results with renal pathology promises to further expand nuclear medicine's utility in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal disease.

  5. Pathogenesis and clinical presentation of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2015-04-01

    Acute heart failure constitutes a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, whose pathophysiology is complex and not completely understood. Given the diversity of clinical presentations, several different pathophysiological mechanisms along with factors triggering circulatory decompensation are involved. This article discusses the available evidence on the pathophysiological phenomena attributed or/and associated with episodes of acute heart failure and describes different clinical profiles, which, from a clinical perspective, constitute a key element for therapeutic decision-making. PMID:25743769

  6. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Roberts, George H

    2004-01-01

    Transfusion is an inevitable event in the life of many individuals. Transfusion medicine personnel attempt to provide blood products that will result in a safe and harmless transfusion. However, this is not always possible since no laboratory test gives totally accurate and reliable results all the time and testing in routine transfusion services is devoted primarily to the identification of red blood cell problems. Thus, when patients are transfused, several possible adverse effects may occur in the transfused patient even though quality testing indicates no potential problem. These adverse events include infectious complications, hemolytic reactions, anaphylaxis, urticaria, circulatory overload, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, chills and fever, immunomodulation, and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). PMID:15314887

  7. Acute renal failure in pregnancy: our experience.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rohina S; Mishra, Vineet V; Jasani, Anil F; Gumber, Manoj

    2014-03-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a serious medical complication during pregnancy, and, in the post-partum period, is associated with significant maternal morbidity and mortality as well as fetal loss. The objective of our study is to find the etiology and maternal outcome of ARF during pregnancy. The study was conducted at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of the Institute of Kidney Disease and Research Center, Ahmedabad, India from January 2009 to January 2011. Fifty previously healthy patients who developed ARF, diagnosed on oliguria and serum creatinine >2 mg%, were included in the study. Patients with a known history of renal disease, diabetes and hypertension were excluded from the study. All patients were followed-up for a period of six months. Patient re-cords, demographic data, urine output on admission and preceding history of antepartum hemorrhage (APH), post-partum hemorrhage (PPH), septicemia, operative interventions and retained product of conception were noted and need for dialysis was considered. Patients were thoroughly examined and baseline biochemical investigations and renal and obstetrical ultrasound were performed on each patient and bacterial culture sensitivity on blood, urine or vaginal swabs were performed in selected patients. The age range was 19-38 years (mean 26 ± 3.8). The first trimester, second trimester and puerperal groups comprised of four (8%), 25 (50%) and 21 patients (42%), respectively. Hemorrhage was the etiology for ARF in 15 (30%), APH in ten (20%) and PPH in five (10%) patients. Eleven (22%) patients had lower segment cesarian section (LSCS) while 36 (78%) patients had normal vaginal delivery. In 20 (40%) patients, puerperal sepsis was the etiological factor, while pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and HELLP syndrome accounted for 18 (36%) patients. Two (4%) patients had disseminated intravascular coagulation on presentation while one (2%) patient was diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome. Maternal mortality was 12% (n = 6

  8. Fish gall bladder consumption presenting as acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A; Karnik, ND; Gupta, VA; Hase, NK

    2015-01-01

    A forty two year old male was admitted with history of anuria and breathlessness following consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder. He had azotemia and required hemodialysis. His renal failure improved over a period of about four weeks. Incidences have been reported from South East Asian countries associating consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder with acute renal failure. PMID:26440398

  9. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure in Plasmodium vivax malaria infection, a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Sangappa, Jainapur Ravi; Choudhary, Prakash Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male presented with 6 days history of intermittent fever with chills, 2 days history of upper abdomen pain, distension of abdomen, and decreased urine output. He was diagnosed to have Plasmodium vivax malaria, acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure. These constellations of complications in P. vivax infection have never been reported in the past. The patient responded to intravenous chloroquine and supportive treatment. For renal failure, he required hemodialysis. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure form an unusual combination in P. vivax infection. PMID:26629455

  10. Time profile of oxidative stress and neutrophil activation in ovine acute lung injury and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Matthias; Szabo, Csaba; Traber, Daniel L; Horvath, Eszter; Hamahata, Atsumori; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D; Cox, Robert A; Schmalstieg, Frank C; Herndon, David N; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2012-05-01

    The formation of oxidative stress in the lung and activation of neutrophils are major determinants in the development of respiratory failure after acute lung injury and sepsis. However, the time changes of these pathogenic factors have not been sufficiently described. Twenty-four chronically instrumented sheep were subjected to cotton smoke inhalation injury and instillation of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa into both lungs. The sheep were euthanized at 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h after injury. Additional sheep received sham injury and were euthanized after 24 h. Pulmonary function was assessed by determination of oxygenation index and pulmonary shunt fraction. In addition, lung tissue was harvested at the respective time points for the measurement of malondialdehyde, interleukin 6, poly(ADP ribose), myeloperoxidase, and alveolar polymorphonuclear neutrophil score. The injury induced severe respiratory failure that was associated with an early increase in lipid peroxidation and interleukin 6 expression. The injury further led to an increase in poly(ADP ribose) activity that reached its peak at 12 h after injury and declined afterward. In addition, progressive increases in markers of neutrophil accumulation in the lung were observed. The peak of neutrophil accumulation in the lung was associated with a severe depletion of circulating neutrophils. The results from our model may enhance the understanding of the pathophysiological alterations after acute lung injury and sepsis and thus be useful in exploring therapeutic interventions directed at modifying the expression or activation of inflammatory mediators. PMID:22266977

  11. Acute liver failure associated with Garcinia cambogia use.

    PubMed

    Corey, Rebecca; Werner, K Tuesday; Singer, Andrew; Moss, Adyr; Smith, Maxwell; Noelting, Jessica; Rakela, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Millions of Americans regularly use herbal supplements, but many are unaware of the potential hidden dangers. Numerous supplements have been associated with hepatotoxicity and, indeed dietary/herbal supplements represent an increasingly common source of acute liver injury. We report a case of acute liver failure requiring liver transplantation associated with the use of Garcinia cambogia, a supplement widely promoted for weight loss. When patients present with acute hepatitis or liver failure from an unknown etiology, a careful history of supplement use should be performed. PMID:26626648

  12. Renin and Acute Renal Failure: Studies in Man

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. J.; Gleadle, R. I.; Lawson, D. H.; Lever, A. F.; Linton, A. L.; Macadam, R. F.; Prentice, E.; Robertson, J. I. S.; Tree, M.

    1970-01-01

    Plasma renin concentration was increased, usually appreciably, in 22 out of 25 patients with acute renal failure, the average value being 226 units/litre (mean for normal subjects 8·2 units/1.). The highest renin values were found in the first 10 days of the disease; lower and sometimes normal values were found subsequently. Unequivocal acute tubular necrosis was present in only two of the eight cases examined post mortem. These findings are compatible with Goormaghtigh's proposal that an excess of renin and angiotensin may act within the kidney to produce acute renal failure. PMID:4313590

  13. Acute Failure of a Glenoid Component in Anatomic Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, III, Norman D.

    2016-01-01

    Glenoid loosening is the most common cause of failure in primary total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and often occurs years after the initial surgery. It is rare for a glenoid component to fail acutely. Several case reports of complete glenoid dissociation appear in the literature. It is important to report these failures to identify technical errors or component design flaws to improve outcomes in TSA. In this case report, we present an unrecognized acute failure of a cemented hybrid glenoid component at the time of surgery. PMID:27555976

  14. Acute anuric renal failure following jering bean ingestion.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jin Shyan; Ong, Teng-Aik; Chua, Hock-Hin; Tan, Clare

    2007-01-01

    Djenkol beans or jering (Pithecellobium jeringa) is a traditional delicacy consumed by the local population in Malaysia. Jering poisoning or djenkolism is characterized by spasmodic pain, urinary obstruction and acute renal failure. The underlying pathology is an obstructive nephropathy, which is usually responsive to aggressive hydration and diuretic therapy. We present a case of djenkolism following ingestion of jering. The patient required urgent bilateral ureteric stenting following the failure of conservative therapy. Healthcare providers need to recognize djenkolism as a cause of acute renal failure and the public educated on this potential health hazard. PMID:17337378

  15. [Acute renal failure after participation in high endurance sport].

    PubMed

    Lange, Marie Liva Kjærgaard; Skansing, Terese Bräuner

    2016-01-18

    In two case report Danish men, who were experienced amateur athletes, suffered from severe reversible acute renal failure after participation in a trail run and a long-distance bike race. For both men the treatment was dialysis, diuretics and fluid therapy. The cause of renal failure was never fully clarified. Both men consumed non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs during the race, had high levels of creatinine kinase and were dehydrated. Possibly, these factors together resulted in "the perfect storm" and caused acute reversible renal failure. PMID:26815586

  16. THE 5-LIPOXYGENASE PATHWAY IS REQUIRED FOR ACUTE LUNG INJURY FOLLOWING HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Eun, John C.; Moore, Ernest E.; Mauchley, David C.; Johnson, Chris A.; Meng, Xianzhong; Banerjee, Anirban; Wohlauer, Max V.; Zarini, Simona; Gijón, Miguel A.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular and biochemical mechanisms leading to acute lung injury and subsequent multiple organ failure are only partially understood. In order to study the potential role of eicosanoids, particularly leukotrienes, as possible mediators of acute lung injury, we used a murine experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock after blood removal via cardiac puncture. Neutrophil sequestration as shown by immunofluorescence, and protein leakage into the alveolar space, were measured as markers of injury. We used liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry to unequivocally identify several eicosanoids in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of experimental animals. MK886, a specific inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway, as well as transgenic mice deficient in 5-lipoxygenase, were used to determine the role of this enzymatic pathway in this model. Leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4 were consistently elevated in shock-treated mice compared to sham-treated mice. MK886 attenuated neutrophil infiltration and protein extravasation induced by hemorrhagic shock. 5-lipoxygenase-deficient mice showed reduced neutrophil infiltration and protein extravasation after shock treatment, indicating greatly reduced lung injury. These results support the hypothesis that 5-lipoxygenase, most likely through the generation of leukotrienes, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock in mice. This pathway could represent a new target for pharmacological intervention to reduce lung damage following severe primary injury. PMID:22392149

  17. Asialoerythropoietin ameliorates bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in rabbits by reducing inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Akinaga; Nitta, Norihisa; Tsuchiya, Keiko; Otani, Hideji; Watanabe, Shobu; Mukaisho, Kenichi; Tomozawa, Yuki; Nagatani, Yukihiro; Ohta, Shinichi; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2014-11-01

    Acute lung injury, a critical illness characterized by acute respiratory failure with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, remains unresponsive to current treatments. The condition involves injury to the alveolar capillary barrier, neutrophil accumulation and the induction of proinflammatory cytokines followed by lung fibrosis. In the present study, a rabbit model of bleomycin-induced acute lung injury was established to examine the effects of asialoerythropoietin (AEP), an agent with tissue-protective activities, on pulmonary inflammation. Six Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into two equal groups. Acute lung injury was induced in all rabbits by intratracheally injecting bleomycin. The control group was injected with bleomycin only; the experimental (AEP) group was injected intravenously with AEP (80 μg/kg) prior to the bleomycin injection. Computed tomography (CT) studies were performed seven days later. The CT inflammatory scores of areas exhibiting abnormal density and the pathological inflammatory scores were recorded as a ratio on a 7×7 mm grid. The CT and pathological inflammatory scores were significantly different between the control and AEP groups [122±10 and 16.3±1.5 (controls) vs. 71±8.5 and 9.7±1.4 (AEP), respectively; P<0.01]. Thus, the present study revealed that AEP prevents bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in rabbits. PMID:25289037

  18. Acute renal failure and severe thrombocytopenia associated with metamizole.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Pachon, Maria Dolores; Enriquez, Ricardo; Sirvent, Ana Esther; Millan, Isabel; Romero, Alberto; Amorós, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Metamizole or dipyrone is a pyrazolone derivative that belongs to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Its main side-effect is hematological toxicity. Thrombocytopenia due to metamizole is rare and is usually associated with the involvement of the two other blood series. Drug-induced thrombocytopenia is more frequently related to immune mechanisms, and the diagnosis is still largely made by exclusion of other causes and by correlation of timing of thrombocytopenia with the administration of drug. Metamizole may cause acute renal failure due to hemodynamic renal failure/acute tubular necrosis and/or acute tubulointerstitial nephritis. We report a case of acute renal failure and severe thrombocytopenia after metamizole. As far as we know, this combination of adverse effects from this drug has not been reported previously. PMID:24434395

  19. Management of Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Durand, Francois; Nadim, Mitra K

    2016-05-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is defined by the occurrence of organ failure(s) other than the liver in patients with cirrhosis. Even though mortality rates are high, there should no longer be reluctance to admit patients with ACLF in the intensive care unit. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is high and broad spectrum antibiotics should be initiated as soon as infection is suspected. In patients with circulatory failure, the assessment of circulatory status is challenging due to the hyperkinetic state and an imbalance between the splanchnic and systemic blood volume. Acute kidney injury is common in patients with ACLF. Acute tubular necrosis should be differentiated from hepatorenal syndrome, which justifies vasoconstrictive agents. Renal replacement therapy and mechanical ventilation should be decided on clinical grounds. Recent trials on extracorporeal liver support failed to demonstrate a survival benefit. Aggressive management may serve as a bridge to transplantation provided patients are likely to survive after transplantation. PMID:27172356

  20. Acute heart failure: Epidemiology, risk factors, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Parissis, John; Lekakis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-03-01

    Acute heart failure represents the first cause of hospitalization in elderly persons and is the main determinant of the huge healthcare expenditure related to heart failure. Despite therapeutic advances, the prognosis of acute heart failure is poor, with in-hospital mortality ranging from 4% to 7%, 60- to 90-day mortality ranging from 7% to 11%, and 60- to 90-day rehospitalization from 25% to 30%. Several factors including cardiovascular and noncardiovascular conditions as well as patient-related and iatrogenic factors may precipitate the rapid development or deterioration of signs and symptoms of heart failure, thus leading to an acute heart failure episode that usually requires patient hospitalization. The primary prevention of acute heart failure mainly concerns the prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and heart disease, including coronary artery disease, while the secondary prevention of a new episode of decompensation requires the optimization of heart failure therapy, patient education, and the development of an effective transition and follow-up plan. PMID:25659507

  1. High lung volume increases stress failure in pulmonary capillaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Z.; Costello, M. L.; Tsukimoto, K.; Prediletto, R.; Elliott, A. R.; Mathieu-Costello, O.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We previously showed that when pulmonary capillaries in anesthetized rabbits are exposed to a transmural pressure (Ptm) of approximately 40 mmHg, stress failure of the walls occurs with disruption of the capillary endothelium, alveolar epithelium, or sometimes all layers. The present study was designed to test whether stress failure occurred more frequently at high than at low lung volumes for the same Ptm. Lungs of anesthetized rabbits were inflated to a transpulmonary pressure of 20 cmH2O, perfused with autologous blood at 32.5 or 2.5 cmH2O Ptm, and fixed by intravascular perfusion. Samples were examined by both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results were compared with those of a previous study in which the lung was inflated to a transpulmonary pressure of 5 cmH2O. There was a large increase in the frequency of stress failure of the capillary walls at the higher lung volume. For example, at 32.5 cmH2O Ptm, the number of endothelial breaks per millimeter cell lining was 7.1 +/- 2.2 at the high lung volume compared with 0.7 +/- 0.4 at the low lung volume. The corresponding values for epithelium were 8.5 +/- 1.6 and 0.9 +/- 0.6. Both differences were significant (P less than 0.05). At 52.5 cmH2O Ptm, the results for endothelium were 20.7 +/- 7.6 (high volume) and 7.1 +/- 2.1 (low volume), and the corresponding results for epithelium were 32.8 +/- 11.9 and 11.4 +/- 3.7. At 32.5 cmH2O Ptm, the thickness of the blood-gas barrier was greater at the higher lung volume, consistent with the development of more interstitial edema. Ballooning of the epithelium caused by accumulation of edema fluid between the epithelial cell and its basement membrane was seen at 32.5 and 52.5 cmH2O Ptm. At high lung volume, the breaks tended to be narrower and fewer were oriented perpendicular to the axis of the pulmonary capillaries than at low lung volumes. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy measurements agreed well. Our findings provide a physiological

  2. Extracorporeal support for patients with acute and acute on chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Aron, Jonathan; Agarwal, Banwari; Davenport, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The number of patients developing liver failure; acute on chronic liver failure and acute liver failure continues to increase, along with the demand for donor livers for transplantation. As such there is a clinical need to develop effective extracorporeal devices to support patients with acute liver failure or acute-on-chronic liver failure to allow time for hepatocyte regeneration, and so avoiding the need for liver transplantation, or to bridge the patient to liver transplantation, and also potentially to provide symptomatic relief for patients with cirrhosis not suitable for transplantation. Currently devices can be divided into those designed to remove toxins, including plasma exchange, high permeability dialyzers and adsorption columns or membranes, coupled with replacement of plasma proteins; albumin dialysis systems; and bioartificial devices which may provide some of the biological functions of the liver. In the future we expect combinations of these devices in clinical practice, due to the developments in bioartificial scaffolds. PMID:26894968

  3. Management of Patients Admitted with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Krim, Selim R.; Campbell, Patrick T.; Desai, Sapna; Mandras, Stacy; Patel, Hamang; Eiswirth, Clement; Ventura, Hector O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital admission for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure is an unfortunate certainty in the vast majority of patients with heart failure. Regardless of the etiology, inpatient treatment for acute decompensated heart failure portends a worsening prognosis. Methods This review identifies patients with heart failure who need inpatient therapy and provides an overview of recommended therapies and management of these patients in the hospital setting. Results Inpatient therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure should be directed at decongestion and symptom improvement. Clinicians should also treat possible precipitating events, identify comorbid conditions that may exacerbate heart failure, evaluate and update current guideline-directed medical therapy, and perform risk stratification for all patients. Finally, efforts should be made to educate patients about the importance of restricting salt and fluid, monitoring daily weights, and adhering to a graded exercise program. Conclusion Early discharge follow-up and continued optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy are key to preventing future heart failure readmissions. PMID:26413005

  4. Toluene inducing acute respiratory failure in a spray paint sniffer

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Diego P.; Chang, Aymara Y.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Toluene, formerly known as toluol, is an aromatic hydrocarbon that is widely used as an industrial feedstock and as a solvent. Like other solvents, toluene is sometimes also used as an inhalant drug for its intoxicating properties. It has potential to cause multiple effects in the body including death. Case Report: I report a case of a 27-year-old male, chronic spray paint sniffer, who presented with severe generalized muscle weakness and developed acute respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. Toluene toxicity was confirmed with measurement of hippuric acid of 8.0 g/L (normal <5.0 g/L). Conclusions: Acute respiratory failure is a rare complication of chronic toluene exposure that may be lethal if it is not recognized immediately. To our knowledge, this is the second case of acute respiratory failure due to toluene exposure. PMID:23569498

  5. Computed radionuclide urogram for assessing acute renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, J.U.; Lang, E.K.

    1980-05-01

    The computed radionuclide urogram is advocated as a noninvasive diagnostic method for differentiation of the most common prerenal, renal, and postrenal causes of acute renal failure. On the basis of characteristic changes in the effective renal plasma flow rate, the calculated filtration fraction, and the calculated glomerular filtration rate, prerenal conditions such as renal artery stenosis or thrombosis, renal conditions such as acute rejection or acute tubular necrosis, and postrenal conditions such as obstruction or leakage, which are the most common causes of acute renal failure, can be differentiated. In conjunction with morphologic criteria derived from sonograms, a diagnosis with acceptable confidence can be rendered in most instances. Both the computed radionuclide urogram and sonogram are noninvasive and can be used without adverse effects in the presence of azotemia and even anuria. This also makes feasible reexamination at intervals to assess effect of therapy and offer prognostic information.

  6. Acute-on-chronic liver failure in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Vicente; Moreau, Richard; Kamath, Patrick S; Jalan, Rajiv; Ginès, Pere; Nevens, Frederik; Fernández, Javier; To, Uyen; García-Tsao, Guadalupe; Schnabl, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The definition of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) remains contested. In Europe and North America, the term is generally applied according to the European Association for the Study of the Liver-Chronic Liver Failure (EASL-CLIF) Consortium guidelines, which defines this condition as a syndrome that develops in patients with cirrhosis and is characterized by acute decompensation, organ failure and high short-term mortality. One-third of patients who are hospitalized for acute decompensation present with ACLF at admission or develop the syndrome during hospitalization. ACLF frequently occurs in a closed temporal relationship to a precipitating event, such as bacterial infection or acute alcoholic, drug-induced or viral hepatitis. However, no precipitating event can be identified in approximately 40% of patients. The mechanisms of ACLF involve systemic inflammation due to infections, acute liver damage and, in cases without precipitating events, probably intestinal translocation of bacteria or bacterial products. ACLF is graded into three stages (ACLF grades 1-3) on the basis of the number of organ failures, with higher grades associated with increased mortality. Liver and renal failures are the most common organ failures, followed by coagulation, brain, circulatory and respiratory failure. The 28-day mortality rate associated with ACLF is 30%. Depending on the grade, ACLF can be reversed using standard therapy in only 16-51% of patients, leaving a considerable proportion of patients with ACLF that remains steady or progresses. Liver transplantation in selected patients with ACLF grade 2 and ACLF grade 3 increases the 6-month survival from 10% to 80%. PMID:27277335

  7. A general theory of acute and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    MacIver, David H; Dayer, Mark J; Harrison, Andrew J I

    2013-04-30

    Current concepts of heart failure propose multiple heterogeneous pathophysiological mechanisms. Recently a theoretical framework for understanding chronic heart failure was suggested. This paper develops this framework to include acute heart failure syndromes. We propose that all acute heart failure syndromes may be understood in terms of a relative fall in left ventricular stroke volume. The initial compensatory mechanism is frequently a tachycardia often resulting in a near normal cardiac output. In more severe forms a fall in cardiac output causes hypotension or cardiogenic shock. In chronic heart failure the stroke volume and cardiac output is returned to normal predominantly through ventricular remodeling or dilatation. Ejection fraction is simply the ratio of stroke volume and end-diastolic volume. The resting stroke volume is predetermined by the tissue's needs; therefore, if the ejection fraction changes, the end-diastolic volume must change in a reciprocal manner. The potential role of the right heart in influencing the presentation of left heart disease is examined. We propose that acute pulmonary edema occurs when the right ventricular stroke volume exceeds left ventricular stroke volume leading to fluid accumulation in the alveoli. The possible role of the right heart in determining pulmonary hypertension and raised filling pressures in left-sided heart disease are discussed. Different clinical scenarios are presented to help clarify these proposed mechanisms and the clinical implications of these theories are discussed. Finally an alternative definition of heart failure is proposed. PMID:22483252

  8. Resolvin D1 protects against inflammation in experimental acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Dan; Long, Fei-Wu; Chen, Ke-Ling; Yang, Hong-Wei; Lv, Zhao-Yin; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that may lead to multisystemic organ failure with considerable mortality. Recently, resolvin D1 (RvD1) as an endogenous anti-inflammatory lipid mediator has been confirmed to protect against many inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to investigate the effects of RvD1 in acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury. Acute pancreatitis varying from mild to severe was induced by cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS, respectively. Mice were pretreated with RvD1 at a dose of 300 ng/mouse 30 min before the first injection of cerulein. Severity of AP was assessed by biochemical markers and histology. Serum cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in pancreas and lung were determined for assessing the extent of inflammatory response. NF-κB activation was determined by Western blotting. The injection of cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS resulted in local injury in the pancreas and corresponding systemic inflammatory changes with pronounced severity in the cerulein and LPS group. Pretreated RvD1 significantly reduced the degree of amylase, lipase, TNF-α, and IL-6 serum levels; the MPO activities in the pancreas and the lungs; the pancreatic NF-κB activation; and the severity of pancreatic injury and associated lung injury, especially in the severe acute pancreatitis model. These results suggest that RvD1 is capable of improving injury of pancreas and lung and exerting anti-inflammatory effects through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in experimental acute pancreatitis, with more notable protective effect in severe acute pancreatitis. These findings indicate that RvD1 may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy in the management of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26702138

  9. Acute renal failure following oxalic acid poisoning: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Oxalic acid poisoning is being recognized as an emerging epidemic in the rural communities of Sri Lanka as it is a component of locally produced household laundry detergents. Herein we describe a case of a 32 year old female, presenting after direct ingestion of oxalic acid. She then went on to develop significant metabolic acidosis and acute renal failure, requiring dialysis. Renal biopsy revealed acute tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with diffuse moderate acute tubular damage with refractile crystals in some of the tubules. The patient symptomatically improved with haemodialysis and renal functions subsequently returned to normal. PMID:22978510

  10. Efficacy of intraoperative, single-bolus corticosteroid administration to prevent postoperative acute respiratory failure after oesophageal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong Yong; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Jang, Hee-Jin; Joo, Jungnam; Zo, Jae Ill

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Respiratory failure from acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pneumonia are the major cause of morbidity and mortality following an oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer. This study was performed to investigate whether an intraoperative corticosteroid can attenuate postoperative respiratory failure. METHODS Between November 2005 and December 2008, 234 consecutive patients who underwent an oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer were reviewed. A 125-mg dose of methylprednisolone was administered after performing the anastomosis. ALI, ARDS and pneumonia occurring before postoperative day (POD) 7 were regarded as acute respiratory failure. RESULT The mean age was 64.2 ± 8.7 years. One hundred and fifty-one patients were in the control group and 83 patients in the steroid group. Patients' characteristics were comparable. The incidence of acute respiratory failure was lower in the steroid group (P = 0.037). The incidences of anastomotic leakage and wound dehiscence were not different (P = 0.57 and P = 1.0). The C-reactive protein level on POD 2 was lower in the steroid group (P < 0.005). Multivariate analysis indicates that the intraoperative steroid was a protective factor against acute respiratory failure (P = 0.046, OR = 0.206). CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative corticosteroid administration was associated with a decreased risk of acute respiratory failure following an oesophagectomy. The laboratory data suggest that corticosteroids may attenuate the stress-induced inflammatory responses after surgery. PMID:22745302

  11. Leptospirosis: an ignored cause of acute renal failure in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, C W; Pan, M J; Wu, M S; Chen, Y M; Tsen, Y T; Lin, C L; Wu, C H; Huang, C C

    1997-12-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by a spirochete, is the most common zoonosis in domestic or wild animals. Animals excrete infected urine in soil or water and may cause human infections through abrased wound, mucosa, conjunctiva, or by swallowing contaminated water. Clinical presentations of leptospirosis are mostly subclinical. Five to ten percent of leptospirosis are fatal, causing fever, hemorrhage, jaundice, and acute renal failure (Weil's syndrome). Leptospirosis has been ignored as a cause of acute renal failure in Taiwan. We report two patients with leptospirosis who presented with high fever, abdominal pain, jaundice, and acute renal failure. Patient 1 died on day 12 of admission of multiple organ failure associated with pancytopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and reactive hemophagocytosis. Leptospirosis was recognized after death. Patient 2 was admitted with similar presentations 2 weeks later. Penicillin and doxycycline were given early in the course, and azotemia, jaundice, respiratory failure, and aseptic meningitis gradually improved. Renal biopsy showed interstitial nephritis. Several tubular clearance tests showed proximal tubular defect with severe bicarbonate wasting (FeHCO3- 20.9%) and incomplete type II renal tubular acidosis without affecting the distal nephron. After 80 days of treatment, this patient was discharged with recovery of conscious level and renal function. This is the first leptospirosis patient with detailed tubular functional and morphological studies of the kidney. Diagnosis of leptospirosis was made by microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for antibody to leptospira and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for leptospira DNA in blood and urine (interrogans serogroup australis in case 1 and Leptospira borgpetersenii serogroup ballum in case 2). Because active surveillance has resulted in 13 cases diagnosed as leptospirosis islandwide thereafter, underestimation and ignorance of leptospirosis as a cause of acute renal failure may occur in Taiwan

  12. Ventilators for noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele; Naldi, Mario

    2008-08-01

    The application of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) to treat acute respiratory failure has increased tremendously both inside and outside the intensive care unit. The choice of ventilator is crucial for success of NIV in the acute setting, because poor tolerance and excessive air leaks are significantly correlated with NIV failure. Patient-ventilator asynchrony and discomfort can occur if the physician or respiratory therapist fails to adequately set NIV to respond to the patient's ventilatory demand, so clinicians need to fully understood the ventilator's technical peculiarities (eg, efficiency of trigger and cycle systems, speed of pressurization, air-leak compensation, CO(2) rebreathing, reliability of fraction of inspired oxygen reading, monitoring accuracy). A wide range of ventilators of different complexity have been introduced into clinical practice to noninvasively support patients in acute respiratory failure, but the numerous commercially available ventilators (bi-level, intermediate, and intensive care unit ventilators) have substantial differences that can influence patient comfort, patient-ventilator interaction, and, thus, the chance of NIV clinical success. This report examines the most relevant aspects of the historical evolution, the equipment, and the acute-respiratory-failure clinical application of NIV ventilators. PMID:18655744

  13. Acute Renal Failure Induced by Chinese Herbal Medication in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akpan, Effiong Ekong; Ekrikpo, Udeme E

    2015-01-01

    Traditional herbal medicine is a global phenomenon especially in the resource poor economy where only the very rich can access orthodox care. These herbal products are associated with complications such as acute renal failure and liver damage with a high incidence of mortalities and morbidities. Acute renal failure from the use of herbal remedies is said to account for about 30-35% of all cases of acute renal failure in Africa. Most of the herbal medications are not usually identified, but some common preparation often used in Nigeria includes "holy water" green water leaves, bark of Mangifera indica (mango), shoot of Anacardium occidentale (cashew), Carica papaya (paw-paw) leaves, lime water, Solanum erianthum (Potato tree), and Azadirachta indica (Neem) trees. We report a rare case of a young man who developed acute renal failure two days after ingestion of Chinese herb for "body cleansing" and general wellbeing. He had 4 sessions of haemodialysis and recovered kidney function fully after 18 days of admission. PMID:26199625

  14. [Hyperhydration and dialysis in acute kidney failure].

    PubMed

    Saner, Fuat H; Bienholz, Anja; Tyczynski, Bartosz; Kribben, Andreas; Feldkamp, Thorsten

    2015-05-01

    Despite the advances in critical care medicine, the hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring dialysis remains high. Depending on the underlying disease the in-house mortality is reported to be up to 80%. Several observational studies demonstrated an association between mortality and fluid overload. A primary mechanism of interest is that fluid overload causes tissue edema and subsequent reduction of perfusion, oxygenation and nutrient delivery. This results in further renal damage. In addition, fluid overload-related dilution within the extracellular space causes artificially low serum creatinine, which masks AKI diagnosis. As a consequence, renal protective management strategies are deferred, which further aggravates kidney injury. This aggravation of renal damage subsequently increases the mortality. This review discusses the role of fluid overload for outcomes in critically ill patients as described in the current literature and assesses criteria for the initiation of renal replacement therapy in this critically ill population. PMID:25970415

  15. [Acute liver failure after ingestion of death cap mushrooms].

    PubMed

    Zuliani, Anna-Maria; Kabar, Iyad; Mitchell, Todd; Heinzow, Hauke Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Amatoxins, which are mainly found in Amanita phalloides, Amanita virosa, and Galerina autumnalis, are responsible for the majority of fatal intoxication with green death cap. The intoxication is associated with acute liver failure, which explains the poor prognosis. Acute liver injury is generally preceeded by a gastrointestinal phase with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. In the course, pre-renal kidney failure due to the associated fluid deficit and fulminant liver failure may occur. General guidelines for the treatment of amatoxin poisoning are yet not available. We report on three patients who suffered from amatoxin mushroom poisoning after ingestion of green death cap mushrooms. Based on the pathophysiology of amatoxin poisoning, we discuss a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:27359312

  16. [Current approaches to the treatment of severe hypoxic respiratory insufficiency (acute lung injury; acute respiratory distress syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Kluge, S; Müller, T; Pfeifer, M

    2011-02-01

    Lung-protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, plateau pressure < 30 cm H(2)O. oxygen saturation > 90% and permissive hypercapnia results in reduction of the mortality rate in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The level of the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) must be chosen in relation to oxygen requirement. High frequency oscillatory ventilation and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist are promising methods. However, further studies with firm end-points have to be awaited before a final judgment is possible. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can ensure life-sustaining gas exchange in patients with severe vitally compromised pulmonary failure, to provide time for lung tissue to heal and reduce ventilatory stress. The latest guidelines for analgesia and sedation in intensive care medicine demand consistent monitoring of the level of sedation and the intensity of pain. The sedation should be interrupted daily, with phases of awakenings and, if possible, spontaneous breathing. Methods of supportive treatment: Positional treatment (prone position) and inhalation of vasodilators can improve ventilation/perfusion mismatch and thus oxygenation. However, administration of surfactant is currently not advised in adult respiratory failure. PMID:21271478

  17. Therapeutic lymphangiogenesis ameliorates established acute lung allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Monzon-Medina, Maria E; Padera, Robert F; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Toprak, Demet; Abdelnour, Elie; D'Agostino, Emmanuel; Goldberg, Hilary J; Perrella, Mark A; Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Rosas, Ivan O; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2015-11-01

    Lung transplantation is the only viable option for patients suffering from otherwise incurable end-stage pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Despite aggressive immunosuppression, acute rejection of the lung allograft occurs in over half of transplant recipients, and the factors that promote lung acceptance are poorly understood. The contribution of lymphatic vessels to transplant pathophysiology remains controversial, and data that directly address the exact roles of lymphatic vessels in lung allograft function and survival are limited. Here, we have shown that there is a marked decline in the density of lymphatic vessels, accompanied by accumulation of low-MW hyaluronan (HA) in mouse orthotopic allografts undergoing rejection. We found that stimulation of lymphangiogenesis with VEGF-C156S, a mutant form of VEGF-C with selective VEGFR-3 binding, alleviates an established rejection response and improves clearance of HA from the lung allograft. Longitudinal analysis of transbronchial biopsies from human lung transplant recipients demonstrated an association between resolution of acute lung rejection and decreased HA in the graft tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that lymphatic vessel formation after lung transplantation mediates HA drainage and suggest that treatments to stimulate lymphangiogenesis have promise for improving graft outcomes. PMID:26485284

  18. Therapeutic lymphangiogenesis ameliorates established acute lung allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Monzon-Medina, Maria E.; Padera, Robert F.; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Toprak, Demet; Abdelnour, Elie; D’Agostino, Emmanuel; Goldberg, Hilary J.; Perrella, Mark A.; Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Rosas, Ivan O.; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is the only viable option for patients suffering from otherwise incurable end-stage pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Despite aggressive immunosuppression, acute rejection of the lung allograft occurs in over half of transplant recipients, and the factors that promote lung acceptance are poorly understood. The contribution of lymphatic vessels to transplant pathophysiology remains controversial, and data that directly address the exact roles of lymphatic vessels in lung allograft function and survival are limited. Here, we have shown that there is a marked decline in the density of lymphatic vessels, accompanied by accumulation of low-MW hyaluronan (HA) in mouse orthotopic allografts undergoing rejection. We found that stimulation of lymphangiogenesis with VEGF-C156S, a mutant form of VEGF-C with selective VEGFR-3 binding, alleviates an established rejection response and improves clearance of HA from the lung allograft. Longitudinal analysis of transbronchial biopsies from human lung transplant recipients demonstrated an association between resolution of acute lung rejection and decreased HA in the graft tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that lymphatic vessel formation after lung transplantation mediates HA drainage and suggest that treatments to stimulate lymphangiogenesis have promise for improving graft outcomes. PMID:26485284

  19. Mechanical ventilation of patients with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sessler, C N

    1998-10-01

    Ventilatory management of patients with acute lung injury (ALI), particularly its most severe subset, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), is complex. Newer lung protective strategies emphasize measures to enhance alveolar recruitment and avoid alveolar overdistention, thus minimizing the risk of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Key components of such strategies include the use of smaller-than-conventional tidal volumes which maintain peak transpulmonary pressure below the pressure associated with overdistention, and titration of positive end-expiratory pressure to promote maximal alveolar recruitment. Novel techniques, including prone positioning, inverse ratio ventilation, tracheal gas insufflation, and high frequency ventilation, are considerations in severe ARDS. No single approach is best for all patients; adjustment of ventilatory parameters to individual characteristics, such as lung mechanics and gas exchange, is required. PMID:9891634

  20. Pancreatitis-induced acute lung injury. An ARDS model.

    PubMed Central

    Guice, K S; Oldham, K T; Johnson, K J; Kunkel, R G; Morganroth, M L; Ward, P A

    1988-01-01

    Cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats is associated with acute lung injury characterized by increased pulmonary microvascular permeability, increased wet lung weights, and histologic features of alveolar capillary endothelial cell and pulmonary parenchymal injury. The alveolar capillary permeability index is increased 1.8-fold after a 3-hour injury (0.30 to 0.54, p less than 0.05). Gravimetric analysis shows a similar 1.5-fold increase in wet lung weights at 3 hours (0.35% vs. 0.51% of total body weight, p less than 0.05). Histologic features assessed by quantitative morphometric analysis include significant intra-alveolar hemorrhage (0.57 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.12 +/- 0.02 RBC/alveolus at 6 hours, p less than 0.001); endothelial cell disruption (28.11% vs. 4.3%, p less than 0.001); and marked, early neutrophil infiltration (7.45 +/- 0.53 vs. 0.83 +/- 0.18 PMN/hpf at 3 hours, p less than 0.001). The cerulein peptide itself, a cholecystokinin (CCK) analog, is naturally occurring and is not toxic and in several in vitro settings including exposure to pulmonary artery endothelial cells, Type II epithelial cells, and an ex vivo perfused lung preparation. The occurrence of this ARDS-like acute lung injury with acute pancreatitis provides an excellent experimental model to investigate mechanisms and mediators involved in the pathogenesis of ARDS. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3389946

  1. Pancreatitis-induced acute lung injury. An ARDS model.

    PubMed

    Guice, K S; Oldham, K T; Johnson, K J; Kunkel, R G; Morganroth, M L; Ward, P A

    1988-07-01

    Cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats is associated with acute lung injury characterized by increased pulmonary microvascular permeability, increased wet lung weights, and histologic features of alveolar capillary endothelial cell and pulmonary parenchymal injury. The alveolar capillary permeability index is increased 1.8-fold after a 3-hour injury (0.30 to 0.54, p less than 0.05). Gravimetric analysis shows a similar 1.5-fold increase in wet lung weights at 3 hours (0.35% vs. 0.51% of total body weight, p less than 0.05). Histologic features assessed by quantitative morphometric analysis include significant intra-alveolar hemorrhage (0.57 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.12 +/- 0.02 RBC/alveolus at 6 hours, p less than 0.001); endothelial cell disruption (28.11% vs. 4.3%, p less than 0.001); and marked, early neutrophil infiltration (7.45 +/- 0.53 vs. 0.83 +/- 0.18 PMN/hpf at 3 hours, p less than 0.001). The cerulein peptide itself, a cholecystokinin (CCK) analog, is naturally occurring and is not toxic and in several in vitro settings including exposure to pulmonary artery endothelial cells, Type II epithelial cells, and an ex vivo perfused lung preparation. The occurrence of this ARDS-like acute lung injury with acute pancreatitis provides an excellent experimental model to investigate mechanisms and mediators involved in the pathogenesis of ARDS. PMID:3389946

  2. Ceftriaxone-related hemolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Demirkaya, Erkan; Atay, Abdullah Avni; Musabak, Ugur; Sengul, Ali; Gok, Faysal

    2006-05-01

    A 5-year-old girl with no underlying immune deficiency or hematologic disease was treated with a combination of ceftriaxone and ampicilline-sulbactam for pneumonia. On the ninth day of the therapy, she developed oliguria, paleness, malaise, immune hemolytic anemia (IHA) and acute renal failure (ARF). Laboratory studies showed the presence of antibodies against ceftriaxone. Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) was diagnosed by renal biopsy. The patient's renal insufficiency was successfully treated with peritoneal dialysis without any complications. The patient recovered without any treatment using steroids or other immunosuppressive agents. PMID:16491410

  3. Liver transplantation for acute liver failure accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kirino, Izumi; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Hata, Koichiro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    The role of liver transplantation (LT) in acute liver failure (ALF) complicated by severe acute pancreatitis is still unclear. We here report a case of deceased-donor LT for idiopathic ALF accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis. A 58-year-old man with no history of liver disease presented with idiopathic ALF and acute pancreatitis. After careful consideration, he received a liver from a deceased donor. Following surgery, the patient's liver function rapidly reverted to normal level and the acute pancreatitis simultaneously subsided. The patient later developed a pancreatic pseudocyst, which was treated successfully with combination interventional radiology. LT can be considered for ALF associated with severe acute pancreatitis if there is no clinical evidence of an absolute contraindication for organ transplantation, such as systemic or local infection. Moreover, we recommend a close follow-up by ultrasonography to allow early detection and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts following surgery. PMID:27600056

  4. Lung Postmortem Autopsy Revealing Extramedullary Involvement in Multiple Myeloma Causing Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ravinet, Aurélie; Perbet, Sébastien; Guièze, Romain; Guérin, Renaud; Gayraud, Guillaume; Aliane, Jugurtha; Tremblay, Aymeric; Pascal, Julien; Ledoux, Albane; Chaleteix, Carine; Dechelotte, Pierre; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma is rare. We report the case of a 61-year-old man with past medical history of chronic respiratory failure with emphysema, and a known multiple myeloma (Durie and Salmon stage III B and t(4;14) translocation). Six months after diagnosis and first line of treatment, he presented acute dyspnea with interstitial lung disease. Computed tomography showed severe bullous emphysema and diffuse, patchy, multifocal infiltrations bilaterally with nodular character, small bilateral pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and a known lytic lesion of the 12th vertebra. He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, oseltamivir, and methylprednisolone. Finally, outcome was unfavourable. Postmortem analysis revealed diffuse and nodular infracentimetric infiltration of the lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Physicians should be aware that acute respiratory distress syndrome not responding to treatment of common causes could be a manifestation of the disease, even with negative BAL or biopsy and could be promptly treated with salvage therapy. PMID:25165587

  5. [Acute oliguric renal failure and haemolytic anaemia following infectious mononucleosis].

    PubMed

    Brkovic, Natasa; Jørgensen, Kit Riegels; Rosenbæk, Jeppe Bakkestrøm; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2015-11-01

    A 19-year-old man was admitted to hospital due to fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain and faint. He was pale and icteric, awake with sufficient respiration and circulation. He had infectious mononucleosis complicated with acute oliguric renal failure and severe haemolytic anaemia with a positive Coombs test. He had a cold agglutinin syndrome. The treatment comprised intermittent haemodialysis, plasmapheresis and heating. He recovered completely after two months. PMID:26573947

  6. Acute renal failure in four cats treated with paromomycin.

    PubMed

    Gookin, J L; Riviere, J E; Gilger, B C; Papich, M G

    1999-12-15

    Acute renal failure was diagnosed in 4 cats receiving paromomycin orally for treatment of infectious enteritis. All 4 cats responded to fluid therapy and recovered normal or near-normal renal function; however, 3 of the cats subsequently became deaf and developed cataracts. Toxicoses were attributed to a combination of an excessive dosage of paromomycin and absorption of the drug across injured intestinal mucosal epithelium. Pharmacokinetic studies are needed to further define the disposition of paromomycin after oral administration to cats. PMID:10613215

  7. The role of intravenous vasodilators in acute heart failure management.

    PubMed

    Piper, Susan; McDonagh, Theresa

    2014-08-01

    Acute heart failure is a major cause of emergency hospital admission, with significant impact on health resources and patient outcomes. With no new treatments for over 20 years, the advent of new innovative therapies may facilitate a radical change in our approach to such patients. In this article, we examine the current evidence for the use of current intravenous vasodilators in AHF management, and review the potential of novel therapies currently in development. PMID:25100108

  8. Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Volutrauma and Molecular Effects

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco Loza, R; Villamizar Rodríguez, G; Medel Fernández, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical condition secondary to a variety of insults leading to a severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality in critically ill patients. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which is another important factor that may increase the ALI (acute lung injury) by a series of pathophysiological mechanisms, whose common element is the initial volutrauma in the alveolar units, and forming part of an entity known clinically as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Injured lungs can be partially protected by optimal settings and ventilation modes, using low tidal volume (VT) values and high positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP). The benefits in ARDS outcomes caused by these interventions have been confirmed by several prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and are attributed to reduction in volutrauma. The purpose of this article is to present an approach to VILI pathophysiology focused on the effects of volutrauma that lead to lung injury and the ‘mechanotransduction’ mechanism. A more complete understanding about the molecular effects that physical forces could have, is essential for a better assessment of existing strategies as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies to reduce the damage resulting from VILI, and thereby contribute to reducing mortality in ARDS. PMID:26312103

  9. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Control Lung Inflammation and Monocyte Recruitment in Indirect Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Venet, Fabienne; Huang, Xin; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Chen, Yaping; Ayala, Alfred

    2010-01-01

    Indirect acute lung injury (ALI, not caused by a direct insult to the lung) represents the first organ dysfunction in trauma patients, with nonpulmonary sepsis being the most common cause of indirect ALI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are thought to participate in a number of inflammatory lung diseases; however, their role in indirect ALI is currently not established. Using a clinically relevant model of indirect ALI induced in mice by hemorrhagic shock followed 24 hours later by polymicrobial septic challenge, we report that mature DC numbers were markedly increased in the lung during indirect ALI. DC depletion induced a significant increase in indirect ALI severity, which was associated with enhanced lung and plasma proinflammatory cytokine concentration and recruitment of proinflammatory CD115+ monocytes in response to increased lung monocyte chemotactic protein-1 production. Among the different DC subpopulations, plasmacytoid DCs, which were induced and activated in the lung during indirect ALI, were responsible for this effect because their specific depletion reproduced the observations made in DC-depleted mice. As the recruitment of monocytes to the lung plays a central deleterious role in the pathophysiology of indirect ALI, our data therefore position plasmacytoid DCs as important regulators of acute lung inflammation. PMID:20042672

  10. Cholangitis with acute renal failure: priorities in therapeutics.

    PubMed Central

    Bismuth, H; Kuntziger, H; Corlette, M B

    1975-01-01

    Obstructive cholangitis with acute renal failure is a dramatic syndrome which merits individual definition. Twenty-one patients with acute suppurative cholangitis complicated by rapidly developing renal insufficiency were studied, and the severity of the renal failure, an acute interstitial tubulopathy, bore no significant relationship to the serum bilirubin level. The mechanism of renal damage was clearly related to episodes of septicemia. Increasing experience has modified the approach to treatment. The dominant septic problem can often be controlled by vigorous antibiotic and fluid therapy, allowing time for spontaneous improvements in renal function. All patients thus operated at a distance from the septic episode survived. If emergency operation is required because of persistent or recrudescnet sepsis, the necessity for dialysis should be considered first; the circumstances demanding dialysis are defined. The priorities in therapy are then: 1) treatment of the infection, 2) treatment of the renal failure, and finally 3) operation. The amount of the operation depends on the evolution of the sepsis, but should be preceded by dialysis when required. PMID:1138640

  11. Liver transplantation in acute liver failure: A challenging scenario

    PubMed Central

    Mendizabal, Manuel; Silva, Marcelo Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a critical medical condition defined as rapid development of hepatic dysfunction associated with encephalopathy. The prognosis in these patients is highly variable and depends on the etiology, interval between jaundice and encephalopathy, age, and the degree of coagulopathy. Determining the prognosis for this population is vital. Unfortunately, prognostic models with both high sensitivity and specificity for prediction of death have not been developed. Liver transplantation has dramatically improved survival in patients with acute liver failure. Still, 25% to 45% of patients will survive with medical treatment. The identification of patients who will eventually require liver transplantation should be carefully addressed through the combination of current prognostic models and continuous medical assessment. The concerns of inaccurate selection for transplantation are significant, exposing the recipient to a complex surgery and lifelong immunosuppression. In this challenging scenario, where organ shortage remains one of the main problems, alternatives to conventional orthotopic liver transplantation, such as living-donor liver transplantation, auxiliary liver transplant, and ABO-incompatible grafts, should be explored. Although overall outcomes after liver transplantation for acute liver failure are improving, they are not yet comparable to elective transplantation. PMID:26819519

  12. Liver transplantation in acute liver failure: A challenging scenario.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal, Manuel; Silva, Marcelo Oscar

    2016-01-28

    Acute liver failure is a critical medical condition defined as rapid development of hepatic dysfunction associated with encephalopathy. The prognosis in these patients is highly variable and depends on the etiology, interval between jaundice and encephalopathy, age, and the degree of coagulopathy. Determining the prognosis for this population is vital. Unfortunately, prognostic models with both high sensitivity and specificity for prediction of death have not been developed. Liver transplantation has dramatically improved survival in patients with acute liver failure. Still, 25% to 45% of patients will survive with medical treatment. The identification of patients who will eventually require liver transplantation should be carefully addressed through the combination of current prognostic models and continuous medical assessment. The concerns of inaccurate selection for transplantation are significant, exposing the recipient to a complex surgery and lifelong immunosuppression. In this challenging scenario, where organ shortage remains one of the main problems, alternatives to conventional orthotopic liver transplantation, such as living-donor liver transplantation, auxiliary liver transplant, and ABO-incompatible grafts, should be explored. Although overall outcomes after liver transplantation for acute liver failure are improving, they are not yet comparable to elective transplantation. PMID:26819519

  13. Acute renal failure: outcomes and risk of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Block, C A; Schoolwerth, A C

    2007-09-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury that might confer a different prognosis. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease and more information regarding recovery from ARF is available. Controversy exists regarding the optimal management of ARF. Recent publications emphasize the importance of timing and dose of renal replacement therapy rather than the modality of treatment (intermittent hemodialysis vs continuous therapies). These issues are explored in this review. PMID:17912228

  14. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia associated with acute liver graft failure.

    PubMed

    Pannicke, Nadine; Pollok, Joerg-Matthias; Kluge, Stefan; Petzoldt, Martin

    2012-01-01

    An orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is of a proven benefit in an acute liver failure (ALF). Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is strongly associated with thromboembolic complications. We present the case of a 56-year-old patient who underwent an OLT owing to an ALF of unknown aetiology. HIT type II with consecutive hepatic and portal vein thrombosis caused progressive graft failure. Total hepatectomy and porto-caval shunt were performed to reduce the toxic effects of liver cell necrosis such as multiorgan failure involving the respiratory, renal and cardiovascular systems. A suitable liver graft was allocated after an anhepatic bridging period of 56 h. Specific complications due to end-stage liver failure-such as acidosis, coagulopathy, decrease of vascular resistance, cerebral oedema, myocardial infarction and right heart failure-were treated. Following a re-OLT, the patient made a complete recovery. We present a rare case of HIT-associated early liver graft failure followed by a prolonged anhepatic phase and finally a successful re-OLT. PMID:23188860

  15. Vasodilator treatment for acute and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, K; Parmley, W W

    1977-01-01

    The current status of the use of vasodilator drugs in the treatment of acute and chronic heart failure has been reviewed. It is apparent that vasodilator treatment can be used effectively in some patients with heart failure with a beneficial haemodynamics response, and that vasodilator agents are likely to find an important place in the management of such patients. Vasodilator treatment may be associated with complications and must be used with care. Though several nonparenteral vasodilator agents have been investigated, no ideal drug is yet available for the treatment of chronic heart failure. Nevertheless, it is probable that suitable drugs will emerge and find an important place in the management of such patients. Images PMID:884021

  16. Diverse macrophage populations mediate acute lung inflammation and resolution

    PubMed Central

    King, Landon S.; D'Alessio, Franco R.

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating disease with distinct pathological stages. Fundamental to ARDS is the acute onset of lung inflammation as a part of the body's immune response to a variety of local and systemic stimuli. In patients surviving the inflammatory and subsequent fibroproliferative stages, transition from injury to resolution and recovery is an active process dependent on a series of highly coordinated events regulated by the immune system. Experimental animal models of acute lung injury (ALI) reproduce key components of the injury and resolution phases of human ARDS and provide a methodology to explore mechanisms and potential new therapies. Macrophages are essential to innate immunity and host defense, playing a featured role in the lung and alveolar space. Key aspects of their biological response, including differentiation, phenotype, function, and cellular interactions, are determined in large part by the presence, severity, and chronicity of local inflammation. Studies support the importance of macrophages to initiate and maintain the inflammatory response, as well as a determinant of resolution of lung inflammation and repair. We will discuss distinct roles for lung macrophages during early inflammatory and late resolution phases of ARDS using experimental animal models. In addition, each section will highlight human studies that relate to the diverse role of macrophages in initiation and resolution of ALI and ARDS. PMID:24508730

  17. Pulmonary and urinary clearance of atrial natriuretic factor in acute congestive heart failure in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Perrella, M A; Margulies, K B; Wei, C M; Aarhus, L L; Heublein, D M; Burnett, J C

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a peptide hormone of cardiac origin elevated in acute congestive heart failure (CHF), which is degraded by the enzyme neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP). This study was designed to investigate the pulmonary and urinary clearance of ANF before and after the initiation of acute experimental CHF in dogs, and to assess the contribution of enzymatic degradation to these clearances in CHF. This study demonstrated a significant clearance of plasma ANF across the pulmonary circulation at baseline, and a tendency for pulmonary clearance to decrease in CHF (1115 +/- 268 to 498 +/- 173 ml/min, NS). The pulmonary extraction of ANF present at baseline was not altered with acute CHF (36.0 +/- 7.8 to 34.9 +/- 12.1%, NS). NEP inhibition (NEPI) abolished both the clearance and extraction of plasma ANF across the lung in CHF. Similarly, significant urinary clearance of ANF was present at baseline, and in acute CHF the urinary clearance of ANF decreased (0.14 +/- 0.02 to 0.02 +/- 0.01 ml/min, P less than 0.05). NEPI prevented the decrease in the urinary clearance of ANF, and enhanced the renal response to endogenous ANF, independent of further increases in plasma ANF during CHF. This study supports an important role for NEP in the pulmonary and urinary metabolism of endogenous ANF during acute CHF. Images PMID:1850758

  18. Hepatitis E and Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Saraswat, Vivek A.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis (AVH) globally. It causes large scale epidemics of AVH across the low- and middle income countries in Asia and Africa, and also causes sporadic cases of AVH in the same geographical region. AVH due to HEV is usually an acute, self-limiting illness, similar in clinical presentation to AVH caused by hepatitis A virus (HAV). When HEV causes AVH in patients of chronic liver disease it may worsen rapidly to a syndrome called acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) leading to very high mortality. Acute deterioration of liver function in a patient with compensated chronic liver disease is the characteristic feature of ACLF. The typical disease course of patients with ACLF is the appearance of organ failure, which progresses to multi-organ failure and death. Many publications have reported HEV as one of the leading causes for ACLF from Asia and Africa, where HEV is endemic. The mortality rate of HEV-related ACLF (HEV-ACLF) ranges from 0% to 67% with a median being 34%. These patients require admission in the intensive care unit and they benefit from a team approach of clinicians with expertise in both hepatology and critical care. The goals of treatment are to prevent further deterioration in liver function, reverse precipitating factors, and support failing organs. Liver transplantation is required in selected patients to improve survival and quality of life. One preliminary report suggests that ribavirin may be an effective and safe drug for treatment of HEV-ACLF however this requires validation in large trials. PMID:25755504

  19. Prospects for the temporary treatment of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, Hein B A C; IJzermans, Jan N M

    2002-02-01

    At present, the most successful treatment of acute liver failure is orthotopic liver transplantation, with survival rates ranging from 70% to 85%. However, mortality rates for liver failure remain high because of the shortage of available donor organs. Therefore, there has been renewed interest in temporary treatment methods for patients with acute liver failure to either allow liver regeneration or await liver transplantation. It is thought that the function of the liver can only be replaced with the biological substrate, e.g. liver cells or a whole liver specimen, which requires the availability of liver tissue from xenogeneic or human sources. In this review, existing temporary liver support techniques are summarized and the potential hazards are described. These include the immunological implications of these techniques, e.g. the host versus graft reaction, which may influence the effectivity of the support system, and in the long run may sensitize the patient to subsequent allogeneic transplantation. The graft versus host reaction is also considered. At present, one of the major concerns is the threat of pig-to-human transmission of activated endogenous retrovirus present in the pig genome. An overview is given of literature concerning the transmission of retrovirus particles in vitro and in vivo. Finally, new solutions for the development of ex vivo systems for temporary treatment of patients with acute liver failure are discussed. These include the use of new immortalized human cell lines and human fetal hepatocytes, and the possibility of isolating, expanding and genetically manipulating stem cells in order to have stable differentiated and committed cells. PMID:11981346

  20. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Mortality from Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Sara E.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Martin, Greg S.; Wheeler, Arthur P.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Matthay, Michael A.; Eisner, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the influence of race and ethnicity on mortality from acute lung injury. We sought to determine whether black race or Hispanic ethnicity are independently associated with mortality among patients with acute lung injury. Design: Retrospective cohort study of patients enrolled in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) Network randomized controlled trials. Setting: Adult intensive care units participating in the ARDS Network trials. Patients: 2362 mechanically ventilated patients (1,715 white, 449 black and 198 Hispanic) with acute lung injury. Measurements and Main Results: The primary outcome was 60-day mortality. A secondary outcome was number of ventilator-free days. Crude mortality was 33% for both blacks and Hispanics compared with 27% for whites (p=0.02). After adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates, the association between race/ethnicity and mortality persisted (OR = 1.42; 95% CI 1.10-1.84 for blacks; OR=1.94; 95% CI, 1.36-2.77 for Hispanics; OR=1 for whites, reference). After adjustment for severity of illness (Acute Physiology Score), black race was no longer significantly associated with mortality (OR =1.25; 95% CI, 0.95-1.66), whereas the association with Hispanic ethnicity persisted (OR=2.00; 95% CI, 1.37-2.90). Hispanics had significantly fewer ventilator-free days compared with whites after adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates (mean difference in days = -2.3; 95% CI -3.9 to -0.7). Conclusions: Black and Hispanic patients with acute lung injury have a significantly higher risk of death compared to white patients. This increased risk appeared to be mediated by increased severity of illness at presentation for blacks, but was unexplained among Hispanics. PMID:19050621

  1. Translational toxicological research: investigating and preventing acute lung injury in organophosphorus insecticide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Elspeth J; Clutton, R E; Drummond, G; Eddleston, M

    2014-06-01

    Poisoning through ingestion of organophosphorus (OP) insecticide is a leading cause of suicide globally. Severe poisoning with OP compounds creates an unconscious, paralysed patient with respiratory failure. These symptoms make pulmonary aspiration of stomach contents highly likely, potentially causing an acute lung injury. To explore this hypothesis, we created a Gottingen minipig pulmonary aspiration model (n=26) to investigate the mechanism and severity of lung injury created through pulmonary instillation of 0.5 mL/kg mixtures of porcine gastric juice (GJ), OP and/or its solvent. Early results show that aspiration of OP and GJ causes pulmonary neutrophil sequestration, alveolar haemorrhage and interstitial oedema, with disruption of the alveolar-capillary membrane. Further measurements will include quantitative CT imaging, histopathology scoring, acute lung injury biomarkers and respiratory function. In order to test the validity of the minipig model, a pilot study in Sri Lanka has been devised to observe signs of lung injury in human patients who have ingested OP insecticide with or without clinical evidence of pulmonary aspiration. Lung injury will be assessed with PaO2/FIO2 ratios and physiological dead space measurement. Blood, bronchoalveolar lavage and urine will be taken at 24 and 48 h after poisoning and at 3-4 h in surgical control patients to measure acute lung injury biomarkers. An unpublished toxicology study from Sri Lanka, 2011-2012, showed that over 40% of unconscious poisoned patients with a GCS <9 were not intubated for ambulance transfer between rural and district hospitals. Delay in intubation leads to aspiration pneumonitis and pneumonia in 38%-45% of unconscious poisoned patients. We hypothesise that non-drug assisted placement of supraglottic airways may be a good tool for use in unconscious poisoned patients requiring transfer from small rural hospitals in Asia. They could confer better airway protection than no airway intervention

  2. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes of Acute Heart Failure Patients: Observations from the Oman Acute Heart Failure Registry

    PubMed Central

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alazzawi, Aouf AbdlRahman; Abraham, Abraham; Singh, Prit Pal; Narayan, Narayan Anantha; Rajarao, Mamatha Punjee; Khdir, Mohammed Ahmed; Abdlraheem, Mohamad; Siddiqui, Aftab Ahmed; Soliman, Hisham; Elkadi, Osama Abdellatif; Bichu, Ruchir Kumar; Al Lawati, Kumayl Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of patients in Oman with acute heart failure (AHF) as part of the Gulf aCute heArt failuRe rEgistry (CARE) project. Methods Data were analyzed from 988 consecutive patients admitted with AHF to 12 hospitals in Oman between 14 February and 14 November 2012. Results The mean age of our patients was 63±12 years. Over half (57%) were male and 95% were Omani citizens. Fifty-seven percent of patients presented with acute decompensated chronic heart failure (ADCHF) while 43% had new-onset AHF. The primary comorbid conditions were hypertension (72%), coronary artery disease (55%), and diabetes mellitus (53%). Ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypertensive heart disease, and idiopathic cardiomyopathy were the most common etiologies of AHF in Oman. The median left ventricular ejection fraction of the cohort was 36% (27–45%) with 56% of the patients having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (< 40%). Atrial fibrillation was seen in 15% of patients. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and non-compliance with medications were the most common precipitating factors. At discharge, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers were prescribed adequately, but aldosterone antagonists were under prescribed. Within 12-months follow-up, one in two patients were rehospitalized for AHF. In-hospital mortality was 7.1%, which doubled to 15.7% at three months and reached 26.4% at one-year post discharge. Conclusions Oman CARE was the first prospective multicenter registry of AHF in Oman and showed that heart failure (HF) patients present at a younger age with recurrent ADCHF and HF with reduced ejection fraction. IHD was the most common etiology of HF with a low prevalence of AHF, but a high prevalence of acute coronary syndrome and non-compliance with medications precipitating HF. A quarter of patients died at one-year follow-up even though at discharge medical therapy was

  3. Rare Presentation of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Causing Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Ryan R; Kumar, Sameer; Grossman, Ronald F; Price, Charles; Srigley, John R

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare condition characterized by dysfunctional alveolar macrophages, which ineffectively clear surfactant and typically cause mild hypoxemia. Characteristic Computed Tomography findings are septal reticulations superimposed on ground-glass opacities in a crazy paving pattern, with a clear juxtaposition between affected and unaffected parenchyma. While traditionally PAP was diagnosed via biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is usually sufficient; the fluid appears milky, and on microscopic examination there are foamy macrophages with eosinophilic granules and extracellular hyaline material that is Periodic Acid-Schiff positive. Standard therapy is whole lung lavage (WLL), although novel treatments are under development. The case presented is a 55-year-old woman with six months of progressive dyspnea, who developed hypoxemic respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation; she had typical findings of PAP on imaging and BAL. WLL was ultimately successful in restoring adequate oxygenation. Respiratory failure of this magnitude is a rare finding in PAP. PMID:27445536

  4. Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure in children

    PubMed Central

    Abadesso, Clara; Nunes, Pedro; Silvestre, Catarina; Matias, Ester; Loureiro, Helena; Almeida, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical efficacy of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in avoiding endotracheal intubation (ETI), to demonstrate clinical and gasometric improvement and to identify predictive risk factors associated with NIV failure. An observational prospective clinical study was carried out. Included Patients with acute respiratory disease (ARD) treated with NIV, from November 2006 to January 2010 in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). NIV was used in 151 patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Patients were divided in two groups: NIV success and NIV failure, if ETI was required. Mean age was 7.2±20.3 months (median: 1 min: 0,3 max.: 156). Main diagnoses were bronchiolitis in 102 (67.5%), and pneumonia in 44 (29%) patients. There was a significant improvement in respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), pH, and pCO2 at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset (P<0.05) in both groups. Improvement in pulse oximetric saturation/fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2/FiO2) was verified at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset in the success group (P<0.001). In the failure group, significant SpO2/FiO2 improvement was only observed in the first 4 hours. NIV failure occurred in 34 patients (22.5%). Risk factors for NIV failure were apnea, prematurity, pneumonia, and bacterial co-infection (P<0.05). Independent risk factors for NIV failure were apneia (P<0.001; odds ratio 15.8; 95% confidence interval: 3.42–71.4) and pneumonia (P<0.001, odds ratio 31.25; 95% confidence interval: 8.33–111.11). There were no major complications related with NIV. In conclusion this study demonstrates the efficacy of NIV as a form of respiratory support for children and infants with ARF, preventing clinical deterioration and avoiding ETI in most of the patients. Risk factors for failure were related with immaturity and severe infection. PMID:22802994

  5. Acute Unilateral Vestibular Failure Does Not Cause Spatial Hemineglect

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Julian; Habs, Maximilian; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Visuo-spatial neglect and vestibular disorders have common clinical findings and involve the same cortical areas. We questioned (1) whether visuo-spatial hemineglect is not only a disorder of spatial attention but may also reflect a disorder of higher cortical vestibular function and (2) whether a vestibular tone imbalance due to an acute peripheral dysfunction can also cause symptoms of neglect or extinction. Therefore, patients with an acute unilateral peripheral vestibular failure (VF) were tested for symptoms of hemineglect. Methods Twenty-eight patients with acute VF were assessed for signs of vestibular deficits and spatial neglect using clinical measures and various common standardized paper-pencil tests. Neglect severity was evaluated further with the Center of Cancellation method. Pathological neglect test scores were correlated with the degree of vestibular dysfunction determined by the subjective visual vertical and caloric testing. Results Three patients showed isolated pathological scores in one or the other neglect test, either ipsilesionally or contralesionally to the VF. None of the patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of spatial hemineglect or extinction. Conclusions A vestibular tone imbalance due to unilateral failure of the vestibular endorgan does not cause spatial hemineglect, but evidence indicates it causes mild attentional deficits in both visual hemifields. PMID:26247469

  6. Effects of acute hypercapnia with and without acidosis on lung inflammation and apoptosis in experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, L M; Rzezinski, A; Silva, J D; Maron-Gutierrez, T; Ornellas, D S; Henriques, I; Capelozzi, V L; Teodoro, W; Morales, M M; Silva, P L; Pelosi, P; Garcia, C S N B; Rocco, P R M

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of acute hypercapnic acidosis and buffered hypercapnia on lung inflammation and apoptosis in experimental acute lung injury (ALI). Twenty-four hours after paraquat injection, 28 Wistar rats were randomized into four groups (n=7/group): (1) normocapnia (NC, PaCO2=35-45 mmHg), ventilated with 0.03%CO2+21%O2+balancedN2; (2) hypercapnic acidosis (HC, PaCO2=60-70 mmHg), ventilated with 5%CO2+21%O2+balancedN2; and (3) buffered hypercapnic acidosis (BHC), ventilated with 5%CO2+21%O2+balancedN2 and treated with sodium bicarbonate (8.4%). The remaining seven animals were not mechanically ventilated (NV). The mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6 (p=0.003), IL-1β (p<0.001), and type III procollagen (PCIII) (p=0.001) in lung tissue was more reduced in the HC group in comparison with NC, with no significant differences between HC and BHC. Lung and kidney cell apoptosis was reduced in HC and BHC in comparison with NC and NV. In conclusion, in this experimental ALI model, hypercapnia, regardless of acidosis, reduced lung inflammation and lung and kidney cell apoptosis. PMID:25246186

  7. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure: Revisiting Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Julio; Miñana, Gema; Santas, Enrique; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney. Worsening renal function that occurs in patients with acute heart failure has been classified as cardiorenal syndrome type 1. In this setting, worsening renal function is a common finding and is due to complex, multifactorial, and not fully understood processes involving hemodynamic (renal arterial hypoperfusion and renal venous congestion) and nonhemodynamic factors. Traditionally, worsening renal function has been associated with worse outcomes, but recent findings have revealed mixed and heterogeneous results, perhaps suggesting that the same phenotype represents a diversity of pathophysiological and clinical situations. Interpreting the magnitude and chronology of renal changes together with baseline renal function, fluid overload status, and clinical response to therapy might help clinicians to unravel the clinical meaning of renal function changes that occur during an episode of heart failure decompensation. In this article, we critically review the contemporary evidence on the pathophysiology and clinical aspects of worsening renal function in acute heart failure. PMID:25758162

  8. Novel biomarkers in acute heart failure: MR-pro-adrenomedullin.

    PubMed

    Peacock, W Frank

    2014-10-01

    First isolated from human pheochromocytoma cells, adrenomedullin (ADM) is a peptide hormone with natriuretic, vasodilatory, and hypotensive effects mediated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), nitric oxide, and renal prostaglandin systems. ADM expression occurs in many tissues and organ systems, including cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, cerebrovascular, gastrointestinal, and endocrine tissues where it acts as a circulating hormone and a local autocrine and paracrine hormone. ADM plasma concentrations are increased in hypertension, chronic renal disease, and heart failure. As ADM is unstable in vitro, it is necessary to measure its mid-regional pro-hormone fragment, the levels of which correspond to ADM concentration (MR-proADM). The prognostic potential of MR-proADM was recently demonstrated in the Biomarkers in Acute Heart Failure (BACH) trial. In this trial of 568 acute heart failure patients, MR-proADM was superior to both brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and NT-proBNP in predicting mortality within 14 days. MR-proADM also provided significant additive incremental predictive value for 90-day mortality when added to BNP and NT-proBNP. PMID:24756062

  9. Metallothionein-induced zinc partitioning exacerbates hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Min; McLaughlin, Joseph N.; Frederick, Daniel R.; Zhu, Lin; Thambiayya, Kalidasan; Wasserloos, Karla J.; Kaminski, Iris; Pearce, Linda L.; Peterson, Jim; Li, Jin; Latoche, Joseph D.; Peck Palmer, Octavia M.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Fattman, Cheryl L.; Alcorn, John F.; Oury, Tim D.; Angus, Derek C.; Pitt, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Hypozincemia, with hepatic zinc accumulation at the expense of other organs, occurs in infection, inflammation, and aseptic lung injury. Mechanisms underlying zinc partitioning or its impact on extrahepatic organs are unclear. Here we show that the major zinc-binding protein, metallothionein (MT), is critical for zinc transmigration from lung to liver during hyperoxia and preservation of intrapulmonary zinc during hyperoxia is associated with an injury-resistant phenotype in MT-null mice. Particularly, lung-to-liver zinc ratios decreased in wild-type (WT) and increased significantly in MT-null mice breathing 95% oxygen for 72 h. Compared with female adult WT mice, MT-null mice were significantly protected against hyperoxic lung injury indicated by reduced inflammation and interstitial edema, fewer necrotic changes to distal airway epithelium, and sustained lung function at 72 h hyperoxia. Lungs of MT-null mice showed decreased levels of immunoreactive LC3, an autophagy marker, compared with WT mice. Analysis of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the lungs revealed similar levels of manganese-SOD activity between strains under normoxia and hyperoxia. Lung extracellular SOD activity decreased significantly in both strains at 72 h of hyperoxia, although there was no difference between strains. Copper-zinc-SOD activity was ∼4× higher under normoxic conditions in MT-null compared with WT mice but was not affected in either group by hyperoxia. Collectively the data suggest that genetic deletion of MT-I/II in mice is associated with compensatory increase in copper-zinc-SOD activity, prevention of hyperoxia-induced zinc transmigration from lung to liver, and hyperoxia-resistant phenotype strongly associated with differences in zinc homeostasis during hyperoxic acute lung injury. PMID:23275622

  10. Dasatinib Reduces Lung Inflammation and Fibrosis in Acute Experimental Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Horta, Lucas Felipe Bastos; Maia, Lígia de Albuquerque; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; da Silva, André Benedito; Morales, Marcelo Marco; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Takiya, Christina Maeda; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease with no effective treatment. We hypothesized that dasatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, might exhibit therapeutic efficacy in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Silicosis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by a single intratracheal administration of silica particles, whereas the control group received saline. After 14 days, when the disease was already established, animals were randomly assigned to receive DMSO or dasatinib (1 mg/kg) by oral gavage, twice daily, for 14 days. On day 28, lung morphofunction, inflammation, and remodeling were investigated. RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) were incubated with silica particles, followed by treatment or not with dasatinib, and evaluated for macrophage polarization. On day 28, dasatinib improved lung mechanics, increased M2 macrophage counts in lung parenchyma and granuloma, and was associated with reduction of fraction area of granuloma, fraction area of collapsed alveoli, protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β, and reduced neutrophils, M1 macrophages, and collagen fiber content in lung tissue and granuloma in silicotic animals. Additionally, dasatinib reduced expression of iNOS and increased expression of arginase and metalloproteinase-9 in silicotic macrophages. Dasatinib was effective at inducing macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype and reducing lung inflammation and fibrosis, thus improving lung mechanics in a murine model of acute silicosis. PMID:26789403

  11. Crocin attenuates lipopolysacchride-induced acute lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Kuai, Jianke; Luo, Zhonghua; Wang, Wuping; Wang, Lei; Ke, Changkang; Li, Xiaofei; Ni, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Crocin, a representative of carotenoid compounds, exerts a spectrum of activities including radical scavenger, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties. To investigate the protective effect of crocin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS (1 mg/kg). The mice received intragastric injection of crocin (50 mg/kg) 1 h before LPS administration. Pulmonary histological changes were evaluated by hematoxylineosin stain and lung wet/dry weight ratios were observed. Concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and nitric oxide (NO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were measured by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung tissues was determined by Western blot analysis. Crocin pretreatment significantly alleviated the severity of lung injury and inhibited the production of TNF-α and IL-1β in mice with ALI. After LPS administration, the lung wet/dry weight ratios, as an index of lung edema, and MPO activity were also markedly reduced by crocin pretreatment. Crocin pretreatment also reduced the concentrations of NO in lung tissues. Furthermore, the expression of iNOS was significantly suppressed by crocin pretreatment. Croncin potently protected against LPS-induced ALI and the protective effects of crocin may attribute partly to the suppression of iNOS expression. PMID:26191176

  12. Dasatinib Reduces Lung Inflammation and Fibrosis in Acute Experimental Silicosis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Horta, Lucas Felipe Bastos; Maia, Lígia de Albuquerque; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; da Silva, André Benedito; Morales, Marcelo Marco; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Takiya, Christina Maeda; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease with no effective treatment. We hypothesized that dasatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, might exhibit therapeutic efficacy in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Silicosis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by a single intratracheal administration of silica particles, whereas the control group received saline. After 14 days, when the disease was already established, animals were randomly assigned to receive DMSO or dasatinib (1 mg/kg) by oral gavage, twice daily, for 14 days. On day 28, lung morphofunction, inflammation, and remodeling were investigated. RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) were incubated with silica particles, followed by treatment or not with dasatinib, and evaluated for macrophage polarization. On day 28, dasatinib improved lung mechanics, increased M2 macrophage counts in lung parenchyma and granuloma, and was associated with reduction of fraction area of granuloma, fraction area of collapsed alveoli, protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β, and reduced neutrophils, M1 macrophages, and collagen fiber content in lung tissue and granuloma in silicotic animals. Additionally, dasatinib reduced expression of iNOS and increased expression of arginase and metalloproteinase-9 in silicotic macrophages. Dasatinib was effective at inducing macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype and reducing lung inflammation and fibrosis, thus improving lung mechanics in a murine model of acute silicosis. PMID:26789403

  13. MicroRNAs: Novel regulatory molecules in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    CAO, YONGMEI; LYU, YI; TANG, JIAHUA; LI, YINGCHUAN

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are common and complex inflammatory lung diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a type of non-coding RNA molecule that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, have emerged as a novel class of gene regulators, which have critical roles in a wide range of human disorders and diseases, including ALI. Certain types of miRNAs are abnormally expressed in response to lung injury. miRNAs can regulate inflammation pathways by targeting specific molecules and modulate immune response in the process of lung injury and repair. The regulation of miRNA can relieve injury response and promote the recovery of ALI/ARDS. Therefore, miRNAs may serve as novel therapeutic targets in ALI/ARDS. PMID:27123242

  14. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R.L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported. PMID:26312100

  15. Pressure Controlled Ventilation to Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koeppen, Michael; Eckle, Tobias; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2011-01-01

    Murine models are extensively used to investigate acute injuries of different organs systems (1-34). Acute lung injury (ALI), which occurs with prolonged mechanical ventilation, contributes to morbidity and mortality of critical illness, and studies on novel genetic or pharmacological targets are areas of intense investigation (1-3, 5, 8, 26, 30, 33-36). ALI is defined by the acute onset of the disease, which leads to non-cardiac pulmonary edema and subsequent impairment of pulmonary gas exchange (36). We have developed a murine model of ALI by using a pressure-controlled ventilation to induce ventilator-induced lung injury (2). For this purpose, C57BL/6 mice are anesthetized and a tracheotomy is performed followed by induction of ALI via mechanical ventilation. Mice are ventilated in a pressure-controlled setting with an inspiratory peak pressure of 45 mbar over 1 - 3 hours. As outcome parameters, pulmonary edema (wet-to-dry ratio), bronchoalveolar fluid albumin content, bronchoalveolar fluid and pulmonary tissue myeloperoxidase content and pulmonary gas exchange are assessed (2). Using this technique we could show that it sufficiently induces acute lung inflammation and can distinguish between different treatment groups or genotypes (1-3, 5). Therefore this technique may be helpful for researchers who pursue molecular mechanisms involved in ALI using a genetic approach in mice with gene-targeted deletion. PMID:21587159

  16. Acute Aortic Dissection Extending Into the Lung.

    PubMed

    Makdisi, George; Said, Sameh M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2015-07-01

    The radiologic manifestations of ruptured acute aortic dissection, Stanford type A aortic dissection, DeBakey type 1 can present in different radiographic scenarios with devastating outcomes. Here, we present a rare case of a 70-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with chest pain radiating to the back. A chest computed tomography scan showed a Stanford type A, DeBakey type 1, acute aortic dissection ruptured into the aortopulmonary window and stenosing the pulmonary trunk, both main pulmonary arteries, and dissecting the bronchovascular sheaths and flow into the pulmonary interstitium, causing pulmonary interstitial hemorrhage. The patient underwent emergent ascending aorta replacement with hemiarch replacement with circulatory arrest. The postoperative course was unremarkable. PMID:26140779

  17. [Extracorporeal lung support and endovascular stent in traumatic aortic rupture and severe lung failure].

    PubMed

    Schmid, F X; Philipp, A; Faltermeier, H; Schädinger, U; Link, J; Birnbaum, D

    2002-07-01

    Blunt thoracic injury in association with aortic rupture represents a life-threatening situation. Surgical repair used to be the preferred method of treatment. Because most patients are multiple trauma patients including head injuries, bone fractures and respiratory failure, urgent surgical procedures portend excessively high morbidity and mortality rates. Delay in operative management bears the risk of exsanguinating hemorrhage, secondary complications, prolonged hospital stay with increased costs. We present here an alternative treatment protocol including pumpless extracorporal lung assist and endovascular aortic stent graft placement in a 20-year old traffic accident victim. This procedure may be an especially useful treatment option in managing patients with complex lung and aortic pathology primarily not suitable for transportation or surgery. PMID:12219652

  18. A Critical Care and Transplantation-Based Approach to Acute Respiratory Failure after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children.

    PubMed

    Elbahlawan, Lama; Srinivasan, Ashok; Morrison, R Ray

    2016-04-01

    Acute respiratory failure contributes significantly to nonrelapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although there is a trend of improved survival over time, mortality remains unacceptably high. An understanding of the pathophysiology of early respiratory failure, opportunities for targeted therapy, assessment of the patient at risk, optimal use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, strategies to improve alveolar recruitment, appropriate fluid management, care of the patient with chronic lung disease, and importantly, a team approach between critical care and transplantation services may improve outcomes. PMID:26409244

  19. Acute Hepatic Failure in a Dog after Xylitol Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Renee D; Hovda, Lynn R

    2016-06-01

    Xylitol is a five-carbon sugar alcohol produced from natural resources frequently used as a sugar substitute for humans. We report the development and successful treatment of acute hepatic failure and coagulopathy in a dog after xylitol ingestion. A 9-year-old 4.95 kg (10.9 lb) neutered male Chihuahua was evaluated at a veterinary clinic for vomiting after ingesting 224 g (45 g/kg, 20.5 g/lb) of granulated xylitol. Hypoglycemia developed within 1-2 h, elevated liver values, suggesting the development of acute hepatic failure, within 12 h and coagulopathy less than 24 h after ingestion. Treatment included maropitant, intravenous dextrose, phytonadione, metronidazole, and fresh frozen plasma. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and S-adensoyl-L-methionine (SAMe) provided hepatic detoxification and support. The dog survived and liver values returned to normal within 1 month post ingestion. No adverse effects to hepatic function have been identified 2 years after acute xylitol toxicity. This paper is one of the few reports of successful management of a dog with hypoglycemia, hepatic failure, and coagulopathy caused by xylitol toxicity. To date, this is the highest published xylitol dose survived by a dog, as well as the only reported case that documents laboratory changes throughout the course of toxicity and includes normal hepatic indices for 7 months following xylitol toxicity. The rapidly expanding use of xylitol in a variety of products intended for human consumption has led to a rise in xylitol toxicity cases reported in dogs, and clinicians should be aware that more dogs may potentially be exposed and develop similar manifestations. PMID:26691320

  20. Overview on acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Gao, Shan; Duan, Zhongping; Hu, Ke-Qin

    2016-03-01

    Liver failure (LF) is defined as severe dysfunction in hepatic synthesis, detoxification, and metabolism induced by various etiologies. Clinical presentation of LF typically includes severe jaundice, coagulation disorder, hepatic encephalopathy, and ascites. LF can be classified into acute LF, acute-on-chronic LF (ACLF), and chronic LF. ACLF has been demonstrated as a distinct syndrome with unique clinical presentation and outcomes. The severity, curability, and reversibility of ACLF have attracted considerable attention. Remarkable developments in ACLF-related conception, diagnostic criteria, pathogenesis, and therapy have been achieved. However, this disease, especially its diagnostic criteria, remains controversial. In this paper, we systemically reviewed the current understanding of ACLF from its definition, etiology, pathophysiology, pathology, and clinical presentation to management by thoroughly comparing important findings between east and west countries, as well as those from other regions. We also discussed the controversies, challenges, and needs for future studies to promote the standardization and optimization of the diagnosis and treatment for ACLF. PMID:26976617

  1. Haemodynamic changes in adrenaline-induced acute massive lung oedema.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C P

    1975-01-01

    During the production of adrenaline-induced acute massive lung oedema in the dog, plumonary arterial, pulmonary venous, systemic arterial, and bronchial arterial blood pressures all increase markedly. Pulmonary arterial and venous blood flows fall steeply after initial transient rises. Systemic arterial blood flow also declines, with or without an initial transient increase. The bronchial arterial blood flow shows an initial fall followed by a rise of late onset. The main determinant for the pathogenesis of adrenaline-induced lung oedema is apparently the enormously increased hydrostatic pressure in the pulmonary vascular bed. PMID:123482

  2. [Organ damage and cardiorenal syndrome in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Casado Cerrada, Jesús; Pérez Calvo, Juan Ignacio

    2014-03-01

    Heart failure is a complex syndrome that affects almost all organs and systems of the body. Signs and symptoms of organ dysfunction, in particular kidney dysfunction, may be accentuated or become evident for the first time during acute decompensation of heart failure. Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney, regardless of which of the two organs may have suffered the initial damage and regardless also of their previous functional status. Research into the mechanisms regulating the complex relationship between the two organs is prompting the search for new biomarkers to help physicians detect renal damage in subclinical stages. Hence, a preventive approach to renal dysfunction may be adopted in the clinical setting in the near future. This article provides a general overview of cardiorenal syndrome and an update of the physiopathological mechanisms involved. Special emphasis is placed on the role of visceral congestion as an emergent mechanism in this syndrome. PMID:24930080

  3. Acute Liver Failure After a Late TIPSS Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Radeleff, Boris Sommer, Christof-Matthias; Schawo, Simone; Lopez-Benitez, Ruben; Sauer, Peter; Schemmer, Peter; Kauffmann, Guenter W.; Richter, Goetz M.

    2008-01-15

    We report a rare case of late transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS) occlusion due to progressive stent protrusion into the periportal liver parenchyma, which was a result of delayed liver shrinkage 2 years after TIPSS. The initial TIPSS procedure had been carried out in a 52-year-old man as a bridge for liver transplantation because of post-alcoholic liver cirrhosis. We describe the applied TIPSS recanalization and revision technique. Immediately after TIPSS revision acute liver failure developed, which required emergency liver transplantation.

  4. Review article: liver support systems in acute hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Rahman, T M; Hodgson, H J

    1999-10-01

    The treatment of acute hepatic failure has developed rapidly over the last 40 years, reducing morbidity and mortality from this syndrome. Whilst this has been partly attributed to significant improvements in the specialist medical management of these patients, advances in surgical techniques and pharmaceutical developments have led to the establishment of successful liver transplantation programmes, which have improved mortality significantly. This review will examine the clinical impact of alternative methods that have been used to provide extra-corporeal hepatic support. Non-biological, bio- logical and hybrid hepatic extra-corporeal support will be explored, offering a comprehensive historical overview and an appraisal of present and future advances. PMID:10540040

  5. Lung Neutrophilia in Myeloperoxidase Deficient Mice during the Course of Acute Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kremserova, Silvie; Perecko, Tomas; Soucek, Karel; Klinke, Anna; Baldus, Stephan; Eiserich, Jason P; Kubala, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation accompanying diseases such as sepsis affects primarily lungs and induces their failure. This remains the most common cause of sepsis induced mortality. While neutrophils play a key role in pulmonary failure, the mechanisms remain incompletely characterized. We report that myeloperoxidase (MPO), abundant enzyme in neutrophil granules, modulates the course of acute pulmonary inflammatory responses induced by intranasal application of lipopolysaccharide. MPO deficient mice had significantly increased numbers of airway infiltrated neutrophils compared to wild-type mice during the whole course of lung inflammation. This was accompanied by higher levels of RANTES in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the MPO deficient mice. Other markers of lung injury and inflammation, which contribute to recruitment of neutrophils into the inflamed lungs, including total protein and other selected proinflammatory cytokines did not significantly differ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the wild-type and the MPO deficient mice. Interestingly, MPO deficient neutrophils revealed a decreased rate of cell death characterized by phosphatidylserine surface expression. Collectively, the importance of MPO in regulation of pulmonary inflammation, independent of its putative microbicidal functions, can be potentially linked to MPO ability to modulate the life span of neutrophils and to affect accumulation of chemotactic factors at the inflammatory site. PMID:26998194

  6. Lung Neutrophilia in Myeloperoxidase Deficient Mice during the Course of Acute Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kremserova, Silvie; Perecko, Tomas; Soucek, Karel; Klinke, Anna; Baldus, Stephan; Eiserich, Jason P.; Kubala, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation accompanying diseases such as sepsis affects primarily lungs and induces their failure. This remains the most common cause of sepsis induced mortality. While neutrophils play a key role in pulmonary failure, the mechanisms remain incompletely characterized. We report that myeloperoxidase (MPO), abundant enzyme in neutrophil granules, modulates the course of acute pulmonary inflammatory responses induced by intranasal application of lipopolysaccharide. MPO deficient mice had significantly increased numbers of airway infiltrated neutrophils compared to wild-type mice during the whole course of lung inflammation. This was accompanied by higher levels of RANTES in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the MPO deficient mice. Other markers of lung injury and inflammation, which contribute to recruitment of neutrophils into the inflamed lungs, including total protein and other selected proinflammatory cytokines did not significantly differ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the wild-type and the MPO deficient mice. Interestingly, MPO deficient neutrophils revealed a decreased rate of cell death characterized by phosphatidylserine surface expression. Collectively, the importance of MPO in regulation of pulmonary inflammation, independent of its putative microbicidal functions, can be potentially linked to MPO ability to modulate the life span of neutrophils and to affect accumulation of chemotactic factors at the inflammatory site. PMID:26998194

  7. Advances in the management of acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-Wei; Yin, Yi-Mei; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is an uncommon but dramatic clinical syndrome characterized by hepatic encephalopathy and a bleeding tendency due to abrupt loss of liver function caused by massive or submassive liver necrosis in a patient with a previously healthy liver. The causes of ALF encompass a wide variety of toxic, viral, metabolic, vascular and autoimmune insults to the liver, and identifying the correct cause can be difficult or even impossible. Many patients with ALF develop a cascade of serious complications involving almost every organ system, and death is mostly due to multi-organ failure, hemorrhage, infection, and intracranial hypertension. Fortunately, the outcome of ALF has been improved in the last 3 decades through the specific treatment for the disease of certain etiology, and the advanced intensive care management. For most severely affected patients who fail to recover after treatment, rapid evaluation for transfer to a transplantation center and consideration for liver transplantation is mandatory so that transplantation can be applied before contraindications develop. This review focuses on the recent advances in the understanding of various contributing etiologies, the administration of etiology-specific treatment to alleviate the liver injury, and the management of complications (e.g., encephalopathy, coagulopathy, cardiovascular instability, respiratory failure, renal failure, sepsis and metabolic disturbance) in patients with ALF. Assessment of the need for liver transplantation is also presented. PMID:24222950

  8. Role of serotonin in patients with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Huval, W V; Lelcuk, S; Shepro, D; Hechtman, H B

    1984-08-01

    An early event in the evolution of acute respiratory failure (ARF) is thought to be the activation of platelets, their pulmonary entrapment and subsequent release of the smooth muscle constrictor serotonin (5HT). This study tests the thesis that inhibition of 5HT will improve lung function. The etiology of ARF in the 18 study patients was sepsis (N = 10), aspiration (N = 3), pancreatitis (N = 1), embolism (N = 2), and abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery (N = 2). Patients were divided into two groups determined by whether their period of endotracheal intubation was less than or equal to 4 days (early ARF, N = 12) or greater than 4 days (late ARF, N = 6). Transpulmonary platelet counts in the early group showed entrapment of 26,300 +/- 5900 platelets/mm3 in contrast to the late group where there was no entrapment (p less than 0.05). The platelet 5HT levels in the early group were 55 +/- 5 ng/10(9) platelets, values lower than 95 +/- 15 ng/10(9) platelets in the late ARF group (p less than 0.05), and 290 +/- 70 ng/10(9) platelets in normals. The selective 5HT receptor antagonist, ketanserin was given as an intravenous bolus over 3 minutes in a dose of 0.1 mg/kg, followed by a 30-minute infusion of 0.08 mg/kg. During this period mean arterial pressure (MAP) fell from 87 +/- 5 to 74 +/- 6 mmHg (mean +/- SEM) (p less than 0.05). One and one-half hours following the start of therapy, MAP returned to baseline. At this time, patients with early ARF showed decreases in: physiologic shunt (Qs/QT) from 26 +/- 3 to 19 +/- 3 (p less than 0.05); peak inspiratory pressure from 35 +/- 2 to 32 +/- 2 cmH2O (p less than 0.05) and in mean pulmonary arterial pressure from 32 +/- 2 to 29 +/- 1 mmHg (p less than 0.05). At 4 hours all changes returned to baseline levels. In early ARF ketanserin did not alter pretreatment values of: pulmonary arterial wedge pressure, 17 +/- 3 mmHg; cardiac index, 2.8 +/- 0.3 L/min X m2; platelet count, 219,000 +/- 45,000/mm3; platelet 5HT, 55 +/- 5 ng/10

  9. NOS-2 Inhibition in Phosgene-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Filipczak, Piotr T.; Senft, Albert P.; Seagrave, JeanClare; Weber, Waylon; Kuehl, Philip J.; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; McDonald, Jacob D.; Baron, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Phosgene exposure via an industrial or warfare release produces severe acute lung injury (ALI) with high mortality, characterized by massive pulmonary edema, disruption of epithelial tight junctions, surfactant dysfunction, and oxidative stress. There are no targeted treatments for phosgene-induced ALI. Previous studies demonstrated that nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS-2) is upregulated in the lungs after phosgene exposure; however, the role of NOS-2 in the pathogenesis of phosgene-induced ALI remains unknown. We previously demonstrated that NOS-2 expression in lung epithelium exacerbates inhaled endotoxin-induced ALI in mice, mediated partially through downregulation of surfactant protein B (SP-B) expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that a selective NOS-2 inhibitor delivered to the lung epithelium by inhalation would mitigate phosgene-induced ALI. Inhaled phosgene produced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein, histologic lung injury, and lung NOS-2 expression at 24 h. Administration of the selective NOS-2 inhibitor 1400 W via inhalation, but not via systemic delivery, significantly attenuated phosgene-induced ALI and preserved epithelial barrier integrity. Furthermore, aerosolized 1400 W augmented expression of SP-B and prevented downregulation of tight junction protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), both critical for maintenance of normal lung physiology and barrier integrity. We also demonstrate for the first time that NOS-2-derived nitric oxide downregulates the ZO-1 expression at the transcriptional level in human lung epithelial cells, providing a novel target for ameliorating vascular leak in ALI. Our data demonstrate that lung NOS-2 plays a critical role in the development of phosgene-induced ALI and suggest that aerosolized NOS-2 inhibitors offer a novel therapeutic strategy for its treatment. PMID:25870319

  10. Pros and cons of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2010-08-01

    In patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a protective mechanical ventilation strategy characterized by low tidal volumes has been associated with reduced mortality. However, such a strategy may result in alveolar collapse, leading to cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli and distal airways. Thus, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) have been used to open up collapsed lungs, while adequate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels may counteract alveolar derecruitment during low tidal volume ventilation, improving respiratory function and minimizing ventilator-associated lung injury. Nevertheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the appropriateness of RMs. The most commonly used RM is conventional sustained inflation, associated with respiratory and cardiovascular side effects, which may be minimized by newly proposed strategies: prolonged or incremental PEEP elevation; pressure-controlled ventilation with fixed PEEP and increased driving pressure; pressure-controlled ventilation applied with escalating PEEP and constant driving pressure; and long and slow increase in pressure. The efficiency of RMs may be affected by different factors, including the nature and extent of lung injury, capability of increasing inspiratory transpulmonary pressures, patient positioning and cardiac preload. Current evidence suggests that RMs can be used before setting PEEP, after ventilator circuit disconnection or as a rescue maneuver to overcome severe hypoxemia; however, their routine use does not seem to be justified at present. The development of new lung recruitment strategies that have fewer hemodynamic and biological effects on the lungs, as well as randomized clinical trials analyzing the impact of RMs on morbidity and mortality of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, are warranted. PMID:20658909

  11. Presumptive acute lung injury following multiple surgeries in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Masaaki; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Rieko; Sasaki, Jun; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Uzuka, Yuji; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Nezu, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.5-kg spayed female domestic shorthair cat had a tracheal mass identified as malignant B-cell lymphoma. The cat had tracheal resection and subsequently developed laryngeal paralysis. Due to multiple episodes of respiratory distress the cat subsequently had tracheal surgeries. Finally, the cat had a sudden onset of severe respiratory distress and collapsed. Computed tomography imaging and arterial blood gas analysis supported a diagnosis of acute lung injury. PMID:24082167

  12. [Sodium dichloroisocyanurate-induced acute lung injury in a child].

    PubMed

    Wiel, E; Sicot, J; Leteurtre, S; Binoche, A; Nisse, P; Assez, N

    2013-04-01

    Intoxication, by cyanurate and its chlorated derivatives in children, is increasingly reported in the literature due to accidental ingestion compared to accidental inhalation. We report a case in a 5-year-old child who presented with acute lung injury due to accidental inhalation of gas formed after a reaction of sodium dichloroisocyanurate tablets with water. Prevention remains the best way to reduce the risk of children being intoxicated by inhalation of the gas formed after contact of tablets with water. PMID:23433843

  13. Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmin

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was introduced in 1983 to describe a clinical syndrome seen within 6 h of a plasma-containing blood products transfusion. TRALI is a rare transfusion complication; however, the FDA has suggested that TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Understanding the pathogenesis of TRALI will facilitate adopting preventive strategies, such as deferring high plasma volume female product donors. This review outlines the clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of TRALI. PMID:25844126

  14. Oronasal mask versus helmet in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Lara; Mega, Chiara; Vaschetto, Rosanna; Bellone, Andrea; Scala, Raffaele; Cosentini, Roberto; Musti, Muriel; Del Forno, Manuela; Grassi, Mario; Fasano, Luca; Navalesi, Paolo; Nava, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    The choice of the interface for noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is a key factor in NIV success. We hypothesised that a new helmet specifically design to improve performance in hypercapnic patients would be clinically equivalent to a standard oronasal mask. In a multicentre, short-term, physiological, randomised trial in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients facing an acute hypercapnic respiratory failure episode, we compared the changes in arterial blood gases (ABGs) and tolerance score obtained using the helmet or mask, and, as secondary end-points, dyspnoea, vital signs, early NIV discontinuation and rate of intubation. 80 patients were randomly assigned to receive NIV either with the helmet (n=39) or mask (n=41), using an intensive care unit ventilator. Compared with baseline, in the first 6 h, NIV improved ABGs, dyspnoea and respiratory rate (p<0.05) in both groups. Changes in ABGs and discomfort were similar with the two groups, while dyspnoea decreased more (p<0.005) using the mask. The rate of intubation and the need for interface change during the whole period of NIV were very low and not different between groups. The new helmet may be a valid alternative to a mask in improving ABGs and achieving a good tolerance during an episode of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. PMID:25504992

  15. Acute renal failure after a holiday in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Guron, G; Holmdahl, J; Dotevall, L

    2006-12-01

    A 20-year-old, previously healthy woman, presented with high fever, headache and myalgia 3 days after her return from a holiday in Southeast Asia. Laboratory data on admission demonstrated a pronounced increase in plasma creatinine, marked thrombocytopenia and moderately elevated liver aminotransferases. After having ruled out malaria, dengue fever was primarily suspected and supportive intravenous fluid therapy was initiated. Still, 1 day after admission, platelet counts dropped even further and she became anuric although she did not appear hypovolemic. On day 2 after admission, urine production commenced spontaneously and the patient slowly recovered. All laboratory test results had returned to normal approximately 2 months later. Serological analysis for dengue fever was negative. It turned out that the patient had been trekking in the jungle while in Thailand and we, therefore, analyzed serology for Leptospira spirochetes which was clearly positive. The patient was diagnosed with leptospirosis which is a serious condition associated with a high mortality when complicated by acute renal failure. Differential diagnoses in patients with acute renal failure and tropical infections are reviewed. The importance of early recognition of leptospirosis, and prompt treatment with antibiotics in suspected cases, is emphasized. PMID:17176921

  16. Acute renal failure in children. An ultrasonographic-clinical study.

    PubMed

    Vergesslich, K A; Sommer, G; Wittich, G R; Balzar, E; Weninger, M; Ponhold, W

    1987-11-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) may be due to obstructive uropathy or renal parenchymal disease. Twenty-five children with acute renal failure secondary to renal parenchymal disease underwent ultrasonographic examination of the kidneys. Changes of renal size and cortical echogenicity were correlated with renal function. All patients presented with bilaterally enlarged kidneys with the exception of those in the neonatal age group (12%). Improvement in renal function resulted in normalization of renal size. With regard to cortical echogenicity two groups were formed. Group A comprised 11 patients whose kidneys had the same echogenicity as the liver, while in group B the kidneys were more echogenic (14 patients). Cortical echogenicity was always increased. Determination of creatinine levels showed a statistically significant difference between group A (3.32 mg% +/- 1.40 S.D.) and group B (5.95 mg% +/- 1.96 S.D.), p less than 0.001. Changes in renal function were paralleled by rapid changes in renal size and cortical echogenicity. PMID:3319623

  17. [Acute lung injury as a consequence of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moyado, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) has been recognized as a consequence of blood transfusion (BT) since 1978; the Food and Drug Administration, has classified it as the third BT mortality issue, in 2004, and in first place related with ALI. It can be mainly detected as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The clinical onset is: severe dyspnea, bilateral lung infiltration and low oxygen saturation. In USA, ARDS has an incidence of three to 22.4 cases/100 000 inhabitants, with 58.3 % mortality. TACO and TRALI are less frequent; they have been reported according to the number of transfusions: one in 1275 to 6000 for TRALI and one in 356 transfusions for TACO. Mortality is reported from two to 20 % in TRALI and 20 % in TACO. Antileukocyte antibodies in blood donors plasma, caused TRALI in 89 % of cases; also it has been found antigen specificity against leukocyte blood receptor in 59 %. The UCI patients who received a BT have ALI as a complication in 40 % of cases. The capillary pulmonary endothelia is the target of leukocyte antibodies and also plasma biologic modifiers of the stored plasma, most probable like a Sanarelli-Shwar-tzman phenomenon. PMID:21838994

  18. Long-term physiologic outcome after acute farmer's lung

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier, Y.; Belanger, J.

    1985-06-01

    We performed a follow-up study of 61 patients who had an acute episode of farmer's lung (54 men and seven women). Twenty-four subjects had ceased all contact with the barn, while 37 had continued farming. Pulmonary function tests for all subjects showed an initial improvement after the acute episode: 92.4 percent of predicted for carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (Dco) after one year, compared to 61.5 percent at diagnosis; and 6.01 L for total lung capacity (TLC) after three years, compared to 5.35 L. Subsequently, pulmonary function decreased over time. Five years or more after the acute episode, pulmonary function tests in subjects who had continued farm work were not worse than those of subjects who had ceased contact for Dco (68.1 of predicted vs 80.6 percent, respectively and for TLC (5.55 L vs 5.90 L. This study shows that during a long-term follow-up, subjects with farmer's lung who stayed on the farm have subnormal values for pulmonary function but comparable values to those who left their farm.

  19. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury: The Work of DAMPs*

    PubMed Central

    Land, Walter G.

    2013-01-01

    Current notions in immunology hold that not only pathogen-mediated tissue injury but any injury activates the innate immune system. In principle, this evolutionarily highly conserved, rapid first-line defense system responds to pathogen-induced injury with the creation of infectious inflammation, and non-pathogen-induced tissue injury with ‘sterile’ tissue inflammation. In this review, evidence has been collected in support of the notion that the transfusion-related acute lung injury induces a ‘sterile’ inflammation in the lung of transfused patients in terms of an acute innate inflammatory disease. The inflammatory response is mediated by the patient's innate immune cells including lung-passing neutrophils and pulmonary endothelial cells, which are equipped with pattern recognition receptors. These receptors are able to sense injury-induced, damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) generated during collection, processing, and storage of blood/blood components. The recognition process leads to activation of these innate cells. A critical role for a protein complex known as the NLRP3 inflammasome has been suggested to be at the center of such a scenario. This complex undergoes an initial ‘priming’ step mediated by 1 class of DAMPs and then an ‘activating’ step mediated by another class of DAMPs to activate interleukin-1beta and interleukin-18. These 2 cytokines then promote, via transactivation, the formation of lung inflammation. PMID:23637644

  20. The role of glycemia in acute heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Seferović, Jelena P; Milinković, Ivan; Tešić, Milorad; Ristić, Arsen; Lalić, Nebojša; Simeunović, Dejan; Zivković, Ivana; Di Somma, Salvatore; Seferovic, Petar M

    2014-10-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is one of the most important cardiovascular syndromes associated with high cardiovascular morbidity, and is the major cause of admission in emergency departments worldwide. The clinical complexity of AHF has significantly increased, mostly due to the comorbidities: diabetes, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, peripheral vascular disease, renal insufficiency and anemia. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated a frequent association of AHF and diabetes. Since AHF is a very heterogeneous condition, it is important to identify clinical and laboratory parameters useful for risk stratification of these populations. Hyperglycemia may be one of the most convenient, since it is widely measured, easily interpreted, and inexpensive. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), arrhythmias and poor compliance to chronic medications are considered to be the most frequent precipitating factors of AHF in diabetics. Several studies identified diabetes as the most prominent independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic heart failure (HF) patients. The following parameters were identified as the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with AHF and diabetes: older age, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, ACS, non-compliance, history of hypertension, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%, serum creatinine >1.5 mg/dL, marked elevation of natriuretic peptides, hyponatremia, treatment at admission without ACE inhibitors/ARBs/β-blockers, and no percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as a treatment modality. The most frequent cause of AHF is ACS, both with ST segment elevation (STEMI) or without (NSTEMI). Hyperglycemia is very common in these patients and although frequently unrecognized and untreated, has a large in-hospital and mortality significance. PMID:24988247

  1. A new approach to treatment of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Steven R

    2016-05-01

    Conventional therapies for acute decongestion have yielded uniformly poor results in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). The failure of current strategies may be due to advanced disease in hospitalized patients, incomplete therapy, inherent limitations to existing therapy, or some combination of all three factors. Loop diuretics are the mainstay of current therapy and are in theory not ideal since while producing immediate intravascular volume reduction and relief of symptoms they activate neurohormonal forces that are deleterious to both the heart and the kidney. Ultrafiltration is an alternative to loop diuretics but has not proved advantageous in the setting of renal dysfunction, and if not carefully applied may also aggravate neurohormonal imbalance. In theory decongestive therapy for AHF should remove large volumes of fluid quickly and safely and improve symptoms, particularly dyspnea, without aggravating renal dysfunction or causing neurohormonal activation. Several studies have now suggested that the use of aquaretics such as antagonists to the V2 receptor for arginine vasopressin may be useful as adjunctive therapy in AHF, particularly when renal dysfunction and/or hyponatremia are present. These agents leverage osmotic forces to produce tissue decongestion while causing a water diuresis. They do not adversely affect renal function or neurohormonal balance. Building on the current base of knowledge about outcomes in AHF together with the only study of vasopressin antagonists as short-term monotherapy in chronic heart failure, it would be reasonable to design a trial in AHF in which the use of loop diuretics was minimized in favor of these agents. PMID:26946929

  2. A case of anorexia nervosa with acute renal failure resulting from rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Mezaki, T; Hirono, N; Udaka, F; Kameyama, M

    1990-01-01

    Symptoms of acute renal failure were observed in an anorexia patient who had a history of frequent vomiting. The acute renal failure might have resulted from rhabdomyolysis subsequent to a disturbance of electrolyte balance. This acute renal failure might have resulted in death if not treated. We postulate that even a mild case of anorexia nervosa should be carefully observed to prevent such possible tragedy. PMID:2330820

  3. Device monitoring strategies in acute heart failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Samara, Michael A; Tang, W H Wilson

    2011-09-01

    Acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) represent the most common discharge diagnoses in adults over age 65 and translate into dramatically increased heart failure-associated morbidity and mortality. Conventional approaches to the early detection of pulmonary and systemic congestion have been shown to be of limited sensitivity. Despite their proven efficacy, disease management and structured telephone support programs have failed to achieve widespread use in part due to their resource intensiveness and reliance upon motivated patients. While once thought to hold great promise, results from recent prospective studies on telemonitoring strategies have proven disappointing. Implantable devices with their capacity to monitor electrophysiologic and hemodynamic parameters over long periods of time and with minimal reliance on patient participation may provide solutions to some of these problems. Conventional electrophysiologic parameters and intrathoracic impedance data are currently available in the growing population of heart failure patients with equipped devices. A variety of implantable hemodynamic monitors are currently under investigation. How best to integrate these devices into a systematic approach to the management of patients before, during, and after AHFS is yet to be established. PMID:21424278

  4. Prospective Study on the Clinical Course and Outcomes in Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Mark R.; Roubinian, Nareg; Gajic, Ognjen; Gropper, Michael A.; Hubmayr, Rolf D.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Wilson, Gregory; Koenigsberg, Monique; Lee, Deanna C.; Wu, Ping; Grimes, Barbara; Norris, Philip J.; Murphy, Edward L.; Gandhi, Manish J.; Winters, Jeffrey L.; Mair, David C.; Schuller, Randy M.; Hirschler, Nora V.; Rosen, Rosa Sanchez; Matthay, Michael A.; Toy, Pearl

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transfusion-related acute lung injury is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. A prospective study using electronic surveillance was conducted at two academic medical centers in the United States with the objective to define the clinical course and outcomes in transfusion-related acute lung injury cases. Design Prospective case study with controls. Setting University of California, San Francisco and Mayo Clinic, Rochester. Patients We prospectively enrolled 89 patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury, 164 transfused controls, and 145 patients with possible transfusion-related acute lung injury. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury had fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypotension, and prolonged hypoxemia compared with controls. Of the patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury, 29 of 37 patients (78%) required initiation of mechanical ventilation and 13 of 53 (25%) required initiation of vasopressors. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury and possible transfusion-related acute lung injury had an increased duration of mechanical ventilation and increased days in the ICU and hospital compared with controls. There were 15 of 89 patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury (17%) who died, whereas 61 of 145 patients with possible transfusion-related acute lung injury (42%) died and 7 of 164 of controls (4%) died. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury had evidence of more systemic inflammation with increases in circulating neutrophils and a decrease in platelets compared with controls. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury and possible transfusion-related acute lung injury also had a statistically significant increase in plasma interleukin-8, interleukin-10, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist posttransfusion compared with controls. Conclusions In conclusion, transfusion-related acute lung injury produced a condition

  5. Thaliporphine derivative improves acute lung injury after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gunng-Shinng; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Huang, Chien-Chu; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) occurs frequently in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and is associated with a poor clinical outcome. Aquaporins (AQPs), particularly AQP1 and AQP4, maintain water balances between the epithelial and microvascular domains of the lung. Since pulmonary edema (PE) usually occurs in the TBI-induced ALI patients, we investigated the effects of a thaliporphine derivative, TM-1, on the expression of AQPs and histological outcomes in the lung following TBI in rats. TM-1 administered (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) at 3 or 4 h after TBI significantly reduced the elevated mRNA expression and protein levels of AQP1 and AQP4 and diminished the wet/dry weight ratio, which reflects PE, in the lung at 8 and 24 h after TBI. Postinjury TM-1 administration also improved histopathological changes at 8 and 24 h after TBI. PE was accompanied with tissue pathological changes because a positive correlation between the lung injury score and the wet/dry weight ratio in the same animal was observed. Postinjury administration of TM-1 improved ALI and reduced PE at 8 and 24 h following TBI. The pulmonary-protective effect of TM-1 may be attributed to, at least in part, downregulation of AQP1 and AQP4 expression after TBI. PMID:25705683

  6. Prognosis and Biomarkers in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P

    2016-05-01

    As formal definitions of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) have now been established, and given an increased recognition of the dynamic nature of this condition, there is a growing clinical need to assess prognosis and response to interventions. Conventional scoring systems such as Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) fail to capture the two key prognostic elements in ACLF-namely, extrahepatic organ failure and measures of systemic inflammation-and as such are limited in their prognostic accuracy. Even the best available scoring systems such as the recently described CLIF (Chronic Liver Failure) Consortium ACLF (CLIF-C ACLF) score, are at best 75% accurate and need to be applicable to all etiologies of liver disease. Thus, in the absence of "gold standard" markers of prognosis that render one scoring system superior to another, there is a need to explore other markers of pathophysiology that may better define outcome. This review addresses the evidence for markers of oxidative stress, including those reflecting the inflammasome; elements of cell death such as cytokeratins M30 and M65; and indicators of immune dysfunction, innate immune failure and gut dysbiosis. Finally, evidence for relevance of markers of organ dysfunction, including hemodynamic response, are explored along with associated mediators such as copeptin, dimethylarginines, and renin. It is anticipated that further critique and validation of emerging and relevant biomarkers will facilitate a composite score which, either alone or in combination with existing scoring systems such as CLIF-C, will enable improved prognostication and targeting of therapy in ACLF. PMID:27172354

  7. Acute respiratory failure induced by bleomycin and hyperoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Goad, M.E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Bleomycin, a chemotherapeutic agent, and oxygen at concentrations greater than 20%, induce acute pulmonary damage separately and when administered together. The interaction of 5 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin and 24 hours of exposure to 80% oxygen in hamsters produces delayed onset acute respiratory distress syndrome three days after treatment. As little as 12 hours of 80% O/sub 2/ exposure, after intratracheal bleomycin, induces severe pulmonary damage. Lung lesions are characterized as diffuse alveolar damage. Significantly pulmonary edema, measured by iodine-125-bovine serum albumin and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate, occurs 72 hours after treatment. Lesions progress from focal mild alveolar interstitial and air-space macrophage and granulocyte infiltrates at 24 hours to marked infiltrates and severe interstitial and air space edema with hemorrhages and hyaline membranes at 96 hours. Significant changes measured by electron microscopy morphometry are increases in volume fractions of neutrophils, alveolar tissue and mononuclear leukocytes. Surfactant assay of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid shows a marked decrease in the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio at 72 hours. Proposed mechanisms of bleomycin and hyperoxia synergism include enhanced production of superoxide radicals either directly or indirectly by increasing neutrophil activity or numbers, or by alteration of cell mediators. The pulmonary edema, without evidence of severe morphological changes, may be secondary to alterations of transalveolar transport mechanisms.

  8. Acute renal failure by ingestion of Euphorbia paralias.

    PubMed

    Boubaker, Karima; Ounissi, Mondher; Brahmi, Nozha; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Abdellah, Taieb Ben; El Younsi, Fethi; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2013-05-01

    Euphorbia paralias is known in traditional medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent, a purgative and for its local anesthetic property. To the best our knowledge, renal toxicity of this substance has not been previously reported. In this paper, we report the case of a 29-year-old male who developed renal damage following ingestion of Euphorbia paralias. He had been on follow-up for nephrotic syndrome since 1986, although irregularly, with several relapses but each responding well to steroid therapy. A kidney biopsy had not been performed earlier due to refusal by the patient. He was off steroids since April 2008 because the patient developed osteoporosis. He was admitted with general malaise and oliguria to our department in May 2009, following repeated vomiting and watery diarrhea for three days. On examination, he was edematous but had normal vital signs except for a pulse rate of 120/min. Hemoglobin was only 5.5 g/dL but with normal white cell and platelet counts. Blood biochemistry showed evidence of advanced renal failure with a serum creatinine level of 1835 μmol/L and urea at 44.6 mmol/L, sodium of 132 μmol/L and potassium at 4.3 mmol/L. He had features of nephrotic syndrome with severe hypoproteinamia and 24-h urinary protein of 10.45 g. Ultrasonography revealed enlarged kidneys with a reduced echogenecity of the medulla and the papillae. Subsequently, after hemodialysis with blood transfusion, a kidney biopsy was performed that showed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis associated with an acute tubular injury. On intensive interrogation, the patient gave a history of ingesting boiled Euphorbia paralias as a native treatment for edema, ten days prior to the onset of the current illness. A diagnosis of acute renal failure (ARF) resulting from the possible nephrotoxic effect of Euphorbia paralias poisoning was made. He was treated with intermittent hemodialysis and corticosteroids. Serum creatinine values improved after 48 days. At six months following the

  9. Donor age and early graft failure after lung transplantation: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Matthew R; Peterson, Eric R; Easthausen, Imaani; Quintanilla, Isaac; Colago, Eric; Sonett, Joshua R.; D’Ovidio, Frank; Costa, Joseph; Diamond, Joshua M; Christie, Jason D; Arcasoy, Selim M; Lederer, David J

    2014-01-01

    Lungs from older adult organ donors are often unused because of concerns for increased mortality. We examined associations between donor age and transplant outcomes among 8,860 adult lung transplant recipients using Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network and Lung Transplant Outcomes Group data. We used stratified Cox proportional hazard models and generalized linear mixed models to examine associations between donor age and both 1-year graft failure and primary graft dysfunction. The rate of 1-year graft failure was similar among recipients of lungs from donors age 18–64 years, but severely ill recipients (LAS > 47.7 or use of mechanical ventilation) of lungs from donors age 56–64 years had increased rates of 1-year graft failure (p-values for interaction = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively). Recipients of lungs from donors <18 and ≥65 years had increased rates of 1-year graft failure (adjusted hazard ratio 1.23, 95% CI 1.01–1.50 and adjusted hazard ratio 2.15, 95% CI 1.47–3.15, respectively). Donor age was not associated with the risk of primary graft dysfunction. In summary, the use of lungs from donors age 56–64 years may be safe for adult candidates without a high LAS, and the use of lungs from pediatric donors is associated with a small increase in early graft failure. PMID:24034167

  10. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Michalick, Laura; Tang, Christine; Tabuchi, Arata; Goldenberg, Neil; Dan, Qinghong; Awwad, Khader; Wang, Liming; Erfinanda, Lasti; Nouailles, Geraldine; Witzenrath, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Lv, Lu; Lee, Warren L; Zhang, Haibo; Rotstein, Ori; Kapus, Andras; Szaszi, Katalin; Fleming, Ingrid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B; Kuppe, Hermann; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2016-03-01

    The cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is expressed in endothelial and immune cells; however, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. The functional relevance of TRPV4 was assessed in vivo, in isolated murine lungs, and in isolated neutrophils. Genetic deficiency of TRPV4 attenuated the functional, histological, and inflammatory hallmarks of acid-induced ALI. Similar protection was obtained with prophylactic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, GSK2193874; however, therapeutic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, HC-067047, after ALI induction had no beneficial effect. In isolated lungs, platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased vascular permeability in lungs perfused with trpv4(+/+) more than with trpv4(-/-) blood, independent of lung genotype, suggesting a contribution of TRPV4 on blood cells to lung vascular barrier failure. In neutrophils, TRPV4 inhibition or deficiency attenuated the PAF-induced increase in intracellular calcium. PAF induced formation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by neutrophils, which, in turn, stimulated TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, whereas inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation inhibited the Ca(2+) response to PAF. TRPV4 deficiency prevented neutrophil responses to proinflammatory stimuli, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, neutrophil adhesion, and chemotaxis, putatively due to reduced activation of Rac. In chimeric mice, however, the majority of protective effects in acid-induced ALI were attributable to genetic deficiency of TRPV4 in parenchymal tissue, whereas TRPV4 deficiency in circulating blood cells primarily reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Our findings identify TRPV4 as novel regulator of neutrophil activation and suggest contributions of both parenchymal and neutrophilic TRPV4 in the pathophysiology of ALI. PMID:26222277

  11. Potential Effects of Medicinal Plants and Secondary Metabolites on Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cornélio Favarin, Daniely; Robison de Oliveira, Jhony; Jose Freire de Oliveira, Carlo; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening syndrome that causes high morbidity and mortality worldwide. ALI is characterized by increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary membrane, edema, uncontrolled neutrophils migration to the lung, and diffuse alveolar damage, leading to acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Although corticosteroids remain the mainstay of ALI treatment, they cause significant side effects. Agents of natural origin, such as medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites, mainly those with very few side effects, could be excellent alternatives for ALI treatment. Several studies, including our own, have demonstrated that plant extracts and/or secondary metabolites isolated from them reduce most ALI phenotypes in experimental animal models, including neutrophil recruitment to the lung, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, edema, and vascular permeability. In this review, we summarized these studies and described the anti-inflammatory activity of various plant extracts, such as Ginkgo biloba and Punica granatum, and such secondary metabolites as epigallocatechin-3-gallate and ellagic acid. In addition, we highlight the medical potential of these extracts and plant-derived compounds for treating of ALI. PMID:24224172

  12. Acute kidney injury in critically ill patients with lung disease: kidney-lung crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, Krasnalhia Lívia Soares; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Muniz, Thalita Diógenes; Barreto, Adller Gonçalves Costa; Lima, Rafael Siqueira Athayde; Holanda, Marcelo Alcântara; Pereira, Eanes Delgado Barros; Libório, Alexandre Braga; Daher, Elizabeth de Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the factors associated with acute kidney injury and outcome in patients with lung disease. Methods A prospective study was conducted with 100 consecutive patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit in Fortaleza (CE), Brazil. The risk factors for acute kidney injury and mortality were investigated in a group of patients with lung diseases. Results The mean age of the study population was 57 years, and 50% were male. The incidence of acute kidney injury was higher in patients with PaO2/FiO2<200 mmHg (54% versus 23.7%; p=0.02). Death was observed in 40 cases and the rate of mortality of the acute kidney injury group was higher (62.8% versus 27.6%; p=0.01). The independent factor that was found to be associated with acute kidney injury was PaO2/FiO2<200 mmHg (p=0.01), and the independent risk factors for death were PEEP at admission (OR: 3.6; 95%CI: 1.3-9.6; p=0.009) and need for hemodialysis (OR: 7.9; 95%CI: 2.2-28.3; p=0.001). Conclusion There was a higher mortality rate in the acute kidney injury group. Increased mortality was associated with mechanical ventilation, high PEEP, urea and need for dialysis. Further studies must be performed to better establish the relationship between kidney and lung injury and its impact on patient outcome. PMID:23917978

  13. Acute renal failure and intravascular hemolysis following henna ingestion.

    PubMed

    Qurashi, Hala E A; Qumqumji, Abbas A A; Zacharia, Yasir

    2013-05-01

    The powder of henna plant (Lawsonia inermis Linn.) is extensively used as a decorative skin paint for nail coloring and as a hair dye. Most reports of henna toxicity have been attributed to adding a synthetic dye para-phenylenediamine (PPD). PPD is marketed as black henna added to natural henna to accentuate the dark color and shorten the application time. PPD toxicity is well known and extensively reported in medical literature. We report a case of a young Saudi male who presented with characteristic features of acute renal failure and intravascular hemolysis following ingestion of henna mixture. Management of PPD poisoning is only supportive and helpful only if instituted early. Diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion, as the clinical features are quite distinctive. PMID:23640630

  14. Acute peripheral polyneuropathy with multiorgan failure: a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Kosar; Abubaker, Jawed; Ahmad Dar, Javeed; Ahmed, Raees

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a young man who presented with abdominal pain, vomiting and acute symmetric peripheral polyneuropathy. He was noted to have high anion gap metabolic acidosis with high lactate levels and persistently high arterial and venous pO2 values. The cerebrospinal fluid was acellular with a high protein and the nerve conduction study was consistent with axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. His clinical condition deteriorated rapidly despite full supportive care and he subsequently died of multiorgan failure. An extensive workup for various infectious, autoimmune and other possible aetiologies was carried out to identify the underlying cause for his fulminant illness. All diagnostic workup was non-conclusive except for a significantly elevated serum aluminium level. We have discussed the possibility of aluminium phosphide poisoning in view of the clinical presentation. PMID:24899008

  15. Malignant Infiltration of the Liver Presenting as Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Nicole E.; Sanders, Corron; Hughes, Randall S.; Fontana, Robert J.; Stravitz, R. Todd; Fix, Oren; Han, Steven H.; Naugler, Willscott E.; Zaman, Atif; Lee, William M.

    2014-01-01

    There have been few reports of acute liver failure (ALF, with encephalopathy and coagulopathy) due to infiltration of the liver by malignant cells. We describe a case series of 27 patients with ALF caused by malignancy. We examined a large, multi-center ALF registry (1910 patients; mean age, 47.1±13.9 years) and found only 27 cases (1.4%) of ALF attributed to malignancy. Twenty cases (74%) presented with abdominal pain and 11 with ascites. The malignancies included lymphoma or leukemia (33%), breast cancer, (30%), and colon cancer (7%); 90% of the patients with lymphoma or leukemia had no history of cancer, compared to 25% of patients with breast cancer. Overall, 44% of the patients had evidence of liver masses by imaging. Diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy in 15 (55%) and autopsy for 6 cases. Twenty-four patients (89%) died within 3 weeks of ALF. PMID:25277846

  16. Narrative review: the management of acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Marik, Paul E; Flemmer, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is the most common reason for hospitalization in Western nations. The prognosis of patients admitted to hospital with ADHF is poor, with up to 64% being readmitted within the first 90 days after discharge and with a 1-year mortality approximating 20%. Epidemiological studies suggest that the majority of patients hospitalized with ADHF receive treatment that is inadequate and which is not based on scientific evidence. Furthermore, emerging data suggest that the "conventional" therapeutic interventions for ADHF including morphine, high-dose diuretics, and inotropic agents may be harmful. The goal of this review is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of ADHF. PMID:21616957

  17. Blood-brain barrier in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Justin H.

    2011-01-01

    Brain edema remains a challenging obstacle in the management of acute liver failure (ALF). Cytotoxic mechanisms associated with brain edema have been well recognized, but evidence for vasogenic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of brain edema in ALF has been lacking. Recent reports have not only shown a role of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in the pathogenesis of brain edema in experimental ALF but have also found significant alterations in the tight junction elements including occludin and claudin-5, suggesting a vasogenic injury in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. This article reviews and explores the role of the paracellular tight junction proteins in the increased selective BBB permeability that leads to brain edema in ALF. PMID:22100566

  18. Exertional heat stroke and acute liver failure: a late dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Rodeia, Simão C; Silvestre, Joana; Póvoa, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Heat stroke (HS) is defined as a severe elevation of core body temperature along with central nervous system dysfunction. Exertional heat stroke (EHS) with acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare condition. The authors report the case of a 25-year-old man with a history of cognitive enhancers' intake who developed hyperthermia and neurological impairment while running an outdoor marathon. The patient was cooled and returned to normal body temperature after 6 h. He subsequently developed ALF and was transferred to the intensive care unit. Over-the-counter drug intake may have been related to heat intolerance and contributed to the event. The patient was successfully treated with conservative measures. In the presence of EHS, it is crucial to act promptly with aggressive total body cooling, in order to prevent progression of the clinical syndrome. Liver function must also be monitored, since it can be a late organ dysfunction. PMID:26969359

  19. Risk Factors and Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients With Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tujios, Shannan R.; Hynan, Linda S.; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Larson, Anne M.; Seremba, Emmanuel; Sanders, Corron M.; Lee, William M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) frequently develop renal dysfunction, yet its overall incidence and outcomes have not been fully assessed. We investigated the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) among patients with ALF, using defined criteria to identify risk factors and to evaluate its effect on overall outcomes. METHODS We performed a retrospective review of data from 1604 patients enrolled in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group, from 1998 through 2010. Patients were classified by the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, as well as for etiology of liver failure (acetaminophen-based, ischemic, and all others). RESULTS Seventy percent of patients with ALF developed AKI, and 30% received renal replacement therapy (RRT). Patients with severe AKI had higher international normalized ratio values than those without renal dysfunction (P < .001), and a higher proportion had advanced-grade coma (coma grades 3 or 4; P < .001) or presented with hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy (P < .001). A greater proportion of patients with acetaminophen-induced ALF had severe kidney injury than of patients with other etiologies of ALF; 34% required RRT, compared with 25% of patients with ALF not associated with acetaminophen or ischemia (P < .002). Of the patients with ALF who were alive at 3 weeks after study entry, significantly fewer with AKI survived for 1 year. Although AKI reduced the overall survival time, more than 50% of patients with acetaminophen-associated or ischemic ALF survived without liver transplantation (even with RRT), compared with 19% of patients with ALF attribute to other causes (P < .001). Only 4% of patients requiring RRT became dependent on dialysis. CONCLUSIONS Based on a retrospective analysis of data from more than 1600 patients, AKI is common in patients with ALF and affects short- and long-term outcomes, but rarely results in chronic kidney disease. Acetaminophen-induced kidney injury is frequent, but patients have

  20. Recurrent Acute Liver Failure Because of Acute Hepatitis Induced by Organic Solvents: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daisuke; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Ito, Kyoji; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Hayato; Fujinaga, Hidetaka; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    The authors present a case of recurrent acute liver failure because of occupational exposure to organic solvents. A 35-year-old man with a 3-week history of worsening jaundice and flu-like symptoms was admitted to our hospital. Viral hepatitis serology and autoimmune factors were negative. The authors considered liver transplantation, but the patient's liver function spontaneously recovered. Liver biopsy revealed massive infiltration of neutrophils, but the cause of the acute hepatitis was not identified. Four months after discharge, the patient's liver function worsened again. The authors considered the possibility of antinuclear antibody-negative autoimmune hepatitis and initiated steroid treatment, which was effective. Four months after discharge, the patient was admitted for repeated liver injury. The authors started him on steroid pulse therapy, but this time it was not effective. Just before the first admission, he had started his own construction company where he was highly exposed to organic solvents, and thus the authors considered organic solvent-induced hepatitis. Although urine test results for organic solvents were negative, a second liver biopsy revealed severe infiltration of neutrophils, compatible with toxic hepatitis. Again, his liver function spontaneously improved. Based on the pathology and detailed clinical course, including the patient's high exposure to organic solvents since just before the first admission, and the spontaneous recovery of his liver damage in the absence of the exposure, he was diagnosed with toxic hepatitis. The authors strongly advised him to avoid organic solvents. Since then, he has been in good health without recurrence. This is the first report of recurrent acute liver failure because of exposure to organic solvents, which was eventually diagnosed through a meticulous medical history and successfully recovered by avoiding the causative agents. In acute liver failure with an undetermined etiology, clinicians should rule

  1. Recurrent Acute Liver Failure Because of Acute Hepatitis Induced by Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Ito, Kyoji; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Hayato; Fujinaga, Hidetaka; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The authors present a case of recurrent acute liver failure because of occupational exposure to organic solvents. A 35-year-old man with a 3-week history of worsening jaundice and flu-like symptoms was admitted to our hospital. Viral hepatitis serology and autoimmune factors were negative. The authors considered liver transplantation, but the patient's liver function spontaneously recovered. Liver biopsy revealed massive infiltration of neutrophils, but the cause of the acute hepatitis was not identified. Four months after discharge, the patient's liver function worsened again. The authors considered the possibility of antinuclear antibody-negative autoimmune hepatitis and initiated steroid treatment, which was effective. Four months after discharge, the patient was admitted for repeated liver injury. The authors started him on steroid pulse therapy, but this time it was not effective. Just before the first admission, he had started his own construction company where he was highly exposed to organic solvents, and thus the authors considered organic solvent-induced hepatitis. Although urine test results for organic solvents were negative, a second liver biopsy revealed severe infiltration of neutrophils, compatible with toxic hepatitis. Again, his liver function spontaneously improved. Based on the pathology and detailed clinical course, including the patient's high exposure to organic solvents since just before the first admission, and the spontaneous recovery of his liver damage in the absence of the exposure, he was diagnosed with toxic hepatitis. The authors strongly advised him to avoid organic solvents. Since then, he has been in good health without recurrence. This is the first report of recurrent acute liver failure because of exposure to organic solvents, which was eventually diagnosed through a meticulous medical history and successfully recovered by avoiding the causative agents. In acute liver failure with an undetermined etiology, clinicians

  2. Acute liver failure in pregnancy: Challenges and management

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Chandra Kant; Karna, Sunaina Tejpal; Pandey, Vijay Kant; Tandon, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) in pregnancy negatively affects both maternal and foetal outcome. The spectrum of liver disease in pregnancy may range from mild asymptomatic transaminitis to fatal and irreversible deterioration in liver functions leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. In this comprehensive review, we searched articles published as review articles, clinical trials, and case series in the Medline from 1970 to 2012. The overall outcome of ALF in pregnancy depends on the aetiology, timely diagnosis, prompt management, and early referral to a centre equipped in managing medical or obstetric complication. The foetal outcome is affected by the stage of pregnancy in which the mother has a deterioration of the liver function, with a worst prognosis associated with first or second-trimester liver failure. When ALF complicates pregnancy, liver transplantation is the one of the viable options. Management protocols need to be individualised for each case keeping in mind the risk versus benefit to both the mother and the foetus. PMID:25838585

  3. Management of acute heart failure in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio; Arrigo, Mattia; Tolppanen, Heli; Gayat, Etienne; Laribi, Said; Metra, Marco; Seronde, Marie France; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is the most common cause of unplanned hospital admissions, and is associated with high mortality rates. Over the next few decades, the combination of improved cardiovascular disease survival and progressive ageing of the population will further increase the prevalence of AHF in developed countries. New recommendations on the management of AHF have been published recently, but as elderly patients are under-represented in clinical trials, and scientific evidence is often lacking, the diagnosis and management of AHF in this population is challenging. The clinical presentation of AHF, especially in patients aged>85years, differs substantially from that in younger patients, with unspecific symptoms, such as fatigue and confusion, often overriding dyspnoea. Older patients also have a different risk profile compared with younger patients: often heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and infection as the most frequent precipitating factor of AHF. Moreover, co-morbidities, disability and frailty are common, and increase morbidity, recovery time, readmission rates and mortality; their presence should be detected during a geriatric assessment. Diagnostics and treatment for AHF should be tailored according to cardiopulmonary and geriatric status, giving special attention to the patient's preferences for care. Whereas many elderly AHF patients may be managed similarly to younger patients, different strategies should be applied in the presence of relevant co-morbidities, disability and frailty. The option of palliative care should be considered at an early stage, to avoid unnecessary and harmful diagnostics and treatments. PMID:27185193

  4. Acute heart failure: inotropic agents and their clinical uses.

    PubMed

    Endoh, Masao; Hori, Masatsugu

    2006-11-01

    Inotropic agents are indispensable for the improvement of cardiac contractile dysfunction in acute or decompensated heart failure. Clinically available agents, including sympathomimetic amines (dopamine, dobutamine, noradrenaline) and selective phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitors (amrinone, milrinone, olprinone and enoximone) act via cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated facilitation of intracellular Ca2+ mobilisation. Phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitors also have a vasodilatory action, which plays a role in improving haemodynamic parameters in certain patients, and are termed inodilators. The available inotropic agents suffer from risks of Ca2+ overload leading to arrhythmias, myocardial cell injury and ultimately, cell death. In addition, they are energetically disadvantageous because of an increase in activation energy and cellular metabolism. Furthermore, they lose their effectiveness under pathophysiological conditions, such as acidosis, stunned myocardium and heart failure. Pimobendan and levosimendan (that act by a combination of an increase in Ca2+ sensitivity and phosphodiesterase-3 inhibition) appear to be more beneficial among existing agents. Novel Ca2+ sensitisers that are under basic research warrant clinical trials to replace available inotropic agents. PMID:17059376

  5. Critical management decisions in patients with acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Stravitz, R Todd

    2008-11-01

    Few admissions to the ICU present a greater clinical challenge than the patient with acute liver failure (ALF), the syndrome of abrupt loss of liver function in a previously unaffected individual. Although advances in the intensive care management of patients with ALF have improved survival, the prognosis of ALF remains poor, with a 33% mortality rate and a 25% liver transplant rate in the United States. ALF adversely affects nearly every organ system, with most deaths occurring from sepsis and subsequent multiorgan system failure, and cerebral edema, resulting in intracranial hypertension (ICH) and brainstem herniation. Unfortunately, the optimal management of ALF remains poorly defined, and practices are often based on local experience and case reports rather than on randomized, controlled clinical trials. The paramount question in any patient presenting with ALF remains defining an etiology, since specific antidotes can save lives and spare the liver. This article will consider recent advances in the assignment of an etiology, the administration of etiology-specific treatment to abate the liver injury, and the management of complications (eg, infection, cerebral edema, and the bleeding diathesis) in patients with ALF. New data on the administration of N-acetylcysteine to patients with non-acetaminophen ALF, the treatment of ICH, and assessment of the need for liver transplantation will also be presented. PMID:18988787

  6. Acute liver failure in pregnancy: Challenges and management.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Chandra Kant; Karna, Sunaina Tejpal; Pandey, Vijay Kant; Tandon, Manish

    2015-03-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) in pregnancy negatively affects both maternal and foetal outcome. The spectrum of liver disease in pregnancy may range from mild asymptomatic transaminitis to fatal and irreversible deterioration in liver functions leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. In this comprehensive review, we searched articles published as review articles, clinical trials, and case series in the Medline from 1970 to 2012. The overall outcome of ALF in pregnancy depends on the aetiology, timely diagnosis, prompt management, and early referral to a centre equipped in managing medical or obstetric complication. The foetal outcome is affected by the stage of pregnancy in which the mother has a deterioration of the liver function, with a worst prognosis associated with first or second-trimester liver failure. When ALF complicates pregnancy, liver transplantation is the one of the viable options. Management protocols need to be individualised for each case keeping in mind the risk versus benefit to both the mother and the foetus. PMID:25838585

  7. Nilotinib ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nilotinib on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given nilotinib (10 mg/kg) by oral gavage twice daily for 1 week prior to exposure to aerosolized LPS. At 24 h after LPS exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples and lung tissue were collected. The lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio, protein level and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF were determined. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities as well as nitrite/nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -}) levels were measured in lung tissues. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were determined in lung tissues. Treatment with nilotinib prior to LPS exposure significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pulmonary edema, as it significantly decreased lung W/D ratio, protein concentration and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the BALF. This was supported by the histopathological examination which revealed marked attenuation of LPS-induced ALI in nilotinib treated rats. In addition, nilotinib significantly increased SOD and GSH activities with significant decrease in MDA content in the lung. Nilotinib also reduced LPS mediated overproduction of pulmonary NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -} levels. Importantly, nilotinib caused down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and iNOS levels in the lung. Taken together, these results demonstrate the protective effects of nilotinib against the LPS-induced ALI. This effect can be attributed to nilotinib ability to counteract the inflammatory cells

  8. Cognitive Status in Patients Hospitalized with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Seth N.; Hajduk, Alexandra M.; McManus, David D.; Darling, Chad E.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Spencer, Frederick A.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Saczynski, Jane S.

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Background Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in patients with heart failure and is associated with adverse outcomes. However, whether specific cognitive abilities (e.g., memory versus executive function) are impaired in heart failure has not been fully examined. We investigated the prevalence of impairment in three cognitive domains in patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and the associations of impairment with demographic and clinical characteristics. Methods The sample included 744 patients hospitalized with ADHF (mean age = 72 years, 46% female) at 5 medical centers. Impairment was assessed in three cognitive domains (memory, processing speed, executive function) using standardized measures. Demographic and clinical characteristics were obtained from a structured interview and medical record review. Results A total of 593 of 744 (80%) patients were impaired in at least one cognitive domain; 32%, 31%, and 17% of patients were impaired in one, two, or all three cognitive domains, respectively. Patients impaired in more than one cognitive domain were significantly older, had less formal education, and had more non-cardiac comorbidities (all p’s < 0.05). In multivariable adjusted analyses, patients with older age and lower education had higher odds of impairment in two or more cognitive domains. Depressed patients had twice the odds of being impaired in all three cognitive domains (OR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.08, 3.64). Conclusion Impairments in executive function, processing speed and memory are common among patients hospitalized for ADHF. Recognition of these prevalent cognitive deficits is critical for the clinical management of these high risk patients. PMID:25458656

  9. Epithelial cell apoptosis causes acute lung injury masquerading as emphysema.

    PubMed

    Mouded, Majd; Egea, Eduardo E; Brown, Matthew J; Hanlon, Shane M; Houghton, A McGarry; Tsai, Larry W; Ingenito, Edward P; Shapiro, Steven D

    2009-10-01

    Theories of emphysema traditionally revolved around proteolytic destruction of extracellular matrix. Models have recently been developed that show airspace enlargement with the induction of pulmonary cell apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which a model of epithelial cell apoptosis caused airspace enlargement. Mice were treated with either intratracheal microcystin (MC) to induce apoptosis, intratracheal porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE), or their respective vehicles. Mice from all groups were inflated and morphometry was measured at various time points. Physiology measurements were performed for airway resistance, tissue elastance, and lung volumes. The groups were further analyzed by air-saline quasistatic measurements, surfactant staining, and surfactant functional studies. Mice treated with MC showed evidence of reversible airspace enlargement. In contrast, PPE-treated mice showed irreversible airspace enlargement. The airspace enlargement in MC-treated mice was associated with an increase in elastic recoil due to an increase in alveolar surface tension. PPE-treated mice showed a loss of lung elastic recoil and normal alveolar surface tension, a pattern more consistent with human emphysema. Airspace enlargement that occurs with the MC model of pulmonary epithelial cell apoptosis displays physiology distinct from human emphysema. Reversibility, restrictive physiology due to changes in surface tension, and alveolar enlargement associated with heterogeneous alveolar collapse are most consistent with a mild acute lung injury. Inflation near total lung capacity gives the appearance of enlarged alveoli as neighboring collapsed alveoli exert tethering forces. PMID:19188661

  10. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  11. Proteomic Biomarkers for Acute Interstitial Lung Disease in Gefitinib-Treated Japanese Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takao; Nagasaka, Keiko; Takami, Sachiko; Wada, Kazuya; Tu, Hsiao-Kun; Otsuji, Makiko; Kyono, Yutaka; Dobashi, Tae; Komatsu, Yasuhiko; Kihara, Makoto; Akimoto, Shingo; Peers, Ian S.; South, Marie C.; Higenbottam, Tim; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakata, Koichiro; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kudoh, Shoji; Clausen, Ib Groth; Nishimura, Toshihide; Marko-Varga, György; Kato, Harubumi

    2011-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) events have been reported in Japanese non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We investigated proteomic biomarkers for mechanistic insights and improved prediction of ILD. Blood plasma was collected from 43 gefitinib-treated NSCLC patients developing acute ILD (confirmed by blinded diagnostic review) and 123 randomly selected controls in a nested case-control study within a pharmacoepidemiological cohort study in Japan. We generated ∼7 million tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) measurements with extensive quality control and validation, producing one of the largest proteomic lung cancer datasets to date, incorporating rigorous study design, phenotype definition, and evaluation of sample processing. After alignment, scaling, and measurement batch adjustment, we identified 41 peptide peaks representing 29 proteins best predicting ILD. Multivariate peptide, protein, and pathway modeling achieved ILD prediction comparable to previously identified clinical variables; combining the two provided some improvement. The acute phase response pathway was strongly represented (17 of 29 proteins, p = 1.0×10−25), suggesting a key role with potential utility as a marker for increased risk of acute ILD events. Validation by Western blotting showed correlation for identified proteins, confirming that robust results can be generated from an MS/MS platform implementing strict quality control. PMID:21799770

  12. Simkania negevensis and acute cellular rejection in lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Alainna J; Resende, Mariangela R; Prochnow, Taisa; McGilvray, Ian; Pilewski, Joseph M; Crespo, Maria M; Singer, Lianne G; McCurry, Kenneth R; Kolls, Jay K; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liles, W Conrad; Husain, Shahid

    2015-08-01

    Simkania negevensis infection has been hypothesized to play a role in lung transplant rejection. The incidence of S. negevensis infection and its association with acute cellular rejection (ACR) were determined in a prospective cohort study of 78 lung transplant recipients (LTRs) in Toronto, Canada, and Pittsburgh, USA, from July 2007 to January 2010. Simkania negevensis testing was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The relationship between S. negevensis and ACR was examined using Cox proportional hazards models and generalized linear and latent mixed models. Cumulative incidence estimates for time-to-ACR in S. negevensis PCR-positive vs. PCR-negative LTRs were 52.7% vs. 31.1% at six months and 68.9% vs. 44.6% at one yr, respectively. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend toward a higher risk of ACR among S. negevensis PCR-positive vs. PCR-negative LTRs in all statistical models. PMID:26009941

  13. Enhanced Resolution of Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury as a result of Aspirin Triggered Resolvin D1 Treatment.

    PubMed

    Cox, Ruan; Phillips, Oluwakemi; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Fukumoto, Itsuko; Parthasarathy, Prasanna Tamarapu; Arias, Stephen; Cho, Young; Lockey, Richard F; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2015-09-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), which presents as acute respiratory failure, is a major clinical problem that requires aggressive care, and patients who require prolonged oxygen exposure are at risk of developing this disease. Although molecular determinants of ALI have been reported, the molecules involved in disease catabasis associated with oxygen toxicity have not been well studied. It has been reported that lung mucosa is rich in omega-3 fatty acid dicosahexanoic acid (DHA), which has antiinflammatory properties. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) is a potent proresolution metabolite of DHA that can curb the inflammatory effects in various acute injuries, yet the effect of AT-RvD1 on hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) or in the oxygen toxicity setting in general has not been investigated. The effects of AT-RvD1 on HALI were determined for the first time in 8- to 10-week-old C57BL/6 mice that were exposed to hyperoxia (≥95% O2) for 48 hours. Mice were given AT-RvD1 (100 ng) in saline or a saline vehicle for 24 hours in normoxic (≈21% O2) conditions after hyperoxia. Lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were collected for analysis associated with proinflammatory signaling and lung inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment resulted in reduced oxidative stress, increased glutathione production, and significantly decreased tissue inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment also significantly reduced the lung wet/dry ratio, protein in BAL fluid, and decreased apoptotic and NF-κB signaling. These results show that AT-RvD1 curbs oxygen-induced lung edema, permeability, inflammation, and apoptosis and is thus an effective therapy for prolonged hyperoxia exposure in this murine model. PMID:25647402

  14. Respiratory failure due to infliximab induced interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kakavas, Sotiris; Balis, Evangelos; Lazarou, Vasiliki; Kouvela, Marousa; Tatsis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Although poorly understood, interstitial lung disease has been reported as a possible complication of tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors. We report a case of interstitial lung disease in a 64-year-old man with psoriasis 3 weeks after the initiation of infliximab treatment. The patient had received two fortnightly infusions of infliximab following a short course of methotrexate. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral ground glass and interstitial infiltrates, while the results of microbiology and immunologic workup were negative. Likewise, bronchoalveolar lavage detected neither typical nor atypical pathogens. Infliximab-induced interstitial lung injury was suspected and corticosteroid therapy was administered which resulted in rapid clinical and radiological improvement. This is one of the few reported cases of interstitial lung disease due to infliximab in the psoriasis population. The patient had no pre-existing lung pathology, while his previous exposure to methotrexate was minimal and was not temporally associated with the induction of interstitial lung disease. PMID:23969008

  15. Enteral Omega-3 Fatty Acid, γ-Linolenic Acid, and Antioxidant Supplementation in Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Todd W.; Wheeler, Arthur P.; Thompson, B. Taylor; deBoisblanc, Bennett P.; Steingrub, Jay; Rock, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Context The omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, along with γ-linolenic acid and antioxidants, may modulate systemic inflammatory response and improve oxygenation and outcomes in patients with acute lung injury. Objective To determine if dietary supplementation of these substances to patients with acute lung injury would increase ventilator-free days to study day 28. Design, Setting, and Participants The OMEGA study, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial conducted from January 2, 2008, through February 21, 2009. Participants were 272 adults within 48 hours of developing acute lung injury requiring mechanical ventilation whose physicians intended to start enteral nutrition at 44 hospitals in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute ARDS Clinical Trials Network. All participants had complete follow-up. Interventions Twice-daily enteral supplementation of n-3 fatty acids, γ-linolenic acid, and antioxidants compared with an isocaloric control. Enteral nutrition, directed by a protocol, was delivered separately from the study supplement. Main Outcome Measure Ventilator-free days to study day 28. Results The study was stopped early for futility after 143 and 129 patients were enrolled in the n-3 and control groups. Despite an 8-fold increase in plasma eicosapentaenoic acid levels, patients receiving the n-3 supplement had fewer ventilator-free days (14.0 vs 17.2; P=.02) (difference, -3.2 [95% CI, -5.8 to -0.7]) and intensive care unit-free days (14.0 vs 16.7; P=.04). Patients in the n-3 group also had fewer nonpulmonary organ failure-free days (12.3 vs 15.5; P=.02). Sixty-day hospital mortality was 26.6% in the n-3 group vs 16.3% in the control group (P=.054), and adjusted 60-day mortality was 25.1% and 17.6% in the n-3 and control groups, respectively (P=.11). Use of the n-3 supplement resulted in more days with diarrhea (29% vs 21%; P=.001). Conclusions Twice-daily enteral supplementation of n-3

  16. Prognostic Implications of Acute Renal Failure after Surgery for Type A Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Fabrizio; Morgante, Alessandro; Ceresa, Fabrizio; Salamone, Giovanni; Patanè, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background “Type A” acute aortic dissection (AAAD) is the most challenging among the emergency operations in cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the role of acute renal failure (ARF) in postoperative survival of patients operated for AAAD. Methods From February 2010 to April 2012, 37 consecutive patients were operated at our department for AAAD. We studied our population by subdividing the patients within groups according to the presence of ARF requiring continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) and according to hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) times and degrees. Results The overall 30-day mortality was 27% (50% group A with ARF, 13% group B no ARF). Acute renal failure requiring CVVH was 37.8%. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant association with 30-day mortality (odds ratio 6.6 and p = 0.020). Preoperative oliguria [urine output less than 30 ml/h (odds ratio 4.7 p = 0.039)], CPB greater than 180 minutes (odds ratio 6.5 p = 0.023) and postoperative bleeding requiring a surgical reopening (odds ratio 12.2 and p = 0.021) were the variables significantly associated with acute kidney injury. Conclusions The data obtained from our analysis bring out the high incidence of renal injuries after surgery for AAAD, and indicate a negative impact on renal injuries of a preoperative oliguria, longer Cardiopulmonary bypass (CBP)/HCA times, and postoperative bleeding requiring a surgical revision. Our data also suggest a better 30-day survival and better renal outcomes in case of shorter HCA and lesser degree of hypothermia. The option of lesser and shorter hypothermia may be very useful, especially for the elderly patients and octogenarians. PMID:27069938

  17. Pathophysiology of cerebral oedema in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Teresa R; Kronsten, Victoria T; Hughes, Robin D; Shawcross, Debbie L

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral oedema is a devastating consequence of acute liver failure (ALF) and may be associated with the development of intracranial hypertension and death. In ALF, some patients may develop cerebral oedema and increased intracranial pressure but progression to life-threatening intracranial hypertension is less frequent than previously described, complicating less than one third of cases who have proceeded to coma since the advent of improved clinical care. The rapid onset of encephalopathy may be dramatic with the development of asterixis, delirium, seizures and coma. Cytotoxic and vasogenic oedema mechanisms have been implicated with a preponderance of experimental data favouring a cytotoxic mechanism. Astrocyte swelling is the most consistent neuropathological finding in humans with ALF and ammonia plays a definitive role in the development of cytotoxic brain oedema. The mechanism(s) by which ammonia induces astrocyte swelling remains unclear but glutamine accumulation within astrocytes has led to the osmolyte hypothesis. Current evidence also supports an alternate ‘Trojan horse’ hypothesis, with glutamine as a carrier of ammonia into mitochondria, where its accumulation results in oxidative stress, energy failure and ultimately astrocyte swelling. Although a complete breakdown of the blood-brain barrier is not evident in human ALF, increased permeation to water and other small molecules such as ammonia has been demonstrated resulting from subtle alterations in the protein composition of paracellular tight junctions. At present, there is no fully efficacious therapy for cerebral oedema other than liver transplantation and this reflects our incomplete knowledge of the precise mechanisms underlying this process which remain largely unknown. PMID:24409052

  18. Preemptive mechanical ventilation can block progressive acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Sadowitz, Benjamin; Jain, Sumeet; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Gatto, Louis A; Nieman, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptable, approaching 45% in certain high-risk patient populations. Treating fulminant ARDS is currently relegated to supportive care measures only. Thus, the best treatment for ARDS may lie with preventing this syndrome from ever occurring. Clinical studies were examined to determine why ARDS has remained resistant to treatment over the past several decades. In addition, both basic science and clinical studies were examined to determine the impact that early, protective mechanical ventilation may have on preventing the development of ARDS in at-risk patients. Fulminant ARDS is highly resistant to both pharmacologic treatment and methods of mechanical ventilation. However, ARDS is a progressive disease with an early treatment window that can be exploited. In particular, protective mechanical ventilation initiated before the onset of lung injury can prevent the progression to ARDS. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a novel mechanical ventilation strategy for delivering a protective breath that has been shown to block progressive acute lung injury (ALI) and prevent ALI from progressing to ARDS. ARDS mortality currently remains as high as 45% in some studies. As ARDS is a progressive disease, the key to treatment lies with preventing the disease from ever occurring while it remains subclinical. Early protective mechanical ventilation with APRV appears to offer substantial benefit in this regard and may be the prophylactic treatment of choice for preventing ARDS. PMID:26855896

  19. Preemptive mechanical ventilation can block progressive acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sadowitz, Benjamin; Jain, Sumeet; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Gatto, Louis A; Nieman, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptable, approaching 45% in certain high-risk patient populations. Treating fulminant ARDS is currently relegated to supportive care measures only. Thus, the best treatment for ARDS may lie with preventing this syndrome from ever occurring. Clinical studies were examined to determine why ARDS has remained resistant to treatment over the past several decades. In addition, both basic science and clinical studies were examined to determine the impact that early, protective mechanical ventilation may have on preventing the development of ARDS in at-risk patients. Fulminant ARDS is highly resistant to both pharmacologic treatment and methods of mechanical ventilation. However, ARDS is a progressive disease with an early treatment window that can be exploited. In particular, protective mechanical ventilation initiated before the onset of lung injury can prevent the progression to ARDS. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a novel mechanical ventilation strategy for delivering a protective breath that has been shown to block progressive acute lung injury (ALI) and prevent ALI from progressing to ARDS. ARDS mortality currently remains as high as 45% in some studies. As ARDS is a progressive disease, the key to treatment lies with preventing the disease from ever occurring while it remains subclinical. Early protective mechanical ventilation with APRV appears to offer substantial benefit in this regard and may be the prophylactic treatment of choice for preventing ARDS. PMID:26855896

  20. Clinical and prognostic significance of lung thallium uptake on rest imaging in acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, D.; Lahiri, A.; Raftery, E.B. )

    1990-01-15

    Exercise-induced pulmonary uptake of thallium-201 in patients with ischemic heart disease is probably due to transient pulmonary edema and left ventricular failure induced by exercise. The significance of increased lung uptake of thallium-201 at rest after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been described. Ninety-six patients admitted with chest pain for suspected AMI or unstable angina underwent thallium-201 imaging at rest. Using conventional diagnostic criteria, 62 had AMI, 12 had unstable angina and 22 had neither. Increased lung uptake of thallium-201 was present in 24 of the total 96 (25%) patients, 20 of the 62 (32%) patients with AMI and 4 of 34 (13%) patients with no evidence of infarction. In the AMI group, those with increased lung thallium-201 uptake had a higher mean +/- standard deviation segmental thallium-201 defect score (22 +/- 7 vs 12 +/- 8, p less than 0.0001), lower ejection fraction (35 +/- 14 vs 49 +/- 14%, p less than 0.002), higher peak creatine kinase levels (2,410 +/- 1,247 vs 1,496 +/- 1,228 IU/liter, p less than 0.01), higher wall motion abnormality score (25 +/- 13 vs 13 +/- 12, p less than 0.0001), increased incidence of clinical in-hospital heart failure (15 of 20 vs 7 of 42, p less than 0.0001) and higher short-term mortality (4 of 20 vs 1 of 42, p less than 0.02) compared to those without increased lung thallium-201 uptake.

  1. Lack of cyclophilin D protects against the development of acute lung injury in endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Fonai, Fruzsina; Priber, Janos K; Jakus, Peter B; Kalman, Nikoletta; Antus, Csenge; Pollak, Edit; Karsai, Gergely; Tretter, Laszlo; Sumegi, Balazs; Veres, Balazs

    2015-12-01

    Sepsis caused by LPS is characterized by an intense systemic inflammatory response affecting the lungs, causing acute lung injury (ALI). Dysfunction of mitochondria and the role of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species produced by mitochondria have already been proposed in the pathogenesis of sepsis; however, the exact molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Oxidative stress induces cyclophilin D (CypD)-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT), leading to organ failure in sepsis. In previous studies mPT was inhibited by cyclosporine A which, beside CypD, inhibits cyclophilin A, B, C and calcineurin, regulating cell death and inflammatory pathways. The immunomodulatory side effects of cyclosporine A make it unfavorable in inflammatory model systems. To avoid these uncertainties in the molecular mechanism, we studied endotoxemia-induced ALI in CypD(-/-) mice providing unambiguous data for the pathological role of CypD-dependent mPT in ALI. Our key finding is that the loss of this essential protein improves survival rate and it can intensely ameliorate endotoxin-induced lung injury through attenuated proinflammatory cytokine release, down-regulation of redox sensitive cellular pathways such as MAPKs, Akt, and NF-κB and reducing the production of ROS. Functional inhibition of NF-κB was confirmed by decreased expression of NF-κB-mediated proinflammatory genes. We demonstrated that impaired mPT due to the lack of CypD reduces the severity of endotoxemia-induced lung injury suggesting that CypD specific inhibitors might have a great therapeutic potential in sepsis-induced organ failure. Our data highlight a previously unknown regulatory function of mitochondria during inflammatory response. PMID:26385159

  2. [Role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Franchi, Federico; Volterrani, Luca; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Macarini, Luca

    2012-11-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a complex pulmonary pathology with high mortality rates, manifesting over a wide range of severity. Clinical diagnosis relies on the following 4 criteria stated by the American-European Consensus Conference: acute onset of impaired gas exchange, severe hypoxemia defined as a PaO2 to FiO2 ratio <300 (PaO2 in mmHg), bilateral diffuse infiltration on chest X-ray; pulmonary artery wedge pressure of ≤18 mmHg to rule out cardiogenic causes of pulmonary edema. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:23096732

  3. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25008149

  4. Escin attenuates acute lung injury induced by endotoxin in mice.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wenyu; Zhang, Leiming; Fan, Huaying; Jiang, Na; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2011-01-18

    Endotoxin causes multiple organ dysfunctions, including acute lung injury (ALI). The current therapeutic strategies for endotoxemia are designed to neutralize one or more of the inflammatory mediators. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that escin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-edematous effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of escin on ALI induced by endotoxin in mice. ALI was induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intravenously. The mice were given dexamethasone or escin before injection of LPS. The mortality rate was recorded. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and nitric oxide (NO) were measured. Pulmonary superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were also determined. The expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) level was detected by Western blotting. Pretreatment with escin could decrease the mortality rate, attenuate lung injury resulted from LPS, down-regulate the level of the inflammation mediators, including NO, TNF-α, and IL-1β, enhance the endogenous antioxidant capacity, and up-regulating the GR expression in lung. The results suggest that escin may have potent protective effect on the LPS-induced ALI by inhibiting of the inflammatory response, and its mechanism involves in up-regulating the GR and enhancing the endogenous antioxidant capacity. PMID:21040784

  5. Inhibition of Neutrophil Exocytosis Ameliorates Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Uriarte, Silvia M.; Rane, Madhavi J.; Merchant, Michael L.; Jin, Shunying; Lentsch, Alex B.; Ward, Richard A.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Exocytosis of neutrophil granules contributes to acute lung injury (ALI) induced by infection or inflammation, suggesting that inhibition of neutrophil exocytosis in vivo could be a viable therapeutic strategy. This study was conducted to determine the effect of a cell-permeable fusion protein that inhibits neutrophil exocytosis (TAT-SNAP-23) on ALI using an immune complex deposition model in rats. The effect of inhibition of neutrophil exocytosis by intravenous administration of TAT-SNAP-23 on ALI was assessed by albumin leakage, neutrophil infiltration, lung histology, and proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf). Administration of TAT-SNAP-23, but not TAT-Control, significantly reduced albumin leakage, total protein levels in the BALf, and intra-alveolar edema and hemorrhage. Evidence that TAT-SNAP-23 inhibits neutrophil exocytosis included a reduction in plasma membrane CD18 expression by BALf neutrophils and a decrease in neutrophil granule proteins in BALf. Similar degree of neutrophil accumulation in the lungs and/or BALf suggests that TAT-SNAP-23 did not alter vascular endothelial cell function. Proteomic analysis of BALf revealed that components of the complement and coagulation pathways were significantly reduced in BALf from TAT-SNAP-23-treated animals. Our results indicate that administration of a TAT-fusion protein that inhibits neutrophil exocytosis reduces in vivo ALI. Targeting neutrophil exocytosis is a potential therapeutic strategy to ameliorate ALI. PMID:23364427

  6. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Kathleen A.; McKay, Ryan T.; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a “snapshot” in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision

  7. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Kathleen A; McKay, Ryan T; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a "snapshot" in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision-making and

  8. Metronidazole pharmacokinetics in patients with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, A A; Kong, C B; Gurr, F W; Sabto, J; Spicer, W J; McLean, A J

    1984-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of intravenous metronidazole were studied in six patients with acute renal failure. In two of the patients a single dose (500 mg) of metronidazole was administered, whereas in four patients the steady-state pharmacokinetics were studied after four days therapy of 500 mg twice daily. Plasma concentrations of metronidazole and its hydroxy and acetic acid metabolites were measured by a specific and sensitive HPLC method. The volume of distribution was 0.65 +/- 0.13 l/kg (mean +/- S.D.), elimination half-life was 9.9 +/- 2.5 h and total plasma clearance was 55.5 +/- 17.7 ml/min. Renal clearance was almost non-existent (1.4 +/- 1.4 ml/min), whereas non-renal clearance was 54.0 +/- 18.2 ml/min. Steady-state plasma concentrations of metronidazole were 15.3 +/- 3.8 mg/l, the hydroxy metabolite were 17.4 +/- 2.0 mg/l and the acetic acid metabolite were 1.2 +/- 0.8 mg/l. In the patients studied, a dosing regimen of 500 mg twice daily resulted in therapeutically adequate blood levels of metronidazole. PMID:6706889

  9. Acute Liver Failure in Pregnancy: Causative and Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sahai, Shweta; Kiran, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Acute liver failure (ALF) in pregnancy is often associated with a poor prognosis. In this single-center observational study we aim to study the incidence, causes, and factors affecting mortality in pregnant women with ALF. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight pregnant women reporting with clinical features of liver dysfunction were enrolled as cases. Their clinical course was followed and laboratory studies were performed. The presence of ALF was defined as the appearance of encephalopathy. The results were compared with a control group of 16 nonpregnant women presenting with similar complaints. The cases were further subdivided into two groups of survivors and nonsurvivors and were compared to find out the factors that contribute to mortality. Results: ALF was seen in significantly more number of pregnant women than the controls (P = 0.0019). The mortality rate was also significantly higher (P = 0.0287). Hepatitis E virus (HEV) caused jaundice in a higher number of pregnant women (P < 0.001). It also caused ALF in majority (70.3%) of pregnant women, but HEV infection was comparable between the survivors and nonsurvivors (P = 0.0668), hence could not be correlated with mortality. Conclusions: Pregnant women appear to be more susceptible for HEV infection and development of ALF. The mortality of jaundiced pregnant women increased significantly with appearance of ALF, higher bilirubin, lower platelet count, higher international normalized ratio, and spontaneous delivery. PMID:25672236

  10. Extracorporeal ultrafiltration therapy for acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pourafshar, Negiin; Karimi, Ashkan; Kazory, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Congestion is the most common reason for hospitalization of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and adversely impacts their outcomes. Extracorporeal ultrafiltration (UF) therapy has re-emerged as an effective strategy for decongestion in this setting. This article is intended to discuss key concepts in UF and its technique, provide a brief historical view of UF application for decongestion in ADHF, review the hemodynamic and neurohormonal effects of UF and their positive effects on the pathophysiology of ADHF, discuss the findings of the landmark trials in this field, and explain key findings of these studies as well as the apparent discrepancies in their findings. In a separate section we discuss the intricacies of renal dysfunction in ADHF as it plays a very important role in understanding the current evidence and designing futures clinical trials of UF in ADHF. In the end, the authors provide their perspective on the future role of UF in management of patients with ADHF and congestion. PMID:26523337

  11. Pathophysiology of protracted acute renal failure in man

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, S.M.; Myers, B.D.

    1985-10-01

    Postischemic acute renal failure (ARF) induced by cardiac surgery is commonly prolonged and may be irreversible. To examine whether persistence of postischemic, tubular cell injury accounts for delayed recovery from ARF, we studied 10 patients developing protracted (36 +/- 4 d) ARF after cardiac surgery. The differential clearance and excretion dynamics of probe solutes of graded size were determined. Inulin clearance was depressed (5.0 +/- 1.7 ml/min), while the fractional urinary clearance of dextrans (radii 17-30 A) were elevated above unity. Employing a model of conservation of mass, we calculated that 44% of filtered inulin was lost via transtubular backleak. The clearance and fractional backleak of technetium-labeled DTPA ((/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA, radius = 4 A) were identical to those of inulin (radius 15 A). The time at which inulin or DTPA excretion reached a maximum after an intravenous bolus injection was markedly delayed when compared with control subjects with ARF of brief duration, 102 vs. 11 min. Applying a three-compartment model of inulin/DTPA kinetics (which takes backleak into account) revealed the residence time of intravenously administered inulin/DTPA in the compartment occupied by tubular fluid and urine to be markedly prolonged, 20 vs. 6 min in controls, suggesting reduced velocity of tubular fluid flow.

  12. Green tea extract: A potential cause of acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shreena S; Beer, Stacey; Kearney, Debra L; Phillips, Garrett; Carter, Beth A

    2013-01-01

    The use of herbal products has increased significantly in recent years. Because these products are not subject to regulation by the Food and Drug Administration and are often used without supervision by a healthcare provider, the indication for and consumption of these supplements is quite variable. Moreover, their use is generally regarded as safe and natural by the lay-public. Unfortunately, there has been an increase in the number of reported adverse events occurring with the use of herbal products. We present a case of acute impending liver failure in an adolescent male using a weight-loss product containing green tea extract. Our case adds to the growing concern surrounding the ingestion of green tea extract and serves to heighten healthcare provider awareness of a potential green tea extract hepatotoxicity. Despite the generally touted benefits of green tea as a whole, clinical concern regarding its use is emerging and has been linked to its concentration in multiple herbal supplements. Interestingly, the suspected harmful compounds are those previously proposed to be advantageous for weight-loss, cancer remedy, and anti-inflammatory purposes. Yet, we emphasize the need to be aware of not just green tea extract, but the importance of monitoring patient use of all dietary supplements and herbal products. PMID:23964154

  13. Knockdown of Burton's tyrosine kinase confers potent protection against sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Panyu; Ma, Bing; Xu, Shuogui; Zhang, Shijie; Tang, Hongtai; Zhu, Shihui; Xiao, Shichu; Ben, Daofeng; Xia, Zhaofan

    2014-11-01

    Sepsis is a common and critical complication in surgical patients that often leads to multiple organ failure syndrome (MOFS), including acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Despite intensive supportive care and treatment modalities, the mortality of these patients remains high. In this study, we investigated the role of Burton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the Btk/Tec family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, in the pathogenesis of sepsis, and evaluated the protective effect of in vivo Btk RNA interference in a mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis. After intratracheal injection of Btk siRNA, the mice were then subjected to CLP to induce sepsis. The results demonstrated that this approach conferred potent protection against sepsis-induced ALI, as evidenced by a significant reduction in pathological scores, epithelial cell apoptosis, pulmonary edema, vascular permeability, and the expression of inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration in the lung tissues of septic mice. In addition, RNA interference of Btk significantly suppressed p-38 and iNOS signaling pathways in transduced alveolar macrophages in vitro. These results identify a novel role for BTK in lethal sepsis and provide a potential new therapeutic approach to sepsis and ALI. PMID:24906236

  14. β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase gene therapy upregulates tight junctions to rescue lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Barravecchia, M; Kothari, P; Young, J L; Dean, D A

    2016-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are associated with diverse disorders and characterized by disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leakage of edema fluid into the lung, and substantial inflammation leading to acute respiratory failure. Gene therapy is a potentially powerful approach to treat ALI/ARDS through repair of alveolar epithelial function. Herein, we show that delivery of a plasmid expressing β1-subunit of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase) alone or in combination with epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) α1-subunit using electroporation not only protected from subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated lung injury, but also treated injured lungs. However, transfer of α1-subunit of ENaC (α1-ENaC) alone only provided protection benefit rather than treatment benefit although alveolar fluid clearance had been remarkably enhanced. Gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, but not α1-ENaC, not only enhanced expression of tight junction protein zona occludins-1 (ZO-1) and occludin both in cultured cells and in mouse lungs, but also reduced pre-existing increase of lung permeability in vivo. These results demonstrate that gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase upregulates tight junction formation and therefore treats lungs with existing injury, whereas delivery of α1-ENaC only maintains pre-existing tight junction but not for generation. This indicates that the restoration of epithelial/endothelial barrier function may provide better treatment of ALI/ARDS. PMID:26910760

  15. Non–Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase Isoform Is a Viable Molecular Target in Acute Inflammatory Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Moitra, Jaideep; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Sammani, Saad; Turner, Jerry R.; Chiang, Eddie T.; Evenoski, Carrie; Wang, Ting; Singleton, Patrick A.; Huang, Yong; Lussier, Yves A.; Watterson, D. Martin; Dudek, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and mechanical ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), major causes of acute respiratory failure with elevated morbidity and mortality, are characterized by significant pulmonary inflammation and alveolar/vascular barrier dysfunction. Previous studies highlighted the role of the non–muscle myosin light chain kinase isoform (nmMLCK) as an essential element of the inflammatory response, with variants in the MYLK gene that contribute to ALI susceptibility. To define nmMLCK involvement further in acute inflammatory syndromes, we used two murine models of inflammatory lung injury, induced by either an intratracheal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS model) or mechanical ventilation with increased tidal volumes (the VILI model). Intravenous delivery of the membrane-permeant MLC kinase peptide inhibitor, PIK, produced a dose-dependent attenuation of both LPS-induced lung inflammation and VILI (∼50% reductions in alveolar/vascular permeability and leukocyte influx). Intravenous injections of nmMLCK silencing RNA, either directly or as cargo within angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) antibody–conjugated liposomes (to target the pulmonary vasculature selectively), decreased nmMLCK lung expression (∼70% reduction) and significantly attenuated LPS-induced and VILI-induced lung inflammation (∼40% reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage protein). Compared with wild-type mice, nmMLCK knockout mice were significantly protected from VILI, with significant reductions in VILI-induced gene expression in biological pathways such as nrf2-mediated oxidative stress, coagulation, p53-signaling, leukocyte extravasation, and IL-6–signaling. These studies validate nmMLCK as an attractive target for ameliorating the adverse effects of dysregulated lung inflammation. PMID:20139351

  16. Neurodiagnostic Abnormalities in Patients with Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jerry D.; Lazarowitz, Virginia C.; Arieff, Allen I.

    1978-01-01

    Neurological abnormalities are a major cause of morbidity in patients with renal failure. The pathophysiology of these neurological changes is unclear, and the effects on them of dialysis and return of renal function have not been well studied. Studies were done in 31 patients who had acute renal failure (ARF), all of whom were either treated with dialysis within 5 days or did not survive. Studies on these patients included the electroencephalogram (EEG), motor nerve conduction velocity, and plasma Ca++ and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. Studies were done at the time ARF was diagnosed, after stabilization on dialysis, during the diuretic phase of ARF, and 3 mo after recovery from ARF. In 16 patients with acute or chronic renal failure who did not survive and in nine patients without renal disease who died, measurements were made in brain of content of Na+, K+, Cl−, Ca++, Mg++, and water. In patients with ARF for less than 48 h, despite the fact that there were only modest increases in plasma urea and creatinine, there were striking abnormalities in the EEG. The percent EEG power < 5 Hz±SE was 41±8% (normal = 2±1%), whereas the percent of frequencies > 9 Hz was only 22±6% (normal = 62±3%). These changes were unaffected by dialysis, but became normal with return of renal function and remained normal at 3 mo follow-up. The motor nerve conduction velocity was unaffected by either ARF or dialysis. In patients with ARF, the brain Ca++ was 46.5±3.2 meq/kg dry wt, almost twice the normal value of 26.9±1.0 meq/kg dry wt (P < 0.001). The plasma PTH level was 3.2±0.6 ng/ml (normal < 1.5 ng/ml, P < 0.01). The increased brain Ca++ was not related to an increased plasma (Ca++) (PO4−−−) product (r2 = 0.14, P > 0.05). There was a small but significant decrement in brain Na+ (P < 0.05), but brain water, K+, and Mg++ were unaffected by ARF. Thus, in patients with ARF for less than 48 h, the EEG is grossly abnormal and there are elevated levels of PTH in plasma

  17. Perfusion of nonventilated lung: failure of hypoxic vasoconstriction

    SciTech Connect

    Sostman, H.D.; Neumann, R.D.; Gottschalk, A.; Greenspan, R.H.

    1983-07-01

    Alveolar hypoxia is a well established cause of regional vasoconstriction such that nonventilated segments are not perfused. The paradoxical situation of retained perfusion of nonventilated lung has seldom been discussed. Three clinical examples are illustrated. In each case coexistent chronic obstructive lung disease may have contributed to this unexpected finding by reducing pulmonary vascular capacity such that blood flow diversion from hypoxic segments was not possible.

  18. Djenkol bean poisoning (djenkolism): an unusual cause of acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Segasothy, M; Swaminathan, M; Kong, N C; Bennett, W M

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a patient with acute renal failure that resulted from the ingestion of djenkol beans. Features of acute djenkolism include nausea, vomiting, bilateral loin pain, gross hematuria, and oliguria. The blood urea level was 16.2 mmol/L and the serum creatinine was 460 mumol/L. Phase contrast microscopy of the urinary sediment indicated that the hematuria was nonglomerular. Ultrasound of the kidneys showed slightly enlarged kidneys with no features of obstruction. Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis similar to the single animal study reported in the literature. With conservative therapy, which included rehydration with normal saline and alkalinization of the urine with sodium bicarbonate, the acute renal failure resolved. Based on its chemistry, djenkol bean-associated acute renal failure may be analogous to acute uric acid nephropathy. PMID:7810535

  19. Myeloid tissue factor does not modulate lung inflammation or permeability during experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Ciara M; Grove, Brandon S; Clune, Jennifer K; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a critical mediator of direct acute lung injury (ALI) with global TF deficiency resulting in increased airspace inflammation, alveolar-capillary permeability, and alveolar hemorrhage after intra-tracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the lung, TF is expressed diffusely on the lung epithelium and intensely on cells of the myeloid lineage. We recently reported that TF on the lung epithelium, but not on myeloid cells, was the major source of TF during intra-tracheal LPS-induced ALI. Because of a growing body of literature demonstrating important pathophysiologic differences between ALI caused by different etiologies, we hypothesized that TF on myeloid cells may have distinct contributions to airspace inflammation and permeability between direct and indirect causes of ALI. To test this, we compared mice lacking TF on myeloid cells (TF(∆mye), LysM.Cre(+/-)TF(flox/flox)) to littermate controls during direct (bacterial pneumonia, ventilator-induced ALI, bleomycin-induced ALI) and indirect ALI (systemic LPS, cecal ligation and puncture). ALI was quantified by weight loss, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cell number, cytokine concentration, protein concentration, and BAL procoagulant activity. There was no significant contribution of TF on myeloid cells in multiple models of experimental ALI, leading to the conclusion that TF in myeloid cells is not a major contributor to experimental ALI. PMID:26924425

  20. Myeloid tissue factor does not modulate lung inflammation or permeability during experimental acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Shaver, Ciara M.; Grove, Brandon S.; Clune, Jennifer K.; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B.; Bastarache, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a critical mediator of direct acute lung injury (ALI) with global TF deficiency resulting in increased airspace inflammation, alveolar-capillary permeability, and alveolar hemorrhage after intra-tracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the lung, TF is expressed diffusely on the lung epithelium and intensely on cells of the myeloid lineage. We recently reported that TF on the lung epithelium, but not on myeloid cells, was the major source of TF during intra-tracheal LPS-induced ALI. Because of a growing body of literature demonstrating important pathophysiologic differences between ALI caused by different etiologies, we hypothesized that TF on myeloid cells may have distinct contributions to airspace inflammation and permeability between direct and indirect causes of ALI. To test this, we compared mice lacking TF on myeloid cells (TF∆mye, LysM.Cre+/−TFflox/flox) to littermate controls during direct (bacterial pneumonia, ventilator-induced ALI, bleomycin-induced ALI) and indirect ALI (systemic LPS, cecal ligation and puncture). ALI was quantified by weight loss, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cell number, cytokine concentration, protein concentration, and BAL procoagulant activity. There was no significant contribution of TF on myeloid cells in multiple models of experimental ALI, leading to the conclusion that TF in myeloid cells is not a major contributor to experimental ALI. PMID:26924425

  1. Paediatric heart failure research: role of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kristin M

    2015-08-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, of the National Institutes of Health, is committed to supporting research in paediatric heart failure. The Institute's support of paediatric heart failure research includes both investigator-initiated grants and Institute initiatives. There were 107 funded grants in paediatric heart failure over the past 20 years in basic, translational and clinical research, technology development, and support of registries. Such research includes a broad diversity of scientific topics and approaches. The Institute also supports several initiatives for paediatric heart failure, including the Pediatric Circulatory Support Program, the Pumps for Kids, Infants, and Neonates (PumpKIN) Program, PediMACS, and the Pediatric Heart Network. This review article describes the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's past, present, and future efforts to promote a better understanding of paediatric heart failure, with the ultimate goal of improving outcomes. PMID:26377724

  2. Prediction of acute renal failure following soft-tissue injury using the venous bicarbonate concentration.

    PubMed

    Muckart, D J; Moodley, M; Naidu, A G; Reddy, A D; Meineke, K R

    1992-12-01

    Sixty-four patients with soft-tissue injuries were studied prospectively to determine whether an initial venous bicarbonate concentration (VBC) of less than 17 mmol/L would predict the development of myoglobin-induced acute renal failure. The VBC was > 17 mmol/L in 59 patients, seven of whom had myoglobinuria. All recovered without renal complications. The remaining five patients all had VBC < 17 mmol/L and four had myoglobinuria. Acute renal failure developed in four patients (p < 0.001). The VBC on hospital arrival was the most accurate predictor of these patients' risk for the development of acute renal failure following soft-tissue injury. PMID:1474620

  3. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia associated with influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia after lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Immunocompromised patients, particularly after lung transplantation, are at high risk to develop atypical forms of pulmonary infections including influenza A/H1N1. Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia (AFOP) is a special histological pattern in acute respiratory failure with high mortality. Case presentation We describe a 66-year-old woman with double lung transplantation in August 2009 due to end stage pulmonary fibrosis. After prolonged weaning and subsequent promising course, she developed atypical pneumonia with diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in both lungs in January 2010. Infection with influenza A/H1N1 virus was verified. The patient rapidly suffered from respiratory insufficiency and died eight days after this diagnosis. The post-mortem revealed especially in the lower parts of the lungs the classical histological pattern of pure AFOP. Molecular analyses of lung tissue were positive for influenza A/H1N1. Conclusion To our knowledge we present the first case of AFOP triggered by viral infection, here proven to be influenza virus A/H1N1. Thus, also in the setting of viral infection the highly deadly differential diagnosis of AFOP must be considered. PMID:23683442

  4. Inhaled nitric oxide exacerbated phorbol-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hen I; Chu, Shi Jye; Hsu, Kang; Wang, David

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we determined the effect of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) on the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in isolated rat lung. Typical acute lung injury was induced successfully by PMA during 60 min of observation. PMA (2 microg/kg) elicited a significant increase in microvascular permeability, (measured using the capillary filtration coefficient Kfc), lung weight gain, lung weight/body weight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Pretreatment with inhaled NO (30 ppm) significantly exacerbated acute lung injury. All of the parameters reflective of lung injury increased significantly except PAP (P<0.05). Coadministration of Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (5 mM) attenuated the detrimental effect of inhaled NO in PMA-induced lung injury, except for PAP. In addition, L-NAME (5 mM) significantly attenuated PMA-induced acute lung injury except for PAP. These experimental data suggest that inhaled NO significantly exacerbated acute lung injury induced by PMA in rats. L-NAME attenuated the detrimental effect of inhaled NO. PMID:14643171

  5. Mechanisms of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gralinski, Lisa E.; Bankhead, Armand; Jeng, Sophia; Menachery, Vineet D.; Proll, Sean; Belisle, Sarah E.; Matzke, Melissa; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Luna, Maria L.; Shukla, Anil K.; Ferris, Martin T.; Bolles, Meagan; Chang, Jean; Aicher, Lauri; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Law, G. Lynn; Katze, Michael G.; McWeeney, Shannon; Baric, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systems biology offers considerable promise in uncovering novel pathways by which viruses and other microbial pathogens interact with host signaling and expression networks to mediate disease severity. In this study, we have developed an unbiased modeling approach to identify new pathways and network connections mediating acute lung injury, using severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as a model pathogen. We utilized a time course of matched virologic, pathological, and transcriptomic data within a novel methodological framework that can detect pathway enrichment among key highly connected network genes. This unbiased approach produced a high-priority list of 4 genes in one pathway out of over 3,500 genes that were differentially expressed following SARS-CoV infection. With these data, we predicted that the urokinase and other wound repair pathways would regulate lethal versus sublethal disease following SARS-CoV infection in mice. We validated the importance of the urokinase pathway for SARS-CoV disease severity using genetically defined knockout mice, proteomic correlates of pathway activation, and pathological disease severity. The results of these studies demonstrate that a fine balance exists between host coagulation and fibrinolysin pathways regulating pathological disease outcomes, including diffuse alveolar damage and acute lung injury, following infection with highly pathogenic respiratory viruses, such as SARS-CoV. PMID:23919993

  6. Anesthesiology Devices; Reclassification of Membrane Lung for Long-Term Pulmonary Support; Redesignation as Extracorporeal Circuit and Accessories for Long-Term Respiratory/Cardiopulmonary Failure. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-02-12

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to redesignate membrane lung devices for long-term pulmonary support, a preamendments class III device, as extracorporeal circuit and accessories for long-term respiratory/cardiopulmonary failure, and to reclassify the device to class II (special controls) in patients with acute respiratory failure or acute cardiopulmonary failure where other available treatment options have failed, and continued clinical deterioration is expected or the risk of death is imminent. A membrane lung device for long-term pulmonary support (>6 hours) refers to the oxygenator in an extracorporeal circuit used during long-term procedures, commonly referred to as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Because a number of other devices and accessories are used with the oxygenator in the circuit, the title and identification of the regulation are revised to include extracorporeal circuit and accessories for long-term respiratory/cardiopulmonary failure. Although an individual device or accessory used in an ECMO circuit may already have its own classification regulation when the device or accessory is intended for short-term use (<=6 hours), such device or accessory will be subject to the same regulatory controls applied to the oxygenator (i.e., class II, special controls) when evaluated as part of the ECMO circuit for long-term use (>6 hours). On its own initiative, based on new information, FDA is revising the classification of the membrane lung device for long-term pulmonary support. PMID:26878739

  7. Immune mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Krenkel, Oliver; Mossanen, Jana C; Tacke, Frank

    2014-12-01

    An overdose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP), also termed paracetamol, can cause severe liver damage, ultimately leading to acute liver failure (ALF) with the need of liver transplantation. APAP is rapidly taken up from the intestine and metabolized in hepatocytes. A small fraction of the metabolized APAP forms cytotoxic mitochondrial protein adducts, leading to hepatocyte necrosis. The course of disease is not only critically influenced by dose of APAP and the initial hepatocyte damage, but also by the inflammatory response following acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI). As revealed by mouse models of AILI and corresponding translational studies in ALF patients, necrotic hepatocytes release danger-associated-molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by resident hepatic macrophages, Kupffer cell (KC), and neutrophils, leading to the activation of these cells. Activated hepatic macrophages release various proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α or IL-1β, as well as chemokines (e.g., CCL2) thereby further enhancing inflammation and increasing the influx of immune cells, like bone-marrow derived monocytes and neutrophils. Monocytes are mainly recruited via their receptor CCR2 and aggravate inflammation. Infiltrating monocytes, however, can mature into monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMF), which are, in cooperation with neutrophils, also involved in the resolution of inflammation. Besides macrophages and neutrophils, distinct lymphocyte populations, especially γδ T cells, are also linked to the inflammatory response following an APAP overdose. Natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and T cells possibly further perpetuate inflammation in AILI. Understanding the complex interplay of immune cell subsets in experimental models and defining their functional involvement in disease progression is essential to identify novel therapeutic targets for human disease. PMID:25568858

  8. Chronic Acetaminophen Exposure in Pediatric Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Estella M.; Im, Kelly; Belle, Steven H.; Squires, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol [APAP]) is a widely used medication that can cause hepatotoxicity. We examined characteristics and outcomes of children with chronic exposure (CE) to APAP in the multinational Pediatric Acute Liver Failure (PALF) Study. METHODS: A total of 895 children enrolled from 2002 to 2009 were grouped by APAP exposure history as: CE (received multiple doses \\x{2265}2 days; n = 83), single dose exposure (SE; n = 85), and no exposure (NE; n = 498). CE was the reference group for pairwise comparisons. Median values are shown. RESULTS: Patients with CE compared with those with SE were younger (3.5 vs 15.2 years, P < .0001), less likely to be female (46% vs 82%, P < .0001), and more likely to be Hispanic (25% vs 7%, P = .001), but they did not differ significantly from the NE group. At enrollment, total bilirubin was lower with CE than with NE (3.2 vs 13.1 mg/dL, P < .001). Alanine aminotransferase levels were higher with CE than with NE (2384 vs 855 IU/L, P < .0001), but lower than with SE (5140 IU/L, P < .0001). Survival without liver transplantation at 21 days was worse for CE than for SE (68% vs 92%, P = .0004) but better than for NE (49%, P = .008). CONCLUSIONS: Children in the PALF study with CE had lower bilirubin and higher alanine aminotransferase than those with NE. Outcomes with CE were worse than with SE but better than with NE. Potential reasons for this outcomes advantage over non–APAP-exposed subjects should be explored. PMID:23439908

  9. Aspirin failure in patients presenting with acute cerebrovascular ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Halawani, Saeed H M; Williams, David J P; Adefurin, Abiodun; Webster, John; Greaves, Michael; Ford, Isobel

    2011-08-01

    Aspirin is the most commonly used antiplatelet drug for prevention of ischaemic stroke. In order to determine the prevalence and nature of aspirin failure, we studied 51 adults admitted with suspected ischaemic stroke and already prescribed daily aspirin. Within 48 hours (h) of onset, blood and urine samples were collected to assess platelet aggregation, activation and aspirin response by a range of methods. All tests were then repeated on a second sample taken 24 h after witnessed administration of 75 mg or 150 mg aspirin. At entry to the study, incomplete response to aspirin, measured by arachidonic acid (AA)-stimulated platelet aggregation, was found in 43% of patients. Following in-hospital aspirin administration, there was a significant decrease in AA-aggregation (p=0.001) suggesting poor adherence to therapy prior to admission. However, residual aggregation (10-15%) persisted in 11 subjects - suggesting alternative causes. In incomplete responders on admission, platelet aggregation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was significantly higher compared with responders (p<0.05) but there were no significant differences in collagen aggregation, platelet fibrinogen binding or P-selectin expression, plasma von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, or the urinary metabolite, 11-dehydro-TxB2. Incomplete platelet inhibition is common around the time of acute cerebrovascular ischaemic events in patients prescribed aspirin. Up to 50% of these observations appear due to incomplete adherence to aspirin therapy. Intervention studies are required to determine the clinical relevance of measured platelet response to aspirin in terms of outcome, and the effectiveness of improved pharmacotherapy for stroke prevention. PMID:21544317

  10. Biomarkers in Acute Lung Injury – Marking Forward Progress

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Nicolas; Ware, Lorraine B.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we review the ‘state of the art’ with regards to biomarkers for prediction, diagnosis and prognosis in acute lung injury (ALI). We begin by defining biomarkers and the goals of biomarker research in ALI including their ability to define more homogenous populations for recruitment into trials of novel therapies as well as to identify important biological pathways in the pathogenesis of ALI. Progress along four general routes is then examined. First the results of wide-ranging existing protein biomarkers are reported. Secondly, we describe newer biomarkers awaiting or with strong potential for validation. Thirdly, we report progress in the fields of genomics and proteomics. Finally given the complexity and number of potential biomarkers, we examine the results of combining clinical predictors with protein and other biomarkers to produce better prognostic and diagnostic indices. PMID:21742222

  11. Measuring dead-space in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kallet, R H

    2012-11-01

    Several recent studies have advanced our understanding of dead-space ventilation in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). They have demonstrated the utility of measuring physiologic dead-space-to-tidal volume ratio (VD/VT) and related variables in assessing outcomes as well as therapeutic interventions. These studies have included the evaluation of mortality risk, pulmonary perfusion, as well as the effectiveness of drug therapy, prone positioning, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration, and inspiratory pattern in improving gas exchange. In patients with ALI/ARDS managed with lung-protective ventilation a significant relationship between elevated VD/VT and increased mortality continues to be reported in both early and intermediate phases of ALI/ARDS. Some clinical evidence now supports the suggestion that elevated VD/VT in part reflects the severity of pulmonary vascular endothelial damage. Monitoring VD/VT also appears useful in assessing alveolar recruitment when titrating PEEP and may be a particularly expedient method for assessing the effectiveness of prone positioning. It also has revealed how subtle manipulations of inspiratory time and pattern can improve CO(2) excretion. Much of this has been accomplished using volumetric capnography. This allows for more sophisticated measurements of pulmonary gas exchange function including: alveolar VD/VT, the volume of CO(2) excretion and the slope of the alveolar plateau which reflects ventilation: perfusion heterogeneity. Many of these measurements now can be made non-invasively which should only increase the research and clinical utility of volumetric capnography in studying and managing patients with ALI/ARDS. PMID:22858884

  12. Side effects of using nitrates to treat heart failure and the acute coronary syndromes, unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Thadani, Udho; Ripley, Toni L

    2007-07-01

    Nitrates are potent venous dilators and anti-ischemic agents. They are widely used for the relief of chest pain and pulmonary congestion in patients with acute coronary syndromes and heart failure. Nitrates, however, do not reduce mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Combination of nitrates and hydralazine when given in addition to beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce mortality and heart failure hospitalizations in patients with heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction who are of African-American origin. Side effects during nitrate therapy are common but are less well described in the literature compared with the reported side effects in patients with stable angina pectoris. The reported incidence of side effects varies highly among different studies and among various disease states. Headache is the most commonly reported side effect with an incidence of 12% in acute heart failure, 41-73% in chronic heart failure, 3-19% in unstable angina and 2-26% in acute myocardial infarction. The reported incidence of hypotension also differs: 5-10% in acute heart failure, 20% in chronic heart failure, 9% in unstable angina and < 1-48% in acute myocardial infarction, with the incidence being much higher with concomitant nitrate therapy plus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Reported incidence of dizziness is as low as 1% in patients with acute myocardial infarction to as high as 29% in patients with heart failure. Severe headaches and/or symptomatic hypotension may necessitate discontinuation of nitrate therapy. Severe life threatening hypotension or even death may occur when nitrates are used in patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction associated with right ventricular dysfunction or infarction, or with concomitant use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine. Despite the disturbing observational reports in the literature that continuous and prolonged use of nitrates may lead to

  13. Successful management of acute respiratory failure in an Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis patient using an extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal system.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Andrea; Arcaro, Giovanna; Paladini, Luciana; Iovino, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) requiring Invasive Mechanical Ventilation (IMV) following unsuccessful treatment with Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) have a high mortality rate. IMV is, moreover, an independent predictor of poor outcome during the post-transplantation period in patients on waiting lists for Lung Transplantation (LT). Here we describe the successful management of an IPF patient with acute respiratory failure (ARF) using a pump-assisted veno-venous system for extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) (ProLUNG® system) as an alternative to endotracheal intubation (ETI) following NIV failure. Given this positive experience, further studies are warranted focusing on the ECCO2R system's tolerability, safety, and efficacy in patients with IPF and severe ARF in whom NIV alone is ineffective. PMID:27537725

  14. The Implantable Pediatric Artificial Lung: Interim Report on the Development of an End-Stage Lung Failure Model

    PubMed Central

    Alghanem, Fares; Davis, Ryan P.; Bryner, Benjamin S.; Hoffman, Hayley R.; Trahanas, John; Cornell, Marie; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Bartlett, Robert H.; Hirschl, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    An implantable pediatric artificial lung (PAL) may serve as a bridge to lung transplantation for children with end-stage lung failure (ESLF); however, an animal model of pediatric lung failure is needed to evaluate a PAL’s efficacy before it can enter clinical trials. The objective of this study was to assess ligation of the right pulmonary artery (rPA) as a model for pediatric ESLF. Seven 20-30kg lambs underwent rPA ligation and were recovered and monitored for up to 4 days. Intraoperatively, rPA ligation significantly increased physiologic deadspace fraction (Vd/Vt: baseline=48.6±5.7%, rPA ligation=60.1±5.2%, p=0.012), mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPPA: baseline=17.4±2.2mmHg, rPA ligation=28.5±5.2mmHg, p<0.001), and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2: baseline=40.4±9.3mmHg, rPA ligation=57.3±12.7mmHg, p=0.026). Of the 7 lambs, 3 were unable to be weaned from mechanical ventilation post-operatively, 3 were successfully weaned but suffered cardiorespiratory failure within 4 days, and 1 survived all 4 days. All 4 animals that were successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation had persistent pulmonary hypertension (mPPA=28.6±2.2mmHg) and remained tachypneic (respiratory rate=63±21min−1). Three of the 4 recovered lambs required supplemental oxygen. We conclude that rPA ligation creates the physiologic derangements commonly seen in pediatric end-stage lung failure and may be suitable for testing and implanting a PAL. PMID:25905495

  15. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of paralleled Aza resveratrol-chalcone compounds as potential anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenbo; Ge, Xiangting; Xu, Fengli; Zhang, Yali; Liu, Zhiguo; Pan, Jialing; Song, Jiao; Dai, Yuanrong; Zhou, Jianmin; Feng, Jianpeng; Liang, Guang

    2015-08-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure in critically-ill patients. It has been reported that both resveratrol and chalcone derivatives could ameliorate lung injury induced by inflammation. A series of paralleled Aza resveratrol-chalcone compounds (5a-5m, 6a-6i) were designed, synthesized and screened for anti-inflammatory activity. A majority showed potent inhibition on the IL-6 and TNF-α expression-stimulated by LPS in macrophages, of which compound 6b is the most potent analog by inhibition of LPS-induced IL-6 release in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, 6b exhibited protection against LPS-induced acute lung injury in vivo. These results offer further insight into the use of Aza resveratrol-chalcone compounds for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, and the use of compound 6b as a lead compound for the development of anti-ALI agents. PMID:26048788

  16. Acute renal failure due to phenazopyridine (Pyridium) overdose: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Onder, Ali Mirza; Espinoza, Veronica; Berho, Mariana E; Chandar, Jayanthi; Zilleruelo, Gaston; Abitbol, Carolyn

    2006-11-01

    Phenazopyridine (Pyridium) is a commonly used urinary tract analgesic. It has been associated with yellow skin discoloration, hemolytic anemia, methemoglobinemia, and acute renal failure, especially in patients with preexisting kidney disease. We report a 17-year-old female with vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, presenting with acute renal failure and methemoglobinemia following a suicidal attempt with a single 1,200 mg ingestion of Pyridium. She had no prior evidence of HIV nephropathy. The patient had a progressive nonoliguric renal failure on the 3rd day following the ingestion. She was treated with N-acetylcysteine, intravenous carnitine, and alkalinization of the urine. Her kidney biopsy revealed acute tubular necrosis with no glomerular changes. After 7 days of conservative management, she was discharged home with normal kidney function. To our knowledge, this is the second smallest amount of Pyridium overdose resulting in acute renal failure with no previous history of kidney disease. PMID:16897003

  17. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Role of Oleic Acid-Triggered Lung Injury and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Burth, Patrícia; Castro-Faria, Mauro Velho; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury especially acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be triggered by diverse stimuli, including fatty acids and microbes. ARDS affects thousands of people worldwide each year, presenting high mortality rate and having an economic impact. One of the hallmarks of lung injury is edema formation with alveoli flooding. Animal models are used to study lung injury. Oleic acid-induced lung injury is a widely used model resembling the human disease. The oleic acid has been linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases; here we focus on lung injury. Firstly, we briefly discuss ARDS and secondly we address the mechanisms by which oleic acid triggers lung injury and inflammation. PMID:26640323

  18. [Acute cortical blindness: a reversible complication of acute kidney failure in a child with burns].

    PubMed

    Balzar, E; Reisner, T; Wolf, A

    1983-01-01

    An 11 year old boy was admitted to the Department of Pediatrics Medical School of Vienna with 2nd and 3rd degree burns covering 30% of his body. He presented with complications--high fever, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration--which had led to acute renal failure. After 6 hemodialyses renal function recovered after two weeks and the patient entered a polyuric phase. In connection with a transient dehydration the patient showed a sudden bilateral cortical blindness. The computerized tomogram (CT) showed vague evidence of an occipital cortical ischemia. We assume that several factors have played a role in this sudden occurrence. As a result of hypovolemia and coincident anemia and electrolyte inbalance, cerebral edema and cortical tissue hypoxia with emphasis in the occipital cortical region developed in the brain possibly already damaged by burn injury. A complete reversal of the clinical state was achieved. The patient was discharged with normal vision and normalized renal function. PMID:6835679

  19. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide induced acute inflammation in lung by chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinshan; Xue, Jinling; Xu, Bi; Xie, Jiani; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-02-13

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, also called endotoxin) is a pro-inflammatory constituent of gram negative bacteria and cyanobacteria, which causes a potential health risk in the process of routine urban application of reclaimed water, such as car wash, irrigation, scenic water refilling, etc. Previous studies indicated that the common disinfection treatment, chlorination, has little effect on endotoxin activity removal measured by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. However, in this study, significant decrease of acute inflammatory effects was observed in mouse lung, while LAL assay still presented a moderate increase of endotoxin activity. To explore the possible mechanisms, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results showed the chlorination happened in alkyl chain of LPS molecules, which could affect the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein. Also the size of LPS aggregates was found to drop significantly after treatment, which could be another results of chlorination caused polarity change. In conclusion, our observation demonstrated that chlorination is effective to reduce the LPS induced inflammation in lung, and it is recommended to use health effect-based methods to assess risk removal of water treatment technologies. PMID:26530889

  20. Wogonoside ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Ren, Yi; Yang, Chengliang; Guo, Yue; Zhang, Xiaojing; Hou, Gang; Guo, Xinjin; Sun, Nan; Liu, Yongyu

    2014-12-01

    Wogonoside has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we evaluated the effect of wogonoside on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Male BALB/c mice with ALI, induced by intranasal instillation of LPS, were treated with wogonoside 1 h prior to LPS exposure. Mice treated with LPS alone showed significantly increased TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). When pretreated with wogonoside, the TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β levels were significantly decreased. Meanwhile, wogonoside significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases in the macrophage and neutrophil infiltration of lung tissues and markedly attenuated myeloperoxidase activity. Furthermore, wogonoside inhibited the TLR4 expression and the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, and IκB induced by LPS. In conclusion, our results indicate that wogonoside exhibits a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI via suppression of TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:24854163

  1. Ventricular assist devices for treatment of acute heart failure and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, James N; Wieselthaler, Georg; Strueber, Martin; St John Sutton, Martin G; Rame, J Eduardo

    2015-07-01

    Despite therapeutic advances that improve longevity and quality of life, heart failure (HF) remains a relentless disease. At the end stage of HF, patients may become eligible for mechanical circulatory support (MCS) for the indications of stabilising acute cardiogenic shock or for chronic HF management. MCS use is growing rapidly in the USA and some countries of the European Union, especially in transplant-ineligible patients. In others, it remains largely a tool to stabilise patients until heart transplant. MCS comprises a heterogeneous group of temporary and durable devices which augment or replace the pumping function of one or both ventricles, with postimplant 2 year survival rivalling that of transplant in selected, lower-risk patients. In transplant-eligible and non-transplant-eligible patients, improvement in end-organ perfusion, functional capacity and quality of life have been noted. Even for optimal candidates, however, there are a host of potential complications that require constant vigilance of a coordinated care team. Recently, there has been official recognition of the importance of palliative care expertise in advance care planning preimplant and management of patients with ventricular assist devices at the end of their lives. PMID:25948420

  2. Acanthoic acid ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Qiushi, Wang; Guanghua, Li; Guangquan, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Acanthoic acid, a pimaradiene diterpene isolated from Acanthopanax koreanum, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of acanthoic acid on LPS-induced acute lung injury have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of acanthoic acid on LPS-induced ALI and to clarify the possible anti-inflammatory mechanisms. In vivo, an LPS-induced ALI model in mice was used to assess the protective effects of acanthoic acid on ALI. Meanwhile, mouse alveolar macrophages MH-S were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of acanthoic acid. The expressions of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were measured by ELISA. LXRα and NF-κB expression were detected by Western blot analysis. The results showed that acanthoic acid downregulated LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production in BALF. MPO activity and lung wet-to-dry ratio were also inhibited by acanthoic acid. In addition, acanthoic acid attenuated lung histopathologic changes. In vitro, acanthoic acid inhibited inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production and NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages. Acanthoic acid was found to up-regulated the expression of LXRα. The inhibition of acanthoic acid on LPS-induced cytokines and NF-κB activation can be abolished by LXRα siRNA. In conclusion, our results suggested that the protective effect of acanthoic acid on LPS-induced ALI was due to its ability to activate LXRα, thereby inhibiting LPS-induced inflammatory response. PMID:25620130

  3. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Neuromyelitis Optica Treated Successfully with Plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Zantah, Massa; Coyle, Timothy B.; Datta, Debapriya

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) is a demyelinating autoimmune disease involving the central nervous system. Acute respiratory failure from cervical myelitis due to NMO is known to occur but is uncommon in monophasic disease and is treated with high dose steroids. We report a case of a patient with NMO who developed acute respiratory failure related to cervical spinal cord involvement, refractory to pulse dose steroid therapy, which resolved with plasmapheresis. PMID:26989546

  4. Recurrent Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Owing to Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia Caused by Inappropriate Habitual Bloodletting

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Na, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Kang, Eun Gyu; Seo, Jae-Bin; Chung, Woo-Young; Zo, Joo-Hee; Hong, Jung Ae; Kim, Kwangyoun; Kim, Myung-A

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman visited the emergency department twice with symptoms of acute heart failure including shortness of breath, general weakness, and abdominal distension. Laboratory findings showed extremely low level of serum hemoglobin at 1.4 g/dL. Echocardiographic examination demonstrated dilated left ventricular cavity with systolic dysfunction and moderate amount of pericardial effusion. In this patient, acute heart failure due to severe iron deficiency anemia was caused by inappropriate habitual bloodletting. PMID:26755934

  5. Severe physical exertion, oxidative stress, and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nikunj R; Iqbal, M Bilal; Barlow, Andrew; Bayliss, John

    2011-11-01

    We report the case of a 27-year-old male athlete presenting with severe dyspnoea 24 hours after completing an "Ironman Triathlon." Subsequent chest radiology excluded pulmonary embolus but confirmed an acute lung injury (ALI). Echocardiography corroborated a normal brain natriuretic peptide level by demonstrating good biventricular systolic function with no regional wall motion abnormalities. He recovered well, without requiring ventilatory support, on supplemental oxygen therapy and empirical antibiotics. To date, ALI following severe physical exertion has never been described. Exercise is a form of physiological stress resulting in oxidative stress through generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. In its extreme form, there is potential for an excessive oxidative stress response--one that overwhelms the body's protective antioxidant mechanisms. As our case demonstrated, oxidative stress secondary to severe physical exertion was the most likely factor in the pathogenesis of ALI. Further studies are necessary to explore the pathological consequences of exercise-induced oxidative stress. Although unproven as of yet, further research may be needed to demonstrate if antioxidant therapy can prevent or ameliorate potential life-threatening complications in the acute setting. PMID:22064719

  6. Effect of Thoracentesis on Intubated Patients with Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Matthew B; Serna-Gallegos, Derek; Ault, Mark; Khan, Ahsan; Chung, Rex; Ley, Eric J; Melo, Nicolas; Margulies, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusions occur frequently in mechanically ventilated patients, but no consensus exists regarding the clinical benefit of effusion drainage. We sought to determine the impact of thoracentesis on gas exchange in patients with differing severities of acute lung injury (ALI). A retrospective analysis was conducted on therapeutic thoracenteses performed on intubated patients in an adult surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary center. Effusions judged by ultrasound to be 400 mL or larger were drained. Subjects were divided into groups based on their initial P:F ratios: normal >300, ALI 200 to 300, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) <200. Baseline characteristics, physiologic variables, arterial blood gases, and ventilator settings before and after the intervention were analyzed. The primary end point was the change in measures of oxygenation. Significant improvements in P:F ratios (mean ± SD) were seen only in patients with ARDS (50.4 ± 38.5, P = 0.001) and ALI (90.6 ± 161.7, P = 0.022). Statistically significant improvement was observed in the pO2 (31.1, P = 0.005) and O2 saturation (4.1, P < 0.001) of the ARDS group. The volume of effusion removed did not correlate with changes in individual patient's oxygenation. These data support the role of therapeutic thoracentesis for intubated patients with abnormal P:F ratios. PMID:27099064

  7. Effects of contrast material on computed tomographic measurements of lung volumes in patients with acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Bouhemad, Bélaid; Richecoeur, Jack; Lu, Qin; Malbouisson, Luiz M; Cluzel, Philippe; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Background Intravenous injection of contrast material is routinely performed in order to differentiate nonaerated lung parenchyma from pleural effusion in critically ill patients undergoing thoracic computed tomography (CT). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of contrast material on CT measurement of lung volumes in 14 patients with acute lung injury. Method A spiral thoracic CT scan, consisting of contiguous axial sections of 10 mm thickness, was performed from the apex to the diaphragm at end-expiration both before and 30 s (group 1; n = 7) or 15 min (group 2; n = 7) after injection of 80 ml contrast material. Volumes of gas and tissue, and volumic distribution of CT attenuations were measured before and after injection using specially designed software (Lungview®; Institut National des Télécommunications, Evry, France). The maximal artifactual increase in lung tissue resulting from a hypothetical leakage within the lung of the 80 ml contrast material was calculated. Results Injection of contrast material significantly increased the apparent volume of lung tissue by 83 ± 57 ml in group 1 and 102 ± 80 ml in group 2, whereas the corresponding maximal artifactual increases in lung tissue were 42 ± 52 ml and 31 ± 18 ml. Conclusion Because systematic injection of contrast material increases the amount of extravascular lung water in patients with acute lung injury, it seems prudent to avoid this procedure in critically ill patients undergoing a thoracic CT scan and to reserve its use for specific indications. PMID:12617742

  8. What factors determine the severity of hepatitis A-related acute liver failure?

    PubMed Central

    Ajmera, V.; Xia, G.; Vaughan, G.; Forbi, J. C.; Ganova-Raeva, L. M.; Khudyakov, Y.; Opio, C. K.; Taylor, R.; Restrepo, R.; Munoz, S.; Fontana, R. J.; Lee, W. M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The reason(s) that hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection may progress infrequently to acute liver failure are poorly understood. We examined host and viral factors in 29 consecutive adult patients with HAV-associated acute liver failure enrolled at 10 sites participating in the US ALF Study Group. Eighteen of twenty-four acute liver failure sera were PCR positive while six had no detectable virus. HAV genotype was determined using phylogenetic analysis and the full-length genome sequences of the HAV from a cute liver failure sera were compared to those from self-limited acute HAV cases selected from the CDC database. We found that rates of nucleotide substitution did not vary significantly between the liver failure and non-liver failure cases and there was no significant variation in amino acid sequences between the two groups. Four of 18 HAV isolates were subgenotype IB, acquired from the same study site over a 3.5-year period. Sub-genotype IB was found more frequently among acute liver failure cases compared to the non-liver failure cases (chi-square test, P < 0.01). At another centre, a mother and her son presented with HAV and liver failure within 1 month of each other. Predictors of spontaneous survival included detectable serum HAV RNA, while age, gender, HAV genotype and nucleotide substitutions were not associated with outcome. The more frequent appearance of rapid viral clearance and its association with poor outcomes in acute liver failure as well as the finding of familial cases imply a possible host genetic predisposition that contributes to a fulminant course. Recurrent cases of the rare subgenotype IB over several years at a single centre imply a community reservoir of infection and possible increased pathogenicity of certain infrequent viral genotypes. PMID:21143345

  9. Extracorporeal liver assist device to exchange albumin and remove endotoxin in acute liver failure: Results of a pivotal pre-clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Karla C.L.; Baker, Luisa A.; Stanzani, Giacomo; Alibhai, Hatim; Chang, Yu Mei; Jimenez Palacios, Carolina; Leckie, Pamela J.; Giordano, Paola; Priestnall, Simon L.; Antoine, Daniel J.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Goldring, Christopher E.; Park, B. Kevin; Andreola, Fausto; Agarwal, Banwari; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Davies, Nathan A.; Jalan, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims In acute liver failure, severity of liver injury and clinical progression of disease are in part consequent upon activation of the innate immune system. Endotoxaemia contributes to innate immune system activation and the detoxifying function of albumin, critical to recovery from liver injury, is irreversibly destroyed in acute liver failure. University College London-Liver Dialysis Device is a novel artificial extracorporeal liver assist device, which is used with albumin infusion, to achieve removal and replacement of dysfunctional albumin and reduction in endotoxaemia. We aimed to test the effect of this device on survival in a pig model of acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure. Methods Pigs were randomised to three groups: Acetaminophen plus University College London-Liver Dialysis Device (n = 9); Acetaminophen plus Control Device (n = 7); and Control plus Control Device (n = 4). Device treatment was initiated two h after onset of irreversible acute liver failure. Results The Liver Dialysis Device resulted in 67% reduced risk of death in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure compared to Control Device (hazard ratio = 0.33, p = 0.0439). This was associated with 27% decrease in circulating irreversibly oxidised human non-mercaptalbumin-2 throughout treatment (p = 0.046); 54% reduction in overall severity of endotoxaemia (p = 0.024); delay in development of vasoplegia and acute lung injury; and delay in systemic activation of the TLR4 signalling pathway. Liver Dialysis Device-associated adverse clinical effects were not seen. Conclusions The survival benefit and lack of adverse effects would support clinical trials of University College London-Liver Dialysis Device in acute liver failure patients. PMID:25937432

  10. Lung ultrasound-a primary survey of the acutely dyspneic patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Francis Chun Yue

    2016-01-01

    There has been an explosion of knowledge and application of clinical lung ultrasound (LUS) in the last decade. LUS has important applications in the ambulatory, emergency, and critical care settings and its deployability for immediate bedside assessment allows many acute lung conditions to be diagnosed and early interventional decisions made in a matter of minutes. This review detailed the scientific basis of LUS, the examination techniques, and summarises the current applications in several acute lung conditions. It is to be hoped that clinicians, after reviewing the evidence within this article, would see LUS as an important first-line modality in the primary evaluation of an acutely dyspneic patient. PMID:27588206

  11. Phantom tumour of the lung in a patient with renal failure misdiagnosed as chest infection

    PubMed Central

    Althomali, Sarah Ali; Almalki, Mazen Mohammed; Mohiuddin, Syed Atif

    2014-01-01

    Phantom or vanishing tumour of the lung is a rare finding on chest radiographs that has been reported secondary to heart failure or chronic kidney disease. It has been described as an interlobular effusion of the transverse or oblique fissure of the right lung. Although it is uncommon, it should always be considered as a differential diagnosis for a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung zone because it can be easily mistaken for a lung mass or infiltration. We herein present a case involving a patient with chronic kidney disease and a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung that was diagnosed as a chest infection. The patient did not respond to various antibiotics and showed a poor response to diuretics, the standard treatment for phantom tumour. However, the patient markedly improved after dialysis, and the radiographic chest opacity disappeared. PMID:24943144

  12. Phantom tumour of the lung in a patient with renal failure misdiagnosed as chest infection.

    PubMed

    Althomali, Sarah Ali; Almalki, Mazen Mohammed; Mohiuddin, Syed Atif

    2014-01-01

    Phantom or vanishing tumour of the lung is a rare finding on chest radiographs that has been reported secondary to heart failure or chronic kidney disease. It has been described as an interlobular effusion of the transverse or oblique fissure of the right lung. Although it is uncommon, it should always be considered as a differential diagnosis for a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung zone because it can be easily mistaken for a lung mass or infiltration. We herein present a case involving a patient with chronic kidney disease and a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung that was diagnosed as a chest infection. The patient did not respond to various antibiotics and showed a poor response to diuretics, the standard treatment for phantom tumour. However, the patient markedly improved after dialysis, and the radiographic chest opacity disappeared. PMID:24943144

  13. The serpentine path to a novel mechanism-based inhibitor of acute inflammatory lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Comroe lecture on which this review is based described my research path during the past 45 years, beginning with studies of oxidant stress (hyperoxia) and eventuating in the discovery of a synthetic inhibitor of phospholipase A2 activity (called MJ33) that prevents acute lung injury in mice exposed to lipopolysaccharide. In between were studies of lung ischemia, lung surfactant metabolism, the protein peroxiredoxin 6 and its phospholipase A2 activity, and mechanisms for NADPH oxidase activation. These seemingly unrelated research activities provided the nexus for identification of a novel target and a potentially novel therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of acute lung injury. PMID:24744383

  14. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring in Acute Liver Failure: Institutional Case Series.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick R; Mallory, Grant W; Atkinson, John L D; Wijdicks, Eelco F; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2016-08-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) has been associated with cerebral edema and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP), which may be managed utilizing an ICP monitor. The most feared complication of placement is catastrophic intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of severe coagulopathy. Previous studies reported hemorrhage rates between 3.8-22 % among various devices, with epidural catheters having lower hemorrhage rates and precision relative to subdural bolts and intraparenchymal catheters. We sought to identify institutional hemorrhagic rates of ICP monitoring in ALF and its associated factors in a modern series guided by protocol implantation. Patient records treated for ALF with ICP monitoring at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN from 1995 to 2014 were reviewed. Protocalized since 1995, epidural (EP) ICP monitors were first used followed by intraparenchymal (IP) for stage III-IV hepatic encephalopathy. The following variables and outcomes were collected: patient demographics, ICPs and treatment methods, laboratory data, imaging studies, number of days for ICP monitoring, radiographic and symptomatic hemorrhage rates, orthotopic liver transplantation rates, and death. A total of 20 ICP monitors were placed for ALF, 7 EP, and 13 IP. International normalized ratio (INR) at placement of an EP monitor was 2.4 (1.7-3.2) with maximum of 2.7 (2.0-3.6) over the following 2.3 (1-3) days. Mean EP ICP at placement was 36.3 (11-55) and maximum of 43.1 (20-70) mm Hg. INR at placement of an IP monitor was 1.3 (<0.8-3.0) with maximum value of 2.9 (1.6-5.4) over the following 4.2 (2-6) days. Mean IP ICP at placement was 9.9 (2-19) and maximum was 39.8 (11-100) mm Hg. There was one asymptomatic hemorrhage in the EP group (14.3 % hemorrhage rate) and two hemorrhages in the IP group (hemorrhage rate was 15.4 %), both of which were fatal. Overall mortality rate in the EP group was 71.4 % (5/7) with two patients receiving transplantation, and one death in the transplant group. Overall mortality

  15. Anabolic steroid-induced cardiomyopathy underlying acute liver failure in a young bodybuilder

    PubMed Central

    Bispo, Miguel; Valente, Ana; Maldonado, Rosário; Palma, Rui; Glória, Helena; Nóbrega, João; Alexandrino, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure may lead to subclinical circulatory disturbances and remain an unrecognized cause of ischemic liver injury. We present the case of a previously healthy 40-year-old bodybuilder, referred to our Intensive-Care Unit of Hepatology for treatment of severe acute liver failure, with the suspicion of toxic hepatitis associated with anabolic steroid abuse. Despite the absence of symptoms and signs of congestive heart failure at admission, an anabolic steroid-induced dilated cardiomyopathy with a large thrombus in both ventricles was found to be the underlying cause of the liver injury. Treatment for the initially unrecognized heart failure rapidly restored liver function to normal. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of severe acute liver failure due to an unrecognized anabolic steroid-induced cardiomyopathy. Awareness of this unique presentation will allow for prompt treatment of this potentially fatal cause of liver failure. PMID:19533818

  16. Intravenous colistin-induced acute respiratory failure: A case report and a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Amardeep; Soriano, Sheryll Mae; Song, Mingchen; Chihara, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multi-drug-resistant gram negative bacillary infections has regained popularity of ancient drugs such as polymyxins. We report a case of acute respiratory failure induced by use of intravenous colistimethate, which is one of the forms of polymyxin. The patient is a 31 year old female with paraplegia due to spina bifida who underwent excisional debridement of large lumbosacral decubitus ulcer with osteomyelitis infected with pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA. Six days after initiation of intravenous colistimethate and vancomycin, she developed acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Pan-culture was negative including a chest radiograph. V/Q scan showed low probability for pulmonary embolism. Echocardiogram showed normal right ventricle with no strain or pulmonary hypertension. Colistimethate was discontinued. Within 24 hours, she was extubated. In the early years after introduction of polymyxin, there were several reports of acute respiratory paralysis. The mechanism is thought to be noncompetitive myoneuronal presynaptic blockade of acetylcholine release. Though a direct causal relationship for respiratory failure is often difficult to establish in current era with multiple co morbidities, the timeframe of apnea, acuity of onset as well as rapid recovery in our case clearly point out the causal relationship. In addition, our patient also developed acute renal failure, presumably due to colistimethate induced nephrotoxicity, a possible contributing factor for her acute respiratory failure. In summary, colistimethate can induce acute neurotoxicity including respiratory muscular weakness and acute respiratory failure. Clinicians should consider its toxicity in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure especially in critically ill patients. PMID:25337492

  17. Intravenous colistin-induced acute respiratory failure: A case report and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Amardeep; Soriano, Sheryll Mae; Song, Mingchen; Chihara, Shingo

    2014-07-01

    The emergence of multi-drug-resistant gram negative bacillary infections has regained popularity of ancient drugs such as polymyxins. We report a case of acute respiratory failure induced by use of intravenous colistimethate, which is one of the forms of polymyxin. The patient is a 31 year old female with paraplegia due to spina bifida who underwent excisional debridement of large lumbosacral decubitus ulcer with osteomyelitis infected with pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA. Six days after initiation of intravenous colistimethate and vancomycin, she developed acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Pan-culture was negative including a chest radiograph. V/Q scan showed low probability for pulmonary embolism. Echocardiogram showed normal right ventricle with no strain or pulmonary hypertension. Colistimethate was discontinued. Within 24 hours, she was extubated. In the early years after introduction of polymyxin, there were several reports of acute respiratory paralysis. The mechanism is thought to be noncompetitive myoneuronal presynaptic blockade of acetylcholine release. Though a direct causal relationship for respiratory failure is often difficult to establish in current era with multiple co morbidities, the timeframe of apnea, acuity of onset as well as rapid recovery in our case clearly point out the causal relationship. In addition, our patient also developed acute renal failure, presumably due to colistimethate induced nephrotoxicity, a possible contributing factor for her acute respiratory failure. In summary, colistimethate can induce acute neurotoxicity including respiratory muscular weakness and acute respiratory failure. Clinicians should consider its toxicity in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure especially in critically ill patients. PMID:25337492

  18. Metabolomics Investigation Reveals Metabolite Mediators Associated with Acute Lung Injury and Repair in a Murine Model of Influenza Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liang; Zheng, Dahai; Lee, Yie Hou; Chan, Tze Khee; Kumar, Yadunanda; Ho, Wanxing Eugene; Chen, Jian Zhu; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Ong, Choon Nam

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infection (IVI) can cause primary viral pneumonia, which may progress to acute lung injury (ALI) and respiratory failure with a potentially fatal outcome. At present, the interactions between host and influenza virus at molecular levels and the underlying mechanisms that give rise to IVI-induced ALI are poorly understood. We conducted a comprehensive mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling of serum, lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from a non-lethal mouse model with influenza A virus at 0, 6, 10, 14, 21 and 28 days post infection (dpi), representing the major stages of IVI. Distinct metabolite signatures were observed in mice sera, lung tissues and BALF, indicating the molecular differences between systematic and localized host responses to IVI. More than 100 differential metabolites were captured in mice sera, lung tissues and BALF, including purines, pyrimidines, acylcarnitines, fatty acids, amino acids, glucocorticoids, sphingolipids, phospholipids, etc. Many of these metabolites belonged to pulmonary surfactants, indicating IVI-induced aberrations of the pulmonary surfactant system might play an important role in the etiology of respiratory failure and repair. Our findings revealed dynamic host responses to IVI and various metabolic pathways linked to disease progression, and provided mechanistic insights into IVI-induced ALI and repair process. PMID:27188343

  19. Metabolomics Investigation Reveals Metabolite Mediators Associated with Acute Lung Injury and Repair in a Murine Model of Influenza Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liang; Zheng, Dahai; Lee, Yie Hou; Chan, Tze Khee; Kumar, Yadunanda; Ho, Wanxing Eugene; Chen, Jian Zhu; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Ong, Choon Nam

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infection (IVI) can cause primary viral pneumonia, which may progress to acute lung injury (ALI) and respiratory failure with a potentially fatal outcome. At present, the interactions between host and influenza virus at molecular levels and the underlying mechanisms that give rise to IVI-induced ALI are poorly understood. We conducted a comprehensive mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling of serum, lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from a non-lethal mouse model with influenza A virus at 0, 6, 10, 14, 21 and 28 days post infection (dpi), representing the major stages of IVI. Distinct metabolite signatures were observed in mice sera, lung tissues and BALF, indicating the molecular differences between systematic and localized host responses to IVI. More than 100 differential metabolites were captured in mice sera, lung tissues and BALF, including purines, pyrimidines, acylcarnitines, fatty acids, amino acids, glucocorticoids, sphingolipids, phospholipids, etc. Many of these metabolites belonged to pulmonary surfactants, indicating IVI-induced aberrations of the pulmonary surfactant system might play an important role in the etiology of respiratory failure and repair. Our findings revealed dynamic host responses to IVI and various metabolic pathways linked to disease progression, and provided mechanistic insights into IVI-induced ALI and repair process. PMID:27188343

  20. Acute Respiratory Failure Caused by Hepatopulmonary Fistula in a Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungsil; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jee-Min; Kim, Young-Chan

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with acute dyspnea following sudden productive cough and expectoration of a full cup of "blood-tinged" sputum. He had been diagnosed with hepatitis B virus–related hepatocellular carcinoma and had received transarterial chemoembolization 5 years ago for a 20-cm hepatic mass; he denied any history of hematemesis and the last esophagogastroduodenoscopy from a year ago showed absence of varix. Chest computed tomography (CT) with angiography showed new appearance of right basal lung consolidation but no bleeding focus. Despite the use of systemic antibiotics, the patient developed respiratory failure on day 7 of hospitalization. After intubation, a massive amount of brown sputum with anchovy-paste-like consistency was suctioned via the endotracheal tube. Bronchoscopic toileting was performed and the patient was extubated. In the ward, he continued to expectorate the brown sputum. On day 25 of hospitalization, a repeat CT scan showed simultaneous disappearance of the pneumonic consolidation and the necrotic fluid within the hepatic mass, suggesting the presence of a fistula. He has continued to receive systemic antibiotics, sorafenib, and entecavir, and follow up by respiratory and hepato-oncology specialists. PMID:27433178

  1. Acute Respiratory Failure Caused by Hepatopulmonary Fistula in a Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungsil; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jee-Min; Kim, Young-Chan; Choi, Sun Mi

    2016-07-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with acute dyspnea following sudden productive cough and expectoration of a full cup of "blood-tinged" sputum. He had been diagnosed with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma and had received transarterial chemoembolization 5 years ago for a 20-cm hepatic mass; he denied any history of hematemesis and the last esophagogastroduodenoscopy from a year ago showed absence of varix. Chest computed tomography (CT) with angiography showed new appearance of right basal lung consolidation but no bleeding focus. Despite the use of systemic antibiotics, the patient developed respiratory failure on day 7 of hospitalization. After intubation, a massive amount of brown sputum with anchovy-paste-like consistency was suctioned via the endotracheal tube. Bronchoscopic toileting was performed and the patient was extubated. In the ward, he continued to expectorate the brown sputum. On day 25 of hospitalization, a repeat CT scan showed simultaneous disappearance of the pneumonic consolidation and the necrotic fluid within the hepatic mass, suggesting the presence of a fistula. He has continued to receive systemic antibiotics, sorafenib, and entecavir, and follow up by respiratory and hepato-oncology specialists. PMID:27433178

  2. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate imaging in acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1986-10-01

    Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PYP) imaging was performed in five patients with acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis. Four patients had phencyclidine intoxication and one had viral pneumonia. During the acute phase, marked uptake of pyrophosphate was seen in all patients in several muscle groups, but always in the thigh adductors. The results show that phencyclidine intoxication can result in diffuse muscle uptake of Tc-PYP without overt evidence of muscle injury. Tc-PYP imaging may provide a clue to the cause of acute renal failure in patients with suspected rhabdomyolysis in whom elevations of serum creatine phosphokinase concentrations are equivocal.

  3. Acute-on-chronic and Decompensated Chronic Liver Failure: Definitions, Epidemiology, and Prognostication.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jody C

    2016-07-01

    Chronic liver disease is the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and represents a major burden for the health care community. Cirrhosis is a progressive disease resulting in end-stage liver failure, which in the absence of liver transplantation is fatal. Acute-on-chronic liver failure carries high short-term mortality but is potentially reversible. Viral hepatitis, alcohol, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease remain the principal causes of liver disease. Though treatments exist for hepatitis B and C, they remain unavailable to many with these diseases. This article reviews the epidemiology of advanced liver disease and the concept of acute-on-chronic liver failure. PMID:27339672

  4. Epstein-Barr virus associated graft failure following heart/lung transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Egan, J J; Stewart, J P; Hasleton, P S; Yonan, N; Bishop, P; Arrand, J R; Rahman, A N; Carroll, K B; Woodcock, A A

    1996-01-01

    A case is described of late pulmonary graft failure in a heart/lung transplant recipient. The major characteristics were alveolar fibrosis and a restrictive physiological deficit. Epstein-Barr virus was implicated as an aetiological agent using immunohistochemical analysis and by a response to treatment with ganciclovir. Images PMID:8958903

  5. Monoacylglycerol Lipase (MAGL) Inhibition Attenuates Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Costola-de-Souza, Carolina; Ribeiro, Alison; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Calefi, Atilio Sersun; Aloia, Thiago Pinheiro Arrais; Gimenes-Júnior, João Antonio; de Almeida, Vinicius Izidio; Pinheiro, Milena Lobão; Palermo-Neto, João

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoid signaling is terminated by enzymatic hydrolysis, a process that, for 2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), is mediated by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). The piperidine carbamate, 4-​nitrophenyl- ​4-​(dibenzo[d] [1,3]dioxol-​5-​yl (hydroxy) methyl) piperidine- 1-​carboxylate (JZL184), is a drug that inhibits MAGL and presents high potency and selectivity. Thus, JZL184 increases the levels of 2-AG, an endocannabinoid that acts on the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors. Here, we investigated the effects of MAGL inhibition, with a single dose (16 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) of JZL184, in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced acute lung injury (ALI) 6, 24 and 48 hours after the inflammatory insult. Treatment with JZL184 decreased the leukocyte migration into the lungs as well as the vascular permeability measured through the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and histological analysis. JZL184 also reduced the cytokine and chemokine levels in the BAL and adhesion molecule expression in the blood and BAL. The CB1 and CB2 receptors were considered involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of JZL184 because the AM281 selective CB1 receptor antagonist (1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-4-morpholinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide) and the AM630 selective CB2 receptor antagonist ([6-​iodo-​2-​methyl-​1-​[2-​(4-​morpholinyl)ethyl]-​1H-​indol-​3-​yl](4-​methoxyphenyl)-​methanone) blocked the anti-inflammatory effects previously described for JZL184. It was concluded that MAGL inhibition, and consequently the increase in 2-AG levels, produced anti-inflammatory effects in a murine model of LPS-induced ALI, a finding that was considered a consequence of the activation of the CB1 and CB2 receptors. PMID:24204926

  6. Early Identification of Patients at Risk of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gajic, Ognjen; Dabbagh, Ousama; Park, Pauline K.; Adesanya, Adebola; Chang, Steven Y.; Hou, Peter; Anderson, Harry; Hoth, J. Jason; Mikkelsen, Mark E.; Gentile, Nina T.; Gong, Michelle N.; Talmor, Daniel; Bajwa, Ednan; Watkins, Timothy R.; Festic, Emir; Yilmaz, Murat; Iscimen, Remzi; Kaufman, David A.; Esper, Annette M.; Sadikot, Ruxana; Douglas, Ivor; Sevransky, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Accurate, early identification of patients at risk for developing acute lung injury (ALI) provides the opportunity to test and implement secondary prevention strategies. Objectives: To determine the frequency and outcome of ALI development in patients at risk and validate a lung injury prediction score (LIPS). Methods: In this prospective multicenter observational cohort study, predisposing conditions and risk modifiers predictive of ALI development were identified from routine clinical data available during initial evaluation. The discrimination of the model was assessed with area under receiver operating curve (AUC). The risk of death from ALI was determined after adjustment for severity of illness and predisposing conditions. Measurements and Main Results: Twenty-two hospitals enrolled 5,584 patients at risk. ALI developed a median of 2 (interquartile range 1–4) days after initial evaluation in 377 (6.8%; 148 ALI-only, 229 adult respiratory distress syndrome) patients. The frequency of ALI varied according to predisposing conditions (from 3% in pancreatitis to 26% after smoke inhalation). LIPS discriminated patients who developed ALI from those who did not with an AUC of 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.78–0.82). When adjusted for severity of illness and predisposing conditions, development of ALI increased the risk of in-hospital death (odds ratio, 4.1; 95% confidence interval, 2.9–5.7). Conclusions: ALI occurrence varies according to predisposing conditions and carries an independently poor prognosis. Using routinely available clinical data, LIPS identifies patients at high risk for ALI early in the course of their illness. This model will alert clinicians about the risk of ALI and facilitate testing and implementation of ALI prevention strategies. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00889772). PMID:20802164

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Methods Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient’s condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Results Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. Discussion In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Conclusion Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission. PMID:24180319

  8. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Marianne; Millar, Jonathan; Blackwood, Bronagh; Davies, Andrew; Brett, Stephen J; McAuley, Daniel F; McNamee, James J

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO₂R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO₂R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO₂R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO₂R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO₂R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCOvR. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO₂R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment

  9. Lung Transcriptomics during Protective Ventilatory Support in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Herrera, Marialbert; Lorenzo-Diaz, Fabian; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Corrales, Almudena; Valladares, Francisco; Klassert, Tilman E.; Valladares, Basilio; Slevogt, Hortense; Ma, Shwu-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe inflammatory process of the lung. The only proven life-saving support is mechanical ventilation (MV) using low tidal volumes (LVT) plus moderate to high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, it is currently unknown how they exert the protective effects. To identify the molecular mechanisms modulated by protective MV, this study reports transcriptomic analyses based on microarray and microRNA sequencing in lung tissues from a clinically relevant animal model of sepsis-induced ALI. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. At 24 hours post-CLP, septic animals were randomized to three ventilatory strategies: spontaneous breathing, LVT (6 ml/kg) plus 10 cmH2O PEEP and high tidal volume (HVT, 20 ml/kg) plus 2 cmH2O PEEP. Healthy, non-septic, non-ventilated animals served as controls. After 4 hours of ventilation, lung samples were obtained for histological examination and gene expression analysis using microarray and microRNA sequencing. Validations were assessed using parallel analyses on existing publicly available genome-wide association study findings and transcriptomic human data. The catalogue of deregulated processes differed among experimental groups. The ‘response to microorganisms’ was the most prominent biological process in septic, non-ventilated and in HVT animals. Unexpectedly, the ‘neuron projection morphogenesis’ process was one of the most significantly deregulated in LVT. Further support for the key role of the latter process was obtained by microRNA studies, as four species targeting many of its genes (Mir-27a, Mir-103, Mir-17-5p and Mir-130a) were found deregulated. Additional analyses revealed 'VEGF signaling' as a central underlying response mechanism to all the septic groups (spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated). Based on this data, we conclude that a co-deregulation of 'VEGF signaling' along with 'neuron projection

  10. Clinical review: Stem cell therapies for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome - hope or hype?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A growing understanding of the complexity of the pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), coupled with advances in stem cell biology, has led to a renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of stem cells for this devastating disease. Mesenchymal stem cells appear closest to clinical translation, given the evidence that they may favourably modulate the immune response to reduce lung injury, while maintaining host immune-competence and also facilitating lung regeneration and repair. The demonstration that human mesenchymal stem cells exert benefit in the endotoxin-injured human lung is particularly persuasive. Endothelial progenitor cells also demonstrate promise in reducing endothelial damage, which is a key pathophysiological feature of ALI. Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are at an earlier stage in the translational process, but offer the hope of directly replacing injured lung tissue. The lung itself also contains endogenous stem cells, which may ultimately offer the greatest hope for lung diseases, given their physiologic role in replacing and regenerating native lung tissues. However, significant deficits remain in our knowledge regarding the mechanisms of action of stem cells, their efficacy in relevant pre-clinical models, and their safety, particularly in critically ill patients. These gaps need to be addressed before the enormous therapeutic potential of stem cells for ALI/ARDS can be realised. PMID:22424108

  11. Acute-on-chronic liver failure: a new syndrome in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis who are hospitalized for an acute decompensation (AD) and also have organ failure(s) are at high risk of short-term death. These patients have a syndrome called Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure (ACLF). ACLF is now considered as a new syndrome that it is distinct from “mere” AD not only because of the presence of organ failure(s) and high short-term mortality but also because of younger age, higher prevalence of alcoholic etiology of cirrhosis, higher prevalence of some precipitants (such as bacterial infections, active alcoholism), and more intense systemic inflammatory response. ACLF is a new syndrome also because severe sepsis or severe alcoholic hepatitis do not account for 100% of the observed cases; in fact, almost 50% of the cases are of “unknown” origin. In other words, severe sepsis, severe alcoholic hepatitis and ACLF of “unknown origin” are subcategories of the syndrome. PMID:27044760

  12. Acute-on-chronic liver failure: a new syndrome in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Patients with cirrhosis who are hospitalized for an acute decompensation (AD) and also have organ failure(s) are at high risk of short-term death. These patients have a syndrome called Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure (ACLF). ACLF is now considered as a new syndrome that it is distinct from "mere" AD not only because of the presence of organ failure(s) and high short-term mortality but also because of younger age, higher prevalence of alcoholic etiology of cirrhosis, higher prevalence of some precipitants (such as bacterial infections, active alcoholism), and more intense systemic inflammatory response. ACLF is a new syndrome also because severe sepsis or severe alcoholic hepatitis do not account for 100% of the observed cases; in fact, almost 50% of the cases are of "unknown" origin. In other words, severe sepsis, severe alcoholic hepatitis and ACLF of "unknown origin" are subcategories of the syndrome. PMID:27044760

  13. Successful treatment of experimental neonatal respiratory failure using extracorporeal membrane lung assist.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, R; Kolobow, T; Arosio, P; Chen, V; Buckhold, D K; Pierce, J E

    1986-11-01

    A total of 44 preterm fetal lambs at great risk of developing respiratory failure were delivered by Cesarean section, and were then managed on conventional mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Fifteen animals initially fared well, and 14 of these were long term survivors. Twenty-nine other lambs showed a progressive deterioration in arterial blood gases within 30 minutes of delivery, of which 10 lambs were continued on mechanical pulmonary ventilation (20% survival), while the remaining 19 lambs were placed on an extracorporeal membrane lung respiratory assist (79% survival). Extracorporeal membrane lung bypass rapidly corrected arterial blood gas values, and permitted the use of high levels of CPAP instead of the continuation of mechanical pulmonary ventilation at high peak airway pressures. Improvement in lung function was gradual, and predictable. Early institution of extracorporeal respiratory assist using a membrane artificial lung rapidly corrected arterial blood gas values and significantly improved on neonate survival. PMID:3643887

  14. Science review: Searching for gene candidates in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Finigan, James H; Hassoun, Paul; Garcia, Joe GN

    2004-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a complex and devastating illness, often occurring within the setting of sepsis, and carries an annual mortality rate of 30–50%. Although the genetic basis of ALI has not been fully established, an increasing body of evidence suggests that genetic predisposition contributes to disease susceptibility and severity. Significant difficulty exists, however, in defining the exact nature of these genetic factors, including large phenotypic variance, incomplete penetrance, complex gene–environment interactions, and strong potential for locus heterogeneity. We utilized the candidate gene approach and an ortholog gene database to provide relevant gene ontologies and insights into the genetic basis of ALI. We employed a Medline search of selected basic and clinical studies in the English literature and studies sponsored by the HopGene National Institutes of Health sponsored Program in Genomic Applications. Extensive gene expression profiling studies in animal models of ALI (rat, murine, canine), as well as in humans, were performed to identify potential candidate genes . We identified a number of candidate genes for ALI, with blood coagulation and inflammation gene ontologies being the most highly represented. The candidate gene approach coupled with extensive gene profiling and novel bioinformatics approaches is a valuable way to identify genes that are involved in ALI. PMID:15566614

  15. Regulation of alveolar procoagulant activity and permeability in direct acute lung injury by lung epithelial tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Ciara M; Grove, Brandon S; Putz, Nathan D; Clune, Jennifer K; Lawson, William E; Carnahan, Robert H; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2015-11-01

    Tissue factor (TF) initiates the extrinsic coagulation cascade in response to tissue injury, leading to local fibrin deposition. Low levels of TF in mice are associated with increased severity of acute lung injury (ALI) after intratracheal LPS administration. However, the cellular sources of the TF required for protection from LPS-induced ALI remain unknown. In the current study, transgenic mice with cell-specific deletions of TF in the lung epithelium or myeloid cells were treated with intratracheal LPS to determine the cellular sources of TF important in direct ALI. Cell-specific deletion of TF in the lung epithelium reduced total lung TF expression to 39% of wild-type (WT) levels at baseline and to 29% of WT levels after intratracheal LPS. In contrast, there was no reduction of TF with myeloid cell TF deletion. Mice lacking myeloid cell TF did not differ from WT mice in coagulation, inflammation, permeability, or hemorrhage. However, mice lacking lung epithelial TF had increased tissue injury, impaired activation of coagulation in the airspace, disrupted alveolar permeability, and increased alveolar hemorrhage after intratracheal LPS. Deletion of epithelial TF did not affect alveolar permeability in an indirect model of ALI caused by systemic LPS infusion. These studies demonstrate that the lung epithelium is the primary source of TF in the lung, contributing 60-70% of total lung TF, and that lung epithelial, but not myeloid, TF may be protective in direct ALI. PMID:25884207

  16. Redistribution of pulmonary blood flow impacts thermodilution-based extravascular lung water measurements in a model of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Easley, R. Blaine; Mulreany, Daniel G.; Lancaster, Christopher T.; Custer, Jason W.; Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Simon, Brett A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies using transthoracic thermodilution have demonstrated increased extravascular lung water (EVLW) measurements attributed to progression of edema and flooding during sepsis and acute lung injury. We hypothesize that redistribution of pulmonary blood flow can cause increased apparent EVLW secondary to increased perfusion of thermally silent tissue, not increased lung edema. Methods Anesthetized, mechanically ventilated canines were instrumented with PiCCO® (Pulsion Medical, Munich, Germany) catheters and underwent lung injury by repetitive saline lavage. Hemodynamic and respiratory physiologic data were recorded. After stabilized lung injury, endotoxin was administered to inactivate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Computerized tomographic imaging was performed to quantify in vivo lung volume, total tissue (fluid) and air content, and regional distribution of blood flow. Results Lavage injury caused an increase in airway pressures and decreased arterial oxygen content with minimal hemodynamic effects. EVLW and shunt fraction increased after injury and then markedly following endotoxin administration. Computerized tomographic measurements quantified an endotoxin-induced increase in pulmonary blood flow to poorly aerated regions with no change in total lung tissue volume. Conclusions The abrupt increase in EVLW and shunt fraction after endotoxin administration is consistent with inactivation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and increased perfusion to already flooded lung regions that were previously thermally silent. Computerized tomographic studies further demonstrate in vivo alterations in regional blood flow (but not lung water) and account for these alterations in shunt fraction and EVLW. PMID:19809280

  17. Role of the acute care nurse in managing patients with heart failure using evidence-based care.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sara; Hice, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Acute heart failure is a major US public health problem, accounting for more than 1 million hospitalizations each year. As part of the health care team, nurses play an important role in the evaluation and management of patients presenting to the emergency department with acute decompensated heart failure. Once acute decompensation is controlled, nurses also play a critical role in preparing patients for hospital discharge and educating patients and caregivers about strategies to improve long-term outcomes and prevent future decompensation and rehospitalization. Nurses' assessment skills and comprehensive knowledge of acute and chronic heart failure are important to optimize patient care and improve outcomes from initial emergency department presentation through discharge and follow-up. This review presents an overview of current heart failure guidelines, with the goal of providing acute care cardiac nurses with information that will allow them to better use their knowledge of heart failure to facilitate diagnosis, management, and education of patients with acute heart failure. PMID:25185764

  18. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells from EGFP Transgenic Mice Attenuate Hyperoxia-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Cheng-Wei; Yen, Chih-Ching; Lee, Kun-Hsiung; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of oxygen aggravate the severity of lung injury in patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Although mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to effectively attenuate various injured tissues, there is limited information regarding a role for amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs) in treating acute lung injury. We hypothesized that intravenous delivery of AFSCs would attenuate lung injury in an experimental model of hyperoxia-induced lung injury. AFSCs were isolated from EGFP transgenic mice. The in vitro differentiation, surface markers, and migration of the AFSCs were assessed by specific staining, flow cytometry, and a co-culture system, respectively. The in vivo therapeutic potential of AFSCs was evaluated in a model of acute hyperoxia-induced lung injury in mice. The administration of AFSCs significantly reduced the hyperoxia-induced pulmonary inflammation, as reflected by significant reductions in lung wet/dry ratio, neutrophil counts, and the level of apoptosis, as well as reducing the levels of inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and early-stage fibrosis in lung tissues. Moreover, EGFP-expressing AFSCs were detected and engrafted into a peripheral lung epithelial cell lineage by fluorescence microscopy and DAPI stain. Intravenous administration of AFSCs may offer a new therapeutic strategy for acute lung injury (ALI), for which efficient treatments are currently unavailable. PMID:24040409

  19. What has been learnt from P/V curves in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maggiore, S M; Richard, J C; Brochard, L

    2003-08-01

    Mechanical impairment of the respiratory system was recognised soon after the description of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The analysis of the pressure/volume (P/V) curve of the respiratory system contributed a lot to the understanding of the pathophysiology of acute lung injury and formed the basis for lung protection. The lower and upper inflection points were regarded as points of interest to avoid cyclic derecruitment and overdistension and to optimise ventilatory settings. However, because of the heterogeneity of lung injury, reducing the mechanical properties of the whole respiratory system to a single curve is a schematic approach, which makes interpretation difficult. New data suggest that alveolar re-inflation occurs along the whole P/V curve that can, therefore, be considered as a recruitment curve. The lower inflection point has no relationship with alveolar opening and closure and does not indicate the positive end-expiratory pressure needed to prevent alveolar collapse. The shape of the P/V curve gives information about the extension and the homogeneity of lung injury, indicating the possibility of lung recruitment. The upper inflection point, classically seen as the beginning of overdistension, may also indicate the end of recruitment. The pressure/volume curve offers the unique opportunity of evaluating alveolar recruitment/derecruitment at the bedside that can be helpful for the identification of optimal ventilatory settings and makes the curve a valuable tool for the ventilatory management of acute lung injury. PMID:12945997

  20. Relaxin for the Treatment of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: Pharmacology, Mechanisms of Action, and Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tien M H; Goland, Sorel; Elkayam, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure remains a major cause of morbidity, and its treatment requires an increasing investment of the health care system. Whereas success in treating chronic heart failure has been achieved over the last decades, several pharmacological approaches for acute heart failure have been introduced but have failed to demonstrate any clinical benefit. Serelaxin is a recombinant human relaxin-2 vasoactive peptide that causes systemic and renal vasodilation. Data suggest that the clinical benefits may be attributable to a potential combination of multiple actions of serelaxin, including improving systemic, cardiac, and renal hemodynamics, and protecting cells and organs from damage via neurohormonal, anti-inflammatory, antiremodeling, antifibrotic, anti-ischemic, and proangiogenic effects. Recently, a number of clinical trials have demonstrated that serelaxin infusion over 48 hours improved dyspnea with more rapid relief of congestion during the first days after admission for heart failure. In addition, administration of serelaxin diminished cardiac, renal, and hepatic damage, which were associated with improved long-term mortality. Available data support substantial clinical benefits and significant promise for serelaxin as a treatment option for patients with acute heart failure. This review focuses on the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of serelaxin and provides a detailed discussion of the clinical evidence for this novel therapy in acute heart failure. PMID:26331289

  1. Local Failure in Resected N1 Lung Cancer: Implications for Adjuvant Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Kristin A.; Chino, Junzo P.; Berry, Mark; Ready, Neal; Boyd, Jessamy; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate actuarial rates of local failure in patients with pathologic N1 non-small-cell lung cancer and to identify clinical and pathologic factors associated with an increased risk of local failure after resection. Methods and Materials: All patients who underwent surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer with pathologically confirmed N1 disease at Duke University Medical Center from 1995-2008 were identified. Patients receiving any preoperative therapy or postoperative radiotherapy or with positive surgical margins were excluded. Local failure was defined as disease recurrence within the ipsilateral hilum, mediastinum, or bronchial stump/staple line. Actuarial rates of local failure were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox multivariate analysis was used to identify factors independently associated with a higher risk of local recurrence. Results: Among 1,559 patients who underwent surgery during the time interval, 198 met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 50 (25%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Actuarial (5-year) rates of local failure, distant failure, and overall survival were 40%, 55%, and 33%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with an increased risk of local failure included a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach (hazard ratio [HR], 2.5; p = 0.01), visceral pleural invasion (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04), and increasing number of positive N1 lymph nodes (HR, 1.3 per involved lymph node; p = 0.02). Chemotherapy was associated with a trend toward decreased risk of local failure that was not statistically significant (HR, 0.61; p = 0.2). Conclusions: Actuarial rates of local failure in pN1 disease are high. Further investigation of conformal postoperative radiotherapy may be warranted.

  2. Acute intermittent porphyria associated with respiratory failure: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Menegueti, Mayra Gonçalves; Gil Cezar, Alkmim-Teixeira; Casarini, Karin Aparecida; Muniz Cordeiro, Kátia Simone; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Despite being challenging, delivery of effective nursing care to patients with acute intermittent porphyria is a matter of utmost importance. In this paper, the diversity of symptoms and the difficult diagnosis of this condition are emphasized, and details concerning the treatment of this disorder in the intensive care unit are presented. We believe that acute intermittent porphyria should be borne in mind during performance of differential diagnosis of neurological, psychiatric, and gastroenterological disorders on patients whose routine investigation tests are normal, especially when precipitating factors exist. Intensive care measures and a multidisciplinary team approach are essential. PMID:21687623

  3. Acute Intermittent Porphyria Associated with Respiratory Failure: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Menegueti, Mayra Gonçalves; Gil Cezar, Alkmim-Teixeira; Casarini, Karin Aparecida; Muniz Cordeiro, Kátia Simone; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Despite being challenging, delivery of effective nursing care to patients with acute intermittent porphyria is a matter of utmost importance. In this paper, the diversity of symptoms and the difficult diagnosis of this condition are emphasized, and details concerning the treatment of this disorder in the intensive care unit are presented. We believe that acute intermittent porphyria should be borne in mind during performance of differential diagnosis of neurological, psychiatric, and gastroenterological disorders on patients whose routine investigation tests are normal, especially when precipitating factors exist. Intensive care measures and a multidisciplinary team approach are essential. PMID:21687623

  4. Trapped lung secondary to cardiomegaly in a 78 year-old male with congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Amabile, Amy H.; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D.; DePhilip, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Although the etiologies of both trapped lung and cardiomegaly are well-established, co-presentation of the two conditions, and possible interactions between them, are much rarer. Here we describe the case of 78 year-old male found to have both cardiomegaly and trapped lung, with a cause of death of congestive heart failure and subsequent cardiac arrest. This case prompted consideration of possible interactions between the two conditions. Issues related to decision-making for imaging and clinical interventions are also discussed. PMID:27054087

  5. Trapped lung secondary to cardiomegaly in a 78 year-old male with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Amabile, Amy H; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D; DePhilip, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Although the etiologies of both trapped lung and cardiomegaly are well-established, co-presentation of the two conditions, and possible interactions between them, are much rarer. Here we describe the case of 78 year-old male found to have both cardiomegaly and trapped lung, with a cause of death of congestive heart failure and subsequent cardiac arrest. This case prompted consideration of possible interactions between the two conditions. Issues related to decision-making for imaging and clinical interventions are also discussed. PMID:27054087

  6. Gloriosa superba ingestion: Hair loss and acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Khanam, P. S.; Sangeetha, B.; Kumar, B. V.; Kiran, U.; Priyadarshini, P. I.; Ram, R.; Sridhar, M. S.; Kumar, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Gloriosa superba is a plant that grows wild in several parts of South India. Tubers of this plant contain several alkaloids. Acute intoxication following the ingestion of G. superba results in gastrointestinal and haematological abnormalities, hepatic and renal insufficiency, cardiotoxicity and hair loss. We present a case with typical features of G superba toxicity. PMID:26060369

  7. Selective plasma exchange with dialysis in patients with acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Hajime; Igarashi, Toshiko; Tajimi, Kimitaka

    2012-10-01

    Selective plasma exchange with dialysis is a blood purification therapy in which simple plasma exchange is performed using a selective membrane plasma separator while the dialysate flows out of the hollow fibers. To evaluate the effect of plasma exchange with dialysis, biochemical examination of the blood, for example, the oxidative stress regulation system and interleukin 18 levels, was performed in patients with acute liver failure. We studied four patients with acute liver failure in whom the therapy was performed (nine times in total). The degree of hepatic encephalopathy and interleukin 18 levels decreased significantly after treatment. However, total protein levels did not change significantly. The level of reactive oxygen species and total antioxidant capacity did not change significantly. Plasma exchange with dialysis may be a useful blood purification therapy in cases of acute liver failure in terms of the removal of water-soluble and albumin-bound toxins. PMID:23046372

  8. [Key messages for the initial management of the elderly patient with acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Martín-Sánchez, F Javier; Rodríguez-Adrada, Esther; Llorens, Pere; Formiga, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Acute heart failure is a high prevalence geriatric syndrome that has become one of the most frequent causes of visits to emergency departments, as well as hospital admission, and is associated with high morbidity, mortality and functional impairment. There has been an increasing amount of information published in recent years on the initial management of acute heart failure and the results of the short-term outcomes, as well as the natural history of the disease. The objective of this study is to provide several recommendations that should be taken into account in the initial management of the elderly patient with acute heart failure in the emergency departments, and to review the most interesting currently on-going clinical trials. PMID:25959134

  9. Treatment of acute lung injury by targeting MG53-mediated cell membrane repair.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanlin; Chen, Ken; Lin, Peihui; Lieber, Gissela; Nishi, Miyuki; Yan, Rosalie; Wang, Zhen; Yao, Yonggang; Li, Yu; Whitson, Bryan A; Duann, Pu; Li, Haichang; Zhou, Xinyu; Zhu, Hua; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Hunter, John C; McLeod, Robbie L; Weisleder, Noah; Zeng, Chunyu; Ma, Jianjie

    2014-01-01

    Injury to lung epithelial cells has a role in multiple lung diseases. We previously identified mitsugumin 53 (MG53) as a component of the cell membrane repair machinery in striated muscle cells. Here we show that MG53 also has a physiological role in the lung and may be used as a treatment in animal models of acute lung injury. Mice lacking MG53 show increased susceptibility to ischaemia-reperfusion and overventilation-induced injury to the lung when compared with wild-type mice. Extracellular application of recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein protects cultured lung epithelial cells against anoxia/reoxygenation-induced injuries. Intravenous delivery or inhalation of rhMG53 reduces symptoms in rodent models of acute lung injury and emphysema. Repetitive administration of rhMG53 improves pulmonary structure associated with chronic lung injury in mice. Our data indicate a physiological function for MG53 in the lung and suggest that targeting membrane repair may be an effective means for treatment or prevention of lung diseases. PMID:25034454

  10. MicroRNA Regulation of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Pattarayan, Dhamotharan; Rajaguru, P; Sudhakar Gandhi, P S; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K

    2016-10-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI), is a very common condition associated with critically ill patients, which causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite decades of research, effective therapeutic strategies for clinical ALI/ARDS are not available. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding molecules have emerged as a major area of biomedical research as they post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression in diverse biological and pathological processes, including ALI/ARDS. In this context, this present review summarizes a large body of evidence implicating miRNAs and their target molecules in ALI/ARDS originating largely from studies using animal and cell culture model systems of ALI/ARDS. We have also focused on the involvement of miRNAs in macrophage polarization, which play a critical role in regulating the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Finally, the possible future directions that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALI/ARDS are also reviewed. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2097-2106, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26790856

  11. BPC 157 therapy to detriment sphincters failure-esophagitis-pancreatitis in rat and acute pancreatitis patients low sphincters pressure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, I; Dobric, I; Drmic, D; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Zlatar, M; Kunjko, K; Jurcic, D; Martinac, M; Rasic, Z; Boban Blagaic, A; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2011-10-01

    Possibly, acute esophagitis and pancreatitis cause each other, and we focused on sphincteric failure as the common causative key able to induce either esophagitis and acute pancreatitis or both of them, and thereby investigate the presence of a common therapy nominator. This may be an anti-ulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (tested for inflammatory bowel disease, wound treatment) affecting esophagitis, lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters failure and acute pancreatitis (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally or in drinking water). The esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure (i.e., insertion of the tubes into the sphincters, lower esophageal and pyloric) and acute pancreatitis procedure (i.e., bile duct ligation) were combined in rats. Esophageal manometry was done in acute pancreatitis patients. In rats acute pancreatitis procedure produced also esophagitis and both sphincter failure, decreased pressure 24 h post-surgery. Furthermore, bile duct ligation alone immediately declines the pressure in both sphincters. Vice versa, the esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure alone produced acute pancreatitis. What's more, these lesions (esophagitis, sphincter failure, acute pancreatitis when combined) aggravate each other (tubes into sphincters and ligated bile duct). Counteraction occurred by BPC 157 therapies. In acute pancreatitis patients lower pressure at rest was in both esophageal sphincters in acute pancreatitis patients. We conclude that BPC 157 could cure esophagitis/sphincter/acute pancreatitis healing failure. PMID:22204800

  12. Effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in rat lungs* **

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Lopes; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Laste, Gabriela; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress, as quantified by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), in rat lungs. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: acute treatment, comprising rats receiving a single injection of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg i.p.); acute control, comprising rats i.p. injected with saline; chronic treatment, comprising rats receiving methylprednisolone in drinking water (6 mg/kg per day for 30 days); and chronic control, comprising rats receiving normal drinking water. Results: The levels of TRAP were significantly higher in the acute treatment group rats than in the acute control rats, suggesting an improvement in the pulmonary defenses of the former. The levels of lung LPO were significantly higher in the chronic treatment group rats than in the chronic control rats, indicating oxidative damage in the lung tissue of the former. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the acute use of corticosteroids is beneficial to lung tissue, whereas their chronic use is not. The chronic use of methylprednisolone appears to increase lung LPO levels. PMID:25029646

  13. Alcohol Worsens Acute Lung Injury by Inhibiting Alveolar Sodium Transport through the Adenosine A1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Urich, Daniela; Soberanes, Saul; Manghi, Tomas S.; Chiarella, Sergio E.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Budinger, G. R. Scott; Mutlu, Gökhan M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Alcohol intake increases the risk of acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is associated with poor outcomes in patients who develop these syndromes. No specific therapies are currently available to treat or decrease the risk of ARDS in patients with alcoholism. We have recently shown increased levels of lung adenosine inhibit alveolar fluid clearance, an important predictor of outcome in patients with ARDS. We hypothesized that alcohol might worsen lung injury by increasing lung adenosine levels, resulting in impaired active Na+ transport in the lung. Methods We treated wild-type mice with alcohol administered i.p. to achieve blood alcohol levels associated with moderate to severe intoxication and measured the rate of alveolar fluid clearance and Na,K-ATPase expression in peripheral lung tissue and assessed the effect of alcohol on survival during exposure to hyperoxia. We used primary rat alveolar type II cells to investigate the mechanisms by which alcohol regulates alveolar Na+ transport. Results Exposure to alcohol reduced alveolar fluid clearance, downregulated Na,K-ATPase in the lung tissue and worsened hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Alcohol caused an increase in BAL fluid adenosine levels. A similar increase in lung adenosine levels was observed after exposure to hyperoxia. In primary rat alveolar type II cells alcohol and adenosine decreased the abundance of the Na,K-ATPase at the basolateral membrane via a mechanism that required activation of the AMPK. Conclusions Alcohol decreases alveolar fluid clearance and impairs survival from acute lung injury. Alcohol induced increases in lung adenosine levels may be responsible for reduction in alveolar fluid clearance and associated worsening of lung injury. PMID:22272351

  14. Does lung diffusion impairment affect exercise capacity in patients with heart failure?

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, P G; Bussotti, M; Palermo, P; Guazzi, M

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is a relation between impairment of lung diffusion and reduced exercise capacity in chronic heart failure. Design: 40 patients with heart failure in stable clinical condition and 40 controls participated in the study. All subjects underwent standard pulmonary function tests plus measurements of resting lung diffusion (carbon monoxide transfer, Tlco), pulmonary capillary volume (Vc), and membrane resistance (Dm), and maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. In 20 patients and controls, the following investigations were also done: (1) resting and constant work rate Tlco; (2) maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing with inspiratory O2 fractions of 0.21 and 0.16; and (3) rest and peak exercise blood gases. The other subjects underwent Tlco, Dm, and Vc measurements during constant work rate exercise. Results: In normoxia, exercise induced reductions of haemoglobin O2 saturation never occurred. With hypoxia, peak exercise uptake (peak V̇o2) decreased from (mean (SD)) 1285 (395) to 1081 (396) ml/min (p < 0.01) in patients, and from 1861 (563) to 1771 (457) ml/min (p < 0.05) in controls. Resting Tlco correlated with peak V̇o2 in heart failure (normoxia < hypoxia). In heart failure patients and normal subjects, Tlco and peak V̇o2 correlated with O2 arterial content at rest and during peak exercise in both normoxia and hypoxia. Tlco, Vc, and Dm increased during exercise. The increase in Tlco was greater in patients who had a smaller reduction of exercise capacity with hypoxia. Alveolar–arterial O2 gradient at peak correlated with exercise capacity in heart failure during normoxia and, to a greater extent, during hypoxia. Conclusions: Lung diffusion impairment is related to exercise capacity in heart failure. PMID:12381630

  15. Minimal Effects of Acute Liver Injury/Acute Liver Failure on Hemostasis as Assessed by Thromboelastography

    PubMed Central

    Stravitz, R. Todd; Lisman, Ton; Luketic, Velimir A.; Sterling, Richard K.; Puri, Puneet; Fuchs, Michael; Ibrahim, Ashraf; Lee, William M.; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with acute liver injury/failure (ALI/ALF) are assumed to have a bleeding diathesis on the basis of elevated INR; however, clinically significant bleeding is rare. We hypothesized that patients with ALI/ALF have normal hemostasis despite elevated INR Methods Fifty-one patients with ALI/ALF were studied prospectively using thromboelastography (TEG), which measures the dynamics and physical properties of clot formation in whole blood. ALI was defined as an INR ≥1.5 in a patient with no previous liver disease, and ALF as ALI with hepatic encephalopathy. Results Thirty-seven of 51 patients (73%) had ALF and 22 patients (43%) underwent liver transplantation or died. Despite a mean INR of 3.4±1.7 (range 1.5–9.6), mean TEG parameters were normal, and 5 individual TEG parameters were normal in 32 (63%). Low maximum amplitude, the measure of ultimate clot strength, was confined to patients with platelet counts <126 × 109/L. Maximum amplitude was higher in patients with ALF than ALI and correlated directly with venous ammonia concentrations and with increasing severity of liver injury assessed by elements of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. All patients had markedly decreased procoagulant factor V and VII levels, which were proportional to decreases in anticoagulant proteins and inversely proportional to elevated factor VIII levels. Conclusions Despite elevated INR, most patients with ALI/ALF maintain normal hemostasis by TEG, the mechanisms of which include an increase in clot strength with increasing severity of liver injury, increased factor VIII levels, and a commensurate decline in pro- and anticoagulant proteins. PMID:21703173

  16. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  17. Sex, Race, and the Development of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lemos-Filho, Luciano B.; Mikkelsen, Mark E.; Martin, Greg S.; Dabbagh, Ousama; Adesanya, Adebola; Gentile, Nina; Esper, Annette; Gajic, Ognjen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prior studies suggest that mortality differs by sex and race in patients who develop acute lung injury (ALI). Whether differences in presentation account for these disparities remains unclear. We sought to determine whether sexual and racial differences exist in the rate of ALI development and ALI-related mortality after accounting for differences in clinical presentations. Methods: This was a multicenter, observational cohort study of 5,201 patients at risk for ALI. Multivariable logistic regression with adjustment for center-level effects was used to adjust for potential covariates. Results: The incidence of ALI development was 5.9%; in-hospital mortality was 5.0% for the entire cohort, and 24.4% for those patients who developed ALI. Men were more likely to develop ALI compared to women (6.9% vs 4.7%, P < .001) and had a nonsignificant increase in mortality when ALI developed (27.6% vs 18.5%, P = .08). However, after adjustment for baseline imbalances between sexes these differences were no longer significant. Black patients, compared to white patients, presented more frequently with pneumonia, sepsis, or shock and had higher severity of illness. Black patients were less likely to develop ALI than whites (4.5% vs. 6.5%, P = .014), and this association remained statistically significant after adjusting for differences in presentation (OR, 0.66; 95 % CI, 0.45-0.96). Conclusions: Sex and race differences exist in the clinical presentation of patients at risk of developing ALI. After accounting for differences in presentation, there was no sex difference in ALI development and outcome. Black patients were less likely to develop ALI despite increased severity of illness on presentation. PMID:23117155

  18. Pulmonary hydatid cyst in a pregnant patient causing acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Mohammed H; Al-Ansari, Mariam A

    2007-04-01

    A 21-year-old primigravida, at 32 weeks of gestation, presented with acute onset of respiratory failure and circulatory shock. Chest imaging showed findings suggestive of ruptured hydatid cyst, which was confirmed by histology post-thoracotomy. Tissue cultures from the removed cyst grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis also. She was successfully managed in the intensive care unit and was then discharged home on antituberculosis medications in addition to albendazole after prolonged hospitalization and a need for chest tube for bronchopleural fistula. Acute respiratory failure and anaphylactic shock secondary to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst and superimposed pulmonary tuberculosis in a pregnant lady should be considered in patients living in endemic areas. PMID:19727350

  19. Pulmonary hydatid cyst in a pregnant patient causing acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Mohammed H.; Al-Ansari, Mariam A.

    2007-01-01

    A 21-year-old primigravida, at 32 weeks of gestation, presented with acute onset of respiratory failure and circulatory shock. Chest imaging showed findings suggestive of ruptured hydatid cyst, which was confirmed by histology post-thoracotomy. Tissue cultures from the removed cyst grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis also. She was successfully managed in the intensive care unit and was then discharged home on antituberculosis medications in addition to albendazole after prolonged hospitalization and a need for chest tube for bronchopleural fistula. Acute respiratory failure and anaphylactic shock secondary to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst and superimposed pulmonary tuberculosis in a pregnant lady should be considered in patients living in endemic areas. PMID:19727350

  20. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries: role in lung and heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Mathieu-Costello, O.

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary capillaries have extremely thin walls to allow rapid exchange of respiratory gases across them. Recently it has been shown that the wall stresses become very large when the capillary pressure is raised, and in anaesthetised rabbits, ultrastructural damage to the walls is seen at pressures of 40 mm Hg and above. The changes include breaks in the capillary endothelial layer, alveolar epithelial layer, and sometimes all layers of the wall. The strength of the thin part of the capillary wall can be attributed to the type IV collagen in the extracellular matrix. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries results in a high-permeability form of oedema, or even frank haemorrhage, and is apparently the mechanism of neurogenic pulmonary oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. It also explains the exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage that occurs in all racehorses. Several features of mitral stenosis are consistent with stress failure. Overinflation of the lung also leads to stress failure, a common cause of increased capillary permeability in the intensive care environment. Stress failure also occurs if the type IV collagen of the capillary wall is weakened by autoantibodies as in Goodpasture's syndrome. Neutrophil elastase degrades type IV collagen and this may be the starting point of the breakdown of alveolar walls that is characteristic of emphysema. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries is a hitherto overlooked and potentially important factor in lung and heart disease.

  1. Failure to visualize acutely injured kidneys with technetium-99m DMSA does not preclude recoverable function

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A. Jr.; Akiya, F.; Gregory, M.C.

    1986-03-01

    A 35-yr-old patient developed severe acute tubular necrosis requiring hemodialysis. A (99mTc)dimercaptosuccinic acid scan of the kidneys showed no renal uptake at 4 or 24 hr, but the patient subsequently recovered normal renal function as judged by a normal serum creatinine. Based on this case report and a review of the literature, one cannot assume irreversible loss of function in patients with acute renal failure, based on the absence of radiopharmaceutical uptake by the kidneys.

  2. [Lung ultrasound in acute and critical care medicine].

    PubMed

    Zechner, P M; Seibel, A; Aichinger, G; Steigerwald, M; Dorr, K; Scheiermann, P; Schellhaas, S; Cuca, C; Breitkreutz, R

    2012-07-01

    The development of modern critical care lung ultrasound is based on the classical representation of anatomical structures and the need for the assessment of specific sonography artefacts and phenomena. The air and fluid content of the lungs is interpreted using few typical artefacts and phenomena, with which the most important differential diagnoses can be made. According to a recent international consensus conference these include lung sliding, lung pulse, B-lines, lung point, reverberation artefacts, subpleural consolidations and intrapleural fluid collections. An increased number of B-lines is an unspecific sign for an increased quantity of fluid in the lungs resembling interstitial syndromes, for example in the case of cardiogenic pulmonary edema or lung contusion. In the diagnosis of interstitial syndromes lung ultrasound provides higher diagnostic accuracy (95%) than auscultation (55%) and chest radiography (72%). Diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary embolism can be achieved at the bedside by evaluating subpleural lung consolidations. Detection of lung sliding can help to detect asymmetrical ventilation and allows the exclusion of a pneumothorax. Ultrasound-based diagnosis of pneumothorax is superior to supine anterior chest radiography: for ultrasound the sensitivity is 92-100% and the specificity 91-100%. For the diagnosis of pneumothorax a simple algorithm was therefore designed: in the presence of lung sliding, lung pulse or B-lines, pneumothorax can be ruled out, in contrast a positive lung point is a highly specific sign of the presence of pneumothorax. Furthermore, lung ultrasound allows not only diagnosis of pleural effusion with significantly higher sensitivity than chest x-ray but also visual control in ultrasound-guided thoracocentesis. PMID:22772347

  3. [Organ-protection therapy. A new therapeutic approach for acute heart failure?].

    PubMed

    Chivite, David; Formiga, Francesc; Corbella, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Unlike the prolonged benefit produced by the treatment of chronic heart failure, newer drugs tested for the treatment of acute heart failure in the last decade have failed to provide evidence of clinical benefit beyond some improvement in symptom relief. In particular, no drug has shown the ability to reduce the higher medium- and long-term risk of morbidity and mortality in these patients after an episode of decompensation. Current understanding of the pathophysiology of acute heart failure and its consequences has led to the hypothesis that, beyond symptom control, effective therapies for this syndrome should target not only the hemodynamic changes of the initial phase of the syndrome but should also "protect" the organism from the activation of neurohumoral and inflammatory pathways triggered by the decompensation episode, which persist in time and confer a risk of deleterious effects in several organs and tissues. Serelaxin, a new drug related to the peptidic endogenous hormones of the relaxin family, has recently been shown to provide multiple beneficial effects in terms of "organ protection" - not only in the cardiovascular and renal systems - from these acute heart failure-related deleterious changes. This drug has already been tested in acute heart failure patients with encouraging results in terms of medium-term clinical benefit, rendering serelaxin as a serious candidate for first-line, prognosis-modifying therapy in this syndrome. PMID:24930087

  4. [Review of the knowledge on acute kidney failure in the critical patient].

    PubMed

    Romero García, M; Delgado Hito, P; de la Cueva Ariza, L

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal failure affects from 1% to 25% of patients admitted to intensive care units. These figures vary depending on the population studied and criteria. The complications of acute renal failure (fluid overload, metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, bleeding) are treated. However, mortality remains high despite the technological advances of recent years because acute renal failure is usually associated with sepsis, respiratory failure, serious injury, surgical complications or consumption coagulopathy. Mortality ranges from 30% to 90%. Although there is no universally accepted definition, the RIFLE classification gives us an operational tool to define the degree of acute renal failure and to standardize the initiation of renal replacement techniques as well as to evaluate the results. Therefore, nurses working within the intensive care unit must be familiar with this disease, with its treatment (drug or alternative) and with the prevention of possible complications. Equally, they must be capable of detecting the manifestations of dependency each one of the basic needs and to be able to identify the collaboration problems in order to achieve an individualized care plan. PMID:23587554

  5. GABAB Encephalitis: A Fifty-Two-Year-Old Man with Seizures, Dysautonomia, and Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Loftspring, Matthew C.; Landsness, Eric; Wooliscroft, Lindsey; Rudock, Robert; Jo, Sally; Patel, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor, subtype B (GABAB), are a known cause of limbic encephalitis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations attributable to this antibody is not well defined at the present time. Here we present a case of GABAB encephalitis presenting with encephalopathy, status epilepticus, dysautonomia, and acute heart failure. To our knowledge, heart failure and dysautonomia have not yet been reported with this syndrome. PMID:26609456

  6. The role of leukocytes in the pathogenesis of fibrin deposition in bovine acute lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Car, B. D.; Suyemoto, M. M.; Neilsen, N. R.; Slauson, D. O.

    1991-01-01

    The peculiarly fibrinous nature of bovine acute lung injury due to infection with Pasteurella haemolytica A1 suggests an imbalance between leukocyte-directed procoagulant and profibrinolytic influences in the inflamed bovine lung. Calves with experimental pneumonia produced by intratracheal inoculation with P. haemolytica A1 developed acute locally extensive cranioventral fibrinopurulent bronchopneumonia. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) recovered by segmental lavage from affected lung lobes were 30 times more procoagulant than PAM obtained from unaffected lung lobes and 37-fold more procoagulant than PAM from control calf lungs. Unlike the enhancement of procoagulant activity, profibrinolytic activity (plasminogen activator amidolysis) of total lung leukocytes (PAM and plasminogen activator neutrophils [PMN]) was decreased 23 times in cells obtained from affected lung lobes and also was decreased four times in cells obtained from unaffected lobes of infected animals. This marked imbalance in cellular procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity probably contributes significantly to enhanced fibrin deposition and retarded fibrin removal. In addition, PAM from inflamed lungs were strongly positive for bovine tissue factor antigen as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry. Intensely tissue factor-positive PAM enmeshed in fibrinocellular exudates and positive alveolar walls were situated such that they were likely to have, in concert, initiated extrinsic activation of coagulation in the acutely inflamed lung. These data collectively suggest that enhanced PAM-directed procoagulant activity and diminished PAM- and PMN-directed profibrinolytic activity represent important modifications of local leukocyte function in bovine acute lung injury that are central to the pathogenesis of lesion development with extensive fibrin deposition and retarded fibrin removal. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2024707

  7. Whole Lung Lavage in a Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Patient with Severe Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Önemli, Canan Salman; Çatal, Deniz Ayhan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare interstitial lung disease that develops as a result of defects in the clearance of surfactant by alveolar macrophages. The accumulation of lipid- and protein-rich substances in the alveoli constitutes the main pathology of this disease. PAP has three types of aetiology: autoimmune (primary), congenital and secondary. The most common form in adults is autoimmune PAP. Whole lung lavage is a commonly performed method for treatment of this form of disease, especially in more severe cases. Performed under general anaesthesia, the material deposited in the alveoli is removed by washing. In this paper, we present a whole lung lavage under anaesthesia in a PAP patient who had severe respiratory failure. PMID:27366571

  8. Whole Lung Lavage in a Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Patient with Severe Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Önemli, Canan Salman; Çatal, Deniz Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare interstitial lung disease that develops as a result of defects in the clearance of surfactant by alveolar macrophages. The accumulation of lipid- and protein-rich substances in the alveoli constitutes the main pathology of this disease. PAP has three types of aetiology: autoimmune (primary), congenital and secondary. The most common form in adults is autoimmune PAP. Whole lung lavage is a commonly performed method for treatment of this form of disease, especially in more severe cases. Performed under general anaesthesia, the material deposited in the alveoli is removed by washing. In this paper, we present a whole lung lavage under anaesthesia in a PAP patient who had severe respiratory failure. PMID:27366571

  9. SURVIVAL IN INFECTION-RELATED ACUTE-ON-CHRONIC LIVER FAILURE IS DEFINED BY EXTRA-HEPATIC ORGAN FAILURES

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; O’Leary, Jacqueline G; Reddy, K Rajender; Wong, Florence; Biggins, Scott W.; Patton, Heather; Fallon, Michael B; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Maliakkal, Benedict; Malik, Raza; Subramanian, Ram M; Thacker, Leroy R; Kamath, Patrick S

    2014-01-01

    Background Infections worsen survival in cirrhosis; however, simple predictors of survival in infection-related acute-on-chronic liver failure (I-ACLF) derived from multi-center studies are required in order to improve prognostication and resource allocation. Methods Using the NACSELD database, data from 18 centers were collected for survival analysis of prospectively enrolled cirrhotic patients hospitalized with an infection. We defined organ failures as (i) shock, (ii) grade III/IV hepatic encephalopathy(HE), (iii) need for dialysis (iv) mechanical ventilation. Determinants of survival with these organ failures were analyzed. Results 507 patients were included (55 yrs, 52% HCV, 15.8% nosocomial infection, 96% Child score≥7) and 30-day evaluations were available in 453 patients. Urinary tract infection (UTI) (28.5%), and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) (22.5%) were most prevalent. During hospitalization, 55.7% developed HE, 17.6% shock, 15.1% required renal replacement, and 15.8% needed ventilation; 23% died within 30-days and 21.6% developed second infections. Admitted patients developed none (38.4%), one (37.3%), two (10.4%), three (10%) or four (4%) organ failures. 30-day survival worsened with higher number of extra-hepatic organ failures, none (92%), one (72.6%), two (51.3%), three (36%) and all four (23%). I-ACLF was defined as ≥2 organ failures given the significant change in survival probability associated at this cutoff. Baseline independent predictors for development of ACLF were nosocomial infections, MELD score, low mean arterial pressure (MAP), and non-SBP infections. Independent predictors of poor 30-day survival were I-ACLF, second infections, and admission values of high MELD, low MAP, high white blood count and low albumin. In conclusion, using multi-center study data in hospitalized decompensated infected cirrhotic patients, I-ACLF defined by the presence of two or more organ failures using simple definitions is predictive of poor

  10. [Surgical treatment of respiratory failure in young patients with diffuse lung emphysema].

    PubMed

    Gorbunkov, S D; Chernyĭ, S M; Akopov, A L; Varlamov, V V; Lukina, O V; Kiriukhina, L D; Agishev, A S; Gembitskaia, T E

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of results of examination and treatment of 8 young patients (from 25 to 17 years of age) with generalized emphysema of the lungs, pulmonary failure of the II and III degrees was made. The functional examination of the patients before operation has revealed changed respiration by obstructive type. Symptoms of dysplasia of the connective tissue were found in 4 patients. Surgical reduction of the lung volume was performed in 5 patients for correction of respiratory failure. There were neither serious complications nor lethality. Dyspnea by MMRC scale decreased in all the patients at minimum by 1 point during the first months after operation. Three years later 4 out of the operated patients (80%) had retained positive effect of operation. In patients who had no operative treatment the frequency of infectious complications, level of dyspnea during three years of follow-up remained at the same level, while functional indices continued worsening. The surgical method of treatment of severe respiratory failure allowed tolerance of physical exercise to be increased and quality of life of patients with diffuse lung emphysema to be improved. PMID:23488258

  11. Functional genomics of chlorine-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Leikauf, George D; Pope-Varsalona, Hannah; Concel, Vincent J; Liu, Pengyuan; Bein, Kiflai; Brant, Kelly A; Dopico, Richard A; Di, Y Peter; Jang, An-Soo; Dietsch, Maggie; Medvedovic, Mario; Li, Qian; Vuga, Louis J; Kaminski, Naftali; You, Ming; Prows, Daniel R

    2010-07-01

    Acute lung injury can be induced indirectly (e.g., sepsis) or directly (e.g., chlorine inhalation). Because treatment is still limited to supportive measures, mortality remains high ( approximately 74,500 deaths/yr). In the past, accidental (railroad derailments) and intentional (Iraq terrorism) chlorine exposures have led to deaths and hospitalizations from acute lung injury. To better understand the molecular events controlling chlorine-induced acute lung injury, we have developed a functional genomics approach using inbred mice strains. Various mouse strains were exposed to chlorine (45 ppm x 24 h) and survival was monitored. The most divergent strains varied by more than threefold in mean survival time, supporting the likelihood of an underlying genetic basis of susceptibility. These divergent strains are excellent models for additional genetic analysis to identify critical candidate genes controlling chlorine-induced acute lung injury. Gene-targeted mice then could be used to test the functional significance of susceptibility candidate genes, which could be valuable in revealing novel insights into the biology of acute lung injury. PMID:20601635

  12. Role of endogenous atrial natriuretic factor in acute congestive heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M E; Miller, W L; Edwards, B S; Burnett, J C

    1989-01-01

    The current studies were designed to investigate the functional significance of elevated endogenous atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in acute congestive heart failure (CHF). Integrated cardiorenal and endocrine function were measured in three models of acute low-output congestive heart failure with comparably reduced cardiac output (CO) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Acute CHF was produced by rapid right ventricular pacing (group I, n = 5) which decreases CO and increases atrial pressures and plasma ANF. In group II, n = 5, thoracic inferior vena caval constriction (TIVCC) was produced to decrease venous return and CO but without increases in atrial pressure or plasma ANF. In group III, n = 5, TIVCC was performed and exogenous ANF infused to achieve plasma concentrations observed in acute CHF. In acute CHF with increases in endogenous ANF, sodium excretion (UNaV), renal blood flow (RBF), plasma renin activity (PRA), and plasma aldosterone (PA) were maintained despite decreases in CO and MAP. In contrast, TIVCC with similar reductions in CO and MAP but without increases in ANF resulted in decreases in UNaV and RBF and increases in PRA and PA. Exogenous administration of ANF in TIVCC to mimic levels in acute CHF prevented sodium retention, renal vasoconstriction, and activation of renin and aldosterone. These studies demonstrate that endogenous ANF serves as an important physiologic volume regulator in acute CHF to maintain sodium excretion and possibly participate in the suppression of activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system despite the stimulus of arterial hypotension. Images PMID:2531762

  13. Copeptin in acute coronary syndromes and heart failure management: State of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Schurtz, Guillaume; Lamblin, Nicolas; Bauters, Christophe; Goldstein, Patrick; Lemesle, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the use of multiple biomarkers has changed cardiovascular disease management. Recently, several trials have assessed the diagnostic and prognostic performances of copeptin, especially in patients with heart failure or acute coronary syndromes. Primary results are interesting, with copeptin looking promising for: the management of patients who present at emergency departments early after chest pain onset and the risk stratification of patients with heart failure. The purpose of this article is to review the data on the place of copeptin in the management of patients with chest pain or heart failure. PMID:26071835

  14. Brain edema in acute liver failure. Insight from experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Andres, T; Blei, M D; Judy, R; Cho, M D

    1990-07-01

    Brain edema is a leading cause of death in fulminant hepatic failure (FHP). Animal studies are needed to gain further insight into its pathogenesis. The authors describe and analyze the results of brain studies in two animal models of FHF, the rabbit with galactosamine induced hepatitis and the anhepatic model of liver desvascularization. A gravimetric technique is used to determine water content in brain samples as small as 10 mg in weight. Results showed that water content is increased and correlates with the severity of encephalopathy in both experimental models of encephalopathy. The possible pathogenic role of ammonia and octanoic acid are discussed. PMID:19256151

  15. Hyperaluminemia associated with liver transplantation and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, R T; Kusnir, J; Stevenson, W C; Lobo, P; Herman, M M; Wills, M R; Savory, J

    1995-08-01

    Iatrogenic aluminium toxicity is reported in a patient who underwent an orthotopic liver transplant and who had concomitant renal failure requiring hemodialysis. Following transplantation the patient developed a metabolic encephalopathy with only mildly elevated blood ammonia concentrations. During the period following transplantation the patient received massive infusions of albumin and was on oral feeding (vivonexten), both of which contained aluminium, as did the dialysis fluid. Hyperaluminemia and profoundly elevated liver tissue aluminium concentrations were observed. Treatment with desferrioxamine, a trivalent ion chelator, decreased the plasma aluminium concentrations with an improvement in the patient's mental status. PMID:7579738

  16. The role of levosimendan in acute heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome: A review and expert consensus opinion.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Markku S; Buerke, Michael; Cohen-Solál, Alain; Costa, Susana; Édes, István; Erlikh, Alexey; Franco, Fatima; Gibson, Charles; Gorjup, Vojka; Guarracino, Fabio; Gustafsson, Finn; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Husebye, Trygve; Karason, Kristjan; Katsytadze, Igor; Kaul, Sundeep; Kivikko, Matti; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Masip, Josep; Matskeplishvili, Simon; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Møller, Jacob E; Nessler, Jadwiga; Nessler, Bohdan; Ntalianis, Argyrios; Oliva, Fabrizio; Pichler-Cetin, Emel; Põder, Pentti; Recio-Mayoral, Alejandro; Rex, Steffen; Rokyta, Richard; Strasser, Ruth H; Zima, Endre; Pollesello, Piero

    2016-09-01

    Acute heart failure and/or cardiogenic shock are frequently triggered by ischemic coronary events. Yet, there is a paucity of randomized data on the management of patients with heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome, as acute coronary syndrome and cardiogenic shock have frequently been defined as exclusion criteria in trials and registries. As a consequence, guideline recommendations are mostly driven by observational studies, even though these patients have a particularly poor prognosis compared to heart failure patients without signs of coronary artery disease. In acute heart failure, and especially in cardiogenic shock related to ischemic conditions, vasopressors and inotropes are used. However, both pathophysiological considerations and available clinical data suggest that these treatments may have disadvantageous effects. The inodilator levosimendan offers potential benefits due to a range of distinct effects including positive inotropy, restoration of ventriculo-arterial coupling, increases in tissue perfusion, and anti-stunning and anti-inflammatory effects. In clinical trials levosimendan improves symptoms, cardiac function, hemodynamics, and end-organ function. Adverse effects are generally less common than with other inotropic and vasoactive therapies, with the notable exception of hypotension. The decision to use levosimendan, in terms of timing and dosing, is influenced by the presence of pulmonary congestion, and blood pressure measurements. Levosimendan should be preferred over adrenergic inotropes as a first line therapy for all ACS-AHF patients who are under beta-blockade and/or when urinary output is insufficient after diuretics. Levosimendan can be used alone or in combination with other inotropic or vasopressor agents, but requires monitoring due to the risk of hypotension. PMID:27232927

  17. Novel Therapeutic Strategies for Reducing Right Heart Failure Associated Mortality in Fibrotic Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Adegunsoye, Ayodeji; Levy, Matthew; Oyenuga, Olusegun

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic lung diseases carry a significant mortality burden worldwide. A large proportion of these deaths are due to right heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. Underlying contributory factors which appear to play a role in the mechanism of progression of right heart dysfunction include chronic hypoxia, defective calcium handling, hyperaldosteronism, pulmonary vascular alterations, cyclic strain of pressure and volume changes, elevation of circulating TGF-β, and elevated systemic NO levels. Specific therapies targeting pulmonary hypertension include calcium channel blockers, endothelin (ET-1) receptor antagonists, prostacyclin analogs, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, and rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. Newer antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory agents may exert beneficial effects on heart failure in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Furthermore, right ventricle-targeted therapies, aimed at mitigating the effects of functional right ventricular failure, include β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, antioxidants, modulators of metabolism, and 5-hydroxytryptamine-2B (5-HT2B) receptor antagonists. Newer nonpharmacologic modalities for right ventricular support are increasingly being implemented. Early, effective, and individualized therapy may prevent overt right heart failure in fibrotic lung disease leading to improved outcomes and quality of life. PMID:26583148

  18. Acute dissection of a Contegra conduit: a rare mechanism of failure.

    PubMed

    Kavarana, Minoo N; Dorfman, Adam L; Agarwal, Prachi P; Bove, Edward L

    2010-09-01

    The Contegra (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN) bovine jugular vein conduit has been used with increasing frequency in congenital heart disease for the reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract. In this report, we describe a mechanism for conduit failure secondary to an acute dissection of the inner neointimal peel from the conduit wall. PMID:20732536

  19. Characterization of Ions in Urine of Animal Model with Acute Renal Failure using NAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Laura C.; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Pessoal, Edson A.; Borges, Fernanda T.

    2011-08-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique has been used to determine elements concentrations in urine of rats Wistar (control group) and rats Wistar with Acute Renal Failure (ARF). These data contribute for applications in health area related to biochemical analyses using urine to monitor the dialyze treatment.

  20. Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (DDP) induced acute renal failure (ARF): attempts at amelioration.

    PubMed

    Chopra, S; Kaufman, J; Flamenbaum, W

    1983-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a dose limiting feature of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (DDP) cancer chemotherapy. We have previously developed a model of DDP induced acute renal failure in the rat, which is characterized by non oliguric progressive azotemia. Protocols have been established in humans to prevent or diminish DDP associated renal alterations during the course of cancer chemotherapy. The present studies were designed to evaluate the effect of prior diuretic therapy, with furosemide, and enhanced solute diuresis, using dextrose and water as the sole source of drinking fluid, on DDP induced acute renal failure in the rat. As compared to water drinking controls neither the diuretic nor the enhancement of osmotic excretion effected DDP associated mortality. The courses of the acute renal failure observed in all three study groups were similar; however, there was a suggestion in the surviving animals that these maneuvers may have contributed to a more rapid return in renal function among rats not dying of DDP induced acute renal failure. PMID:6684010

  1. [Acute kidney failure and renal replacement therapy after colonoscopy in a 63-year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Bös, D

    2015-11-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with intestinal disorder, alternating between obstipation and diarrhoea. Sodium phosphate/diphosphate (Fleet®) was used in preparation for colonoscopy. Within 24 h the patient developed severe hyperphosphatemia and oliguric acute kidney failure with the need of renal replacement therapy. This case illustrates the rare event of phosphate nephropathy after colonoscopy. PMID:26482077

  2. Impact of intravenous nitroglycerin in the management of acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    den Uil, Corstiaan A; Brugts, Jasper J

    2015-02-01

    Intravenous nitroglycerin is a well-known, but underused, treatment for acute decompensated heart failure. Nitroglycerin has a rapid onset of action and short half-life and there is a clear dose-response curve on both global hemodynamics and peripheral circulation. IV nitroglycerin reduces LV and RV filling pressures and afterload. In the case of acute decompensated heart failure, there is a typical decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO), which needs to be supplemented by exogenous nitrates. Additionally, there is benefit on clinical endpoints, such as fast optimization of arterial oxygenation, lower rates of mechanical ventilation, and improved survival. Drawbacks of therapy include not only side effects such as headache, resistance, and development of tolerability to nitrates but also free radical production. However, nitrates in combination with diuretics remain the cornerstone of acute decompensated heart failure treatment. We propose a more aggressive use of nitrates and a more limited use of inotropes (due to ischemic demand and pro-arrhythmogenic characteristics) in normo- or hypertensive patients with acute heart failure. PMID:25301529

  3. Analysis of infectious complications and timing for emergency liver transplantation in autoimmune acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Keiichi; Yasui, Shin; Yonemitsu, Yutaka; Arai, Makoto; Kanda, Tatsuo; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Masayuki; Oda, Shigeto; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Highlight Fujiwara and colleagues reveal that the critical point for switching to liver transplantation without infectious complications in autoimmune acute liver failure is two weeks after the start of corticosteroid treatment. It is crucial to evaluate corticosteroid efficacy and, if no improvement is seen, to perform liver transplantation by that time. PMID:26808231

  4. Acute renal failure in 2 adult llamas after exposure to Oak trees (Quercus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Manuel F.; Passler, Thomas; Joiner, Kellye; Poppenga, Robert H.; Bayne, Jenna; Walz, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    Two adult llamas (Lama glama) previously exposed to oak trees (Quercus spp.) were presented with a history of depression and anorexia. Clinicopathological abnormalities included severe gastroenteritis, acute renal failure, and increased liver enzymes. This is believed to be the first report of oak toxicosis in South American camelids. PMID:23814303

  5. Treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the Wenchuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xin; Zhang, Kaiwei; Zhong, Gang; Cen, Shiqiang; Huang, Fuguo; Lv, Jingtong; Xiang, Zhou

    2012-04-01

    Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare emergency often treated operatively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of nonoperative treatment for compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Nonoperative treatment, which primarily involves continuous renal replacement therapy, was performed in 6 patients (3 men and 3 women) who presented with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure. The mean mangled extremity severity score (MESS) and laboratory data regarding renal function were analyzed before and after treatment, and the clinical outcome was evaluated at 17-month follow-up. Laboratory data regarding renal function showed improvements. All 6 patients survived with the affected lower limbs intact after nonoperative treatment. Follow-up revealed active knee range of motion and increased muscle strength, as well as a recovery of sensation. A positive linear correlation was found between MESS and the time required to achieve a reduction in swelling, as well as the time required for the recovery of sensation and knee range of motion (r>0.8; P<.05). Satisfactory clinical outcomes were obtained in patients with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure.Urine alkalization, electrolyte and water balance, and continuous renal replacement therapy have played an important role in saving lives and extremities. Nonoperative treatment should be considered in the treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure. PMID:22495847

  6. The role of high flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez-Terán, P; Roca, O

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure represents one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission and oxygen therapy remains the first-line therapy in the management of these patients. In recent years, high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula has been described as a useful alternative to conventional oxygen therapy in patients with acute respiratory failure. High-flow oxygen via nasal cannula rapidly alleviates symptoms of acute respiratory failure and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including dead space washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. However, the experience in adults is still limited and there are no clinical guidelines to establish recommendations for their use. This article aims to review the existing evidence on the use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula in adults with acute respiratory failure and its possible applications, advantages and limitations. PMID:26429697

  7. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  8. Assessment and management of cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Mohsenin, Vahid

    2013-10-01

    Acute liver failure is uncommon but not a rare complication of liver injury. It can happen after ingestion of acetaminophen and exposure to toxins and hepatitis viruses. The defining clinical symptoms are coagulopathy and encephalopathy occurring within days or weeks of the primary insult in patients without preexisting liver injury. Acute liver failure is often complicated by multiorgan failure and sepsis. The most life-threatening complications are sepsis, multiorgan failure, and brain edema. The clinical signs of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) are nonspecific except for neurologic deficits in impending brain stem herniation. Computed tomography of the brain is not sensitive enough in gauging intracranial hypertension or ruling out brain edema. Intracranial pressure monitoring, transcranial Doppler, and jugular venous oximetry provide valuable information for monitoring ICP and guiding therapeutic measures in patients with encephalopathy grade III or IV. Osmotic therapy using hypertonic saline and mannitol, therapeutic hypothermia, and propofol sedation are shown to improve ICPs and stabilize the patient for liver transplantation. In this article, diagnosis and management of hepatic encephalopathy and cerebral edema in patients with acute liver failure are reviewed. PMID:23683564

  9. Non-invasive ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management of acute type 2 respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C M; Brown, J L; Reinhardt, A K; Kaul, S; Scales, K; Mikelsons, C; Reid, K; Winter, R; Young, K; Restrick, L; Plant, P K

    2008-10-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in the management of acute type 2 respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents one of the major technical advances in respiratory care over the last decade. This document updates the 2002 British Thoracic Society guidance and provides a specific focus on the use of NIV in COPD patients with acute type 2 respiratory failure. While there are a variety of ventilator units available most centres now use bi-level positive airways pressure units and this guideline refers specifically to this form of ventilatory support although many of the principles encompassed are applicable to other forms of NIV. The guideline has been produced for the clinician caring for COPD patients in the emergency and ward areas of acute hospitals. PMID:18975486

  10. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation as treatment for acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Massimo; Conti, Giorgio

    2000-01-01

    Our current state of knowledge on noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) and technical aspects are discussed in the present review. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, NPPV can be considered a valid therapeutic option to prevent endotracheal intubation. Evidence suggests that, before eventual endotracheal intubation, NPPV should be considered as first-line intervention in the early phases of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Small randomized and non-randomized studies on the application of NPPV in patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure showed promising results, with reduction in complications such as sinusitis and ventilator-associated pneumonia, and in the duration of intensive care unit stay. The conventional use of NPPV in hypoxaemic acute respiratory failure still remains controversial, however. Large randomized studies are still needed before extensive clinical application in this condition. PMID:11094492

  11. Dual Oxidase 2 in Lung Epithelia Is Essential for Hyperoxia-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ji; Ryu, Jae-Chan; Kwon, Younghee; Lee, Suhee; Bae, Yun Soo; Yoon, Joo-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Acute lung injury (ALI) induced by excessive hyperoxia has been employed as a model of oxidative stress imitating acute respiratory distress syndrome. Under hyperoxic conditions, overloading quantities of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated in both lung epithelial and endothelial cells, leading to ALI. Some NADPH oxidase (NOX) family enzymes are responsible for hyperoxia-induced ROS generation in lung epithelial and endothelial cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of ROS production in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and ALI induced by hyperoxia are poorly understood. Results: In this study, we show that dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) is a key NOX enzyme that affects hyperoxia-induced ROS production, particularly in type II AECs, leading to lung injury. In DUOX2 mutant mice (DUOX2thyd/thyd) or mice in which DUOX2 expression is knocked down in the lungs, hyperoxia-induced ALI was significantly lower than in wild-type (WT) mice. DUOX2 was mainly expressed in type II AECs, but not endothelial cells, and hyperoxia-induced ROS production was markedly reduced in primary type II AECs isolated from DUOX2thyd/thyd mice. Furthermore, DUOX2-generated ROS are responsible for caspase-mediated cell death, inducing ERK and JNK phophorylation in type II AECs. Innovation: To date, no role for DUOX2 has been defined in hyperoxia-mediated ALI despite it being a NOX homologue and major ROS source in lung epithelium. Conclusion: Here, we present the novel finding that DUOX2-generated ROS induce AEC death, leading to hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1803–1818. PMID:24766345

  12. Corticosteroids prevent acute lung dysfunction caused by thoracic irradiation in unanesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Loyd, J.E.; Bolds, J.M.; Wickersham, N.; Malcolm, A.W.; Brigham, K.L.

    1988-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of corticosteroid therapy in a new acute model of oxidant lung injury, thoracic irradiation in awake sheep. Sheep were irradiated with 1,500 rads to the whole chest except for blocking the heart and adjacent ventral lung. Seven experimental sheep were given methylprednisolone (1 g intravenously every 6 h for four doses) and thoracic irradiation; control sheep received only irradiation. In irradiated control sheep, lung lymph flow increased from baseline (7.6 ml/h) to peak at 3 h (13.2), and lung lymph protein clearance increased from 5.1 to 9.7 ml/h. Mean pulmonary artery pressure increased in the irradiated control sheep from 19 to 32.4 cm H/sub 2/O, whereas the lung lymph thromboxane concentration increased from 0.09 to 6.51 ng/ml at 3 h. Arterial oxygen tension in irradiated control sheep fell gradually from 86 mm Hg at baseline to 65 mm Hg at 8 h. Methylprednisolone administration significantly prevented the increase in lung lymph protein clearance, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and lung lymph thromboxane concentration. Methylprednisolone also prevented the fall in arterial oxygen tension after thoracic irradiation, but did not prevent a further decrease in lymphocytes in blood or lung lymph after radiation. We conclude that corticosteroid therapy prevents most of the acute physiologic changes caused by thoracic irradiation in awake sheep.

  13. CLOCK modulates survival and acute lung injury in mice with polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Yung; Hsieh, Ming-Jer; Hsieh, I-Chang; Shie, Shian-Sen; Ho, Ming-Yun; Yeh, Jih-Kai; Tsai, Ming-Lung; Yang, Chia-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Wen, Ming-Shien

    2016-09-16

    Polymicrobial sepsis is a potentially fatal condition and a significant burden on health care systems. Acute lung injury is the most common complication of sepsis and results in high mortality. However, there has been no recent significant progress in the treatment of sepsis or acute lung injury induced by sepsis. Here we show that mice deficient in the circadian protein CLOCK had better survival than wild-type mice after induction of polymicrobial sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture. Inflammatory cytokine production was attenuated and bacterial clearance was improved in CLOCK-deficient mice. Moreover, acute lung injury after induction of sepsis was significantly decreased in CLOCK-deficient mice. Genome-wide profiling analysis showed that inhibin signaling was reduced in CLOCK-deficient mice. These data establish the importance of circadian CLOCK-inhibin signaling in sepsis, which may have potential therapeutic implications. PMID:27520377

  14. Role of inflammation and infection in the pathogenesis of human acute liver failure: Clinical implications for monitoring and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Mhairi C; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare and devastating clinical condition. At present, emergency liver transplantation is the only life-saving therapy in advanced cases, yet the feasibility of transplantation is affected by the presence of systemic inflammation, infection and resultant multi-organ failure. The importance of immune dysregulation and acquisition of infection in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure and its associated complications is now recognised. In this review we discuss current thinking regarding the role of infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of and outcome in human acute liver failure, the implications for the management of such patients and suggest directions for future research. PMID:27468190

  15. Role of inflammation and infection in the pathogenesis of human acute liver failure: Clinical implications for monitoring and therapy.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Mhairi C; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2016-07-14

    Acute liver failure is a rare and devastating clinical condition. At present, emergency liver transplantation is the only life-saving therapy in advanced cases, yet the feasibility of transplantation is affected by the presence of systemic inflammation, infection and resultant multi-organ failure. The importance of immune dysregulation and acquisition of infection in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure and its associated complications is now recognised. In this review we discuss current thinking regarding the role of infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of and outcome in human acute liver failure, the implications for the management of such patients and suggest directions for future research. PMID:27468190

  16. Acute respiratory failure due to Nicotiana glauca ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, D; Kargakis, M; Topalis, T; Drouzas, A; Potolidis, E

    2013-01-01

    Background: A variety of organisms produce potent toxins that impact human health through compromising respiratory function. Case report: We describe a rare case of abrupt respiratory failure afterNicotiana glaucaingestion in a previously healthy sixty years old female patient. She presented complaining for gait instability and malaise after ingestion of cooked leaves of the wild plant and two hours after the onset she developed respiratory failurefor which she was intubated and mechanically ventilated for two days. The patient fully recovered and was discharged from the hospital. Conclusion: Anabasine, the plant’s main active ingredient, can cause severe systemic intoxication due to its nicotinic receptor agonist action with respiratory muscle paralysis being the main effect. PMID:24376330

  17. [Liver replacement therapy. Reliable indications in acute liver failure].

    PubMed

    Rifai, K; Ott, M; Bahr, M M; Schneider, A; Manns, M P

    2003-12-01

    Extracorporeal liver support devices aim at improving the therapeutical options for liver failure. Numerous artificial and bioartificial devices have been tested to reduce the high mortality of this dynamic disease. In particular, the detoxification function of the liver should be upheld, by means of a number of different procedures, either until liver function is restored or until transplantation. Both purely artificial, machine-based procedures including different forms of dialysis and hemoadsorption as well as bioartificial procedures based on hepatocytes are being tested, as are different types of extracorporeal liver perfusion. This paper provides an overview of the different methods and devices and their clinical evidence in order to give a recommendation for the handling of the expensive devices. There is no current indication for the application of liver support devices outside of clinical studies at specialised centres. PMID:14689190

  18. Stem cell technology for the treatment of acute and chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Pino, Christopher J.; Humes, H. David

    2010-01-01

    Acute and chronic renal failure are disorders with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current treatment is based upon conventional dialysis to provide volume regulation and small solute clearance. There is growing recognition that renal failure is a complex disease state requiring a multifactorial therapy to address the short-comings of the conventional monofactorial approach. Kidney transplantation remains the most effective treatment, however, organ availability lags far behind demand. Many key kidney functions including gluconeogenesis, ammoniagenesis, metabolism of glutathione, catabolism of important peptide hormones, growth factors, and cytokines critical to multiorgan homeostasis and immunomodulation are provided by renal tubule cells. Therefore, cell-based therapies are promising multifactorial treatment approaches. In this review, current stem cell technologies including adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells will be discussed as cell sources for the treatment of acute and chronic renal failure. PMID:20801413

  19. Renin-angiotensin system and its role in hyperoxic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P X; Han, C H; Zhou, F J; Li, L; Zhang, H M; Liu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is essential to sustain life, but at a high partial pressure oxygen may cause toxicity to the human body. These injuries to the lung are known as hyperoxic acute lung injury [HALI]). To date, numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the pathogenesis of HALI, for which some hypotheses have been proposed. Accumulating evidence indicates that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of some lung diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and HALI. In this review, we briefly introduce the classic RAS, local (tissue) RAS and intracellular RAS, and we summarize findings on the relationship between local/classic RAS and HALI. The importance--and ambiguity--of the results of these studies indicate a need for further investigations of the RAS and its role in the patho- genesis of HALI. PMID:27416692

  20. N(N)-nicotinic blockade as an acute human model of autonomic failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Black, B. K.; Lance, R. H.; Squillante, M. D.; Costa, F.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Pure autonomic failure has been conceptualized as deficient sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation. Several recent observations in chronic autonomic failure, however, cannot be explained simply by loss of autonomic innervation, at least according to our current understanding. To simulate acute autonomic failure, we blocked N(N)-nicotinic receptors with intravenous trimethaphan (6+/-0.4 mg/min) in 7 healthy subjects (4 men, 3 women, aged 32+/-3 years, 68+/-4 kg, 171+/-5 cm). N(N)-Nicotinic receptor blockade resulted in near-complete interruption of sympathetic and parasympathetic efferents as indicated by a battery of autonomic function tests. With trimethaphan, small postural changes from the horizontal were associated with significant blood pressure changes without compensatory changes in heart rate. Gastrointestinal motility, pupillary function, saliva production, and tearing were profoundly suppressed with trimethaphan. Plasma norepinephrine level decreased from 1.1+/-0.12 nmol/L (180+/-20 pg/mL) at baseline to 0.23+/-0.05 nmol/L (39+/-8 pg/mL) with trimethaphan (P<.001). There was a more than 16-fold increase in plasma vasopressin (P<.01) and no change in plasma renin activity. We conclude that blockade of N(N)-cholinergic receptors is useful to simulate the hemodynamic alterations of acute autonomic failure in humans. The loss of function with acute N(N)-cholinergic blockade is more complete than in most cases of chronic autonomic failure. This difference may be exploited to elucidate the contributions of acute denervation and chronic adaptation to the pathophysiology of autonomic failure. N(N)-Cholinergic blockade may also be applied to study human cardiovascular physiology and pharmacology in the absence of confounding baroreflexes.

  1. Current Evidence for Extracorporeal Liver Support Systems in Acute Liver Failure and Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Karvellas, Constantine J; Subramanian, Ram M

    2016-07-01

    Artificial (nonbiological) extracorporeal liver support devices aim to remove albumin-bound and water-soluble toxins to restore and preserve hepatic function and mitigate or limit the progression of multiorgan failure while hepatic recovery or liver transplant occurs. The following beneficial effects have been documented: improvement of jaundice, amelioration of hemodynamic instability, reduction of portal hypertension, and improvement of hepatic encephalopathy. The only randomized prospective multicenter controlled trial to show an improvement in transplant-free survival was for high-volume plasmapheresis. Biological (cell-based) extracorporeal liver support systems aim to support the failing liver through detoxification and synthetic function and warrant further study for safety and benefit. PMID:27339682

  2. Treatment for sulfur mustard lung injuries; new therapeutic approaches from acute to chronic phase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective Sulfur mustard (SM) is one of the major potent chemical warfare and attractive weapons for terrorists. It has caused deaths to hundreds of thousands of victims in World War I and more recently during the Iran-Iraq war (1980–1988). It has ability to develop severe acute and chronic damage to the respiratory tract, eyes and skin. Understanding the acute and chronic biologic consequences of SM exposure may be quite essential for developing efficient prophylactic/therapeutic measures. One of the systems majorly affected by SM is the respiratory tract that numerous clinical studies have detailed processes of injury, diagnosis and treatments of lung. The low mortality rate has been contributed to high prevalence of victims and high lifetime morbidity burden. However, there are no curative modalities available in such patients. In this review, we collected and discussed the related articles on the preventive and therapeutic approaches to SM-induced respiratory injury and summarized what is currently known about the management and therapeutic strategies of acute and long-term consequences of SM lung injuries. Method This review was done by reviewing all papers found by searching following key words sulfur mustard; lung; chronic; acute; COPD; treatment. Results Mustard lung has an ongoing pathological process and is active disorder even years after exposure to SM. Different drug classes have been studied, nevertheless there are no curative modalities for mustard lung. Conclusion Complementary studies on one hand regarding pharmacokinetic of drugs and molecular investigations are mandatory to obtain more effective treatments. PMID:23351279

  3. Modeling the dynamics of recruitment and derecruitment in mice with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Massa, Christopher B; Allen, Gilman B; Bates, Jason H T

    2008-12-01

    Lung recruitment and derecruitment contribute significantly to variations in the elastance of the respiratory system during mechanical ventilation. However, the decreases in elastance that occur with deep inflation are transient, especially in acute lung injury. Bates and Irvin (8) proposed a model of the lung that recreates time-varying changes in elastance as a result of progressive recruitment and derecruitment of lung units. The model is characterized by distributions of critical opening and closing pressures throughout the lung and by distributions of speeds with which the processes of opening and closing take place once the critical pressures have been achieved. In the present study, we adapted this model to represent a mechanically ventilated mouse. We fit the model to data collected in a previous study from control mice and mice in various stages of acid-induced acute lung injury (3). Excellent fits to the data were obtained when the normally distributed critical opening pressures were about 5 cmH(2)O above the closing pressures and when the hyperbolically distributed opening velocities were about an order of magnitude greater than the closing velocities. We also found that, compared with controls, the injured mice had markedly increased opening and closing pressures but no change in the velocities, suggesting that the key biophysical change wrought by acid injury is dysfunction of surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Our computational model of lung recruitment and derecruitment dynamics is thus capable of accurately mimicking data from mice with acute lung injury and may provide insight into the altered biophysics of the injured lung. PMID:18948446

  4. 17β-estradiol protects the lung against acute injury: possible mediation by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Sayyed A; Dickman, Kathleen G; Berisha, Hasan; Said, Sami I

    2011-12-01

    Beyond their classical role as a class of female sex hormones, estrogens (e.g. 17β-estradiol) exert important biological actions, both protective and undesirable. We have investigated the ability of estradiol to protect the lung in three models of acute injury induced by 1) oxidant stress due to the herbicide paraquat; 2) excitotoxicity, caused by glutamate agonist N-methyl-d-aspartate; and 3) acute alveolar anoxia. We also assessed the role of estrogen receptors (ER) ERα and ERβ and the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in mediating this protection. Isolated guinea pig or rat lungs were perfused in situ at constant flow and mechanically ventilated. The onset and severity of lung injury were monitored by increases in pulmonary arterial and airway pressures, wet/dry lung weight ratio, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein content. Estradiol was infused into the pulmonary circulation, beginning 10 min before induction of injury and continued for 60-90 min. Lung injury was marked by significant increases in the above measurements, with paraquat producing the most severe, and excitotoxicity the least severe, injury. Estradiol significantly attenuated the injury in each model. Both ER were constitutively expressed and immunohistochemically demonstrable in normal lung, and their selective agonists reduced anoxic injury, the only model in which they were tested. As it protected against injury, estradiol rapidly and significantly stimulated VIP mRNA expression in rat lung. Estradiol attenuated acute lung injury in three experimental models while stimulating VIP gene expression, a known mechanism of lung protection. The up-regulated VIP expression could have partially mediated the protection by estrogen. PMID:22009726

  5. 17β-Estradiol Protects the Lung against Acute Injury: Possible Mediation by Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Sayyed A.; Dickman, Kathleen G.; Berisha, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Beyond their classical role as a class of female sex hormones, estrogens (e.g. 17β-estradiol) exert important biological actions, both protective and undesirable. We have investigated the ability of estradiol to protect the lung in three models of acute injury induced by 1) oxidant stress due to the herbicide paraquat; 2) excitotoxicity, caused by glutamate agonist N-methyl-d-aspartate; and 3) acute alveolar anoxia. We also assessed the role of estrogen receptors (ER) ERα and ERβ and the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in mediating this protection. Isolated guinea pig or rat lungs were perfused in situ at constant flow and mechanically ventilated. The onset and severity of lung injury were monitored by increases in pulmonary arterial and airway pressures, wet/dry lung weight ratio, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein content. Estradiol was infused into the pulmonary circulation, beginning 10 min before induction of injury and continued for 60–90 min. Lung injury was marked by significant increases in the above measurements, with paraquat producing the most severe, and excitotoxicity the least severe, injury. Estradiol significantly attenuated the injury in each model. Both ER were constitutively expressed and immunohistochemically demonstrable in normal lung, and their selective agonists reduced anoxic injury, the only model in which they were tested. As it protected against injury, estradiol rapidly and significantly stimulated VIP mRNA expression in rat lung. Estradiol attenuated acute lung injury in three experimental models while stimulating VIP gene expression, a known mechanism of lung protection. The up-regulated VIP expression could have partially mediated the protection by estrogen. PMID:22009726

  6. Physiological Correlation of Airway Pressure and Transpulmonary Pressure Stress Index on Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yun-Hang; Liu, Wei; Urbino, Rosario; Ranieri, V Marco; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress index at post-recruitment maneuvers could be a method of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, airway pressure (Paw) stress index may not reflect lung mechanics in the patients with high chest wall elastance. This study was to evaluate the Paw stress index on lung mechanics and the correlation between Paw stress index and transpulmonary pressure (PL) stress index in acute respiratory failure (ARF) patients. Methods: Twenty-four ARF patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively recruited from July 2011 to April 2013 in Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing, China and Ospedale S. Giovanni Battista-Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. All patients underwent MV with volume control (tidal volume 6 ml/kg) for 20 min. PEEP was set according to the ARDSnet study protocol. The patients were divided into two groups according to the chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance ratio. The high elastance group (H group, n = 14) had a ratio ≥30%, and the low elastance group (L group, n = 10) had a ratio <30%. Respiratory elastance, gas-exchange, Paw stress index, and PL stress index were measured. Student's t-test, regression analysis, and Bland–Altman analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: Pneumonia was the major cause of respiratory failure (71.0%). Compared with the L group, PEEP was lower in the H group (5.7 ± 1.7 cmH2O vs. 9.0 ± 2.3 cmH2O, P < 0.01). Compared with the H group, lung elastance was higher (20.0 ± 7.8 cmH2O/L vs. 11.6 ± 3.6 cmH2O/L, P < 0.01), and stress was higher in the L group (7.0 ± 1.9 vs. 4.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.02). A linear relationship was observed between the Paw stress index and the PL stress index in H group (R2= 0.56, P < 0.01) and L group (R2= 0.85, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In the ARF patients with MV, Paw stress index can substitute for PL to guide ventilator settings. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02196870 (https

  7. A Bayesian network approach for modeling local failure in lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jung Hun; Craft, Jeffrey; Lozi, Rawan Al; Vaidya, Manushka; Meng, Yifan; Deasy, Joseph O.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; El Naqa, Issam

    2011-03-01

    Locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients suffer from a high local failure rate following radiotherapy. Despite many efforts to develop new dose-volume models for early detection of tumor local failure, there was no reported significant improvement in their application prospectively. Based on recent studies of biomarker proteins' role in hypoxia and inflammation in predicting tumor response to radiotherapy, we hypothesize that combining physical and biological factors with a suitable framework could improve the overall prediction. To test this hypothesis, we propose a graphical Bayesian network framework for predicting local failure in lung cancer. The proposed approach was tested using two different datasets of locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. The first dataset was collected retrospectively, which comprises clinical and dosimetric variables only. The second dataset was collected prospectively in which in addition to clinical and dosimetric information, blood was drawn from the patients at various time points to extract candidate biomarkers as well. Our preliminary results show that the proposed method can be used as an efficient method to develop predictive models of local failure in these patients and to interpret relationships among the different variables in the models. We also demonstrate the potential use of heterogeneous physical and biological variables to improve the model prediction. With the first dataset, we achieved better performance compared with competing Bayesian-based classifiers. With the second dataset, the combined model had a slightly higher performance compared to individual physical and biological models, with the biological variables making the largest contribution. Our preliminary results highlight the potential of the proposed integrated approach for predicting post-radiotherapy local failure in NSCLC patients.

  8. Pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung injury induced by foreign compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.P.; Lindenschmidt, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The lung may become damaged by both airborne or bloodborne agents. Mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of lung injury include formation of highly reactive metabolites formed by pulmonary mixed function oxidases or formation of free oxygen radicals. Acute and chronic damage can be evaluated by several methods, such as histology and quantitative morphometry, non-invasive and non-destructive respiratory function tests, and with biochemical techniques that include measuring lavage enzyme levels or quantitating the presence of macromolecules such as collagen. In addition, cell kinetics provide an additional method to explore events following lung damage. 34 references.

  9. The pathology of the acute and chronic stages of farmer's lung

    PubMed Central

    Seal, R. M. E.; Hapke, E. J.; Thomas, G. O.; Meek, J. C.; Hayes, M.

    1968-01-01

    The pathology of five patients who had a biopsy in the acute stage is described; interstitial pneumonia, sarcoid-like granulomata, bronchiolitis, and vasculitis were found. Three of these patients progressed to the chronic stage, when the one with the most extensive bronchiolar involvement had lung function findings of airway obstruction. One progressed to the chronic stage with lung function findings of a transfer defect, and another had radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis with normal lung function tests at rest. The pathology of the chronic stage is described in six patients, with necropsy findings in five. Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, cystic change, and pulmonary hypertensive changes were the principal findings. Images PMID:5680234

  10. A decremental PEEP trial for determining open-lung PEEP in a rabbit model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yi-Ming; Lien, Shao-Hung; Liu, Tao-Yuan; Lee, Chuen-Ming; Yuh, Yeong-Seng

    2008-04-01

    A positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) above the lower inflection point (LIP) of the pressure-volume curve has been thought necessary to maintain recruited lung volume in acute lung injury (ALI). We used a strategy to identify the level of open-lung PEEP (OLP) by detecting the maximum tidal compliance during a decremental PEEP trial (DPT). We performed a randomized controlled study to compare the effect of the OLP to PEEP above LIP and zero PEEP on pulmonary mechanics, gas exchange, hemodynamic change, and lung injury in 26 rabbits with ALI. After recruitment maneuver, the lavage-injured rabbits received DPTs to identify the OLP. Animals were randomized to receive volume controlled ventilation with either: (a) PEEP = 0 cm H2O (ZEEP); (b) PEEP = 2 cm H2O above OLP (OLP + 2); or (c) PEEP = 2 cm H2O above LIP (LIP + 2). Peak inspiratory pressure and mean airway pressure were recorded and arterial blood gases were analyzed every 30 min. Mean blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously. Lung injury severity was assessed by lung wet/dry weight ratio. Animals in OLP + 2 group had less lung injury as well as relatively better compliance, more stable pH, and less hypercapnia compared to the LIP + 2 and ZEEP groups. We concluded that setting PEEP according to the OLP identified by DPTs is an effective method to attenuate lung injury. This strategy could be used as an indicator for optimal PEEP. The approach is simple and noninvasive and may be of clinical interest. PMID:18293413

  11. [Unexpected cause of acute renal failure in an 85-year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Fabbian, F; Stabellini, N; Catizone, L

    2008-01-01

    Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis (APIGN) is usually diagnosed in young people, while in elderly people rapidly progressive forms appear to be the most important glomerular disease causing acute renal failure. We report on a 85-year-old woman with acute renal failure due to APIGN. An 85-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and cerebrovascular disease was hospitalized because of diarrhea and syncope associated with atrial fibrillation. She was found to have left lower lobe pneumonia. Serum creatinine was over 2 mg/dL. Fluids were given, without improvement in renal function but leading to volume overload instead. Within a few days serum creatinine reached a level of 5.4 mg/dL with reduction of urine output despite administration of diuretics. The patient developed hematuria and purpura of the feet. Serum IgA was high and the urine sediment showed casts. Methylprednisolone 125 mg i.v. was given for three days followed by prednisone 50 mg daily. The patient's clinical condition gradually improved and serum creatinine decreased to 1.9 mg/dL. Renal biopsy showed APIGN. During hospitalization, three major complications occurred: hemodynamic instability due to atrial fibrillation, Clostridium difficile colitis and urinary tract infections due to Enterococcus faecalis and Candida tropicans, all successfully treated. APIGN should be taken into account as a cause of acute renal failure in hospitalized elderly patients with many comorbidities. PMID:19048577

  12. Combined iron sucrose and protoporphyrin treatment protects against ischemic and toxin-mediated acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Frostad, Kirsten B

    2016-07-01

    Tissue preconditioning, whereby various short-term stressors initiate organ resistance to subsequent injury, is well recognized. However, clinical preconditioning of the kidney for protection against acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been established. Here we tested whether a pro-oxidant agent, iron sucrose, combined with a protoporphyrin (Sn protoporphyrin), can induce preconditioning and protect against acute renal failure. Mice were pretreated with iron sucrose, protoporphyrin, cyanocobalamin, iron sucrose and protoporphyrin, or iron sucrose and cyanocobalamin. Eighteen hours later, ischemic, maleate, or glycerol models of AKI were induced, and its severity was assessed the following day (blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine concentrations; post-ischemic histology). Agent impact on cytoprotective gene expression (heme oxygenase 1, hepcidin, haptoglobin, hemopexin, α1-antitrypsin, α1-microglobulin, IL-10) was assessed as renal mRNA and protein levels. AKI-associated myocardial injury was gauged by plasma troponin I levels. Combination agent administration upregulated multiple cytoprotective genes and, unlike single agent administration, conferred marked protection against each tested model of acute renal failure. Heme oxygenase was shown to be a marked contributor to this cytoprotective effect. Preconditioning also blunted AKI-induced cardiac troponin release. Thus, iron sucrose and protoporphyrin administration can upregulate diverse cytoprotective genes and protect against acute renal failure. Associated cardiac protection implies potential relevance to both AKI and its associated adverse downstream effects. PMID:27165818

  13. Strong correlation between lung ultrasound and chest computerized tomography imaging for the detection of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huan; Huang, Daozheng; Guo, Liheng; Chen, Quanfu; Zhong, Wenzhao

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung ultrasound (LUS) is a clinical imaging technique for diagnosing acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In humans and several large animals, LUS demonstrates similar specificity and sensitivity to computerized tomography (CT) scanning. Current study evaluated the degree of agreement between LUS and CT imaging in characterizing ALI/ARDS in rats. Methods Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were imaged by LUS before randomization into three groups to receive intratracheal saline, 3 or 6 mg/kg LPS respectively (n=10). LUS and CT imaging was conducted 2 hours after instillation. Cross table analyses and kappa statistics were used to determine agreement levels between LUS and CT assessments of lung condition. Results Before instillation, rats presented with a largely A-pattern in LUS images, however, a significantly increase B-lines were observed in all groups after instillation and showed dose response to LPS or to saline. One rat treated with 6 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) presented with lung consolidation. The agreement between the LUS and the CT in detecting the main characteristics of ALI/ARDS in rat was strong (r=0.758, P<0.01, k=0.737). Conclusions In conclusion, LUS detects ALI/ARDS with high agreement with micro PET/CT scanning in a rat model, suggesting that LUS represents a positive refinement in rat ALI/ARDS disease models. PMID:27499930

  14. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia: a rare histopathological variant of chemotherapy-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arjun; Sen, Shiraj; Naina, Harris

    2016-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury is the most common chemotherapy-associated lung disease, and is linked with several histopathological patterns. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia (AFOP) is a relatively new and rare histological pattern of diffuse lung injury. We report the first known case of bleomycin-induced AFOP. A 36-year-old man with metastatic testicular cancer received three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin, before being transitioned to paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin. He subsequently presented with exertional dyspnoea, cough and pleuritic chest pain. CT of the chest demonstrated bilateral ground glass opacities with peribronchovascular distribution and pulmonary function tests demonstrated a restrictive pattern of lung disease with impaired diffusion. Transbronchial biopsy revealed intra-alveolar fibrin deposits with organising pneumonia, consisting of intraluminal loose connective tissue consistent with AFOP. The patient received high-dose corticosteroids with symptomatic and radiographic improvement. AFOP should be recognised as a histopathological variant of bleomycin-induced lung injury. PMID:27053543

  15. Multinodular Goiter Spontaneous Hemorrhage in ESRD Patients Result in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wen-Hui; Shao, Chu-Xiao; Xin, Jun; Li, Jie; Mao, Ming-Feng; Yu, Xue-Ping; Jin, Lie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Euthyroid multinodular goiters may lead to acute respiratory failure caused by airway obstruction or laryngotracheal compression. Here, we present a case admitted to the nephrologist with multinodular goiter spontaneous hemorrhage along with respiratory failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which required urgent surgical intervention. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with ESRD who presented with a rapidly enlarging nodular goiter resulting in acute respiratory failure. Endotracheal intubation and emergency partial thyroidectomy were performed, revealing multinodular goiter spontaneous hemorrhage by postoperative histopathology. Several cases of benign goiters necessitating endotracheal intubation have been reported. Goiters are among the rare diagnoses in patients consulting at our institution's Nephrology. This case illustrates that ESRD patients with benign goiter may lead to acute respiratory failure due to airway obstruction or laryngotracheal compression. It was found in agreement with previous reports. This case highlights that ESRD patient at risk of this life threatening complication such as multinodular goiter hemorrhage should be managed with elective thyroidectomy to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:26871832

  16. Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase deficiency presenting with acute liver failure following gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Santra, Saikat; Cameron, Jessie M; Shyr, Casper; Zhang, Linhua; Drögemöller, Britt; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Wevers, Ron A; Rodenburg, Richard J; Gupte, Girish; Preece, Mary Anne; van Karnebeek, Clara D

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient from a consanguineous family who presented with transient acute liver failure and biochemical patterns suggestive of disturbed urea cycle and mitochondrial function, for whom conventional genetic and metabolic investigations for acute liver failure failed to yield a diagnosis. Whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous 12-bp deletion in PCK1 (MIM 614168) encoding cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK); enzymatic studies subsequently confirmed its pathogenic nature. We propose that PEPCK deficiency should be considered in the young child with unexplained liver failure, especially where there are marked, accumulations of TCA cycle metabolites on urine organic acid analysis and/or an amino acid profile with hyperammonaemia suggestive of a proximal urea cycle defect during the acute episode. If suspected, intravenous administration of dextrose should be initiated. Long-term management comprising avoidance of fasting with the provision of a glucose polymer emergency regimen for illness management may be sufficient to prevent future episodes of liver failure. This case report provides further insights into the (patho-)physiology of energy metabolism, confirming the power of genomic analysis of unexplained biochemical phenotypes. PMID:26971250

  17. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production. PMID:26690120

  18. Acute renal failure in pregnancy: Tertiary centre experience from north Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Munna Lal; Sachan, Rekha; Radheshyam; Sachan, Pushpalata

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obstetrical acute renal failure ARF is now a rare entity in the developed countries but still a common occurrence in developing countries. Delay in the diagnosis and late referral is associated with increased mortality. This study aimed to evaluate the contributing factors responsible for pregnancy-related acute kidney failure, its relation with mortality and morbidity and outcome measures in these patients. Materials and Methods: Total 520 patients of ARF of various aetiology were admitted, out of these 60 (11.5%) patients were pregnancy-related acute renal failure. Results: ARF Acute renal failure occurred in 32 (53.3%) cases in early part of their pregnancy, whereas in 28 (46.7%) cases in later of the pregnancy. Thirty-two (53.3%) patients had not received any antenatal visit, and had home delivery, 20 (33.4%) patients had delivered in hospitals but without antenatal care and eight (13.3%) patients received antenatal care and delivered in the hospitals. Anuria was observed in 23 (38.3%) cases, remaining 37 (61.7%) cases presented with oliguria. Septicemia was present in 25 (41.7%), hypertensive disorder of pregnancy in 20 (33.3%), haemorrhage in eight (13.3%), abortion in 5 (8.3%), haemolysis elevated liver enzymes low platelets counts (HELLP) syndrome in one (1.67%) and disseminated intravascular coagulation in one (1.67%). (61.7%) patients were not dialyzed, 33 (55%) recovered normal renal function with conservative treatment. Complete recovery was observed in 45 (75%) patients, five (8.4%) patients developed irreversible renal failure. Maternal mortality was nine (15%) and foetal loss was 25 (41.7%). Conclusion: Pregnancy-related ARF is usually a consequence of obstetric complications; it carries very high morbidity and mortality. PMID:23900700

  19. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B-induced microRNA-155 targets SOCS1 to promote acute inflammatory lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rao, Roshni; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2014-07-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) causes food poisoning in humans. It is considered a biological weapon, and inhalation can trigger lung injury and sometimes respiratory failure. Being a superantigen, SEB initiates an exaggerated inflammatory response. While the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in immune cell activation is getting increasing recognition, their role in the regulation of inflammatory disease induced by SEB has not been studied. In this investigation, we demonstrate that exposure to SEB by inhalation results in acute inflammatory lung injury accompanied by an altered miRNA expression profile in lung-infiltrating cells. Among the miRNAs that were significantly elevated, miR-155 was the most overexpressed. Interestingly, miR-155(-/-) mice were protected from SEB-mediated inflammation and lung injury. Further studies revealed a functional link between SEB-induced miR-155 and proinflammatory cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Through the use of bioinformatics tools, suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), a negative regulator of IFN-γ, was identified as a potential target of miR-155. While miR-155(-/-) mice displayed increased expression of Socs1, the overexpression of miR-155 led to its suppression, thereby enhancing IFN-γ levels. Additionally, the inhibition of miR-155 resulted in restored Socs1expression. Together, our data demonstrate an important role for miR-155 in promoting SEB-mediated inflammation in the lungs through Socs1 suppression and suggest that miR-155 may be an important target in preventing SEB-mediated inflammation and tissue injury. PMID:24778118

  20. Trajectories of risk after hospitalization for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, or pneumonia: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Angela F; Kulkarni, Vivek T; Lin, Zhenqiu; Ross, Joseph S; Horwitz, Leora I; Kim, Nancy; Suter, Lisa G; Lin, Haiqun; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize the absolute risks for older patients of readmission to hospital and death in the year after hospitalization for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, or pneumonia. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 4767 hospitals caring for Medicare fee for service beneficiaries in the United States, 2008-10. Participants More than 3 million Medicare fee for service beneficiaries, aged 65 years or more, surviving hospitalization for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, or pneumonia. Main outcome measures Daily absolute risks of first readmission to hospital and death for one year after discharge. To illustrate risk trajectories, we identified the time required for risks of readmission to hospital and death to decline 50% from maximum values after discharge; the time required for risks to approach plateau periods of minimal day to day change, defined as 95% reductions in daily changes in risk from maximum daily declines after discharge; and the extent to which risks are higher among patients recently discharged from hospital compared with the general elderly population. Results Within one year of hospital discharge, readmission to hospital and death, respectively, occurred following 67.4% and 35.8% of hospitalizations for heart failure, 49.9% and 25.1% for acute myocardial infarction, and 55.6% and 31.1% for pneumonia. Risk of first readmission had declined 50% by day 38 after hospitalization for heart failure, day 13 after hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction, and day 25 after hospitalization for pneumonia; risk of death declined 50% by day 11, 6, and 10, respectively. Daily change in risk of first readmission to hospital declined 95% by day 45, 38, and 45; daily change in risk of death declined 95% by day 21, 19, and 21. After hospitalization for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, or pneumonia, the magnitude of the relative risk for hospital admission over the first 90 days was 8, 6, and 6 times greater than that

  1. [Diagnosis of acute heart failure and relevance of biomarkers in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Ortega, Raúl Antonio; Manzano, Luis; Montero-Pérez-Barquero, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Diagnosis of acute heart failure (HF) is difficult in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities. Risk scales and classification criteria based exclusively on clinical manifestations, such as the Framingham scales, lack sufficient specificity. In addition to clinical manifestations, diagnosis should be based on two key factors: natriuretic peptides and echocardiographic study. When there is clinical suspicion of acute HF, a normal natriuretic peptide level will rule out this process. When a consistent clinical suspicion is present, an echocardiographic study should also be performed. Diagnosis of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HF/pEF) requires detection of an enlarged left atrium or the presence of parameters of diastolic dysfunction. Elevation of cardiac biomarkers seems to be due to myocardial injury and the compensatory mechanisms of the body against this injury (hormone and inflammatory response and repair mechanisms). Elevation of markers of cardiac damage (troponins and natriuretic peptides) have been shown to be useful both in the diagnosis of acute HF and in prediction of outcome. MMP-2 could be useful in the diagnosis of HF/pEF. In addition to biomarkers with diagnostic value, other biomarkers are helpful in prognosis in the acute phase of HF, such as biomarkers of renal failure (eGFR, cystatin and urea), inflammation (cytokines and CRP), and the cell regeneration marker, galectin-3. A promising idea that is under investigation is the use of panels of biomarkers, which could allow more accurate diagnosis and prognosis of acute HF. PMID:24930079

  2. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F.; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M.; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S.; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N.; Thorneloe, Kevin S.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  3. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N; Thorneloe, Kevin S; Bradshaw, Heather B; Matalon, Sadis; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2014-07-15

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  4. Prospective, Randomized, Multicenter, Controlled Trial of a Bioartificial Liver in Treating Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Demetriou, Achilles A.; Brown, Robert S.; Busuttil, Ronald W.; Fair, Jeffrey; McGuire, Brendan M.; Rosenthal, Philip; Am Esch, Jan Schulte; Lerut, Jan; Nyberg, Scott L.; Salizzoni, Mauro; Fagan, Elizabeth A.; de Hemptinne, Bernard; Broelsch, Christoph E.; Muraca, Maurizio; Salmeron, Joan Manuel; Rabkin, John M.; Metselaar, Herold J.; Pratt, Daniel; De La Mata, Manuel; McChesney, Lawrence P.; Everson, Gregory T.; Lavin, Philip T.; Stevens, Anthony C.; Pitkin, Zorina; Solomon, Barry A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The HepatAssist liver support system is an extracorporeal porcine hepatocyte-based bioartificial liver (BAL). The safety and efficacy of the BAL were evaluated in a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter trial in patients with severe acute liver failure. Summary Background Data: In experimental animals with acute liver failure, we demonstrated beneficial effects of the BAL. Similarly, Phase I trials of the BAL in acute liver failure patients yielded promising results. Methods: A total of 171 patients (86 control and 85 BAL) were enrolled. Patients with fulminant/subfulminant hepatic failure and primary nonfunction following liver transplantation were included. Data were analyzed with and without accounting for the following confounding factors: liver transplantation, time to transplant, disease etiology, disease severity, and treatment site. Results: For the entire patient population, survival at 30 days was 71% for BAL versus 62% for control (P = 0.26). After exclusion of primary nonfunction patients, survival was 73% for BAL versus 59% for control (n = 147; P = 0.12). When survival was analyzed accounting for confounding factors, in the entire patient population, there was no difference between the 2 groups (risk ratio = 0.67; P = 0.13). However, survival in fulminant/subfulminant hepatic failure patients was significantly higher in the BAL compared with the control group (risk ratio = 0.56; P = 0.048). Conclusions: This is the first prospective, randomized, controlled trial of an extracorporeal liver support system, demonstrating safety and improved survival in patients with fulminant/subfulminant hepatic failure. PMID:15082970

  5. Flank pain and acute renal failure after binge drinking: a growing concern?

    PubMed

    Calviño, Jesús; Bravo, Juan; Millán, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Tabares, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    We describe two cases of acute renal failure (ARF) after heavy alcohol intake. Remarkable features included a few days latency period after binge drinking, acute flank pain resembling pyelonephritis, lack of rhabdomyolysis or liver injury, and concomitant intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Renal function improved with conservative treatment, and despite NSAIDs use, hyperkalemia was not clinically significant. Since binge drinking is common in the Western population, early recognition of this syndrome may be helpful when examining a patient with flank pain and ARF of unclear etiology. PMID:23477481

  6. Signaling through the A2B Adenosine Receptor Dampens Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schingnitz, Ulrich; Hartman, Katherine; MacManus, Christopher F.; Eckle, Tobias; Zug, Stephanie; Colgan, Sean P.; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis and septic acute lung injury are among the leading causes for morbidity and mortality of critical illness. Extracellular adenosine is a signaling molecule implicated in the cellular adaptation to hypoxia, ischemia or inflammation. Therefore, we pursued the role of the A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR) as potential therapeutic target in endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. We gained initial insight from in vitro studies of cultured endothelia or epithelia exposed to inflammatory mediators showing time-dependent induction of the A2BAR (up to 12.9±3.4-fold, p<0.05). Similarly, murine studies of endotoxin-induced lung injury identified an almost 4.6-fold induction of A2BAR transcript and corresponding protein induction with LPS-exposure. Studies utilizing A2BAR promoter constructs and RNA-protection assays indicated that A2BAR induction involved mRNA stability. Functional studies of LPS-induced lung injury revealed that pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of the A2BAR was associated with dramatic increases in lung inflammation and histologic tissue injury. Studies of A2BAR-bone marrow chimeric mice suggested pulmonary A2BAR signaling in lung protection. Finally, studies with a specific A2BAR agonist (BAY 60-6583) demonstrated attenuation of lung inflammation and pulmonary edema in wild-type but not in gene-targeted mice for the A2BAR. These studies suggest the A2BAR as potential therapeutic target in the treatment of endotoxin-induced forms of acute lung injury. PMID:20348420

  7. αKlotho deficiency in acute kidney injury contributes to lung damage.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Priya; Li, Liping; Ye, Jianfeng; Shi, Mingjun; Taniguchi, Masatomo; Zhang, Jianning; Kuro-O, Makoto; Hu, Ming Chang; Moe, Orson W; Hsia, Connie C W

    2016-04-01

    αKlotho is a circulating protein that originates predominantly from the kidney and exerts cytoprotective effects in distant sites. We previously showed in rodents that the lung is particularly vulnerable to αKlotho deficiency. Because acute lung injury is a common and serious complication of acute kidney injury (AKI), we hypothesized that αKlotho deficiency in AKI contributes to lung injury. To test the hypothesis, we created AKI by renal artery ischemia-reperfusion in rats and observed the development of alveolar interstitial edema and increased pulmonary oxidative damage to DNA, protein, and lipids. Administration of αKlotho-containing conditioned media 6 h post-AKI did not alter plasma creatinine but improved recovery of endogenous αKlotho production 3 days post-AKI, reduced lung edema and oxidative damage, and increased endogenous antioxidative capacity in the lung. Intravenously injected αKlotho rapidly exits alveolar capillaries as a macromolecule, suggesting transcytosis and direct access to the epithelium. To explore the epithelial action of αKlotho, we simulated oxidative stress in vitro by adding hydrogen peroxide to cultured A549 lung epithelial cells. Purified recombinant αKlotho directly protected cells at 20 pM with half-maximal effects at 40-50 pM, which is compatible with circulating αKlotho levels. Addition of recombinant αKlotho activated an antioxidant response element reporter and increased the levels of target proteins of the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 related factor system. In summary, αKlotho deficiency in AKI contributes to acute lung injury by reducing endogenous antioxidative capacity and increasing oxidative damage in the lung. αKlotho replacement partially reversed these abnormalities and mitigated pulmonary complications in AKI. PMID:26718784

  8. Boussignac CPAP system for brain death confirmation with apneic test in case of acute lung injury/adult respiratory distress syndrome – series of cases

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Andrzej; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There are some patients with severe respiratory disturbances like adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and suspicion of brain death, for whom typical performance of the apneic test is difficult to complete because of quick desaturation and rapid deterioration without effective ventilation. To avoid failure of brain death confirmation and possible loss of organ donation another approach to apneic test is needed. We present two cases of patients with clinical symptoms of brain death, with lung pathology (acute lung injury, ARDS, lung embolism and lung infection), in whom apneic tests for recognizing brain death were difficult to perform. During typical performance of apneic test involving the use of oxygen catheter for apneic oxygenation we observed severe desaturation with growing hypotension and hemodynamic destabilization. But with the use of Boussignac CPAP system all necessary tests were successfully completed, confirming the patient’s brain death, which gave us the opportunity to perform procedures for organ donation. The main reason of apneic test difficulties was severe gas exchange disturbances secondary to ARDS. Thus lack of positive end expiratory pressure during classical performance of apneic test leads to quick desaturation and rapid hemodynamic deterioration, limiting the observation period below dedicated at least 10-minute interval. Conclusion The Boussignac CPAP system may be an effective tool for performing transparent apneic test in case of serious respiratory disturbances, especially in the form of acute lung injury or ARDS. PMID:26124664

  9. Thyroid Echography-induced Thyroid Storm and Exacerbation of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Naomi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Saito, Hideki; Nomura, Hidekimi; Isomura, Daichi; Okada, Hisayuki; Sugiura, Ryo; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm affect cardiac circulation in some conditions. Several factors including trauma can induce thyroid storms. We herein describe the case of a 57-year-old woman who experienced a thyroid storm and exacerbation of acute heart failure on thyroid echography. She initially demonstrated a good clinical course after medical rate control for atrial fibrillation; however, thyroid echography for evaluating hyperthyroidism led to a thyroid storm and she collapsed. A multidisciplinary approach stabilized her thyroid hormone levels and hemodynamics. Thus, the medical staff should be prepared for a deterioration in the patient's condition during thyroid echography in heart failure patients with hyperthyroidism. PMID:27522996

  10. BiPAP in acute respiratory failure due to myasthenic crisis may prevent intubation.

    PubMed

    Rabinstein, Alejandro; Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2002-11-26

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation using bilevel positive pressure ventilation (BiPAP) has not been studied in acute respiratory failure caused by MG. Eleven episodes in nine patients were initially managed with BiPAP, and endotracheal intubation was avoided in seven of these trials. Presence of hypercapnia (PaCO2 greater than 50 mm Hg) at onset predicted BiPAP failure and subsequent intubation. Results of this preliminary study suggest that a trial of BiPAP may prevent intubation in patients with myasthenic crisis without overt hypercapnia. PMID:12451217

  11. Acute respiratory failure after endoscopic third ventriculostomy: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Elgamal, Essam A; Aqil, Mansoor

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is a relatively safe procedure. However, postoperative acute respiratory failure may be fatal. The authors report an 8-month-old patient with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to posterior fossa cyst, and Chiari malformation. After ETV he developed difficulty in breathing, and had to be reintubated and ventilated. The infant recovered fully after craniocervical decompression and insertion of cystoperitoneal shunt. We speculate that respiratory failure is related to relative expansion of the posterior fossa arachnoid cyst, causing significant compression on the brain stem. Supportive care with mechanical ventilation and brain stem decompression were the mainstay of treatment. PMID:23493148

  12. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Local Failure After Primary Lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn, Jason W.D. Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Djemil, Toufik; Stephans, Kevin L.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Local failure after definitive stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is uncommon. We report the safety and efficacy of SBRT for salvage of local failure after previous SBRT with a biologically effective dose (BED) of ≥100 Gy{sub 10}. Methods and Materials: Using an institutional review board–approved lung SBRT registry, we identified all patients initially treated for early-stage NSCLC between August 2004 and January 2012 who received salvage SBRT for isolated local failure. Failure was defined radiographically and confirmed histologically unless contraindicated. All patients were treated on a Novalis/BrainLAB system using ExacTrac for image guidance, and received a BED of ≥100 Gy{sub 10} for each SBRT course. Tumor motion control involved a Bodyfix vacuum system for immobilization along with abdominal compression. Results: Of 436 patients treated from August 2004 through January 2012, we identified 22 patients with isolated local failure, 10 of whom received SBRT for salvage. The median length of follow-up was 13.8 months from salvage SBRT (range 5.3-43.5 months). Median tumor size was 3.4 cm (range 1.7-4.8 cm). Two of the 10 lesions were “central” by proximity to the mediastinum, but were outside the zone of the proximal bronchial tree. Since completing salvage, 3 patients are alive and without evidence of disease. A fourth patient died of medical comorbidities without recurrence 13.0 months after salvage SBRT. Two patients developed distant disease only. Four patients had local failure. Toxicity included grade 1-2 fatigue (3 patients) and grade 1-2 chest wall pain (5 patients). There was no grade 3-5 toxicity. Conclusions: Repeat SBRT with a BED of ≥100 Gy{sub 10} after local failure in patients with early-stage medically inoperable NSCLC was well tolerated in this series and may represent a viable salvage strategy in select patients with peripheral tumors ≤5 cm.

  13. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by tropical eosinophilic lung disease: a case in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Chani, M; Iken, M; Eljahiri, Y; Nzenze, J R; Mion, G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the case of a 28-year-old woman in whom acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following cholecystectomy led to the discovery of eosinophilic lung disease. Outcome was favorable after oxygenotherapy and medical treatment using ivermectin and corticosteroids. The case shows that hypereosinophilic syndrome can be the underlying cause of ARDS. PMID:21695880

  14. MATRILYSIN PARTICIPATES IN THE ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY OIL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ROLE OF MATRILYSIN IN THE ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY OIL COMBUSTION PARTICLES.

    K L Dreher1, WY Su2 and C L Wilson3. 1US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC; 2Duke University, Durham, NC;3Washington University, St. Louis, MO.

    Mechanisms by ...

  15. ROLE OF CELL SIGNALING IN PROTECTION FROM DIESEL AND LPS INDUCED ACUTE LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously demonstrated in CD-1 mice that pre-administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor (SB203580) reduces acute lung injury and inflammation following pulmonary exposures to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here ...

  16. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F.; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  17. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  18. Inotropes and Inodilators for Acute Heart Failure: Sarcomere Active Drugs in Focus

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, László; Papp, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Acute heart failure (AHF) emerges as a major and growing epidemiological concern with high morbidity and mortality rates. Current therapies in patients with acute heart failure rely on different strategies. Patients with hypotension, hypoperfusion, or shock require inotropic support, whereas diuretics and vasodilators are recommended in patients with systemic or pulmonary congestion. Traditionally inotropic agents, referred to as Ca2+ mobilizers load the cardiomyocyte with Ca2+ and thereby increase oxygen consumption and risk for arrhythmias. These limitations of traditional inotropes may be avoided by sarcomere targeted agents. Direct activation of the cardiac sarcomere may be achieved by either sensitizing the cardiac myofilaments to Ca2+ or activating directly the cardiac myosin. In this review, we focus on sarcomere targeted inotropic agents, emphasizing their mechanisms of action and overview the most relevant clinical considerations. PMID:24785346

  19. Acute liver failure due to primary amyloidosis in a nephrotic syndrome: a swiftly progressive course.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Brigite Aguiar; Leal, Rita; Sá, Helena; Campos, Mário

    2016-01-01

    AL amyloidosis is a clonal plasma cell proliferative disorder characterised by extracellular tissue deposits of insoluble fibrils derived from κ or λ immunoglobulin light chains. The most common organs affected by AL amyloidosis are the kidney, presenting with nephrotic syndrome and/or progressive renal dysfunction, and the heart, with restrictive cardiomyopathy. Hepatic deposition of fibrils occurs in half the cases but the liver is rarely the predominantly affected organ. The most common presentation of hepatic amyloidosis is hepatomegaly with elevated alkaline phosphatase. Acute liver failure with cholestasis and jaundice is a rare complication, with a prevalence of approximately 5%, and is usually associated with a worse prognosis. We report a case of a 39-year-old man admitted to our nephrology department with an unusual presentation of primary amyloidosis with nephrotic syndrome and acute liver failure, complicated by obstructive cholestasis resulting in death 2 months after diagnosis. PMID:26965175

  20. Acute renal failure and bilateral kidney infiltration as the first presentation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Monfared, Ali; Orangpoor, Reza Orangpoor; Fakheri, Tabassom Fakheri; Falahatkar, Siavash

    2009-01-01

    Diffuse bilateral infiltration of the kidneys by lymphoma is probably the rarest cause of renal insufficiency. Moreover, acute renal failure as the initial manifestation of the lymphoma is reported only in a few cases. A 44-year-old man complaining of bilateral flank pain and weakness for 2 months was admitted with acute renal failure. Ultraonography revealed hyperechoic bilaterally enlarged kidneys and an enlarged spleen. Fat pad aspiration was negative for amyloidosis and serum protein electrophoresis was normal. Needle biopsy of the kidney and pathologic examination showed diffuse infiltration of the interstitium with lymphocytes and atypical cells. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy were negative for malignant cells. Open kidney biopsy was performed and infiltrated cells positive for CD20 and negative for CD3 markers were observed based upon which diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell type non-Hodgkin lymphoma was made. PMID:19377260

  1. Clinical course of acute chemical lung injury caused by 3-chloropentafluoropene.

    PubMed

    Morita, Satomu; Takimoto, Takayuki; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Nishi, Katsuji; lino, Morio

    2013-01-01

    Perfluoroallyl chloride (PFAC), a fluorine-containing compound, has very severe toxicity, but this toxicity is not well characterised. We report a fatal case of acute chemical lung injury caused by the inhalation of PFAC. A 39-year-old man, working at a chemical factory, inhaled PFAC gas and died 16 days later of acute lung injury with severe pneumothorax. We present his clinical course together with thoracic CT findings, autopsy and analysis of PFAC in blood and urine samples with gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. Previously, a fatal case of PFAC was reported in 1981 but PFAC was not identified in any of the patient's samples. In our patient, we identified PFAC in both blood and urine samples. Our toxicological analysis may be used as a reference to detect PFAC toxicity in the future. Our study should be helpful for diagnosing lung injury induced by a highly toxic gas, such as PFAC. PMID:24311414

  2. The effect of fibreoptic bronchoscopy in acute respiratory distress syndrome: experimental evidence from a lung model.

    PubMed

    Nay, M-A; Mankikian, J; Auvet, A; Dequin, P-F; Guillon, A

    2016-02-01

    Flexible bronchoscopy is essential for appropriate care during mechanical ventilation, but can significantly affect mechanical ventilation of the lungs, particularly for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. We aimed to describe the consequences of bronchoscopy during lung-protective ventilation in a bench study, and thereby to determine the optimal diameter of the bronchoscope for avoiding disruption of the protective-ventilation strategy during the procedure. Immediately following the insertion of the bronchoscope into the tracheal tube, either minute ventilation decreased significantly, or positive end-expiratory pressure increased substantially, according to the setting of the inspiratory pressure limit. The increase in end-expiratory pressure led to an equivalent increase in the plateau pressure, and lung-protective ventilation was significantly altered during the procedure. We showed that a bronchoscope with an external diameter of 4 mm (or less) would allow safer bronchoscopic interventions in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:26559154

  3. Clinical course of acute chemical lung injury caused by 3-chloropentafluoropene

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Satomu; Takimoto, Takayuki; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Nishi, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    Perfluoroallyl chloride (PFAC), a fluorine-containing compound, has very severe toxicity, but this toxicity is not well characterised. We report a fatal case of acute chemical lung injury caused by the inhalation of PFAC. A 39-year-old man, working at a chemical factory, inhaled PFAC gas and died 16 days later of acute lung injury with severe pneumothorax. We present his clinical course together with thoracic CT findings, autopsy and analysis of PFAC in blood and urine samples with gas chromatograph–mass spectrometry. Previously, a fatal case of PFAC was reported in 1981 but PFAC was not identified in any of the patient's samples. In our patient, we identified PFAC in both blood and urine samples. Our toxicological analysis may be used as a reference to detect PFAC toxicity in the future. Our study should be helpful for diagnosing lung injury induced by a highly toxic gas, such as PFAC. PMID:24311414

  4. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS

    PubMed Central

    SEPEHR, REYHANEH; AUDI, SAID H.; MALEKI, SEPIDEH; STANISZEWSKI, KEVIN; EIS, ANNIE L.; KONDURI, GIRIJA G.; RANJI, MAHSA

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI) in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damage and promotes cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective of this study was to use an optical imaging technique to evaluate the variations in fluorescence intensities of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH and FAD in four different groups of rats. The ratio of these fluorescence signals (NADH/FAD), referred to as NADH redox ratio (NADH RR) has been used as an indicator of tissue metabolism in injuries. Here, we investigated whether the changes in metabolic state can be used as a marker of oxidative stress caused by hyperoxia and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in neonatal rat lungs. We examined the tissue redox states of lungs from four groups of rat pups: normoxic (21% O2) pups, hyperoxic (90% O2) pups, pups treated with LPS (normoxic + LPS), and pups treated with LPS and hyperoxia (hyperoxic + LPS). Our results show that hyperoxia oxidized the respiratory chain as reflected by a ~31% decrease in lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic lungs. LPS treatment alone or with hyperoxia had no significant effect on lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic or hyperoxic lungs, respectively. Thus, NADH RR serves as a quantitative marker of oxidative stress level in lung injury caused by two clinically important conditions: hyperoxia and LPS exposure. PMID:24672581

  5. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Audi, Said H; Maleki, Sepideh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Eis, Annie L; Konduri, Girija G; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI) in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damage and promotes cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective of this study was to use an optical imaging technique to evaluate the variations in fluorescence intensities of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH and FAD in four different groups of rats. The ratio of these fluorescence signals (NADH/FAD), referred to as NADH redox ratio (NADH RR) has been used as an indicator of tissue metabolism in injuries. Here, we investigated whether the changes in metabolic state can be used as a marker of oxidative stress caused by hyperoxia and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in neonatal rat lungs. We examined the tissue redox states of lungs from four groups of rat pups: normoxic (21% O2) pups, hyperoxic (90% O2) pups, pups treated with LPS (normoxic + LPS), and pups treated with LPS and hyperoxia (hyperoxic + LPS). Our results show that hyperoxia oxidized the respiratory chain as reflected by a ~31% decrease in lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic lungs. LPS treatment alone or with hyperoxia had no significant effect on lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic or hyperoxic lungs, respectively. Thus, NADH RR serves as a quantitative marker of oxidative stress level in lung injury caused by two clinically important conditions: hyperoxia and LPS exposure. PMID:24672581

  6. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation. PMID:26617279

  7. Pulmonary administration of a water-soluble curcumin complex reduces severity of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Madathilparambil V; Wagner, Matthew C; Rosania, Gus R; Stringer, Kathleen A; Min, Kyoung Ah; Risler, Linda; Shen, Danny D; Georges, George E; Reddy, Aravind T; Parkkinen, Jaakko; Reddy, Raju C

    2012-09-01

    Local or systemic inflammation can result in acute lung injury (ALI), and is associated with capillary leakage, reduced lung compliance, and hypoxemia. Curcumin, a plant-derived polyphenolic compound, exhibits potent anti-inflammatory properties, but its poor solubility and limited oral bioavailability reduce its therapeutic potential. A novel curcumin formulation (CDC) was developed by complexing the compound with hydroxypropyl-γ-cyclodextrin (CD). This results in greatly enhanced water solubility and stability that facilitate direct pulmonary delivery. In vitro studies demonstrated that CDC increased curcumin's association with and transport across Calu-3 human airway epithelial cell monolayers, compared with uncomplexed curcumin solubilized using DMSO or ethanol. Importantly, Calu-3 cell monolayer integrity was preserved after CDC exposure, whereas it was disrupted by equivalent uncomplexed curcumin solutions. We then tested whether direct delivery of CDC to the lung would reduce severity of ALI in a murine model. Fluorescence microscopic examination revealed an association of curcumin with cells throughout the lung. The administration of CDC after LPS attenuated multiple markers of inflammation and injury, including pulmonary edema and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. CDC also reduced oxidant stress in the lungs and activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. These results demonstrate the efficacy of CDC in a murine model of lung inflammation and injury, and support the feasibility of developing a lung-targeted, curcumin-based therapy for the treatment of patients with ALI. PMID:22312018

  8. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  9. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2015-11-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  10. Initiation or maintenance of beta-blocker therapy in patients hospitalized for acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Passos, Luiz Carlos; Oliveira, Márcio Galvão; Duraes, Andre Rodrigues; Trindade, Thiago Moreira; Barbosa, Andréa Cristina Costa

    2016-08-01

    Background Beta-blockers have been recommended for patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction for their long-term benefits. However, the tolerance to betablockers in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure should be evaluated. Objective To estimate the proportion of patients hospitalized with acute heart failure who can tolerate these agents in clinical practice and compare the clinical outcomes of patients who can and cannot tolerate treatment with beta-blockers. Setting Two reference hospitals in cardiology. Methods Retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients hospitalized for acute heart failure between September 2008 and May 2012. Population-based sample. During the study period, 325 patients were admitted consecutively, including 194 individuals with an acute heart failure diagnosis and systolic left ventricular dysfunction and ejection fraction ≤45 %, who were candidates for the initiation or continuation of beta-blockers. Main outcome measure The percentage of patients intolerant to beta-blockers and the clinical characteristics of patients. Results On admission, 61.8 % of patients were already using beta-blockers, and 73.2 % were using beta-blockers on discharge. During hospitalization, 85 % of patients used these agents for some period. The main reasons for not using betablockers were low cardiac output syndrome (24.4 %), bradycardia (24.4 %), severe hypotension or shock (17.8 %), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (13.3 %). Patients who were intolerant or did not use a beta-blocker had a longer hospital stay (18.3 vs. 11.0 days; p < .001), greater use of vasoactive drugs (41.5 vs. 16.3 %; p < .001, CI 1.80-7.35), sepsis and septic shock (RR = 3.02; CI 95 % 1.59-5.75), and higher mortality rate during hospitalization (22.6 vs. 2.9 %; p < .001; CI 3.05-32.26). Conclusion Beta-blockers could be used in 73.2 % of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure. Patients who can not tolerate BB presented

  11. Hypervolemia induces and potentiates lung damage after recruitment maneuver in a model of sepsis-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Recruitment maneuvers (RMs) seem to be more effective in extrapulmonary acute lung injury (ALI), caused mainly by sepsis, than in pulmonary ALI. Nevertheless, the maintenance of adequate volemic status is particularly challenging in sepsis. Since the interaction between volemic status and RMs is not well established, we investigated the effects of RMs on lung and distal organs in the presence of hypovolemia, normovolemia, and hypervolemia in a model of extrapulmonary lung injury induced by sepsis. Methods ALI was induced by cecal ligation and puncture surgery in 66 Wistar rats. After 48 h, animals were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and randomly assigned to 3 volemic status (n = 22/group): 1) hypovolemia induced by blood drainage at mean arterial pressure (MAP)≈70 mmHg; 2) normovolemia (MAP≈100 mmHg), and 3) hypervolemia with colloid administration to achieve a MAP≈130 mmHg. In each group, animals were further randomized to be recruited (CPAP = 40 cm H2O for 40 s) or not (NR) (n = 11/group), followed by 1 h of protective mechanical ventilation. Echocardiography, arterial blood gases, static lung elastance (Est,L), histology (light and electron microscopy), lung wet-to-dry (W/D) ratio, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, caspase-3, type III procollagen (PCIII), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA expressions in lung tissue, as well as lung and distal organ epithelial cell apoptosis were analyzed. Results We observed that: 1) hypervolemia increased lung W/D ratio with impairment of oxygenation and Est,L, and was associated with alveolar and endothelial cell damage and increased IL-6, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 mRNA expressions; and 2) RM reduced alveolar collapse independent of volemic status. In hypervolemic animals, RM improved oxygenation above the levels observed with the use of positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP), but increased lung injury and led to higher inflammatory and fibrogenetic

  12. Early Management of Patients With Acute Heart Failure: State of the Art and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sean P.; Storrow, Alan B.; Levy, Phillip D.; Albert, Nancy; Butler, Javed; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Felker, G. Michael; Fermann, Gregory J.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Givertz, Michael M.; Hiestand, Brian; Hollander, Judd E.; Lanfear, David E.; Pang, Peter S.; Peacock, W. Frank; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Teerlink, John R.; Lenihan, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) afflicts nearly 6 million Americans, resulting in 1 million emergency department (ED) visits and over 1 million annual hospital discharges. The majority of inpatient admissions originate in the ED; thus, it is crucial that emergency physicians and other providers involved in early management understand the latest developments in diagnostic testing, therapeutics, and alternatives to hospitalization. This article discusses contemporary ED management as well as the necessary next steps for ED-based acute HF research. PMID:25423908

  13. Renovascular acute renal failure precipitated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for pancreatic stones

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Nicolas; Goffette, Pierre; Deprez, Pierre; Jadoul, Michel; Morelle, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic stones is considered a safe and efficient method to facilitate fragmentation and stone removal. We describe the case of a 73-year-old woman with a solitary functioning kidney who presented an acute-onset anuria and renovascular renal failure the day after ESWL. We speculate that vascular calcifications in the area targeted by shock waves played a critical role in renal artery obstruction in the present case. PMID:26251710

  14. Modified Stumper technique for acute postoperative bifurcation stenosis causing right ventricular failure after Ross procedure

    PubMed Central

    Divekar, Abhay A

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we describe a 15-year-old patient who underwent a Ross procedure for a regurgitant bicuspid aortic valve and ascending aortic dilation. After the operation was over, he could not be separated from cardiopulmonary bypass and was noted to have isolated right ventricular failure. This report takes the reader through the diagnostic evaluation, highlights the importance of invasive assessment in the immediate postoperative period, and discusses successful transcatheter intervention in the acute postoperative setting. PMID:27625524

  15. Acute Renal Failure due to Leukaemic Infiltration in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Kayar, Yusuf; Ekinci, Iskender; Bay, Ilker; Bayram Kayar, Nuket; Hamdard, Jamshid; Kazancıoğlu, Rumeyza

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a malignancy characterized by clonal proliferation and accumulation of B lymphocytes. Although leukaemic infiltration of the kidney is well recognized in CLL, acute renal failure (ARF) due to leukaemic infiltration is extremely rare. Here we present a case of ARF as the initial manifestation of CLL. The diagnosis was made by a kidney biopsy. Treatment with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone resulted in a completely improved renal function. PMID:26146503

  16. Modifications of lung clearance mechanisms by acute influenza A infection

    SciTech Connect

    Levandowski, R.A.; Gerrity, T.R.; Garrard, C.S.

    1985-10-01

    Four volunteers with naturally acquired, culture-proved influenza A infection inhaled a radiolabeled aerosol to permit investigation of lung mucociliary clearance mechanisms during and after symptomatic illness. Mucus transport in the trachea was undetectable when monitored with an external multidetector probe within 48 hours of the onset of the illness, but was found at a normal velocity by 1 week in three of the four subjects. In two volunteers who coughed 23 to 48 times during the 4.5-hour observation period, whole lung clearance was as fast within the first 48 hours of illness as during health 3 months later in spite of the absence of measurable tracheal mucus transport. Conversely, in spite of the return 1 week later of mucus transport at velocities expected in the trachea, whole lung clearance for the 4.5-hour period was slowed in two volunteers who coughed less than once an hour. The data offer evidence that cough is important in maintaining lung clearance for at least several days after symptomatic influenza A infection when other mechanisms that depend on ciliary function are severely deficient.

  17. Cell-free hemoglobin: a novel mediator of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Ciara M; Upchurch, Cameron P; Janz, David R; Grove, Brandon S; Putz, Nathan D; Wickersham, Nancy E; Dikalov, Sergey I; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2016-03-15

    Patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have elevated levels of cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) in the air space, but the contribution of CFH to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that levels of CFH in the air space correlate with measures of alveolar-capillary barrier dysfunction in humans with ARDS (r = 0.89, P < 0.001) and in mice with ventilator-induced acute lung injury (r = 0.89, P < 0.001). To investigate the specific contribution of CFH to ARDS, we studied the impact of purified CFH in the mouse lung and on cultured mouse lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells. Intratracheal delivery of CFH in mice causes acute lung injury with air space inflammation and alveolar-capillary barrier disruption. Similarly, in MLE-12 cells, CFH increases proinflammatory cytokine expression and increases paracellular permeability as measured by electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing. Next, to determine whether these effects are mediated by the iron-containing heme moiety of CFH, we treated mice with intratracheal hemin, the chloride salt of heme, and found that hemin was sufficient to increase alveolar permeability but failed to induce proinflammatory cytokine expression or epithelial cell injury. Together, these data identify CFH in the air space as a previously unrecognized driver of lung epithelial injury in human and experimental ARDS and suggest that CFH and hemin may contribute to ARDS through different mechanisms. Interventions targeting CFH and heme in the air space could provide a new therapeutic approach for ARDS. PMID:26773065

  18. Geographic Access to High Capability Severe Acute Respiratory Failure Centers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David J.; Angus, Derek C.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Yealy, Donald M.; Carr, Brendan G.; Kurland, Kristen; Boujoukos, Arthur; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Optimal care of adults with severe acute respiratory failure requires specific resources and expertise. We sought to measure geographic access to these centers in the United States. Design Cross-sectional analysis of geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers in the United States. We defined high capability centers using two criteria: (1) provision of adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), based on either 2008–2013 Extracorporeal Life Support Organization reporting or provision of ECMO to 2010 Medicare beneficiaries; or (2) high annual hospital mechanical ventilation volume, based 2010 Medicare claims. Setting Nonfederal acute care hospitals in the United States. Measurements and Main Results We defined geographic access as the percentage of the state, region and national population with either direct or hospital-transferred access within one or two hours by air or ground transport. Of 4,822 acute care hospitals, 148 hospitals met our ECMO criteria and 447 hospitals met our mechanical ventilation criteria. Geographic access varied substantially across states and regions in the United States, depending on center criteria. Without interhospital transfer, an estimated 58.5% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 79.0% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. With interhospital transfer and under ideal circumstances, an estimated 96.4% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 98.6% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. However, this degree of geographic access required substantial interhospital transfer of patients, including up to two hours by air. Conclusions Geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers varies widely across states and regions in the United States. Adequate

  19. The usage of the Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure system in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Wong, D T; Tam, A D; Van Zundert, T C R V

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) devices have been used to treat patients in acute respiratory failure. However they require an electric power source, are relatively large in size, and may be difficult to use in prehospital settings. The recently introduced Boussignac CPAP system is capable of delivering 10 cmH2O of CPAP, is compact, portable and requires only an oxygen source. This paper reviews the efficacy of using Boussignac CPAP as a treatment for acute respiratory failure in both prehospital and hospital settings. All studies mainly focused on patients treated for cardiogenic pulmonary edema. In the prehospital setting, Boussigac CPAP significantly improved respiratory parameters and oxygenation from baseline values. In the emergency department setting, Boussignac CPAP was more effective than standard oxygen delivery and just as effective as BiPAP in improving patient oxygenation and respiration. In one study, implementing Boussignac CPAP reduced intubation rate and hospital stay. Most hospital staff found Boussignac CPAP easy to use and complication rates were low. Boussigac CPAP is a useful device in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure, especially in the prehospital setting. PMID:23419338

  20. Preventing cerebral oedema in acute liver failure: the case for quadruple-H therapy.

    PubMed

    Warrillow, S J; Bellomo, R

    2014-01-01

    Severe cerebral oedema is a life-threatening complication of acute liver failure. Hyperammonaemia and cerebral hyperaemia are major contributing factors. A multimodal approach, which incorporates hyperventilation, haemodiafiltration, hypernatraemia and hypothermia (quadruple-H therapy), may prevent or attenuate severe cerebral oedema. This approach is readily administered by critical care clinicians and is likely to be more effective than the use of single therapies. Targeting of PaCO2 in the mild hyperventilation range, as seen in acute liver failure patients before intubation, aims to minimise hyperaemic cerebral oedema. Haemodiafiltration aims to achieve the rapid control of elevated blood ammonia concentrations by its removal and to reduce production via the lowering of core temperature. The administration of concentrated saline increases serum tonicity and further reduces cerebral swelling. In addition, the pathologically increased cerebral blood-flow is further attenuated by therapeutic hypothermia. The combination of all four treatments in a multimodal approach may be a safe and effective means of attenuating or treating the cerebral oedema of acute liver failure and preventing death from neurological complications. PMID:24471667

  1. Carcinoid heart disease from ovarian primary presenting with acute pericarditis and biventricular failure

    PubMed Central

    Vergani, D; Massironi, L; Lombardi, F; Fiorentini, C

    1998-01-01

    A case is described of a 54 year old woman who had acute pericarditis with large exudative effusion accompanied by severe right and left ventricular failure. The patient was finally diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian carcinoid teratoma. She was treated with octreotide—a somatostatin analogue—followed by radical surgical resection of the neoplasm. At one year follow up only mild carcinoid tricuspid regurgitation remained. Only 16 cases of carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian primary have been described in literature. Moreover clinically manifest acute, non-metastatic pericarditis and left heart failure are not considered as possible presentations of carcinoid heart disease, whatever the origin. In a recent series a small pericardial effusion was considered an infrequent and unexpected echocardiographic finding in carcinoid heart patients. One case of "carcinoid pericarditis" has previously been described as a consequence of pericardial metastasis. Left sided heart involvement is usually caused by bronchial carcinoids or patency of foramen ovale; both were excluded in the case presented.

 Keywords: carcinoid heart disease;  ovarian tumour;  acute pericarditis;  heart failure PMID:10065036

  2. Challenges in Acute Heart Failure Clinical Management: Optimizing Care Despite Incomplete Evidence and Imperfect Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Maisel, Alan S.; Storrow, Alan B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute heart failure is a common condition associated with considerable morbidity, mortality, and cost. However, evidence-based data on treating heart failure in the acute setting are limited, and current individual treatment options have variable efficacy. The healthcare team must often individualize patient care in ways that may extend beyond available clinical guidelines. In this review, we address the question, “How do you do the best you can clinically with incomplete evidence and imperfect drugs?” Expert opinion is provided to supplement guideline-based recommendations and help address the typical challenges that are involved in the management of patients with acute heart failure. Specifically, we discuss 4 key areas that are important in the continuum of patient care: differential diagnosis and risk stratification; choice and implementation of initial therapy; assessment of the adequacy of therapy during hospitalization or observation; and considerations for discharge/transition of care. A case study is presented to highlight the decision-making process throughout each of these areas. Evidence is accumulating that should help guide patients and healthcare providers on a path to better quality of care. PMID:25679083

  3. Health Literacy and Mortality: A Cohort Study of Patients Hospitalized for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Candace D; Cawthon, Courtney; Kripalani, Sunil; Liu, Dandan; Storrow, Alan B; Roumie, Christianne L

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 30% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are rehospitalized or die within 90 days of discharge. Lower health literacy is associated with mortality among outpatients with chronic heart failure; little is known about this relationship after hospitalization for acute heart failure. Methods and Results Patients hospitalized for acute heart failure and discharged home between November 2010 and June 2013 were followed through December 31, 2013. Nurses administered the Brief Health Literacy Screen at admission; low health literacy was defined as Brief Health Literacy Screen ≤9. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were time to first rehospitalization and, separately, time to first emergency department visit within 90 days of discharge. Cox proportional hazards models determined their relationships with health literacy, adjusting for age, gender, race, insurance, education, comorbidity, and hospital length of stay. For the 1379 patients, average age was 63.1 years, 566 (41.0%) were female, and 324 (23.5%) had low health literacy. Median follow-up was 20.7 months (interquartile range 12.8 to 29.6 months), and 403 (29.2%) patients died. Adjusted hazard ratio for death among patients with low health literacy was 1.34 (95% CI 1.04, 1.73, P=0.02) compared to Brief Health Literacy Screen >9. Within 90 days of discharge, there were 415 (30.1%) rehospitalizations and 201 (14.6%) emergency department visits, with no evident association with health literacy. Conclusions Lower health literacy was associated with increased risk of death after hospitalization for acute heart failure. There was no evident relationship between health literacy and 90-day rehospitalization or emergency department visits. PMID:25926328

  4. A case of anorexia nervosa with acute renal failure induced by rhabdomyolysis; possible involvement of hypophosphatemia or phosphate depletion.

    PubMed

    Wada, S; Nagase, T; Koike, Y; Kugai, N; Nagata, N

    1992-04-01

    A 16-year-old girl with anorexia nervosa first presented with malnutrition, liver dysfunction, and rhabdomyolysis. Administration of fluid and nutrition saved her from the initial critical state, but acute renal failure followed. Laboratory examination revealed intrinsic renal failure induced by rhabdomyolysis. Latent phosphate depletion and refeeding-induced hypophosphatemia was implicated as the cause of rhabdomyolysis; however coexisting hypotension, dehydration, and liver dysfunction may have contributed to the renal failure. The patient recovered from azotemia by hemodialysis. This is the first reported case of anorexia nervosa with acute renal failure resulting from rhabdomyolysis induced by hypophosphatemia or phosphate depletion. PMID:1633352

  5. Multi-factor analysis of failure of renal replacement therapy in acute renal failure developed after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Szwedo, Ireneusz; Tyc, Joanna; Hawrysz, Anna; Janiak, Kamila; Cichoń, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute renal failure (ARF) is a rare (2-15%), but severe complication of cardiac surgery with overall mortality reaching 40-80%. In order to save patients’ lives they are treated with renal replacement therapy (RRT). The aim of our study was to assess the impact of different perioperative factors on mortality among patients treated with RRT because of acute renal failure, which occurred as a complication of a heart surgery. Material and methods Retrospective analysis included 45 patients, operated in the years 2009-2013, who underwent renal replacement therapy in order to treat postoperative ARF. The perioperative factors were analysed in two groups: group 1 – patients who died before discharge; and group 2 – those who survived until hospital discharge. Results Forty-five of 3509 cardiac surgical patients (1.25%) required RRT after the surgery. A total of 23 (51.11%) died before discharge (group 1). Patients in group 1 were characterised by older age (70.21 vs. 67 years), higher mean EuroSCORE value (9.28 vs. 7.15) (p < 0.05), higher percentage of concomitant surgery (63.63% vs. 28.57%) (p < 0.05) and of admission of catecholamines in the postoperative period (100% vs. 68.42%) (p < 0.005), and higher mean urea blood level prior to RRT initiation (156.65 vs. 102.54 mg/dl) (p < 0.05). Conclusions The statistically relevant death predictors proved to be: high EuroSCORE, concomitant surgery, and high urea level at RRT initiation and admission of catecholamines in the postoperative period. After conformation in further studies, those factors may prove useful in stratification of death risk among surgical patients requiring RRT. PMID:26702273

  6. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the treatment of acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Alfonso Megido, Joaquín; González Franco, Alvaro

    2014-03-01

    When acute heart failure progresses and there is acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, routine therapeutic measures should be accompanied by other measures that help to correct oxygenation of the patient. The final and most drastic step is mechanical ventilation. Non-invasive ventilation has been developed in the last few years as a method that attempts to improve oxygenation without the need for intubation, thus, in theory, reducing morbidity and mortality in these patients. The present article describes the controversies surrounding the results of this technique and discusses its indications. The article also discusses how to start non-invasive ventilation in patients with acute pulmonary edema from a practical point of view. PMID:24930085

  7. The epidemiology and outcome of acute renal failure and the impact on chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Block, Clay A; Schoolwerth, Anton C

    2006-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. Recent publications have highlighted changes in the epidemiology and improvement in mortality that was long thought to be static despite improvements in clinical care. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts, such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative, are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease. Two brief case reports are offered to help frame the context and clinical impact of this disorder, followed by a review of some of the recent literature that addresses these points. PMID:17150044

  8. Hemodynamics of Acute Right Heart Failure in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    McLean, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In critically ill patients with circulatory shock, the role of the left ventricle has long been appreciated and the object of measurement and therapeutic targeting. The right ventricle is often under appreciated and dysfunction may be overlooked. Generally, the right ventricle operates passively to support the ejection of the left ventricular diastolic volume. A loss of right ventricular wall compliance secondary to pulmonary pressures may result in an alteration in the normal pressure-volume relationship, ultimately affecting the stroke volume and cardiac output. Traditional right heart filling indices may increase because of decreasing compliance, further complicating the picture. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome combined with the effects of a mean airway pressure strategy may create an acute cor pulmonale. PMID:26567491

  9. Glutaric aciduria type 2 presenting with acute respiratory failure in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Ebru Ortac; Rama, Dorina; Ünal, Özlem; Sivri, Serap; Topeli, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria (GTA) type II can be seen as late onset form with myopathic phenotype. We present a case of a 19-year old female with progressive muscle weakness was admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and acute renal failure. Patient was unconscious. Pupils were anisocoric and light reflex was absent. She had hepatomegaly. The laboratory results showed a glucose level of 70 mg/dl and the liver enzymes were high. The patient also had hyponatremia (117 mEq/L) and lactate level of 3.9 mmol/L. Tandem MS and organic acid analysis were compatible with GTA type II. Carnitine 1gr, riboflavin 100 mg and co-enzymeQ10 100 mg was arranged. After four months from beginning of treatment tandem MS results are improved. Respiratory failure, acute renal failure due to profound proximal myopathy can be due to glutaric aciduria type II that responded rapidly to appropriate therapy. PMID:26236614

  10. Ularitide for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure: from preclinical to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Anker, Stefan D; Ponikowski, Piotr; Mitrovic, Veselin; Peacock, W Frank; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-03-21

    The short- and long-term morbidity and mortality in acute heart failure is still unacceptably high. There is an unmet need for new therapy options with new drugs with a new mode of action. One of the drugs currently in clinical testing in Phase III is ularitide, which is the chemically synthesized form of the human natriuretic peptide urodilatin. Urodilatin is produced in humans by differential processing of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in distal renal tubule cells. Physiologically, urodilatin appears to be the natriuretic peptide involved in sodium homeostasis. Ularitide exerts its pharmacological actions such as vasodilation, diuresis, and natriuresis through the natriuretic peptide receptor/particulate guanylate cyclase/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway. In animal models of heart failure as well as Phase I and II clinical studies in heart failure patients, ularitide demonstrated beneficial effects such as symptom relief and vasodilation, while still preserving renal function. Subsequently, the pivotal acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) Phase III study, called TRUE-AHF, was started with the objectives to evaluate the effects of ularitide infusion on the clinical status and cardiovascular mortality of patients with ADHF compared with placebo. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical data supporting the potential use of ularitide in the treatment of ADHF. PMID:25670819

  11. Glutaric aciduria type 2 presenting with acute respiratory failure in an adult.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Ebru Ortac; Rama, Dorina; Ünal, Özlem; Sivri, Serap; Topeli, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria (GTA) type II can be seen as late onset form with myopathic phenotype. We present a case of a 19-year old female with progressive muscle weakness was admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and acute renal failure. Patient was unconscious. Pupils were anisocoric and light reflex was absent. She had hepatomegaly. The laboratory results showed a glucose level of 70 mg/dl and the liver enzymes were high. The patient also had hyponatremia (117 mEq/L) and lactate level of 3.9 mmol/L. Tandem MS and organic acid analysis were compatible with GTA type II. Carnitine 1gr, riboflavin 100 mg and co-enzymeQ10 100 mg was arranged. After four months from beginning of treatment tandem MS results are improved. Respiratory failure, acute renal failure due to profound proximal myopathy can be due to glutaric aciduria type II that responded rapidly to appropriate therapy. PMID:26236614

  12. Liver dialysis in acute-on-chronic liver failure: current and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Maiwall, Rakhi; Maras, Jaswinder Singh; Nayak, Suman Lata; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) are known to have a very high mortality rate as the majority of these patients succumb to multiorgan failure. Liver transplant remains the only option for these patients; however, there are problems with its availability, cost and also the complications and side effects associated with immunosuppression. Unlike advanced decompensated liver disease, there is a potential for hepatic regeneration and recovery in patients with ACLF. A liver support system, cell or non-cell based, logically is likely to provide temporary functional support until the donor liver becomes available or the failing liver survives the onslaught of the acute insult and spontaneously regenerates. Understanding the pathogenesis of liver failure and regeneration is essential to define the needs for a support system. Removal of hepatotoxic metabolites and inhibitors of hepatic regeneration by liver dialysis, a non-cell-based hepatic support, could help to provide a suitable microenvironment and support the failing liver. The current systems, i.e., MARS and Prometheus, have failed to show survival benefits in patients with ACLF based on which newer devices with improved functionality are currently under development. However, larger randomized trials are needed to prove whether these devices can enable restoration of the complex dysregulated immune system and impact organ failure and mortality in these patients. PMID:26201332

  13. Adequate Systemic Perfusion Maintained by a CentriMag during Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Favaloro, Roberto R.; Bertolotti, Alejandro; Diez, Mirta; Favaloro, Liliana; Gomez, Carmen; Peradejordi, Margarita; Trentadue, Julio; Hellman, Lorena; Arzani, Yanina; Otero, Pilar Varela

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support during severe acute heart failure presents options for myocardial recovery or cardiac replacement. Short-term circulatory support with the newest generation of magnetically levitated centrifugal-flow pumps affords several potential advantages. Herein, we present our experience with such a pump—the CentriMag® (Levitronix LLC; Waltham, Mass) centrifugal-flow ventricular assist device—in 4 critically ill patients who were in cardiogenic shock. From November 2007 through March 2008, 3 patients were supported after cardiac surgery, and 1 after chronic heart failure worsened. Two patients were bridged to heart transplantation, and 2 died during support. Perfusion during support was evaluated in terms of serum lactic acid levels and oxygenation values. In all of the patients, the CentriMag's pump flow was adequate, and continuous mechanical ventilation support was provided. Lactic acid levels substantially improved with CentriMag support and were maintained at near-normal levels throughout. At the same time, arterial pH, PO2, and carbon dioxide levels remained within acceptable ranges. No thromboembolic events or mechanical failures occurred. Our experience indicates that short-term use of the CentriMag ventricular assist device during acute heart failure can restore and adequately support circulation until recovery or until the application of definitive therapy. PMID:18941648

  14. Acute-on-chronic liver failure: Pathogenesis, prognostic factors and management

    PubMed Central

    Blasco-Algora, Sara; Masegosa-Ataz, José; Gutiérrez-García, María Luisa; Alonso-López, Sonia; Fernández-Rodríguez, Conrado M

    2015-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is increasingly recognized as a complex syndrome that is reversible in many cases. It is characterized by an acute deterioration of liver function in the background of a pre-existing chronic liver disease often associated with a high short-term mortality rate. Organ failure (OF) is always associated, and plays a key role in determining the course, and the outcome of the disease. The definition of ACLF remains controversial due to its overall ambiguity, with several disparate criteria among various associations dedicated to the study of liver diseases. Although the precise pathogenesis needs to be clarified, it appears that an altered host response to injury might be a contributing factor caused by immune dysfunction, ultimately leading to a pro-inflammatory status, and eventually to OF. The PIRO concept (Predisposition, Insult, Response and Organ Failure) has been proposed to better approach the underlying mechanisms. It is accepted that ACLF is a different and specific form of liver failure, where a precipitating event is always involved, even though it cannot always be ascertained. According to several studies, infections and active alcoholism often trigger ACLF. Viral hepatitis, gastrointestinal haemorrhage, or drug induced liver injury, which can also provoke the syndrome. This review mainly focuses on the physiopathology and prognostic aspects. We believe these features are essential to further understanding and providing the rationale for improveddisease management strategies. PMID:26576097

  15. Idiopathic neonatal giant cell hepatitis presenting with acute hepatic failure on postnatal day one.

    PubMed

    Correa, Kimberley K; Nanjundiah, Prathiba; Wirtschafter, David D; Alshak, Najeeb S

    2002-01-01

    We report a term male infant presenting on postnatal day 1 with fulminant hepatic failure. Described congenital infection, metabolic disorders, and cardiovascular etiologies of acute neonatal liver failure were assessed and eliminated. A liver biopsy on postnatal day 10 showed neonatal giant cell hepatitis (NGCH) with an unusual degree of fibrosis for this early postnatal age. NGCH is a clinical diagnosis of cholestatic disorders of unknown etiology in the newborn, and, to our knowledge, has not been previously associated with immediate neonatal hepatic failure. The giant cell transformation is a common response to a variety of insults and only rarely occurs beyond the neonatal period. Most cases present with cholestatic jaundice and varying degrees of coagulopathy, and, many, as in this case, show progressive resolution. PMID:11948391

  16. Reinfusion of ascites during hemodialysis as a treatment of massive refractory ascites and acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ta-Wei; Chen, Yi-Chuan; Wu, Meei-Ju; Li, Anna Fen-Yau; Yang, Wu-Chang; Ng, Yee-Yung

    2011-01-01

    Refractory ascites can occur in patients with various conditions. Although several procedures based on the reinfusion of ascitic fluid have been reported after the failure of bed rest, salt and water restriction, diuretics, intravenous administration of albumin, and repeated paracentesis, these procedures are performed for ascitic fluid removal without dialytic effect. In this study, a flow control reinfusion of ascites during hemodialysis (HD) was performed to demonstrate the efficacy of this method in a lupus patient with massive refractory ascites and respiratory and acute renal failure (ARF). The alleviation of ascites and ARF attests to the success of the flow control reinfusion of ascites during HD. This procedure can control the rate of ascites and body fluid removal simultaneously during HD using the roller pump. In conclusion, with a normal coagulation profile, the procedure of flow control reinfusion of ascites during HD is an effective alternative treatment for the alleviation of refractory ascites with renal failure. PMID:21694946

  17. Respiratory acoustic impedance in left ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Depeursinge, F B; Feihl, F; Depeursinge, C; Perret, C H

    1989-12-01

    The measurement of respiratory acoustic impedance (Zrs) by forced pseudorandom noise provides a simple means of assessing respiratory mechanics in nonintubated intensive care patients. To characterize the lung mechanical alterations induced by acute vascular congestion of the lung, Zrs was measured in 14 spontaneously breathing patients hospitalized for acute left ventricular failure. The Zrs data in the cardiac patients were compared with those of 48 semirecumbent normal subjects and those of 23 sitting asthmatic patients during allergen-induced bronchospasm. In the patients with acute left ventricular failure, the Zrs abnormalities noted were an excessive frequency dependence of resistance from 10 to 20 Hz and an abnormally low reactance at all frequencies, abnormalities qualitatively similar to those observed in the asthmatic patients but of lesser magnitude. Acute lung vascular congestion modifies the acoustic impedance of the respiratory system. Reflex-induced bronchospasm might be the main mechanism altering respiratory acoustic impedance in acute left ventricular failure. PMID:2582846

  18. Differentiation of acute renal failure and chronic renal failure by 2-dimensional analysis of urinary dipeptidase versus serum creatinine.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Kang, B Y; We, J S; Park, S K; Park, H S

    1999-03-01

    The differential diagnosis of acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF) may be possible by measuring urinary dipeptidase (Udpase) activity and serum creatinine (Scr) concentration. When the mass test of 246 individuals was examined on a 2-dimensional plot of Udpase (y-axis) versus Scr (x-axis) with the data obtained from healthy volunteers (n = 189), ARF (n = 19) and CRF (n = 38) patients, the characteristic distribution of each group was obvious. It is summarized by the mean values of healthy volunteers (1.44 +/- 0.39 mg/dL, 1.19 (0.59 mU/mL), ARF (6.04 +/- 5.04 mg/dL, 0.12 +/- 0.08 mU/mL), and CRF patients (8.72 +/- 2.93 mg/dL, 0.81 +/- 0.44 mU/mL). The healthy volunteers are distributed along the y-axis and the ARF patients the x-axis, thus separating the two groups 90 degrees apart. The CRF patients are scattered away from both x-, and y-axis. This 2-dimensional approach is thought to be very useful for the differential diagnosis of ARF suggesting Udpase as a new member of the marker enzymes of renal disease. PMID:10088177

  19. Acute viral hepatitis E presenting with haemolytic anaemia and acute renal failure in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh; Aggarwal, Amitesh; Jain, Piyush; Rajpal, Surender; Agarwal, Mukul P

    2015-10-01

    The association of acute hepatitis E viral (HEV) infection with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency leading to extensive intravascular haemolysis is a very rare clinical entity. Here we discuss such a patient, who presented with acute HEV illness, developed severe intravascular haemolysis and unusually high levels of bilirubin, complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), and was later on found to have a deficiency of G6PD. The patient recovered completely with haemodialysis and supportive management. PMID:25500531

  20. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis--a rare cause of acute respiratory failure managed with nasal mask bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) ventilation.

    PubMed

    Lin, M C; Liaw, M Y; Huang, C C; Chuang, M L; Tsai, Y H

    1997-08-01

    A 68 yr old woman presented with acute respiratory failure. She was suspected of having a phrenic-diaphragmatic impairment, without evidence of an intrinsic lung disease or generalized neuromuscular disorder, after 3 weeks of prolonged mechanical ventilation. A series of studies, including fluoroscopy, phrenic nerve stimulation test and diaphragmatic electromyography, was performed before the diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (BDP) was confirmed. The patient was successfully weaned from the conventional mechanical ventilator, and was placed on nasal mask bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) ventilation. A high degree of clinical suspicion of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis should always be raised in patients suffering respiratory failure without definite predisposing factors. Weaning with noninvasive nasal mask ventilation should be tried first instead of direct tracheostomy. PMID:9272940

  1. ROLE OF TACHYKININS IN OZONE-INDUCED ACUTE LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    To examine the hypothesis that the acute, reversible changes caused by O3 exposure are mediated by techykinin release, guinea pigs were depleted of tachykinins using repeated capsaicin (CAP) injections prior to O3 exposure, in an attempt to prevent O3-induced functional changes. ...

  2. Micro-RNA-122 Levels in Acute Liver Failure and Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Perry H.; Yuan, Hejun; Devine, Robert K.; Hynan, Linda S.; Jain, Mamta K.; Lee, William M.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-122 (miR-122) is the foremost liver-related micro-RNA, but its role in the hepatocyte is not fully understood. To evaluate whether circulating levels of miR-122 are elevated in chronic-HCV for a reason other than hepatic injury, we compared serum level in patients with chronic hepatitis C to other forms of liver injury including patients with acute liver failure and healthy controls. MiR-122 was quantitated using sera from 35 acute liver failure patients (20 acetaminophen-induced, 15 other etiologies), 39 chronic-HCV patients and 12 controls. In parallel, human genomic DNA (hgDNA) levels were measured to reflect quantitatively the extent of hepatic necrosis. Additionally, six HIV–HCV co-infected patients, who achieved viral clearance after undergoing therapy with interferon and ribavirin, had serial sera miR-122 and hgDNA levels measured before and throughout treatment. Serum miR-122 levels were elevated approximately 100-fold in both acute liver failure and chronic-HCV sera as compared to controls (P<0.001), whereas hgDNA levels were only elevated in acute liver failure patients as compared to both chronic-HCV and controls (P<0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that chronic-HCV sera with normal aminotransferase levels showed elevated miR-122 despite low levels of hepatocyte necrosis. All successfully treated HCV patients showed a significant Log10 decrease in miR-122 levels ranging from 0.16 to 1.46, after sustained viral response. Chronic-HCV patients have very elevated serum miR-122 levels in the range of most patients with severe hepatic injury leading to acute liver failure. Eradication of HCV was associated with decreased miR-122 but not hgDNA. An additional mechanism besides hepatic injury may be active in chronic-HCV to explain the exaggerated circulating levels of miR-122 observed. PMID:24895202

  3. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called “second pathway of liver regeneration.” The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin. PMID:26136687

  4. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called "second pathway of liver regeneration." The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin. PMID:26136687

  5. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  6. A Curious Case of Acute Respiratory Failure: Is It Antisynthetase Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Serafin; Iliescu, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase (AS) syndrome is a major subgroup of inflammatory myopathies seen in a minority of patients with dermatomyositis and polymyositis. Although it is usually associated with elevated creatine phosphokinase level, some patients may have amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM) like presentation with predominant skin involvement. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the main pulmonary manifestation and may be severe thereby determining the prognosis. It may rarely present with a very aggressive course resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of a 43-year-old male who presented with nonresolving pneumonia who was eventually diagnosed to have ADM through a skin biopsy without any muscle weakness. ADM may be associated with rapidly progressive course of interstitial lung disease (ADM-ILD) which is associated with high mortality. Differentiation between ADM-ILD and AS syndrome may be difficult in the absence of positive serology and clinical presentation may help in clinching the diagnosis. PMID:27433359

  7. Serum from patients with hepatitis E virus-related acute liver failure induces human liver cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    WU, FAN; WANG, MINXIN; TIAN, DEYING

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute liver failure has not been fully elucidated. The present study investigated the effects of the serum from patients with hepatitis E virus (HEV)-related acute liver failure on human liver cell survival and apoptosis, and evaluated the protective effects of anti-lipopolysaccharide(LPS) antibody recognizing core polysaccharide against acute liver failure serum-induced apoptosis. Serum was collected from patients with HEV-related acute liver failure. The levels of endotoxin (LPS) in the serum were measured using a quantitative tachypleus amebocyte lysate endotoxin detection kit with a chromogenic endpoint. Serum with a mean concentration of LPS was incubated with L02 human liver cells and the rate of apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. The apoptotic rate was also evaluated in liver cells incubated with antibody and the HEV-related acute liver failure serum. The results indicated that the concentration of LPS in the serum of patients with HEV-related acute liver failure was 0.26±0.02 EU/ml, which was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). The rate of apoptosis in the human liver cells induced by acute liver failure serum was 5.83±0.42%, which was significantly increased compared with that in the cells treated with the serum of healthy individuals (P<0.05). The apoptotic rate of the cells incubated with antibody and the acute liver failure serum was 5.53±0.51%, which was lower than that of the cells incubated with acute liver failure serum alone (P>0.05). These results indicate that the serum of patients with HEV-related acute liver failure induces the apoptosis of human liver cells. LPS may be directly involved in the apoptosis of human liver cells. Moreover, the presence of the antibody did not significantly reduce the level of apoptosis of liver cells exposed to HEV-related acute liver failure serum. PMID:24348810

  8. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome.

  9. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome. PMID:27222793

  10. Low Dose Dopamine or Low Dose Nesiritide in Acute Heart Failure with Renal Dysfunction: The ROSE Acute Heart Failure Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Horng H.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Givertz, Michael M.; Stevenson, Lynne W.; Semigran, Marc J.; Goldsmith, Steven R.; Bart, Bradley A.; Bull, David A.; Stehlik, Josef; LeWinter, Martin M.; Konstam, Marvin A.; Huggins, Gordon S.; Rouleau, Jean L.; O’Meara, Eileen; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Starling, Randall C.; Butler, Javed; Deswal, Anita; Felker, G. Michael; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Bonita, Raphael E.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Ofili, Elizabeth O.; Mann, Douglas L.; Dávila-Román, Víctor G.; McNulty, Steven E.; Borlaug, Barry A.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Lee, Kerry L.; Shah, Monica R.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Braunwald, Eugene; Redfield, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Small studies suggest low dose dopamine or low dose nesiritide may enhance decongestion and preserve renal function in patients with acute heart failure and renal dysfunction; however, neither strategy has been rigorously tested. Objective To test the two independent hypotheses that when compared to placebo, addition of: (1) low dose dopamine (2 ug/kg/min); or (2) low dose nesiritide (0.005 ug/kg/min without bolus) to diuretic therapy will enhance decongestion and preserve renal function in patients with acute heart failure and renal dysfunction. Design, Setting and Participants Multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial (Renal Optimization Strategies Evaluation) of 360 hospitalized participants with acute heart failure and renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15–60 ml/min/1.73m2), randomized within 24 hours of admission. Participants were randomized from September 2010 to March 2013 across 26 sites in the United States and Canada. Interventions Participants were randomized in an open, 1:1 allocation ratio to the dopamine or nesiritide strategies. Within each strategy, participants were randomized in a double-blind, 2:1 ratio to active treatment or placebo. The dopamine (n=122) and nesiritide (n=119) groups were independently compared to the pooled placebo group (n=119). Main outcome measures Co-primary endpoints included 72-hour cumulative urine volume (decongestion endpoint) and the change in serum cystatin-C from enrollment to 72 hours (renal function endpoint). Results Compared to placebo, low dose dopamine had no significant effect on 72-hour cumulative urine volume (8524 ml [95% CI 7917 to 9131 ml] with dopamine vs. 8296 ml [95% CI 7762 to 8830 ml] with placebo, p=0.59) or on the change in cystatin-C (0.12 mg/L [95% CI 0.06 to 0.18 mg/L] with dopamine vs. 0.11 mg/L [95% CI 0.06 to 0.16 mg/L] with placebo, p=0.72). Similarly, low dose nesiritide had no significant effect on 72-hour cumulative

  11. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Seong Ho; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  12. Acute stress reduces intraparenchymal lung natural killer cells via beta-adrenergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kanemi, O; Zhang, X; Sakamoto, Y; Ebina, M; Nagatomi, R

    2005-01-01

    There are lines of evidence that natural killer (NK) cells are sensitive to physical and psychological stress. Alterations in the immune system including NK cells are known to differ among tissues and organs. The effect of stress on the lung immune system, however, has not been well documented in spite of the fact that the lungs always confront viral or bacterial attacks as well as tumour cell metastasis. In this study, we intended to investigate the effect of restraint stress on lung lymphocytes including NK cells. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 2 h restraint stress. The concentration of plasma epinephrine significantly rose immediately after the release from restraint as compared to home-cage control mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the numbers of most lymphocyte subsets including NK cells were decreased in the lungs and blood but not in the spleen, immediately after restraint stress. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the number of NK cells was decreased in the intraparenchymal region of the lungs, while the number of alveolar macrophages did not change. The decrease in the number of NK cells in the lungs and blood was reversed by the administration of propranolol, a nonselective beta adrenergic antagonist. Taken together, our findings suggest that acute stress reduces the number of intraparenchymal lung NK cells via activation of beta adrenergic receptors. PMID:15606610

  13. Neurogenic stunned myocardium - do we consider this diagnosis in patients with acute central nervous system injury and acute heart failure?

    PubMed

    Mierzewska-Schmidt, Magdalena; Gawecka, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium (NSM) is defined as myocardial injury and dysfunction of a sudden onset, occurring after various types of acute brain injury as a result of an imbalance in the autonomic nervous system. The typical spectrum of clinically observed abnormalities includes acute left ventricular failure, not uncommonly progressing to cardiogenic shock with hypotension that requires inotropic agents, pulmonary oedema and various arrhythmias. Commonly-seen electrocardiographic changes include: prolonged QT interval, ST segment changes, T-wave inversion, a new Q-wave or U-wave. Echocardiography shows both an impaired both systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle. Biochemical markers of NSM comprise metabolic acidosis and increased cardiac enzymes and markers: creatine kinase (CK), and CK-MB, troponin I and B-type natriuretic peptide. The main cause of NSM is myocardial injury induced by local catecholamine release from nerve endings within the myocardium. Recently, a theory has been proposed to classify NSM as one of the stress-related cardiomyopathies, together with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, acute left ventricular failure in the critically ill, cardiomyopathy associated with pheochromacytoma and exogenous catecholamine administration. The occurrence of NSM increases the risk of life-threatening complications, death, and worsens neurologic outcome. As far as we know, treatment should generally focus on the underlying neurologic process in order to maximize neurologic recovery. Improvement in neurologic pathology leads to rapid improvement in cardiac function and its full recovery, as NSM is a fully reversible condition if the patient survives. Awareness of the existence of NSM and a deeper knowledge of its etiopathology may reduce diagnostic errors, optimise its treatment. PMID:25940334

  14. Role of macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 in acute inflammation after lung contusion.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Madathilparambil V; Yu, Bi; Machado-Aranda, David; Bender, Matthew D; Ochoa-Frongia, Laura; Helinski, Jadwiga D; Davidson, Bruce A; Knight, Paul R; Hogaboam, Cory M; Moore, Bethany B; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2012-06-01

    Lung contusion (LC), commonly observed in patients with thoracic trauma is a leading risk factor for development of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Previously, we have shown that CC chemokine ligand (CCL)-2, a monotactic chemokine abundant in the lungs, is significantly elevated in LC. This study investigated the nature of protection afforded by CCL-2 in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome during LC, using rats and CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 2 knockout (CCR2(-/-)) mice. Rats injected with a polyclonal antibody to CCL-2 showed higher levels of albumin and IL-6 in the bronchoalveolar lavage and myeloperoxidase in the lung tissue after LC. Closed-chest bilateral LC demonstrated CCL-2 localization in alveolar macrophages (AMs) and epithelial cells. Subsequent experiments performed using a murine model of LC showed that the extent of injury, assessed by pulmonary compliance and albumin levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage, was higher in the CCR2(-/-) mice when compared with the wild-type (WT) mice. We also found increased release of IL-1β, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-1, and keratinocyte chemoattractant, lower recruitment of AMs, and higher neutrophil infiltration and phagocytic activity in CCR2(-/-) mice at 24 hours. However, impaired phagocytic activity was observed at 48 hours compared with the WT. Production of CCL-2 and macrophage chemoattractant protein-5 was increased in the absence of CCR2, thus suggesting a negative feedback mechanism of regulation. Isolated AMs in the CCR2(-/-) mice showed a predominant M1 phenotype compared with the predominant M2 phenotype in WT mice. Taken together, the above results show that CCL-2 is functionally important in the down-modulation of injury and inflammation in LC. PMID:22281985

  15. Melatonin reduces acute lung inflammation, edema, and hemorrhage in heatstroke rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-shiann; Chou, Ming-ting; Chao, Chien-ming; Chang, Chen-kuei; Lin, Mao-tsun; Chang, Ching-ping

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess the therapeutic effect of melatonin on heat-induced acute lung inflammation and injury in rats. Methods: Heatstroke was induced by exposing anesthetized rats to heat stress (36 °C, 100 min). Rats were treated with vehicle or melatonin (0.2, 1, 5 mg/kg) by intravenous administration 100 min after the initiatioin of heatstroke and were allowed to recover at room temperature (26 °C). The acute lung injury was quantified by morphological examination and by determination of the volume of pleural exudates, the number of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells, and the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 in bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) were measured by ELISA. Nitric oxide (NO) level was determined by Griess method. The levels of glutamate and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio were analyzed by CMA600 microdialysis analyzer. The concentrations of hydroxyl radicals were measured by a procedure based on the hydroxylation of sodium salicylates leading to the production of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA). Results: Melatonin (1 and 5 mg/kg) significantly (i) prolonged the survival time of heartstroke rats (117 and 186 min vs 59 min); (ii) attenuated heatstroke-induced hyperthermia and hypotension; (iii) attenuated acute lung injury, including edema, neutrophil infiltration, and hemorrhage scores; (iv) down-regulated exudate volume, BALF PMN cell number, and MPO activity; (v) decreased the BALF levels of lung inflammation response cytokines like TNF-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 but further increased the level of an anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10; (vi) reduced BALF levels of glutamate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, NO, 2,3-DHBA, and lactate dehydrogenase. Conclusion: Melatonin may improve the outcome of heatstroke in rats by attenuating acute lung inflammation and injury. PMID:22609835

  16. Lung protective ventilation strategies: have we applied them in trauma patients at risk for acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome?

    PubMed

    Gillis, Robert C; Weireter, Leonard J; Britt, Rebecca C; Cole, Frederic J; Collins, Jay N; Britt, L D

    2007-04-01

    Lung protective ventilation strategies for patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are well documented, and many medical centers fail to apply these strategies in ALI/ARDS. The objective of this study was to determine if we apply these strategies in trauma patients at risk for ALI/ARDS. We undertook a retrospective review of trauma patients mechanically ventilated for > or = 4 days with an ICD-9 for traumatic pneumothorax, hemothorax, lung contusion, and/or fractured ribs admitted from May 1, 1999 through April 30, 2000 (Group 1), the pre-ARDS Network study, and from May 1, 2003 through April 30, 2004 (Group 2), the post-ARDS Network study. Tidal volume (VT)/kg admission body weight, VT/kg ideal body weight (IBW), and plateau and peak pressures were analyzed with respect to mortality. VT/Kg admission body weight and IBW were significantly reduced when comparing Group 1 with Group 2 (9.27 to 8.03 and 11.67 to 10.04, respectively). VT/kg IBW was greater (P < 0.01) for patients who died in Group 1 (13.81) compared with patients who lived (10.29) or died (9.89) in Group 2. Peak and plateau pressures were greater (P < 0.01) in patients who died in Group 1 than patients who lived or died in Group 2. A strict ARDS Network ventilation strategy (VT < 6 mL/kg) is not followed, rather a low plateau/peak pressure strategy is used, which is a form of lung protective ventilation. PMID:17439026

  17. Prognostic Value of the Interaction between Galectin-3 and Antigen Carbohydrate 125 in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Julio; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Sandino, Justo; Mainar, Luis; Palau, Patricia; Santas, Enrique; Villanueva, Maria Pilar; Núñez, Eduardo; Bodí, Vicent; Chorro, Francisco J.; Miñana, Gema; Sanchis, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Galectin-3 (Gal-3) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) have emerged as robust prognostic biomarkers in heart failure. Experimental data have also suggested a potential molecular interaction between CA125 and Gal-3; however, the biological and clinical relevance of this interaction is still uncertain. We sought to evaluate, in patients admitted for acute heart failure, the association between plasma Gal-3 with all-cause mortality and the risk for rehospitalizations among high and low levels of CA125. Methods and Results We included 264 consecutive patients admitted for acute heart failure to the Cardiology Department in a third-level center. Both biomarkers were measured on admission. Negative binomial and Cox regression models were used to evaluate the prognostic effect of the interaction between Gal-3 and CA125 (dichotomized by its median) with hospital readmission and all-cause mortality, respectively. During a median follow-up of 2 years (IQR = 1-2.8), 108 (40.9%) patients deaths and 365 rehospitalizations in 171 (69.5%) patients were registered. In a multivariable setting, the effect of Gal-3 on mortality and rehospitalization was differentially mediated by CA125 (p = 0.007 and p<0.001, respectively). Indeed, in patients with CA125 above median (>67 U/ml), values across the continuum of Gal-3 showed a positive and almost linear relationship with either the risk of death or rehospitalization. Conversely, when CA125 was below median (≤67 U/ml), Gal-3 lacked any prognostic effect on both endpoints. Conclusion In patients with acute heart failure, Gal-3 was strongly associated with higher risk of long-term mortality and repeated rehospitalizations, but only in those patients exhibiting higher values of CA125 (above 67 U/ml). PMID:25875367

  18. Role of NMDA receptors in acute liver failure and ammonia toxicity: therapeutical implications.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Regina; Cauli, Omar; Boix, Jordi; ElMlili, Nisrin; Agusti, Ana; Felipo, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) may lead to rapid death unless the patients receive a liver for transplantation. However, the number of livers available is not enough and a number of patients die before a suitable liver is available for transplantation. The liver has a high capacity for regeneration which may allow complete recovery even in patients with severe liver failure. It would be therefore very useful to have procedures to prevent or delay the mechanisms by which ALF leads to death. These mechanisms are no well understood. Progression of ALF leads to multi-organ failure, systemic inflammatory response, hepatic encephalopathy, cerebral oedema and increased intracranial pressure, which seem the most important immediate causes of mortality in patients with ALF. A main contributor to these events is hyperammonemia, due to impaired ammonia detoxification in the liver. Acute hyperammonemia per se leads to death, which is mediated by activation of the NMDA type of glutamate receptors in brain and may be prevented by antagonists blocking these receptors. Acute liver failure also leads to hyperammonemia and excessive activation of NMDA receptors in brain which contributes to ALF-induced death. Sustained blocking of NMDA receptors by continuous administration of the antagonists MK-801 or memantine increases about twice the survival time of rats with severe ALF due to injection of 2.5g/kg of galactosamine. In rats with milder ALF due to injection of 1.5g/kg of galactosamine, blocking NMDA receptors increases the percentage of surviving rats from 23% to 62% and increases about twice the survival time of the rats which die. These data strongly support that blocking NMDA receptors would improve survival of patients with ALF, either by allowing more time for liver regeneration or to get a liver suitable for transplantation. PMID:19428814

  19. The therapeutic effects of tuberostemonine against cigarette smoke-induced acute lung inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Beak, Hyunjung; Park, Soojin; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Jaehoon; Park, Sangwon; Kim, Jinju; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is mainly caused by cigarette smoking and is characterized by the destruction of lung parenchyma, structural alterations of the small airways, and systemic inflammation. Tuberostemonine (TS) is an alkaloid-type phytochemical from Stemona tuberosa. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of TS in a cigarette smoke (CS)-induced mouse model of acute lung inflammation. The mice were whole-body exposed to CS or fresh air for 7 days. TS was administered by an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection 1h before exposure to CS. To test the effects of TS, the numbers of total cells, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were counted. Furthermore, we measured the levels of several chemokines, such as GCP-2, MIP-3α, MCP-1 and KC, in the lung tissue. The cellular profiles and histopathological analysis demonstrated that the infiltration of peribronchial and perivascular inflammatory cells significantly decreased in the TS-treated groups compared with the CS-exposure group. The TS treatment significantly ameliorated the airway epithelial thickness induced by CS exposure and caused a significant decrement in the production of chemokines in the lung. These results suggest that TS has anti-inflammatory effects against CS-induced acute lung inflammation. PMID:26849941

  20. Gadolinium chloride attenuates sepsis-induced pulmonary apoptosis and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kishta, Osama A; Goldberg, Peter; Husain, Sabah N A

    2012-01-01

    Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a Kupffer cells inhibitor, attenuates acute lung injury; however, the mechanisms behind this effect are not completely elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that GdCl3 acts through the inhibition of lung parenchymal cellular apoptosis. Two groups of rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline or E. coli lipopolysaccharide. In two additional groups, rats were injected with GdCl3 24 hrs prior to saline or LPS administration. At 12 hrs, lung injury, inflammation, and apoptosis were studied. Lung water content, myeloperoxidase activity, pulmonary apoptosis and mRNA levels of interleukin-1 β , -2, -5, -6, -10 and TNF- α rose significantly in LPS-injected animals. Pretreatment with GdCl3 significantly reduced LPS-induced elevation of pulmonary water content, myeloperoxidase activity, cleaved caspase-3 intensity, and attenuated pulmonary TUNEL-positive cells. GdCl3 pre-treatment upregulated IL-1 β , -2 and -10 pulmonary gene expression without significantly affecting the others. These results suggest that GdCl3 attenuates acute lung injury through its effects on pulmonary parenchymal apoptosis. PMID:24049647

  1. Excessive Neutrophils and Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Contribute to Acute Lung Injury of Influenza Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Narasaraju, Teluguakula; Yang, Edwin; Samy, Ramar Perumal; Ng, Huey Hian; Poh, Wee Peng; Liew, Audrey-Ann; Phoon, Meng Chee; van Rooijen, Nico; Chow, Vincent T.

    2011-01-01

    Complications of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are common among critically ill patients infected with highly pathogenic influenza viruses. Macrophages and neutrophils constitute the majority of cells recruited into infected lungs, and are associated with immunopathology in influenza pneumonia. We examined pathological manifestations in models of macrophage- or neutrophil-depleted mice challenged with sublethal doses of influenza A virus H1N1 strain PR8. Infected mice depleted of macrophages displayed excessive neutrophilic infiltration, alveolar damage, and increased viral load, later progressing into ARDS-like pathological signs with diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, hemorrhage, and hypoxemia. In contrast, neutrophil-depleted animals showed mild pathology in lungs. The brochoalveolar lavage fluid of infected macrophage-depleted mice exhibited elevated protein content, T1-α, thrombomodulin, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and myeloperoxidase activities indicating augmented alveolar-capillary damage, compared to neutrophil-depleted animals. We provide evidence for the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), entangled with alveoli in areas of tissue injury, suggesting their potential link with lung damage. When co-incubated with infected alveolar epithelial cells in vitro, neutrophils from infected lungs strongly induced NETs generation, and augmented endothelial damage. NETs induction was abrogated by anti-myeloperoxidase antibody and an inhibitor of superoxide dismutase, thus implying that NETs generation is induced by redox enzymes in influenza pneumonia. These findings support the pathogenic effects of excessive neutrophils in acute lung injury of influenza pneumonia by instigating alveolar-capillary damage. PMID:21703402

  2. Protective effect of catalpol on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kai; Piao, Taikui; Wang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Jiuyang; Wang, Xuefeng; Liu, Hongyu

    2014-12-01

    Catalpol, an iridiod glucoside isolated from Rehmannia glutinosa, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. Although anti-inflammatory activity of catalpol already reported, its involvement in lung protection has not been reported. Thus, we investigated the role of catalpol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in this study. Mice acute lung injury model was induced by intranasal instillation of LPS. Catalpol was administrated 1h prior to or after LPS exposure. The severity of pulmonary injury was evaluated 12h after LPS administration. The results showed that catalpol inhibited lung W/D ratio, myeloperoxidase activity of lung samples, the amounts of inflammatory cells and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4 and IL-1β in BALF induced by LPS. The production of IL-10 in BALF was up-regulated by catalpol. In vitro, catalpol inhibited TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4 and IL-1β production and up-regulated IL-10 expression in LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that the activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways was inhibited by catalpol. Furthermore, catalpol was found to inhibit TLR4 expression induced by LPS. In conclusion, catalpol potently protected against LPS-induced ALI. The protective effect may attribute to the inhibition of TLR4-mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:25063711

  3. Protective effect of U74500A on phorbol myristate acetate-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shi-Jye; Chang, Deh-Ming; Wang, David; Lin, Hen-I; Lin, Shih-Hua; Hsu, Kang

    2004-08-01

    1. The present study was designed to determine whether U74500A could ameliorate acute lung injury (ALI) induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in our rat isolated lung model compared with any amelioration induced by dimethylthiourea (DMTU), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. 2. Acute lung injury was induced successfully by PMA during 60 min of observation. At 2 microg/kg, PMA elicited a significant increase in microvascular permeability (measured using the capillary filtration coefficient Kfc), lung weight gain, the lung weight/bodyweight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure and protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. 3. Pretreatment with 1.5 mg/kg U74500A significantly attenuated ALI; there was no significant increase in any parameters measured, except for pulmonary arterial pressure. The protective effect of U74500A was approximately the same as that of 600 mg/kg DMTU. However, 6000 U/kg SOD, 50,000 U/kg catalase and 6000 U/kg SOD + 50,000 U/kg catalase had no protective effect. 4. These experimental data suggest that U74500A significantly ameliorates ALI induced by PMA in rats. PMID:15298545

  4. Efficacy and safety of mesenchymal stromal cells in preclinical models of acute lung injury: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in humans is caused by an unchecked proinflammatory response that results in diffuse and severe lung injury, and it is associated with a mortality rate of 35 to 45%. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs; ‘adult stem cells’) could represent a promising new therapy for this syndrome, since preclinical evidence suggests that MSCs may ameliorate lung injury. Prior to a human clinical trial, our aim is to conduct a systematic review to compare the efficacy and safety of MSC therapy versus controls in preclinical models of acute lung injury that mimic some aspects of the human ARDS. Methods/Design We will include comparative preclinical studies (randomized and non-randomized) of acute lung injury in which MSCs were administered and outcomes compared to animals given a vehicle control. The primary outcome will be death. Secondary outcomes will include the four key features of preclinical acute lung injury as defined by the American Thoracic Society consensus conference (histologic evidence of lung injury, altered alveolar capillary barrier, lung inflammatory response, and physiological dysfunction) and pathogen clearance for acute lung injury models that are caused by infection. Electronic searches of MEDLINE, Embase, BIOSIS Previews, and Web of Science will be constructed and reviewed by the Peer Review of Electronic Search Strategies (PRESS) process. Search results will be screened independently and in duplicate. Data from eligible studies will be extracted, pooled, and analyzed using random effects models. Risk of bias will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool, and individual study reporting will be assessed according to the Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) guidelines. Discussion The results of this systematic review will comprehensively summarize the safety and efficacy of MSC therapy in preclinical models of acute lung injury. Our results will help translational scientists and

  5. Mechanisms of Indirect Acute Lung Injury: A Novel Role for the Co-Inhibitory Receptor, Programmed Death-1 (PD-1)

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Sean F.; Thakkar, Rajan K.; Heffernan, Daithi S.; Huang, Xin; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Lomas-Neira, Joanne; Cioffi, William G.; Ayala, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the contribution of PD-1 in the morbidity and mortality associated with the development of indirect-acute lung injury Summary Background Data The immune cell interaction(s) leading to indirect-acute lung injury are not completely understood. In this respect, while we have recently shown that the murine cell surface co-inhibitory receptor, Programmed Cell death receptor (PD)-1, has a role in septic morbidity/mortality that is mediated in part through the effects on the innate immune arm. However, it is not know if PD-1 has a role in the development of indirect-acute lung injury and how this may be mediated at a cellular level. Methods PD-1 −/− mice were used in a murine model of indirect-acute lung injury (hemorrhagic shock followed 24 h after with cecal ligation & puncture-septic challenge) and compared to wild type controls. Groups were initially compared for survival and subsequently for markers of pulmonary inflammation, influx of lymphocytes and neutrophils, and expression of PD-1 and its ligand, PD-L1. In addition, peripheral blood leukocytes of patients with indirect-acute lung injury were examined to assess changes in cellular PD-1 expression relative to mortality. Results PD-1 −/− mice showed improved survival compared to wild type controls. In the mouse lung, CD4+, CD11c+ and Gr-1+ cells showed increased PD-1 expression in response to indirect-acute lung injury. However, while the rise in BAL fluid protein concentrations, lung IL-6, and lung MCP-1 were similar between PD-1 −/− and wild type animals subjected to indirect acute lung injury, the PD-1 −/− animals that were subjected to shock/septic challenge had reduced CD4:CD8 ratios, TNF-α levels, MPO activity, and caspase 3 levels in the lung. Comparatively, we observed that humans, who survived their acute lung injury, had significantly lower expression of PD-1 on T cells. Conclusions PD-1 expression contributes to mortality following the induction of indirect-acute

  6. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Juviel, José M.; Gordon, Larry M.; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical) ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C) mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS. Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB), a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight), the clinical surfactant Infasurf®, a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS) assays. Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary-alveolar protein

  7. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Walther, Frans J; Hernández-Juviel, José M; Gordon, Larry M; Waring, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical) ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C) mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS. Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB), a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by