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Sample records for acute maternal morbidity

  1. Maternal morbidity: neglected dimension of safe motherhood in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Hardee, Karen; Gay, Jill; Blanc, Ann K

    2012-01-01

    In safe motherhood programming in the developing world, insufficient attention has been given to maternal morbidity, which can extend well beyond childbirth. For every woman who dies of pregnancy-related causes, an estimated 20 women experience acute or chronic morbidity. Maternal morbidity adversely affects families, communities and societies. Maternal morbidity has multiple causes, with duration ranging from acute to chronic, severity ranging from transient to permanent and with a range of diagnosis and treatment options. This article addresses six selected relatively neglected aspects of maternal morbidity to illustrate the range of acute and chronic morbidities that can affect women related to pregnancy and childbearing that are prevalent in developing countries: anaemia, maternal depression, infertility, fistula, uterine rupture and scarring and genital and uterine prolapse. Based on this review, recommendations to reduce maternal morbidity include: expand the focus of safe motherhood to explicitly include morbidity; improve data on incidence and prevalence of maternal morbidity; link mortality and morbidity outcomes and programming; increase access to facility- and community-based maternal health care and reproductive health care; and address the antecedents to poor maternal health through a lifecycle approach. PMID:22424546

  2. Severe maternal morbidity: screening and review.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Sarah K; Ecker, Jeffrey L

    2016-09-01

    This document builds upon recommendations from peer organizations and outlines a process for identifying maternal cases that should be reviewed. Severe maternal morbidity is associated with a high rate of preventability, similar to that of maternal mortality. It also can be considered a near miss for maternal mortality because without identification and treatment, in some cases, these conditions would lead to maternal death. Identifying severe morbidity is, therefore, important for preventing such injuries that lead to mortality and for highlighting opportunities to avoid repeat injuries. The two-step screen and review process described in this document is intended to efficiently detect severe maternal morbidity in women and to ensure that each case undergoes a review to determine whether there were opportunities for improvement in care. Like cases of maternal mortality, cases of severe maternal morbidity merit quality review. In the absence of consensus on a comprehensive list of conditions that represent severe maternal morbidity, institutions and systems should either adopt an existing screening criteria or create their own list of outcomes that merit review. PMID:27560600

  3. Standardized severe maternal morbidity review: rationale and process.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Sarah J; Berg, Cynthia; Bernstein, Peter; Bingham, Debra; Delgado, Ana; Callaghan, William M; Harris, Karen; Lanni, Susan; Mahoney, Jeanne; Main, Elliot; Nacht, Amy; Schellpfeffer, Michael; Westover, Thomas; Harper, Margaret

    2014-08-01

    Severe maternal morbidity and mortality have been rising in the United States. To begin a national effort to reduce morbidity, a specific call to identify all pregnant and postpartum women experiencing admission to an intensive care unit or receipt of 4 or more units of blood for routine review has been made. While advocating for review of these cases, no specific guidance for the review process was provided. Therefore, the aim of this expert opinion is to present guidelines for a standardized severe maternal morbidity interdisciplinary review process to identify systems, professional, and facility factors that can be ameliorated, with the overall goal of improving institutional obstetric safety and reducing severe morbidity and mortality among pregnant and recently pregnant women. This opinion was developed by a multidisciplinary working group that included general obstetrician-gynecologists, maternal-fetal medicine subspecialists, certified nurse-midwives, and registered nurses all with experience in maternal mortality reviews. A process for standardized review of severe maternal morbidity addressing committee organization, review process, medical record abstraction and assessment, review culture, data management, review timing, and review confidentiality is presented. Reference is made to a sample severe maternal morbidity abstraction and assessment form. PMID:25004341

  4. [ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PREGNANCY COMPLICATIONS AND LONG TERM MATERNAL CARDIOVASCULAR MORBIDITY].

    PubMed

    Kessous, Roy; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana; Parientel, Gali; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-05-01

    In recent years there is a significant increase in the rate of the metabolic syndrome. Correspondingly, and possibly due to this increase, there is a significant increase in cardiovascular events in women. Contradictory to the concept that obstetric complication is limited to pregnancy, some obstetric complications may cause or seemingly provide a preliminary sign for future maternal morbidity. In recent years there have been an increasing number of studies that examined the theory that vascular-related complications of pregnancy may be associated with increased risk for future maternal cardiovascular morbidity. We present a review of the literature, in addition to a series of studies conducted in Soroka University Medical Center that examined the association between pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm delivery, placental abruption and recurrent pregnancy loss and future long term maternal cardiovascular morbidity. PMID:27526556

  5. Maternal mortality and morbidity. Zimbabwe's birth force.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J L

    1991-01-01

    The training of traditional birth attendants (TBAs) as a national public health strategy was implemented in the late 1970's in Zimbabwe. Since 1982, the Manicaland rural health programs have trained 6000 women in 12-week courses to change their practices of using unsterilized razor blades, shards of glass, or knives to sever the umbilical cord. These practices and others had led to high rates of neonatal tetanus mortality and maternal mortality. TBAs learned from state certified nurses the basics of personal and domestic hygiene, identification of pregnancy and associated risk factors, the importance of good nutrition, rest, and immunization for pregnant women, and safe practices in labor and delivery. Refresher courses and additional training in prenatal care and family planning have been added recently to the program. Completion of the program leads to a public recognition of their graduation in the base village. Maternity care services are provided as back up. This includes village based maternity waiting homes for women in labor, community health workers, and auxiliary midwives with higher level training. A district health center has been set up for more complicated cases. This access to better health care has led to a 50 and 66% reduction in maternal and infant mortality rates, respectively. A 1988 government survey shows increases in the use of contraceptives and the number of women receiving prenatal care. The components of the program which have contributed to program success and provided similarities to other country's TBA programs are as follows: developing a sense of self esteem and pride among TBAs for their work, utilizing creative ways to teach the largely illiterate TBA population through role plays and songs, and providing involvement in the health care system which reaffirms the TBA's importance. In spite of the advancements made however, there are still problems to solve. Unsafe practices are resorted to when TBAs forget their training

  6. Putting the "M" back in the Maternal and Child Health Bureau: reducing maternal mortality and morbidity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Michael C; Highsmith, Keisher; de la Cruz, David; Atrash, Hani K

    2015-07-01

    Maternal mortality and severe morbidity are on the rise in the United States. A significant proportion of these events are preventable. The Maternal Health Initiative (MHI), coordinated by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau at the Health Resources and Services Administration, is intensifying efforts to reduce maternal mortality and severe morbidity in the U.S. Through a public-private partnership, MHI is taking a comprehensive approach to improving maternal health focusing on five priority areas: improving women's health before, during and beyond pregnancy; improving the quality and safety of maternity care; improving systems of maternity care including both clinical and public health systems; improving public awareness and education; and improving surveillance and research. PMID:25626713

  7. Maternal mortality and severe morbidity in a migration perspective.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Thomas; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2016-04-01

    Among migrants in high-income countries, maternal mortality and severe morbidity generally occur more frequently as compared to host populations. There is marked variation between groups of migrants and host countries, with much elevated risks in some groups and no elevated risk at all in others. Those without a legal resident permit are most vulnerable. A reason for these elevated risks could be a different risk profile in migrants, but risk factors are unevenly distributed and not always present. Another reason is substandard care, which is identified more frequently in migrants, and comprises patient delays, for example, due to a lack of knowledge about the health system in the host country, and health worker delays, often compounded by communication barriers. Improvements in family planning and antenatal services are needed, and audits and confidential enquiries should be extended to include maternal morbidity and ethnic background. This requires scientific and political efforts. PMID:26427550

  8. Maternal mortality and morbidity. Women's reproductive health in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Alloo, F

    1994-01-01

    Sexuality is a taboo for women in a patriarchal society. Tanzania has inadequate reproductive health care. Aspects of reproductive health are dealt with in safe motherhood or maternal and child health programs. Tanzania's health policy is based on women as mothers; it does not refer to women's right. For women in Tanzania, reproductive health is the right to live. Thousands of Tanzanian women die every year due to maternal complications. In an effort to contribute to the improvement of the conditions in health institutions and the advancement of women's status in the country, the Tanzania Media Women's Association (TAMWA) and the Medical Women's Association of Tanzania (MEWATA) joined in the organization of a Reproductive Health Meeting in Dar es Salaam. At the conference, major factors causing maternal mortality and morbidity, such as complications of abortion, anaemia in pregnancy, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and puerperal sepsis, were discussed. A World Health Organization (WHO) report indicated that maternal mortality in Tanzania was 200-400/100,000 live births, while a survey conducted by MEWATA showed that maternal deaths at the Muhimbili Medical Center in the capital were 754/100,000 live births in 1991. Many maternal deaths could be prevented if hospitals were be properly equipped. Tanzanian women's poor health results in large part from their low socioeconomic status, poor nutrition, lack of income and employment. TAMWA chairperson Fatma Alloo and Dr. Kimambo (Ministry of Health) endorsed a national women's health movement to demand a government commitment to a holistic reproductive health policy. PMID:12288398

  9. What about the mothers? An analysis of maternal mortality and morbidity in perinatal health surveillance systems in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier-Colle, M-H; Mohangoo, AD; Gissler, M; Novak-Antolic, Z; Vutuc, C; Szamotulska, K; Zeitlin, J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess capacity to develop routine monitoring of maternal health in the European Union using indicators of maternal mortality and severe morbidity. Design Analysis of aggregate data from routine statistical systems compiled by the EURO-PERISTAT project and comparison with data from national enquiries. Setting Twenty-five countries in the European Union and Norway. Population Women giving birth in participating countries in 2003 and 2004. Methods Application of a common collection of data by selecting specific International Classification of Disease codes from the ‘Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium’ chapter. External validity was assessed by reviewing the results of national confidential enquiries and linkage studies. Main outcome measures Maternal mortality ratio, with distribution of specific obstetric causes, and severe acute maternal morbidity, which included: eclampsia, surgery and blood transfusion for obstetric haemorrhage, and intensive-care unit admission. Results In 22 countries that provided data, the maternal mortality ratio was 6.3 per 100 000 live births overall and ranged from 0 to 29.6. Under-ascertainment was evident from comparisons with studies that use enhanced identification of deaths. Furthermore, routine cause of death registration systems in countries with specific systems for audit reported higher maternal mortality ratio than those in countries without audits. For severe acute maternal morbidity, 16 countries provided data about at least one category of morbidity, and only three provided data for all categories. Reported values ranged widely (from 0.2 to 1.6 women with eclampsia per 1000 women giving birth and from 0.2 to 1.0 hysterectomies per 1000 women). Conclusions Currently available data on maternal mortality and morbidity are insufficient for monitoring trends over time in Europe and for comparison between countries. Confidential enquiries into maternal deaths are recommended. PMID:22571748

  10. [Model for a comprehensive approach to maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity].

    PubMed

    Karolinski, Ariel; Mercer, Raúl; Micone, Paula; Ocampo, Celina; Salgado, Pablo; Szulik, Dalia; Swarcz, Lucila; Corte, Vicente R; del Moral, Belén Fernández; Pianesi, Jorge; Balladelli, Pier Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Maternal mortality is an important public health and human rights problem and reflects the effects of social determinants on women's health. Understanding the extent and causes of maternal death has been insufficient to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. This article proposes a model for a comprehensive approach to maternal mortality, covering seven areas: prioritization and definition of the problem, contextual description, methodological scope, knowledge management, innovation, implementation, and a monitoring and evaluation system. This model helps address problems associated with maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity through early monitoring of potentially fatal complications in the reproductive process. Knowledge management is important for the reorientation of policies, programs, and health care. Interaction and synergies among people, communities, and actors in the health system should be strengthened in order to improve the results of health programs. More validated scientific information is needed on how actions should be implemented in different environments. It is essential to strengthen communication among research centers, cooperation agencies, and government organizations and to include them in programs and in the definition of a new women's health agenda in the Region of the Americas. PMID:26208207

  11. Next steps to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality in the USA.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Sarah J

    2015-03-01

    Maternal mortality is rising in the USA. The pregnancy-related maternal mortality ratio increased from 10/100,000 to 17/100,000 live births from the 1990s to 2012. A large proportion of maternal deaths are preventable. This review highlights a national approach to reduce maternal death and morbidity and discusses multiple efforts to reduce maternal morbidity, death and improve obstetric safety. These efforts include communication and collaboration between all stake holders involved in perinatal health, creation of national bundles addressing key maternal care areas such as hemorrhage management, call for all obstetric hospitals to review and analyze all cases of severe maternal morbidity, and access to contraception. Implementation of interventions based on these efforts is a national imperative to improve obstetric safety. PMID:25776293

  12. Association of Postpartum Maternal Morbidities with Children's Mental, Psychomotor and Language Development in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Tofail, F.; Hilaly, A.; Mehrin, F.; Shiraji, S.; Banu, S.; Huda, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known from developing countries about the effects of maternal morbidities diagnosed in the postpartum period on children's development. The study aimed to document the relationships of such morbidities with care-giving practices by mothers, children's developmental milestones and their language, mental and psychomotor development. Maternal morbidities were identified through physical examination at 6-9 weeks postpartum (n=488). Maternal care-giving practices and postnatal depression were assessed also at 6-9 weeks postpartum. Children's milestones of development were measured at six months, and their mental (MDI) and psychomotor (PDI) development, language comprehension and expression, and quality of psychosocial stimulation at home were assessed at 12 months. Several approaches were used for identifying the relationships among different maternal morbidities, diagnosed by physicians, with children's development. After controlling for the potential confounders, maternal anaemia diagnosed postpartum showed a small but significantly negative effect on children's language expression while the effects on language comprehension did not reach the significance level (p=0.085). Children's development at 12 months was related to psychosocial stimulation at home, nutritional status, education of parents, socioeconomic status, and care-giving practices of mothers at six weeks of age. Only a few mothers experienced each specific morbidity, and with the exception of anaemia, the sample-size was insufficient to make a conclusion regarding each specific morbidity. Further research with a sufficient sample-size of individual morbidities is required to determine the association of postpartum maternal morbidities with children's development. PMID:22838161

  13. The Impact of Cardiac Diseases during Pregnancy on Severe Maternal Morbidity and Mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Campanharo, Felipe F.; Cecatti, Jose G.; Haddad, Samira M.; Parpinelli, Mary A.; Born, Daniel; Costa, Maria L.; Mattar, Rosiane

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate maternal heart disease as a cause or complicating factor for severe morbidity in the setting of the Brazilian Network for Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity. Methods and Findings Secondary data analysis of this multicenter cross-sectional study was implemented in 27 referral obstetric units in Brazil. From July 2009 to June 2010, a prospective surveillance was conducted among all delivery hospitalizations to identify cases of severe maternal morbidity (SMM), including Potentially Life-Threatening Conditions (PLTC) and Maternal Near Miss (MNM), using the new criteria established by the WHO. The variables studied included: sociodemographic characteristics, clinical and obstetric history of the women; perinatal outcome and the occurrence of maternal outcomes (PLTC, MNM, MD) between groups of cardiac and non-cardiac patients. Only heart conditions with hemodynamic impact characterizing severity of maternal morbidity were considered. 9555 women were included in the Network with severe pregnancy-related complications: 770 maternal near miss cases and 140 maternal death cases. A total of 293 (3.6%) cases were related to heart disease and the condition was known before pregnancy in 82.6% of cases. Maternal near miss occurred in 15% of cardiac disease patients (most due to clinical-surgical causes, p<0.001) and 7.7% of non-cardiac patients (hemorrhagic and hypertensive causes, p<0.001). Maternal death occurred in 4.8% of cardiac patients and in 1.2% of non-cardiac patients, respectively. Conclusions In this study, heart disease was significantly associated with a higher occurrence of severe maternal outcomes, including maternal death and maternal near miss, among women presenting with any severe maternal morbidity. PMID:26650684

  14. Obstetric Care Consensus No 5 Summary: Severe Maternal Morbidity: Screening And Review.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    This document builds upon recommendations from peer organizations and outlines a process for identifying maternal cases that should be reviewed. Severe maternal morbidity is associated with a high rate of preventability, similar to that of maternal mortality. It also can be considered a near miss for maternal mortality because without identification and treatment, in some cases, these conditions would lead to maternal death. Identifying severe morbidity is, therefore, important for preventing such injuries that lead to mortality and for highlighting opportunities to avoid repeat injuries. The two-step screen and review process described in this document is intended to efficiently detect severe maternal morbidity in women and to ensure that each case undergoes a review to determine whether there were opportunities for improvement in care. Like cases of maternal mortality, cases of severe maternal morbidity merit quality review. In the absence of consensus on a comprehensive list of conditions that represent severe maternal morbidity, institutions and systems should either adopt an existing screening criteria or create their own list of outcomes that merit review. PMID:27548549

  15. Obstetric Care Consensus No. 5: Severe Maternal Morbidity: Screening and Review.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    This document builds upon recommendations from peer organizations and outlines a process for identifying maternal cases that should be reviewed. Severe maternal morbidity is associated with a high rate of preventability, similar to that of maternal mortality. It also can be considered a near miss for maternal mortality because without identification and treatment, in some cases, these conditions would lead to maternal death. Identifying severe morbidity is, therefore, important for preventing such injuries that lead to mortality and for highlighting opportunities to avoid repeat injuries. The two-step screen and review process described in this document is intended to efficiently detect severe maternal morbidity in women and to ensure that each case undergoes a review to determine whether there were opportunities for improvement in care. Like cases of maternal mortality, cases of severe maternal morbidity merit quality review. In the absence of consensus on a comprehensive list of conditions that represent severe maternal morbidity, institutions and systems should either adopt an existing screening criteria or create their own list of outcomes that merit review. PMID:27548555

  16. The 2016 Hughes Lecture: What's new in maternal morbidity and mortality?

    PubMed

    Arendt, K W

    2016-05-01

    Each year, the Board of Directors of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology selects an individual to review a given year's published obstetric anesthesiology literature. This individual then produces a syllabus of the year's most influential publications, delivers the Ostheimer Lecture at the Society's annual meeting, the Hughes Lecture at the following year's Sol Shnider meeting, and writes corresponding review articles. This 2016 Hughes Lecture review article focuses specifically on the 2014 publications that relate to maternal morbidity and mortality. It begins by discussing the 2014 research that was published on severe maternal morbidity and maternal mortality in developed countries. This is followed by a discussion of specific coexisting diseases and specific causes of severe maternal mortality. The review ends with a discussion of worldwide maternal mortality and the 2014 publications that examined the successes and the shortfalls in the work to make childbirth safe for women throughout the entire world. PMID:26847944

  17. Trends in Maternal Morbidity Before and During Pregnancy in California

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Moshe; Korst, Lisa M.; Chow, Jessica; Lawton, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined trends in maternal comorbidities in California. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 1 551 017 California births using state-linked vital statistics and hospital discharge cohort data for 1999, 2002, and 2005. We used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes to identify the following conditions, some of which were preexisting: maternal hypertension, diabetes, asthma, thyroid disorders, obesity, mental health conditions, substance abuse, and tobacco use. We estimated prevalence rates with hierarchical logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic shifts, and also examined racial/ethnic disparities. Results. The prevalence of these comorbidities increased over time for hospital admissions associated with childbirth, suggesting that pregnant women are getting sicker. Racial/ethnic disparities were also significant. In 2005, maternal hypertension affected more than 10% of all births to non-Hispanic Black mothers; maternal diabetes affected nearly 10% of births to Asian/Pacific Islander mothers (10% and 43% increases, respectively, since 1999). Chronic hypertension, diabetes, obesity, mental health conditions, and tobacco use among Native American women showed the largest increases. Conclusions. The prevalence of maternal comorbidities before and during pregnancy has risen substantially in California and demonstrates racial/ethnic disparity independent of demographic shifts. PMID:24354836

  18. Non-Life Threatening Maternal Morbidity: Cross Sectional Surveys from Malawi and Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Shamsa; Jean-Baptiste, Rachel; Rahman, Atif; Neilson, James P.; van den Broek, Nynke R.

    2015-01-01

    Background For more accurate estimation of the global burden of pregnancy associated disease, clarity is needed on definition and assessment of non-severe maternal morbidity. Our study aimed to define maternal morbidity with clear criteria for identification at primary care level and estimate the distribution of and evaluate associations between physical (infective and non-infective) and psychological morbidities in two different low-income countries. Methods Cross sectional study with assessment of morbidity in early pregnancy (34%), late pregnancy (35%) and the postnatal period (31%) among 3459 women from two rural communities in Pakistan (1727) and Malawi (1732). Trained health care providers at primary care level used semi-structured questionnaires documenting signs and symptoms, clinical examination and laboratory tests which were bundled to reflect infectious, non-infectious and psychological morbidity. Results One in 10 women in Malawi and 1 in 5 in Pakistan reported a previous pregnancy complication with 1 in 10 overall reporting a previous neonatal death or stillbirth. In the index pregnancy, 50.1% of women in Malawi and 53% in Pakistan were assessed to have at least one morbidity (infective or non-infective). Both infective (Pakistan) and non-infective morbidity (Pakistan and Malawi) was lower in the postnatal period than during pregnancy. Multiple morbidities were uncommon (<10%). There were marked differences in psychological morbidity: 26.9% of women in Pakistan 2.6% in Malawi had an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Score (EPDS) > 9. Complications during a previous pregnancy, infective morbidity (p <0.001), intra or postpartum haemorrhage (p <0.02) were associated with psychological morbidity in both settings. Conclusions Our findings highlight the need to strengthen the availability and quality of antenatal and postnatal care packages. We propose to adapt and improve the framework and criteria used in this study, ensuring a basic set of diagnostic tests

  19. Obstetric near miss morbidity and maternal mortality in a Tertiary Care Centre in Western Rajasthan.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Priyanka; Kachhwaha, Chetan Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Obstetric near-miss (ONM) describes a situation of lethal complication during pregnancy, labor or puerperium in which the woman survives either because of medical care or just by chance. In a cross-sectional observational study, five factor scoring system was used to identify the near-miss cases from all the cases of severe obstetric morbidity. Assessment of the causes of maternal mortality and near-miss obstetric cases was done. The ONM rate in this study was 4.18/1000 live births. Totally 54 maternal deaths occurred during this period, resulting in a ratio of 202 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. Hemorrhage, hypertension and sepsis were major causes of near-miss maternal morbidity and mortality, respectively in descending order. PMID:25116827

  20. The cultural environment behind successful maternal death and morbidity reviews.

    PubMed

    Lewis, G

    2014-09-01

    This paper discusses some of the background principles which, through wide experience of instituting reviews of maternal deaths or near-misses around the world, appear common to their successful introduction. A supportive culture at personal, institutional and national level underpinned by the fostering of professionalism and the development of an ethos of safety against a wider supportive environment is needed. Reviews undertaken at a local level are as beneficial as those at a regional or population level and should be encouraged as a routine part of the quality improvement agenda for each and every healthcare facility. PMID:25236630

  1. A systematic review of the relationship between severe maternal morbidity and post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of severe maternal morbidity is increasing in high-income countries as a consequence, in part, of increased obstetric intervention and increasingly complex medical needs of women who become pregnant. Access to emergency obstetric care means that for the majority of women in these countries, an experience of severe maternal morbidity is unlikely to result in loss of life. However, little is known about the subsequent impact on postnatal psychological health resulting in an evidence gap to support provision of appropriate care for these women. There has recently been increasing recognition that childbirth can be a cause of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The combination of experiencing a life-threatening complication and its management may culminate in psychological trauma. This systematic review examined the association between women’s experience of severe maternal morbidity during labour, at the time of giving birth or within the first week following birth, and PTSD and its symptoms. Methods Relevant literature was identified through multiple databases, including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, Web of Science, Cochrane library and the British Library, using predetermined search strategies. The search terms included "post-traumatic stress disorder", "PTSD", "stress disorders, post-traumatic", "maternal morbidity", “pregnancy complications” “puerperal disorders”, "obstetric labo(u)r complication", "postpartum h(a)emorrhage", "eclampsia”. Studies identified were categorised according to pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The quality of included studies was assessed using the relevant CASP appraisal tools. Results Eleven primary studies met review criteria. Evidence of a relationship between severe maternal morbidity and PTSD/PTSD symptoms was inconsistent and findings varied between studies. Nevertheless, there is some evidence that severe pre-eclampsia is a risk factor for PTSD and its

  2. [Significance of viruses in maternal-child morbidity].

    PubMed

    Mena Castro, E

    1990-01-01

    In developing countries infectious diseases continue to be the primary cause of morbidity in children and they are also responsible for an increasing number of untimely deaths. Viral, bacterial, mycotic, and parasitic agents are responsible for various pathological conditions that are present in the most vulnerable groups of the population. Poverty, crowding, lack of access to potable water, low level of education, and inadequate disposition of excreta provide an ideal environment for infectious agents. During human history viruses have represented an important group of disease-producing agents, both in mothers and children. The teratogenic, immunogenic, and oncogenic capabilities of many viruses has been established, and every so often new activities and characteristics of these agents are identified in relation to epidemiology, physiology, and pathogenics. An interesting work concerning parvovirus B19 by Drs. Mateo and Polanco was published in the Archivos Dominicanos de Pediatria. This virus appears to be responsible for infectious erythema and particularly for the medullar aplasia crisis observed in many chronic hemolytic anemias. For the Dominican Republic this discovery is of interest because of the relatively high prevalence of falciform anemia; this disease most often occurs as hereditary anemia, and the medullar aplasia crisis is one of the forms of expression of this disease. PMID:12291425

  3. Acute subdural hematoma: morbidity, mortality, and operative timing.

    PubMed

    Wilberger, J E; Harris, M; Diamond, D L

    1991-02-01

    Traumatic acute subdural hematoma remains one of the most lethal of all head injuries. Since 1981, it has been strongly held that the critical factor in overall outcome from acute subdural hematoma is timing of operative intervention for clot removal; those operated on within 4 hours of injury may have mortality rates as low as 30% with functional survival rates as high as 65%. Data were reviewed for 1150 severely head-injured patients (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores 3 to 7) treated at a Level 1 trauma center between 1982 and 1987; 101 of these patients had acute subdural hematoma. Standard treatment protocol included aggressive prehospital resuscitation measures, rapid operative intervention, and aggressive postoperative control of intracranial pressure (ICP). The overall mortality rate was 66%, and 19% had functional recovery. The following variables statistically correlated (p less than 0.05) with outcome; motorcycle accident as a mechanism of injury, age over 65 years, admission GCS score of 3 or 4, and postoperative ICP greater than 45 mm Hg. The time from injury to operative evacuation of the acute subdural hematoma in regard to outcome morbidity and mortality was not statistically significant even when examined at hourly intervals although there were trends indicating that earlier surgery improved outcome. The findings of this study support the pathophysiological evidence that, in acute subdural hematoma, the extent of primary underlying brain injury is more important than the subdural clot itself in dictating outcome; therefore, the ability to control ICP is more critical to outcome than the absolute timing of subdural blood removal. PMID:1988590

  4. Risk factors for maternal morbidity in Victoria, Australia: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Anthea C; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J; Wallace, Euan M; Oats, Jeremy; Knight, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this analysis was to quantify the risk factors associated with maternal morbidity among women in Victoria, Australia, focusing particularly on sociodemographic factors. Design Case–control analysis. Participants Data on all maternities in Victoria from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2008. Methods A case–control analysis was conducted using unconditional logistic regression to calculate adjusted ORs (aORs). Cases were defined as all women noted to have had a severe complication during the index pregnancy. Severe maternal morbidity was defined by the validated, composite Australian Maternal Morbidity Outcome Indicator. Socioeconomic position was defined by Socio-Economic Indices for Areas (SEIFA), specifically the Index of Relative Socioeconomic Disadvantage (IRSD), and other variables analysed were age, parity, Indigenous background, multiple pregnancy, country of birth, coexisting medical condition, previous caesarean section, spontaneous abortion or ectopic pregnancy. Results The study population comprised 211 060 women, including 1119 cases of severe maternal morbidity (0.53%). Compared with the highest IRSD quintile, the aOR for the 2nd quintile was 1.23 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.49), 0.98 (95% CI 0.79 to 1.21) for the 3rd quintile, 1.55 (95% CI 1.28 to 1.87) for the 4th and 1.21 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.47) for the lowest (most deprived) quintile. Indigenous status was associated with twice (aOR 2.02; 95% CI 1.32 to 3.09) the odds of being a case. Other risk factors for severe maternal morbidity were age ≥35 years (aOR 1.22; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.44), coexisting medical condition (aOR 1.39; 95% CI 1.16 to 1.65), multiple pregnancy (aOR 2.30; 95% CI 1.71 to 3.10), primiparity (aOR 1.36; 95% CI 1.18 to 1.57), previous caesarean section (aOR 1.79; 95% CI 1.53 to 2.10) and previous spontaneous miscarriage (aOR 1.25; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.44). Conclusions The findings from Victoria strongly suggest that social disadvantage needs to be acknowledged and further

  5. [Maternal and perinatal risk factors for neonatal morbidity: a narrative literature review].

    PubMed

    Hernández Núñez, Jónathan; Valdés Yong, Magel; Suñol Vázquez, Yoanca de la Caridad; López Quintana, Marelene de la Caridad

    2015-01-01

    Newborn diseases increase neonatal mortality rates, so a literature review was conducted to establish the risk factors related to maternal and peripartum morbidity affecting the newborn. We searched the following electronic databases: Cumed, EBSCO, LILACS, IBECS and PubMed/MEDLINE. We used specific terms and Boolean operators in Spanish, Portuguese and English. We included longitudinal and cross-sectional descriptive studies, as well as case-control and cohort studies, systematic reviews and meta-analysis, spanning from 2010 to 2015 that responded the topic of interest. The included studies show that multiple maternal and perinatal conditions are risk factors for significant increase of neonatal morbidity, which are described in this narrative review. PMID:26247448

  6. Severe maternal morbidity from direct obstetric causes in West Africa: incidence and case fatality rates.

    PubMed Central

    Prual, A.; Bouvier-Colle, M. H.; de Bernis, L.; Bréart, G.

    2000-01-01

    Data on maternal morbidity make it possible to assess how many women are likely to need essential obstetric care, and permit the organization, monitoring and evaluation of safe motherhood programmes. In the present paper we propose operational definitions of severe maternal morbidity and report the frequency of such morbidity as revealed in a population-based survey of a cohort of 20,326 pregnant women in six West African countries. The methodology and questionnaires were the same in all areas. Each pregnant woman had four contacts with the obstetric survey team: at inclusion, between 32 and 36 weeks of amenorrhoea, during delivery and 60 days postpartum. Direct obstetric causes of severe morbidity were observed in 1215 women (6.17 cases per 100 live births). This ratio varied significantly between areas, from 3.01% in Bamako to 9.05% in Saint-Louis. The main direct causes of severe maternal morbidity were: haemorrhage (3.05 per 100 live births); obstructed labour (2.05 per 100), 23 cases of which involved uterine rupture (0.12 per 100); hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (0.64 per 100), 38 cases of which involved eclampsia (0.19 per 100); and sepsis (0.09 per 100). Other direct obstetric causes accounted for 12.2% of cases. Case fatality rates were very high for sepsis (33.3%), uterine rupture (30.4%) and eclampsia (18.4%); those for haemorrhage varied from 1.9% for antepartum or peripartum haemorrhage to 3.7% for abruptio placentae. Thus at least 3-9% of pregnant women required essential obstetric care. The high case fatality rates of several complications reflected a poor quality of obstetric care. PMID:10859853

  7. Effect of Multiple Repeat Cesarean Sections on Maternal Morbidity: Data from Southeast Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kaplanoglu, Mustafa; Bulbul, Mehmet; Kaplanoglu, Dilek; Bakacak, Suleyman Murat

    2015-01-01

    Background Cesarean section (CS) is one of the most common obstetric procedures worldwide and an increased rate of cesarean section has been observed in recent studies. Maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity associated with cesarean section is an important health problem worldwide. This requires the evaluation of the effect of repeated cesarean delivery on maternal morbidity. Material/Methods A total of 2460 patients who underwent delivery by CS at a center in southeast Turkey between January 2012 and January 2014 (24 months) were included in the study. The patients were divided into 5 groups according to the number of CSs, and the maternal and neonatal outcomes of the groups were retrospectively evaluated. Results A statistically significant difference was found between the groups in terms of maternal age, education level, time of hospitalization, operating time, the presence of dense adhesions, bowel and bladder injury, the presence of placenta previa, hysterectomy, blood transfusion requirements, and need for intensive care (p<0.05). Placenta previa (OR, 11.7; 95% CI, 2.6–53.2) and placenta accreta (OR, 12.2; 95% CI, 3.9–37.8) were found to be important risk factors in terms of the need for hysterectomy. No statistically significant difference was found between the groups for gestational age at birth, birth weight, fifth-minute APGAR score, preoperative and postoperative hemoglobin levels, uterine rupture, wound infection, wound dehiscence, placenta accreta, maternal death, and endometritis (p>0.05). A total of 4 or more CSs was identified as the critical level for most of the major complications. Conclusions An increasing number of CSs is accompanied by serious maternal complications. Four or more CSs are of especially critical importance. Decreasing the number of cesarean sections is required to decrease relevant complications. Vaginal birth after CS is an option that should be recommended to the patient. PMID:25989945

  8. A probabilistic method to estimate the burden of maternal morbidity in resource-poor settings: preliminary development and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal morbidity is more common than maternal death, and population-based estimates of the burden of maternal morbidity could provide important indicators for monitoring trends, priority setting and evaluating the health impact of interventions. Methods based on lay reporting of obstetric events have been shown to lack specificity and there is a need for new approaches to measure the population burden of maternal morbidity. A computer-based probabilistic tool was developed to estimate the likelihood of maternal morbidity and its causes based on self-reported symptoms and pregnancy/delivery experiences. Development involved the use of training datasets of signs, symptoms and causes of morbidity from 1734 facility-based deliveries in Benin and Burkina Faso, as well as expert review. Preliminary evaluation of the method compared the burden of maternal morbidity and specific causes from the probabilistic tool with clinical classifications of 489 recently-delivered women from Benin, Bangladesh and India. Results Using training datasets, it was possible to create a probabilistic tool that handled uncertainty of women’s self reports of pregnancy and delivery experiences in a unique way to estimate population-level burdens of maternal morbidity and specific causes that compared well with clinical classifications of the same data. When applied to test datasets, the method overestimated the burden of morbidity compared with clinical review, although possible conceptual and methodological reasons for this were identified. Conclusion The probabilistic method shows promise and may offer opportunities for standardised measurement of maternal morbidity that allows for the uncertainty of women’s self-reported symptoms in retrospective interviews. However, important discrepancies with clinical classifications were observed and the method requires further development, refinement and evaluation in a range of settings. PMID:24620784

  9. Geomagnetic Storms and Acute Myocardial Infarctions Morbidity in Middle Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.; Babayev, E. S.; Mustafa, F. R.; Stoilova, I.; Taseva, T.; Georgieva, K.

    2009-12-01

    Results of collaborative studies on revealing a possible relationship between solar activity (SA) and geomagnetic activity (GMA) and pre-hospital acute myocardial infarction (AMI) morbidity are presented. Studies were based on medical data from Bulgaria and Azerbaijan. Bulgarian data, covering the period from 01.12.1995 to 31.12.2004, concerned daily distribution of number of patients with AMI diagnose (in total 1192 cases) from Sofia Region on the day of admission at the hospital. Azerbaijani data contained 4479 pre-hospital AMI incidence cases for the period 01.01.2003-31.12.2005 and were collected from 21 emergency and first medical aid stations in Grand Baku Area (including Absheron Economical Region with several millions of inhabitants). Data were "cleaned" as much as possible from social and other factors and were subjected to medical and mathematical/statistical analysis. Medical analysis showed reliability of the used data. Method of ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) was applied to check the significance of GMA intensity effect and the type of geomagnetic storms - those caused by magnetic clouds (MC) and by high speed solar wind streams (HSSWS) - on AMI incidences. Relevant correlation coefficients were calculated. Results were outlined for both considered data. Results obtained for the Sofia data showed statistically significant positive correlation between considered GMA indices and AMI occurrence. ANOVA revealed that AMI incidence number was significantly increased from the day before till the day after geomagnetic storms with different intensities. Geomagnetic storms caused by MC were related to significant increase of AMI number in comparison with the storms caused by HSSWS. There was a trend for such different effects even on -1st and +1st day for the period 1995-2004. Results obtained for the Baku data revealed trends similar to those obtained for Sofia data. AMI morbidity increment was observed on the days with higher GMA intensity and after these days

  10. Does Severe Maternal Morbidity Affect Female Sexual Activity and Function? Evidence from a Brazilian Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Andreucci, Carla B.; Cecatti, José G.; Pacagnella, Rodolfo C.; Silveira, Carla; Parpinelli, Mary A.; Ferreira, Elton C.; Angelini, Carina R.; Santos, Juliana P.; Zanardi, Dulce M.; Bussadori, Jamile C.; Cecchino, Gustavo N.; Souza, Renato T.; Sousa, Maria H.; Costa, Maria L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective to assess Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) scores and delay to resume sexual activity associated with a previous severe maternal morbidity. Method This was a multidimensional retrospective cohort study. Women who gave birth at a Brazilian tertiary maternity between 2008 and 2012 were included, with data extraction from the hospital information system. Those with potentially life-threatening conditions and maternal near miss episodes (severe maternal morbidity) were considered the exposed group. The control group was a random sample of women who had had uncomplicated pregnancy. Female sexual function was evaluated through FSFI questionnaire, and general and reproductive aspects were addressed through specific questions. Statistical analyses were performed using Mann-Whitney and Pearson´s Chi-square for bivariate analyses. Logistic regression was used to identify variables independently associated with lower FSFI scores. Results 638 women were included (315 at exposed and 323 at not exposed groups). The majority of women were under 30 years-old in the control group and between 30 and 46 years-old in the exposed group (p = 0.003). Women who experienced severe maternal morbidity (SMM) had statistically significant differences regarding cesarean section (82.4% versus 47.1% among deliveries without complications, p<0.001), and some previous pathological conditions. FSFI mean scores were similar among groups ranging from 24.39 to 24.42. It took longer for exposed women to resume sexual activity after index pregnancy (mean 84 days after SMM and 65 days for control group, p = 0.01). Multiple analyses showed no significant association of FSFI below cut-off value with any predictor. Conclusion FSFI scores were not different in both groups. However, they were lower than expected. SMM delayed resumption of sexual activity after delivery, beyond postpartum period. However, the proportion of women in both groups having sex at 3 months after delivery was similar

  11. Awareness about a Life-Threatening Condition: Ectopic Pregnancy in a Network for Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edilberto Alves Rocha; Santana, Danielly Scaranello; Costa, Maria Laura; Haddad, Samira Maerrawe; Parpinelli, Mary Angela; Sousa, Maria Helena; Camargo, Rodrigo Soares; Pacagnella, Rodolfo Carvalho; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani; Pinto e Silva, Joao Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess occurrence of severe maternal complications associated with ectopic pregnancy (EP). Method. A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted, with prospective surveillance of potentially life-threatening conditions (PLTC), maternal near miss (MNM), and maternal death (MD). EP complications, patient sociodemographic/obstetric characteristics, and conditions of severity management were assessed, estimating prevalence ratios with respective 95% CI. Factors independently associated with greater severity were identified using multiple regression analysis. Results. Of the 9.555 severe maternal morbidity patients, 312 women (3.3%) had complications after EP: 286 (91.7%) PLTC, 25 (8.0%) MNM, and 1 (0.3%) MD. Severe maternal outcome ratio (SMOR) was 0.3/1000 LB among EP cases and 10.8/1000 LB among other causes. Complicated EP patients faced a higher risk of blood transfusion, laparotomy, and lower risk of ICU admission and prolonged hospitalization than women developing complications resulting from other causes. Substandard care was the most common in more severe maternal morbidity and EP cases (22.7% MNM and MD versus 15% PLTC), although not significant. Conclusion. Increased maternal morbidity due to EP raised awareness about the condition and its impact on female reproductive life. No important risk factors for greater severity were identified. Care providers should develop specific guidelines and interventions to prevent severe maternal morbidity. PMID:24772441

  12. Maternal morbidity and mortality from severe sepsis: a national cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Colleen D; Harrison, David A; Rowan, Kathy; Lucas, D Nuala; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J; Knight, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the incidence, characteristics and risk factors for critical care admission with severe maternal sepsis in the UK. Design National cohort study. Setting 198 critical care units in the UK. Participants 646 pregnant and recently pregnant women who had severe sepsis within the first 24 hours of admission in 2008–2010. Primary and secondary outcome measures Septic shock, mortality. Results Of all maternal critical care admissions, 14.4% (n=646) had severe sepsis; 10.6% (n=474) had septic shock. The absolute risk of maternal critical care admission with severe sepsis was 4.1/10 000 maternities. Pneumonia/respiratory infection (irrespective of the H1N1 pandemic influenza strain) and genital tract infection were the most common sources of sepsis (40% and 24%, respectively). We identified a significant gradient in the risk of severe maternal sepsis associated with increasing deprivation (RR=6.5; 95% CI 4.9 to 8.5 most deprived compared with most affluent women). The absolute risk of mortality was 1.8/100 000 maternities. The most common source of infection among women who died was pneumonia/respiratory infection (41%). Known risk factors for morbidity supported by this study were: younger age, multiple gestation birth and caesarean section. Significant risk factors for mortality in unadjusted analysis were: age ≥35 years (unadjusted OR (uOR)=3.5; 95% CI 1.1 to 10.6), ≥3 organ system dysfunctions (uOR=12.7; 95% CI 2.9 to 55.1), respiratory dysfunction (uOR=6.5; 95% CI1.9 to 21.6), renal dysfunction (uOR=5.6; 95% CI 2.3 to 13.4) and haematological dysfunction (uOR=6.5; 95% CI 2.9 to 14.6). Conclusions This study suggests a need to improve timely recognition of severe respiratory tract and genital tract infection in the obstetric population. The social gradient associated with the risk of severe sepsis morbidity and mortality raises important questions regarding maternal health service provision and usage. PMID:27554107

  13. Amniotic Fluid Embolism (AFE) in China: Are maternal mortality and morbidity preventable?

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiuting; Feng, Aihua; Liu, Xiaoyan; Tobe, Ruoyan Gai

    2014-08-01

    A case of hospital-patient conflict has occurred in China that has lifted billows in the public and highlighted the lethality of amniotic fluid embolism (AFE). AFE is a rare but severe obstetric complication with high maternal mortality and morbidity. Globally, the incidence of AFE is estimated to be approximately 2 to 6 per 100,000 deliveries. The maternal mortality rate (MMR) attributable to AFE ranges between 0.5 to 1.7 deaths per 100,000 deliveries in the developed world and 1.9 to 5.9 deaths per 100,000 deliveries in the developing world. In developed countries, AFE often accounts for a leading cause of maternal mortality; whereas the proportion of maternal death caused by AFE tends to be not as dominant compared to common perinatal complications in developing countries. With the mechanism remaining to be elucidated, AFE can neither be predicted nor prevented even in developed countries. Treatment requires a set of highly intensive advanced emergency obstetric care, challenging obstetric care in developing countries. Although this complication is currently far from preventable, China has potential to improve the prognosis of AFE by strengthening the emergency obstetric care system. PMID:25364652

  14. Metasynthesis: Experiences of Women with Severe Maternal Morbidity and Their Perception of the Quality of Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Norhayati, Mohd Noor

    2015-01-01

    Aim To explore the experiences of women with severe maternal morbidity and their perception of the quality of health care. Background The exploration of factors associated with severe maternal morbidity has emerged as an alternative strategy in reducing maternal mortality. This approach is useful for the evaluation and improvement of maternal health services. Design Included a comprehensive search, appraisal of reports of qualitative studies, the classification of studies and the synthesis of findings. Data Sources A literature search was conducted through nine databases for articles published between January 1980 and August 2013. Review Methods The quality of included studies was assessed with a modified Critical Appraisal Skills Program tool. The synthesis applied a meta-ethnographic approach. It involved (1) identifying and comparing the findings; (2) creating a parsimonious thematic structure and (3) searching for disconfirming data. Results Nine studies published between 2005 and 2012, involving 292 women with severe maternal morbidity, were included. Three key themes were identified: 'provision of care', 'severe maternal morbidity' and 'health care seeking behavior'. Barriers to the access and utilization of heath care services were identified. Conclusion The findings appear to suggest that mental and physical health outcomes of women who experienced severe maternal morbidity were poor. There is a need to identify the persistence and severity of these outcomes over a longer period of time. More realistic and less biased information may be obtained in community-based interviews. The impact of potential negative fetal outcomes would be a strong influencing factor for the women. These findings may help to increase awareness of the non-physical components of severe maternal morbidity and provide guidance for professionals regarding preventive measures. PMID:26132107

  15. Maternal mortality and psychiatric morbidity in the perinatal period: challenges and opportunities for prevention in the Australian setting.

    PubMed

    Austin, Marie-Paule; Kildea, Susan; Sullivan, Elizabeth

    2007-04-01

    Maternal mortality associated with psychiatric illness in the perinatal period (pregnancy to the end of the first year postpartum) has until recently been under-reported in Australia due to limitations in the scope of the data collection and methods of detection. The recent United Kingdom report Why mothers die 2000-2002 identified psychiatric illness as the leading cause of maternal death in the UK. Findings from the last three reports on maternal deaths in Australia (covering the period 1994-2002) suggest that maternal psychiatric illness is one of the leading causes of maternal death, with the majority of suicides occurring by violent means. Such findings strengthen the case for routine perinatal psychosocial screening programs, with clear referral guidelines and assertive perinatal treatment of significant maternal psychiatric morbidity. Data linkage studies are needed to measure the full extent of maternal mortality associated with psychiatric illness in Australia. PMID:17407434

  16. Establishing a National Maternal Morbidity Outcome Indicator in England: A Population-Based Study Using Routine Hospital Data

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Manisha; Kurinczuk, Jennnifer J.; Knight, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As maternal deaths become rarer, monitoring near-miss or severe maternal morbidity becomes important as a tool to measure changes in care quality. Many calls have been made to use routinely available hospital administration data to monitor the quality of maternity care. We investigated 1) the feasibility of developing an English Maternal Morbidity Outcome Indicator (EMMOI) by reproducing an Australian indicator using routinely available hospital data, 2) the impact of modifications to the indicator to address potential data quality issues, 3) the reliability of the indicator. Methods We used data from 6,389,066 women giving birth in England from April 2003 to March 2013 available in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) database of the Health and Social care Information centre (HSCIC). A composite indicator, EMMOI, was generated from the diagnoses and procedure codes. Rates of individual morbid events included in the EMMOI were compared with the rates in the UK reported by population-based studies. Results EMMOI included 26 morbid events (17 diagnosis and 9 procedures). Selection of the individual morbid events was guided by the Australian indicator and published literature for conditions associated with maternal morbidity and mortality in the UK, but was mainly driven by the quality of the routine hospital data. Comparing the rates of individual morbid events of the indicator with figures from population-based studies showed that the possibility of false positive and false negative cases cannot be ruled out. Conclusion While routine English hospital data can be used to generate a composite indicator to monitor trends in maternal morbidity during childbirth, the quality and reliability of this monitoring indicator depends on the quality of the hospital data, which is currently inadequate. PMID:27054761

  17. Appropriate criteria for identification of near-miss maternal morbidity in tertiary care facilities: A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Souza, JP; Cecatti, JG; Parpinelli, MA; Serruya, SJ; Amaral, E

    2007-01-01

    Background The study of severe maternal morbidity survivors (near miss) may be an alternative or a complement to the study of maternal death events as a health care indicator. However, there is still controversy regarding the criteria for identification of near-miss maternal morbidity. This study aimed to characterize the near miss maternal morbidity according to different sets of criteria. Methods A descriptive study in a tertiary center including 2,929 women who delivered there between July 2003 and June 2004. Possible cases of near miss were daily screened by checking different sets of criteria proposed elsewhere. The main outcome measures were: rate of near miss and its primary determinant factors, criteria for its identification, total hospital stay, ICU stay, and number and kind of special procedures performed. Results There were two maternal deaths and 124 cases of near miss were identified, with 102 of them admitted to the ICU (80.9%). Among the 126 special procedures performed, the most frequent were central venous access, echocardiography and invasive mechanical ventilation. The mean hospital stay was 10.3 (± 13.24) days. Hospital stay and the number of special procedures performed were significantly higher when the organ dysfunction based criteria were applied. Conclusion The adoption of a two level screening strategy may lead to the development of a consistent severe maternal morbidity surveillance system but further research is needed before worldwide near miss criteria can be assumed. PMID:17848189

  18. Maternal HIV and drug use: effect on health and social morbidity.

    PubMed Central

    Mok, J Y; Ross, A; Raab, G; Hamilton, B; Gilkison, S; Johnstone, F D

    1996-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of routine child health surveillance information was performed on health visitor records of 459 children, to examine the independent effects of maternal HIV infection and drug use during pregnancy on morbidity in the first 3 years of life. No significant differences were observed in the developmental progress of children born to HIV infected or drug using women when compared to community controls. The pattern of medical consultations in the first 18 months of life was significantly different, maternal drug use exerting a negative influence on outpatient visits (odds ratio 0.6, 95% confidence interval 0.4 to 1.0). At 6 weeks, the majority of children lived with their birth parent(s), and no differences were observed between the groups. By 10 months of age, only 81% of children born to HIV infected drug using women lived with their parent(s). While maternal drug use and HIV did not have adverse effects on child health and development, these findings highlight the social implications for children affected by the heterosexual spread of HIV. PMID:8787424

  19. ["I was like a ticking bomb": Experiences of severe maternal morbidity in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires].

    PubMed

    Szulik, Dalia; Szwarc, Lucila

    2015-12-01

    With the objective of recording and analyzing women's experiences with severe maternal morbidity from their perspective, between February and May 2011, 16 semi-structured interviews with women treated in the public hospitals of the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area who suffered from severe maternal morbidity were carried out. In their testimonies, women report a number of delays in care, such as difficulties in identifying the problem on time, obstacles in accessing health centers and important faults in the management of obstetric emergencies. They describe the event as surprising, distressing and painful, a perception reinforced by the violation of their rights and significant communication problems. These findings are meant as a step towards the holistic and comprehensive study of severe maternal morbidity, as well as to confirm the urgent need for further research from a gender and humans rights perspective. PMID:26676597

  20. The relationship between severe maternal morbidity and psychological health symptoms at 6–8 weeks postpartum: a prospective cohort study in one English maternity unit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence of severe maternal morbidity is increasing in high-income countries. However, little has been known about the impact on postnatal morbidity, particularly on psychological health outcomes. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between severe maternal morbidity (ie. major obstetric haemorrhage, severe hypertensive disorders or intensive care unit/obstetric high dependency unit admission) and postnatal psychological health symptoms, focusing on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms at 6–8 weeks postpartum. Method A prospective cohort study was undertaken of women who gave birth over six months in 2010 in an inner city maternity unit in England. Primary outcomes were prevalence of PTSD symptoms namely: 1) intrusion and 2) avoidance as measured using the Impact of Event Scale at 6 – 8 weeks postpartum via a self-administered postal questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included probable depression. Data on incidence of severe maternal morbidity were extracted from maternity records. Multivariable logistic regression analysis examined the relationship between severe maternal morbidity and PTSD symptoms taking into account factors that might influence the relationship. Results Of women eligible to participate (n=3509), 52% responded. Prevalence of a clinically significant level of intrusion and avoidance were 6.4% (n=114) and 8.4% (n=150) respectively. There was a higher risk of PTSD symptoms among women who experienced severe maternal morbidity compared with women who did not (adjusted OR = 2.11, 95%CI = 1.17-3.78 for intrusion; adjusted OR = 3.28, 95%CI = 2.01-5.36 for avoidance). Higher ratings of reported sense of control during labour/birth partially mediated the risk of PTSD symptoms. There were no statistically significant differences in the prevalence or severity of symptoms of depression. Conclusion This is one of the largest studies to date of PTSD symptoms among women who had recently given birth. Findings

  1. Tandem mass spectrometry determined maternal cortisone to cortisol ratio and psychiatric morbidity during pregnancy-interaction with birth weight.

    PubMed

    Hellgren, Charlotte; Edvinsson, Åsa; Olivier, Jocelien D; Fornes, Romina; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Ubhayasekera, S J Kumari A; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Bergquist, Jonas; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2016-07-01

    Maternal serum cortisol has been suggested to be influenced by psychiatric morbidity, and may also influence fetal growth. However, several studies found equal cortisol levels in depressed and healthy pregnant women. Placental 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) shields the fetus from maternal cortisol by conversion to cortisone, a function that may be compromised by maternal stress. We aimed to compare the serum ratio of cortisone to cortisol, in women with and without psychiatric morbidity during pregnancy. A secondary aim was to investigate whether fetal growth, approximated by infant birth weight, was associated with the cortisone to cortisol ratio. We performed tandem mass spectrometry analysis of serum cortisol and cortisone in late pregnancy in 94 women with antenatal psychiatric morbidity and 122 controls (cohort 1). We also compared the placental gene expression of HSD11B1 and 2 in another group of 69 women with psychiatric morbidity and 47 controls (cohort 2). There were no group differences in cortisol to cortisone ratio, absolute levels of cortisone and cortisol (cohort 1), or expression of HSD11B1 or 2 (cohort 2). However, cortisone to cortisol ratio was positively associated with birth weight in women with psychiatric morbidity, also after adjustment for gestational length, fetal sex, maternal height, smoking, SSRI use, and time of blood sampling (standardized β=0.35, p<0.001), with no association in the healthy controls Thus, the maternal serum cortisone to cortisol ratio does not seem to be affected by psychiatric morbidity, but psychiatric morbidity may increase fetal exposure to cortisol or other metabolic factors influencing fetal growth. PMID:27088373

  2. Liver dysfunction in pregnancy: an important cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, N; Shamsi, T; Kuczynski, E; Lockwood, C J; Paidas, M J

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the maternal and perinatal outcome of women with liver dysfunction during pregnancy. The study involved a prospective observational study design and was carried out at the Dow University of Health Sciences and Civil Hospital Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 800 women, who delivered during the study period from January 2006 to September 2006, constituted the study population. Pregnant women with liver dysfunction underwent evaluation for the aetiology of their liver dysfunction, including screening for hepatitis E. Thirty-five women were identified with liver dysfunction. Fourteen (40%) presented in the second trimester and 21 (60%) presented in the third trimester. Twenty-two of the 35 women (63%) had isolated acute hepatitis E; five (14%) had HELLP (haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count) syndrome; two (6%) had intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (IHCP), two had acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) and two women had hepatitis A. A specific diagnosis was not reached in two women who died prior to delivery. In women with hepatitis E, the mean values of bilirubin and alanine transaminase were 12 mg/dL and 675 U/L, respectively. Abnormal coagulation parameters were present in 20 (57%) of the women and in 18 of 22 (82%) with hepatitis E. Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) was seen in four patients. Seven women (20%) underwent caesarean section, 26 (74%) delivered vaginally and two women died undelivered. There were six maternal deaths in the study population; two were due to hepatitis E, one each from HELLP and AFLP, and two remained undiagnosed. The overall perinatal mortality within the group was 43%. Hepatitis E was the most common cause of FHF and maternal death in pregnant women with liver dysfunction.

  3. The effect of maternal child marriage on morbidity and mortality of children under 5 in India: cross sectional study of a nationally representative sample

    PubMed Central

    Saggurti, Niranjan; Winter, Michael; Labonte, Alan; Decker, Michele R; Balaiah, Donta; Silverman, Jay G

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess associations between maternal child marriage (marriage before age 18) and morbidity and mortality of infants and children under 5 in India. Design Cross-sectional analyses of nationally representative household sample. Generalised estimating equation models constructed to assess associations. Adjusted models included maternal and child demographics and maternal body mass index as covariates. Setting India. Population Women aged 15-49 years (n=124 385); data collected in 2005-6 through National Family Health Survey-3. Data about child morbidity and mortality reported by participants. Analyses restricted to births in past five years reported by ever married women aged 15-24 years (n=19 302 births to 13 396 mothers). Main outcome measures In under 5s: mortality related infectious diseases in the past two weeks (acute respiratory infection, diarrhoea); malnutrition (stunting, wasting, underweight); infant (age <1 year) and child (1-5 years) mortality; low birth weight (<2500 kg). Results The majority of births (73%; 13 042/19 302) were to mothers married as minors. Although bivariate analyses showed significant associations between maternal child marriage and infant and child diarrhoea, malnutrition (stunted, wasted, underweight), low birth weight, and mortality, only stunting (adjusted odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.33) and underweight (1.24, 1.14 to 1.36) remained significant in adjusted analyses. We noted no effect of maternal child marriage on health of boys versus girls. Conclusions The risk of malnutrition is higher in young children born to mothers married as minors than in those born to women married at a majority age. Further research should examine how early marriage affects food distribution and access for children in India. PMID:20093277

  4. Adolescents and Adults with Autism with and without Co-Morbid Psychiatric Disorders: Differences in Maternal Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kring, Sheilah R.; Greenberg, Jan S.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the associations between the characteristics of adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and maternal well-being. Two groups were compared: mothers of adolescents and adults with ASD and co-morbid psychiatric disorders (n = 142) and mothers whose sons or daughters had a single diagnosis of ASD (n = 130).…

  5. Severe maternal morbidity: a case-control study in Maranhao, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality and morbidity are among the top public health priorities in Brazil, being quite high, especially among the most disadvantage women. A case control study was developed to identify risk factors for severe maternal morbidity in Sao Luis, one of the poorest Brazilian State Capitals. Methods The case–control study was carried out between 01/03/2009 and 28/02/2010 in two public high-risk maternities facilities and in two intensive care units (ICUs) for referral of obstetric cases. All cases hospitalized due to complications during gestation period, childbirth or up to 42 days of puerperium and who fulfilled any of Mantel's and/or Waterstone's criteria were identified. Two controls per case were randomly selected among patients of the same clinics discharged for other reasons. Data were obtained through a structured interview as well as from medical charts and prenatal cards and included sociodemographic variables, clinical and obstetric histories, behavioral factors and exposure to stress factors during pregnancy, pre-natal assistance and obstetric complication and childbirth care. Results In the final model of the unconditional logistic regression analysis, being older than 35 years (OR=3.11; 95% CI:1.53-6.31), previous hypertension (OR=2.52; 95% CI:1.09-5.80), history of abortion (OR=1.61; 95% CI:0.97-2.68), 4–5 pre-natal consultations (OR=1.78; 95% CI:1.05-3.01) and 1–3 pre-natal consultations (OR=1.89; 95% CI:1.03-3.49) were independently associated with severe maternal morbidity. Conclusions The results corroborate the importance of reproductive healthcare, of identifying a high-risk pregnancy and of a qualified and complete prenatal care to prevent severe morbid events. Resumo Introdução A mortalidade e morbidade maternas estão entre os tópicos prioritários da Saúde Pública brasileira, especialmente na população de menor nível socioeconômico. Um estudo caso-controle foi desenvolvido para identificar os fatores de risco

  6. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causing maternal death

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hae Rin; Cho, Yoon Jin; Chon, Seung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is rare and occurs in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. It rarely complicates pregnancy, and can occur during any trimester, however over half (52%) of cases occur during the third trimester and during the post-partum period. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, acute pancreatitis caused by hypertriglyceridemia due to increase of estrogen during the gestational period is very unusual, but complication carries a higher risk of morbidity and mortality for both the mother and the fetus. We experienced a case of pregnant woman who died of acute exacerbation of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis at 23 weeks of gestation. We report on progress and management of this case along with literature reviews. PMID:27004207

  7. Population-based study of risk factors for severe maternal morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kristen E; Wallace, Erin R; Nelson, Kailey R; Reed, Susan D; Schiff, Melissa A

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Severe maternal morbidity (SMM) is a serious health condition potentially resulting in death without immediate medical attention, including organ failure, obstetric shock, and elcampsia. SMM affects 20,000 US women every year; however, few population-based studies have examined SMM risk factors. Methods We conducted a population-based case-control study linking birth certificate and hospital discharge data from Washington State (1987–2008), identifying 9,485 women with an antepartum, intrapartum, or postpartum SMM with ≥3-day hospitalization or transfer from another facility and 41,112 random controls. Maternal age, race, smoking during pregnancy, parity, preexisting medical condition, multiple birth, prior cesarean delivery, and BMI were assessed as risk factors with logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for education and delivery payer source. Results Older women [35–39: OR 1.65 CI 1.52, 1.79; 40+: OR 2.48 CI 2.16, 2.81], non-white women [Black: OR 1.82 CI 1.64, 2.01; American Indian: OR 1.52 CI 1.32, 1.73; Asian/Pacific Islander: OR 1.30 CI 1.19, 1.41; Hispanic: OR 1.17 CI 1.07, 1.27], and women at parity extremes [OR 1.83 CI 1.72, 1.95, nulliparous; OR 1.34 CI 1.23, 1.45, parity 3+] were at greater risk of SMM. Women with a preexisting medical condition [OR 2.10 CI 1.88, 2.33], a multiple birth [OR 2.54 CI 2.26, 2.82], and a prior cesarean delivery [OR 2.08 CI 1.93, 2.23] were also at increased risk. Conclusion The risk factors identified are not modifiable at the individual level; therefore, provider and system-level factors may be the most appropriate target for preventing SMM. PMID:23061686

  8. Impact of Janani Suraksha Yojana on institutional delivery rate and maternal morbidity and mortality: an observational study in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjeev K; Pal, Dinesh K; Tiwari, Rajesh; Garg, Rajesh; Shrivastava, Ashish K; Sarawagi, Radha; Patil, Rajkumar; Agarwal, Lokesh; Gupta, Prashant; Lahariya, Chandrakant

    2012-12-01

    The Government of India initiated a cash incentive scheme--Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY)--to promote institutional deliveries with an aim to reduce maternal mortality ratio (MMR). An observational study was conducted in a tertiary-care hospital of Madhya Pradesh, India, before and after implementation of JSY, with a sample of women presenting for institutional delivery. The objectives of this study were to: (i) determine the total number of institutional deliveries before and after implementation of JSY, (ii) determine the MMR, and (iii) compare factors associated with maternal mortality and morbidity. The data were analyzed for two years before implementation of JSY (2003-2005) and compared with two years following implementation of JSY (2005-2007). Overall, institutional deliveries increased by 42.6% after implementation, including those among rural, illiterate and primary-literate persons of lower socioeconomic strata. The main causes of maternal mortality were eclampsia, pre-eclampsia and severe anaemia both before and after implementation of JSY. Anaemia was the most common morbidity factor observed in this study. Among those who had institutional deliveries, there were significant increases in cases of eclampsia, pre-eclampsia, polyhydramnios, oligohydramnios, antepartum haemorrhage (APH), postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), and malaria after implementation of JSY. The scheme appeared to increase institutional delivery by at-risk mothers, which has the potential to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality, improve child survival, and ensure equity in maternal healthcare in India. The lessons from this study and other available sources should be utilized to improve the performance and implementation of JSY scheme in India. PMID:23304913

  9. Maternal Depressive Symptoms in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder: Relationship to Acute Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Mayes, Taryn; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Tao, Rongrong; Carmody, Thomas; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    A study examined maternal depressive symptoms at the beginning and end of acute pediatric treatment of children with major depressive disorder (MDD). Results suggested a direct and possible reciprocal association between maternal and child depression severity.

  10. Perforated appendicitis masquerading as acute pancreatitis in a morbidly obese patient.

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael-J; Akoh, Jacob-A

    2008-03-21

    Diagnosis and treatment of common conditions in morbidly obese patients still pose a challenge to physicians and surgeons. Sometimes too much reliance is put on investigations that can lead to a misdiagnosis. This case demonstrates an obese woman admitted under the medical team with a presumed diagnosis of pneumonia, who was later found to have an acute abdomen and raised amylase, which led to an assumed diagnosis of pancreatitis. She died within 24 h of admission and post mortem confirmed the cause of death as systemic sepsis due to perforated appendicitis, with no evidence of pancreatitis. Significantly elevated serum amylase level may occur in non-pancreatitic acute abdomen. PMID:18350613

  11. Remote prognosis after primary cesarean delivery: the association of VBACs and recurrent cesarean deliveries with maternal morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Erez, Offer; Novack, Lena; Kleitman-Meir, Vered; Dukler, Doron; Erez-Weiss, Idit; Gotsch, Francesca; Mazor, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effects of vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) versus repeated cesarean sections (RCS) after a primary cesarean section (CS), on the rate of intraoperative and postpartum maternal morbidity. Patients and methods This is a retrospective population-based cohort study. During the study period (1988–2005) there were 200,012 deliveries by 76,985 women at our medical center; 16,365 of them had a primary CS, of which 7429 women delivered a singleton infant after the primary CS, met the inclusion criteria, were included in our study, and were followed for four consecutive deliveries. Patients were divided into three study groups according to the outcome of their consecutive delivery after the primary CS: VBAC (n = 3622), elective CS (n = 1910), or an urgent CS (n = 1897). Survival analysis models were used to investigate the effect of the urgency of CS and the numbers of pregnancy predating the primary CS on peripartum complications. Results Women who failed a trial of labor had a higher rate of uterine rupture than those who had a VBAC. Patients who delivered by CS had a higher rate of endometritis than those giving birth vaginally. The rate of cesarean hysterectomy and transfer to other departments increased significantly at the fourth consecutive surgery (P = 0.02 and P = 0.003, respectively). VBAC was associated with a 55% reduction in the risk of intrapartum complications in comparison to a planned CS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.22–0.89. A greater maternal parity at the time of primary CS was associated with lower intrapartum and postpartum morbidities (HR 0.44; 95% CI: 0.24–0.79; HR 0.54; 95% CI: 0.47–0.62, respectively). Conclusions (1) A successful VBAC is associated with a reduction in the intrapartum complications; and (2) maternal morbidity increases substantially from the fourth consecutive cesarean delivery. PMID:22448111

  12. Moderate Exercise Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Associated Maternal and Fetal Morbidities in Pregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald-Goodfellow, Shannyn K.; Surita, Fernanda G.; Pinto e Silva, João L.; Tayade, Chandrakant; Othman, Maha; Ozolinš, Terence R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) and coagulopathies are often associated with aberrant maternal inflammation. Moderate-intensity exercise during pregnancy has been shown to increase utero-placental blood flow and to enhance fetal nutrition as well as fetal and placental growth. Furthermore, exercise is known to reduce inflammation. To evaluate the effect of moderate-intensity exercise on inflammation associated with the development of maternal coagulopathies and FGR, Wistar rats were subjected to an exercise regime before and during pregnancy. To model inflammation-induced FGR, pregnant rats were administered daily intraperitoneal injections of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on gestational days (GD) 13.5–16.5 and sacrificed at GD 17.5. Control rats were injected with saline. Maternal hemostasis was assessed by thromboelastography. Moderate-intensity exercise prevented LPS-mediated increases in white blood cell counts measured on GD 17.5 and improved maternal hemostasis profiles. Importantly, our data reveal that exercise prevented LPS-induced FGR. Moderate-intensity exercise initiated before and maintained during pregnancy may decrease the severity of maternal and perinatal complications associated with abnormal maternal inflammation. PMID:27124733

  13. The role of delays in severe maternal morbidity and mortality: expanding the conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Pacagnella, Rodolfo Carvalho; Cecatti, Jose Guilherme; Osis, Maria Jose; Souza, João Paulo

    2012-06-01

    Maternal mortality has gained importance in research and policy since the mid-1980s. Thaddeus and Maine recognized early on that timely and adequate treatment for obstetric complications were a major factor in reducing maternal deaths. Their work offered a new approach to examining maternal mortality, using a three-phase framework to understand the gaps in access to adequate management of obstetric emergencies: phase I--delay in deciding to seek care by the woman and/or her family; phase II--delay in reaching an adequate health care facility; and phase III--delay in receiving adequate care at that facility. Recently, efforts have been made to strengthen health systems' ability to identify complications that lead to maternal deaths more rapidly. This article shows that the combination of the "three delays" framework with the maternal "near-miss" approach, and using a range of information-gathering methods, may offer an additional means of recognizing a critical event around childbirth. This approach can be a powerful tool for policymakers and health managers to guarantee the principles of human rights within the context of maternal health care, by highlighting the weaknesses of systems and obstetric services. PMID:22789093

  14. [Maternal and fetal morbidity in patients with premature rupture of the membrane after 27-week gestation. Causes and costs].

    PubMed

    Nava Flores, Jorge; Enríquez Miranda, Ma Cecilia; Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino

    2003-07-01

    Premature rupture of the membranes (PROM) occurs in a third of the childbirths preterm, this represents 8% of all pregnancies, with same morbidity and mortality in developing and developed countries, PROM is the more common cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, making this obstetric complication a worldwide problem of health, since it contributes to the economic problem for the cost risen in medical attention for both, mothers and live birth. PROM is considered a mutifactorial entity. This study was carried out in the Hospital de Ginecología y Obstetricia of the Centro Médico "La Raza" in Mexico City, where women entered in serial form with pregnancies from 27 to 34 weeks of gestation and spontaneous PROM, without any other pathology. 120 patients were included, with 26.8 +/- 5.9 year-old age. The gestational age with more frequency of PROM were from 30 to 33 weeks, 22.5% of the patients had 4 days with PROM, 6 of this cases arrived up to 13 days with this complication at delivery. 2.5% of the patients presented deciduitis, with adequated response to the use of antibiotics. When analyzing the hospital stay, a stay was observed from 4 to 7 days (5.26 +/- 1.96 M +/- SD), with a total cost for maternal stay of 2 millions 445,650 pesos. Those babies born had an average of 23 days of hospital stay and the total cot of the days of stay was 4 millions 963,978 pesos. Other costs were the attention of maternal and pediatrics specialty, the obstetric resolution of the pregnancy, obstetric ultrasonography and crystallographies. Thus, the total costs of the attention of this complication in these patients with PROM was of 10 millions 296,988 pesos. The international reference is the American dollar that was in 10 pesos for dollar to the moment of this study. The maternal morbidity is low to that described in previous studies, but in spite of the exhaustive efforts on the prevention, prediction, diagnosis and treatment, the premature rate due to PROM has not diminished

  15. Urinary tract infection during pregnancy: its association with maternal morbidity and perinatal outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Schieve, L A; Handler, A; Hershow, R; Persky, V; Davis, F

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The effects of antepartum urinary tract infection on adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes were examined. Antepartum urinary tract infection has been previously implicated as a risk factor for numerous outcomes. METHODS. Crude and multivariable analyses were performed with a perinatal registry cohort of 25,746 mother/infant pairs. RESULTS. Elevated risks were observed for exposure to urinary tract infection and low birthweight, prematurity, preterm low birthweight, premature labor, hypertension/preeclampsia, maternal anemia, and amnionitis. Urinary tract infection was associated with perinatal death only among subjects 20 to 29 years of age. CONCLUSIONS. These findings underscore the importance of antepartum urine screening to identify patients at risk for adverse outcomes. PMID:8129056

  16. The effects of morbid obesity on maternal and neonatal health outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Lutsiv, O; Mah, J; Beyene, J; McDonald, S D

    2015-07-01

    Morbidly obese (Class III, body mass index [BMI] ≥ 40 kg m(-2)) women constitute 8% of reproductive-aged women and are an increasing proportion; however, their pregnancy risks have not yet been well understood. Hence, we performed meta-analyses following the MOOSE (Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) guideline, searching Medline and Embase from their inceptions. To examine graded relationships, we compared Class III obesity to Class I and I/II, and separately to normal weight. We found important effects on all three primary outcomes in morbidly obese women: preterm birth <37 weeks was 31% higher compared with Class I (relative risk [RR] 1.31 [1.19, 1.43]) and 20% higher than Class I/II (RR 1.20 [1.13, 1.27]), large-for-gestational age was higher (RR 1.37 [1.29, 1.45] and RR 1.30 [1.24, 1.36] compared with Class I and I/II, respectively), while small-for-gestational age was lower (RR 0.89 [0.84, 0.93] compared with Class I, with nearly identical reductions for Class I/II). Morbidly obese women have higher risks of preterm birth, large-for-gestational age and numerous other adverse maternal and infant health outcomes, relative to not only normal weight but also Class I or I/II obese women. These findings have important implications for screening and care of morbidly obese pregnant women, to try to decrease adverse outcomes. PMID:25912896

  17. Severe maternal morbidity and mortality from amniotic fluid embolism in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Koen H; Zwart, Joost J; Schutte, Joke; VAN Roosmalen, Jos

    2012-08-01

    We have assessed the incidence, symptoms and risk factors of amniotic fluid embolism in the Netherlands. Data were retrieved from two nationwide registration systems. From 1983 to 2005 the maternal mortality ratio of amniotic fluid embolism increased from 0.11 to 0.63 (odds ratio (OR) 5.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-25.3). The most common signs and symptoms of amniotic fluid embolism were dyspnea and massive obstetric hemorrhage. In the majority of women, onset of symptoms was intrapartum or immediately postpartum. Potential risk factors of developing amniotic fluid embolism were maternal age >30, multiparity (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.02-10.5), cesarean section (OR 1.3, 95% CI 0.3-5.2) and induction of labor (OR 2.1, 95% CI 2.1-6.1). Perinatal mortality was increased to 38.1% compared with 0.98% in the general pregnant population (p < 0.001) High maternal age and multiparity are the most important risk factors for developing amniotic fluid embolism. PMID:22568783

  18. EFFECT OF ACUTE MATERNAL TOXICITY ON FETAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of acute alterations in maternal health status upon fetal development were assessed following exposure of pregnant CD-1 mice on day 8 of gestation to one of ten chemicals at a dose calculated to be the maternal LD10 or LD40. The dams were killed on day 18 of gestation...

  19. Postpartum depression and infant-mother attachment security at one year: The impact of co-morbid maternal personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne; Tharner, Anne; Steele, Howard; Cordes, Katharina; Mehlhase, Heike; Vaever, Mette Skovgaard

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies on effects of postpartum depression (PPD) on infant-mother attachment have been divergent. This may be due to not taking into account the effects of stable difficulties not specific for depression, such as maternal personality disorder (PD). Mothers (N=80) were recruited for a longitudinal study either during pregnancy (comparison group) or eight weeks postpartum (clinical group). Infants of mothers with depressive symptoms only or in combination with a PD diagnosis were compared with infants of mothers with no psychopathology. Depression and PD were assessed using self-report and clinical interviews. Infant-mother attachment was assessed when infants were 13 months using Strange Situation Procedure (SSP). Attachment (in)security was calculated as a continuous score based on the four interactive behavioral scales of the SSP, and the conventional scale for attachment disorganization was used. PPD was associated with attachment insecurity only if the mother also had a PD diagnosis. Infants of PPD mothers without co-morbid PD did not differ from infants of mothers with no psychopathology. These results suggest that co-existing PD may be crucial in understanding how PPD impacts on parenting and infant social-emotional development. Stable underlying factors may magnify or buffer effects of PPD on parenting and child outcomes. PMID:27400381

  20. Maternal knowledge, attitude and practices regarding childhood acute respiratory infections in Kumasi, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Denno, D M; Bentsi-Enchill, A; Mock, C N; Adelson, J W

    1994-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are a major cause of paediatric mortality and morbidity, particularly when associated with delays in treatment. A study of mothers' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding ARI in their children aged less than 5 years was conducted in an urban Ghanaian population. One hundred and forty-three women traders were interviewed in open air markers in Kumasi, Ghana. Based on Western standards, there was a poor maternal understanding of the aetiology of ARI. A variety of herbal and home care therapies, including some which have potentially harmful effects, were routinely employed for the prophylaxis and treatment of ARI. For example, castor oil and enemas (25.9%) were reported as agents to prevent ARI, and antibiotics were prescribed by the parents in 39.9% for treating coughs. While the mothers exhibited an understanding of symptoms which differentiate between mild and severe ARI, a substantial number indicated that they would delay accessing a health care facility in the presence of the following symptoms which signify severe respiratory distress: dyspnoea (11.2%); tachypnoea (18.9%); chest retraction (21.7%); cough, fever and anorexia (30.0%); and cough, fever and lethargy (57.3%). These findings support the need for an ARI health education programme in Ghana. PMID:7880091

  1. Does induction of labor for constitutionally large-for-gestational-age fetuses identified in utero reduce maternal morbidity?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    policy of induction of labor for women with a constitutionally large-for-gestational-age fetus among women without diabetes does not reduce maternal morbidity. PMID:24885981

  2. Racial/ethnic disparities in maternal morbidities: a statewide study of labor and delivery hospitalizations in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Cabacungan, Erwin T; Ngui, Emmanuel M; McGinley, Emily L

    2012-10-01

    We examined racial/ethnic disparities in maternal morbidities (MM) and the number of MM during labor and delivery among hospital discharges in Wisconsin. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of hospital discharge data for 206,428 pregnant women aged 13-53 years using 2005-2007 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Dataset (HCUP-SID) for Wisconsin. After adjustments for covariates, MM (preterm labor, antepartum and postpartum hemorrhage, hypertension in pregnancy, gestational diabetes, membrane-related disorders, infections and 3rd and 4th perineal lacerations) were examined using logistic regression models, and number of MM (0, 1, 2, >2 MM) were examined using multivariable ordered logistic regressions with partial proportional odds models. African-Americans had significantly higher likelihood of infections (OR = 1.74; 95% CI 1.60-1.89), preterm labor (OR = 1.42; 1.33-1.50), antepartum hemorrhage (OR = 1.63; 1.44-1.83), and hypertension complicating pregnancy (OR = 1.39; 1.31-1.48) compared to Whites. Hispanics, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans had significantly higher likelihood of infections, postpartum hemorrhage, and gestational diabetes than Whites. Major perineal lacerations were significantly higher among Asian/Pacific Islanders (OR = 1.53; 1.34-1.75). All minority racial/ethnic groups, except Asians, had significantly higher likelihood of having 0 versus 1, 2 or >2 MM, 0 or 1 versus 2 or >2 MM, and 0, 1 or 2 versus >2 MM than white women. Findings show significant racial/ethnic disparities in MM, and suggest the need for better screening, management, and timely referral of these conditions, particularly among racial/ethnic women. Disparities in MM may be contributing to the high infant mortality and adverse birth outcomes among different racial/ethnic groups in Wisconsin. PMID:22105738

  3. What Are the Factors That Interplay From Normal Pregnancy to Near Miss Maternal Morbidity in a Nigerian Tertiary Health Care Facility?

    PubMed Central

    Adeoye, Ikeola A.; Ijarotimi, Omotade O.; Fatusi, Adesegun O.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers in Nigeria examined the epidemiological characteristics and factors associated with maternal outcomes using a mixed method approach: a prospective case control study design involving 375 pregnant women who received maternal care from a tertiary facility and in-depth interviews reporting the experience of near-miss survivors. A generalized ordered logit model was used to generate the estimates of partial proportional odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) across categories of the outcome variable. Factors strongly associated with maternal morbidity were late referral of women, presence of complications at booking antenatal visits, low birth weight, and severe birth asphyxia. The nearmiss women were further characterized, and a low proportion (25%) had organ dysfunction or failure. The challenge of such diagnoses in resource-constrained settings raises questions about the appropriateness of using organ dysfunction criteria in developing countries. PMID:25119488

  4. What are the factors that interplay from normal pregnancy to near miss maternal morbidity in a Nigerian tertiary health care facility?

    PubMed

    Adeoye, Ikeola A; Ijarotimi, Omotade O; Fatusi, Adesegun O

    2015-01-01

    Researchers in Nigeria examined the epidemiological characteristics and factors associated with maternal outcomes using a mixed method approach: a prospective case control study design involving 375 pregnant women who received maternal care from a tertiary facility and in-depth interviews reporting the experience of near-miss survivors. A generalized ordered logit model was used to generate the estimates of partial proportional odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) across categories of the outcome variable. Factors strongly associated with maternal morbidity were late referral of women, presence of complications at booking antenatal visits, low birth weight, and severe birth asphyxia. The nearmiss women were further characterized, and a low proportion (25%) had organ dysfunction or failure. The challenge of such diagnoses in resource-constrained settings raises questions about the appropriateness of using organ dysfunction criteria in developing countries. PMID:25119488

  5. A MULTI-CITY TIME-SERIES STUDY OF POLLUTANT MIXTURES AND ACUTE MORBIDITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from this project will advance our understanding of the specific sources, attributes and constituents of the ambient air pollutant mix that impact cardiorespiratory morbidities at two levels of disease severity. By exploring possible explanations for the heterogeneity ...

  6. Acute morbidity associated with scabies and other ectoparasitoses rapidly improves after treatment with ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Worth, Christine; Heukelbach, Jorg; Fengler, Gernot; Walter, Birke; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Hengge, Ulrich; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    In resource-poor settings, scabies is associated with considerable morbidity. Which factors determine morbidity and how rapidly it recedes after specific treatment is not known. Patients with scabies were recruited in three urban slums in Fortaleza, Northeast Brazil. Diagnosis was established according to dermatoscopy, skin scraping, or adhesive film test. Severity of scabies-associated morbidity was assessed semiquantitatively. Patients and close contacts were treated with oral ivermectin (200 μg/kg, repeated after 7 days) and followed up for 2 weeks. Ninety-five patients were included in the study. Papules were the most common lesion type (98.9%). Excoriations due to scratching were observed in 43.2% and bacterial superinfection in 24.2%. Predilection sites were the arms (82.1%) and the abdomen (81.1%). At baseline, 36.3% of patients complained about intense or severe itching. Intense or severe itch decreased to 6.3% 2 weeks after treatment (p=0.02). Whereas 37.5% of the patients complained about intense or severe itch-related sleep disturbances at baseline, only 8.8% reported the symptom 2 weeks after treatment (p=0.35). At baseline, the degree of itching was correlated with the degree of sleep disturbance (ρ=0.64; p<0.001). One week after the first dose of ivermectin, the intensity of itching and of sleep disturbance decreased significantly (p<0.001). In patients living in resource-poor setting, scabies was associated with considerable morbidity. Treatment with ivermectin rapidly reconstituted health in almost all cases. PMID:22211573

  7. Twin anemia-polycythemia sequence after laser surgery for twin-twin transfusion syndrome and maternal morbidity.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Kosuke; Sumie, Masahiro; Sugibayashi, Rika; Wada, Seiji; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Sago, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Twin anemia-polycythemia sequence (TAPS) is characterized by large inter-twin hemoglobin value differences without inter-twin amniotic fluid discordance. The management of post-laser TAPS remains controversial. Hence, more studies on TAPS, together with the associated maternal complications and outcome of the fetuses and infants are needed. Between 2003 and 2012, we performed 287 cases of fetoscopic laser photocoagulation for twin-twin transfusion syndrome. Among the 114 who were placed under our care until delivery, three cases of TAPS occurred. In one case, we conducted intrauterine intravenous transfusion, while in the other two cases, we adopted expectant management. We performed an emergency caesarean section at 27-30 weeks of gestation in all cases due to a severe condition of anemia in the TAPS donor. Two cases with antenatal TAPS stage 4 had severe maternal complications; one had minute pulmonary embolism, while the other had Mirror syndrome. All three pairs of infants survived. One TAPS donor and one TAPS recipient had neurodevelopmental impairment; bilateral deafness at 9.5 years old and spastic paralysis at 2 years old, respectively. In conclusion, post-laser TAPS in a higher stage can cause severe maternal complications. Close observations for both fetuses and mothers are required for such cases. PMID:25613794

  8. Association of Hyperglycemia with In-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Libyan Patients with Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Benamer, Sufyan; Eljazwi, Imhemed; Mohamed, Rima; Masoud, Heba; Tuwati, Mussa; Elbarsha, Abdulwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia on admission and during hospital stay is a well-established predictor of short-term and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Our study investigated the impact of blood glucose levels on admission and in-hospital hyperglycemia on the morbidity and mortality of Libyan patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina). Methods In this retrospective study, the records of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome to The 7th Of October Hospital, Benghazi, Libya, between January 2011 and December 2011 were reviewed. The level of blood glucose on admission, and the average blood glucose during the hospital stay were recorded to determine their effects on in-hospital complications (e.g. cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, arrhythmias, and/or heart block) and mortality. Results During the study period, 121 patients with diabetes were admitted with acute coronary syndrome. The mortality rate in patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was 12.4%. Patients with a mean glucose level greater than 200mg/dL had a higher in-hospital mortality and a higher rate of complications than those with a mean glucose level ≤200mg/dL (27.5% vs. 2.6%, p<0.001 and 19.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.004, respectively). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patients with a glucose level at admission ≤140mg/dL and those admitted with a glucose level >140mg/dL (6.9% vs. 14.3%; p=0.295), but the rate of complications was higher in the latter group (13.8% vs. 34.1%; p=0.036). Patients with admission glucose levels >140mg/dL also had a higher rate of complications at presentation (26.4% vs. 6.9%; p=0.027). Conclusion In patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome, hyperglycemia during hospitalization predicted a worse outcome in terms of the rates of in-hospital complications and in-hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia at the time of admission was also associated with

  9. Acute pancreatitis with eclampsia-preeclampsia syndrome and poor maternal outcome: two case reports and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Gainder, Shalini; Arora, Parul; Saha, S C; Kaman, Lileswar

    2015-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is a rare entity and has been reported to be associated with preeclampsia in the literature. Fulminant pancreatitis may have a guarded prognosis despite intensive multidisciplinary management. Two cases of maternal mortality in women with acute pancreatitis noted in the setting of preeclampsia-eclampsia syndrome are reported here. PMID:27512470

  10. Acute bovine viral diarrhea associated with extensive mucosal lesions, high morbidity, and mortality in a commercial feedlot.

    PubMed

    Hessman, Bill E; Sjeklocha, David B; Fulton, Robert W; Ridpath, Julia F; Johnson, Bill J; McElroy, Diana R

    2012-03-01

    In 2008, a northwest Texas feedlot underwent an outbreak of Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) causing high morbidity and mortality involving 2 lots of calves (lots A and B). Severe mucosal surface lesions were observed grossly in the oral cavity, larynx, and esophagus. Mucosal lesions varied from small (1-3 mm) infrequent mucosal ulcerations to large (5 mm to 1 cm) and coalescing ulcerations. Necrotic debris was present in ulcerations of some mortalities with some having plaque-like debris, but other mortalities presented more proliferative lesions. A calf persistently infected with BVDV arrived with one lot and the isolated virus was genotyped as BVDV-1b. Identical BVDV-1b strains were isolated from 2 other mortalities. A BVDV-2a genotype was also isolated in this outbreak. This genotype was identical to all BVDV-2a strains isolated in both lots. Serum samples were collected from exposed and unexposed animals and tested for antibodies for multiple viral pathogens. Seropositivity ranged from zero percent for calicivirus to 100% positive to Pseudocowpox virusx. At the end of the feeding period, the morbidity and mortality for the 2 lots involved was 76.2% and 30.8%, respectively, for lot A, and 49.0% and 5.6%, respectively, for lot B. Differential diagnoses included vesicular stomatitis viruses, Bovine papular stomatitis virus, and Foot-and-mouth disease virus. Based on the present case, acute BVDV should be considered when mucosal lesions are observed grossly. PMID:22379057

  11. Association of serum uric acid level with mortality and morbidity of patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Reza; Ghaffari, Samad; Salehi, Rezvanieh; Mazani, Sarvin; Aghavali, Sharmin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Investigating the clinical impact of serum uric acid (UA) and its lowering agents on the complications and mortality of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) can open a new era in STEMI treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of on admission serum UA level on the mortality and morbidity of patients admitted with STEMI. Methods: A number of 608 patients with STEMI were enrolled in this study from December 21, 2012 until February 19, 2014. Patients were followed for 20 months. Male to female ratio was 2.53, and the mean age of patients was 62.6±13.4. The relationship between the level of UA and patients’ mortality and morbidity, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), atrial and ventricular arrhythmia was analyzed. Results: Patients with high serum UA level had higher Killip class after STEMI (P=0.001). Mean LVEF was measured to be 39.5±9.6 in normal UA group and 34.6±11.6 in high UA group (P=0.001). In comparison with normal UA group, high UA group had significantly higher cTnI (2.68±0.09 vs 4.09±0.42, respectively, P=0.001), increased blood pressure (P=0.009), and higher atrial fibrillation (AF) occurrence (P=0.03), but no association was seen between ventricular tachycardia and serum UA level. Short term and midterm mortality were not different in two groups (P=0.44 and 0.31, respectively). Conclusion: In the current study, high serum UA level in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) was not associated with higher in-hospital or midterm mortality, but it was associated with lower LVEF, higher Killip class, elevated cTnI, creatinine, triglyceride, and higher AF. PMID:27489597

  12. Comparison of maternal morbidity and medical costs during pregnancy and delivery between patients with gestational diabetes and patients with pre-existing diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Son, K H; Lim, N-K; Lee, J-W; Cho, M-C; Park, H-Y

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effects of gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes on maternal morbidity and medical costs, using data from the Korea National Health Insurance Claims Database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Methods Delivery cases in 2010, 2011 and 2012 (459 842, 442 225 and 380 431 deliveries) were extracted from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. The complications and medical costs were compared among the following three pregnancy groups: normal, gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes. Results Although, the rates of pre-existing diabetes did not fluctuate (2.5, 2.4 and 2.7%) throughout the study, the rate of gestational diabetes steadily increased (4.6, 6.2 and 8.0%). Furthermore, the rates of pre-existing diabetes and gestational diabetes increased in conjunction with maternal age, pre-existing hypertension and cases of multiple pregnancy. The risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, urinary tract infections, premature delivery, liver disease and chronic renal disease were greater in the gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes groups than in the normal group. The risk of venous thromboembolism, antepartum haemorrhage, shoulder dystocia and placenta disorder were greater in the pre-existing diabetes group, but not the gestational diabetes group, compared with the normal group. The medical costs associated with delivery, the costs during pregnancy and the number of in-hospital days for the subjects in the pre-existing diabetes group were the highest among the three groups. Conclusions The study showed that the rates of pre-existing diabetes and gestational diabetes increased with maternal age at pregnancy and were associated with increases in medical costs and pregnancy-related complications. PMID:25472691

  13. Impact of ambient fine particulate matter carbon measurement methods on observed associations with acute cardiorespiratory morbidity.

    PubMed

    Winquist, Andrea; Schauer, Jamie J; Turner, Jay R; Klein, Mitch; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt

    2015-01-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) represent a substantial portion of particulate matter <2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5), and have been associated with adverse health effects. EC and OC are commonly measured using the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method or the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) method. Measurement method differences could have an impact on observed epidemiologic associations. Daily speciated PM2.5 data were obtained from the St Louis-Midwest Supersite, and St Louis emergency department (ED) visit data were obtained from the Missouri Hospital Association for the period June 2001 to April 2003. We assessed acute associations between cardiorespiratory ED visits and EC and OC from NIOSH and IMPROVE methods using Poisson generalized linear models controlling for temporal trends and meteorology. Associations were generally similar for EC and OC from the different measurement methods. The most notable difference between methods was observed for congestive heart failure and EC (for example, warm season rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) per interquartile range change in EC concentration were: NIOSH=1.06 (0.99-1.13), IMPROVE=1.01 (0.96-1.07)). Overall, carbon measurement method had little impact on acute associations between EC, OC, and ED visits. Some specific differences were observed, however, which may be related to particle composition. PMID:25138293

  14. Cytomegalovirus-associated acute hydramnios treated by amniocentesis and maternal indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Hattori, Yukio; Kaneko, Saori; Suzuki, Yoshikatsu; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi

    2009-12-01

    A 22-year-old pregnant woman noticed a rapid increase of abdominal growth, uterine tenderness and irregular contraction, for which she hospitalized at 25 weeks of gestation. An ultrasound examination demonstrated a single fetus with normal anatomy and massive hydramnios. Serial therapeutic amniocentesis was performed for relief of maternal symptoms and indomethacin compress was initiated. Both the maternal and amniotic fluid IgM were positive for cytomegalovirus (CMV). Maternal compress indomethacin was discontinued at 32 weeks. Cesarean section was performed due to fetal distress at 34 weeks of gestation. A female infant was delivered and the neonatal examination was within normal limits with urine culture positive for CMV. At 1 year of age the child was developing normally with normal hearing and no clinical sequelae of intrauterine CMV infection. We postulate that serial and large volume reduction of amniotic fluid by amniocentesis and compress indomethacin in our case interrupted the natural course and provided sufficient time for the fetus to recover from the acute phase of viral infection. PMID:20021488

  15. Association between Hospital Birth Volume and Maternal Morbidity among Low-Risk Pregnancies in Rural, Urban, and Teaching Hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kozhimannil, Katy B; Thao, Viengneesee; Hung, Peiyin; Tilden, Ellen; Caughey, Aaron B; Snowden, Jonathan M

    2016-05-01

    Objectives This study aims to examine the relationship between hospital birth volume and multiple maternal morbidities among low-risk pregnancies in rural hospitals, urban non-teaching hospitals, and urban teaching hospitals, using a representative sample of U.S. hospitals. Study Design Using the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 607 hospitals, we identified 508,146 obstetric deliveries meeting low-risk criteria and compared outcomes across hospital volume categories. Outcomes include postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), chorioamnionitis, endometritis, blood transfusion, severe perineal laceration, and wound infection. Results Hospital birth volume was more consistently related to PPH than to other maternal outcomes. Lowest-volume rural (< 200 births) and non-teaching (< 650 births) hospitals had 80% higher odds (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.56-2.08) and 39% higher odds (AOR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.26-1.53) of PPH respectively, than those in corresponding high-volume hospitals. However, in urban teaching hospitals, delivering in a lower-volume hospital was associated with 14% lower odds of PPH (AOR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.80-0.93). Deliveries in rural hospitals had 31% higher odds of PPH than urban teaching hospitals (AOR = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.13-1.53). Conclusions Low birth volume was a risk factor for PPH in both rural and urban non-teaching hospitals, but not in urban teaching hospitals, where higher volume was associated with greater odds of PPH. PMID:26731180

  16. A randomized controlled trial on preweaning morbidity, growth and mortality in Holstein heifers fed a lacteal-derived colostrum replacer or pooled maternal colostrum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to determine the effect of feeding a commercial lacteal-derived colostrum replacer (CR) or pooled maternal colostrum (MC) on preweaning morbidity, growth and mortality in Holstein heifer calves. A total of 568 calves were randomly assigned to be fed either 3.8 L of pooled MC or two doses (200 g IgG) of a CR. Calves were monitored daily for preweaning morbidity until weaning at 60 d old. Birth and weaning weights were measured to estimate growth rates. Results Calves fed CR were significantly less likely to be affected with a diarrhea event (OR = 0.58; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.88; P value = 0.011) and had a higher rate of daily weight gain (0.051 kg/day; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.08; P value <0.001) compared to calves fed pooled MC. Use of lacteal-derived colostrum replacer was not significantly associated with respiratory disease (OR = 1.01; 95% CI 0.67 to 1.51; P value = 0.974 ), omphalitis (OR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.06 to 14.86; P value = 0.956), or mortality (HR = 0.71; 95% CI 0.27 to 1.92; P value = 0.505) in the study calves. Conclusions The lacteal-derived CR fed at the study dose was a viable colostrum alternative in the event of poor quality pooled MC for the prevention of preweaning diarrhea and resulted in higher growth rates in comparison to calves fed pooled MC in the study herd. PMID:23965249

  17. The non-thyroidal illness syndrome in acute coronary syndrome is associated with increased cardiac morbidity and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Adawiyah, J; Norasyikin, A W; Mat, N H; Shamsul, A S; Azmi, K Nor

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) or the sick euthyroid syndrome refers to abnormal changes in circulating thyroid hormones due to systemic illnesses. Thyroid hormones are pivotal in the regulation of normal cardiac functions. However, the effects of the NTIS on the heart in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are still unclear. Methods A 6-month prospective cohort study involving 85 patients admitted with ACS was carried out. TSH, FT4 and FT3 were assessed on days 1, 5 and 42. Antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, antithyroglobulin antibodies, fasting blood sugar, HbA1c and fasting serum lipid were obtained on admission. Mortality, functional status (Killip and New York Heart Association Classifications), arrhythmias and readmission rate were recorded. Results The prevalence of NTIS was 53%. It was seen in 48% of unstable angina (UA), 54% of non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and 56% of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. NTIS is associated with cardiovascular mortality, all-cause mortality, severe heart failure and a higher readmission rate. The levels of FT3 correlate with severity of myocardial damage as measured by CK and Troponin T. Lower TSH was seen in the non-survivors and in those with ventricular arrhythmias. The most common presentation of NTIS was low FT3 (43.5%), followed by low TSH (12.9%) and FT4 (4.7%). None of the predisposing factors analysed were associated with the development of NTIS. Conclusions NTIS in patients with ACS is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, and affects UA, NSTEMI and STEMI equally. PMID:27325934

  18. Maternal serum soluble CD30 is increased in pregnancies complicated with acute Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Romero, Roberto; Espinoza, Jimmy; Gotsch, Francesca; Edwin, Samuel; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Mittal, Pooja; Soto, Eleazar; Erez, Offer; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Than, Nandor Gabor; Friel, Lara; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Mazor, Moshe; Hassan, Sonia

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Normal pregnancy is characterized by activation of the innate immunity and suppression of the adaptive limb of the immune response. However, pregnant women are more susceptible to the effects of infection and microbial products than non-pregnant women. CD30 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily and is preferentially expressed by activated T cells producing Th2-type cytokines. Its soluble form (sCD30) is proposed to be an index of Th2 immune response. High serum concentrations of sCD30 have been found in the acute phase of viral infections, such as HIV-1 and hepatitis B. There is, however, conflicting evidence about serum sCD30 concentration in patients with bacterial infections. The objective of this study was to determine whether there are changes in the serum concentration of sCD30 in pregnant women with pyelonephritis. Methods This cross-sectional study included normal pregnant women (N=89) and pregnant women with pyelonephritis (N=41). Maternal serum concentration of sCD30 was measured by a specific and sensitive enzyme-linked immunoassay. Non-parametric tests were used for comparisons. A p value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results (1) Pregnant women with pyelonephritis had a significantly higher median serum concentration of sCD30 than those with a normal pregnancy (median: 44.3 U/ml, range: 16–352.5 vs. median: 29.7 U/ml, range: 12.2–313.2, respectively; p<0.001); and (2) No significant differences were found in the median maternal serum concentration of sCD30 between pregnant women with pyelonephritis who had a positive blood culture compared to those with a negative blood culture (median:47.7 U/mL, range: 17.1–118.8 vs. median: 42.6 U/mL, range: 16–352.5, respectively; p=0.86). Conclusions Acute pyelonephritis during pregnancy is associated with a higher maternal serum concentration of sCD30 than normal pregnancy. This finding is novel, and suggests that pregnant women with pyelonephritis may

  19. Maternal metallothionein and zinc after acute ethanol exposure during gestation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.E. )

    1992-02-26

    Acute exposure of the rat fetus to ethanol at critical periods can cause growth retardation and brain damage; the mechanism(s) is not known. Ethanol may cause redistribution of maternal zinc which results in fetal zinc deficiency and subsequent interruption of growth and development. The purpose was to determine if acute ethanol administration to the pregnant rat alters Zn and the Zn binding protein metallothionein (MT) in selected tissues. On gestational day (gd) 14, eighteen pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into groups. By intragastric tube, ethanol treated dams were given ethanol and pairfed controls were given a 0.85% NaCl solution. On gd 15, intragastric feedings were repeated. Throughout, the Lieber-DeCarli control diet was fed (adlibitum to untreated controls and ethanol treated dams and in appropriate quantities to pair fed controls). Blood ethanol concentrations at 90 minutes after the ethanol dose were 154 {plus minus} 46 and 265 {plus minus} 110 mg% on gd 14 and 15, respectively.

  20. Maternal, fetal and renal outcomes of pregnancy-associated acute kidney injury requiring dialysis.

    PubMed

    Krishna, A; Singh, R; Prasad, N; Gupta, A; Bhadauria, D; Kaul, A; Sharma, R K; Kapoor, D

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated acute kidney injury (PAKI) is encountered frequently in developing countries. We evaluated the maternal, fetal and renal outcomes in women with PAKI who needed at least one session of dialysis. Of the total of 98 cases (mean age 28.85 ± 5.13 years; mean parity 2.65 ± 1.28) of PAKI, the most common cause of PAKI was postabortal sepsis. Eighteen patients died; those with oligoanuria, sepsis and central nervous system (CNS) involvement were at greater risk of mortality. The relative risk (RR) of neonatal mortality was lower after with full-term delivery (RR: 0.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.03-0.96, P = 0.02) compared to preterm delivery. Of the 80 surviving patients, 60 (75%) patients achieved complete recovery of renal function at the end of 3 months; and of the remaining 14 had presumed (n = 4) or, biopsy-proven (n = 10) acute patchy cortical necrosis. The RR of non-recovery of renal function was high (RR: 24.7, 95% CI: 3.4- 179.5) in patients who did not recover at 6 weeks. Of the 14 patients with cortical necrosis, 3 (21.42%) became independent of dialysis at 6 months. PAKI patients should be watched for dialysis independency for 6 months. PMID:25838643

  1. In patients with acute flail chest does surgical rib fixation improve outcomes in terms of morbidity and mortality?

    PubMed

    Schulte, Katharina; Whitaker, Donald; Attia, Rizwan

    2016-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: In patients with acute flail chest does surgical rib fixation improve outcomes in terms of morbidity and mortality? Using the reported search criteria, 137 papers were found. Of these, 11 papers (N = 1712) represent the best evidence to answer the clinical question, and include one meta-analysis, two randomized, controlled trials (RCTs), five retrospective cohort studies and two case-control series. In-hospital mortality was lower for the surgical group in the meta-analysis [n = 582, odds ratio (OR) 0.31 (0.20-0.48), risk difference (RD) 0.19 (0.13-0.26), number needed to treat (NNT) 5] as well as significant decreases in ventilator days [mean 8 days, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5-10 days] and intensive care unit stay (mean 5 days, 95% CI 2-8 days). A reduction was found for septicaemia [n = 345, OR 0.36 (0.19-0.71), RD 0.14 (0.56-0.23), NNT 7], pneumonia [n = 616, OR 0.18 (0.11-0.32), RD 0.31 (0.21-0.41), NNT 3, P = 0.001], tracheostomy (OR 0.06, 95% CI 0.02-0.20) and chest wall deformity [n = 228, OR 0.11 (0.02-0.60), RD 0.30 (0.00-0.60), NNT 3]. Eight studies (n = 1015) had a shorter duration of mechanical ventilation following surgery. A reduction in intensive care unit stay was demonstrated in four papers (n = 389, 3.1-9.0 days), whereas a further three papers described a reduction in the duration of hospitalization (n = 489, 4-10.6 days). Three studies (n = 166) showed a lower risk for tracheostomy. One retrospective cohort study estimated lower total treatment costs in surgically treated patients ($32 300 vs $37 100) although not statistically significant. One retrospective case-control study described a lower risk for reintubation (n = 50, P = 0.034) and home oxygen requirements (n = 50, P = 0.034). One cohort study showed a better APACHE II score 14 days after trauma in the surgical group (P = 0.02). Surgical stabilization of flail

  2. Maternal agency influences the prevalence of diarrhea and acute respiratory tract infections among young Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Agustina, Rina; Shankar, Anita V; Ayuningtyas, Azalea; Achadi, Endang L; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationship between measures of mother's caretaking, practice and individual agency on acute diarrhea and respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) of Indonesian children. Using population-based household data from the Indonesian Demographic Health Surveys for 2002-2003 (n = 9,151 children) and 2007 (n = 9,714 children), we selected 28 indicators related to mother' caretaking, and applied principal component analysis to derive indices for access to care, practice and experience, and agency. The association between index quartiles (level 1-4) and the prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in the youngest child <5 years of age was assessed with multivariate logistic regression adjusting for socioeconomic status, residence type, mother's age and education, family size, child's age and sex, immunization status and received vitamin A supplementation. Moderate levels (level 3) of practice and experience were associated with decreased diarrheal risk (adjusted OR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.75-0.98), but not for ARTIs. Children of mothers with higher levels (level 4) of agency were protected against both diarrhea (adjusted OR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.60-0.77) and ARTIs (adjusted OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.66-0.91). Stratified analyses with child's age and mother's education, and tests of interaction, showed that agency had a stronger effect on diarrhea and ARTIs prevalence in children <2 years of age. Maternal caretaking, especially agency, is strongly associated with lower prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in younger children. Interventions specifically designed to promote maternal autonomy and decision-making may lead to improved child health. PMID:25108503

  3. Preclinical efficacy of maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK) inhibition in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Alachkar, Houda; Mutonga, Martin B G; Metzeler, Klaus H; Fulton, Noreen; Malnassy, Gregory; Herold, Tobias; Spiekermann, Karsten; Bohlander, Stefan K; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Matsuo, Yo; Stock, Wendy; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2014-12-15

    Maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK), which was reported to be frequently up-regulated in various types of solid cancer, plays critical roles in formation and maintenance of cancer stem cells. However, little is known about the relevance of this kinase in hematologic malignancies. Here we report characterization of possible roles of MELK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MELK is expressed in AML cell lines and AML blasts with higher levels in less differentiated cells. MELK is frequently upregulated in AML with complex karyotypes and is associated with worse clinical outcome. MELK knockdown resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis of leukemic cells. Hence, we investigated the potent anti-leukemia activity of OTS167, a small molecule MELK kinase inhibitor, in AML, and found that the compound induced cell differentiation and apoptosis as well as decreased migration of AML cells. MELK expression was positively correlated with the expression of FOXM1 as well as its downstream target genes. Furthermore, MELK inhibition resulted in downregulation of FOXM1 activity and the expression of its downstream targets. Taken together, and given that OTS167 is undergoing a phase I clinical trial in solid cancer, our study warrants clinical evaluation of this compound as a novel targeted therapy for AML patients. PMID:25365263

  4. Acute bovine viral diarrhea associated with extensive mucosal lesions, high morbidity, and mortality in a commercial feedlot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2008, a northwest Texas feedlot underwent an outbreak of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) disease causing high morbidity and mortality involving two lots of calves (Lots A and B). Severe mucosal surface lesions were observed grossly in the oral cavity, larynx and esophagus. Mucosal lesions vari...

  5. Routine HIV testing in acute medical admissions in a high prevalence area reduces morbidity and mortality of HIV: a full cycle audit.

    PubMed

    Hill-Tout, Rachel; Cormack, Ian; Elgalib, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Late HIV diagnosis in the UK remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In line with British HIV Association recommendations, we implemented routine HIV Screening in Croydon University Hospital Acute Medical Unit in London after an audit in 2011 revealed very high levels of late diagnosis. Our re-audit assessed the impact of Acute Medical Unit screening and found that patients identified by screening, compared to those tested due to clinical suspicion of HIV, were significantly less likely to be diagnosed late, had fewer AIDS-defining illnesses and shorter hospital admissions. In addition, screening identified patients who were not in traditional 'high-risk' groups and patients who had defaulted HIV care and who subsequently re-engaged with care. PMID:26378190

  6. Maternal Benzene Exposure during Pregnancy and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhu, Jie; Bi, Yongyi; Bai, YuE; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of childhood leukemia is increasing rapidly all over the world. However, studies on maternal benzene exposure during pregnancy and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have not been systematically assessed. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between maternal solvent, paint, petroleum exposure, and smoking during pregnancy and risk of childhood ALL. Methods Relevant studies up to September 1st, 2013 were identified by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library and the Web of Science databases. The effects were pooled using either fixed or random effect models based on the heterogeneity of the studies. Results Twenty-eight case-control studies and one cohort study were included for analysis, with a total of 16,695 cases and 1,472,786 controls involved. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for ALL was 1.25 (1.09, 1.45) for solvent, 1.23 (1.02, 1.47) for paint, 1.42 (1.10, 1.84) for petroleum exposure, and 0.99 (0.93, 1.06) for maternal smoking during pregnancy. No publication bias was found in this meta-analysis and consistent results were observed for subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Childhood ALL was associated with maternal solvent, paint, and petroleum exposure during pregnancy. No association was found between ALL and maternal smoking during pregnancy. Avoidance of maternal occupational and environmental benzene exposure during pregnancy could contribute to a decrease in the risk of childhood ALL. PMID:25333868

  7. Acute Maternal Infection and Risk of Pre-Eclampsia: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Minassian, Caroline; Thomas, Sara L.; Williams, David J.; Campbell, Oona; Smeeth, Liam

    2013-01-01

    Background Infection in pregnancy may be involved in the aetiology of pre-eclampsia. However, a clear association between acute maternal infection and pre-eclampsia has not been established. We assessed whether acute urinary tract infection, respiratory tract infection, and antibiotic drug prescriptions in pregnancy (a likely proxy for maternal infection) are associated with an increased risk of pre-eclampsia. Methods and Findings We used a matched nested case-control design and data from the UK General Practice Research Database to examine the association between maternal infection and pre-eclampsia. Primiparous women aged at least 13 years and registered with a participating practice between January 1987 and October 2007 were eligible for inclusion. We selected all cases of pre-eclampsia and a random sample of primiparous women without pre-eclampsia (controls). Cases (n = 1533) were individually matched with up to ten controls (n = 14236) on practice and year of delivery. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pre-eclampsia comparing women exposed and unexposed to infection using multivariable conditional logistic regression. After adjusting for maternal age, pre-gestational hypertension, diabetes, renal disease and multifetal gestation, the odds of pre-eclampsia were increased in women prescribed antibiotic drugs (adjusted odds ratio 1.28;1.14–1.44) and in women with urinary tract infection (adjusted odds ratio 1.22;1.03–1.45). We found no association with maternal respiratory tract infection (adjusted odds ratio 0.91;0.72–1.16). Further adjustment for maternal smoking and pre-pregnancy body mass index made no difference to our findings. Conclusions Women who acquire a urinary infection during pregnancy, but not those who have a respiratory infection, are at an increased risk of pre-eclampsia. Maternal antibiotic prescriptions are also associated with an increased risk. Further research is required to elucidate the underlying

  8. Selected maternal morbidities in women with a prior caesarean delivery planning vaginal birth or elective repeat caesarean section: a retrospective cohort analysis using data from the UK Obstetric Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Manisha; Soffer, Kate; Noor, Nudrat; Knight, Marian; Griffiths, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Objective To conduct a secondary analysis of data from the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS) to estimate the rates of specific maternal risks associated with planned vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC) and elective repeat caesarean section (ERCS). Design A retrospective cohort analysis using UKOSS data from 4 studies conducted between 2005 and 2012. Setting All hospitals with consultant-led maternity units in the UK. Population Pregnant women who had a previous caesarean section. Method Women who had undergone a previous caesarean section were divided into 2 exposure groups: planned VBAC and ERCS. We calculated the incidence of each of the 4 outcomes of interest with 95% CIs for the 2 exposure groups using proxy denominators (total estimated VBAC and ERCS maternities in a given year). Incidences were compared between groups using χ2 test or Fisher's exact test and risk ratios with 95% CI. Main outcome measures Severe maternal morbidities: peripartum hysterectomy, severe sepsis, peripartum haemorrhage and failed tracheal intubation. Results The risks of all complications examined in both groups were low. The rates of peripartum hysterectomy, severe sepsis, peripartum haemorrhage and failed tracheal intubation were not significantly different between the 2 groups in absolute or relative terms. Conclusions While the risk of uterine rupture in the VBAC and ERCS groups is well understood, this national study did not demonstrate any other clear differences in the outcomes we examined. The absolute and relative risks of maternal complications were small in both groups. Large epidemiological studies could further help to assess whether the incidence of these rare outcomes would significantly differ between the VBAC and ERCS groups if a larger number of cases were to be examined. In the interim, this study provides important information to help pregnant women in their decision-making process. PMID:26038358

  9. Morbidity statistics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alwyn

    1969-01-01

    This paper is based on an analysis of questionnaires sent to the health ministries of Member States of WHO asking for information about the extent, nature, and scope of morbidity statistical information. It is clear that most countries collect some statistics of morbidity and many countries collect extensive data. However, few countries relate their collection to the needs of health administrators for information, and many countries collect statistics principally for publication in annual volumes which may appear anything up to 3 years after the year to which they refer. The desiderata of morbidity statistics may be summarized as reliability, representativeness, and relevance to current health problems. PMID:5306722

  10. Acute alcohol exposure, acidemia or glutamine administration impacts amino acid homeostasis in ovine maternal and fetal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Shannon E.; Sawant, Onkar B.; Lunde, Emilie R.; Wu, Guoyao; Cudd, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a significant problem in human reproductive medicine. Maternal alcohol administration alters maternal amino acid homeostasis and results in acidemia in both mother and fetus, causing fetal growth restriction. We hypothesized that administration of glutamine, which increases renal ammoniagenesis to regulate acid-base balance, may provide an intervention strategy. This hypothesis was tested using sheep as an animal model. On day 115 of gestation, ewes were anesthetized and aseptic surgery was performed to insert catheters into the fetal abdominal aorta as well as the maternal abdominal aorta and vena cava. On day 128 of gestation, ewes received intravenous administration of saline, alcohol [1.75 g/kg body weight (BW)/h], a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, or received CO2 administration to induce acidemia independent of alcohol. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the mother and the fetus at times 0 and 60 min (the time of peak blood alcohol concentration) of the study. Administration of alcohol to pregnant ewes led to a reduction in concentrations of glutamine and related amino acids in plasma by 21–30%. An acute administration of glutamine to ewes, concurrent with alcohol administration, improved the profile of most amino acids (including citrulline and arginine) in maternal and fetal plasma. We suggest that glutamine may have a protective effect against alcohol-induced metabolic disorders and FAS in the ovine model. PMID:23315157

  11. A prospective study of maternal and fetal outcome in acute Lassa fever infection during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Price, M. E.; Fisher-Hoch, S. P.; Craven, R. B.; McCormick, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Several viral infections have been reported to result in more severe disease in pregnant than non-pregnant women, but the relative risks have not been well characterised. This has now been done for Lassa fever in a prospective study of 68 pregnant and 79 non-pregnant women who were admitted to hospital in Sierra Leone with confirmed Lassa fever. Lassa fever was the main cause of maternal mortality in the hospital, accounting for 25% of maternal deaths. Twelve of 40 patients in the third trimester died, compared with two of 28 in the first two trimesters and 10 of 79 non-pregnant women. The odds ratio for death in the third trimester compared with the first two trimesters was 5.57 (95% confidence intervals 1.02 to 30.26). The condition of the mother improved rapidly after evacuation of the uterus, whether by spontaneous abortion, evacuation of retained products of conception, or normal delivery; 10 of 26 women without uterine evacuation died, but only four of 39 women with evacuation died (p = 0.0016). The odds ratio for death with pregnancy intact was 5.47 (95% confidence interval 1.35 to 22.16). Fetal and neonatal loss was 87%. The risk of death from Lassa fever in the third trimester is significantly higher than that in the first two trimesters and higher than that for non-pregnant women, but evacuation of the uterus can significantly improve the mother's chance of survival. PMID:3139220

  12. HINDBRAIN AND CRANIAL NERVE DYSMORPHOGENESIS RESULT FROM ACUTE MATERNAL ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure of mouse embryos to ethanol during stages of hindbrain segmentation results in excessive cell death in specific cell populations. This study details the ethanol-induced cell loss and defines the subsequent effects of this early insult on rhombomere and cranial ner...

  13. Inflammation in Maternal Obesity and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pantham, Priyadarshini; Aye, Irving L. M. H; Powell, Theresa L.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of maternal obesity is rising rapidly worldwide and constitutes a major obstetric problem, increasing mortality and morbidity in both mother and offspring. Obese women are predisposed to pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and children of obese mothers are more likely to develop cardiovascular and metabolic disease in later life. Maternal obesity and GDM may be associated with a state of chronic, low-grade inflammation termed “metainflammation”, as opposed to an acute inflammatory response. This inflammatory environment may be one mechanism by which offspring of obese women are programmed to develop adult disorders. Herein we review the evidence that maternal obesity and GDM are associated with changes in the maternal, fetal and placental inflammatory profile. Maternal inflammation in obesity and GDM may not always be associated with fetal inflammation. We propose that the placenta ‘senses’ and adapts to the maternal inflammatory environment, and plays a central role as both a target and producer of inflammatory mediators. In this manner, maternal obesity and GDM may indirectly program the fetus for later disease by influencing placental function. PMID:25972077

  14. [Social inequalities in maternal health].

    PubMed

    Azria, E; Stewart, Z; Gonthier, C; Estellat, C; Deneux-Tharaux, C

    2015-10-01

    Although medical literature on social inequalities in perinatal health is qualitatively heterogeneous, it is quantitatively important and reveals the existence of a social gradient in terms of perinatal risk. However, published data regarding maternal health, if also qualitatively heterogeneous, are relatively less numerous. Nevertheless, it appears that social inequalities also exist concerning severe maternal morbidity as well as maternal mortality. Analyses are still insufficient to understand the mechanisms involved and explain how the various dimensions of the women social condition interact with maternal health indicators. Inadequate prenatal care and suboptimal obstetric care may be intermediary factors, as they are related to both social status and maternal outcomes, in terms of maternal morbidity, its worsening or progression, and maternal mortality. PMID:26433316

  15. Migraine and Common Morbidities

    MedlinePlus

    ... headaches . Home > Migraine and Common Morbidities Print Email Migraine and Common Morbidities ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Migraine and Common Morbidities For many patients, migraine is ...

  16. Maternal and Fetal Blood and Organ Toluene Levels in Rats Following Acute and Repeated Binge Inhalation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Scott E.; Hannigan, John H.; Irtenkauf, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Inhalation of organic solvents is a persistent form of drug abuse with particular concern being the abuse of inhalants by women of child-bearing age. While studies have begun assessing postnatal outcomes of offspring exposed prenatally to inhalants, relatively little is known about the distribution of toluene in blood and body tissues of pregnant, inhalant-abusing women, or in the fetuses. The present study assessed the tissue toluene levels attained following brief toluene exposures using a pre-clinical rat model of maternal inhalant abuse. Timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to toluene at 8,000 or 12,000 parts per million (ppm) for 15, 30 or 45 min/exposure. Exposures occurred twice each day from gestational day 8 (GD8) through GD20. Immediately following the second exposure on GD8, GD14 and GD20 blood was taken from the saphenous vein of the dams. Following saphenous vein blood collection on GD20, dams were sacrificed and trunk blood was collected along with maternal tissue specimens from cerebellum, heart, lung, kidney and liver. The placenta, amniotic fluid and fetal brain were also collected. Results demonstrated that maternal saphenous blood toluene levels increased as the inhaled concentration of toluene and duration of exposure increased. The maternal cerebellum, heart, kidney and liver appeared to be saturated after 30 min on GD20 such that toluene levels in those organs were equivalent across all ambient concentrations of inhaled toluene. Toluene levels also increased in fetal brain as the inhaled concentration of toluene increased and in placenta and amniotic fluid as the duration of exposure increased. Toluene levels in all tissues at GD20, except maternal lung and amniotic fluid, were higher than in maternal saphenous blood suggesting that toluene concentrated in those organs. Measurement of toluene levels in blood and other tissues following repeated toluene exposure demonstrated that toluene readily reaches a variety of potential sites

  17. Maternal nutrition, health, and survival.

    PubMed

    Christian, Parul

    2002-05-01

    The burden of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries is high. Each year, 600,000 women die from pregnancy-related causes and 62 million women suffer from morbidity and complications of pregnancy. The extent to which maternal nutrition can improve maternal health and survival is not well understood. Excluding deaths due to induced abortions, the other four main causes of maternal mortality (preeclampsia, hemorrhage, obstructed labor, and infection) may be amenable to nutrition interventions. The role of calcium in reducing the incidence of preeclampsia and hypertension is promising, but more research in deficient populations is urgently needed. Antenatal iron supplementation, although frequently recommended to prevent anemia during pregnancy, has had little program success. Severe anemia may be an important cause of maternal mortality, but convincing evidence is lacking on the health consequences of mild-to-moderate maternal anemia. Knowledge of the etiology of anemia is important in identifying effective strategies for combating it. Other vitamins such as folate, B12, and vitamin A may enhance the effect of iron supplementation in populations where multiple nutrition deficiencies exist. Maternal night blindness is widespread in South Asian women. In Nepal, this condition is associated with markedly increased risks of vitamin A deficiency, anemia, morbidity, and maternal and infant mortality. These findings need to be replicated elsewhere in South Asia. One study has shown vitamin A and beta carotene supplementation to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity. These findings need testing in different settings with emphasis on investigating the mechanisms of the effect. The area of prepregnancy nutrition and its influence on prolonged and obstructed labor is wide open for investigation. The scope for research in the area of maternal nutrition and health is large and the onus is on nutritionists to bring to the forefront the role of nutrition in

  18. Effects of Child Psychopathology on Maternal Depression: The Mediating Role of Child-Related Acute and Chronic Stressors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raposa, Elizabeth B.; Hammen, Constance L.; Brennan, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    In light of recent research highlighting the potential effects of children's behavior on mothers' mental health, the current study examined 679 mothers and their adolescent children from a community-based sample to determine the effects of youth psychopathology on maternal depression and levels of child-related stress in mothers' lives. It was…

  19. Respiratory disease and cardiovascular morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Koskela, R; Mutanen, P; Sorsa, J; Klockars, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Work related dust exposure is a risk factor for acute and chronic respiratory irritation and inflammation. Exposure to dust and cigarette smoke predisposes to exogenous viral and bacterial infections of the respiratory tract. Respiratory infection can also act as a risk factor in the development of atherosclerotic and coronary artery disease. Aims: To investigate the association of dust exposure and respiratory diseases with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and other cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Methods: The study comprised 6022 dust exposed (granite, foundry, cotton mill, iron foundry, metal product, and electrical) workers hired in 1940–76 and followed until the end of 1992. National mortality and morbidity registers and questionnaires were used. The statistical methods were person-year analysis and Cox regression. Results: Co-morbidity from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases ranged from 17% to 35%. In at least 60% of the co-morbidity cases a respiratory disease preceded a cardiovascular disease. Chronic bronchitis, pneumonia, and upper respiratory track infections predicted IHD in granite workers (rate ratio (RR) = 1.9; 95% CI 1.38 to 2.72), foundry workers (2.1; 1.48 to 2.93), and iron foundry workers (1.7; 1.16 to 2.35). Dust exposure was not a significant predictor of IHD or other CVD in any group. Dust exposure was related to respiratory morbidity. Thus, some respiratory diseases appeared to act as intermediate variables in the association of dust exposure with IHD. Conclusion: Dust exposure had only a small direct effect on IHD and other CVD. IHD morbidity was associated with preceding respiratory morbidity. A chronic infectious respiratory tract disease appeared to play an independent role in the development of IHD. PMID:16109822

  20. Effect of caesarean section on maternal and foetal outcomes in acute fatty liver of pregnancy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Jiang, Qing; Shi, Hao; Xu, Yun-Qing; Shi, Ai-Chao; Sun, Yuan-Li; Li, Jian; Ning, Qin; Shen, Guan-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported a positive association between caesarean section for expeditious pregnancy termination and perinatal outcomes in acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP); however, the risks remain unclear and independent studies have reported conflicting findings. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to confirm the relationship between caesarean section and perinatal outcomes in AFLP. The PubMed, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched (until July 17, 2015) for observational clinical studies focusing on the association between caesarean section and perinatal outcomes in AFLP. Data were extracted and processed independently by 2 authors. We also compared caesarean section with vaginal delivery to further investigate this relationship. We observed that 2 of the 3 primary outcomes in caesarean section exhibited positive effects—the maternal mortality rate was 44% lower (relative risk [RR], 0.56 [0.41–0.76]) and perinatal mortality rate was also reduced (RR, 0.52 [0.38–0.71]), compared to those for vaginal delivery. We did not find any associations between caesarean section and perinatal outcomes in AFLP in terms of neonatal mortality type and maternal multiple organ complications. These findings emphasise the significant prognostic value and clinical implications of caesarean section in AFLP, and suggest that the adverse outcomes should be reduced. PMID:27387594

  1. Corrigendum: The Associations Between Maternal Factors During Pregnancy and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kangkang; Xu, Xuejing; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Xikui; Hua, Shucheng; Wang, Chunpeng; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Because of the erroneous application of multiple publications, the conclusions of our recent paper (Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:1162-70) were not reliable. The corrected results show that coffee drinking during pregnancy was risk factor for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (OR = 1.44, 95% confidence interval = 1.07-1.92). PMID:26999072

  2. Case report of ruptured non-communicating right rudimentary horn pregnancy: an acute emergency.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Che Hasnura Che; Karim, Abdul Kadir Abdul; Ismail, Nor Azlin Mohamed; Omar, Mohd Hashim

    2011-01-01

    Ruptured pregnancy in the rudimentary horn of women who have had a vaginal delivery is rare and unpredictable. However, when undiagnosed, this condition could lead to maternal morbidity and mortality. We report a pregnancy at 19 weeks gestation presented with acute abdomen and hypovolemic shock. She was initially thought to have an intrauterine pregnancy with the provisional diagnosis of a ruptured uterus. Intraoperatively, a ruptured non-communicating right rudimentary horn with ex utero pregnancy was discovered. PMID:22250483

  3. Causes of Acute Hospitalization in Adolescence: Burden and Spectrum of HIV-Related Morbidity in a Country with an Early-Onset and Severe HIV Epidemic: A Prospective Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ferrand, Rashida A.; Bandason, Tsitsi; Musvaire, Praise; Larke, Natasha; Nathoo, Kusum; Mujuru, Hilda; Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo E.; Munyati, Shungu; Cowan, Frances M.; Gibb, Diana M.; Corbett, Elizabeth L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Survival to older childhood with untreated, vertically acquired HIV infection, which was previously considered extremely unusual, is increasingly well described. However, the overall impact on adolescent health in settings with high HIV seroprevalence has not previously been investigated. Methods and Findings Adolescents (aged 10–18 y) systematically recruited from acute admissions to the two public hospitals in Harare, Zimbabwe, answered a questionnaire and underwent standard investigations including HIV testing, with consent. Pre-set case-definitions defined cause of admission and underlying chronic conditions. Participation was 94%. 139 (46%) of 301 participants were HIV-positive (median age of diagnosis 12 y: interquartile range [IQR] 11–14 y), median CD4 count = 151; IQR 57–328 cells/µl), but only four (1.3%) were herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) positive. Age (median 13 y: IQR 11–16 y) and sex (57% male) did not differ by HIV status, but HIV-infected participants were significantly more likely to be stunted (z-score<−2: 52% versus 23%, p<0.001), have pubertal delay (15% versus 2%, p<0.001), and be maternal orphans or have an HIV-infected mother (73% versus 17%, p<0.001). 69% of HIV-positive and 19% of HIV-negative admissions were for infections, most commonly tuberculosis and pneumonia. 84 (28%) participants had underlying heart, lung, or other chronic diseases. Case fatality rates were significantly higher for HIV-related admissions (22% versus 7%, p<0.001), and significantly associated with advanced HIV, pubertal immaturity, and chronic conditions. Conclusion HIV is the commonest cause of adolescent hospitalisation in Harare, mainly due to adult-spectrum opportunistic infections plus a high burden of chronic complications of paediatric HIV/AIDS. Low HSV-2 prevalence and high maternal orphanhood rates provide further evidence of long-term survival following mother-to-child transmission. Better recognition of this growing phenomenon is

  4. Maternal microchimerism

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jody; Vives-Pi, Marta; Gillespie, Kathleen M

    2014-01-01

    Increased levels of non-inherited maternal HLA alleles have been detected in the periphery of children with type 1 diabetes and an increased frequency of maternal cells have been identified in type 1 diabetes pancreas. It is now clear that the phenotype of these cells is pancreatic,1 supporting the hypothesis that maternal cells in human pancreas are derived from multipotent maternal progenitors. Here we hypothesize how increased levels of maternal cells could play a role in islet autoimmunity. PMID:25093746

  5. Does Time of Delivery Influence the Risk of Neonatal Morbidity?

    PubMed

    Brookfield, Kathleen F; O'Malley, Katharine; El-Sayed, Yasser Y; Blumenfeld, Yair J; Butwick, Alexander J

    2016-04-01

    Objective To examine whether time of delivery influences the risk of neonatal morbidity among women with singleton pregnancies. Study Design Secondary analysis of data from the Maternal Fetal Medicine Units Network Factor V Leiden Mutation study. We categorized time of delivery as day (07:00-16:59), evening (17:00-23:59), and overnight (midnight-06:59). Severe neonatal morbidity was defined by at least one of the following: respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea of the newborn, sepsis, seizures, neonatal intensive care admission, or a 5-minute APGAR ≤3. We calculated frequencies of severe neonatal morbidity by time of delivery. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine whether time of delivery was independently associated with severe neonatal morbidity. Results Among 4,087 women, 1,917 (46.9%) delivered during the day, 1,140 (27.9%) delivered in the evening, and 1,030 (25.2%) delivered overnight. We observed no significant differences in the rates of neonatal morbidity between delivery time periods (day: 12.3%; evening: 12.8%; overnight: 12.6%; p = 0.9). No significant association was observed between time of delivery and neonatal morbidity after adjustment for maternal, obstetric, and peripartum factors. Conclusion Our findings suggest that time of delivery is not associated with severe neonatal morbidity. PMID:26595143

  6. Transvaginal appendectomy in morbidly obese patient.

    PubMed

    Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Ates, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Laparoscopic appendectomy has significant benefits in obese patients. However, morbid obesity can be accepted as an exclusion criterion for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). Here, we present a transvaginal appendectomy in a 66-year-old morbidly obese (BMI 36 kg/m(2), ASA III) patient. Case and Technique. Acute appendicitis was suspected based on history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and ultrasound findings. During laparoscopic surgery, a 5 mm trocar was inserted through the umbilicus and a 5 mm telescope was placed. A 12 mm trocar and a 5 mm grasper were inserted separately through the posterior fornix of the vagina under laparoscopic guidance. The appendix was divided with an endoscopic stapler through the transvaginal 12 mm trocar and removed from the same trocar. The operating time was 75 minutes with minimal blood loss (<10 mL). The patient was discharged 16 hours after surgery uneventfully and she did not require any analgesic administration. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clinical case that focuses on the transvaginal appendectomy at morbid obesity. We can say that morbid obesity does not constitute an obstacle for treatment of acute appendicitis by transvaginal endoscopic surgery. PMID:25506028

  7. Managing Major Postpartum Haemorrhage following Acute Uterine Inversion with Rusch Balloon Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Keriakos, Remon; Chaudhuri, Smriti Ray

    2011-01-01

    Acute postpartum uterine inversion is a relatively rare complication. The uterus inverts and the uterine fundus prolapses to or through the dilated cervix. It is associated with major postpartum haemorrhage with or without shock. Shock is sometimes out of proportion to the haemorrhage. Minimal maternal morbidity and mortality can be achieved when uterine inversion is promptly and aggressively managed. We present this report of three cases of acute uterine inversion complicated with major postpartum haemorrhage and managed with Rusch balloon. The paper highlights the importance of early recognition and the safety of the use of intrauterine balloon to manage major postpartum haemorrhage in these cases. PMID:24826322

  8. Psychiatric morbidity among prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Ayirolimeethal, Anithakumari; Ragesh, G.; Ramanujam, Jayanthi M.; George, Biju

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a considerable lack of scientific estimate of psychiatric morbidity among Indian prisoners. Objective: The objective of the following study is to study the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among prisoners. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study at District Jail, Kozhikode, Kerala. Materials and Methods: A total of 255 prisoners who were inmates during the period from mid-April to mid-July 2011 participated in the study. The study subjects included both male and female remand or convict prisoners. Socio-demographic data, clinical history and criminological history were collected from each individual. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using MINI-Plus. Statistical Analysis: Done by using SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). Results: A total of 175 subjects (68.6%) had a current mental illness. Substance use disorder was the most common diagnosis (47.1%). Antisocial personality disorder was diagnosed in 19.2%, adjustment disorder in 13.7%, mood disorder in 4.3% and psychosis in another 6.3% of prisoners. A high rate of a current psychiatric disorder was seen in male (69.7%) prisoners. A significant association was noticed for the different nature of crimes with psychiatric diagnoses and previous imprisonment. Nearly 4% of prisoners reported a moderate to high suicide risk. Conclusion: Mental health problems among prisoners were quite high. Mentally ill prisoners are at high risk for repeated incarceration. The increased rate of psychiatric disorders should be a concern for mental health professionals and the policy makers. PMID:24891702

  9. Perinatal Morbidity and Mortality in Offsprings of Diabetic Mothers in Qatif, Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Dabbous, Ibrahim A. Al-; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Studied perinatal and neonatal morbidity and mortality of diabetic mothers and their offspring in Qatif, Saudi Arabia. Suggests diabetes mellitus in pregnancy may be a common problem in Saudi Arabia, as poor maternal diabetic control results in high perinatal morbidity and mortality. Results suggest that health education and improved coverage of…

  10. Social experiences in childhood and adult psychiatric morbidity: a multiple regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Tennant, C; Bebbington, P; Hurry, J

    1982-05-01

    The effect of childhood experiences on adult psychiatric morbidity was examined in a community psychiatric survey. The Present State Examination was used to assess psychiatric morbidity. Childhood experiences assessed included childhood demographic factors and 'loss and deprivation' variables. The latter group comprised maternal and paternal deaths and separations and other disruptions in parental care 'Loss and deprivation' in combination accounted for between 4.5 and 5.5% of the variance in adult psychiatric morbidity. PMID:7100355

  11. Severe Adverse Maternal Outcomes among Women in Midwife-Led versus Obstetrician-Led Care at the Onset of Labour in the Netherlands: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Ank; Mesman, Jeanette A. J. M.; Manniën, Judith; Zwart, Joost J.; Buitendijk, Simone E.; van Roosmalen, Jos; van Dillen, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that it is possible to select a group of low risk women who can start labour in midwife-led care without having increased rates of severe adverse maternal outcomes compared to women who start labour in secondary care. Design and Methods We conducted a nationwide cohort study in the Netherlands, using data from 223 739 women with a singleton pregnancy between 37 and 42 weeks gestation without a previous caesarean section, with spontaneous onset of labour and a child in cephalic presentation. Information on all cases of severe acute maternal morbidity collected by the national study into ethnic determinants of maternal morbidity in the Netherlands (LEMMoN study), 1 August 2004 to 1 August 2006, was merged with data from the Netherlands Perinatal Registry of all births occurring during the same period. Our primary outcome was severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM, i.e. admission to an intensive care unit, uterine rupture, eclampsia or severe HELLP, major obstetric haemorrhage, and other serious events). Secondary outcomes were postpartum haemorrhage and manual removal of placenta. Results Nulliparous and parous women who started labour in midwife-led care had lower rates of SAMM, postpartum haemorrhage and manual removal of placenta compared to women who started labour in secondary care. For SAMM the adjusted odds ratio’s and 95% confidence intervals were for nulliparous women: 0.57 (0.45 to 0.71) and for parous women 0.47 (0.36 to 0.62). Conclusions Our results suggest that it is possible to identify a group of women at low risk of obstetric complications who may benefit from midwife-led care. Women can be reassured that we found no evidence that midwife-led care at the onset of labour is unsafe for women in a maternity care system with a well developed risk selection and referral system. PMID:25961723

  12. Effect on Infant Illness of Maternal Supplementation With 400 000 IU Vs 200 000 IU of Vitamin A

    PubMed Central

    Figueiroa, José Natal; Grande de Arruda, Ilma Kruze; Diniz, Alcides da Silva

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Postpartum vitamin A supplementation is a strategy used to combat vitamin A deficiency and seems to reduce maternal/infant morbidity and mortality. However, studies have shown that a dose of 200 000 IU (World Health Organization [WHO] protocol) does not seem to provide adequate retinol levels in maternal breast milk, infant serum, and infant tissue. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of postpartum maternal supplementation with 400 000 IU (International Vitamin A Consultative Group protocol) compared with 200 000 IU of vitamin A on infant morbidity. METHODS: This was a randomized controlled, triple-blinded clinical trial conducted at 2 public maternity hospitals in Recife in northeastern Brazil. There were 276 mother–child pairs that were allocated to 2 treatment groups: 400 000 IU or 200 000 IU of vitamin A. They were followed up for >6 months to evaluate infant morbidity. RESULTS: Fever (rate ratio [RR]: 0.92 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.75–1.14]), diarrhea (RR: 0.96 [95% CI: 0.72–1.28]), otitis (RR: 0.94 [95% CI: 0.48–1.85]), acute respiratory infection (RR: 1.03 [95% CI: 0.88–1.21]), the need for intravenous rehydration (RR: 2.08 [95% CI: 0.64–2.07]), and the use of antibiotic treatment (RR: 0.80 [95% CI: 0.43–1.47]) did not differ significantly between the 2 treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that postpartum maternal supplementation with 400 000 IU of vitamin A does not provide any additional benefits in the reduction of illness in children aged <6 months; therefore, we do not support the proposal to increase the standard vitamin A dose in the existing WHO protocol. PMID:22412025

  13. Stigma and psychiatric morbidity among mothers of children with epilepsy in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Elafros, Melissa A.; Sakubita-Simasiku, Claire; Atadzhanov, Masharip; Haworth, Alan; Chomba, Elwyn; Birbeck, Gretchen L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Epilepsy-associated stigma contributes substantially to the social, medical, and economic burden of disease for people with epilepsy (PWE), but little is known about its impact on caregivers of PWE. Methods To better understand stigma experienced by caregivers of PWE, factors that influence caregiver stigma, and the effect of stigma on a caregiver's psychologic well being, we interviewed 100 caregivers of children with epilepsy in Zambia. Questions assessed maternal knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to epilepsy, maternal stigma, mother's proxy report of child stigma, and maternal psychiatric morbidity. Results Of 100 mothers, 39 (39%) indicated that their child was stigmatized because of his or her epilepsy. Maternal proxy report of child stigma was highly correlated with maternal stigma (OR: 5.4, p=0.04), seizure frequency (p=0.03) and seizure severity (p=0.01). One in five of 100 mothers (20%) reported feeling stigmatized because of their child's epilepsy. Higher maternal stigma was associated with lower familial and community support (ORs: 65.2 and 34.7, respectively; both p<0.0001) as well as higher psychiatric morbidity (OR: 1.2; p=0.002). Formal education and epilepsy knowledge were associated with decreased maternal stigma (ORs: 0.8 and 0.7, respectively; both p<0.001). Conclusions One in five mothers of PWE feel stigmatized because of their child's epilepsy. As maternal stigma is associated with psychiatric morbidity, educating caregivers about epilepsy and screening for anxiety and depression are warranted. PMID:24214528

  14. Anesthetic management of maternal Mirror syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tayler, E; DeSimone, C

    2014-11-01

    Mirror syndrome (Ballantyne syndrome, triple edema, maternal hydrops, pseudotoxemia) is a rarely diagnosed condition associated with pregnancy that can be life-threatening for both the mother and fetus. There is limited literature on its pathogenesis and anesthetic management, making prevention and treatment complex. The duration of pregnancy and severity of maternal or fetal presentation often determines outcome. We describe the anesthetic considerations of a morbidly obese parturient with Mirror syndrome. PMID:25066819

  15. Gastrointestinal Morbidity in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that results from increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The gastrointestinal system plays a key role in the pathogenesis of obesity and facilitates caloric imbalance. Changes in gastrointestinal hormones and the inhibition of mechanisms that curtail caloric intake result in weight gain. It is not clear if the gastrointestinal role in obesity is a cause or an effect of this disease. Obesity is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Obesity is also associated with gastrointestinal disorders, which are more frequent and present earlier than T2DM and CVD. Diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease, cholelithiasis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are directly related to body weight and abdominal adiposity. Our objective is to assess the role of each gastrointestinal organ in obesity and the gastrointestinal morbidity resulting in those organs from effects of obesity. PMID:24602085

  16. Maternal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Englund, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines. PMID:24799324

  17. Inflammatory disturbances in preeclampsia: relationship between maternal and umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Catarino, Cristina; Santos-Silva, Alice; Belo, Luís; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Rocha, Susana; Patrício, Belmiro; Quintanilha, Alexandre; Rebelo, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is one of the main causes of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. PE is associated with an inflammatory state and with oxidative stress, in maternal circulation. Our aim was to evaluate and compare the levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers in maternal and umbilical cord blood (UCB), in normal and PE pregnancies. We measured acute-phase proteins (CRP and α1-antitrypsin), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α), leukocyte activation (elastase, lactoferrin, sL-selectin, sVCAM, sPECAM), total antioxidant status (TAS), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and uric acid levels. We studied 42 healthy pregnant women, 46 PE women, and their neonates. The concentrations of IL-6, TNF-α, α1-antitrypsin, CRP, sVCAM, uric acid, and TBARS were significantly higher, and sL-selectin was significantly lower in PE pregnant women as compared with normotensive pregnant women. In newborns uric acid, α1-antitrypsin, and CRP values were significantly higher in PE; leukocyte count, sL-selectin, lactoferrin, and the ratio elastase/α1-antitrypsin were significantly lower. Our data suggest that PE pregnancy is associated with an enhanced maternal inflammatory condition, which is reflected in fetal circulation. This enhanced inflammatory state seems to be related to endothelial dysfunction and increased cytokine synthesis, rather than with neutrophil activation. PMID:22685662

  18. Maternal immunization

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Michelle H; Beigi, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization holds tremendous promise to improve maternal and neonatal health for a number of infectious conditions. The unique susceptibilities of pregnant women to infectious conditions, as well as the ability of maternally-derived antibody to offer vital neonatal protection (via placental transfer), together have produced the recent increased attention on maternal immunization. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) currently recommends 2 immunizations for all pregnant women lacking contraindication, inactivated Influenza and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap). Given ongoing research the number of vaccines recommended during pregnancy is likely to increase. Thus, achieving high vaccination coverage of pregnant women for all recommended immunizations is a key public health enterprise. This review will focus on the present state of vaccine acceptance in pregnancy, with attention to currently identified barriers and determinants of vaccine acceptance. Additionally, opportunities for improvement will be considered. PMID:25483490

  19. 78 FR 37553 - Maternal Health Town Hall Listening Session; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... national strategy to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality, and improve the quality and safety of... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Maternal Health Town Hall Listening Session; Notice of Meeting Name: Maternal Health Town Hall Listening Session. Date and Time: August 27, 2013,...

  20. Maternal near-miss case reviews: the UK approach.

    PubMed

    Knight, M; Lewis, G; Acosta, C D; Kurinczuk, J J

    2014-09-01

    The UK has a well-established programme of Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths and a national system for research into near-miss maternal morbidities, the UK Obstetric Surveillance System. The addition of a programme of near-miss case reviews, the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Morbidity, permits a complete examination of the incidence, risk factors, care and outcomes of the severest complications in pregnancy, and enables the lessons learnt to improve future care to be identified more quickly. This in turn allows for more rapid inclusion of recommendations into national guidance and hence the potential of better health for both women and babies. PMID:25236644

  1. Obstetric and Perinatal Morbidity in Northern Tasmanian Aboriginal Population: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Amanda; Ogden, Kathryn; Ahuja, Kiran D.K.; Hakeem, Mohammed Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are at increased risk of maternal morbidity and mortality as compared to non-Aboriginals. Similarly, aboriginal babies are at increased risk of low birth weight and infant mortality. Aim To investigate the independent association of aboriginality with Tasmanian maternal and neonatal morbidity. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis of all the births (gestation more than 20 weeks) from June 2013 to May 2014 was conducted at the Launceston General Hospital, Tasmania. The study compared 66 Aboriginal (4.2% of the total births) to 1477 non-aboriginal births for maternal and neonatal morbidity. Comparisons were made using logistic regression. The outcome measures were maternal and neonatal morbidity. Results Significantly higher number of aboriginal women (49% vs 19%; OR 4.15 90%CI 2.52- 6.85) smoked and used illicit drugs (15% vs 2%; OR 9.24; 95%CI 4.28-19.96) than the non-aboriginal women (both p<0.001). Maternal morbidity was not significantly different between aboriginal compared to non-aboriginal women (OR 0.64; 95%CI 0.36-1.14; p=0.13; adjusted OR 1.00; 95%CI 0.52-1.93; p=0.99). Factors positively associated with maternal morbidity included: age (OR 1.28; 95%CI 1.13-1.46; p<0.01) and BMI (OR 1.50; 95%CI 1.33-1.70; p<0.01). The unadjusted OR of neonatal morbidity for aboriginality was 1.98 (95%CI 1.17-3.34; p=0.01) and adjusted was 1.45 (95%CI 0.77-2.72; p=0.25). Factors positively associated with neonatal morbidity included smoking (OR 2.24; 95%CI 1.59-3.14; p<0.01), illicit drug use 95%CI 1.49-(OR 3.26; 95%CI 1.49-7.13; p <0.01), hypertension (OR 2.49; 95%CI 1.61-3.84; p<0.01) and diabetes (OR 1.92; 95%CI 1.33-2.78; p<0.01). Conclusion The composite Aboriginal maternal morbidity does not differ, however the increased rates of smoking and illicit drug use are largely responsible for neonatal morbidity. Along with strengthening strategies to decrease medical comorbidities in aboriginals, we recommend

  2. Iatrogenic risks and maternal health: Issues and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Khaskheli, Meharun-nissa; Baloch, Shahla; Sheeba, Aneela

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe acute maternal morbidity and mortality due to iatrogenic factors and outcomes. Methods: This observational cross sectional study was conducted at intensive care unit of Liaquat University of Medical and Health sciences Jamshoro from 1-January-2011 to 31-December-2012. In this study all the delivered or undelivered women who needed intensive care unit (ICU) admission due to management related life threatening complication referred from periphery or within this hospital were included, while those women who had pregnancy complicated by medical conditions were excluded. These women were registered on the predesigned proforma containing variables like Demographic characteristics, various iatrogenic risk factors, complications and management out comes. The data was collected and analyzed on SPSS version 20. Results: During these study period 51 women needed ICU care for different complications due to adverse effects of medical treatments. Majority of these women were between 20-40 years of age 41(80.39%), multiparous 29(56.86%), unbooked 38(74.50%), referred from periphery 39(76.47%), common iatrogenic factors were misuse of oxytocin 16(31.37%), fluid overload/cardiac failure 8(15.68%), blood reaction 7(13.72%), anesthesia related problems were delayed recovery 3(5.88%), cardiac arrest 2(3.92%), spinal shock 2(3.92%), surgical problems were bladder injury 5(9.8%), post operative internal haemorrhage 3(5.88%), 37(72.54%) women recovered and 14(27.45%) expired. Conclusion: The maternal morbidity and mortality rate with iatrogenic factors was high and majority of these factors were avoidable. PMID:24639842

  3. Acute myocardial infarction in the obstetric patient

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Tabassum; Magee, Laura A

    2012-01-01

    Acute myocardial infraction (AMI) in the obstetric patient is a rare event, although the incidence is rising due to advancing maternal age and pre-existing cardiac risk factors and medical co-morbidities. While atherosclerotic disease is the leading cause of AMI, coronary artery dissection is an important consideration in pregnancy and in the postpartum period. The physiological changes of pregnancy as well as pregnancy-specific risk factors can predispose the obstetric patient to AMI. Diagnosis of AMI can be challenging as symptoms may be atypical. Furthermore, diagnostic tests must be interpreted in the context of pregnancy. While the overall management of the obstetric patient with AMI is similar to that outside of pregnancy, drug therapy requires modification as some medications may be contraindicated in pregnancy and breastfeeding. There is limited information about prognosis and risk stratification but it is anticipated that future studies will address this issue.

  4. Maternal Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sam

    1975-01-01

    The overwhelming evidence from years of research is that maternal employment, by itself, has little influence on the behaviors of children. More relevant issues are: mother's reasons for working, family's acceptance of mother's employment, quality of substitute child care, family's social and emotional health, and economic conditions. (Author/AJ)

  5. RTOG 0529: A Phase 2 Evaluation of Dose-Painted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With 5-Fluorouracil and Mitomycin-C for the Reduction of Acute Morbidity in Carcinoma of the Anal Canal

    SciTech Connect

    Kachnic, Lisa A.; Winter, Kathryn; Myerson, Robert J.; Goodyear, Michael D.; Willins, John; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Haddock, Michael G.; Rotman, Marvin; Parikh, Parag J.; Safran, Howard; Willett, Christopher G.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A multi-institutional phase 2 trial assessed the utility of dose-painted intensity modulated radiation therapy (DP-IMRT) in reducing grade 2+ combined acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary adverse events (AEs) of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and mitomycin-C (MMC) chemoradiation for anal cancer by at least 15% compared with the conventional radiation/5FU/MMC arm from RTOG 9811. Methods and Materials: T2-4N0-3M0 anal cancer patients received 5FU and MMC on days 1 and 29 of DP-IMRT, prescribed per stage: T2N0, 42 Gy elective nodal and 50.4 Gy anal tumor planning target volumes (PTVs) in 28 fractions; T3-4N0-3, 45 Gy elective nodal, 50.4 Gy ≤3 cm or 54 Gy >3 cm metastatic nodal and 54 Gy anal tumor PTVs in 30 fractions. The primary endpoint is described above. Planned secondary endpoints assessed all AEs and the investigator’s ability to perform DP-IMRT. Results: Of 63 accrued patients, 52 were evaluable. Tumor stage included 54% II, 25% IIIA, and 21% IIIB. In primary endpoint analysis, 77% experienced grade 2+ gastrointestinal/genitourinary acute AEs (9811 77%). There was, however, a significant reduction in acute grade 2+ hematologic, 73% (9811 85%, P=.032), grade 3+ gastrointestinal, 21% (9811 36%, P=.0082), and grade 3+ dermatologic AEs 23% (9811 49%, P<.0001) with DP-IMRT. On initial pretreatment review, 81% required DP-IMRT replanning, and final review revealed only 3 cases with normal tissue major deviations. Conclusions: Although the primary endpoint was not met, DP-IMRT was associated with significant sparing of acute grade 2+ hematologic and grade 3+ dermatologic and gastrointestinal toxicity. Although DP-IMRT proved feasible, the high pretreatment planning revision rate emphasizes the importance of real-time radiation quality assurance for IMRT trials.

  6. Socioeconomic Status, Migration, and Morbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Thomas T. H.; Tarver, James D

    1972-01-01

    The conceptual framework of this study is that various population groups have different vulnerabilities to disease, and that different levels of social psychological stress induced by different social stressors lead to differential rates of morbidity. (DM)

  7. Elevated maternal cortisol leads to relative maternal hyperglycemia and increased stillbirth in ovine pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Keller-Wood, Maureen; Feng, Xiaodi; Wood, Charles E; Richards, Elaine; Anthony, Russell V; Dahl, Geoffrey E; Tao, Sha

    2014-08-15

    In normal pregnancy, cortisol increases; however, further pathological increases in cortisol are associated with maternal and fetal morbidities. These experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that increased maternal cortisol would increase maternal glucose concentrations, suppress fetal growth, and impair neonatal glucose homeostasis. Ewes were infused with cortisol (1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) from day 115 of gestation to term; maternal glucose, insulin, ovine placental lactogen, estrone, progesterone, nonesterified free fatty acids (NEFA), β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and electrolytes were measured. Infusion of cortisol increased maternal glucose concentration and slowed the glucose disappearance after injection of glucose; maternal infusion of cortisol also increased the incidence of fetal death at or near parturition. The design of the study was altered to terminate the study prior to delivery, and post hoc analysis of the data was performed to test the hypothesis that maternal metabolic factors predict the fetal outcome. In cortisol-infused ewes that had stillborn lambs, plasma insulin was increased relative to control ewes or cortisol-infused ewes with live lambs. Maternal cortisol infusion did not alter maternal food intake or plasma NEFA, BHB, estrone, progesterone or placental lactogen concentrations, and it did not alter fetal body weight, ponderal index, or fetal organ weights. Our study suggests that the adverse effect of elevated maternal cortisol on pregnancy outcome may be related to the effects of cortisol on maternal glucose homeostasis, and that chronic maternal stress or adrenal hypersecretion of cortisol may create fetal pathophysiology paralleling some aspects of maternal gestational diabetes. PMID:24920731

  8. Elevated maternal cortisol leads to relative maternal hyperglycemia and increased stillbirth in ovine pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaodi; Wood, Charles E.; Richards, Elaine; Anthony, Russell V.; Dahl, Geoffrey E.; Tao, Sha

    2014-01-01

    In normal pregnancy, cortisol increases; however, further pathological increases in cortisol are associated with maternal and fetal morbidities. These experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that increased maternal cortisol would increase maternal glucose concentrations, suppress fetal growth, and impair neonatal glucose homeostasis. Ewes were infused with cortisol (1 mg·kg−1·day−1) from day 115 of gestation to term; maternal glucose, insulin, ovine placental lactogen, estrone, progesterone, nonesterified free fatty acids (NEFA), β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and electrolytes were measured. Infusion of cortisol increased maternal glucose concentration and slowed the glucose disappearance after injection of glucose; maternal infusion of cortisol also increased the incidence of fetal death at or near parturition. The design of the study was altered to terminate the study prior to delivery, and post hoc analysis of the data was performed to test the hypothesis that maternal metabolic factors predict the fetal outcome. In cortisol-infused ewes that had stillborn lambs, plasma insulin was increased relative to control ewes or cortisol-infused ewes with live lambs. Maternal cortisol infusion did not alter maternal food intake or plasma NEFA, BHB, estrone, progesterone or placental lactogen concentrations, and it did not alter fetal body weight, ponderal index, or fetal organ weights. Our study suggests that the adverse effect of elevated maternal cortisol on pregnancy outcome may be related to the effects of cortisol on maternal glucose homeostasis, and that chronic maternal stress or adrenal hypersecretion of cortisol may create fetal pathophysiology paralleling some aspects of maternal gestational diabetes. PMID:24920731

  9. Morbidity and Mortality in Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Alicia K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Chronic sarcoidosis is a complex disease with numerous comorbid conditions and can be fatal in some cases. Recognizing causes of morbidity and mortality is important to effectively select treatments, manage symptoms, and improve outcomes. The purpose of this review is to examine emerging knowledge on morbidity and mortality in sarcoidosis. Recent Findings Approximately one to five percent of patients with sarcoidosis die from complications of sarcoidosis. Recent population studies indicate that mortality may be increasing over the past decade. The reasons behind these trends are unclear, but could include increasing incidence, detection rates, severity of disease, or age of the population. Morbidity of sarcoidosis is reflected by a trend of increased hospitalizations over recent years and increased use of healthcare resources. Morbidity can be caused by organ damage from granulomatous inflammation, treatment complications, and psychosocial effects of the disease. Recent studies are focused on morbidity related to cardiopulmonary complications, bone health, and aging within the sarcoidosis population. Last, sarcoidosis is associated with autoimmune diseases, pulmonary embolism, and malignancy; however, the underlying mechanisms linking diseases continue to be debated. Summary Morbidity in sarcoidosis is significant and multifactorial. Mortality is infrequent, but may be increasing over the years. PMID:25029298

  10. Update on the management of non-obstetric acute abdomen in pregnant patients.

    PubMed

    Barber-Millet, Sebastián; Bueno Lledó, José; Granero Castro, Pablo; Gómez Gavara, Immaculada; Ballester Pla, Neus; García Domínguez, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    Acute abdomen is a rare entity in the pregnant patient, with an incidence of one in 500-635 patients. Its appearance requires a quick response and an early diagnosis to treat the underlying disease and prevent maternal and fetal morbidity. Imaging tests are essential, due to clinical and laboratory masking in this subgroup. Appendicitis and complicated biliary pathology are the most frequent causes of non-obstetric acute abdomen in the pregnant patient. The decision to operate, the timing, and the surgical approach are essential for a correct management of this pathology. The aim of this paper is to perform a review and update on the diagnosis and treatment of non-obstetric acute abdomen in pregnancy. PMID:26875476

  11. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lang, Joanna; Zuber, Kim; Davis, Jane

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates up to 20% of all hospital admissions. Responding to the increase in admissions, complications, mortality, morbidity, and cost of AKI, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes convened an expert panel to study the issue, review the literature, and publish guidelines to evaluate and treat patients with AKI in the acute setting. This article reviews those guidelines. PMID:27023656

  12. Maternal and perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Krishna Menon, M K

    1972-01-01

    A brief analysis of data from the records of the Government Hospital for Women and Children in Madras for a 36-year period (1929-1964) is presented. India with a population of over 550 million has only 1 doctor for each 6000 population. For the 80% of the population which is rural, the doctor ratio is only 88/1 million. There is also a shortage of paramedical personnel. During the earlier years of this study period, abortions, puerperal infections; hemorrhage, and toxemia accounted for nearly 75% of all meternal deaths, while in later years deaths from these causes were 40%. Among associated factors in maternal mortality, anemia was the most frequent, it still accounts for 20% and is a contributory factor in another 20%. The mortality from postpartum hemorrhage was 9.3% but has now decreased to 2.8%. Eclampsia is a preventable disease and a marked reduction in maternal and perinatal mortality from this cause has been achieved. Maternal deaths from puerperal infections have dropped from 25% of all maternal deaths to 7%. Uterine rupture has been reduced from 75% to 9.3% due to modern facilities. Operative deliveries still have an incidence of 2.1% and a mortality rate of 1.4% of all deliveries. These rates would be further reduced by more efficient antenatal and intranatal care. Reported perinatal mortality of infants has been reduced from 182/1000 births to an average of 78/1000 in all areas, but is 60.6/1000 in the city of Madras. Socioeconomic standards play an important role in perinatal mortality, 70% of such deaths occurring in the lowest economic groups. Improvement has been noted in the past 25 years but in rural areas little progress has been made. Prematurity and low birth weights are still larger factors in India than in other countries, with acute infectious diseases, anemia, and general malnutrition among mothers the frequent causes. Problems requiring further efforts to reduce maternal and infant mortality are correct vital statistics, improved

  13. Development of an obstetric vital sign alert to improve outcomes in acute care obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Behling, Diana J; Renaud, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality is a national health problem. Causal analysis of near-miss and actual serious patient safety events, including those resulting in maternal death, within obstetric units often highlights a failure to promptly recognize and treat women who were exhibiting signs of decompensation/deterioration. The Obstetric Vital Sign Alert (OBVSA) is an early warning tool that leverages discrete data points in the electronic health record, calculating a risk score that is displayed as a visual cue for acute care obstetric staff. When studied in a cohort of women with postpartum hemorrhage, use of the OBVSA reduced symptom-to-response time and intervention time, as well as key process and outcome measures. PMID:25900584

  14. Maternal complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Vidushi; Agarwal, Nutan

    2016-09-01

    Maternal complications of diabetes in pregnancy include obstetric complications such as pre-eclampsia, preterm labour, polyhydramnios, increased operative delivery and increased infective morbidity. These can be minimized with optimal glycaemic control. Additionally, pregnancies with overt/pregestational diabetes may have diabetes related complications such as hypoglycaemia, worsening of retinopathy, nephropathy and diabetic ketoacidosis. Women with pre-existing diabetic vasculopathy should be managed with multi-disciplinary approach with maternal and foetal surveillance to detect any deterioration. Such patients have a poor pregnancy outcome. Gastropathy and coronary artery disease in diabetics is a contraindication to pregnancy. PMID:27582159

  15. MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY CHART BOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Provides information on the progress being made in the fight against cardiovascular, lung, and blood diseases. It serves as a resource for the Institute as it plans and prioritizes future activities. Compilation of data on the size and trends of morbidity and mortality from the c...

  16. Maternal vaccination: moving the science forward

    PubMed Central

    Faucette, Azure N.; Unger, Benjamin L.; Gonik, Bernard; Chen, Kang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Infections remain one of the leading causes of morbidity in pregnant women and newborns, with vaccine-preventable infections contributing significantly to the burden of disease. In the past decade, maternal vaccination has emerged as a promising public health strategy to prevent and combat maternal, fetal and neonatal infections. Despite a number of universally recommended maternal vaccines, the development and evaluation of safe and effective maternal vaccines and their wide acceptance are hampered by the lack of thorough understanding of the efficacy and safety in the pregnant women and the offspring. METHODS An outline was synthesized based on the current status and major gaps in the knowledge of maternal vaccination. A systematic literature search in PUBMED was undertaken using the key words in each section title of the outline to retrieve articles relevant to pregnancy. Articles cited were selected based on relevance and quality. On the basis of the reviewed information, a perspective on the future directions of maternal vaccination research was formulated. RESULTS Maternal vaccination can generate active immune protection in the mother and elicit systemic immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal IgG, IgA and IgM responses to confer neonatal protection. The maternal immune system undergoes significant modulation during pregnancy, which influences responsiveness to vaccines. Significant gaps exist in our knowledge of the efficacy and safety of maternal vaccines, and no maternal vaccines against a large number of old and emerging pathogens are available. Public acceptance of maternal vaccination has been low. CONCLUSIONS To tackle the scientific challenges of maternal vaccination and to provide the public with informed vaccination choices, scientists and clinicians in different disciplines must work closely and have a mechanistic understanding of the systemic, reproductive and mammary mucosal immune responses to vaccines. The use of animal models should be

  17. Pulmonary function in morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Sugerman, H J

    1987-06-01

    Morbid obesity is not infrequently associated with severe respiratory impairment. In our experience approximately 10 per cent of morbidly obese patients who underwent gastric surgery had severe respiratory impairment. Respiratory insufficiency of obesity can be divided into two primary breathing disorders: the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) and the obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). In its most severe form, when both SAS and OHS are present, it is called the Pickwickian syndrome. In our series 59 morbidly obese patients with respiratory insufficiency secondary to obesity underwent gastric surgery for weight reduction. Fourteen had OHS, 19 had SAS and 26 had both. Of these, two patients died of postoperative complications and one died at five weeks with an inconclusive autopsy, totalling an operative mortality rate of 3.4 per cent and a total mortality of 5.1 per cent. In our overall experience morbidly obese patients lost 67 per cent of excess weight after gastric procedures. In conclusion, surgically induced weight loss will markedly improve or correct respiratory insufficiency secondary to obesity. It will improve arterial oxygenation, minimize CO2 retention, expand lung volumes, correct polycythemia, and reduce apnea frequency. The magnitude of changes in these variables is clinically significant. Therefore, respiratory insufficiency of obesity should be considered a major indication for an aggressive approach to weight reduction. The jejunoileal bypass and unbanded gastroplasty operations have an unacceptable incidence of complications or failure, respectively. There is a high degree of recidivism following dietary programs. Sweets eaters will not do well with a gastroplasty procedure. Gastric bypass for individuals addicted to sweets or the vertical banded gastroplasty for "gorgers" are currently our procedures of choice and are associated with the average loss of two thirds of excess weight and correction of breathing problems associated with

  18. Maternal filicide in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Eke, Salih Murat; Basoglu, Saba; Bakar, Bulent; Oral, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Filicide occurs in every socioeconomic stratum around the world. This study was conducted to evaluate motives, psychopathological aspects, and socio-demographic factors of 74 filicide cases of women in Turkey. Mean age of mothers, most of whom committed infanticide, was 26 years, and breakdown of criminal offenses are as follows: "to get rid of unwanted babies" (24.3%), "acute psychotic-type filicide" (21.6%), "fatal child abuse and neglect" (17.6%), "to get revenge" (12.2%), "protect the lonely child from the harm and badness after suicide" (10.8%), and "pity" (9.5%) motives. Results showed that maternal filicide cannot be reduced to only mental instability or environmental factors and indicates deficiencies in the capacity of the mothers' role in connecting with their child and with parenting skills. Finally, with regard to defendants' motives, similar factors that contribute to committing maternal filicide should be considered while making an assessment of the data and determining employee risk groups. PMID:25066272

  19. Central V1b receptor antagonism in lactating rats: impairment of maternal care but not of maternal aggression.

    PubMed

    Bayerl, D S; Klampfl, S M; Bosch, O J

    2014-12-01

    Maternal behaviour in rodents is mediated by the central oxytocin and vasopressin systems, amongst others. The role of vasopressin, acting via the V1a receptor (V1aR), on maternal care and maternal aggression has recently been described. However, a potential involvement of the V1b receptor (V1bR) in maternal behaviour has only been demonstrated in knockout mice. The present study aimed to examine the effects of central pharmacological manipulation of the V1bR on maternal behaviour in lactating Wistar rats. On pregnancy day 18, female rats were implanted with a guide cannula targeting the lateral ventricle. After parturition, dams received an acute central infusion of a specific V1bR agonist (d[Leu4,Lys8]VP) or V1bR antagonist (SSR149415) once daily, followed by observations of maternal care [lactation day (LD) 1], maternal motivation in the pup retrieval test (LD 2), anxiety-related behaviour on the elevated plus-maze (LD 3) and maternal aggression in the maternal defence test followed by maternal care monitoring (LD 4). Our data demonstrate that, under nonstress conditions, the V1bR antagonist decreased the occurrence of both nursing and mother-pup interaction, whereas the V1bR agonist did not affect either parameter. Under stress conditions (i.e. after the maternal defence test), mother-pup interaction was decreased by infusion of the V1bR antagonist. During the maternal defence test, neither treatment affected aggressive or non-aggressive behaviour. Finally, neither treatment altered maternal motivation or anxiety. In conclusion, central V1bR antagonism modulates aspects of maternal care but not of maternal aggression or maternal motivation in lactating rats. These findings further extend our knowledge on the vasopressin system as a vital mediator of maternal behaviour. PMID:25283607

  20. Infectious Morbidity After Radical Vulvectomy

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Linda F.; Brooker, Doris C.; Carter, Jonathan R.; Twiggs, Leo B.

    1994-01-01

    Objective: This retrospective investigation describes the infectious morbidity of patients following radical vulvectomy with or without inguinal lymph node dissection. Methods: The charts of patients undergoing radical vulvectomy between January 1, 1986, and September 1, 1989, were reviewed for age, weight, cancer type, tumor stage, operative procedure(s), prophylactic antibiotic and its length of use, febrile morbidity, infection site, culture results, significant medical history, and length of use and number of drains or catheters used. Results: The study group was composed of 61 patients, 14 of whom underwent a radical vulvectomy and 47 who also had inguinal lymph node dissection performed. Twenty-nine patients (48%) had at least 1 postoperative infection. Five patients (8%) had 2 or more postoperative infections. The site and incidence of the infections were as follows: urinary tract 23%, wound 23%, lymphocyst 3%, lymphatics (lymphangitis) 5%, and bowel (pseudomembranous colitis) 3%. The most common pathogens isolated from both urine and wound sites were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, enterococcus, and Escherichia coli. A significant decrease in wound infection was demonstrated when separate incisions were made for inguinal lymph node dissection (P <0.05). The mean number of days to onset of postoperative infection for wound, urine, lymphatics, lymphocyst, and bowel were 11, 8, 57, 48, and 5, respectively. Conclusions: We conclude that the clinical appearance of post-radical vulvectomy infections is delayed when compared with other post-surgical wound infections. Second, utilizing separate inguinal surgical incisions may reduce infectious morbidity. Finally, tumor stage and type do not necessarily increase the infectious morbidity of radical vulvar surgery. PMID:18475379

  1. Under-reporting of maternal and perinatal adverse events in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Cynthia; Armstrong, Sarah; Kim, Boa; Masson, Vicki; Sadler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the proportion of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity cases, identified by the Perinatal and Maternal Mortality Review Committee (PMMRC), that are also reported within the annual serious adverse events (SAEs) reports published by the Health Quality and Safety Commission (HQSC). Setting Nationally collated data from the PMMRC and HQSC, New Zealand. Participants Analysis of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity data 2009–2012. Interventions Every SAE report published by the HQSC from 2009 to 2012 was scrutinised for maternal and perinatal cases using the case history provided by district health boards (DHB). Further detail of each case was requested from each DHB to establish whether they had been identified as maternal or perinatal mortalities or morbidities by the PMMRC. Primary outcome measure The proportion of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity cases identified by HQSC SAE reports, compared with PMMRC reporting. Results 58 maternal and perinatal SAEs were identified from the SAE reports 2009–2012. Of these, 50 fit under the PMMRC reporting definitions, all of which were also reported by the PMMRC. In the same time frame, the PMMRC captured 536 potentially avoidable maternal and perinatal mortalities and morbidities that fitted the HQSC SAE definition. Fewer than 9% of maternal and perinatal SAEs are captured by the HQSC SAE reporting process. Conclusions The rate of maternal and perinatal adverse event reporting to the HQSC is low and not improving annually, compared with PMMRC reporting of eligible events. This is of concern as these events may not be adequately reviewed locally, and because the SAE report is considered a measure of quality by the DHBs and the HQSC. Currently, the reporting of SAEs to the HQSC cannot be considered a reliable way to monitor or improve the quality of maternity services provided in New Zealand. PMID:26204910

  2. Placenta accreta: diagnosis, management and the molecular biology of the morbidly adherent placenta.

    PubMed

    Goh, William A; Zalud, Ivica

    2016-06-01

    Placenta accreta is now the chief cause of postpartum hemorrhage resulting in maternal and neonatal morbidity. Prenatal diagnosis decreases blood loss at delivery and intra and post-partum complications. Ultrasound is critical for diagnosis and MRI is a complementary tool when the diagnosis is uncertain. Peripartum hysterectomy has been the standard of therapy but conservative management is increasingly being used. The etiology of accreta is due to a deficiency of maternal decidua resulting in placental invasion into the uterine myometrium. The molecular basis for the development of invasive placentation is yet to be elucidated but may involve abnormal paracrine/autocrine signaling between the deficient maternal decidua and the trophoblastic tissue. The interaction of hormones such as Relaxin which is abundant in maternal decidua and insulin-like 4, an insulin-like peptide found in placental trophoblastic tissue may play role in the formation of placenta accreta. PMID:26135782

  3. Maternal immunoglobulin E and childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeffrey S; Buffler, Patricia A; Metayer, Catherine; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Patoka, Joe; Kronish, Daniel; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2009-08-01

    Childhood leukemia, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has long been hypothesized to be affected by abnormal immune responses to microbial challenges stemming from a lack of immune modulation in early childhood. Studies of allergies suggest that a child's immune development may be modulated by maternal immune status. We conducted a study to explore the relationship between maternal immunoglobulin E (IgE) and childhood leukemia and to investigate whether maternal immune status can influence childhood leukemia risk. Serum total and specific IgE (respiratory and food) were measured in biological mothers of 352 children (193 healthy controls and 159 leukemia cases, including 139 ALL cases) ages <8 years who were enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. Odds ratios associated with maternal IgE were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for child's age, sex, race/ethnicity, and annual household income. A positive association between childhood leukemia or ALL and elevated levels of maternal serum total IgE was observed, especially among Hispanics. In addition, a positive association was observed between childhood leukemia or ALL and maternal respiratory or food IgE status. These results suggest that maternal immune function may play a crucial role in the etiology of childhood leukemia, although additional studies need to be conducted to confirm the results of this study and provide a perspective on mechanisms. PMID:19622720

  4. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Huseini, Mustafa; Wood, G. Craig; Seiler, Jamie; Argyropoulos, George; Irving, Brian A.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Benotti, Peter; Still, Christopher; Rolston, David D. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several reports have shown an increased prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in obese subjects in community-based studies. To better understand the role of the GI tract in obesity, and because there are limited clinic-based studies, we documented the prevalence of upper and lower GI symptoms in morbidly obese individuals in a clinic setting. Objective: The aim of our study was to compare the prevalence of GI symptoms in morbidly obese individuals in a weight management clinic with non-obese individuals with similar comorbidities as morbidly obese individuals in an Internal Medicine clinic. Methods: Class II and III obese patients BMI >35 kg/m2 (N = 114) and 182 non-obese patients (BMI <25 kg/m2) completed the GI symptoms survey between August 2011 and April 2012 were included in this study. The survey included 24 items pertaining to upper and lower GI symptoms. The participants rated the frequency of symptoms as absent (never, rarely) or present (occasionally, frequently). The symptoms were clustered into five categories: oral symptoms, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal pain, and bowel habits. Responses to each symptom cluster were compared between obese group and normal weight groups using logistic regression. Results: Of the 24 items, 18 had a higher frequency in the obese group (p < 0.005 for each). After adjusting for age and gender, the obese patients were more likely to have upper GI symptoms: any oral symptom (OR = 2.3, p = 0.0013), dysphagia (OR 2.9, p = 0.0006), and any gastroesophageal reflux (OR 3.8, p < 0.0001). Similarly, the obese patients were more likely to have lower GI symptoms: any abdominal pain (OR = 1.7, p = 0.042) and altered bowel habits (OR = 2.8, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: These observations suggest a statistically significant increase in frequency of both upper and lower GI symptoms in morbidly obese patients when compared to non-obese subjects. PMID:25593922

  5. National Partnership for Maternal Safety: Consensus Bundle on Obstetric Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Main, Elliott K; Goffman, Dena; Scavone, Barbara M; Low, Lisa Kane; Bingham, Debra; Fontaine, Patricia L; Gorlin, Jed B; Lagrew, David C; Levy, Barbara S

    2015-07-01

    Hemorrhage is the most frequent cause of severe maternal morbidity and preventable maternal mortality and therefore is an ideal topic for the initial national maternity patient safety bundle. These safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. They are developed by multidisciplinary work groups of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The safety bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and System Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. References contain sample resources and "Potential Best Practices" to assist with implementation. PMID:26241269

  6. National Partnership for Maternal Safety: Consensus Bundle on Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    D'Alton, Mary E; Friedman, Alexander M; Smiley, Richard M; Montgomery, Douglas M; Paidas, Michael J; D'Oria, Robyn; Frost, Jennifer L; Hameed, Afshan B; Karsnitz, Deborah; Levy, Barbara S; Clark, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Obstetric venous thromboembolism is a leading cause of severe maternal morbidity and mortality. Maternal death from thromboembolism is amenable to prevention, and thromboprophylaxis is the most readily implementable means of systematically reducing the maternal death rate. Observational data support the benefit of risk-factor-based prophylaxis in reducing obstetric thromboembolism. This bundle, developed by a multidisciplinary working group and published by the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care, supports routine thromboembolism risk assessment for obstetric patients, with appropriate use of pharmacologic and mechanical thromboprophylaxis. Safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. The safety bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition, Response, and Reporting and Systems Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. PMID:27619099

  7. Antepartum morbidities and health seeking behaviour among women in an urban slum of Delhi.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tanu; Garg, Suneela; Singh, M M; Kaushik, Annu; Batra, Sachin; Gupta, V K; Ingle, G K

    2011-05-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the pattern of antepartum morbidities and its relationship with socio-economic, demographic characteristics and the health seeking behaviour among 214 women in an urban slum community of Delhi. Interviews were conducted in the households using a pretested semi-structured schedule. The age at marriage, age at co-habitation, and age at child-birth were below 18 years in 36.4%, 32.7%, and 5.1% respectively. The average number of antepartum morbidities per woman was 1.7. Commonest morbidities were: Urinary problems (11.2%), swelling over hands and feet (9.3%), fever > 3 days duration (7.5%), antepartum bleeding (7.0%), etc. The antepartum morbidities were found to be significantly higher among wives of illiterate (p = 0.01) husbands and of unskilled workers (p = 0.01). Out of 144 morbidities, consultation was sought for 101 morbidities (70.1%), mostly in a government hospital (78.2%). Main reasons for non-consultation among 43 women were: Non-availability of persons to accompany (32.6%), or to look after the children (23.3%) and feeling unnecessary to consult (23.3%). Study findings revealed the need for family support, sensitising men about women's health problems during pregnancy and education regarding identification of danger signs during pregnancy for reducing maternal morbidity and related mortality. PMID:22187764

  8. Triggers, bundles, protocols, and checklists--what every maternal care provider needs to know.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavita Shah; Shields, Larry E; Grobman, William A; D'Alton, Mary E; Lappen, Justin R; Mercer, Brian M

    2016-04-01

    The rise in maternal morbidity and mortality has resulted in national and international attention at optimally organizing systems and teams for pregnancy care. Given that maternal morbidity and mortality can occur unpredictably in any obstetric setting, specialists in general obstetrics and gynecology along with other primary maternal care providers should be integrally involved in efforts to improve the safety of obstetric care delivery. Quality improvement initiatives remain vital to meeting this goal. The evidence-based utilization of triggers, bundles, protocols, and checklists can aid in timely diagnosis and treatment to prevent or limit the severity of morbidity as well as facilitate interdisciplinary, patient-centered care. The purpose of this document is to summarize the pertinent elements from this forum to assist primary maternal care providers in their utilization and implementation of these safety tools. PMID:26478105

  9. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

  10. Health expectancy and the problem of substitute morbidity.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Water, H P

    1997-01-01

    During the past century, the developed world has not only witnessed a dramatic increase in life expectancy (ageing), but also a concomitant rise in chronic disease and disability. Consequently, the tension between 'living longer' on the one hand and health-related 'quality of life' on the other has become an increasingly important health policy problem. The paper deals with two consequences of this so-called epidemiological transition in population health. The first one concerns the question of how--given the impressive changes--population health can be measured in an adequate and policy relevant present-day fashion. The second one is the so-called phenomenon of 'substitute morbidity and mortality': more and more acute fatal diseases are replaced by non-fatal delayed degenerative diseases like dementia and arthritis. How the phenomenon of substitute morbidity and mortality affects the development of population health is illustrated with the epidemiological transitions, worldwide shifts in the main causes of death, assumptions used in models, adverse consequences of medical technologies and some results from intervention trials. Substitute morbidity and mortality may thwart our disease-specific expectations of interventions and asks for a shift to a 'total population health' perspective when judging potential health gains of interventions. Better understanding of the dynamics that underly the changes in population health is necessary. Implications for data collections are more emphasis on morbidity data and their relation with mortality, more longitudinal studies, stricter requirements for intervention trials and more use of modelling as a tool. A final recommendation is the promotion of integrative measures of population health. For the latter several results are presented suggesting that, although the amount of morbidity and disability is growing with an increasing life expectancy, this is mild unhealthiness in particular. This finding supports the 'dynamic

  11. Psychiatric Morbidity of Cannabis Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Jaydip; Murthy, Pratima; Singh, Swaran P

    2003-01-01

    The paper evaluates the hypothesis that cannabis abuse is associated with a broad range of psychiatric disorders in India, an area with relatively high prevalence of cannabis use. Retrospective case-note review of all cases with cannabis related diagnosis over a 11 -year period, for subjects presenting to a tertiary psychiatric hospital in southern India was carried out. Information pertaining to sociodemographic, personal, social, substance-use related, psychiatric and treatment histories, was gathered. Standardized diagnoses were made according to Diagnostic Criteria for Research of the World Health Organization, on the basis of information available. Cannabis abuse is associated with widespread psychiatric morbidity that spans the major categories of mental disorders under the ICD-10 system, although proportion of patients with psychotic disorders far outweighed those with non-psychotic disorders. Whilst paranoid psychoses were more prevalent, a significant number of patients with affective psychoses, particularly mania, was also noted. Besides being known as either the causative agent or a potent risk factor in cases of paranoid psychoses, cannabis appears to have similar capabilities with regard to affective psychoses, particularly in cases of mania. It is suggested that cannabis has the potential to act as a "life event stressor" amongst subjects vulnerable to develop affective psychoses and the possible aetiopathogenesis of such a finding is discussed. PMID:21206852

  12. Civil law problems and morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Pleasence, P; Balmer, N; Buck, A; O'Grady, A; Genn, H

    2004-01-01

    Study objective: In the United Kingdom, recognition of the links between social and health problems has led to government initiatives such as health action zones. The principles of civil law apply to many types of social problem, and the civil justice system provides one means through which they can be tackled. However, little research has been undertaken into the particular links between problems to which civil legal principles and processes can be applied and morbidity. This study examines these links, and the role of legal advice and services in preventing ill health. Design: This study examined survey respondents' self reports of longstanding illness/disability and experience of 18 problems to which legal principles can be applied. Setting: A random national survey conducted across England and Wales. Participants: 5611 adults drawn from 3348 residential households. Main results: Significant associations were found between illness/disability and 13 of the problem types. Moreover, experience of greater numbers of problems increased the likelihood of reported illness/disability. In attempting to resolve problems respondents' health also frequently suffered. Conclusions: This study highlights the contribution that public legal education and legal advice can make to the promotion of public health, and the importance of further integration of health and civil justice initiatives through health action zones, community legal service partnerships, etc, to further this end. PMID:15194714

  13. Lateral sacral imaging in the morbidly obese.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anna N; Krieg, James C; Chip Routt, Milton L

    2013-05-01

    Obesity can complicate surgical procedures by both adding to difficulty intraoperatively and increasing postoperative complications. Intraoperative imaging can be difficult on morbidly obese patients. We have noted specifically that in morbidly obese patients where the lateral sacrum cannot be visualized on the pre-operative scout computed tomography image, the lateral sacrum will not be able to be seen on intraoperative fluoroscopy. This is an important component of preoperative planning in morbidly obese patients with pelvic ring injuries. PMID:22648043

  14. Impact of Infection on Stroke Morbidity and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad M; Behrouz, Réza

    2016-09-01

    Each year, millions of persons worldwide are disabled by stroke. The burden of stroke is expected to increase as a consequence of growth in our elderly population. Outcome is dependent upon limitation of secondary medical processes in the acute setting that lead to deterioration and increased long-term disability. The prevalence of infection after stroke is greater that seen in other medical conditions with similar acuity and its impact upon morbidity and mortality is substantial. Physical impairment and immune modulation are chief determinants in rate of infection after stroke. Each of these factors has been a target for therapeutic intervention. Current best practices for acute stroke management implement strategies for prevention, prompt identification, and treatment of infection. Novel therapies are currently being explored which have the opportunity to greatly minimize infectious complications following stroke. Fever commonly accompanies infection and independently influences stroke outcome. Targeted temperature management provides an additional chance to improve stroke recovery. PMID:27485944

  15. Morbidities of Lung Cancer Surgery in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Binod; Eastwood, Daniel; Sukumaran, Sunitha; Hassler, George; Tisol, William; Gasparri, Mario; Choong, Nicholas; Santana-Davila, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is a risk factor for increased peri-operative morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. There have been limited studies to correlate the morbidity of lung cancer resection with obesity. Methods We performed a retrospective study of patients who underwent surgical resection for lung cancer at the Medical College of Wisconsin from 2006 to 2010. Data on patient demographics, weight, pathology findings and hospital course were abstracted after appropriate IRB approval. Peri-operative morbidity was defined as atrial fibrillation, heart failure, respiratory failure, pulmonary embolism or any medical complications arising within 30 days after surgery. Fisher’s exact test was used to test the association between BMI and peri-operative morbidities. Results Between 2006 and 2010,320 lung resections were performed for lung cancer. Median age was 67(IQR 59–75) years and 185(57.8%) were females.121 (37.8%) patients had a BMI<25 and 199(62.18%) patients had a BMI≥25. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.8 % (n=6) in the whole group; only 2 of these patients had a BMI ≥ 25. Peri-operative morbidity occurred in 28(23.14%) of normal BMI patients and in 47(23.61%) of BMI ≥ 25 patients (p=0.54). Specific morbidities encountered by patients with normal vs. BMI ≥ 25 were: atrial fibrillation 11(9.09%) vs. 24(12.06%) (p=0.46), Pulmonary embolism 1(0.83%) vs. 3(1.51%) (p=1.0), congestive heart failure 2(1.65%) vs. 2(1.01%) (p=0.63), renal failure 4(3.3%) vs.2 (1.0%)(p=0.29), respiratory failure 12(9.92%) vs. 17(8.54%) (p=0.69) and acute respiratory distress syndrome 2(1.65%) vs. 1(0.50%) (p=0.55). Median hospital stay was 5 days in the lower BMI group and 4 days in the BMI ≥25 groups (p=0.52). Conclusions Overweight and normal weight patients do not differ significantly in rates of perioperative morbidities, 30-day mortality and length of stay. Our study indicates that potential curative surgical resections can be offered to even significantly overweight

  16. Psychiatric morbidity associated with motor vehicle accidents.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, E B; Hickling, E J; Taylor, A E; Loos, W

    1995-08-01

    The primary purpose of this report was to determine the extent of psychiatric morbidity and comorbidity among a sample of recent victims of motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) in comparison to a nonaccident control population. Victims of recent MVAs (N = 158), who sought medical attention as a result of the MVA, were assessed in a University-based research clinic, 1 to 4 months after the accident for acute psychiatric and psychosocial consequences as well as for pre-MVA psychopathology using structured clinical interviews (Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale, SCID, SCID-II, LIFE Base). Age- and gender-matched controls (N = 93) who had had no MVAs in the past year served as controls. Sixty-two MVA victims (39.2%) met DSM-III-R criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and 55 met DSM-IV criteria. The MVA victims who met the criteria for PTSD were more subjectively distressed and had more impairment in role function (performance at work/school/homemaking, relationships with family or friends) than the MVA victims who did not meet the PTSD criteria or the controls. A high percentage (53%) of the MVA-PTSD group also met the criteria for current major depression, with most of that developing after the MVA. A prior history of major depression appears to be a risk factor for developing PTSD after an MVA (p = .0004): 50% of MVA victims who developed PTSD had a history of previous major depression, as compared with 23% of those with a less severe reaction to the MVA. A prior history of PTSD from earlier trauma also is associated with developing PTSD or a subsyndromal form of it (25.2%) (p = .0012). Personal injury MVAs exact substantial psychosocial costs on the victims. Early intervention, especially in vulnerable populations, might prevent some of this. PMID:7643060

  17. Maternal obesity, lipotoxicity and cardiovascular diseases in offspring.

    PubMed

    Dong, Maolong; Zheng, Qijun; Ford, Stephen P; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Ren, Jun

    2013-02-01

    Maternal obesity has risen dramatically over the past 20 years, by nearly 42% in African-Americans and 29% in Caucasians. Maternal obesity is afflicted with many maternal obstetric complications in the offspring including high blood pressure, obesity, gestational diabetes and increased perinatal morbidity. Maternal nutritional environment plays a rather important role in the programming of the health set-points in the offspring such as glucose and insulin metabolism, energy balance and predisposition to metabolic disorders. In particular, maternal obesity is associated with elevated prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in the offspring. Evidence from human and experimental studies including rodents and nonhuman primates has indicated that maternal obesity or overnutrition programs offspring for an increased risk of adult obesity. Maternal obesity or fat diet exposure predisposes the onset and development of obesity, insulin resistance, cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial contractile anomalies in the offspring. A number of mechanisms including elevated hormones (leptin, insulin), nutrients (fatty acids, triglycerides and glucose) and inflammatory cytokines have been postulated to play a key role in maternal obesity-induced postnatal cardiovascular sequelae. In addition, lipotoxicity (accumulation of lipid metabolites) resulting from maternal obesity is capable of activating a number of stress signaling cascades including pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress to exacerbate maternal obesity-induced cardiovascular complications later on in adult life. This mini-review summarizes the recent knowledge with regard to the role of lipotoxicity in maternal obesity-induced change in cardiovascular function in the offspring. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Focus on Cardiac Metabolism". PMID:22982026

  18. ICMR Task Force National Collaborative Study on Identification of High Risk Families, Mothers and Outcome of their Off-springs with particular reference to the problem of maternal nutrition, low birth weight, perinatal and infant morbidity and mortality in rural and urban slum communities. Summary, conclusions and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, S K; Singh, K K; Saxena, B N

    1991-12-01

    The objectives was to assess the determinants of and rates of abortion, stillbirth, and infant mortality for a cohort of pregnant women from slums in New Delhi, Calcutta, and Madras, India and rural slums in Hyderabad, Varanasi, and Chandigarh, India in 1981. The relationship of low birthweight (LBW) and high risk pregnancies to social, environmental, nutritional, cultural, and biological factors was of interest. The results showed variation both between and within urban and rural areas. Rural pregnancy outcome showed fewer LBWs and perinatal and neonatal mortality. Perinatal, neonatal, and infant mortality rates were consistent with prior findings. There was a demonstrated need for prenatal care and referral due to the 10-12% with a poor obstetric history and the significant number with anemia, bleeding, hypertension, toxemia, and urinary tract infections during this pregnancy. Many women were malnourished (body weight 40 kg, height 145 cm, and midarm circumference of 22.5 cm. These women can be identified as high risk. Other risk factors identified were women with disadvantageous personal habits: smoking, alcohol use, tobacco chewing, and working. 10-25% of pregnancies were not registered even though the prenatal clinic was accessible and outreach was provided. 20% completed the recommended number of prenatal visits. 75-85% visited at least once and sometimes more often. Screening for high risk must be done at the 1st visit. Women had strong feelings about the preference for a Dai during delivery and for place of delivery. Poor training of health workers was reflected in the lack of adequate sanitation during the birthing process. Neonatal units were lacking and primary care absent. 10-14% of births were preterm of which 50% occurred at 36 weeks. Multiple regression identified risk factors for fetal and neonatal mortality and LBW as maternal age, preterm birth, maternal anemia, previous preterm or LBW, birth interval, and previous fetal and neonatal mortality

  19. Three case reports of maternal primary hyperparathyroidism in each trimester and a review of optimal management in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Elaine; Osakwe, Osaeloke; Teoh, Tiong Ghee; Tolley, Neil; Robinson, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) during pregnancy is associated with significant maternal and fetal risks. Prompt diagnosis and effective management during pregnancy can improve both maternal and fetal outcomes. However, there is no consensus with regard to conservative versus surgical management especially in the first and third trimester. We report three cases of PHPT associated with pregnancy that underwent parathyroidectomy each in a different trimester. Cases 1 and 2 were found to have hypercalcaemia and elevated parathyroid hormone levels in the second and first trimesters, respectively. Case 3 was known to have PHPT prenatally but previously declined parathyroidectomy. All three cases underwent parathyroidectomies during pregnancy without significant postoperative complications and all achieved favourable maternal and neonatal outcomes. Maternal hyperparathyroidism represents a preventable cause of maternal morbidity, with fetal morbidity and mortality. The benefits of parathyroidectomy with normalization of serum calcium in the mothers outweigh the risks of hypercalcaemia and suppression of the fetal parathyroid, especially where maternal vitamin D concentration is low.

  20. Abdominal computed tomography during pregnancy for suspected appendicitis: a 5-year experience at a maternity hospital.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Mahesh K; Garrett, Nan M; Carpenter, Wendy S; Shah, Yogesh P; Roberts, Candace

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) in a pregnant patient with right lower quadrant pain in whom there was a clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis. During a 5-year period the clinical records of all pregnant women who underwent imaging examination for clinically suspected appendicitis were reviewed. The imaging findings were correlated with patient management and final outcome. Thirty-nine pregnant patients were referred for imaging, of which 35 underwent initial evaluation with sonography, 23 of these women underwent a computed tomographic examination, and an additional 4 patients were directly imaged with CT without earlier sonographic assessment. Surgery confirmed appendicitis in all 5 patients who were operated on on the basis of findings of appendicitis on a CT scan. Two patients underwent surgery based on an alternate diagnosis suggested preoperatively (tubal torsion = 1, ovarian torsion = 1). All patients with negative findings at CT had an uneventful clinical course. In those patients who were evaluated only with ultrasound, a diagnosis of appendicitis was missed in 5 patients. The sensitivity of CT in the diagnosis of appendicitis in our study group was 100%, compared with a sensitivity of 46.1% for ultrasound. CT provides an accurate diagnosis in patients suspected to have acute appendicitis and is of value in avoiding false negative exploratory laparatomy with its consequent risk of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Although sonography is the preferred initial imaging modality as its lack of ionizing radiation, CT is more accurate in providing a timely diagnosis and its use is justified to reduce maternal mortality and mortality in patients with appendicitis. PMID:20102691

  1. Early child health in Lahore, Pakistan: VI. Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Zaman, S; Jalil, F; Karlberg, J; Hanson, L A

    1993-08-01

    Morbidity patterns were studied according to the age, area of living, sex and season among 1476 monthly followed infants born during 1984-1987 in four socio-economically different areas in Lahore, Pakistan. Infections were responsible for 87.0% of the morbidity during the first two years of life. The overall monthly based morbidity was 77.0% between birth and 24 months of age; diarrhoeal diseases 30.3%, upper and lower acute respiratory tract infections (ARI) 22.4%, skin and eye infections 6.7% and skin rash 6.2%. The vaccine-preventable diseases were only 0.5% of the total. Anaemia and rickets were rare (2.0%), but commonly seen among the nutritional deficiencies. Diarrhoea, tetanus, septicaemia, ARI and infections of the skin and eyes were reported more during earlier ages and from the three poorer areas of living. Diarrhoeal diseases, respiratory tract, skin and eye infections, in particular, followed clear seasonal patterns, while scabies prevailed throughout the year. The presence of these many preventable infections and illnesses implies that proper planning of interventions must be forthcoming. PMID:8219468

  2. [Occupational morbidity of railway transport workers].

    PubMed

    Karetskaia, T D; Pfaf, V F; Chernov, O E

    2015-01-01

    The authors present results of medical social monitoring of occupationalhazards that are the most prevalent in railway occupations workers, statistic data on occupational morbidity of railway transport workers over last 10 years. The article covers major causes of unfavorable effects resulting from occupational hazards in various workers categories. Dynamics of occupational morbidity parameters and its structure concerning separate nosologic entities are analyzed. PMID:25826875

  3. Socio-demographic and environmental determinants of infectious disease morbidity in children under 5 years in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Amugsi, Dickson A.; Aborigo, Raymond A.; Oduro, Abraham R.; Asoala, Victor; Awine, Timothy; Amenga-Etego, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Background Globally, diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections (ARIs) have been identified as major threats to child survival. In Ghana, the two conditions are among the top three causes of morbidity and mortality among children under 5 years. An in-depth analysis of the factors associated with these two diseases is warranted, because of their high degree of fatality and also it provides a basis for intervention planning. Objectives To investigate socio-demographic and environmental factors associated with infectious disease morbidity in children under 5 years old in Ghana. Design Population-based cross-sectional survey. The study sample comprised 2,790 children aged 0–59 months, drawn from the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveys. The mothers reported whether their children under age 5 had been ill with a cough accompanied by short, rapid breathing (ARI), or diarrhoea with the presence of blood or mucus in the stool, in the 2 weeks preceding the survey. Results Children in the 6–11, 12–23, and 24–59 months age groups had, respectively, 3.48 (95% CI=2.23, 5.44), 4.57 (95% CI=3.03, 6.90), and 1.93 (95% CI=1.30, 2.87) increased odds of getting diarrhoea infection compared to those in the youngest age category (0–5). Similarly, children in the 6–11, 12–23, and 24–59 months age brackets were, respectively, 2.64 (95% CI=1.76, 3.97), 2.63 (95% CI=1.81, 3.83), and 1.83 (95% CI=1.29, 2.59) times more likely to have cough compared to children in 0–5 months age brackets. Children who were not breastfeeding had higher odds of childhood diarrhoea (OR=1.33, 95% CI=1.03, 1.73) compared to those who were breastfeeding. Compared to children who were living in households without co-wives, children who were living in households with co-wives had 1.74 increased odds of diarrhoea (95% CI=1.33, 2.27). A unit increase in maternal opinion regarding wife beating was associated with 14% reduced odds of diarrhoea (OR=0.86, 95% CI=0.80, 0.91), while a unit change in the

  4. Acute renal failure in pregnancy: our experience.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rohina S; Mishra, Vineet V; Jasani, Anil F; Gumber, Manoj

    2014-03-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a serious medical complication during pregnancy, and, in the post-partum period, is associated with significant maternal morbidity and mortality as well as fetal loss. The objective of our study is to find the etiology and maternal outcome of ARF during pregnancy. The study was conducted at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of the Institute of Kidney Disease and Research Center, Ahmedabad, India from January 2009 to January 2011. Fifty previously healthy patients who developed ARF, diagnosed on oliguria and serum creatinine >2 mg%, were included in the study. Patients with a known history of renal disease, diabetes and hypertension were excluded from the study. All patients were followed-up for a period of six months. Patient re-cords, demographic data, urine output on admission and preceding history of antepartum hemorrhage (APH), post-partum hemorrhage (PPH), septicemia, operative interventions and retained product of conception were noted and need for dialysis was considered. Patients were thoroughly examined and baseline biochemical investigations and renal and obstetrical ultrasound were performed on each patient and bacterial culture sensitivity on blood, urine or vaginal swabs were performed in selected patients. The age range was 19-38 years (mean 26 ± 3.8). The first trimester, second trimester and puerperal groups comprised of four (8%), 25 (50%) and 21 patients (42%), respectively. Hemorrhage was the etiology for ARF in 15 (30%), APH in ten (20%) and PPH in five (10%) patients. Eleven (22%) patients had lower segment cesarian section (LSCS) while 36 (78%) patients had normal vaginal delivery. In 20 (40%) patients, puerperal sepsis was the etiological factor, while pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and HELLP syndrome accounted for 18 (36%) patients. Two (4%) patients had disseminated intravascular coagulation on presentation while one (2%) patient was diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome. Maternal mortality was 12% (n = 6

  5. Acute lower respiratory illness in under-five children in Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Prietsch, Silvio O M; Fischer, Gilberto B; César, Juraci A; Lempek, Berenice S; Barbosa, Luciano V; Zogbi, Luciano; Cardoso, Olga C; Santos, Adriana M

    2008-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of acute lower respiratory illness and to identify associated factors among children less than five years of age in the city of Rio Grande, southern Brazil. Using a cross-sectional survey, a standardized household questionnaire was applied to mothers or guardians. Information was collected on household conditions, socioeconomic status, and parental smoking. Prenatal care attendance, nutritional status, breastfeeding pattern, and use of health services for the children were also investigated. Data analysis was based on prevalence ratios and logistic regression, using a conceptual framework. Among 771 children studied, 23.9% presented acute lower respiratory illness. The main risk factors were previous episodes of acute lower respiratory infection or wheezing, crowding, maternal schooling less than five years, monthly family income less than US$ 200, four or more people per room, asthma in family members, and maternal smoking. Mothers 30 years or older were identified as a protective factor. These results can help define specific measures to reduce morbidity and mortality due to acute lower respiratory illness in this setting. PMID:18545768

  6. Correlates of asthma morbidity in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K. P.; Bain, D. J.; Middleton, M.; Mullee, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To explore the morbidity of patients diagnosed as asthmatic in general practice, to examine the determinants of this morbidity, and to derive a simple morbidity screening tool for use in primary care. DESIGN--Patient interviews, lung function measurements, and data extraction from general practice case notes. SUBJECTS--300 asthmatic patients aged 5 to 65 years randomly selected from the repeat prescribing registers of three general practices in the Southampton area. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Reported morbidity using a calculated index based on three questions (Are you in a wheezy or asthmatic condition at least once per week; Have you had time off work or school in the past year because of your asthma; Do you suffer from attacks of wheezing during the night?); mean forced expiratory volume in one second and mean peak expiratory flow (over a seven day period); diurnal variation in peak flow; and the relation of the morbidity index to lung function. RESULTS--Mean forced expiratory volume in one second was 67% predicted (SD 18.4), mean peak expiratory flow was 80% predicted (SD 18.9), and mean diurnal variation was 10% (SD 7.7). 76 subjects were classified as having low morbidity, 95 medium, and 125 high. The morbidity index was significantly associated with forced expiratory volume in one second, mean peak expiratory flow rate, and diurnal variation (p less than 0.05); it was not significantly associated with inhaler technique or use of prophylaxis. CONCLUSIONS--There was a large burden of persisting morbidity across all ages of patients diagnosed as asthmatic in the three well resourced practices studied. The use of the morbidity index may help to target the asthmatic patients needing more attention by concentrating on those reporting medium to high morbidity. PMID:1540736

  7. Acute chorioamnionitis and funisitis: definition, pathologic features, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chong Jai; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Chaiyasit, Noppadol; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Kim, Yeon Mee

    2015-10-01

    Acute inflammatory lesions of the placenta consist of diffuse infiltration of neutrophils at different sites in the organ. These lesions include acute chorioamnionitis, funisitis, and chorionic vasculitis and represent a host response (maternal or fetal) to a chemotactic gradient in the amniotic cavity. While acute chorioamnionitis is evidence of a maternal host response, funisitis and chorionic vasculitis represent fetal inflammatory responses. Intraamniotic infection generally has been considered to be the cause of acute chorioamnionitis and funisitis; however, recent evidence indicates that "sterile" intraamniotic inflammation, which occurs in the absence of demonstrable microorganisms induced by "danger signals," is frequently associated with these lesions. In the context of intraamniotic infection, chemokines (such as interleukin-8 and granulocyte chemotactic protein) establish a gradient that favors the migration of neutrophils from the maternal or fetal circulation into the chorioamniotic membranes or umbilical cord, respectively. Danger signals that are released during the course of cellular stress or cell death can also induce the release of neutrophil chemokines. The prevalence of chorioamnionitis is a function of gestational age at birth, and present in 3-5% of term placentas and in 94% of placentas delivered at 21-24 weeks of gestation. The frequency is higher in patients with spontaneous labor, preterm labor, clinical chorioamnionitis (preterm or term), or ruptured membranes. Funisitis and chorionic vasculitis are the hallmarks of the fetal inflammatory response syndrome, a condition characterized by an elevation in the fetal plasma concentration of interleukin-6, and associated with the impending onset of preterm labor, a higher rate of neonatal morbidity (after adjustment for gestational age), and multiorgan fetal involvement. This syndrome is the counterpart of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in adults: a risk factor for short- and long

  8. Maternal mortality in Sirur.

    PubMed

    Shrotri, A; Pratinidhi, A; Shah, U

    1990-01-01

    The research aim was 1) to determine the incidence of maternal mortality in a rural health center area in Sirur, Maharashtra state, India; 2) to determine the relative risk; and 3) to make suggestions about reducing maternal mortality. The data on deliveries was obtained between 1981 and 1984. Medical care at the Rural Training Center was supervised by the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, the B.J. Medical College in Pune. Deliveries numbered 5994 singleton births over the four years; 5919 births were live births. 15 mothers died: 14 after delivery and 1 predelivery. The maternal mortality rate was 2.5/1000 live births. The maternal causes of death included 9 direct obstetric causes, 3 from postpartum hemorrhage of anemic women, and 3 from puerperal sepsis of anemic women with prolonged labor. 2 deaths were due to eclampsia, and 1 death was unexplained. There were 5 (33.3%) maternal deaths due to indirect causes (3 from hepatitis and 2 from thrombosis). One woman died of undetermined causes. Maternal jaundice during pregnancy was associated with the highest relative risk of maternal death: 106.4. Other relative risk factors were edema, anemia, and prolonged labor. Attributable risk was highest for anemia, followed by jaundice, edema, and maternal age of over 30 years. Maternal mortality at 30 years and older was 3.9/1000 live births. Teenage maternal mortality was 3.3/1000. Maternal mortality among women 20-29 years old was lowest at 2.1/1000. Maternal mortality for women with a parity of 5 or higher was 3.6/1000. Prima gravida women had a maternal mortality rate of 2.9/1000. Parities between 1 and 4 had a maternal mortality rate of 2.3/1000. The lowest maternal mortality was at parity of 3. Only 1 woman who died had received more than 3 prenatal visits. 11 out of 13 women medically examined prenatally were identified with the following risk factors: jaundice, edema, anemia, young or old maternal age, parity, or poor obstetric history. The local

  9. Clinician challenges in providing health care for a morbidly obese family member: a bariatric case study.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    Morbid obesity is a chronic disease affecting millions of Americans. The disorder is likely to increase in prevalence because currently one third of the American population is obese. Many factors are associated with morbid obesity, including psychological (eg, depression), physiological (eg, hypothyroidism) mechanisms, sleep disorders (eg, sleep apnea), drug therapy (antidepressants, antidiabetic agents, steroids), and genetics. Increasing numbers of morbidly obese patients are requiring critical care, presenting major challenges to professional staff across the disciplines. This manuscript presents a case study describing the experiences of a morbidly obese woman in the final years of her life from the perspective of her health professional relative. The patient typifies many of the major risk factors for morbid obesity; her story reveals many of the issues faced as she revolved in and out of the critical care and acute care system. Her substantive health problems affected multiple body systems and included hypothyroidism, congestive heart failure, hyperlipidemia, and subclinical Cushing's Syndrome, likely related to previous medical therapy (cortisone) for rheumatic fever in childhood. The case description addresses many integumentary system issues the patient experienced; skin injuries and infections that can pose serious life-threatening situations for the morbidly obese patient must be prevented or treated efficiently. Health professionals can learn a great deal and improve the care they provide by listening to morbidly obese patients. PMID:25581606

  10. Co-morbid disorders in Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mol Debes, Nanette M M

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is often accompanied by other symptoms and syndromes. The two best-known co-morbidities are Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), but also other conditions like rage-attacks, depression, and sleeping disturbances are frequent in persons with TS. Both in clinical cohorts and in population-based cohorts the prevalence of co-morbidities is high. The presence of co-morbid ADHD and/or OCD has an impact on psychosocial, educational, and neuropsychological consequences of TS and it is associated with higher rates of other co-morbid disorders, like rage, anxiety, and conduct disorders. The symptoms of a co-morbid disorder might appear prior to the time that tics reach clinical attention. The TS phenotype probably changes during the course of the disease. The exact aetiology of the co-occurrence of co-morbid disorders and TS is not known, but they probably all are neurotransmitter disorders. European guidelines recommend first-choice pharmacological treatment, but randomised double-blinded trials are needed. Professionals need to be aware of the close relationship between TS and co-morbidities in order to give the patients the right treatment and support. PMID:23187139

  11. The neglected role of insulin-like growth factors in the maternal circulation regulating fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Sferruzzi-Perri, A N; Owens, J A; Pringle, K G; Roberts, C T

    2011-01-01

    Maternal insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play a pivotal role in modulating fetal growth via their actions on both the mother and the placenta. Circulating IGFs influence maternal tissue growth and metabolism, thereby regulating nutrient availability for the growth of the conceptus. Maternal IGFs also regulate placental morphogenesis, substrate transport and hormone secretion, all of which influence fetal growth either via indirect effects on maternal substrate availability, or through direct effects on the placenta and its capacity to supply nutrients to the fetus. The extent to which IGFs influence the mother and/or placenta are dependent on the species and maternal factors, including age and nutrition. As altered fetal growth is associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality and a greater risk of developing degenerative diseases in adult life, understanding the role of maternal IGFs during pregnancy is essential in order to identify mechanisms underlying altered fetal growth and offspring programming. PMID:20921199

  12. Global obstetric medicine: Collaborating towards global progress in maternal health

    PubMed Central

    Ateka-Barrutia, Oier; Rojas-Suarez, Jose Antonio; Wijeyaratne, Chandrika; Castillo, Eliana; Lombaard, Hennie; Magee, Laura A

    2015-01-01

    Globally, the nature of maternal mortality and morbidity is shifting from direct obstetric causes to an increasing proportion of indirect causes due to chronic conditions and ageing of the maternal population. Obstetric medicine can address an important gap in the care of women by broadening its scope to include colleagues, communities and countries that do not yet have established obstetric medicine training, education and resources. We present the concept of global obstetric medicine by highlighting three low- and middle-income country experiences as well as an example of successful collaboration. The article also discusses ideas and initiatives to build future partnerships within the global obstetric medicine community. PMID:27512469

  13. Inflammation and Epidural-Related Maternal Fever: Proposed Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Pervez; David, Anna L; Fernando, Roshan; Ackland, Gareth L

    2016-05-01

    Intrapartum fever is associated with excessive maternal interventions as well as higher neonatal morbidity. Epidural-related maternal fever (ERMF) contributes to the development of intrapartum fever. The mechanism(s) for ERMF has remained elusive. Here, we consider how inflammatory mechanisms may be modulated by local anesthetic agents and their relevance to ERMF. We also critically reappraise the clinical data with regard to emerging concepts that explain how anesthetic drug-induced metabolic dysfunction, with or without activation of the inflammasome, might trigger the release of nonpathogenic, inflammatory molecules (danger-associated molecular patterns) likely to underlie ERMF. PMID:27101499

  14. Asymmetric large-for-gestational-age infants of type 1 diabetic women: morbidity and abdominal growth.

    PubMed

    Bollepalli, Sureka; Dolan, Lawrence M; Miodovnik, Menachem; Feghali, Maisa; Khoury, Jane C

    2010-09-01

    We sought to examine neonatal morbidity in four groups of offspring (asymmetric large for gestational age [LGA], symmetric LGA, asymmetric non-LGA, symmetric non-LGA) exposed in utero to maternal type 1 diabetes, and the association between rate of fetal abdominal circumference growth and asymmetric LGA. We performed a secondary analysis of 302 singleton pregnancies. Neonatal morbidity (respiratory distress syndrome, polycythemia, hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, acidosis, and composite morbidity [any of the five]) was assessed. Serial ultrasound examinations after 20 weeks' gestation were available for 35 fetuses. Logistic regression and general linear mixed modeling were used for analysis. Asymmetric LGA infants had 3.5-, 2.2-, and 3.2-fold greater odds of hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and composite morbidity, respectively, compared with symmetric non-LGA infants. The rate of growth of the abdominal circumference in asymmetric LGA infants (1.11 cm/wk) was greater than for both the symmetric LGA infants (0.87 cm/wk, P = 0.09) and the symmetric non-LGA infants (0.87 cm/wk, P = 0.03). Asymmetric LGA infants are at higher risk for morbidity than symmetric LGA and non-LGA infants. Intrauterine growth rate of the abdominal circumference may potentially be used as a marker to identify the asymmetric LGA and thereby aid in the identification of newborns at greatest risk for perinatal complications. PMID:20225174

  15. Stress echocardiography in patients with morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Roxy

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of significant obesity is rising across the globe. These patients often have a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and are frequently referred for noninvasive cardiac imaging tests. Stress echocardiography (SE) is widely used for assessment of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), but its clinical utility in morbidly obese patients (in whom image quality may suffer due to body habitus) has been largely unknown. The recently published Stress Ultrasonography in Morbid Obesity (SUMO) study has shown that SE, when performed appropriately with ultrasound contrast agents (whether performed with physiological or pharmacological stress), has excellent feasibility and appropriately risk stratifies morbidly obese patients, including identification of patients who require revascularization. This article reviews the evidence supporting the use of echocardiographic techniques in morbidly obese patients for assessment of known or suspected CAD and briefly discusses other noninvasive modalities, including magnetic resonance and nuclear techniques, comparing and contrasting these techniques against SE. PMID:27249552

  16. Stress echocardiography in patients with morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Shah, Benoy N; Senior, Roxy

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of significant obesity is rising across the globe. These patients often have a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and are frequently referred for noninvasive cardiac imaging tests. Stress echocardiography (SE) is widely used for assessment of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), but its clinical utility in morbidly obese patients (in whom image quality may suffer due to body habitus) has been largely unknown. The recently published Stress Ultrasonography in Morbid Obesity (SUMO) study has shown that SE, when performed appropriately with ultrasound contrast agents (whether performed with physiological or pharmacological stress), has excellent feasibility and appropriately risk stratifies morbidly obese patients, including identification of patients who require revascularization. This article reviews the evidence supporting the use of echocardiographic techniques in morbidly obese patients for assessment of known or suspected CAD and briefly discusses other noninvasive modalities, including magnetic resonance and nuclear techniques, comparing and contrasting these techniques against SE. PMID:27249552

  17. Mortality and morbidity risks and economic behavior.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Avraham; Meltzer, David

    2013-02-01

    There are theoretical reasons to expect that high risk of mortality or morbidity during young adulthood decreases investment in human capital. However, investigation of this hypothesis is complicated by a variety of empirical challenges, including difficulties in inferring causation due to omitted variables and reverse causation. For example, to compare two groups with substantially different mortality rates, one typically has to use samples from different countries or periods, making it difficult to control for other relevant variables. Reverse causation is important because human capital investment can affect mortality and morbidity. To counter these problems, we collected data on human capital investments, fertility decisions, and other economic choices of people at risk for Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a fatal genetic disorder that introduces a large and exogenous risk of early mortality and morbidity. We find a strong negative relation between mortality and morbidity risks and human capital investment. PMID:22308067

  18. MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT (MMWR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) is used to disseminate weekly provisional data on nationally notifiable infectious diseases. These provisional data are used for program planning and evaluation, monitoring trends in incidence, and detecting disease outbreaks.

  19. Overpaying morbidity adjusters in risk equalization models.

    PubMed

    van Kleef, R C; van Vliet, R C J A; van de Ven, W P M M

    2016-09-01

    Most competitive social health insurance markets include risk equalization to compensate insurers for predictable variation in healthcare expenses. Empirical literature shows that even the most sophisticated risk equalization models-with advanced morbidity adjusters-substantially undercompensate insurers for selected groups of high-risk individuals. In the presence of premium regulation, these undercompensations confront consumers and insurers with incentives for risk selection. An important reason for the undercompensations is that not all information with predictive value regarding healthcare expenses is appropriate for use as a morbidity adjuster. To reduce incentives for selection regarding specific groups we propose overpaying morbidity adjusters that are already included in the risk equalization model. This paper illustrates the idea of overpaying by merging data on morbidity adjusters and healthcare expenses with health survey information, and derives three preconditions for meaningful application. Given these preconditions, we think overpaying may be particularly useful for pharmacy-based cost groups. PMID:26420555

  20. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as morbid jealousy.

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, A.; Carney, M. W.; Denman, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    A patient fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus and presenting with morbid jealousy is described. There was evidence of cerebral lupus. Her physical and mental symptoms responded to a combination of chlorpromazine and steroids. The morbid mental process was probably caused by her physical condition while the content of her disordered thought and behaviour was determined by her introverted premorbid personality, religiosity, unhappy childhood experiences and frustrated desire for children. PMID:7413541

  1. Maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcome in low-resource countries

    PubMed Central

    van Lonkhuijzen, Luc; Stekelenburg, Jelle; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Background A maternity waiting home (MWH) is a facility within easy reach of a hospital or health centre which provides emergency obstetric care (EmOC). Women may stay in the MWH at the end of their pregnancy and await labour. Once labour starts, women move to the health facility so that labour and giving birth can be assisted by a skilled birth attendant. The aim of the MWH is to improve accessibility to skilled care and thus reduce morbidity and mortality for mother and neonate should complications arise. Some studies report a favourable effect on the outcomes for women and their newborns. Others show that utilisation is low and barriers exist. However, these data are limited in their reliability. Objectives To assess the effects of a maternity waiting facility on maternal and perinatal health. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (27 January 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 4 of 4), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2012), EMBASE (1980 to January 2012), CINAHL (1982 to January 2012), African Journals Online (AJOL) (January 2012), POPLINE (January 2012), Dissertation Abstracts (January 2012) and reference lists of retrieved papers. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials including quasi-randomised and cluster-randomised trials that compared perinatal and maternal outcome in women using a MWH and women who did not. Data collection and analysis There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Main results There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Authors’ conclusions There is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:23076927

  2. Maternal manifestations of malaria in pregnancy: a review.

    PubMed

    Maitra, N; Joshi, M; Hazra, M

    1993-01-01

    Malaria is a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, and this risk is highest in the areas of unstable malaria transmission. In 1990 and 1991 the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Sir Sayajirao General Hospital in central Gujarat, India, has cared for a total of 445 urban as well as rural patients with malaria in pregnancy: 232 were labor ward admissions and 213 were antenatal ward admissions. Plasmodium falciparum infection affected 97.27% of patients, both primigravidae and multigravidae. Heavy parasitemia was observed in 27.14% of primigravidae and 48.57% in secundigravidae, however, this was not statistically significant. Out of the 260 (58.42.) cases who had various degrees of anaemia, 59 (22.69) had severe anaemia with haemoglobin of less than 6.0 gm O/dl. Within this group, 71.16% women were primigravidae or secundigravidae, the rest were multigravidae. Out of the 6 patients in first trimester, the miscarriage rate was 100%. In the second trimester, out of 52 patients 74.99 pregnancies were discontinued, whereas in the third trimester, the miscarriage rate was 18.17%. This observation was statistically significant (p 0.05). 178 patients who were admitted antenatally were discharged, their pregnancy outcome was not known, and accordingly they were excluded. There were 11 patients in the first trimester, 139 in the second trimester, and 295 in the third trimester. The known pregnancy losses were 54.54% in the first trimester. 28.05% in the second trimester, and 12.88% in the third trimester. 75.59% of those with minor parasitemia and 47.36% with heavy parasitemia had a normal pregnancy outcome. The overall fetal loss was 31.08%, which was almost twice that of the miscarriage rates among the general population. Maternal deaths attributed to malaria in pregnancy were 15, with cerebral malaria accounting for 5 deaths. 46.66% of the deaths occurred in primigravidae and secundigravidae. The other causes of mortality were postpartum

  3. Acute renal failure in pregnancy: Tertiary centre experience from north Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Munna Lal; Sachan, Rekha; Radheshyam; Sachan, Pushpalata

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obstetrical acute renal failure ARF is now a rare entity in the developed countries but still a common occurrence in developing countries. Delay in the diagnosis and late referral is associated with increased mortality. This study aimed to evaluate the contributing factors responsible for pregnancy-related acute kidney failure, its relation with mortality and morbidity and outcome measures in these patients. Materials and Methods: Total 520 patients of ARF of various aetiology were admitted, out of these 60 (11.5%) patients were pregnancy-related acute renal failure. Results: ARF Acute renal failure occurred in 32 (53.3%) cases in early part of their pregnancy, whereas in 28 (46.7%) cases in later of the pregnancy. Thirty-two (53.3%) patients had not received any antenatal visit, and had home delivery, 20 (33.4%) patients had delivered in hospitals but without antenatal care and eight (13.3%) patients received antenatal care and delivered in the hospitals. Anuria was observed in 23 (38.3%) cases, remaining 37 (61.7%) cases presented with oliguria. Septicemia was present in 25 (41.7%), hypertensive disorder of pregnancy in 20 (33.3%), haemorrhage in eight (13.3%), abortion in 5 (8.3%), haemolysis elevated liver enzymes low platelets counts (HELLP) syndrome in one (1.67%) and disseminated intravascular coagulation in one (1.67%). (61.7%) patients were not dialyzed, 33 (55%) recovered normal renal function with conservative treatment. Complete recovery was observed in 45 (75%) patients, five (8.4%) patients developed irreversible renal failure. Maternal mortality was nine (15%) and foetal loss was 25 (41.7%). Conclusion: Pregnancy-related ARF is usually a consequence of obstetric complications; it carries very high morbidity and mortality. PMID:23900700

  4. Inhaled /sup 147/Pm and/or total-body gamma radiation: Early mortality and morbidity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Filipy, R.E.; Lauhala, K.E.; McGee, D.R.; Cannon, W.C.; Buschbom, R.L.; Decker, J.R.; Kuffel, E.G.; Park, J.F.; Ragan, H.A.; Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1989-05-01

    Rats were given doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation and/or lung burdens of /sup 147/Pm (in fused aluminosilicate particles) within lethal ranges in an experiment to determine and compare morbidity and mortality responses for the radiation insults within 1 year after exposure. Radiation-induced morbidity was assessed by measuring changes in body weights, hematologic parameters, and pulmonary-function parameters. Acute mortality and morbidity from inhaled promethium were caused primarily by radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis that occurred more than 53 days after exposure. Acute mortality and morbidity from total-body gamma irradiation occurred within 30 days of exposure and resulted from the bone-marrow radiation syndrome. Gamma radiation caused transient morbidity, reflected by immediately depressed blood cell levels and by reduced body weight gain in animals that survived the acute gamma radiation syndrome. Inhaled promethium caused a loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function, but its only effect on blood cell levels was lymphocytopenia. Combined gamma irradiation and promethium lung burdens were synergistic, in that animals receiving both radiation insults had higher morbidity and mortality rates than would be predicted based on the effect of either kind of radiation alone. Promethium lung burdens enhanced the effect of gamma radiation in rats within the first 30 days of exposure, and gamma radiation enhanced the later effect of promethium lung burdens. 70 refs., 68 figs., 21 tabs.

  5. [Wernicke encephalopathy after subtotal gastrectomy for morbid obesity].

    PubMed

    Gabaudan, C; La-Folie, T; Sagui, E; Soulier, B; Dion, A-M; Richez, P; Brosset, C

    2008-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is one of the potential complications of obesity surgery. It is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency often associated with repeated vomiting. The classic triad is frequently reported in these patients (optic neuropathy, ataxia and confusion), associated with uncommon features. Cerebral impairment affects the dorsal medial nucleus of the thalamus and the periaqueductal grey area, appearing on MRI, as hyperintense signals on T2, Flair and Diffusion weighted imaging. Early diagnosis and parenteral thiamine are required to decrease morbidity and mortality. We report a case of WE and Korsakoff's syndrome in a young obese patient after subtotal gastrectomy, who still has substantial sequelae. The contribution of MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging is illustrated. The interest of nutritional supervision in the first weeks and preventive thiamine supplementation in case of repeated vomiting are of particular importance in these risky situations. PMID:18555879

  6. Individual Effect Modifiers of Dust Exposure Effect on Cardiovascular Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Vodonos, Alina; Friger, Michael; Katra, Itzhak; Krasnov, Helena; Zahger, Doron; Schwartz, Joel; Novack, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Background High concentrations of particulate matter (PM) air pollution have been associated with death and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular morbidity. However, it is not clear a) whether high levels of non-anthropogenic PM from dust storms constitute a health risk; and b) whether these health risks are exacerbated in a particular demographic. Methods This study comprised all patients above 18 years old admitted to Soroka University Medical Center (1000 bed tertiary hospital, Be’er- Sheva, Israel, 2001–2010) with a primary diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Data on meteorological parameters and PM10 (particulate matter <10 μm in aerodiameter) were obtained from monitoring stations in the city of Be'er-Sheva. Data were analyzed using a case crossover analysis to examine the effect of dust exposure on hospitalization due to ACS and the interaction with co-morbidities and demographic factors. Results There were 16,734 hospitalizations due to ACS during the study period. The estimated odds of hospitalization due to ACS was significantly associated with PM10 during non dust storm days at the same day of the exposure (lag0); OR = 1.014 (95%CI 1.001–1.027) for a 10 μg/m3 increase, while a delayed response (lag1) was found during the dust storm days; OR = 1.007 (95%CI 1.002–1.012). The effect size for the dust exposure association was larger for older (above the age of 65), female or Bedouin patients. Conclusions Exposure to non-anthropogenic PM is associated with cardiovascular morbidity. Health risk associated dust exposure is gender and age specific with older women and Bedouin patients being the most vulnerable groups. PMID:26381397

  7. Maternal and Child Health Issues and Female Labor Force Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howze, Dorothy C.; And Others

    Reviewing health related "costs" of female labor force participation, this paper examines four highly salient maternal and child health issues. Discussion of acute illness in day care settings begins with an overview of studies on day care and illness and focuses on hepatitis A, appropriate sanitation, and indications of research on respiratory…

  8. Fetal and maternal metabolic responses to exercise during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mottola, Michelle F; Artal, Raul

    2016-03-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by physiological, endocrine and metabolic adaptations creating a pseudo-diabetogenic state of progressive insulin resistance. These adaptations occur to sustain continuous fetal requirements for nutrients and oxygen. Insulin resistance develops at the level of the skeletal muscle, and maternal exercise, especially activity involving large muscle groups improve glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. We discuss the maternal hormonal and metabolic changes associated with a normal pregnancy, the metabolic dysregulation that may occur leading to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and the consequences to mother and fetus. We will then examine the acute and chronic (training) responses to exercise in the non-pregnant state and relate these alterations to maternal exercise in a low-risk pregnancy, how exercise can be used to regulate glucose tolerance in women at risk for or diagnosed with GDM. Lastly, we present key exercise guidelines to help maintain maternal glucose regulation and suggest future research directions. PMID:26803360

  9. Psychiatric morbidity after screening for breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, C; Roberts, M M; French, K; Robinson, S

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and thirty two women with normal breast screening results were interviewed six months after their attendance at the Edinburgh Breast Screening Clinic. Eight percent of women said screening had made them more anxious about developing breast cancer. Thirty eight percent said they were more aware of the disease since screening but they regarded this as advantageous. Seventy percent of the women were still practising breast self-examination. There was no difference in the psychiatric morbidity of the screened sample when compared with a matched random sample community control group. Neither was there any difference in the General Health Questionnaire case rates before and after screening. Screening does not appear to increase the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity. Twenty nine percent of the interview sample were examining their breasts more than once a month--21% once a week or more. However, these frequent self-examiners did not have a greater prevalence of psychiatric morbidity than their matched controls. PMID:3711771

  10. Thrombolysis for Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Webb, John; Thompson, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    Thrombolysis has an important role in the management of acute myocardial infarction. Early treatment can markedly reduce mortality and morbidity. This new standard of care requires knowledge of accepted indications and contraindications for thrombolysis as well as familiarity with available agents and regimens. ImagesFigure 3 PMID:21221398

  11. Preeclampsia and Future Risk for Maternal Ophthalmic Complications.

    PubMed

    Beharier, Ofer; Davidson, Ehud; Sergienko, Ruslan; Szaingurten-Solodkin, Irit; Kessous, Roy; Charach, Ron; Belfair, Nadav J; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-06-01

    Objective To investigate whether patients with a history of preeclampsia have an increased risk of long-term ophthalmic complications. Study Design A population-based study comparing the incidence of long-term maternal ophthalmic complications in a cohort of women with and without a history of preeclampsia. Results During the study period, a total of 103,183 deliveries met the inclusion criteria; 8.1% (n = 8,324) occurred in patients with a diagnosis of preeclampsia during at least one of their pregnancies. Patients with preeclampsia had a significantly higher incidence of long-term ophthalmic morbidity such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal detachment. In addition, a positive linear correlation was found between the severity of preeclampsia and the prevalence of future ophthalmic morbidities (0.3 vs. 0.5 vs. 2.2%, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival curve indicated that women with preeclampsia had higher rates of total ophthalmic morbidity (0.2 vs. 0.4%, for no preeclampsia and with preeclampsia, respectively; odds ratio = 2.06, 95% confidence interval: 1.42-2.99; p < 0.001). In a Cox proportional hazards model, adjusted for confounders, a history of preeclampsia remained independently associated with ophthalmic complications. Conclusion Preeclampsia is an independent risk factor for long-term maternal ophthalmic morbidity, specifically diabetic retinopathy and retinal detachment. This risk is more substantial depending on the severity of the disease. PMID:26871904

  12. Epidemiology and aetiology of maternal bacterial and viral infections in low- and middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Velu, Prasad Palani; Gravett, Courtney A.; Roberts, Tom K.; Wagner, Thor A.; Zhang, Jian Shayne F.; Rubens, Craig E.; Gravett, Michael G.; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Background Maternal morbidity and mortality in low- and middle-income countries has remained exceedingly high. However, information on bacterial and viral maternal infections, which are important contributors to poor pregnancy outcomes, is sparse and poorly characterised. This review aims to describe the epidemiology and aetiology of bacterial and viral maternal infections in low- and middle-income countries. Methods A systematic search of published literature was conducted and data on aetiology and epidemiology of maternal infections was extracted from relevant studies for analysis. Searches were conducted in parallel by two reviewers (using OVID) in the following databases: Medline (1950 to 2010), EMBASE (1980 to 2010) and Global Health (1973 to 2010). Results Data from 158 relevant studies was used to characterise the epidemiology of the 10 most extensively reported maternal infections with the following median prevalence rates: Treponema pallidum (2.6%), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (1.5%), Chlamydia trachomatis (5.8%), Group B Streptococcus (8.6%), bacterial vaginosis (20.9%), hepatitis B virus (4.3%), hepatitis C virus (1.4%), Cytomegalovirus (95.7% past infection), Rubella (8.9% susceptible) and Herpes simplex (20.7%). Large variations in the prevalence of these infections between countries and regions were noted. Conclusion This review confirms the suspected high prevalence of maternal bacterial and viral infections and identifies particular diseases and regions requiring urgent attention in public health policy planning, setting research priorities and donor funding towards reducing maternal morbidity and mortality in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:23198117

  13. Applying the lessons of maternal mortality reduction to global emergency health.

    PubMed

    Calvello, Emilie J; Skog, Alexander P; Tenner, Andrea G; Wallis, Lee A

    2015-06-01

    Over the last few decades, maternal health has been a major focus of the international community and this has resulted in a substantial decrease in maternal mortality globally. Although, compared with maternal illness, medical and surgical emergencies account for far more morbidity and mortality, there has been less focus on global efforts to improve comprehensive emergency systems. The thoughtful and specific application of the concepts used in the effort to decrease maternal mortality could lead to major improvements in global emergency health services. The so-called three-delay model that was developed for maternal mortality can be adapted to emergency service delivery. Adaptation of evaluation frameworks to include emergency sentinel conditions could allow effective monitoring of emergency facilities and further policy development. Future global emergency health efforts may benefit from incorporating strategies for the planning and evaluation of high-impact interventions. PMID:26240463

  14. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  15. [Acute respiratory failure in neuromuscular disease].

    PubMed

    Damak, H; Décosterd, D

    2015-09-30

    Neuromuscular diseases can affect all respiratory muscles, leading to acute respiratory failure, which is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in those patients. Two situations must be distinguished. 1) Acute respiratory failure as part of a neuromuscular disorder of acute onset and possibly reversible (Guillain-Barre syndrome, myasthenic crisis...). 2) Acute respiratory failure occurring in a patient with an already advanced neuromuscular disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy...). This article describes the neuromuscular acute respiratory failure in these different aspects, discusses its initial management in the emergency department and identifies the parameters that have to be monitored. PMID:26619704

  16. Co-morbidities and 90-day outcomes in hospitalized COPD exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christopher M; Stone, Robert A; Lowe, Derek; Pursey, Nancy A; Buckingham, Rhona J

    2011-10-01

    COPD exacerbations resulting in hospitalization are accompanied by high mortality and morbidity. The contribution of specific co-morbidities to acute outcomes is not known in detail: existing studies have used either administrative data or small clinical cohorts and have provided conflicting results. Identification of co-existent diseases that affect outcomes provides opportunities to address these conditions proactively and improve overall COPD care. Cases were identified prospectively on admission then underwent retrospective case note audit to collect data including co-morbidities on up to 60 unselected consecutive acute COPD admissions between March and May in each hospital participating in the 2008 UK National COPD audit. Outcomes recorded were death in hospital, length of stay, and death and readmission at 90 days after index admission. 232 hospitals collected data on 9716 patients, mean age 73, 50% male, mean FEV1 42% predicted. Prevalence of co-morbidities were associated with increased age but better FEV1 and ex-smoker status and with worse outcomes for all four measures. Hospital mortality risk was increased with cor pulmonale, left ventricular failure, neurological conditions and non-respiratory malignancies whilst 90 day death was also increased by lung cancer and arrhythmias. Ischaemic and other heart diseases were important factors in readmission. This study demonstrates that co-morbidities adversely affect a range of short-term patient outcomes related to acute admission to hospital with exacerbations of COPD. Recognition of relevant accompanying diseases at admission provides an opportunity for specific interventions that may improve short-term prognosis. PMID:21864116

  17. Impacts of temperature extremes on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davídkovová, H.; Kyselý, J.; Plavcová, E.; Urban, A.; Kriz, B.; Kyncl, J.

    2012-04-01

    Elevated mortality associated with high ambient temperatures in summer represents one of the main impacts of weather extremes on human society. Increases in cardiovascular mortality during heat waves have been reported in many European countries; much less is known about which particular cardiovascular disorders are most affected during heat waves, and whether similar patterns are found for morbidity (hospital admissions). Relatively less understood is also cold-related mortality and morbidity in winter, when the relationships between weather and human health are more complex, less direct, and confounded by other factors such as epidemics of influenza/acute respiratory infections. The present study analyses relationships between temperature extremes and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We make use of the datasets on hospital admissions and daily mortality in the population of the Czech Republic (about 10.3 million) over 1994-2009. The data have been standardized to remove the effects of the long-term trend and the seasonal and weekly cycles. Periods when the morbidity/mortality data were affected by epidemics of influenza and other acute respiratory infections have been removed from the analysis. We use analogous definitions for hot and cold spells based on quantiles of daily average temperature anomalies, which allows for a comparison of the findings for summer hot spells and winter cold spells. The main aims of the study are (i) to identify deviations of mortality and morbidity from the baseline associated with hot and cold spells, (ii) to compare the hot- and cold-spell effects for individual cardiovascular diseases (e.g. ischaemic heart disease I20-I25, cerebrovascular disease I60-I69, hypertension I10, aterosclerosis I70) and to identify those diagnoses that are most closely linked to temperature extremes, (iii) to identify population groups most vulnerable to temperature extremes, and (iv) to compare the links to temperature extremes for morbidity and

  18. Morbidity and Mortality in American Blacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Maureen; Cowan, Linda

    Comparisons are used in this paper to identify improvements in mortality and morbidity experiences over time, to identify new environmental hazards, and to emphasize the potential for improvement. The comparisons are presented in the full belief that racial variations are fundamentally socioeconomic variations. Efforts are also made to identify…

  19. Co-Morbidity of Conditions among Prisoners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinkfield, Alison J.; Graffam, J.; Meneilly, Sharn

    2009-01-01

    Eighty seven adult prisoners (58 males, 29 females) completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and a questionnaire on current health in order to examine both the prevalence of co-morbid conditions and the relation of depression and anxiety to ill-health and prior substance use. High prevalence rates of…

  20. Morbidity and Infant Development: A Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Ernesto

    1983-01-01

    Results of a study conducted in 14 villages of Sui Lin Township, Taiwan, suggest the hypothesis that, under conditions of extreme economic impoverishment and among children within populations where energy protein malnutrition is endemic, there is an inverse relationship between incidence of morbidity in infancy and measures of motor and mental…

  1. The morbid anatomy of high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Donald

    1979-01-01

    The morbid anatomical changes which take place in man and animals exposed to the chronic hypoxia of residence at high altitude are briefly reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 4Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:493205

  2. Perioperative morbidity of intracavitary gynecologic brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lanciano, R.; Corn, B.; Martin, E.; Schulthesis, T.; Hogan, W.M.; Rosenblum, N.

    1994-07-30

    The purpose was to define the incidence and severity of perioperative morbidity and its subsequent management with standard tandem and ovoid insertions to evaluate pretreatment and treatment factors associated with an increased risk of perioperative morbidity. Intraoperative complications were seen in 3% of implants and included two perforations and a vaginal laceration in two patients. Twenty-four percent of implants (16 patients) developed temperatures of > 100.5 (range 100.6 to 103), although only one patient required implant removal because of fever. Management of fever included antibiotics in 35% and acetaminophen only in 65%. Five implants were removed emergently secondary to presumed sepsis, exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypotension, change in mental status, and myocardial infarction/congestive heart failure. No patient developed a deep-vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, gastrointestinal obstruction, or died of a postoperative complication. Univariate analysis of pretreatment and treatment factors revealed older age and spinal/epidural anesthesia to be associated with increased perioperative morbidity, and older age and higher ASA classification to be associated with severe complications requiring removal of implant. Multivariate analysis revealed only older age to be significantly related to perioperative morbidity. Fever of > 100.5 was seen in 24% of implants and can be managed successfully without removal of the implant in 96% of cases. Use of antibiotics preoperatively and intraoperatively did not reduce the risk of perioperative temperature elevation. Use of routine diphenoxylate hydrochloride prophylaxis was tolerated without ileus or gastrointestinal obstruction clinically. Although routine deep-vein thrombosis prophylaxis is reasonable, the data would support a low risk of deep-vein thrombosis for untreated patients. Severe perioperative morbidity necessitated premature implant removal in only 5% of cases. 24 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Maternal Responses to Aerobic Exercise in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Margie H; Skow, Rachel J; Steinback, Craig D

    2016-09-01

    Exercise is one of the most physiologically challenging stressors requiring the coordination of metabolic, respiratory, and cardiovascular responses to meet increased energy requirements of the working muscle. During pregnancy, all women without contraindication are encouraged to exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. Pregnancy itself is associated with profound physiological adaptations to the maternal cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic systems, which serve to support the needs of the growing fetus. Therefore the physiological adaptations to exercise during pregnancy are more pronounced and critically important. This review provides an overview of our current understanding of the physiological adaptations to acute prenatal exercise. PMID:27042798

  4. Stroke: morbidity, risk factors, and care in taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Fang-I; Chiou, Hung-Yi

    2014-05-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the most common cause of complex disability in Taiwan. The annual age-standardized mortality rate of stroke is steadily decreasing between 2001 and 2012. The average years of potential life lost before age 70 for stroke is 13.8 years, ranked the fifth in the cause of death. Its national impact is predicted to be greater accompany aging population. The most common type of stroke was ischemic stroke in Taiwan. Small vessel occlusion was the majority of ischemic strokes subtype. Age, gender, hypertension, diabetes hyperlipidemia, obesity, atrial fibrillation, and smoking were important contributory factors to stroke morbidity. The standard treatment for acute ischemic stroke in Taiwan is providing the intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) therapy for ischemic stroke patients within 3 hours of symptom onset. However, the rate of IV tPA therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke is still low in Taiwan. Therefore, improving the public awareness of stroke warning signs and act on stroke and improving in-hospital critical pathway for thrombolysis would be the most important and urgent issues in Taiwan. To improve acute stroke care quality, a program of Breakthrough Series-Stroke activity was conducted from 2010 to 2011 and stroke centers were established in the medical centers. For the prevention of stroke, it was successful to increased annual smoke cessation rate through the 2009 Tobacco Hazards Prevention Act and decreased obesity rate through a nationwide weight-loss program conducted by Health Promotion Administration from 2011 to 2013 in Taiwan. PMID:24949310

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS and other important predictors of maternal mortality in Mulago Hospital Complex Kampala Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Women with severe maternal morbidity are at high risk of dying. Quality and prompt management and sometimes luck have been suggested to reduce on the risk of dying. The objective of the study was to identify the direct and indirect causes of severe maternal morbidity, predictors of progression from severe maternal morbidity to maternal mortality in Mulago hospital, Kampala, Uganda. Methods This was a longitudinal follow up study at the Mulago hospital's Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Participants were 499 with severe maternal morbidity admitted in Mulago hospital between 15th November 2001 and 30th November 2002 were identified, recruited and followed up until discharge or death. Potential prognostic factors were HIV status and CD4 cell counts, socio demographic characteristics, medical and gynaecological history, past and present obstetric history and intra- partum and postnatal care. Results Severe pre eclampsia/eclampsia, obstructed labour and ruptured uterus, severe post partum haemorrhage, severe abruptio and placenta praevia, puerperal sepsis, post abortal sepsis and severe anaemia were the causes for the hospitalization of 499 mothers. The mortality incidence rate was 8% (n = 39), maternal mortality ratio of 7815/100,000 live births and the ratio of severe maternal morbidity to mortality was 12.8:1. The independent predictors of maternal mortality were HIV/AIDS (OR 5.1 95% CI 2-12.8), non attendance of antenatal care (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.3-9.2), non use of oxytocics (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.7-9.7), lack of essential drugs (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.1-11.3) and non availability of blood for transfusion (OR 53.7, 95% CI (15.7-183.9) and delivery of amale baby (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.6-10.1). Conclusion The predictors of progression from severe maternal morbidity to mortalitywere: residing far from hospital, low socio economic status, non attendance of antenatal care, poor intrapartum care, and HIV/AIDS. There is need to improve on the referral system, economic

  6. Seasonality of the links between weather and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davídkovová, Hana; Kyselý, Jan

    2015-04-01

    While there is strong evidence that weather variations, particularly temperature extremes, affect cardiovascular (CVD) health in mid-latitudes, limited understanding is related to the seasonality of the links between weather and CVD mortality/morbidity. The present study examines observed seasonal and interannual fluctuations in the effects of weather conditions on variations in CVD mortality/morbidity, and how excess winter mortality (its magnitude as well as position of the peak within season) is linked to the interannual variability of weather conditions, using long-term mortality and morbidity (hospital admissions) data in the population of the Czech Republic since 1994. We also evaluate changes in the amplitude of the annual cycle of the CVD mortality and morbidity over time, and whether they are related to epidemics of acute respiratory infections and/or weather characteristics (such as the annual temperature range). The identified links are particularly useful as they may provide a source of predictability of the magnitude and timing of the winter CVD mortality/morbidity peak using seasonal climate predictions.

  7. Maternal and Handicapped Child Characteristics Associated with Maternal Involvement Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntington, Gail S.

    Eighty-six mother-infant pairs were studied to determine the extent to which maternal and child variables predicted maternal involvement. The infants, ranging in age from 3-36 months, were examined on temperament and developmental status. Maternal characteristics studied were temperament, locus of control, and socioeconomic status. Criterion…

  8. Maternal Separation Anxiety and Child Care: Effects on Maternal Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, Heidi A.; Ridley-Johnson, Robyn

    Maternal separation anxiety influences maternal behavior, attitudes about employment, and employment decisions made by mothers. This study examined the relationship between maternal separation anxiety and the number of hours a child was in substitute care. The sample consisted of 44 mothers and their children who ranged in age from 12 to 41 months…

  9. Maternal and neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2015-01-24

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58,000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  10. Treatment of Morbidity with Atypical Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cott, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    The appropriate management of atypical chest pain requires an integration of medical and behavioural treatments. Unnecessary medicalization can increase morbidity. A sensitivity to the behavioural factors contributing to symptoms and disability may reduce both. The purpose of this paper is to provide physicians with a cognitive-behavioural perspective of the nature of morbidity and disability associated with chronic chest discomfort; some strategies for detecting heretofore unsuspected disability associated with chronic chest pain and related discomfort in patients with organic findings (both cardiac and non-cardiac), as well those with no identifiable disease process or organic cause; and some simple behavioural and cognitive-behavioural therapeutic techniques for treating and preventing such problems. PMID:21263912

  11. "Vicious circles": the development of morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Owen-Smith, Amanda; Donovan, Jenny; Coast, Joanna

    2014-09-01

    Although there has been extensive research around the etiology of moderate obesity, there are still important questions relating to the development and lived experience of extreme obesity. We present a synthesis of data from two in-depth qualitative studies in which morbidly obese participants (N = 31) were able to explain the development of the condition in their own terms. We identified consistent themes in the two datasets, and undertook a detailed data synthesis. Particularly salient themes in the development of morbid obesity related to family structures and early socialization experiences, and the role of emotional distress was dominant in both initial weight gain and ongoing cycles of loss and regain. All informants accepted some responsibility for their health state, but identified a number of mitigating factors that limited personal culpability that were often related to the fulfillment of gendered social expectations. PMID:25079501

  12. Factors Affecting Morbidity in Solid Organ Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Baygeldi, Serdar; Karakose, Oktay; Özcelik, Kazım Caglar; Pülat, Hüseyin; Damar, Sedat; Eken, Hüseyin; Zihni, İsmail; Çalta, Alpaslan Fedai; Baç, Bilsel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of demographic characteristics, biochemical parameters, amount of blood transfusion, and trauma scores on morbidity in patients with solid organ injury following trauma. Material and Method. One hundred nine patients with solid organ injury due to abdominal trauma during January 2005 and October 2015 were examined retrospectively in the General Surgery Department of Dicle University Medical Faculty. Patients' age, gender, trauma interval time, vital status (heart rate, arterial tension, and respiratory rate), hematocrit (HCT) value, serum area aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) values, presence of free abdominal fluid in USG, trauma mechanism, extra-abdominal system injuries, injured solid organs and their number, degree of injury in abdominal CT, number of blood transfusions, duration of hospital stay, time of operation (for those undergoing operation), trauma scores (ISS, RTS, Glasgow coma scale, and TRISS), and causes of morbidity and mortality were examined. In posttraumatic follow-up period, intra-abdominal hematoma infection, emboli, catheter infection, and deep vein thrombosis were monitored as factors of morbidity. Results. One hundred nine patients were followed up and treated due to isolated solid organ injury following abdominal trauma. There were 81 males (74.3%) and 28 females (25.7%), and the mean age was 37.6 ± 18.28 (15–78) years. When examining the mechanism of abdominal trauma in patients, the following results were obtained: 58 (53.3%) traffic accidents (22 out-vehicle and 36 in-vehicle), 27 (24.7%) falling from a height, 14 (12.9%) assaults, 5 (4.5%) sharp object injuries, and 5 (4.5%) gunshot injuries. When evaluating 69 liver injuries scaled by CT the following was detected: 14 (20.3%) of grade I, 32 (46.4%) of grade II, 22 (31.8%) of grade III, and 1 (1.5%) of grade IV. In 63 spleen injuries scaled by CT the following was present: grade I in

  13. Factors Affecting Morbidity in Solid Organ Injuries.

    PubMed

    Baygeldi, Serdar; Karakose, Oktay; Özcelik, Kazım Caglar; Pülat, Hüseyin; Damar, Sedat; Eken, Hüseyin; Zihni, İsmail; Çalta, Alpaslan Fedai; Baç, Bilsel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of demographic characteristics, biochemical parameters, amount of blood transfusion, and trauma scores on morbidity in patients with solid organ injury following trauma. Material and Method. One hundred nine patients with solid organ injury due to abdominal trauma during January 2005 and October 2015 were examined retrospectively in the General Surgery Department of Dicle University Medical Faculty. Patients' age, gender, trauma interval time, vital status (heart rate, arterial tension, and respiratory rate), hematocrit (HCT) value, serum area aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) values, presence of free abdominal fluid in USG, trauma mechanism, extra-abdominal system injuries, injured solid organs and their number, degree of injury in abdominal CT, number of blood transfusions, duration of hospital stay, time of operation (for those undergoing operation), trauma scores (ISS, RTS, Glasgow coma scale, and TRISS), and causes of morbidity and mortality were examined. In posttraumatic follow-up period, intra-abdominal hematoma infection, emboli, catheter infection, and deep vein thrombosis were monitored as factors of morbidity. Results. One hundred nine patients were followed up and treated due to isolated solid organ injury following abdominal trauma. There were 81 males (74.3%) and 28 females (25.7%), and the mean age was 37.6 ± 18.28 (15-78) years. When examining the mechanism of abdominal trauma in patients, the following results were obtained: 58 (53.3%) traffic accidents (22 out-vehicle and 36 in-vehicle), 27 (24.7%) falling from a height, 14 (12.9%) assaults, 5 (4.5%) sharp object injuries, and 5 (4.5%) gunshot injuries. When evaluating 69 liver injuries scaled by CT the following was detected: 14 (20.3%) of grade I, 32 (46.4%) of grade II, 22 (31.8%) of grade III, and 1 (1.5%) of grade IV. In 63 spleen injuries scaled by CT the following was present: grade I in 21

  14. Maternal Obesity and its Short- and Long-Term Maternal and Infantile Effects.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Levent; Baştuğ, Osman; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2016-06-01

    Obesity, in childhood or in adulthood, remains to be a global health problem. The worldwide prevalence of obesity has increased in the last few decades, and consequently, the women of our time suffer more gestational problems than women in the past. The prevalence of obesity is greater in older women than in younger ones and in women with low educational level than in their counterparts with a higher level of education. Maternal obesity during pregnancy may increase congenital malformations and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Maternal obesity is associated with a decreased intention to breastfeed, decreased initiation of breastfeeding, and decreased duration of breastfeeding. We discuss the current epidemiological evidence for the association of maternal obesity with congenital structural neural tube and cardiac defects, fetal macrosomia that predisposes infants to birth injuries and to problems with physiological and metabolic transition, as well as potential for long-term complications secondary to prenatal and neonatal programming effects compounded by a reduction in sustained breastfeeding. PMID:26758575

  15. Life Satisfaction and Morbidity among Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Lukkala, Pyry S.; Honkanen, Risto J.; Rauma, Päivi H.; Williams, Lana J.; Quirk, Shae E.; Kröger, Heikki; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate associations between morbidity and global life satisfaction in postmenopausal women taking into account type and number of diseases. Materials and Methods A total of 11,084 women (age range 57–66 years) from a population-based cohort of Finnish women (OSTPRE Study) responded to a postal enquiry in 1999. Life satisfaction was measured with a 4-item scale. Self-reported diseases diagnosed by a physician and categorized according to ICD-10 main classes were used as a measure of morbidity. Enquiry data on health and lifestyle were used as covariates in the multivariate logistic models. Results Morbidity was strongly associated with life dissatisfaction. Every additional disease increased the risk of life dissatisfaction by 21.1% (p < .001). The risk of dissatisfaction was strongest among women with mental disorders (OR = 5.26; 95%CI 3.84–7.20) and neurological disorders (OR = 3.62; 95%CI 2.60–5.02) compared to the healthy (each p < .001). Smoking, physical inactivity and marital status were also associated with life dissatisfaction (each p < .001) but their introduction to the multivariate model did not attenuate the pattern of associations. Conclusions Morbidity and life dissatisfaction have a disease-specific and dose-dependent relationship. Even if women with mental and neurological disorders have the highest risk for life dissatisfaction, monitoring life satisfaction among aging women regardless of disorders should be undertaken in order to intervene the joint adverse effects of poor health and poor well-being. PMID:26799838

  16. Mortality and cancer morbidity among cement workers.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, K; Horstmann, V; Welinder, H

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To explore associations between exposure to cement dust and cause specific mortality and tumour morbidity, especially gastrointestinal tumours. DESIGN--A retrospective cohort study. SUBJECTS AND SETTING--2400 men, employed for at least 12 months in two Swedish cement factories. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Cause specific morality from death certificates (1952-86). Cancer morbidity from tumour registry information (1958-86). Standardised mortality rates (SMRs; national reference rates) and standardised morbidity incidence rates (SIRs; regional reference rates) were calculated. RESULTS--An increased risk of colorectal cancer was found > or = 15 years since the start of employment (SIR 1.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1-2.3), mainly due to an increased risk for tumours in the right part of the colon (SIR 2.7, 95% CI 1.4-4.8), but not in the left part (SIR 1.0, 95% CI 0.3-2.5). There was a numerical increase of rectal cancer (SIR 1.5, 95% CI 0.8-2.5). Exposure (duration of blue collar employment)-response relations were found for right sided colon cancer. After > or = 25 years of cement work, the risk was fourfold (SIR 4.3, 95% CI 1.7-8.9). There was no excess of stomach cancer or respiratory cancer. Neither total mortality nor cause specific mortality were significantly increased. CONCLUSIONS--Diverging risk patterns for tumours with different localisations within the large bowel were found in the morbidity study. Long term exposure to cement dust was a risk factor for right sided colon cancer. The mortality study did not show this risk. PMID:8457494

  17. Preconception maternal nutrition: a multi-site randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research directed to optimizing maternal nutrition commencing prior to conception remains very limited, despite suggestive evidence of its importance in addition to ensuring an optimal nutrition environment in the periconceptional period and throughout the first trimester of pregnancy. Methods/Study design This is an individually randomized controlled trial of the impact on birth length (primary outcome) of the time at which a maternal nutrition intervention is commenced: Arm 1: ≥ 3 mo preconception vs. Arm 2: 12-14 wk gestation vs. Arm 3: none. 192 (derived from 480) randomized mothers and living offspring in each arm in each of four research sites (Guatemala, India, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo). The intervention is a daily 20 g lipid-based (118 kcal) multi-micronutient (MMN) supplement. Women randomized to receive this intervention with body mass index (BMI) <20 or whose gestational weight gain is low will receive an additional 300 kcal/d as a balanced energy-protein supplement. Researchers will visit homes biweekly to deliver intervention and monitor compliance, pregnancy status and morbidity; ensure prenatal and delivery care; and promote breast feeding. The primary outcome is birth length. Secondary outcomes include: fetal length at 12 and 34 wk; incidence of low birth weight (LBW); neonatal/infant anthropometry 0-6 mo of age; infectious disease morbidity; maternal, fetal, newborn, and infant epigenetics; maternal and infant nutritional status; maternal and infant microbiome; gut inflammatory biomarkers and bioactive and nutritive compounds in breast milk. The primary analysis will compare birth Length-for-Age Z-score (LAZ) among trial arms (independently for each site, estimated effect size: 0.35). Additional statistical analyses will examine the secondary outcomes and a pooled analysis of data from all sites. Discussion Positive results of this trial will support a paradigm shift in attention to nutrition of all females of

  18. Fluid administration and morbidity in transhiatal esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Oliver S.; Arlow, Renee L.; Moore, Dirk; Chen, Chunxia; Langenfeld, John E.; August, David A.; Carpizo, Darren R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Esophagectomy is associated with significant morbidity. Optimizing perioperative fluid administration is one potential strategy to mitigate morbidity. We sought to investigate the relationship of intraoperative fluid (IOF) administration to outcomes in patients undergoing transhiatal esophagectomy with particular attention to malnourished patients, who may be more susceptible to the effects of fluid overload. Material and methods Patients who underwent transhiatal esophagectomy from 2000–2013 were identified from a retrospective database. IOF rates (mL/kg/hr) were determined and their relationship to outcomes compared. To examine the impact of malnutrition, we stratified patients based on median preoperative serum albumin and compared outcomes. Results and discussion 211 patients comprised the cohort. 74% of patients underwent esophagectomy for esophageal adenocarcinoma. Linear regression analyses were performed comparing independent perioperative variables to four outcomes variables: length of stay, complications per patient, major complications, and Clavien-Dindo classification. IOF rate was significantly associated with three of four outcomes on univariate analysis. Significantly more patients with a preoperative albumin level ≤3.7 g/dL who received more than the median IOF rate experienced more severe complications. Conclusions Increased intraoperative fluid administration is associated with perioperative morbidity in patients undergoing transhiatal esophagectomy. Patients with lower preoperative albumin levels may be particularly sensitive to the effects of volume overload. PMID:26319974

  19. Offspring of diabetic mothers. Problems of morbidity.

    PubMed

    Jährig, D; Stiete, S; Jonas, C

    1993-01-01

    In the past decade, malformation rates and life-threatening neonatal disorders of infants of diabetic mothers have been lowered to a marked degree. However, the remaining neonatal morbidity (metabolic and functional abnormalities and macrosomia) is still rather high. The meaning of these signs and symptoms for the further somatic development is unclear. A study comprising 443 neonatal infants of diabetic mothers was performed in order to quantify the morbidity. In 340 of the mothers, insulin treatment during pregnancy was based on HbA1c and blood glucose values; in the remaining 103 women, it was additionally controlled by measurement of insulin concentration in the amniotic fluid. A new classification of fetopathy at four different stages was established as a basis for further follow-up. In preparation of the latter, a pilot study including 160 infants in their fourth year of life was conducted to test the hypothesis that the further somatic growth is related to neonatal findings. The results demonstrate that the neonatal morbidity profile has changed with therapy. Metabolic control based additionally on insulin concentration in the amniotic fluid has resulted (1) in less infants with macrosomia and/or with striking phenotype but (2) also in a increase of small-for-gestational-age infants and of the frequency of hypoglycaemia. Only purely macrosomatic infants showed a tendency towards obesity and length acceleration in their fourth year of life. PMID:8314428

  20. Update: Acute Heart Failure (VII): Nonpharmacological Management of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Plácido, Rui; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    Acute heart failure is a major and growing public health problem worldwide with high morbidity, mortality, and cost. Despite recent advances in pharmacological management, the prognosis of patients with acute decompensated heart failure remains poor. Consequently, nonpharmacological approaches are being developed and increasingly used. Such techniques may include several modalities of ventilation, ultrafiltration, mechanical circulatory support, myocardial revascularization, and surgical treatment, among others. This document reviews the nonpharmacological approach in acute heart failure, indications, and prognostic implications. PMID:26169327

  1. Effects of pregnancy on maternal work tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Larry A; Charlesworth, Sarah A; Glenn, Nicole M; Heenan, Aaron P; Davies, Gregory A L

    2005-04-01

    This review summarizes current information on the tolerance of healthy pregnant women and their fetuses to acute strenuous exertion. Maximal aerobic power, expressed in L x min(-1), is not significantly affected in women who maintain an active lifestyle, whereas values expressed in ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) decline with advancing gestational age in relation to maternal/fetal weight gain. Efficiency during standard exercise testing and the ventilatory anaerobic threshold (Tvent) also appear to be unaffected by pregnancy, but the ability to utilize carbohydrate and exercise anaerobically during brief strenuous exercise may be reduced. Fetal responses to short strenuous exercise are usually moderate and revert to baseline values within approximately 30 min postexercise. Future studies should examine alveolar gas exchange kinetics at the start of exercise and during recovery from both moderate and strenuous exertion. Existing studies of the responses of pregnant women to prolonged exercise have focused primarily on substrate utilization and glucose homeostasis. Other maternal responses to prolonged exercise that should be examined include acid-base regulation, temperature regulation, fluid and electrolyte balance, and perception of effort. Fetal reactions should also be examined in relation to maternal responses. Until evidence-based, occupation-specific guidelines become available, it is recommended that pregnant women use the Joint SOGC/CSEP Clinical Practice Guideline: Exercise in Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period, published by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada and the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (2003). PMID:15981789

  2. Maternal Sexuality and Breastfeeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Alison

    2005-01-01

    In this paper I consider the ways in which lactation has been discussed as a form of maternal sexuality, and the implications this carries for our understanding of breastfeeding practices and sexuality. Drawing on knowledge constructed in the western world during the last half of the twentieth century, the paper identifies a shift between the…

  3. Maternal Attitudes. Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnischfeger, Annegret; Wiley, David E.

    This paper discusses ways in which maternal attitudes may serve as mediating variables linking social class characteristics of the family to the socialization of children. Reference is made to the Family Problem Scale (Ernhart and Loevinger) which provides a psychological characterization of social class levels on five dimensions or subscales:…

  4. Maternity Leave in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Joyce Yen; Han, Wen-Jui

    2010-01-01

    Using the first nationally representative birth cohort study in Taiwan, this paper examines the role that maternity leave policy in Taiwan plays in the timing of mothers returning to work after giving birth, as well as the extent to which this timing is linked to the amount of time mothers spend with their children and their use of breast milk…

  5. Complexities and Perplexities: A Critical Appraisal of the Evidence for Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection-Related Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Susana V.; Doi, Suhail A.; Gray, Darren J.; Soares Magalhães, Ricardo J.; McCarthy, James S.; Traub, Rebecca J.; Andrews, Ross M.; Clements, Archie C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Soil-transmitted helminths (STH) have acute and chronic manifestations, and can result in lifetime morbidity. Disease burden is difficult to quantify, yet quantitative evidence is required to justify large-scale deworming programmes. A recent Cochrane systematic review, which influences Global Burden of Disease (GBD) estimates for STH, has again called into question the evidence for deworming benefit on morbidity due to STH. In this narrative review, we investigate in detail what the shortfalls in evidence are. Methodology/Principal Findings: We systematically reviewed recent literature that used direct measures to investigate morbidity from STH and we critically appraised systematic reviews, particularly the most recent Cochrane systematic review investigating deworming impact on morbidity. We included six systematic reviews and meta-analyses, 36 literature reviews, 44 experimental or observational studies, and five case series. We highlight where evidence is insufficient and where research needs to be directed to strengthen morbidity evidence, ideally to prove benefits of deworming. Conclusions/Significance: Overall, the Cochrane systematic review and recent studies indicate major shortfalls in evidence for direct morbidity. However, it is questionable whether the systematic review methodology should be applied to STH due to heterogeneity of the prevalence of different species in each setting. Urgent investment in studies powered to detect direct morbidity effects due to STH is required. PMID:27196100

  6. Investigating financial incentives for maternal health: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Mary Ellen; Higgs, Elizabeth S; Koblinsky, Marge

    2013-12-01

    Projection of current trends in maternal and neonatal mortality reduction shows that many countries will fall short of the UN Millennium Development Goal 4 and 5. Underutilization of maternal health services contributes to this poor progress toward reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the quality of services continues to lag in many countries, with a negative effect on the health of women and their babies, including deterring women from seeking care. To enhance the use and provision of quality maternal care, countries and donors are increasingly using financial incentives. This paper introduces the JHPN Supplement, in which each paper reviews the evidence of the effectiveness of a specific financial incentive instrument with the aim of improving the use and quality of maternal healthcare and impact. The US Agency for International Development and the US National Institutes of Health convened a US Government Evidence Summit on Enhancing Provision and Use of Maternal Health Services through Financial Incentives on 24-25 April 2012 in Washington, DC. The Summit brought together leading global experts in finance, maternal health, and health systems from governments, academia, development organizations, and foundations to assess the evidence on whether financial incentives significantly and substantially increase provision, use and quality of maternal health services, and the contextual factors that impact the effectiveness of these incentives. Evidence review teams evaluated the multidisciplinary evidence of various financial mechanisms, including supply-side incentives (e.g. performance-based financing, user fees, and various insurance mechanisms) and demand-side incentives (e.g. conditional cash transfers, vouchers, user fee exemptions, and subsidies for care-seeking). At the Summit, the teams presented a synthesis of evidence and initial recommendations on practice, policy, and research for discussion. The Summit enabled structured

  7. Investigating Financial Incentives for Maternal Health: An Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Elizabeth S.; Koblinsky, Marge

    2013-01-01

    Projection of current trends in maternal and neonatal mortality reduction shows that many countries will fall short of the UN Millennium Development Goal 4 and 5. Underutilization of maternal health services contributes to this poor progress toward reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the quality of services continues to lag in many countries, with a negative effect on the health of women and their babies, including deterring women from seeking care. To enhance the use and provision of quality maternal care, countries and donors are increasingly using financial incentives. This paper introduces the JHPN Supplement, in which each paper reviews the evidence of the effectiveness of a specific financial incentive instrument with the aim of improving the use and quality of maternal healthcare and impact. The US Agency for International Development and the US National Institutes of Health convened a US Government Evidence Summit on Enhancing Provision and Use of Maternal Health Services through Financial Incentives on 24-25 April 2012 in Washington, DC. The Summit brought together leading global experts in finance, maternal health, and health systems from governments, academia, development organizations, and foundations to assess the evidence on whether financial incentives significantly and substantially increase provision, use and quality of maternal health services, and the contextual factors that impact the effectiveness of these incentives. Evidence review teams evaluated the multidisciplinary evidence of various financial mechanisms, including supply-side incentives (e.g. performance-based financing, user fees, and various insurance mechanisms) and demand-side incentives (e.g. conditional cash transfers, vouchers, user fee exemptions, and subsidies for care-seeking). At the Summit, the teams presented a synthesis of evidence and initial recommendations on practice, policy, and research for discussion. The Summit enabled structured

  8. Burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality following humanitarian emergencies: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Kaitlin G.; Sharma, Davina; Wardlow, Robert D.; Singh, Sonal

    2016-01-01

    Background The global burden of cardiovascular mortality is increasing, as is the number of large-scale humanitarian emergencies. The interaction between these phenomena is not well understood. This review aims to clarify the relationship between humanitarian emergencies and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Methods With assistance from a research librarian, electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Global Health) were searched in January 2014. Findings were supplemented by reviewing citations of included trials. Observational studies reporting the effect of natural disasters and conflict events on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in adults since 1997 were included. Studies without a comparison group were not included. Double-data extraction was utilized to abstract information on acute coronary syndrome (ACS), acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), and cardiac death (SCD). Review Manager 5.0 was used to create figures for qualitative synthesis (Version 5.2, Copenhagen Denmark, The Nordic Cochrane Centre). Results The search retrieved 1697 unique records; 24 studies were included (17 studies of natural disasters, 7 studies of conflict). These studies involved 14,583 cardiac events. All studies utilized retrospective designs: 4 were population-based, 15 were single-center, and 5 were multicenter studies. 23 studies utilized historical controls in the primary analysis, and 1 utilized primarily geographical controls. Conflicts are associated with an increase in long-term morbidity from ACS; the short-term effects of conflict vary by study. Natural disasters exhibit heterogeneous effects including increased occurrence of ACS, ADHF, and SCD. Conclusions In certain settings, humanitarian emergencies are associated with increased cardiac morbidity and mortality that may persist for years following the event. Humanitarian aid organizations should consider morbidity from non-communicable disease when planning relief and recuperation projects. PMID

  9. Maternal age and risk of labor and delivery complications

    PubMed Central

    Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A.; Krauss, Melissa J.; Spitznagel, Edward L.; Bommarito, Kerry; Madden, Tessa; Olsen, Margaret A.; Subramaniam, Harini; Peipert, Jeffrey F.; Jean Bierut, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Objective We utilized an updated nationally representative database to examine associations between maternal age and prevalence of maternal morbidity during complications of labor and delivery. Study design We used hospital inpatient billing data from the 2009 United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), part of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). To determine whether the likelihood that maternal morbidity during complications of labor and delivery differed among age groups, separate logistic regression models were run for each complication. Age was the main independent variable of interest. Results In analyses that controlled for demographics and clinical confounders, we found that complications with the highest odds among women, 11–18 years of age, compared to 25–29 year old women, included preterm delivery, chorioamnionitis, endometritis, and mild preeclampsia. Pregnant women who were 15–19 years old had greater odds for severe preeclampsia, eclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage, poor fetal growth, and fetal distress. Pregnant women who were ≥35 years old had greater odds for preterm delivery, hypertension, superimposed preeclampsia, severe preeclampsia, and decreased risk for chorioamnionitis. Older women (≥40 years old) had increased odds for mild preeclampsia, fetal distress, and poor fetal growth. Conclusions Our findings underscore the need for pregnant women to be aware of the risks associated with extremes of age so that they can watch for signs and symptoms of such complications. PMID:25366100

  10. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  11. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  12. Trends in Care Practices, Morbidity, and Mortality of Extremely Preterm Neonates, 1993–2012

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Barbara J.; Hansen, Nellie I.; Bell, Edward F.; Walsh, Michele C.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Wyckoff, Myra; Das, Abhik; Hale, Ellen C.; Ball, M. Bethany; Newman, Nancy S.; Schibler, Kurt; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Cotten, C. Michael; Watterberg, Kristi L.; D’Angio, Carl T.; DeMauro, Sara B.; Truog, William E.; Devaskar, Uday; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Extremely preterm infants contribute disproportionately to neonatal morbidity and mortality. Objective To review 20-year trends in maternal/neonatal care, complications, and mortality among extremely preterm infants born at Neonatal Research Network centers. Design, Setting, Participants Prospective registry of 34,636 infants 22–28 weeks’ gestational age (GA) and 401–1500 gram birthweight born at 26 Network centers, 1993–2012. Exposure Extremely preterm birth. Main Outcomes Maternal/neonatal care, morbidities, and survival. Major morbidities, reported for infants who survived more than 12 hours, were: severe necrotizing enterocolitis, infection, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, severe intracranial hemorrhage, cystic periventricular leukomalacia, and/or severe retinopathy of prematurity. Regression models assessed yearly changes, adjusting for study center, race/ethnicity, GA, birthweight for GA, and sex. Results Use of antenatal corticosteroids increased from 1993 to 2012 (348/1431 [24%] to 1674/1919 [87%], p<0.001), as did cesarean delivery (625/1431 [44%] to 1227/1921 [64%], p<0.001). Delivery room intubation decreased from 1144/1433 (80%) in 1993 to 1253/1922 (65%) in 2012 (p<0.001). After increasing in the 1990s, postnatal steroid use declined to 141/1757 (8%) in 2004 (p<0.001), with no significant change thereafter. Although most infants were ventilated, continuous positive airway pressure without ventilation increased from 120/1666 (7%) in 2002 to 190/1756 (11%) in 2012 (p<0.001). Despite no improvement from 1993 to 2004, rates of late-onset sepsis declined between 2005 and 2012 for infants of each GA (median GA 26 weeks, 109/296 [37%] to 85/320 [27%], adjusted relative risk [aRR]: 0.93 [95% CI, 0.92–0.94]). Rates of other morbidities declined, but bronchopulmonary dysplasia increased between 2009 and 2012 for infants 26–27 weeks (26 weeks, 130/258 [50%] to 164/297 [55%], p<0.001). Survival increased between 2009 and 2012 for infants 23

  13. Application of WHO ‘Near-Miss’ Tool Indicates Good Quality of Maternal Care in Rural Healthcare Setting in Uttarakhand, Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debabrata; Aggarwal, Pradeep; Nautiyal, Ruchira; Chaturvedi, Jaya; Kakkar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Women who experienced and survived a severe health condition during pregnancy, childbirth or postpartum are considered as ‘near-miss’ or severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM) cases. Women who survive life-threatening conditions arising from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth have many common aspects with those who die of such complications. Aim To evaluate health-care facility preparedness and perfor-mance in reducing severe maternal out comes at all levels of health care. Materials and Methods The present study was carried out over a period of 12 months under the Department of Community Medicine. The cross-sectional study included all the women (937) attending health-care facilities, at all levels of health care i.e. Primary, Secondary & Tertiary level in Doiwala block of Dehradun district. This study was conducted as per the WHO criteria for ‘near-miss’ by using probability sampling for random selection of health facilities. All eligible study subjects visiting health-care facilities during the study period were included, i.e. who were pregnant, in labour, or who had delivered or aborted up to 42 days ago. Results It was found that all women delivering at the THC received oxytocin to prevent postpartum haemorrhage. Treatment of severe post-partum haemorrhage by removal of retained products was significantly associated with levels of health care. Majority (94.73%) women who had eclampsia received magnesium sulfate as primary treatment. Conclusion Application of WHO ‘near-miss’ tool indicates good quality of maternal care in rural healthcare setting in Uttarakhand, North India. The women would have otherwise died due to obstetrics complications, had proper care not been provided to them in time. PMID:26894094

  14. Air pollution and respiratory morbidity among adults in southern California.

    PubMed

    Ostro, B D; Lipsett, M J; Mann, J K; Krupnick, A; Harrington, W

    1993-04-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation of the acute effects of air pollution in 321 nonsmoking adults residing in Southern California. Previous epidemiologic investigations of effects of acute exposure to ozone have focused on groups who may not be representative of the general public, such as asthmatics or student nurses. For this study, participants recorded the daily incidence of several respiratory symptoms over a 6-month period between 1978 and 1979. The authors examined the impact of ambient concentrations of ozone, particulate sulfates, and other air pollutants on the incidence of respiratory morbidity, measured as either upper or lower respiratory tract symptoms. Using a logistic regression model, the authors found a significant association between the incidence of lower respiratory tract symptoms and 1-hour daily maximum ozone levels (odds ratio (OR) = 1.22, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 1.11-1.34, for a 10 parts per hundred million (pphm) change), 7-hour average ozone levels (OR = 1.32, 95% Cl 1.14-1.52), and ambient sulfates (OR = 1.30, 95% Cl 1.09-1.54, for a 10-micrograms/m3 change), but no association was found with coefficient of haze, a more general measure of particulates. The existence of a gas stove in the home was also associated with lower respiratory tract symptoms (OR = 1.23, 95% Cl 1.03-1.47). The effects of ozone were greater in the subpopulation without a residential air conditioner. In addition, ozone appears to have had a greater effect among individuals with a preexisting respiratory infection. PMID:8484360

  15. Psychiatric Morbidity and Correlates in Postpartum Women in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narendra; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar Mysore; Koudike, Umashree; Majgi, Sumanth Mallikarjuna

    2016-01-01

    Background: A range of psychological disorders occur in women in the postpartum period apart from the traditional blues, postpartum depression and psychosis. These include obsession of infanticide, PTSD, morbid preoccupations regarding child birth and disorders of mother-infant relationships, though they are under emphasized. Methods: it is a cross-sectional study conducted in the tertiary maternity care hospital. A total of 152 study subjects were interviewed on MINI (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Inventory) and GAF (Global Assessment of Functioning) within 2 weeks after delivery. Results: The psychiatric morbidity was seen in 67 (44%) of the study subjects. About 26% of subjects had Depressive disorder NOS. Obsessive harm to the child, Panic disorder, Social phobia were the other disorders identified. There were no cases of Mania, Bipolar disorder, psychosis, post traumatic stress disorder or substance use disorder diagnosed across the sample. The Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score averaged 87.8. Statistically significant association was seen to be present between psychiatric illness and number of previous still births and dead children before this delivery (P = 0.045). Conclusions: The study reveals that psychiatric co-morbidity is very common in the postpartum period and can be detected as early as first week after delivery. Social phobia identified as a common association is a new finding and needs further replication. It needs a larger sample with a prospective assessment to generalize the findings of our study. PMID:27570341

  16. Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis: Therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Paulina K; Lucey, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) causes great morbidity and mortality in the United States and throughout the world. Advances in therapy have proven difficult. In part, this reflects challenges in diagnosis, including the distinction between AH and acute-on-chronic liver failure. Liver biopsy is the best method to clarify the cause in circumstances whereby conflicting clinical data confound the diagnosis. All treatment of AH begins with abstinence from alcohol. All patients with AH should be given sufficient nutrition. Prednisolone has become the principal agent for treating patients with severe AH. PMID:27373613

  17. Acute liver failure in pregnancy: Challenges and management

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Chandra Kant; Karna, Sunaina Tejpal; Pandey, Vijay Kant; Tandon, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) in pregnancy negatively affects both maternal and foetal outcome. The spectrum of liver disease in pregnancy may range from mild asymptomatic transaminitis to fatal and irreversible deterioration in liver functions leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. In this comprehensive review, we searched articles published as review articles, clinical trials, and case series in the Medline from 1970 to 2012. The overall outcome of ALF in pregnancy depends on the aetiology, timely diagnosis, prompt management, and early referral to a centre equipped in managing medical or obstetric complication. The foetal outcome is affected by the stage of pregnancy in which the mother has a deterioration of the liver function, with a worst prognosis associated with first or second-trimester liver failure. When ALF complicates pregnancy, liver transplantation is the one of the viable options. Management protocols need to be individualised for each case keeping in mind the risk versus benefit to both the mother and the foetus. PMID:25838585

  18. Tocolysis for acute preterm labor: does anything work.

    PubMed

    Haram, Kjell; Mortensen, Jan Helge Seglem; Morrison, John C

    2015-03-01

    The central rationale of tocolysis for preterm labor (PTL) is to delay delivery for at least 48 h to allow for transfer of the mother to a tertiary facility and for corticosteroids to induce surfactant production in fetal lungs. Beta-mimetics decrease the number of women in preterm labor giving birth within 48 h without reducing adverse neonatal outcomes. Calcium channel blockers inclusive of nifedipine decrease the adverse neonatal outcomes by significantly delaying delivery. Atosiban has the best maternal and fetal safety profile but does not seem to reduce neonatal complications. Magnesium sulfate is controversial as a tocolytic, but is valuable as a neuroprotective agent and for treatment of eclamptic seizures. Indomethacin may be a reasonable first choice for acute tocolytsis in gestational ages less than 32 weeks' gestation. Prolonged use (>48 h) should be avoided. Transdermal nitroglycerin can reduce neonatal morbidity and mortality as a result of decreased risk of birth before 28 weeks' gestation. Nifedipine may be a reasonable first choice because it is easy to administer and also of limited side effects relative to β2-mimetics. Tocolysis does not appear to significantly lengthen the gestational age beyond seven days. PMID:24990666

  19. Acute liver failure in pregnancy: Challenges and management.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Chandra Kant; Karna, Sunaina Tejpal; Pandey, Vijay Kant; Tandon, Manish

    2015-03-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) in pregnancy negatively affects both maternal and foetal outcome. The spectrum of liver disease in pregnancy may range from mild asymptomatic transaminitis to fatal and irreversible deterioration in liver functions leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. In this comprehensive review, we searched articles published as review articles, clinical trials, and case series in the Medline from 1970 to 2012. The overall outcome of ALF in pregnancy depends on the aetiology, timely diagnosis, prompt management, and early referral to a centre equipped in managing medical or obstetric complication. The foetal outcome is affected by the stage of pregnancy in which the mother has a deterioration of the liver function, with a worst prognosis associated with first or second-trimester liver failure. When ALF complicates pregnancy, liver transplantation is the one of the viable options. Management protocols need to be individualised for each case keeping in mind the risk versus benefit to both the mother and the foetus. PMID:25838585

  20. Maternal and fetal outcomes in term premature rupture of membrane

    PubMed Central

    Endale, Tigist; Fentahun, Netsanet; Gemada, Desta; Hussen, Mamusha Aman

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Premature rupture of membrane (PROM) is linked to significant maternal prenatal mortalities and morbidity. In Ethiopia, where maternal mortality is still high, the maternal and fetal outcomes in PROM is very important to decrease maternal and child mortality and for better management and prevention of complications. Thus, this study aimed to detect the maternal and fetal outcomes and associated factors in term PROM at Mizan-Aman General Hospital, south-west Ethiopia. METHODS: A retrospective cross sectional study was conducted using data available at Mizan-Aman General Hospital during a period of 3 years (January 2011 to December 2013). We examined records of 4 525 women who gave birth in the hospital; out of these women, 185 were diagnosed with term PROM and all of them were included in the study. The data of these women were collected using a checklist based on registration books. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 statistical package. The association between independent and dependent variables was assessed by bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. 95%CI and P value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Of the 4 525 women who gave birth in the hospital, 202 were complicated by term PROM. About 22.2% of the women showed unfavorable maternal outcomes. The most common cause of maternal morbidity and mortality was puerperal sepsis. About 33.5% of neonates experienced unfavorable outcomes. The duration of PROM >12 hours (AOR=5.6, 95%CI 1.3–24.1) latency >24 hours (AOR=2.8, 95%CI 1.7–11.8), residing in rural areas (AOR=4.2, 95%CI 3.96–29.4) and birth weight less than 2 500 g were associated with unfavorable outcomes. CONCLUSION: Women residing in rural areas, long latency, and neonates with birth weight less 2 500 g may have unfavorable outcomes. Therefore, optimum obstetric and medical care is essential for the reduction of the devastating complications related to disorders. PMID:27313811

  1. Acute Myocardial Infarction in the First Trimester of Pregnancy in a Great Grand Multiparous Woman with Poorly Controlled Chronic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Prasannan, Lakha; Blitz, Matthew J.; Rabin, Jill M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Acute myocardial infarction (MI) in pregnancy is a rare event, usually occurring late in gestation, either in the third trimester or in the puerperium. It is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Although diagnosis and management of MI in pregnancy has been discussed in the literature, management of pregnancy following an early antepartum MI, which may have more consequences for the fetus, has not received as much attention. Case  A 38-year-old great grand multiparous woman presented to the emergency department complaining of acute onset chest pain. The patient had a history of chronic hypertension and was an active smoker. She was incidentally found to be 5 weeks pregnant. She was diagnosed with an acute MI, which was treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Her subsequent pregnancy course was complicated by poorly controlled chronic hypertension, but she ultimately delivered a healthy newborn at 36 weeks of gestational age. Conclusion  Good pregnancy outcomes are possible after early antepartum MI, especially with early diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and a multidisciplinary team approach to prenatal care. Delivery should occur in a tertiary referral center with experience managing high-risk obstetric patients with cardiac disease. PMID:27551581

  2. Every death counts: electronic tracking systems for maternal death review in India.

    PubMed

    Purandare, Chittaranjan; Bhardwaj, Ajey; Malhotra, Manisha; Bhushan, Himanshu; Shah, Paramanand Keshavlal

    2014-10-01

    Maternal death review (MDR) is an important strategy to improve the quality of obstetric care and reduce maternal morbidity and mortality. MDR provides detailed information on various factors at community, facility, and district levels that influence maternal health outcomes. One of the key challenges is to analyze large volumes of data collected via a paper-based system that uses facility and community level forms. This database continues to expand quantitatively (multiple forms and data elements), which makes analysis of data increasingly difficult for timely management and analysis. The present paper describes the development process involved in linking the paper-based system with an electronic system for MDR in India. The lessons learnt from this experience can contribute to understanding how innovative technologies can be used to address large-scale public health issues in low-resource countries and in particular solutions to address maternal health. PMID:25262442

  3. Task shifting: A key strategy in the multipronged approach to reduce maternal mortality in India.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Himanshu; Bhardwaj, Ajey

    2015-10-01

    Task shifting from specialist to nonspecialist doctors (NSDs) is an important strategy that has been implemented in India to overcome the critical shortage of healthcare workers by using the human resources available to serve the vast population, particularly in rural areas. A competency-based training program in comprehensive emergency obstetric care was implemented to train and certify NSDs. Trained NSDs were able to provide key services in maternal health, which contribute toward reductions in maternal morbidity and mortality. The present article provides an overview of the maternal health challenges, shares important steps in program implementation, and shows how challenges can be overcome. The lessons learned from this experience contribute to understanding how task shifting can be used to address large-scale public health issues in low-resource countries and in particular solutions to address maternal health issues. PMID:26433512

  4. Quality of maternal healthcare in India: Has the National Rural Health Mission made a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Harish; Panda, Rajmohan

    2011-01-01

    Despite a five decade old Family Welfare programme, India still continues to contribute almost a quarter of the global estimates of maternal morbidity and mortality. Quality aspects in maternal health care have long been ignored in the Indian public health system. It is only with the launch of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) that quality of care has been accorded due recognition at the policy and planning levels of the national health programmes. Using review of available data sources and published literature, this paper aims to examine the scenario of quality of care in maternal health over the last decade and the impact of NRHM initiatives on the same. While NRHM has made efforts to address lacunae associated with quality of maternal care in the public health system, there is much scope for improvement. PMID:23198105

  5. Improving adolescent maternal health.

    PubMed

    Baxter, C; Moodley, D

    2015-11-01

    Each year thousands of adolescent girls and young women in South Africa (SA) become pregnant and many die from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. Although women of all ages are susceptible, girls<15 years of age are five times as likely, and those aged 15-19 years twice as likely, to die from complications related to childbirth than women in their 20s. In SA, non-pregnancy-related infections (e.g. HIV), obstetric haemorrhage and hypertension contributed to almost 70% of avoidable maternal deaths. In addition to the implementation of standardized preventive interventions to reduce obstetric haemorrhage and hypertension, better reproductive health services for adolescents, access to HIV care and treatment for women infected with HIV, and improved access to and uptake of long-acting reversible contraception are important ingredients for reducing maternal mortality among adolescents. PMID:26937508

  6. Maternal obesity and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S R; Kolberg, B H; Varner, M W; Railsback, L D

    1987-05-01

    We examined the risk of maternal obesity in 588 pregnant women weighing at least 113.6 kilograms (250 pounds) during pregnancy. Compared with a control group matched for age and parity, we found a significantly increased risk in the obese patient for gestational diabetes, hypertension, therapeutic induction, prolonged second stage of labor, oxytocin stimulation of labor, shoulder dystocia, infants weighing more than 4,000 grams and delivery after 42 weeks gestation. Certain operative complications were also more common in obese women undergoing cesarean section including estimated blood loss of more than 1,000 milliliters, operating time of more than two hours and wound infection postoperatively. These differences remained significant after controlling for appropriate confounding variables. We conclude that maternal obesity should be considered a high risk factor. PMID:3576419

  7. Maternal Hartnup disorder.

    PubMed

    Mahon, B E; Levy, H L

    1986-07-01

    We describe childbearing in two unrelated women with Hartnup disorder, an inborn error of neutral amino acid transport. Two living, unaffected offspring born after untreated and uneventful pregnancies, one from each woman, have had normal growth and development. The older one had an IQ of 92 at 4 years while the younger one at 4 months had a Development Quotient of 107 on the Mental Scale and 102 on the Motor Scale. A third offspring had a neural tube defect complicated by hydrocephalus and died at 3 months. This mother had a family history of major congenital anomalies. We think that this experience supports the view that Hartnup disorder in the mother, unlike phenylketonuria, does not have an adverse effect on the fetus. The presence of normal ratios of the amino acid concentrations between maternal and umbilical veins in one mother also suggests that placental transport of free amino acids, unlike renal transport, may not be reduced in maternal Hartnup disorder. PMID:3728570

  8. Perioperative morbidity of radical cystectomy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Jagdeesh N.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature on perioperative morbidity (POM) was done using Medline software with a combination of keywords like mortality, morbidity, and complications. In addition, we review the analysis of our hospital data of 261 Radical cystectomies (RCs) performed in an 11-year period and our latest clinical pathway for RC. Age range in our series was 50 to 81 years with 240 males and 21 females. RCs were performed by intraperitoneal method in 172 patients and by our extraperitoneal (EP) method in 89 patients. Urinary diversion was ileal conduit in 159 patients and neobladder in 102 patients. Blood loss ranged between 500 and 1500 ccs. Postoperative mortality occurred in eight patients (3%). Among the other early post-op complications, major urinary leak was seen in nine and minor in 11, requiring PCN in five patients and reoperation in four patients. Bowel leak or obstruction was seen in six and four patients, respectively, requiring reoperation in six patients. EP RC in our series showed some benefit in reduction of POM. The mortality of RC has declined but the POM still ranges from 11 to 68%, as reported in 23 series (1999-2008) comprising of 14 076 patients. Various risk factors leading to POM and some corrective measures are discussed in detail. However, most of these series are retrospective and lack standard complication reporting, which limits the comparison of outcomes. Various modifications in open surgical technique and laparoscopic and Robotic approaches are aimed at reduction in mortality and POM of RC. PMID:21814314

  9. Maternal filicide theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Mugavin, Marie

    2008-01-01

    The maternal filicide theoretical framework (MFTF) was developed to enrich the understanding of how traumatic experiences during formative years can affect a woman's relationship with her own child. Exposure to a known set of vulnerabilities can foster triggers that predispose a woman to respond impulsively and violently toward her child. Comprehensive assessment of vulnerable families is essential for the prevention of fatal and nonfatal abuse. The MFTF may be applied to both crimes. PMID:18522605

  10. Maternal-fetal conflict.

    PubMed

    Fasouliotis, S J; Schenker, J G

    2000-03-01

    Advances in prenatal care have brought about a greater understanding as to the special status of the fetus to the point that it is considered a patient in its own regard. Pregnant women generally follow the medical recommendations of their physicians that are intended for the benefit of their baby. Any situation where maternal well-being or wishes contradict fetal benefit constitutes a maternal-fetal conflict. Such situations include a broad range of possible interventions, non-interventions, and coercive influences. In such cases, the attending physician is expected to attain an attitude that involves either the respect of the woman's autonomy and right to privacy, which precludes any approach other than to accept her decision, or to modify this absolute for the beneficence of the fetus. Current ethical viewpoints range from absolute respect for maternal autonomy with no persuasion allowed, to gentle persuasion and to others which permit intervention and overriding of the woman's autonomy. Court-ordered decisions enforcing the pregnant woman to undergo a procedure in order to improve fetal outcome have been criticized as an invasion of a woman's privacy, limitation of her autonomy, and taking away of her right to informed consent. PMID:10733034

  11. Materno-infantilism, feminism and maternal health policy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Simone

    2012-06-01

    In the last days of 2011, President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff issued a provisional measure (or draft law) entitled "National Surveillance and Monitoring Registration System for the Prevention of Maternal Mortality" (MP 557), as part of a new maternal health programme. It was supposed to address the pressing issue of maternal morbidity and mortality in Brazil, but instead it caused an explosive controversy because it used terms such as nascituro (unborn child) and proposed the compulsory registration of every pregnancy. After intense protests by feminist and human rights groups that this law was unconstitutional, violated women's right to privacy and threatened our already limited reproductive rights, the measure was revised in January 2012, omitting "the unborn child" but not the mandatory registration of pregnancy. Unfortunately, neither version of the draft law addresses the two main problems with maternal health in Brazil: the over-medicalisation of childbirth and its adverse effects, and the need for safe, legal abortion. The content of this measure itself reflects the conflictive nature of public policies on reproductive health in Brazil and how they are shaped by close links between different levels of government and political parties, and religious and professional sectors. PMID:22789090

  12. Acute kidney injury in children.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Flechelles, O; Jouvet, P

    2012-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5% of critically ill hospitalized children and is a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality. The current review focuses on new definitions of acute kidney injury, standardized to reflect the entire spectrum of the disease, as well as on ongoing research to identify early biomarkers of kidney injury. Its also provides an overview of current practice and available therapies, with emphasis on new strategies for the prevention and pharmacological treatment of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome. Furthermore, a decision-making algorithm is presented for the use of renal replacement therapies in critically ill children with AKI. PMID:22495187

  13. Self Report Co-Morbidity and Health Related Quality of Life -- A Comparison with Record Based Co-Morbidity Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voaklander, Donald C.; Kelly, Karen D.; Jones, C. Allyson; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare three hospital-based measures of co-morbidity to patient self-report co-morbidity and to determine the relative proportion of outcome predicted by each of the co-morbidity measures in a population of individuals receiving major joint arthroplasty. Baseline measures using the SF-36 general health…

  14. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  15. Atrial natriuretic factor in maternal and fetal sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.Y.; Gibbs, D.M.; Brace, R.A.

    1987-02-01

    To determine atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) concentrations in the circulation and body fluids of adult pregnant sheep and their fetuses, pregnant ewes were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium, and the fetuses were exteriorized for sampling. ANF concentration, as measured by radioimmunoassay, was 47 +/- 6 (SE) pg/ml in maternal plasma, which was significantly higher than the 15 +/- 3 pg/ml in maternal urine. In the fetus, plasma ANF concentration was 265 +/- 49 pg/ml, 5.6 times that in maternal plasma. No umbilical arterial and venous difference in ANF concentration was observed. Fetal urine ANF concentration was significantly lower than that in fetal plasma, and was similar to that measured in amniotic and allantoic fluid. In chronically catheterized maternal and fetal sheep, fetal plasma ANF was again 5.1 times that in maternal plasma, and these levels were not different from those measured in acutely anesthetized animals. These results demonstrate that immunoreactive ANF is present in the fetal circulation at levels higher than those found in the mother. The low concentration of ANF in fetal urine suggests that ANF is probably metabolized and/or reabsorbed by the fetal kidney.

  16. Pre-eclampsia and long-term maternal health

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David

    2012-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a syndrome of pregnancy, defined by the gestational-onset of hypertension and proteinuria, which resolves postpartum. This definition does not consider the variable multiorgan involvement of a syndrome that can include seizures, fulminating hepatic necrosis and a consumptive coagulopathy. These disparate clinical features are a consequence of an accelerated but transient metabolic syndrome with widespread maternal endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. A trigger to this maternal state is the relatively ischaemic placenta. As pregnancy progresses, the concentration of vaso-toxic factors released by the relatively ischaemic placenta gradually builds up in the maternal circulation. Those predisposed to endothelial dysfunction, e.g. women with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, are more sensitive to these placental derived factors and will develop pre-eclampsia before natural onset of labour. A woman's vulnerability to pre-eclampsia is therefore composed of a unique balance between her pre-existing maternal endothelial and metabolic health and the concentration of placental derived factors toxic to maternal endothelium. Delivery of the placenta remains the only cure. Years later, women who had pre-eclampsia are at increased risk of chronic hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, thromboembolism, hypothyroidism and even impaired memory. This article describes how a brief, usually single episode of this acute pregnancy syndrome might both identify those vulnerable to chronic disease in later life and in some cases initiate chronic disease.

  17. Unruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy presenting with acute haemoperitoneum with combined intrauterine pregnancy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lallar, Meenakshi; Nandal, Rajesh; Sharma, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of rudimentary heterotopic uterine horn pregnancy varies from 1:76,000 to 1:140,000. However the incidence of twin pregnancy i.e. intrauterine pregnancy in unicornuate uterus and its associated rudimentary horn pregnancy is estimated to be around 1 in 10 million gestations. Case: Here, we present 19 year old pramigravida women with acute haemoperitoneum with diagnosis of unruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy combined by intrauterine pregnancy. The patient was managed with emergency laparatomy and resuscitation. Rudimentary horn containing foetus was excised and intrauterine pregnancy was left untouched. The intrauterine pregnancy was supported with progesterone and tocolytics and the patient delivered a newborn of 2.8 kg through spontaneous labor at 37 weeks of gestation. Conclusion: Heterotopic pregnancies incidence have increased in comparison to past and there should be high level of suspicion for this rare event as this is often associated with high maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality where diagnosis is difficult and challenging and easily missed. . Timely intervention provides survival of intrauterine pregnancy in case of twin pregnancy, even in low resource settings where usually the diagnosis is missed before acute event. PMID:25653676

  18. Changes in morbidity and medical care utilization after the recent economic crisis in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanjoong; Chung, Woo Jin; Song, Young Jong; Kang, Dae Ryong; Yi, Jee Jeon; Nam, Chung Mo

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine and quantify the impact of the recent economic crisis on morbidity and medical care utilization in the Republic of Korea. METHODS: 22 675 people from 6791 households and 43 682 people from 12 283 households were questioned for two nationwide surveys that took place in 1995 and 1998, respectively. A separate sample pretest-posttest design was used and we conducted c2 test and logistic regression analysis after controlling for the maturation effect of the morbidity and medical care utilization. FINDINGS: The morbidity rates of chronic disease and acute disease increased significantly by 27.1% and 9.5%, respectively, whereas the utilization rates of outpatient and inpatient services decreased by 15.1% and 5.2%, respectively. In particular, the pace of decline in the utilization rate of outpatient services varied depending on the type of disease: morbidity rates for mental and behavioural disorders were 13.7%; for cardiovascular disease, 7.1%; and for injury, 31.6%. CONCLUSION: After the Republic of Korean economic crisis, the morbidity and medical care utilization rates changed significantly but the degree of change depended on the type of disease or service. The time-dependent relationship between the national economy and the morbidity and medical care utilization rates needs to be further investigated. PMID:14576888

  19. Using survival analysis to determine association between maternal pelvis height and antenatal fetal head descent in Ugandan mothers

    PubMed Central

    Munabi, Ian Guyton; Luboga, Samuel Abilemech; Mirembe, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fetal head descent is used to demonstrate the maternal pelvis capacity to accommodate the fetal head. This is especially important in low resource settings that have high rates of childbirth related maternal deaths and morbidity. This study looked at maternal height and an additional measure, maternal pelvis height, from automotive engineering. The objective of the study was to determine the associations between maternal: height and pelvis height with the rate of fetal head descent in expectant Ugandan mothers. Methods This was a cross sectional study on 1265 singleton mothers attending antenatal clinics at five hospitals in various parts of Uganda. In addition to the routine antenatal examination, each mother had their pelvis height recorded following informed consent. Survival analysis was done using STATA 12. Results It was found that 27% of mothers had fetal head descent with an incident rate of 0.028 per week after the 25th week of pregnancy. Significant associations were observed between the rate of fetal head descent with: maternal height (Adj Haz ratio 0.93 P < 0.01) and maternal pelvis height (Adj Haz ratio 1.15 P < 0.01). Conclusion The significant associations observed between maternal: height and pelvis height with rate of fetal head descent, demonstrate a need for further study of maternal pelvis height as an additional decision support tool for screening mothers in low resource settings. PMID:26918071

  20. Morbidity in whooping cough and measles.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, S P; Phillips, R R

    1989-01-01

    Parents of 99 children who were admitted to hospital with whooping cough or measles, and of 50 children with whooping cough or measles who were nursed at home, were interviewed to determine the extent of morbidity and its effects on the family. Children admitted with whooping cough or measles spent a mean of 12.6 and 5.8 days in hospital, respectively. Time to full recovery was 13.7 and 2.1 weeks, respectively. Over a third of the children who were admitted were emotionally upset during the admission and for several weeks afterwards. Parental anxiety and exhaustion were common. Routine family life was appreciably disturbed. Advice from health care professionals, based on misconceptions of valid contradictions to immunisation, was the main reason for refusing vaccination. PMID:2817928

  1. Respiratory Morbidity in Late Preterm Births

    PubMed Central

    Hibbard, Judith U; Wilkins, Isabelle; Sun, Liping; Gregory, Kimberly; Haberman, Shoshana; Hoffman, Matthew; Kominiarek, Michelle A.; Reddy, Uma; Bailit, Jennifer; Branch, D. Ware; Burkman, Ronald; Gonzalez Quintero, Victor Hugo; Hatjis, Christos G.; Landy, Helain; Ramirez, Mildred; VanVeldhuisen, Paul; Troendle, James; Zhang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Context Late preterm births (LPTB, 34 0/7-36 6/7 weeks) account for a growing proportion of prematurity-associated short term morbidities, particularly respiratory, that require specialized care and prolonged neonatal hospital stays. Objective To assess short-term respiratory morbidity in LPTB compared to term births in a contemporary cohort of deliveries in the United States. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective collection of electronic data from 12 institutions (19 hospitals) across the United States on 233,844 deliveries between 2002 and 2008. Charts were abstracted for all neonates with respiratory compromise admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and LPTB were compared to term births in regard to resuscitation, respiratory support and respiratory diagnoses. A multivariate logistic regression analysis compared infants at each gestational week controlling for factors that influence respiratory outcomes. Main outcome measures Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN), pneumonia, respiratory failure, standard and oscillatory ventilator support. Results Of 19,334 LPTB, 7,055 were admitted to a NICU and 2,032 had respiratory compromise. Of 165,993 term infants, 11,980 were admitted to a NICU, 1,874 with respiratory morbidity. Respiratory distress syndrome decreased from 10.5% (390/3700) at 34 weeks to 0.3% (140/41,764) at 38 weeks. Similarly, TTN decreased from 6.4% (n=236) to 0.4% (n=155), pneumonia from 1.5% (n=55) to 0.1% (n=62), and respiratory failure from 1.6% (n=61) to 0.2% (n=63). Standard and oscillatory ventilator support had similar patterns. Odds of RDS decreased with each advancing week until 38 weeks compared to 39-40 weeks (adjusted OR at 34 weeks 40.1 [95% CI 32.0-50.3] and at 38 weeks 1.1 [95% CI, 0.9-1.4]). At 37 weeks odds for RDS were greater than 39-40 weeks (3.1 [95% CI, 2.5-3.7]), but the odds at 38 weeks did not differ from 39-40 weeks. Similar patterns were noted for TTN (adjusted OR

  2. Impact of reproductive laws on maternal mortality: the chilean natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Koch, Elard

    2013-05-01

    Improving maternal health and decreasing morbidity and mortality due to induced abortion are key endeavors in developing countries. One of the most controversial subjects surrounding interventions to improve maternal health is the effect of abortion laws. Chile offers a natural laboratory to perform an investigation on the determinants influencing maternal health in a large parallel time-series of maternal deaths, analyzing health and socioeconomic indicators, and legislative policies including abortion banning in 1989. Interestingly, abortion restriction in Chile was not associated with an increase in overall maternal mortality or with abortion deaths and total number of abortions. Contrary to the notion proposing a negative impact of restrictive abortion laws on maternal health, the abortion mortality ratio did not increase after the abortion ban in Chile. Rather, it decreased over 96 percent, from 10.8 to 0.39 per 100,000 live births. Thus, the Chilean natural experiment provides for the first time, strong evidence supporting the hypothesis that legalization of abortion is unnecessary to improve maternal health in Latin America. PMID:24844146

  3. Maternal cardiac metabolism in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Laura X; Arany, Zolt

    2014-03-15

    Pregnancy causes dramatic physiological changes in the expectant mother. The placenta, mostly foetal in origin, invades maternal uterine tissue early in pregnancy and unleashes a barrage of hormones and other factors. This foetal 'invasion' profoundly reprogrammes maternal physiology, affecting nearly every organ, including the heart and its metabolism. We briefly review here maternal systemic metabolic changes during pregnancy and cardiac metabolism in general. We then discuss changes in cardiac haemodynamic during pregnancy and review what is known about maternal cardiac metabolism during pregnancy. Lastly, we discuss cardiac diseases during pregnancy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy, and the potential contribution of aberrant cardiac metabolism to disease aetiology. PMID:24448314

  4. Termination of pregnancy and psychiatric morbidity.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, A C; Hannaford, P C; Frank, P; Kay, C R

    1995-08-01

    Between October 1976 and July 1979, 1509 general practitioners throughout the UK recruited 13,261 women with an unplanned pregnancy to a prospective study comparing the subsequent psychiatric morbidity rate in the women who underwent an induced abortion with that of the women with other pregnancy outcomes. There was no significant difference in the rates of total psychiatric disorder between women who underwent pregnancy termination and those who underwent childbirth. For example, among women who had no previous illness, the standardized rate of any psychiatric illness was 63.5/1000 woman-years for women who underwent abortion compared to 60.8-63.1/1000 woman-years for other women. In fact, the relative risk (RR) for every group was 1. Women with no history of psychosis faced a lower risk of psychosis after abortion than women with an unplanned pregnancy but who did not seek abortion (4.9/1000 woman-years vs. 11.8/1000 woman-years; RR = 0.4). On the other hand, the rates of psychosis requiring hospital admission for the two groups were similar. In women with no earlier history of psychiatric illness, deliberate self-harm (DSH) occurred significantly more often in women who underwent induced abortion (RR = 1.7) or who were refused an abortion (RR = 2.9). Drug overdoses comprised 89% of DSH cases. DSH was associated with a past history of DSH. It had an inverse trend with age. Women with no history of psychiatric illness had a significant increased risk of subsequent DSH whether they underwent abortion (RR = 1.7) or were refused abortion (RR= 2.9). These findings indicate that psychiatric morbidity after induced abortion is similar to that after childbirth. PMID:7582677

  5. What is the real impact of acute kidney injury?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common clinical problem. Studies have documented the incidence of AKI in a variety of populations but to date we do not believe the real incidence of AKI has been accurately documented in a district general hospital setting. The aim here was to describe the detected incidence of AKI in a typical general hospital setting in an unselected population, and describe associated short and long-term outcomes. Methods A retrospective observational database study from secondary care in East Kent (adult catchment population of 582,300). All adult patients (18 years or over) admitted between 1st February 2009 and 31st July 2009, were included. Patients receiving chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT), maternity and day case admissions were excluded. AKI was defined by the acute kidney injury network (AKIN) criteria. A time dependent risk analysis with logistic regression and Cox regression was used for the analysis of in-hospital mortality and survival. Results The incidence of AKI in the 6 month period was 15,325 pmp/yr (adults) (69% AKIN1, 18% AKIN2 and 13% AKIN3). In-hospital mortality, length of stay and ITU utilisation all increased with severity of AKI. Patients with AKI had an increase in care on discharge and an increase in hospital readmission within 30 days. Conclusions This data comes closer to the real incidence and outcomes of AKI managed in-hospital than any study published in the literature to date. Fifteen percent of all admissions sustained an episode of AKI with increased subsequent short and long term morbidity and mortality, even in those with AKIN1. This confers an increased burden and cost to the healthcare economy, which can now be quantified. These results will furnish a baseline for quality improvement projects aimed at early identification, improved management, and where possible prevention, of AKI. PMID:24952580

  6. Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Europeans represent the majority of international travellers and clinicians encountering returned patients have an essential role in recognizing, and communicating travel-associated public health risks. Methods To investigate the morbidity of travel associated infectious diseases in European travellers, we analysed diagnoses with demographic, clinical and travel-related predictors of disease, in 6957 ill returned travellers who presented in 2008 to EuroTravNet centres with a presumed travel associated condition. Results Gastro-intestinal (GI) diseases accounted for 33% of illnesses, followed by febrile systemic illnesses (20%), dermatological conditions (12%) and respiratory illnesses (8%). There were 3 deaths recorded; a sepsis caused by Escherichia coli pyelonephritis, a dengue shock syndrome and a Plasmodium falciparum malaria. GI conditions included bacterial acute diarrhea (6.9%), as well as giardiasis and amebasis (2.3%). Among febrile systemic illnesses with identified pathogens, malaria (5.4%) accounted for most cases followed by dengue (1.9%) and others including chikungunya, rickettsial diseases, leptospirosis, brucellosis, Epstein Barr virus infections, tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and viral hepatitis. Dermatological conditions were dominated by bacterial infections, arthropod bites, cutaneous larva migrans and animal bites requiring rabies post-exposure prophylaxis and also leishmaniasis, myasis, tungiasis and one case of leprosy. Respiratory illness included 112 cases of tuberculosis including cases of multi-drug resistant or extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, 104 cases of influenza like illness, and 5 cases of Legionnaires disease. Sexually transmitted infections (STI) accounted for 0.6% of total diagnoses and included HIV infection and syphilis. A total of 165 cases of potentially vaccine preventable diseases were reported. Purpose of travel and destination specific risk factors was identified for several diagnoses such as Chagas

  7. Maternal ethanol ingestion: effect on maternal and neonatal glucose balance

    SciTech Connect

    Witek-Janusek, L.

    1986-08-01

    Liver glycogen availability in the newborn is of major importance for the maintenance of postnatal blood glucose levels. This study examined the effect of maternal ethanol ingestion on maternal and neonatal glucose balance in the rate. Female rats were placed on 1) the Lieber-DeCarli liquid ethanol diet, 2) an isocaloric liquid pair-diet, or 3) an ad libitum rat chow diet at 3 wk before mating and throughout gestation. Blood and livers were obtained from dams and rat pups on gestational days 21 and 22. The pups were studied up to 6 h in the fasted state and up to 24 h in the fed state. Maternal ethanol ingestion significantly decreased litter size, birth weight, and growth. A significantly higher mortality during the early postnatal period was seen in the prenatal ethanol exposed pups. Ethanol significantly decreased fed maternal liver glycogen stores but not maternal plasma glucose levels. The newborn rats from ethanol ingesting dams also had significantly decreased liver glycogen stores. Despite mobilizing their available glycogen, these prenatal ethanol exposed pups became hypoglycemic by 6 h postnatal. This was more marked in the fasted pups. Ethanol did not affect maternal nor neonatal plasma insulin levels. Thus maternal ethanol ingestion reduces maternal and neonatal liver glycogen stores and leads to postnatal hypoglycemia in the newborn rat.

  8. Child Health, Maternal Marital and Socioeconomic Factors, and Maternal Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbarski, Dana; Witt, Whitney P.

    2013-01-01

    Although maternal socioeconomic status and health predict in part children's future health and socioeconomic prospects, it is possible that the intergenerational association flows in the other direction such that child health affects maternal outcomes. Previous research demonstrates that poor child health increases the risk of adverse…

  9. Maternal Depression, Maternal Expressed Emotion, and Youth Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompson, Martha C.; Pierre, Claudette B.; Boger, Kathryn Dingman; McKowen, James W.; Chan, Priscilla T.; Freed, Rachel D.

    2010-01-01

    Across development, maternal depression has been found to be a risk factor for youth psychopathology generally and youth depression specifically. Maternal Expressed Emotion (EE) has been examined as a predictor of outcome among youth with depression. The present study explored the associations between youth psychopathology and two…

  10. Viral competition and maternal immunity influence the clinical disease caused by very virulent infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Daral J

    2011-09-01

    The very virulent form of infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) causes an immunosuppressive disease that is further characterized by the rapid onset of morbidity and high mortality in susceptible chickens. In 2009, vvIBDV was first reported in California, U. S. A., and since that time only a few cases of acute infectious bursal disease attributed to vvIBDV have been recognized in California. In other countries where vvIBDV has become established, it rapidly spreads to most poultry-producing regions. Two factors that may be involved in limiting the spread or reducing the severity of the clinical disease caused by vvIBDV in the U. S. A. are maternal immunity and competition with endemic variant strains of the virus. In this study, the ability of vvIBDV to infect and cause disease in maternally immune layer chickens was examined at weekly intervals over a 5-wk period during which their neutralizing maternal antibodies waned. Birds inoculated with vvIBDV at 2, 3, and 4 wk of age seemed healthy throughout the duration of the experiment, but macroscopic and microscopic lesions were observed in their bursa tissues. A real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay also confirmed the presence of vvIBDV RNA in their bursa tissues, indicating this virus was infecting the birds even at 2 wk of age when neutralizing maternal antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus were still relatively high (> 2000 geometric mean antibody titer). No mortality was observed in any birds when inoculated at 2, 3, or 4 wk of age; however, inoculation at 5 and 6 wk of age resulted in 10% and 20% mortality, respectively. Three experiments on the competition between vvIBDV and the two variant viruses T1 and FF6 were conducted. In all three experiments, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) birds that were inoculated with only the vvIBDV became acutely moribund, and except for Experiment 1 (62% mortality) all succumbed to the infection within 4 days of being exposed. When the

  11. Emerging lessons from the FIGO LOGIC initiative on maternal death and near-miss reviews.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gwyneth

    2014-10-01

    This short paper describes some early findings from an overview of the maternal death or severe morbidity "near-miss" reviews that have been undertaken to improve clinical care by the eight societies participating in the FIGO Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) Initiative in Maternal and Newborn Health aimed at strengthening the role of professional obstetric associations. While it is expected that each will publish its own report, generalizable lessons emerged and valuable solutions were implemented that will help others planning such reviews and audits in future. PMID:25128930

  12. Maternal HIV infection influences the microbiome of HIV-uninfected infants.

    PubMed

    Bender, Jeffrey M; Li, Fan; Martelly, Shoria; Byrt, Erin; Rouzier, Vanessa; Leo, Marguerite; Tobin, Nicole; Pannaraj, Pia S; Adisetiyo, Helty; Rollie, Adrienne; Santiskulvong, Chintda; Wang, Shaun; Autran, Chloe; Bode, Lars; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Kuhn, Louise; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2016-07-27

    More than 1 million HIV-exposed, uninfected infants are born annually to HIV-positive mothers worldwide. This growing population of infants experiences twice the mortality of HIV-unexposed infants. We found that although there were very few differences seen in the microbiomes of mothers with and without HIV infection, maternal HIV infection was associated with changes in the microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Furthermore, we observed that human breast milk oligosaccharides were associated with bacterial species in the infant microbiome. The disruption of the infant's microbiome associated with maternal HIV infection may contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. PMID:27464748

  13. Ambient Temperature and Morbidity: A Review of Epidemiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaofang; Wolff, Rodney; Yu, Weiwei; Vaneckova, Pavla; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In this paper, we review the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity. We assessed the methodological issues in previous studies and proposed future research directions. Data sources and data extraction: We searched the PubMed database for epidemiological studies on ambient temperature and morbidity of noncommunicable diseases published in refereed English journals before 30 June 2010. Forty relevant studies were identified. Of these, 24 examined the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity, 15 investigated the short-term effects of heat wave on morbidity, and 1 assessed both temperature and heat wave effects. Data synthesis: Descriptive and time-series studies were the two main research designs used to investigate the temperature–morbidity relationship. Measurements of temperature exposure and health outcomes used in these studies differed widely. The majority of studies reported a significant relationship between ambient temperature and total or cause-specific morbidities. However, there were some inconsistencies in the direction and magnitude of nonlinear lag effects. The lag effect of hot temperature on morbidity was shorter (several days) compared with that of cold temperature (up to a few weeks). The temperature–morbidity relationship may be confounded or modified by sociodemographic factors and air pollution. Conclusions: There is a significant short-term effect of ambient temperature on total and cause-specific morbidities. However, further research is needed to determine an appropriate temperature measure, consider a diverse range of morbidities, and to use consistent methodology to make different studies more comparable. PMID:21824855

  14. Morbidity status of low birth weight babies in rural areas of Assam: A prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Madhur; Baruah, Rupali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Low birth weight (LBW) infants suffer more episodes of common childhood diseases and the spells of illness are more prolonged and serious. Longitudinal studies are useful to observe the health and disease pattern of LBW babies over time. Aims: This study was carried out in rural areas of Assam to assess the morbidity pattern of LBW babies during their first 6 months of life and to compare them with normal birth weight (NBW) counterparts. Materials and Methods: Total 30 LBW babies (0-2 months) and equal numbers of NBW babies from three subcenters under Boko Primary Health Centre of Assam were followed up in monthly intervals till 6 months of age in a prospective fashion. Results: More than two thirds of LBW babies (77%) were suffering from moderate or severe under-nutrition during the follow up. Acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) was the predominant morbidity suffered by LBW infants. The other illnesses suffered by the LBW infants during the follow up were diarrhea, skin disorders, fever and ear disorders. LBW infants had more episodes of hospitalization (65%) than the NBW infants (35%). Incidence rate of episodes of morbidity was found to be higher among those LBW infants who remained underweight at 6 months of age (Incidence rate of 49.3 per 100 infant months) and those who were not exclusively breast fed till 6 months of age (Incidence rate of 66.7 per 100 infant months). Conclusion: The study revealed that during the follow up, incidence of morbidities were higher among the LBW babies compared to NBW babies. It was also observed that ARI was the predominant morbidity in the LBW infants during first 6 months of age. PMID:26288777

  15. Associations between life conditions and multi-morbidity in marginalized populations: the case of Palestinian refugees

    PubMed Central

    Hojeij, Safa; Elzein, Kareem; Chaaban, Jad; Seyfert, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that higher multi-morbidity rates among people with low socioeconomic status produces and maintains poverty. Our research explores the relationship between socioeconomic deprivation and multi-morbidity among Palestinian refugees in Lebanon, a marginalized and impoverished population. Methods: A representative sample of Palestinian refugees in Lebanon was surveyed, interviewing 2501 respondents (97% response rate). Multi-morbidity was measured by mental health, chronic and acute illnesses and disability. Multinomial logistic regression models assessed the association between indicators of poverty and multi-morbidities. Results: Findings showed that 14% of respondents never went to school, 41% of households reported water leakage and 10% suffered from severe food insecurity. Participants with an elementary education or less and those completing intermediate school were more than twice as likely to report two health problems than those with secondary education or more (OR: 2.60, CI: 1.73–3.91; OR: 2.47, CI: 1.62–3.77, respectively). Those living in households with water leakage were nearly twice as likely to have three or more health reports (OR = 1.88, CI = 1.45–2.44); this pattern was more pronounced for severely food insecure households (OR = 3.41, CI = 1.83–6.35). Conclusion: We identified a positive gradient between socioeconomic status and multi-morbidity within a refugee population. These findings reflect inequalities produced by the health and social systems in Lebanon, a problem expected to worsen following the massive influx of refugees from Syria. Ending legal discrimination and funding infrastructural, housing and health service improvements may counteract the effects of deprivation. Addressing this problem requires providing a decent livelihood for refugees in Lebanon. PMID:24994504

  16. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  17. Assessing numbers and faces: a prerequisite for improving access to lymphatic filariasis morbidity care.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sören L; Fürst, Thomas; Addiss, David G; Utzinger, Jürg

    2015-06-01

    Concerted efforts to eliminate lymphatic filariasis worldwide have registered success; multiple rounds of mass drug administration have led to the interruption of transmission in many previously endemic areas. However, the management of patients with established clinical disease (e.g., lymphoedema, hydrocoele and acute dermatolymphangioadenitis) has not been addressed sufficiently. Two recent studies from Malawi underscore the need for accurate epidemiological and clinical data, and comprehensive morbidity assessments across various domains of daily life. Addressing these issues will guide the implementation of programmes to improve access to treatment and disability prevention for affected individuals in Malawi and beyond. PMID:25778735

  18. Acute renal failure in general surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Slapak, M

    1996-01-01

    The high mortality and morbidity can be significantly reduced by three cardinal steps: 1. Early diagnosis of intrinsic renal failure 2. Early institution of fluid restriction and dialysis 3. The identification of patients who are likely to be at high risk from acute renal failure, and the careful planning and institution of available therapeutic measures to prevent it. PMID:9155748

  19. Acute neonatal appendicitis in a preterm.

    PubMed

    Mammou, Sihem; Ayadi, Imen; Ben Hamida, Emira; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Acute neonatal appendicitis is very rare in the neonatal period. It is usually associated with comorbidity including prematurity. Symptoms are non-specific. The prognosis is marked by high risk of mortality and morbidity. Here, we report a case of preterm new born who presented with sepsis, apnoea, and digestive signs. The laparotomy revealed perforated appendicitis complicated with peritonitis. PMID:26712299

  20. Acute neonatal appendicitis in a preterm

    PubMed Central

    Mammou, Sihem; Ayadi, Imen; Hamida, Emira Ben; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Acute neonatal appendicitis is very rare in the neonatal period. It is usually associated with comorbidity including prematurity. Symptoms are non-specific. The prognosis is marked by high risk of mortality and morbidity. Here, we report a case of preterm new born who presented with sepsis, apnoea, and digestive signs. The laparotomy revealed perforated appendicitis complicated with peritonitis. PMID:26712299

  1. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  2. Maternal Gatekeeping: Antecedents and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaunt, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    This study examined maternal gatekeeping, its background and psychological antecedents, and its consequences for paternal and maternal involvement in child care. In sum, 209 couples with 6- to 36-month-old children completed extensive questionnaires. Analyses revealed that various dimensions of gate-keeping were differentially associated with the…

  3. Evolution of maternal effect senescence

    PubMed Central

    Moorad, Jacob A.; Nussey, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Increased maternal age at reproduction is often associated with decreased offspring performance in numerous species of plants and animals (including humans). Current evolutionary theory considers such maternal effect senescence as part of a unified process of reproductive senescence, which is under identical age-specific selective pressures to fertility. We offer a novel theoretical perspective by combining William Hamilton’s evolutionary model for aging with a quantitative genetic model of indirect genetic effects. We demonstrate that fertility and maternal effect senescence are likely to experience different patterns of age-specific selection and thus can evolve to take divergent forms. Applied to neonatal survival, we find that selection for maternal effects is the product of age-specific fertility and Hamilton’s age-specific force of selection for fertility. Population genetic models show that senescence for these maternal effects can evolve in the absence of reproductive or actuarial senescence; this implies that maternal effect aging is a fundamentally distinct demographic manifestation of the evolution of aging. However, brief periods of increasingly beneficial maternal effects can evolve when fertility increases with age faster than cumulative survival declines. This is most likely to occur early in life. Our integration of theory provides a general framework with which to model, measure, and compare the evolutionary determinants of the social manifestations of aging. Extension of our maternal effects model to other ecological and social contexts could provide important insights into the drivers of the astonishing diversity of lifespans and aging patterns observed among species. PMID:26715745

  4. Evolution of maternal effect senescence.

    PubMed

    Moorad, Jacob A; Nussey, Daniel H

    2016-01-12

    Increased maternal age at reproduction is often associated with decreased offspring performance in numerous species of plants and animals (including humans). Current evolutionary theory considers such maternal effect senescence as part of a unified process of reproductive senescence, which is under identical age-specific selective pressures to fertility. We offer a novel theoretical perspective by combining William Hamilton's evolutionary model for aging with a quantitative genetic model of indirect genetic effects. We demonstrate that fertility and maternal effect senescence are likely to experience different patterns of age-specific selection and thus can evolve to take divergent forms. Applied to neonatal survival, we find that selection for maternal effects is the product of age-specific fertility and Hamilton's age-specific force of selection for fertility. Population genetic models show that senescence for these maternal effects can evolve in the absence of reproductive or actuarial senescence; this implies that maternal effect aging is a fundamentally distinct demographic manifestation of the evolution of aging. However, brief periods of increasingly beneficial maternal effects can evolve when fertility increases with age faster than cumulative survival declines. This is most likely to occur early in life. Our integration of theory provides a general framework with which to model, measure, and compare the evolutionary determinants of the social manifestations of aging. Extension of our maternal effects model to other ecological and social contexts could provide important insights into the drivers of the astonishing diversity of lifespans and aging patterns observed among species. PMID:26715745

  5. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  6. Maternal health phone line: saving women in papua new Guinea.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amanda H A; Sabumei, Gaius; Mola, Glen; Iedema, Rick

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a research project which has involved the establishment of a maternal health phone line in Milne Bay Province of Papua New Guinea (PNG). Mobile phones and landline phones are key information and communication technologies (ICTs). This research study uses the "ICTs for healthcare development" model to ascertain benefits and barriers to the successful implementation of the Childbirth Emergency Phone. PNG has a very high maternal mortality rate. The "three stages of delay" typology was developed by Thaddeus and Maine to determine factors that might delay provision of appropriate medical treatment and hence increase risk of maternal death. The "three stages of delay" typology has been utilised in various developing countries and also in the present study. Research undertaken has involved semi-structured interviews with health workers, both in rural settings and in the labour ward in Alotau. Additional data has been gathered through focus groups with health workers, analysis of notes made during phone calls, interviews with women and community leaders, observations and field visits. One hundred percent of interviewees (n = 42) said the project helped to solve communication barriers between rural health workers and Alotau Provincial Hospital. Specific examples in which the phone line has helped to create positive health outcomes will be outlined in the paper, drawn from research interviews. The Childbirth Emergency Phone project has shown itself to play a critical role in enabling healthcare workers to address life-threatening childbirth complications. The project shows potential for rollout across PNG; potentially reducing maternal morbidity and maternal mortality rates by overcoming communication challenges. PMID:25923199

  7. Maternal Health Phone Line: Saving Women in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Amanda H.A.; Sabumei, Gaius; Mola, Glen; Iedema, Rick

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a research project which has involved the establishment of a maternal health phone line in Milne Bay Province of Papua New Guinea (PNG). Mobile phones and landline phones are key information and communication technologies (ICTs). This research study uses the “ICTs for healthcare development” model to ascertain benefits and barriers to the successful implementation of the Childbirth Emergency Phone. PNG has a very high maternal mortality rate. The “three stages of delay” typology was developed by Thaddeus and Maine to determine factors that might delay provision of appropriate medical treatment and hence increase risk of maternal death. The “three stages of delay” typology has been utilised in various developing countries and also in the present study. Research undertaken has involved semi-structured interviews with health workers, both in rural settings and in the labour ward in Alotau. Additional data has been gathered through focus groups with health workers, analysis of notes made during phone calls, interviews with women and community leaders, observations and field visits. One hundred percent of interviewees (n = 42) said the project helped to solve communication barriers between rural health workers and Alotau Provincial Hospital. Specific examples in which the phone line has helped to create positive health outcomes will be outlined in the paper, drawn from research interviews. The Childbirth Emergency Phone project has shown itself to play a critical role in enabling healthcare workers to address life-threatening childbirth complications. The project shows potential for rollout across PNG; potentially reducing maternal morbidity and maternal mortality rates by overcoming communication challenges. PMID:25923199

  8. The effects of gabapentin in two animal models of co-morbid anxiety and visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    O' Mahony, Siobhain M; Coelho, Anne-Marie; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Lee, Kevin; Winchester, Wendy; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2011-09-30

    Visceral hypersensitivity and an increased response to stress are two of the main symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Thus efforts to develop animal models of irritable bowel syndrome have centred on both of these parameters. The anticonvulsant gabapentin, which is widely used as an analgesic agent, also reduces anxiety. No data exists to our knowledge of the effects of gabapentin in animal models of co-morbid exaggerated stress response and visceral pain. Our aim was to assess the effect of gabapentin on stress and visceral hypersensitivity in two different animal models of irritable bowel syndrome. The animal models employed were the genetically susceptible Wistar Kyoto rat and the neonatally stressed maternal separation model. These animals were subjected to the open field paradigm to assess stress-induced defecation rates and colorectal distension to assess the level of visceral sensitivity. Gabapentin (30 mg/kg) prevented the stress-induced increase in faecal pellet output in the maternally separated rat, but not the Wistar Kyoto animals. On the other hand gabapentin (30 mg/kg) reduced the number of pain behaviours in response to colorectal distension in both models. These results show that whilst both models have similar responses to gabapentin in terms of visceral pain they differ in terms of their physiological response to stress. This indicates that the origin of anxiety and perhaps then visceral hypersensitivity differs in these models. Overall, these data suggest that gabapentin may be a useful treatment in disorders of co-morbid pain and an overactive stress system such as irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:21645509

  9. Postoperative respiratory morbidity: identification and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, C; Garrahy, P; Peake, P

    1982-04-01

    Two hundred consecutive patients admitted for general surgery were studied prospectively to evaluate the contribution of risk factors to postoperative respiratory morbidity (PORM). PORM was expressed both in terms of individual clinical features present on the second postoperative day (when the incidence was greatest), and as an aggregate score incorporating many clinical features. The importance of recognised risk factors, such as previous respiratory disease, cigarette smoking, upper abdominal procedures and the duration of surgery was confirmed, in that these factors were associated with some of the individual clinical features of PORM. The relative importance and independent contribution of these risk factors were assessed by their association with the aggregate score. A naso-gastric tube (NGT) present for 24 hours postoperatively was the factor more associated with PORM. The NGT identified patients at risk more clearly than, and independently of, the next most important factor, upper abdominal surgery. The duration of surgery did not contribute to PORM after the influence of NGT and site of surgery had been considered. Previous respiratory disease predisposed to PORM, and was best identified by, in order of importance, an observed productive cough, a reduced one second forced expiratory volume, and purulent sputum. After the incidence of these factors had been considered, cigarette smoking and a history of a chronic productive cough did not contribute further to PORM. PMID:6952867

  10. Morbidity profile of steel pipe production workers

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Kirti; Tiwari, Rajnarayan R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the different morbid conditions among steel pipe producing workers. Methods: The present cross-sectional study has been carried out among the workers of one of the steel pipes and tubes manufacturing factory of Gujarat. Hundred workers from the four major departments of the steel pipe production plant, namely welding, pressing machine, X-ray welding and loading/transportation department were covered. The information regarding demographic, occupational, clinical characteristics and diagnosis were recorded on a pre-designed proforma. Statistical analysis included calculation of percentages and proportions and was carried out using the statistical software Epi Info Version 3.3.2. Results: The mean age of the study subjects was found to be 38.7±7.1 years. The mean duration of exposure was found to be 9.0±3.4 years. Forty-four percent of the subjects had an upper respiratory tract infection, as evidenced by symptoms like dry cough, cough with rhinitis and cough with fever. Symptoms suggestive of allergic bronchitis were observed in 12% of the subjects while symptoms suggestive of heat stress such as prickly heat, dehydration, perspiration and pyrexia were observed in 13% of the subjects. PMID:20040985

  11. Psychological morbidity associated with motor vehicle accidents.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, E B; Hickling, E J; Taylor, A E; Loos, W R; Gerardi, R J

    1994-03-01

    Fifty victims of recent motor vehicle accidents (MVAs), who had sought medical attention after their accidents, were assessed for possible psychological morbidity as a result of the accident. Forty age, gender-matched controls were also assessed with the same instruments. Forty-six percent of the MVA victims met the criteria for current post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) as a result of the accident while 20% showed a sub-syndromal version (the reexperiencing symptom cluster plus either the avoidance/numbing cluster or the over-arousal cluster) of PTSD. Although all MVA victims showed some form of driving reluctance, only 1 S met the criteria for driving phobia. Those MVA victims who met the criteria for PTSD or sub-syndromal PTSD were significantly more likely to have experienced previous trauma, other than a serious MVA, and were more likely (P = 0.008) to have previously met the criteria for PTSD as a result of that trauma. Forty-eight percent of MVA victims who met the criteria for current PTSD also met the criteria for current major depression. Significantly more current MVA-PTSDs had suffered previous major depressive episodes. PMID:8192626

  12. [Acute abdomen in gynecology].

    PubMed

    von Hugo, R; Meyer, B; Loos, W; Dirmeier, H

    1988-09-01

    The aim of the present study is, to describe the morbidity and mortality of 196 patients with an acute abdominal condition who underwent surgery at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the TU Munich between 1982 and 1986. This is a percentage of 2.7 of all 7,167 operations carried out during this period. 118 of these patients had an extrauterine pregnancy and were therefore excluded from the study. The second group of 79 patients, mostly with inflammatory diseases, were analyzed. In most of these cases the acute abdominal condition was caused by a tuboovarian abscess (48.1%), followed by peritonitis because of a bowel-disease (11.4%). 6 patients suffered from an abscessing endometritis due to a caesarean section with sepsis in 5 cases. A generalized peritonitis occurred in 5 cases and was treated with a planned relaparatomy with lavage. 63% of the patients had no complications within 28 days after operation, 13% developed a subileus; in 7% a relaparatomy was necessary. 6% of the patients had problems of wound-healing. One patient with stomach-cancer died 3 weeks after the operation because of a fulminant lung-embolism. Thus the mortality rate was 1.5%. A further 27% were treated at the intensive care-unit and 18% needed artificial respiration. The average postoperative period of hospitalisation was 15 days. In comparison, patients with elective operations remained 13 days. The morbidity and mortality of patients due to surgery of an acute abdominal condition was relatively small; postoperative complications could be well treated in all cases and is probably the result of a positive and early indication for surgical intervention. PMID:3181709

  13. Psychiatric morbidity and depressive symptomatology in patients with permanent pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, O; Ozmen, E; Küey, L; Kültür, S; Yeşil, M; Postaci, N; Bayata, S

    1997-06-01

    Implantation of a permanent pacemaker requires a psychological effort on the patient's part for adaptation in the acute term, and chronically, it restricts activities of the patient and may cause some psychiatric disturbances. To investigate psychiatric morbidity and depressive symptomatology of the patients with permanent pacemakers, 84 pacemaker patients were diagnosed using the DSM-III-R criteria and depressive symptoms were determined by modified Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (mHDRS). Sixteen (19.1%) patients had been given a psychiatric diagnosis. The most frequent diagnoses were adjustment disorder (5.9%) and major depressive episode (4.7%). Nine patients (10.7%) were diagnosed as having clinical depression (mHDRS > or = 17). The mean score of mHDRS was 7.57 +/- 7.46, and the severity of depression was significantly higher in females. The most frequent symptoms are difficulties in work and activities (53.6%), psychic anxiety (48.8%), loss of energy (42.9%), and hypochondriasis and insomnia (39.3%). Depressed mood, psychic anxiety, loss of energy, loss of interest, insomnia, and hypochondriasis were significantly more frequent in females. Uneducated patients had a more significant loss of energy than educated patients. Depressed mood, psychic anxiety, and somatic concerns and symptoms were more frequent in patients with permanent pacemakers than in the general population. These symptoms, resembling mixed anxiety-depression disorder, were related to fears of having a permanent pacemaker, since our series were composed of uneducated patients who did not have enough knowledge about the device. PMID:9227759

  14. Nutrition and maternal, neonatal, and child health.

    PubMed

    Christian, Parul; Mullany, Luke C; Hurley, Kristen M; Katz, Joanne; Black, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    This article reviews the central role of nutrition in advancing the maternal, newborn, and child health agenda with a focus on evidence for effective interventions generated using randomized controlled trials in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The 1000 days spanning from conception to 2 years of life are a critical period of time when nutritional needs must be ensured; failure to do so can lead to adverse impacts on short-term survival as well as long-term health and development [corrected]. The burden of maternal mortality continues to be high in many under-resourced settings; prenatal calcium supplementation in populations with low intakes can reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia morbidity and mortality and is recommended, and antenatal iron-folic acid use in many countries may reduce anemia, a condition that may be an underlying factor in postpartum hemorrhage. Sufficient evidence exists to promote multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy to reduce fetal growth restriction and low birth weight. Early initiation of breastfeeding (within an hour), exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months of life, and vitamin A supplementation in the first few days of life in Asia (but not in Africa) reduce infant mortality. Biannual large-dose vitamin A supplements to children 6-59 months of age and zinc for treatment of diarrhea continue to be important strategies for improving child health and survival. Early nutrition and micronutrient status can influence child development but should be integrated with early responsive learning interventions. Future research is needed that goes beyond the 1000 days to ensure adequate preconceptional nutrition and health, with special emphasis on adolescents who contribute to a large proportion of first births in many LMIC. Thus, we make the case for integrating proven nutrition interventions with those for health in pregnant women, and with those for health and child development in neonates, infants, and

  15. [The morbidity of students and the ways of its decreasing].

    PubMed

    Medvedkova, N I; Medvedkov, V D; Ashirova, S V

    2012-01-01

    The lower level of health of youth and unfavorable ecological environment inputs drastically into children morbidity. Hence, the important value has rationalization of life style and decrease of parents 'morbidity. The article presents the main components of the total structure of students' morbidity and outlines the ways of its decreasing. The changes in the education process and health of students, special medical group and students, released of physical exercises are demonstrated. The dynamics of morbidity of students over 20 years in the ecologically relatively clean environment and in industrial megalopolis is analyzed. PMID:23373343

  16. Jejunioleal Bypass Procedures in Morbid Obesity: Preoperative Psychological Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Warren W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Seventy patients who averaged 155 percent overweight and requested jejunioleal bypass surgery as a treatment intervention for morbid obesity were studied preoperatively for prominent psychological characteristics. (Author)

  17. Maternal schistosomiasis: a growing concern in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Salawu, Oyetunde T; Odaibo, Alexander B

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains one of the most important tropical parasitic infections threatening millions of lives in endemic areas. Cases of infections due to Schistosoma spp, the diecious digenetic trematodes have been on the increase over the last decades. While considerable efforts have been made to reduce infections and morbidities in most endemic areas, these efforts seem to be tailored only towards a specific group (school-based resources). This bias towards school children in epidemiological studies has also been observed in various research efforts in sub-Saharan Africa, thus making it difficult to produce a reliable estimate of the extent of infection in other strata of the population at risk. In recent times, attention has been drawn to Schistosoma spp infections in infants and preschool children, while studies on epidemiology of maternal schistosomiasis still suffer neglect. Considering the potential morbidity of Schistosoma infections on the mothers, fetuses, and neonates, as evidenced in some animal models and human case studies, more attention is solicited in all areas of observational studies and clinical trials, for maternal schistosomiasis with the aim of providing relevant data and information for effective management of the disease during pregnancy. PMID:25223633

  18. Major Placenta Previa: Rate, Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes Experience at a Tertiary Maternity Hospital, Sohag, Egypt: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Salah Roshdy; Aitallah, Abdusaeed; Abdelghafar, Hazem M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Major degree placenta is a serious health issue and is associated with high fetal-maternal morbidity and mortality. Literature from developing countries is scant. Aim To determine the prevalence and maternal and neonatal outcomes among women with major placenta previa (PP). Materials and Methods A prospective descriptive study of 52 singleton pregnancies with PP was evaluated in this study. The study was conducted at Sohag University Hospital, Egypt from January through June 2014. Outcome measures, including the prevalence of PP, maternal and neonatal outcomes, and case-fatality rate. Results The total number of deliveries performed during the study period was 3841, of them, 52 cases were placenta previa. Thus, the prevalence of PP was 1.3%. The mean of previous cesarean scars was 2.2±1.4. Of women with PP, 26.4% (n=14) had placenta accreta. In total, 15.1% (n=8) of women underwent an obstetric hysterectomy. From the total no. of babies, 13.2% (n=7) were delivered fresh stillborn babies. Of the surviving babies (n=45), 20% (n=9) required admission to NICU. The frequencies of bowel and bladder injuries were 3.8% (n=2) and 13.2% (n=7) respectively. There was no maternal death in this study. Conclusion The rate of PP is comparable to previous studies, however, the rate of placenta accreta is high. Also, there are high rates of neonatal mortality and intraoperative complications which can be explained by accreta. The study highlights the need to revise maternity and child health services. PMID:26674539

  19. Effects of Shiga Toxin Type 2 on Maternal and Fetal Status in Rats in the Early Stage of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sacerdoti, Flavia; Amaral, María M.; Zotta, Elsa; Franchi, Ana M.; Ibarra, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2), a toxin secreted by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), could be one of the causes of maternal and fetal morbimortality not yet investigated. In this study, we examined the effects of Stx2 in rats in the early stage of pregnancy. Sprague-Dawley pregnant rats were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with sublethal doses of Stx2, 0.25 and 0.5 ng Stx2/g of body weight (bwt), at day 8 of gestation (early postimplantation period of gestation). Maternal weight loss and food and water intake were analyzed after Stx2 injection. Another group of rats were euthanized and uteri were collected at different times to evaluate fetal status. Immunolocalization of Stx2 in uterus and maternal kidneys was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The presence of Stx2 receptor (globotriaosylceramide, Gb3) in the uteroplacental unit was observed by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Sublethal doses of Stx2 in rats caused maternal weight loss and pregnancy loss. Stx2 and Gb3 receptor were localized in decidual tissues. Stx2 was also immunolocalized in renal tissues. Our results demonstrate that Stx2 leads to pregnancy loss and maternal morbidity in rats in the early stage of pregnancy. This study highlights the possibility of human pregnancy loss and maternal morbidity mediated by Stx2. PMID:25157355

  20. The Impact of Maternal Obesity on Maternal and Fetal Health

    PubMed Central

    Leddy, Meaghan A; Power, Michael L; Schulkin, Jay

    2008-01-01

    The increasing rate of maternal obesity provides a major challenge to obstetric practice. Maternal obesity can result in negative outcomes for both women and fetuses. The maternal risks during pregnancy include gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. The fetus is at risk for stillbirth and congenital anomalies. Obesity in pregnancy can also affect health later in life for both mother and child. For women, these risks include heart disease and hypertension. Children have a risk of future obesity and heart disease. Women and their offspring are at increased risk for diabetes. Obstetrician-gynecologists are well positioned to prevent and treat this epidemic. PMID:19173021

  1. Idiopathic Polyhydramnios: Severity and Perinatal Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Samantha L; Beamon, Carmen J; Chescheir, Nancy C; Stamilio, David

    2016-06-01

    Objective To estimate the association between the severity of idiopathic polyhydramnios and adverse outcomes. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of deliveries at one hospital from 2000 to 2012 with an amniotic fluid index (AFI) measurement ≥24 + 0 weeks' gestation. Pregnancies complicated by diabetes, multiples, or fetal anomalies were excluded. Exposure was the degree of polyhydramnios: normal (AFI 5-24 cm), mild (≥ 24-30 cm), and moderate-severe (> 30 cm). Primary outcomes were perinatal mortality, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission, and postpartum hemorrhage. Results There were 10,536 pregnancies: 10,188 with a normal AFI, 274 mild (78.74%), and 74 moderate-severe polyhydramnios (21.26%). Adverse outcomes were increased with idiopathic polyhydramnios: NICU admission (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.77-4.99), postpartum hemorrhage (AOR 15.81, 95% CI 7.82-31.96), macrosomia (AOR 3.41, 95% CI 2.61-4.47), low 5-minute Apgar score (AOR 2.60, 95% CI 1.57-4.30), and cesarean (AOR 2.16, 95% CI 1.74-2.69). There were increasing odds of macrosomia (mild: AOR 3.19, 95% CI 2.36-4.32; moderate-severe: AOR 4.44, 95% CI 2.53-7.79) and low 5-minute Apgar score (mild: AOR 2.24, 95% CI 1.23-4.08; moderate-severe: AOR 3.93, 95% CI 1.62-9.55) with increasing severity of polyhydramnios. Conclusion Idiopathic polyhydramnios is independently associated with increased risks of morbidity. There appears to be a dose-response relationship for neonatal macrosomia and low 5-minute Apgar score risks. PMID:26862725

  2. Maternal Phenylketonuria (MPKU)

    PubMed Central

    Schoonheyt, W.E.; Hanley, W.B.; Clarke, J.T.R.; Austin, V.; Howe, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Untreated maternal phenylketonuria (MPKU) is a major cause of microcephaly, congenital heart disease, intrauterine growth retardation and mental retardation in the offspring of mothers who have the disease. There is evidence, however, that dietary restriction of phenylalanine in the mother before conception and throughout the pregnancy will reduce the risk of these congenital anomalies in the fetus. It is important to be alert to this preventable cause of developmental retardation and congenital abnormalities in all pregnancies until the stage is reached where every woman of child-bearing age has been through the neonatal PKU-screening program. Family physicians are advised to consider prenatal or premarital screening for PKU of all female patients of child-bearing age for the next generation. PMID:21267327

  3. Neuroendocrine Regulation of Maternal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The expression of maternal behavior in mammals is regulated by the developmental and experiential events over a female’s lifetime. In this review the relationships between the endocrine and neural systems that play key roles in these developmental and experiential that affect both the establishment and maintenance of maternal care are presented. The involvement of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and lactogens are discussed in the context of ligand, receptor, and gene activity in rodents and to a lesser extent in higher mammals. The roles of neuroendocrine factors, including oxytocin, vasopressin, classical neurotransmitters, and other neural gene products that regulate aspects of maternal care are set forth, and the interactions of hormones with central nervous system mediators of maternal behavior are discussed. The impact of prior developmental factors, including epigenetic events, and maternal experience on subsequent maternal care are assessed over the course of the female’s lifespan. It is proposed that common neuroendocrine mechanisms underlie the regulation of maternal care in mammals. PMID:25500107

  4. Morbidly Adherent Placenta: Ultrasound Assessment and Supplemental Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Mahesh K; Dryden, Damla K

    2015-08-01

    Morbidly adherent placenta or placenta accreta is being increasingly encountered in obstetrical practice mainly owing to the increasing rates of cesarean delivery. This condition is associated with increased maternal morbidity and mortality resulting from postpartum hemorrhage. When unsuspected, outcomes can be catastrophic to the pregnant woman. Timely diagnosis during the antenatal period, on the contrary, allows for optimal planning of a multidisciplinary management approach and delivery at a tertiary care institution. A higher index of suspicion in those at greatest risk such as in women with placenta previa and with history of some prior cesarean deliveries should lead to diligent antenatal evaluation for possible placenta accreta. Management of invasive placenta implantation often involves cesarean delivery hysterectomies; uterus-sparing alternatives to manage this condition can be an option in selected cases. Ultrasound imaging remains the modality of choice for the diagnosis. This review article discusses the ultrasound image findings in placenta accreta, its limitations and pitfalls, and the supplemental role of magnetic resonance imaging in the imaging evaluation of placenta accreta. PMID:26296483

  5. Work and lifestyle factors associated with morbidity of electronic women workers in Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hwei-Mian Lim; Heng-Leng Chee; Mirnalini Kandiah; Sharifah Zainiyah Syed Yahya; Rashidah Shuib

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify sociodemographic, work, living arrangement and lifestyle factors associated with morbidity of electronics women workers in selected factories in Selangor, Malaysia. The research design was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey. Most of the 401 respondents were young single Malay women. Morbidity was high as 85.5% of the women reported experiencing at least one chronic health problem, and 25.7% said that an illness or injury prevented them from carrying out normal activities within the last two weeks. Major acute illness symptoms were the common cold, backache, and diarrhoea while chronic health problems such as persistent headache, eye problems, menstrual problems, and persistent backache were also reported. After logistic regression, chronic health problems was significantly associated with room sharing; while illness that prevented normal activities within the last two weeks was significantly associated with overtime work and exercise. Further research is recommended to understand the complex inter-relationship between morbidity and working and living conditions. PMID:12862411

  6. Morbidity Among Tribal Under-Five Children of Tea Garden Areas in a Block of Darjeeling District, West Bengal: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ishore, Kaushik; Das, Dilip Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background In the developing world, more than half of infant and childhood mortality is related to childhood diseases particularly- acute respiratory infections (ARI) and diarrhoea. The situation is worse among underprivileged population such as tribals and people living in tea garden areas. Aim To identify the morbidity pattern and the associated factors among tribal, under five, children living in tea garden areas of Darjeeling district. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in three randomly chosen tea garden areas of a block in Darjeeling District, West Bengal, India from September 2013-February 2014. The collected data was analysed using SPSS software and binary logistic regression was applied to test association between morbidity and other epidemiological correlates. Results Morbidity was noted among 74 out of 192 children studied. Major causes of morbidity were- diarrhoea (26%), acute respiratory infections (24.5%) and fever (16.7%). Proportion of underweight children according to their age was 64.4%. Morbidity status was found statistically significant with some factors, like- religion, socio-economic status, immunization status and number of siblings. Conclusion There is high prevalence of diarrhoea and ARI associated morbidity in this part of the country. PMID:26468469

  7. How are older maternal age and grand multiparity related to infant health?

    PubMed

    Haaga, J G

    1989-12-01

    Most of the studies that have shown excess risks of morbidity and mortality for infants born to older mothers or those at very high parity have used data from countries with low infant mortality rates, mainly in Europe and North America. In these countries, increasing numbers of women are delaying childbearing into their thirties and early forties, making the consequences of older maternal age for the infant an important public health concern. Grand multiparity, by contrast, is now exceedingly rare in those countries. In many developing countries, however, childbearing typically continues, even if it does not start, at older maternal ages, and grand multiparity is not at all uncommon, It is thus important for the design and targeting of maternal and child health and family planning programs to distinguish the effects of infant health of high parity from those of older maternal age, and of maternal age as such from those of primiparity at older ages. This review uses data from countries that now have low fertility and infant mortality rates as well as from countries where both rates are higher to assess the evidence for different mechanisms through which maternal age and parity affect infant health. PMID:12283074

  8. Caesarean Delivery and Postpartum Maternal Mortality: A Population-Based Case Control Study in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Esteves-Pereira, Ana Paula; Deneux-Tharaux, Catherine; Nakamura-Pereira, Marcos; Saucedo, Monica; Bouvier-Colle, Marie-Hélène; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2016-01-01

    Background Cesarean delivery rates continue to increase worldwide and reached 57% in Brazil in 2014. Although the safety of this surgery has improved in the last decades, this trend is a concern because it carries potential risks to women’s health and may be a modifiable risk factor of maternal mortality. This paper aims to investigate the risk of postpartum maternal death directly associated with cesarean delivery in comparison to vaginal delivery in Brazil. Methods This was a population-based case—control study performed in eight Brazilian states. To control for indication bias, deaths due to antenatal morbidity were excluded. We included 73 cases of postpartum maternal deaths from 2009–2012. Controls were selected from the Birth in Brazil Study, a 2011 nationwide survey including 9,221 postpartum women. We examined the association of cesarean section and postpartum maternal death by multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for confounders. Results After controlling for indication bias and confounders, the risk of postpartum maternal death was almost three-fold higher with cesarean than vaginal delivery (OR 2.87, 95% CI 1.63–5.06), mainly due to deaths from postpartum hemorrhage and complications of anesthesia. Conclusion Cesarean delivery is an independent risk factor of postpartum maternal death. Clinicians and patients should consider this fact in balancing the benefits and risks of the procedure. PMID:27073870

  9. Medical disease as a cause of maternal mortality: the pre-imminence of cardiovascular pathology.

    PubMed

    Mocumbi, A O; Sliwa, K; Soma-Pillay, P

    2016-01-01

    Maternal mortality ratio in low- to middle-income countries (LMIC) is 14 times higher than in high-income countries. This is partially due to lack of antenatal care, unmet needs for family planning and education, as well as low rates of birth managed by skilled attendants. While direct causes of maternal death such as complications of hypertension, obstetric haemorrhage and sepsis remain the largest cause of maternal death in LMICs, cardiovascular disease emerges as an important contributor to maternal mortality in both developing countries and the developed world, hampering the achievement of the millennium development goal 5, which aimed at reducing by three-quarters the maternal mortality ratio until the end of 2015. Systematic search for cardiac disease is usually not performed during pregnancy in LMICs despite hypertensive disease, rheumatic heart disease and cardiomyopathies being recognised as major health problems in these settings. New concern has been rising due to both the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Undetected or untreated congenital heart defects, undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension, uncontrolled heart failure and complications of sickle cell disease may also be important challenges. This article discusses issues related to the role of cardiovascular disease in determining a substantial portion of maternal morbidity and mortality. It also presents an algorhitm to be used for suspected and previously known cardiac disease in pregnancy in the context of LIMCs. PMID:27213855

  10. Changing picture of acute kidney injury in pregnancy: Study of 259 cases over a period of 33 years.

    PubMed

    Prakash, J; Pant, P; Prakash, S; Sivasankar, M; Vohra, R; Doley, P K; Pandey, L K; Singh, U

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in pregnancy is declining in developing countries but still remains a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to analyze the changing trends in pregnancy related AKI (PR-AKI) over a period of thirty-three years. Clinical characteristics of PR-AKI with respect to incidence, etiology and fetal and maternal outcomes were compared in three study periods, namely 1982-1991,1992-2002 and 2003-2014. The incidence of PR-AKI decreased to 10.4% in 1992-2002, from 15.2% in 1982-1991, with declining trend continuing in 2003-2014 (4.68%).Postabortal AKI decreased to 1.49% in 2003-2014 from 9.4% in 1982-1991of total AKI cases. The AKI related to puerperal sepsis increased to 1.56% of all AKI cases in 2003-2014 from 1.4% in 1982-1991. Preeclampsia/eclampsia associated AKI decreased from 3.5% of total AKI cases in 1982-1991 to 0.54% in 2003-2014. Pregnancy associated - thrombotic microangiopathy and acute fatty liver of pregnancy were uncommon causes of AKI. Hyperemesis gravidarum associated AKI was not observed in our study. Incidence of renal cortical necrosis (RCN) decreased to 1.4% in 2003-2014 from 17% in 1982-1991.Maternal mortality reduced to 5.79% from initial high value 20% in 1982-1991. The progression of PR-AKI to ESRD decreased to1.4% in 2003-2014 from 6.15% in 1982-1991. The incidence of PR-AKI has decreased over last three decades, mainly due to decrease in incidence of postabortal AKI. Puerperal sepsis and obstetric hemorrhage were the major causes of PR-AKI followed by preeclampsia in late pregnancy. Maternal mortality and incidence and severity of RCN have significantly decreased in PR-AKI. The progression to CKD and ESRD has decreased in women with AKI in pregnancy in recent decade. However, the perinatal mortality did not change throughout study period. PMID:27512298

  11. Changing picture of acute kidney injury in pregnancy: Study of 259 cases over a period of 33 years

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, J.; Pant, P.; Prakash, S.; Sivasankar, M.; Vohra, R.; Doley, P. K.; Pandey, L. K.; Singh, U.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in pregnancy is declining in developing countries but still remains a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to analyze the changing trends in pregnancy related AKI (PR-AKI) over a period of thirty-three years. Clinical characteristics of PR-AKI with respect to incidence, etiology and fetal and maternal outcomes were compared in three study periods, namely 1982-1991,1992-2002 and 2003-2014. The incidence of PR-AKI decreased to 10.4% in 1992-2002, from 15.2% in 1982-1991, with declining trend continuing in 2003-2014 (4.68%).Postabortal AKI decreased to 1.49% in 2003-2014 from 9.4% in 1982-1991of total AKI cases. The AKI related to puerperal sepsis increased to 1.56% of all AKI cases in 2003-2014 from 1.4% in 1982-1991. Preeclampsia/eclampsia associated AKI decreased from 3.5% of total AKI cases in 1982-1991 to 0.54% in 2003-2014. Pregnancy associated – thrombotic microangiopathy and acute fatty liver of pregnancy were uncommon causes of AKI. Hyperemesis gravidarum associated AKI was not observed in our study. Incidence of renal cortical necrosis (RCN) decreased to 1.4% in 2003-2014 from 17% in 1982-1991.Maternal mortality reduced to 5.79% from initial high value 20% in 1982-1991. The progression of PR-AKI to ESRD decreased to1.4% in 2003-2014 from 6.15% in 1982-1991. The incidence of PR-AKI has decreased over last three decades, mainly due to decrease in incidence of postabortal AKI. Puerperal sepsis and obstetric hemorrhage were the major causes of PR-AKI followed by preeclampsia in late pregnancy. Maternal mortality and incidence and severity of RCN have significantly decreased in PR-AKI. The progression to CKD and ESRD has decreased in women with AKI in pregnancy in recent decade. However, the perinatal mortality did not change throughout study period. PMID:27512298

  12. Prospective study of healthcare utilisation and respiratory morbidity due to RSV infection in prematurely born infants

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, S; Roberts, A; Fox, G; Pollina, E; Zuckerman, M; Chaudhry, S; Greenough, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: A study was undertaken to determine the impact of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, both in hospital and the community, on healthcare utilisation and respiratory morbidity in prematurely born infants and to identify risk factors for symptomatic RSV infection. Methods: A hospital and community follow up study was undertaken of 126 infants born before 32 weeks of gestational age. Healthcare utilisation (hospital admissions and general practitioner attendances) in the first year, respiratory morbidity at follow up (wheeze and cough documented by parent completed diary cards), and RSV positive lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) were documented. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained for immunofluorescence and culture for RSV whenever the infants had an LRTI, either in the community or in hospital. Results: Forty two infants had an RSV positive LRTI (RSV group), 50 had an RSV negative LRTI (RSV negative LRTI group), and 32 infants had no LRTI (no LRTI group). Compared with the RSV negative LRTI and the no LRTI groups, the RSV group required more admissions (p = 0.392, p<0.001) and days in hospital (p = 0.049, p = 0.006) and had more cough (p = 0.05, p = 0.038) and wheeze (p = 0.003, p = 0.003) at follow up. Significant risk factors for symptomatic RSV LRTI were number of siblings (p = 0.035) and maternal smoking in pregnancy (p = 0.005), for cough were number of siblings (p = 0.002) and RSV LRTI (p = 0.02), and for wheeze was RSV LRTI (p = 0.019). Conclusion: RSV infection, even if hospital admission is not required, is associated with increased subsequent respiratory morbidity in prematurely born infants. PMID:16227330

  13. Effects of prenatal stress on maternal behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Patin, V; Lordi, B; Vincent, A; Thoumas, J L; Vaudry, H; Caston, J

    2002-11-15

    Some authors reported a link between maternal stress and disturbances in their infants. Because of difficulties due to human research, the effects of prenatal stress have to be examined in animal models. Our approach was original in that the stressor was an ecological one and was applied at a given gestational day. Indeed, the stressor was a cat and the effects of stress on maternal behavior were investigated in five groups of 10 female rats: two groups were composed of females which were acutely stressed either at the 10th or the 14th gestational day; two other groups were composed of females which were repeatedly stressed either at the 10th or the 14th gestational day; the fifth group comprised non-stressed females. Plasma corticosterone concentrations measured in blood samples collected from dams just after stress were significantly higher than in controls showing that cat represents an efficient stressor for rats. Maternal behavior was recorded during 30 min at the 2nd, 4th, and 6th postnatal days. In all cases, stressed dams' activities directly directed towards the pups (retrieving, sniffing and licking), those non-directly directed towards the pups (carrying its tail and digging the sawdust), and those directed towards themselves (eating, drinking and resting) were altered to different degrees. These alterations in maternal behavior can explain, at least in part, the mortality and the low growth rate observed in pups born from stressed dams. PMID:12414088

  14. Maternal and child health in Yushu, Qinghai Province, China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Surmang, Qinghai Province is a rural nomadic Tibetan region in western China recently devastated by the 2010 Yushu earthquake; little information is available on access and coverage of maternal and child health services. Methods A cross-sectional household survey was conducted in August 2004. 402 women of reproductive age (15-50) were interviewed regarding their pregnancy history, access to and utilization of health care, and infant and child health care practices. Results Women's access to education was low at 15% for any formal schooling; adult female literacy was <20%. One third of women received any antenatal care during their last pregnancy. Institutional delivery and skilled birth attendance were <1%, and there were no reported cesarean deliveries. Birth was commonly attended by a female relative, and 8% of women delivered alone. Use of unsterilized instrument to cut the umbilical cord was nearly universal (94%), while coverage for tetanus toxoid immunization was only 14%. Traditional Tibetan healers were frequently sought for problems during pregnancy (70%), the postpartum period (87%), and for childhood illnesses (74%). Western medicine (61%) was preferred over Tibetan medicine (9%) for preventive antenatal care. The average time to reach a health facility was 4.3 hours. Postpartum infectious morbidity appeared to be high, but only 3% of women with postpartum problems received western medical care. 64% of recently pregnant women reported that they were very worried about dying in childbirth. The community reported 3 maternal deaths and 103 live births in the 19 months prior to the survey. Conclusions While China is on track to achieve national Millennium Development Goal targets for maternal and child health, women and children in Surmang suffer from substantial health inequities in access to antenatal, skilled birth and postpartum care. Institutional delivery, skilled attendance and cesarean delivery are virtually inaccessible, and

  15. Morbidity and Hospitalizations of Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenbaum, Ariel; Chavkin, Maor; Wexler, Isaiah D.; Korem, Maya; Merrick, Joav

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade a significant increase in the life expectancy of people with Down syndrome (DS) has been observed, which has caused a higher incidence of morbidity as they age. However, there is a lack of literature regarding morbidity and hospitalization of adults with DS. Analysis of 297 hospitalizations of 120 adults with DS aged 18-73…

  16. TRICARE Program; surgery for morbid obesity. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2011-02-14

    This final rule adds a definition of Bariatric Surgery, amends the definition of Morbid Obesity, and revises the language relating to the treatment of morbid obesity to allow benefit consideration for newer bariatric surgical procedures that are considered appropriate medical care. The final rule removes language that specifically limits the types of surgical procedures to treat co-morbid conditions associated with morbid obesity and retains the TRICARE Program exclusion of non-surgical interventions related to morbid obesity, obesity and/or weight reduction. This final rule is necessary to allow coverage for other surgical procedures that reduce or resolve co-morbid conditions associated with morbid obesity and the use of the Body Mass Index (BMI), which is the more accurate measure for excess weight to estimate relative risk of disease. As new technologies or procedures evolve from investigational into generally accepted norms for medical practice, the statutes and regulations governing the TRICARE Program allow the Department to offer beneficiaries these new benefits. These changes are required in order to allow the Department to provide these newer technologies and procedures for the treatment of morbid obesity as they evolve. PMID:21348347

  17. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 61, Number 31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Ronald L., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data presented by the Notifiable Disease Data Team and 122 Cities Mortality Data Team in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "Morbidity and…

  18. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 61, Number 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Ronald L., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data presented by the Notifiable Disease Data Team and 122 Cities Mortality Data Team in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "Morbidity and…

  19. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 60, Number 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Ronald L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data presented by the Notifiable Disease Data Team and 122 Cities Mortality Data Team in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "Morbidity and…

  20. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 60, Number 23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data presented by the Notifiable Disease Data Team and 122 Cities Mortality Data Team in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "Morbidity and…

  1. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 61, Number 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Ronald L., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data presented by the Notifiable Disease Data Team and 122 Cities Mortality Data Team in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "Morbidity and…

  2. The New Morbidity: A National Plan of Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumeister, Alfred A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discusses child morbidity, suggesting solutions can be found at the community level. Argues the federal government's role is essential in articulating policy and providing resources. Generates a new morbidity model emphasizing poverty and social factors as crucial influences. Lists priorities for effective, preventive, intervention planning. (NL)

  3. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 61, Number 33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Ronald L., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data presented by the Notifiable Disease Data Team and 122 Cities Mortality Data Team in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "Morbidity and…

  4. Maternal Education and Immunization Status Among Children in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Onsomu, Elijah O; Abuya, Benta A; Okech, Irene N; Moore, DaKysha; Collins-McNeil, Janice

    2015-08-01

    Child morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases continues to be a major threat and public health concern worldwide. Although global vaccination coverage reached 90 % for diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTP3) across 129 countries, Kenya and other sub-Saharan countries continue to experience under-vaccination. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between maternal education and child immunization (12-23 months) in Kenya. This study used retrospective cross-sectional data from the 2008-2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey for women aged 15-49, who had children aged 12-23 months, and who answered questions about vaccination in the survey (n = 1,707). The majority of the children had received vaccinations, with 77 % for poliomyelitis, 74 % for measles, 94 % for tuberculosis, and 91 % for diphtheria, whooping cough (pertussis), and tetanus. After adjusting for other covariates, women with primary, secondary, and college/university education were between 2.21 (p < 0.01) and 9.10 (p < 0.001) times more likely to immunize their children than those who had less than a primary education. Maternal education is clearly crucial in ensuring good health outcomes among children, and integrating immunization knowledge with maternal and child health services is imperative. More research is needed to identify factors influencing immunization decisions among less-educated women in Kenya. PMID:25636652

  5. REPEATED MATERNAL SEPARATION IN THE NEONATAL RAT: CELLULAR MECHANISMS CONTRIBUTING TO BRAIN GROWTH SPARING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Separation of rat neonates from their dam has been shown to evoke acutely a variety of biochemical and physiological responses. n the current study, we examined whether these responses were extended to pups who were subject to daily episodes of maternal deprivation, and whether t...

  6. [Contemporary work conditions and occupational morbidity in metallurgists].

    PubMed

    Chebotarev, A G; Prokhorov, V A

    2012-01-01

    Based on analysis of materials provided by Central Council of Russian Federal Coal Miners Trade Union, the authors assessed contemporary work conditions and occupational morbidity among workers engaged into iron industry. In these enterprises, a total of 68.4% of certified workplaces are assigned to hazardous and jeopardy class (3 and 4 degree of variable hazards). The article covers number of workplaces with various work condition classes in 9 metallurgy enterprises having considerable differences. The authors defined suggestions on improving activity to certify workplaces. In iron industry enterprises, level of occupational morbidity remains high (in 2010--17.85 cases per 10,000 workers examined), analysis revealed growth trend of the morbidity over 2002-2010. The morbidity materials are analysed for separate diseases, for occupational traits and among female workers. The authors defined suggestions on preventing occupational morbidity among metallurgists. PMID:22997751

  7. Nonlinearity in Demographic and Behavioral Determinants of Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Jean C; Van der laan, Mark J; Lane, Sylvia; Anderson, James N; Block, Gladys

    2003-01-01

    Objective To examine nonlinearity of determinants of morbidity in the United States Data Sources A secondary analysis of data on individuals with dietary data from the Cancer Epidemiology Supplement and National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) 1987, a cross-sectional, stratified random sample of the U.S. population (n=22,080). Study Design A statistical exploration using additive multiple regression models. Methods A Morbidity Index (0–30 points), derived from 1987 National Health Interview Survey data, combines number of conditions, hospitalizations, sick days, doctor visits, and degree of disability. Behavioral (health habits) variables were added to multivariate models containing demographic terms, with Morbidity Index and Self-assessed Health outcomes (n=17,612). Tables and graphs compare models of morbidity with self-assessed health models, with and without behavioral terms. Graphs illustrate curvilinear relationships. Principal Findings Morbidity and health are associated nonlinearly with age, race, education, and income, as well as alcohol, diet change, vitamin supplement use, body mass index (BMI), marital status/living arrangement, and smoking. Diet change and supplement use, education, income, race/ethnicity, and age relate differently to self-assessed health status than to morbidity. Morbidity is strongly associated with income up to about $15,000 above poverty. Additional income predicts no further reduction in morbidity. Better health is strongly related to both higher income and education. After controlling for income, black race does not predict morbidity, but remains associated with lower self-assessed health. Conclusions Good health habits, as captured in these models, are associated with a 10–20-year delay in onset and progression of morbidity. PMID:14727798

  8. Oxytocin and Maternal Brain Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sohye; Strathearn, Lane

    2016-09-01

    Although dramatic postnatal changes in maternal behavior have long been noted, we are only now beginning to understand the neurobiological mechanisms that support this transition. The present paper synthesizes growing insights from both animal and human research to provide an overview of the plasticity of the mother's brain, with a particular emphasis on the oxytocin system. We examine plasticity observed within the oxytocin system and discuss how these changes mediate an array of other adaptations observed within the maternal brain. We outline factors that affect the oxytocin-mediated plasticity of the maternal brain and review evidence linking disruptions in oxytocin functions to challenges in maternal adaptation. We conclude by suggesting a strategy for intervention with mothers who may be at risk for maladjustment during this transition to motherhood, while highlighting areas where further research is needed. PMID:27589498

  9. Partnership Transitions and Maternal Parenting

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Audrey N.; Cooper, Carey E.; McLanahan, Sara; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 1,975) to examine the association between mothers’ partnership changes and parenting behavior during the first five years of their children’s lives. We compare coresidential with dating transitions, and recent with more distal transitions. We also examine interactions between transitions and race/ethnicity, maternal education and family structure at birth. Findings indicate that both coresidential and dating transitions were associated with higher levels of maternal stress and harsh parenting; recent transitions had stronger associations than distal transitions. Maternal education significantly moderates these associations, with less educated mothers responding more negatively to instability in terms of maternal stress, and more educated mothers responding more negatively in terms of literacy activities. PMID:21423848

  10. Maternal Competence, Expectation, and Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Douglas H.

    1977-01-01

    Presents a study of maternal competence, expectations and involvement in child rearing decisions in relation to paternal personality and marital characteristics. Subjects were 45 thirty-year-old mothers. (BD)

  11. Maternal Care Determinant of Longevity?

    PubMed

    Giorgio, Marco; Renzi, Chiara; Oliveri, Serena; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-04-01

    Maternal care is an essential early environment in mammals that ensures emotional regulation and adaptive fitness of progeny. Longevity and healthy aging are associated with favorable environmental factors including fitting social and behavioral features. In the present review, we discuss the findings that link rearing conditions and early maternal care with life span and aging from an evolutionary, psychological, and molecular perspective. The quality of maternal care may influence internal adaptation through a variety of parallel mechanisms including emotional regulation, stress sensitivity, coping and other behavioral strategies in response to events requiring adaptation. From a biological perspective, it regulates physiological pathways that may persist in adulthood through epigenetic mechanisms, influencing disease susceptibility and, potentially, longevity. Abnormal maternal care induces maladaptation that persists over the life span, may accelerate the onset of aging associated diseases, and shorten life span. This may have important implications in the development of preventive approaches and early interventions. PMID:27548096

  12. Relationship between Maternal Immunological Response during Pregnancy and Onset of Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Varea, Alicia; Pellicer, Begoña; Perales-Marín, Alfredo; Pellicer, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Maternofetal immune tolerance is essential to maintain pregnancy. The maternal immunological tolerance to the semiallogeneic fetus becomes greater in egg donation pregnancies with unrelated donors as the complete fetal genome is allogeneic to the mother. Instead of being rejected, the allogeneic fetus is tolerated by the pregnant woman in egg donation pregnancies. It has been reported that maternal morbidity during egg donation pregnancies is higher as compared with spontaneous or in vitro fertilization pregnancies. Particularly, egg donation pregnancies are associated with a higher incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension and placental pathology. Preeclampsia, a pregnancy-specific disease characterized by the development of both hypertension and proteinuria, remains the leading cause of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. The aim of this review is to characterize and relate the maternofetal immunological tolerance phenomenon during pregnancies with a semiallogenic fetus, which are the spontaneously conceived pregnancies and in vitro fertilization pregnancies, and those with an allogeneic fetus or egg donation pregnancies. Maternofetal immune tolerance in uncomplicated pregnancies and pathological pregnancies, such as those with preeclampsia, has also been assessed. Moreover, whether an inadequate maternal immunological response to the allogenic fetus could lead to a higher prevalence of preeclampsia in egg donation pregnancies has been addressed. PMID:24987708

  13. Laparoscopic Repair of Perforated Peptic Ulcer: Outcome and Associated Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Alemrajabi, Mahdi; Safari, Saeed; Tizmaghz, Adnan; Alemrajabi, Fatemeh; Shabestanipour, Ghazaal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The mainstay of treatment for perforated peptic ulcer is Omental patch closure. With the advent of laparoscopic surgery, this approach is being used for the treatment of perforated peptic ulcer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of laparoscopy in Firoozgar general hospital over a period of 18 months. The outcome of the laparoscopic approach and the associated morbidity and mortality, operation time, conversion rate and hospital stay were assessed. Methods A prospective analysis of 29 consecutive patients (mean age 37.5 years; 23 men) with perforated peptic ulcers and who had undergone laparoscopic surgery was carried over a period of 18 months from March 2014 until September 2015. Pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative clinical data were collectively analyzed by SPSS 19 for Windows. Results Seventeen patients had a history of cigarette smoking, 11 patients had a history of opium consumption, 19 were chronic NSAID users, 26 had Helicobacter pylori infections, and six had a co-morbid condition. Previous surgical history included laparotomy for pancreatic cancer in two patients, for sigmoid colon cancer in one patient, and for acute appendicitis in four patients. The average operating time for all cases was 47.5 + 20 min. The mean lag time between onset of symptoms and surgery was 20.4 hours. All patients underwent laparoscopic closure of the perforation with Omental patch closure. No morbidity was observed, and none of the patients needed conversion to open surgery. One patient died after 11 months of follow-up due to the progression of underlying pancreatic cancer. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 4.2 days. Conclusions The results of the laparoscopic approach for perforated peptic ulcer were promising, with no conversion to open surgery, no morbidity, and mortality. PMID:27504170

  14. Neurotensin inversely modulates maternal aggression.

    PubMed

    Gammie, S C; D'Anna, K L; Gerstein, H; Stevenson, S A

    2009-02-18

    Neurotensin (NT) is a versatile neuropeptide involved in analgesia, hypothermia, and schizophrenia. Although NT is released from and acts upon brain regions involved in social behaviors, it has not been linked to a social behavior. We previously selected mice for high maternal aggression (maternal defense), an important social behavior that protects offspring, and found significantly lower NT expression in the CNS of highly protective females. Our current study directly tested NT's role in maternal defense. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of NT significantly impaired defense in terms of time aggressive and number of attacks at all doses tested (0.05, 0.1, 1.0, and 3.0 microg). Other maternal behaviors, including pup retrieval, were unaltered following NT injections (0.05 microg) relative to vehicle, suggesting specificity of NT action on defense. Further, i.c.v. injections of the NT receptor 1 (NT1) antagonist, SR 48692 (30 microg), significantly elevated maternal aggression in terms of time aggressive and attack number. To understand where NT may regulate aggression, we examined Fos following injection of either 0.1 microg NT or vehicle. Thirteen of 26 brain regions examined exhibited significant Fos increases with NT, including regions expressing NT1 and previously implicated in maternal aggression, such as lateral septum, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, and central amygdala. Together, our results indicate that NT inversely regulates maternal aggression and provide the first direct evidence that lowering of NT signaling can be a mechanism for maternal aggression. To our knowledge, this is the first study to directly link NT to a social behavior. PMID:19118604

  15. Study of Morbidity Profile of a Rural Population in Tamil Nadu

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshkumar, P.; Katta, Ajitha

    2015-01-01

    found to be higher among males. The burden of illness increased with age. Acute ailments were responsible for high morbidity among children, while chronic ailments caused high morbidity among the elderly. PMID:25859470

  16. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  17. Association of Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy with Infant Hospitalization and Mortality Due to Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Michael J.; Halperin, Abigail C.; Manhart, Lisa E.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal smoking is associated with infant respiratory infections and with increased risk of low birthweight (LBW) infants and preterm birth. This study assesses the association of maternal smoking during pregnancy with both respiratory and non-respiratory infectious disease (ID) morbidity and mortality in infants. Methods We conducted two retrospective case-control analyses of infants born in Washington State from 1987–2004 using linked birth certificate, death certificate, and hospital discharge records. One assessed morbidity—infants hospitalized due to ID within one year of birth (47,404 cases/48,233 controls). The second assessed mortality—infants who died within one year due to ID (627 cases/2,730 controls). Results Maternal smoking was associated with both hospitalization (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.52; 95%CI: 1.46, 1.58) and mortality (AOR=1.51; 95%CI: 1.17, 1.96) due to any ID. In subgroup analyses, maternal smoking was associated with hospitalization due to a broad range of ID including both respiratory (AOR=1.69; 95%CI: 1.63, 1.76) and non-respiratory ID (AOR=1.27; 95%CI: 1.20, 1.34). Further stratification by birthweight and gestational age did not appreciably change these estimates. In contrast, there was no association of maternal smoking with ID infant mortality when only LBW infants were considered. Conclusions Maternal smoking was associated with a broad range of both respiratory and non-respiratory ID outcomes. Despite attenuation of the mortality association among LBW infants, ID hospitalization was found to be independent of both birthweight and gestational age. These findings suggest that full-term infants of normal weight whose mothers smoked may suffer an increased risk of serious ID morbidity and mortality. PMID:22929173

  18. Maternal critical care: what can we learn from patient experience? A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Lisa; Locock, Louise; Knight, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Objective For every maternal death, nine women develop severe maternal morbidity. Many of those women will need care in an intensive care unit (ICU) or high dependency unit (HDU). Critical care in the context of pregnancy poses distinct issues for staff and patients, for example, with breastfeeding support and separation from the newborn. This study aimed to understand the experiences of women who experience a maternal near miss and require critical care after childbirth. Setting Women and some partners from across the UK were interviewed as part of a study of experiences of near-miss maternal morbidity. Design A qualitative study, using semistructured interviews. Participants A maximum variation sample was recruited of 35 women and 11 partners of women who had experienced a severe maternal illness, which without urgent medical attention would have led to her death. 18 of the women were admitted to ICU or HDU. Results The findings are presented in three themes: being in critical care; being a new mother in critical care; transfer and follow-up after critical care. The study highlights the shock of requiring critical care for new mothers and the gulf between their expectations of birth and what actually happened; the devastation of being separated from their baby, how valuable access to their newborn was, if possible, and the importance of breast feeding; the difficulties of transfer and the need for more support; the value of follow-up and outreach to this population of critical care patients. Conclusions While uncommon, critical illness in pregnancy can be devastating for new mothers and presents a challenge for critical care and maternity staff. This study provides insights into these challenges and recommendations for overcoming them drawn from patient experiences. PMID:25916486

  19. Irritable Bowel Syndrome may be associated with maternal inheritance and mitochondrial DNA control region sequence variants

    PubMed Central

    van Tilburg, Miranda A.L.; Zaki, Essam A.; Venkatesan, Thangam; Boles, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in various functional disorders that are co-morbid to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) such as migraine, depression and chronic fatigue syndrome. The aim of the current case-control pilot study was to determine if functional symptoms in IBS show a maternal inheritance bias, and if the degree of this maternal inheritance is related to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms. Methods Pedigrees were obtained from N=308 adult IBS patients, N=102 healthy controls, and N=36 controls with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), all from Caucasian heritage, to determine probable maternal inheritance. Two mtDNA polymorphisms (16519T and 3010A), which have previously been implicated in other functional disorders, were assayed in mtDNA haplogroup H IBS subjects and compared to genetic data from N=344 published haplogroup H controls. Results Probable Maternal Inheritance was found in 17.5% IBS, 2% healthy controls and 0% IBD controls (p < 0.0001). No difference was found between IBS and control for 3010A, and a trend was found for 16519T (p=.05). IBS with maternal inheritance were significantly more likely to have the 16519T than controls (OR=5.8; 95%CI=1.5–23.1) or IBS without maternal inheritance (OR=5.2; 95%CI=1.2–22.6). Conclusions This small pilot study shows that a significant minority (1/6) of IBS patients have pedigrees suggestive of maternal inheritance. The mtDNA polymorphism 16519T, which has been previously implicated in other functional disorders, is also associated with IBS patients who display maternal inheritance. These findings suggest that mtDNA-related mitochondrial dysfunction may constitute a sub-group within IBS. Future replication studies in larger samples are needed. PMID:24500451

  20. Incorporating immunizations into routine obstetric care to facilitate Health Care Practitioners in implementing maternal immunization recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Heather; Street, Jackie; Marshall, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Immunization against pertussis, influenza, and rubella reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women and their offspring. Health care professionals (HCPs) caring for women perinatally are uniquely placed to reduce maternal vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs). Despite guidelines recommending immunization during the perinatal period, maternal vaccine uptake remains low. This qualitative study explored the role of obstetricians, general practitioners, and midwives in maternal vaccine uptake. Semi-structured interviews (n = 15) were conducted with perinatal HCPs at a tertiary maternity hospital in South Australia. HCPs were asked to reflect on their knowledge, beliefs, and practice relating to immunization advice and vaccine provision. Interviews were transcribed and coded using thematic analysis. Data collection and analysis was an iterative process, with collection ceasing with theoretical saturation. Participants unanimously supported maternal vaccination as an effective way of reducing risk of disease in this vulnerable population, however only rubella immunity detection and immunization is embedded in routine care. Among these professionals, delegation of responsibility for maternal immunization was unclear and knowledge about maternal immunization was variable. Influenza and pertussis vaccine prevention measures were not included in standard pregnancy record documentation, information provision to patients was “ad hoc” and vaccinations not offered on-site. The key finding was that the incorporation of maternal vaccinations into standard care through a structured process is an important facilitator for immunization uptake. Incorporating vaccine preventable disease management measures into routine obstetric care including incorporation into the Pregnancy Record would facilitate HCPs in implementing recommendations. Rubella prevention provides a useful “template” for other vaccines. PMID:24509790

  1. Maternal and birth characteristics in relation to childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Podvin, Danise; Kuehn, Carrie M; Mueller, Beth A; Williams, Michelle

    2006-07-01

    Our objective was to investigate the association of childhood leukaemia with selected maternal and birth characteristics by conducting a population-based case-control study using linked cancer registry and birth certificate records for Washington State. We compared maternal and infant characteristics of 595 Washington-born residents <20 years old with leukaemia diagnosed during 1981-2003, and 5,950 control children, using stratified analysis and logistic regression. Maternal age 35+ years (odds ratio [OR] 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1, 2.0), infant birthweight 4,000+ g (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1, 1.8), neonatal jaundice (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.1, 2.1), and Down's syndrome (OR 31.3; 95% CI 6.4, 153.4) were associated with an increased risk of leukaemia. Among women with 2+ pregnancies, having at least two prior early (<20 weeks' gestation) fetal deaths was also associated with an increased risk (OR 1.5; 95% CI 0.97, 2.1). Maternal unmarried status (OR 0.7; 95% CI 0.6, 0.9) and African American race (OR 0.5; 95% CI 0.3, 0.9) were associated with a decreased risk. These results were more marked for acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL) than for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), and for leukaemia diagnosed <5 years of age. These results may provide clues to the aetiology of childhood leukaemia. Genetic epidemiological studies are needed to expand our knowledge of inherent and possibly prenatal influences on the occurrence of this disease. PMID:16879503

  2. Maternity Leave in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Joyce Yen; Han, Wen-Jui

    2011-01-01

    Using the first nationally representative birth cohort study in Taiwan, this paper examines the role that maternity leave policy in Taiwan plays in the timing of mothers returning to work after giving birth, as well as the extent to which this timing is linked to the amount of time mothers spend with their children and their use of breast milk versus formula. We found that the time when mothers returned to work coincided with the duration of guaranteed leave. In particular, mothers with a labor pension plan resumed work significantly earlier than mothers with no pension plan, and mothers with no pension plan returned to work significantly later than those with pension plans. The short leave of absence guaranteed under existing policies translated into mothers spending less time with their children and being more likely to exclusively use formula by 6 months after birth. In contrast, mothers who resumed work later than 6 months after birth were more likely to have not worked before birth or to have quit their jobs during pregnancy. Implications and recommendations for parental leave policy in Taiwan are discussed. PMID:21603074

  3. Acute Kidney Injury in the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Charles; Singhania, Girish; Bihorac, Azra

    2015-10-01

    Perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common, morbid, and costly surgical complication. Current efforts to understand and manage AKI in surgical patients focus on prevention, mitigation of further injury when AKI has occurred, treatment of associated conditions, and facilitation of renal recovery. Lesser severity AKI is now understood to be much more common, and more morbid, than was previously thought. The ability to detect AKI within hours of onset would be helpful in protecting the kidney and in preserving renal function, and several imaging and biomarker modalities are currently being evaluated. PMID:26410139

  4. Maternal zinc supplementation and growth in Peruvian infants1234

    PubMed Central

    Iannotti, Lora L; Zavaleta, Nelly; León, Zulema; Shankar, Anuraj H; Caulfield, Laura E

    2008-01-01

    Background Little is known about how maternal zinc intake influences growth in utero and in postnatal life in humans. Objective We aimed to assess the effect of maternal zinc supplementation during pregnancy on infant growth through age 1 y. Design A double-blind, randomized controlled trial of prenatal zinc supplementation was conducted from 1995 to 1997 in Lima, Peru. Women (n = 1295) were enrolled at 15.6 ± 4.6 wk gestation and assigned to receive daily supplements with zinc (15 mg Zn + 60 mg Fe + 250 µg folic acid) or without zinc (60 Fe + 250 µg folic acid) through pregnancy to 1 mo after delivery. At birth, 546 infants were followed for 12 mo to assess growth. Anthropometric measures of body size and composition were collected monthly, and morbidity and dietary intake surveillance was carried out weekly. Results No differences in maternal socioeconomic characteristics by treatment group or follow-up period were found. Infants born to mothers prenatally supplemented with zinc had significantly (P < 0.05) larger average growth measures beginning in month 4 and continuing through month 12. In longitudinal regression modeling, prenatal zinc was associated with greater weight (by 0.58 ± 0.12 kg; P < 0.001), calf circumference (by 1.01 ± 0.21 cm; P < 0.001), chest circumference (by 0.60 ± 0.20 cm;P = 0.002), and calf muscle area (by 35.78 ± 14.75 mm2; P = 0.01) after adjustment for a range of covariates. No effect was observed for linear growth. Conclusion Maternal zinc supplementation in this population was associated with offspring growth, which is suggestive of lean tissue mass accretion. PMID:18614736

  5. Maternal scaffolding behavior: links with parenting style and maternal education.

    PubMed

    Carr, Amanda; Pike, Alison

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to specify the relationship between positive and harsh parenting and maternal scaffolding behavior. A 2nd aim was to disentangle the effects of maternal education and parenting quality, and a 3rd aim was to test whether parenting quality mediated the association between maternal education and scaffolding practices. We examined associations between positive and harsh parenting practices and contingent and noncontingent tutoring strategies. Ninety-six mother-child dyads (49 boys, 47 girls) from working- and middle-class English families participated. Mothers reported on parenting quality at Time 1 when children were 5 years old and again approximately 5 years later at Time 2. Mother-child pairs were observed working together on a block design task at Time 2, and interactions were coded for contingent (contingent shifting) and noncontingent (fixed failure feedback) dimensions of maternal scaffolding behavior. Positive and harsh parenting accounted for variance in contingent behavior over and above maternal education, whereas only harsh parenting accounted for unique variance in noncontingent scaffolding practices. Our findings provide new evidence for a more differentiated model of the relation between general parenting quality and specific scaffolding behaviors. PMID:22004338

  6. Maternal nutrition and perinatal survival.

    PubMed

    Rush, D

    2001-09-01

    This review addresses the relationship between maternal nutrition and the survival of the foetus and infant. This survey was undertaken because wide-scale programmes on maternal feeding are in process, based, not on a critical synthesis of currently-available empirical research, but on a series of nested and, at times, weakly supported, assumptions. It is concluded that: (i) maternal weight and weight gain are remarkably resistant to either dietary advice or supplementation; (ii) nutritionally-induced increased birth-weight does not universally increase the chance of survival of the offspring, since pre-pregnancy weight, at least in affluent, industrialized societies-while associated with increased birth-weight-is also associated with higher perinatal mortality; (iii) while dietary supplements during pregnancy do have a modest effect on birth-weight, in contrast to a large effect in famine or near-famine conditions, this is not mediated by maternal energy deposition; and (iv) declining peripheral fat stores in late pregnancy are associated with accelerated foetal growth, and improved nutrition can lead to lower fat stores. Rather, the component of maternal weight gain associated with accelerated foetal growth is water, and, presumably, plasma volume. In the few studies, large and thorough enough to adequately address the issues, maternal feeding--both in famine and non-famine conditions--has led to lower perinatal, primarily foetal, mortality; the mechanisms are not likely to have been due only to the acceleration of foetal growth. It is concluded that there is currently an inadequate base of secure knowledge to foster improvement in the health and nutrition of poor mothers and children. The public and policy-makers alike must be informed that greater knowledge relating maternal nutrition to perinatal outcome is urgently needed to create sound health advice and to mount effective programmes. PMID:11761778

  7. Eliminating Preventable HIV-Related Maternal Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa: What Do We Need to Know?

    PubMed Central

    Danel, Isabella; Cooper, Diane; Dilmitis, Sophie; Kaida, Angela; Kourtis, Athena P.; Langer, Ana; Lapidos-Salaiz, Ilana; Lathrop, Eva; Moran, Allisyn C.; Sebitloane, Hannah; Turan, Janet M.; Watts, D. Heather; Wegner, Mary Nell

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: HIV makes a significant contribution to maternal mortality, and women living in sub-Saharan Africa are most affected. International commitments to eliminate preventable maternal mortality and reduce HIV-related deaths among pregnant and postpartum women by 50% will not be achieved without a better understanding of the links between HIV and poor maternal health outcomes and improved health services for the care of women living with HIV (WLWH) during pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum. Methods: This article summarizes priorities for research and evaluation identified through consultation with 30 international researchers and policymakers with experience in maternal health and HIV in sub-Saharan Africa and a review of the published literature. Results: Priorities for improving the evidence about effective interventions to reduce maternal mortality and improve maternal health among WLWH include better quality data about causes of maternal death among WLWH, enhanced and harmonized program monitoring, and research and evaluation that contributes to improving: (1) clinical management of pregnant and postpartum WLWH, including assessment of the impact of expanded antiretroviral therapy on maternal mortality and morbidity, (2) integrated service delivery models, and (3) interventions to create an enabling social environment for women to begin and remain in care. Conclusions: As the global community evaluates progress and prepares for new maternal mortality and HIV targets, addressing the needs of WLWH must be a priority now and after 2015. Research and evaluation on maternal health and HIV can increase collaboration on these 2 global priorities, strengthen political constituencies and communities of practice, and accelerate progress toward achievement of goals in both areas. PMID:25436825

  8. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  9. Rationale for a long-term evaluation of the consequences of potentially life-threatening maternal conditions and maternal "near-miss" incidents using a multidimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Pacagnella, Rodolfo C; Cecatti, Jose G; Camargo, Rodrigo P; Silveira, Carla; Zanardi, Dulce T; Souza, Joao P; Parpinelli, Mary A; Haddad, Samira M

    2010-08-01

    Recent advances in health care mean that women survive severe conditions and events related to pregnancy that would previously have resulted in death. Therefore, a greater number of women will experience significant maternal morbidity with significant consequences. Little is known, however, about these long-term consequences. Some investigators have evaluated the repercussions of severe biological or traumatic events, and have reported that survivors are at an increased risk of death in the five years after the event. In addition, they continue to experience both organic and emotional problems such as clinical, cardiac, respiratory, and neurological complications, as well as anxiety and depression, following discharge from hospital. Following a maternal "near-miss" incident, various life domains may be affected (organic, mental, cognitive, and social function), and these must be evaluated in addition to the related economic issues and quality of life. However, because of the diversity of methods and instruments used to evaluate possible repercussions, comparisons between the few studies available on the subject are difficult. An in-depth debate should be initiated to discuss the methodological aspects of such investigation. We propose a conceptual and methodological discussion on the long-term repercussions of severe maternal morbidity based on the evaluation of the following variables: reproductive health, quality of life, posttraumatic stress syndrome, sexual function, postpartum depression, daily functioning, and the physical, neurological, and psychomotor development of the children born after a complicated pregnancy. PMID:21050503

  10. Evidence from community level inputs to improve quality of care for maternal and newborn health: interventions and findings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Annually around 40 million mothers give birth at home without any trained health worker. Consequently, most of the maternal and neonatal mortalities occur at the community level due to lack of good quality care during labour and birth. Interventions delivered at the community level have not only been advocated to improve access and coverage of essential interventions but also to reduce the existing disparities and reaching the hard to reach. In this paper, we have reviewed the effectiveness of care delivered through community level inputs for improving maternal and newborn health outcomes. We considered all available systematic reviews published before May 2013 on the pre-defined community level interventions and report findings from 43 systematic reviews. Findings suggest that home visitation significantly improved antenatal care, tetanus immunization coverage, referral and early initiation of breast feeding with reductions in antenatal hospital admission, cesarean-section rates birth, maternal morbidity, neonatal mortality and perinatal mortality. Task shifting to midwives and community health workers has shown to significantly improve immunization uptake and breast feeding initiation with reductions in antenatal hospitalization, episiotomy, instrumental delivery and hospital stay. Training of traditional birth attendants as a part of community based intervention package has significant impact on referrals, early breast feeding, maternal morbidity, neonatal mortality, and perinatal mortality. Formation of community based support groups decreased maternal morbidity, neonatal mortality, perinatal mortality with improved referrals and early breast feeding rates. At community level, home visitation, community mobilization and training of community health workers and traditional birth attendants have the maximum potential to improve a range of maternal and newborn health outcomes. There is lack of data to establish effectiveness of outreach services, mass media

  11. [THE MORBIDITY OF POPULATION OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION: GEOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS].

    PubMed

    Semenov, V Yu

    2015-01-01

    The article considers the results of analysis of characteristics of morbidity of population residing in various geographic conditions of the Russian Federation. The comparison was applied to morbidity of residents of subjects of the Russian Federation residing approximately at the levels of 50 and 60 of northern longitude according data of 2008-2013. The average annual size of population of the Northern territories amounted to 8,994,112 and in the southern territories 32,600,569. The maximal differences are noted in relation to diseases of respiratory organs and congenital abnormalities of blood circulation system. Actually, indicators of morbidity of diseases of cardiovascular system and ischemic heart diseases had no differences. The rest of analyzed indicators differed on 10-40% towards higher values in the Northern regions. The exception included cerebrovascular diseases with morbidity higher in southern territories up to 11% than in northern territories. PMID:27116829

  12. Understanding levels of morbidity and hospitalization in Kerala, India.

    PubMed Central

    Dilip, T. R.

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of ailments and hospitalization in Kerala was examined using data from the 52 nd National Sample Survey Data on Health Care in Kerala in 1995-6. The survey included 24401 people from 4928 households. Age and seasonality had considerable effects on the morbidity of individuals. The burden of ill health was higher in rural areas than in urban areas. People who were more likely to have a better lifestyle had a higher level of morbidity and hospitalization. Regional differences were seen, with levels of morbidity and hospitalization higher in the comparatively developed regions of Southern Kerala than in Northern Kerala. Factors like physical accessibility of health care services and capacity to seek health care services could create artificial differences in morbidity and hospitalization among different subgroups of the population in Kerala. PMID:12378294

  13. Immunologic Biomarkers, Morbidity, and Mortality in Treated HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Peter W; Lee, Sulggi A; Siedner, Mark J

    2016-10-01

    Despite marked improvements in the modern treatment era, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, particularly those who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) at advanced disease stages, continue to have increased age-related morbidity and mortality, compared with the general population. Immune activation and inflammation persist despite suppressive ART and predict many of these morbidities. The goal of this review is to examine the evidence suggesting a link between the persistent inflammatory state and morbidity and mortality in this setting, to describe the impact of early ART initiation on these factors, and to highlight important unanswered questions for the field. We also advance a hypothesis to explain why some morbidities-and their root inflammatory drivers-may be prevented more than others by early ART initiation. PMID:27625430

  14. Management of acute myeloid leukemia during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Brenner, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Diagnosis of acute leukemia during pregnancy presents significant medical challenges. Pancytopenia, caused by bone marrow substitution with leukemic cells, impairs maternal and fetal health. Chemotherapeutic agents required to be immediately used to save the mother's life are likely to adversely affect fetal development and outcome, especially if administered at an early gestational stage. Patients diagnosed with acute leukemia during the first trimester are, therefore, recommended to undergo pregnancy termination. At later gestational stages, antileukemic therapy can be administered, although in this case, fetal outcome is still associated with increased incidence of growth restriction and loss. Special attention to the issue of future reproduction, adopting a personalized fertility preservation approach, is required. This article addresses these subjects, presenting women diagnosed with acute myeloid and acute promyelocytic leukemia in pregnancy. The rarity of this event, resulting in insufficient data, emphasizes the need for collaborative efforts to optimize management of this complicated clinical condition. PMID:25052751

  15. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. PMID:27600123

  16. Somatic presentation of psychiatric morbidity in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Weich, S; Lewis, G; Donmall, R; Mann, A

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Twenty per cent of new illnesses in general practice, and 3% of consecutive attenders, are incident cases of 'pure' somatization. AIM. This study set out to estimate the prevalence of consultations by patients with psychiatric morbidity who present only somatic symptoms (somatic presentation), and to compare this with the likely prevalence of pure somatization. METHOD. A cross-sectional survey of consecutive general practice attenders was carried out. Psychiatric morbidity was measured using the general health questionnaire. Pure somatization was defined as medical consultation for somatic symptoms that were judged by a psychiatrist during an interview to be aetiologically attributable to an underlying psychiatric disorder but which were not recognized as such by the patient. RESULTS. Of attenders 25% were identified as somatic presenters. Of the somatic presenters interviewed one in six were estimated to be pure somatizers, which would extrapolate to 4% of attenders. Though all somatic presenters were probable cases of psychiatric disorder, subjects in this group had lower scores on the general health questionnaire than those who presented with psychological symptoms. General practitioner recognition of psychiatric morbidity was significantly lower among somatic presenters than for other subjects with psychiatric morbidity. CONCLUSION. General practitioner recognition of psychiatric morbidity could be improved for all types of somatic presentation, regardless of the aetiology of patients' somatic symptoms. There is a danger that concentrating attention on pure somatization may mean that psychiatric morbidity in the more common undifferentiated form of somatic presentation will be overlooked. PMID:7772392

  17. In utero exposure to maternal obesity and diabetes: animal models that identify and characterize implications for future health.

    PubMed

    Nathanielsz, Peter W; Poston, Lucilla; Taylor, Paul D

    2007-06-01

    The developed and developing worlds are experiencing an epidemic of obesity and associated predisposition to diabetes. This epidemic places a major drain on health care resources. It is now clear that maternal obesity and gestational diabetes have major adverse effects on the developing fetus that lead to increased neonatal morbidity and mortality, as discussed elsewhere in this issue. Obesity in pregnancy and gestational diabetes represent a special problem, not only as a result of their immediate adverse effects on maternal health and pregnancy outcome, but also because of growing evidence for their persistent and deleterious effects on the developing child. PMID:17572267

  18. In utero exposure to maternal obesity and diabetes: animal models that identify and characterize implications for future health.

    PubMed

    Nathanielsz, Peter W; Poston, Lucilla; Taylor, Paul D

    2007-12-01

    The developed and developing worlds are experiencing an epidemic of obesity and associated predisposition to diabetes. This epidemic places a major drain on health care resources. It is now clear that maternal obesity and gestational diabetes have major adverse effects on the developing fetus that lead to increased neonatal morbidity and mortality, as discussed elsewhere in this issue. Obesity in pregnancy and gestational diabetes represent a special problem, not only as a result of their immediate adverse effects on maternal health and pregnancy outcome, but also because of growing evidence for their persistent and deleterious effects on the developing child. PMID:18063102

  19. Acute kidney injury in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Cosentino, Nicola; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2015-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly being seen in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). This condition has a complex pathogenesis, an incidence that can reach 30% and it is associated with higher short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, AKI is still characterised by lack of a single accepted definition, unclear pathophysiology understanding and insensitive diagnostic tools that make its detection difficult, particularly in the setting of ACS. Recent data suggested that patients with AKI during ACS, even those in whom renal function seems to fully recover, face an increased, persisting risk of future AKI and may develop chronic kidney disease. Thus, in these patients, nephrology follow-up, after hospital discharge, and secondary preventive measures should possibly be implemented. In this review, we aim at providing a framework of knowledge to increase cardiologists' awareness of AKI, with the goal of improving the outcome of patients with ACS. PMID:26243789

  20. Caste and maternal health care service use among rural Hindu women in Maitha, Uttar Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Saroha, Ekta; Altarac, Maja; Sibley, Lynn M

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between caste and maternal health care service use among rural Hindu women in India. We analyzed data from the Morbidity and Performance Assessment, a population-based cross-sectional study, for 482 Hindu women who were pregnant during January 1998 to January 1999 in Maitha, Uttar Pradesh, India. Maternal health care service use among both upper and lower caste women was very low. Upper caste women were almost three times more likely to use antenatal care (odds ratio [OR] = 2.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40-5.30), tetanus toxoid (OR = 2.50; 95% CI, 1.48-4.21), and contraceptives (OR = 2.66; 95% CI, 1.28-5.54) and almost five times (OR = 4.77; 95% CI, 1.81-12.54) more likely to have a trained birth attendant compared to the lower caste women. Caste was a significant determinant of tetanus toxoid use and trained birth attendant even after adjusting for sociodemographic factors. Besides caste, maternal literacy was the one sociodemographic factor that was significantly associated with the use of all maternal health care services. Information dissemination and awareness generation can improve the use of subsidized maternal health care services among women of all caste groups. PMID:18761290

  1. Global Reduction in HIV-related Maternal Mortality: ART as a Key Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Salihu, Hamisu M.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Holtz and colleagues present a synthesis of evidence from published studies over the previous decade on the collective impact of HIV-targeted interventions on maternal mortality. Amongst an assortment of interventions [that include antiretroviral therapy (ART), micronutrients (multivitamins, vitamin A and selenium), and antibiotics], only ART reduced maternal mortality among HIV-infected pregnant and post-partum mothers. These findings have fundamental and global strategic implications. They are also timely since they provide the evidence that ART reduces HIV-related maternal mortality, and by further enhancing access to ART in HIV-challenged and poor regions of the world, significant improvement in maternal morbidity and mortality indices could be attained. The paper bears good tidings and sound scientific proof that the financial investment made globally by government and non-governmental organizations and agencies to reduce the global burden of HIV/AIDS primarily by making ART more accessible to regions of the world most affected by the epidemic is beginning to show beneficial effects not only in terms of numerical reductions in the rates of new cases of HIV/AIDS among women, but also in maternal mortality levels.

  2. Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  3. Maternal Employment and Adolescent Development

    PubMed Central

    Ruhm, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates how maternal employment is related to the cognitive development and body weight of 10 and 11 year olds, controlling for a wide variety of child, mother and family characteristics. The results suggest that limited market work benefits youths who are relatively “disadvantaged” and even long hours, which occur infrequently, are unlikely to leave them much worse off. By contrast, maternal labor supply is estimated to have more uniformly harmful consequences for “advantaged” adolescents. The negative cognitive effects for these youths probably partly occur because maternal labor supply reduces the time spent in enriching home environments. Some of the growth in obesity may be related to determinants of excess weight common to the child and mother. PMID:19830269

  4. Improving maternal care reduces mortality.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    Reduction of maternal mortality in developing countries by community-based action is complex but possible. Deaths related to pregnancy are primarily due to bleeding, infection, toxemia and illegal abortion. The excess maternal deaths in developing countries are also related to high numbers of high-risk pregnancies, total lack of prenatal and obstetric care in some areas, poor nutrition and overwork. The basic interventions available to communities include prenatal care, improved alarm and transport systems, referral centers and improved community-based care. Prenatal care can include nutritional supplements and exams and referrals by traditional birth attendants, targeting women suffering from toxemia, bleeding and infections. Local ambulances with life-support equipment, and maternity waiting houses are examples of ways of dealing with transport problems. Referral centers should be capable of providing sterile conditions and blood transfusions. Nurses can be trained to do caesarean sections. Birth attendants can use checklists to administer antibiotics and oxytocic drugs, for example. PMID:12281272

  5. Strategies for reducing maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Clark, Steven L

    2012-02-01

    The maternal death rate in the United States has shown no improvement in several decades and may be increasing. On the other hand, hospital systems that have instituted comprehensive programs directed at the prevention of maternal mortality have demonstrated rates that are half of the national average. These programs have emphasized the reduction of variability in the provision of care through the use of standard protocols, reliance on checklists instead of memory for critical processes, and an approach to peer review that emphasizes systems change. In addition, elimination of a small number of repetitive errors in the management of hypertension, postpartum hemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, and cardiac disease will contribute significantly to a reduction in maternal mortality. Attention to these general principles and specific error reduction strategies will be of benefit to every practitioner and more importantly to the patients we serve. PMID:22280865

  6. Heat- and cold-stress effects on cardiovascular mortality and morbidity among urban and rural populations in the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Aleš; Davídkovová, Hana; Kyselý, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have examined heat- and cold-related cardiovascular (CVD) mortality in the Czech Republic. Much less is understood about heat- and cold-related CVD morbidity and possible regional differences. This study compares heat- and cold-stress effects on excess CVD mortality and morbidity in the city of Prague and a rural region of southern Bohemia over 16-year period (1994-2009). Population size and age structure are similar in the two regions. Excess mortality (number of deaths) and morbidity (number of hospital admissions) were determined as differences between observed and expected daily values, the latter being adjusted for long-term changes, annual and weekly cycles, and epidemics of influenza/acute respiratory infections. Several methods for identifying days and spells of days with heat and cold stress are applied, including Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET) and the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI). Generally higher relative excess CVD mortality on warm days was identified in Prague, while on cold days we found higher excess CVD mortality in the rural region of southern Bohemia. In contrast to mortality, weak excess CVD morbidity was observed for both warm and cold days. The differences between Prague and the rural region of southern Bohemia indicate a possible influence of urban heat island effect in Prague together with other factors such as long- and short-term exposure to air pollution, different lifestyle, or different population, which may result in differing vulnerability to heat and cold stress.

  7. Heat- and cold-stress effects on cardiovascular mortality and morbidity among urban and rural populations in the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Aleš; Davídkovová, Hana; Kyselý, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Several studies have examined the relationship of high and low air temperatures to cardiovascular mortality in the Czech Republic. Much less is understood about heat-/cold-related cardiovascular morbidity and possible regional differences. This paper compares the effects of warm and cold days on excess mortality and morbidity for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in the city of Prague and a rural region of southern Bohemia during 1994-2009. Population size and age structure are similar in the two regions. The results are evaluated for selected population groups (men and women). Excess mortality (number of deaths) and morbidity (number of hospital admissions) were determined as differences between observed and expected daily values, the latter being adjusted for long-term changes, annual and weekly cycles, and epidemics of influenza/acute respiratory infections. Generally higher relative excess CVD mortality on warm days than on cold days was identified in both regions. In contrast to mortality, weak excess CVD morbidity was observed for both warm and cold days. Different responses of individual CVDs to heat versus cold stress may be caused by the different nature of each CVD and different physiological processes induced by heat or cold stress. The slight differences between Prague and southern Bohemia in response to heat versus cold stress suggest the possible influence of environmental and socioeconomic factors such as the effects of urban heat island and exposure to air pollution, lifestyle differences, and divergence in population structure, which may result in differing vulnerability of urban versus rural population to temperature extremes.

  8. Relationships between Maternal Adult Attachment Security, Child Perceptions of Maternal Support, and Maternal Perceptions of Child Responses to Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leifer, Myra; Kilbane, Teresa; Skolnick, Linda I.

    2002-01-01

    Study assessed the relationships between maternal adult attachment style, children's perceptions of maternal support following disclosure of sexual abuse, and maternal perceptions of children's behavioral and emotional responses to sexual abuse. Findings indicate that fostering parent-child attachment is important in order to decrease the risk for…

  9. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  10. [Psychiatry at the maternal clinic].

    PubMed

    Ammälä, Antti-Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Various mental disorders are encountered at the maternal clinic. Pregnancy predisposes to some mental disorders, most commonly depressive and anxiety disorders. The recognition of substance use disorders during pregnancy is very important, but difficult owing to the associated disgrace. An eating disorder with an onset preceding the pregnancy may cause problems for growth and development of the fetus and should thus be identified early enough. The rare but severe postpartum psychosis may often break out only after discharge from the maternity hospital. Drug therapy during pregnancy requires careful consideration and clear-cut reasoning. PMID:26237899

  11. Maternity telehealth: ringing the changes.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Dorothy; Brown, Sheona

    2013-12-01

    This article describes NHS Scotland's Maternity telehealth options project and the implementation of the recommendations made. This 17-month project resulted in the development of national documentation for recording telehealth calls; the development of a self-directed eLearning tool on maternity telehealth call structure which was made available to all health boards in Scotland; a comprehensive programme of training on telehealth for student midwives; a programme of 'Train-the-trainer' events for qualified midwives to enable the cascade of learning throughout the service. The project also involved collaboration with Health Scotland, signposting for women to contact the appropriate caregiver at the appropriate time. PMID:24386706

  12. Alternative medicine in maternity care.

    PubMed

    Petrie, K A; Peck, M R

    2000-03-01

    Primary care physicians are confronted daily with questions from their patients about alternative medicine. When maternity care patients seek information about such therapies, careful attention must be paid to issues of safety and efficacy for both the mother and her unborn child. This article clarifies the role of alternative medicine in maternity care by looking at the definitions and history of common alternative therapies, documenting the evidence for alternative therapies in prenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum care, and suggesting ways to incorporate alternative medicine into primary care practice. PMID:10739460

  13. Advances in predicting acute GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Andrew C.; Ferrara, James L.M.; Levine, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a leading cause of non-relapse mortality following allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation. Attempts to improve treatment response in clinically-established GVHD have not improved overall survival, often due to the increased risk of infectious complications. Alternative approaches to decrease GVHD-related morbidity and mortality have focused on the ability to predict GVHD prior to clinical manifestation in an effort to provide an opportunity to abort GVHD development, and to gain new insights into GVHD pathophysiology. This review outlines the research efforts to date that have identified clinical and laboratory-based factors that are predictive of acute GVHD and describes future directions in developing algorithms that will improve the ability to predict the development of clinically relevant GVHD. PMID:23205489

  14. Clinical cases in acute intoxication.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sean B; Maguire, Jennifer; Mauck, Karen F

    2009-12-01

    Over 2.5 million accidental and intentional drug-related poisonings are reported annually in the United States. Early diagnosis and management of patients who present with acute intoxication can significantly reduce both morbidity and mortality. The initial evaluation of patients with suspected or proven intoxications should focus on hemodynamic stability, mental status, and respiratory function. However, early recognition of toxic ingestion is paramount to implementing life-saving treatments. Important historical clues are often found in a social history that considers intravenous drug use, alcohol use, and any access or exposure to illicit substances. A patient's medication list should also be scrutinized for psychoactive or sedative medications, such as tricyclic antidepressants or opioids. In this article we present case-based discussions of the specific diagnosis and management of 5 commonly occurring acute intoxication syndromes. PMID:20877175

  15. Predictors of Urinary Morbidity in Cs-131 Prostate Brachytherapy Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ryan P.; Jones, Heather A.; Beriwal, Sushil; Gokhale, Abhay; Benoit, Ronald

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Cesium-131 is a newer radioisotope being used in prostate brachytherapy (PB). This study was conducted to determine the predictors of urinary morbidity with Cs-131 PB. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 159 patients underwent PB with Cs-131 at our institution and were followed by using Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) surveys to determine urinary morbidity over time. EPIC scores were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively at 2 and 4 weeks, and 3 and 6 months. Different factors were evaluated to determine their individual effect on urinary morbidity, including patient characteristics, disease characteristics, treatment, and dosimetry. Multivariate analysis of covariance was carried out to identify baseline determinants affecting urinary morbidity. Factors contributing to the need for postoperative catheterization were also studied and reported. Results: At 2 weeks, patient age, dose to 90% of the organ (D90), bladder neck maximum dose (D{sub max}), and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) predicted for worse function. At 4 weeks, age and EBRT continued to predict for worse function. At the 3-month mark, better preoperative urinary function, preoperative alpha blockers, bladder neck D{sub max}, and EBRT predicted for worse urinary morbidity. At 6 months, better preoperative urinary function, preoperative alpha blockers, bladder neck D{sub max}, and EBRT were predictive of increased urinary problems. High bladder neck D{sub max} and poor preoperative urinary function predicted for the need for catheterization. Conclusions: The use of EBRT plus Cs-131 PB predicts for worse urinary toxicity at all time points studied. Patients should be cautioned about this. Age was a consistent predictor of worsened morbidity immediately following Cs-131 PB, while bladder D{sub max} was the only consistent dosimetric predictor. Paradoxically, patients with better preoperative urinary function had worse urinary morbidity at 3 and 6 months, consistent with

  16. Maternal Pharmacokinetics and Fetal Disposition of (±)-Citalopram during Mouse Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Juan C; Goeden, Nick; Herod, Skyla M; Bonnin, Alexandre

    2016-03-16

    While selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants are commonly prescribed in the treatment of depression, their use during pregnancy leads to fetal drug exposures. According to recent reports, such exposures could affect fetal development and long-term offspring health. A central question is how pregnancy-induced physical and physiological changes in mothers, fetuses, and the placenta influence fetal SSRI exposures during gestation. In this study, we examined the effects of gestational stage on the maternal pharmacokinetics and fetal disposition of the SSRI (±)-citalopram (CIT) in a mouse model. We determined the maternal and fetal CIT serum concentration-time profiles following acute maternal administration on gestational days (GD)14 and GD18, as well as the fetal brain drug disposition. The results show that pregnancy affects the pharmacokinetics of CIT and that maternal drug clearance increases as gestation progresses. The data further show that CIT and its primary metabolite desmethylcitalopram (DCIT) readily cross the placenta into the fetal compartment, and fetal exposure to CIT exceeds that of the mother during gestation 2 h after maternal administration. Enzymatic activity assays revealed that fetal drug metabolic capacity develops in late gestation, resulting in elevated circulating and brain concentrations of DCIT at embryonic day (E)18. Fetal exposure to the SSRI CIT in murine pregnancy is therefore influenced by both maternal gestational stage and embryonic development, suggesting potential time-dependent effects on fetal brain development. PMID:26765210

  17. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  18. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  19. Prenatal Maternal Stress Programs Infant Stress Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Glynn, Laura M.; Waffarn, Feizal; Sandman, Curt A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Prenatal exposure to inappropriate levels of glucocorticoids (GCs) and maternal stress are putative mechanisms for the fetal programming of later health outcomes. The current investigation examined the influence of prenatal maternal cortisol and maternal psychosocial stress on infant physiological and behavioral responses to stress.…

  20. FGF23 in Acute and Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Schnedl, Christian; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; Pietschmann, Peter; Amrein, Karin

    2015-01-01

    FGF23 is a bone-derived phosphaturic hormone that may become a useful biomarker for the identification of high-risk patients in chronic but also acute disease. It rises early in chronic kidney disease and is strongly and independently associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Emerging data suggest that FGF23 is also elevated in different scenarios of acute illness. In this review, we give an overview on the role of this interesting disease marker and potential and proven interventional strategies and discuss a blueprint for future research. PMID:26491212

  1. A Fatal Case of Wernicke's Encephalopathy after Sleeve Gastrectomy for Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Manatakis, Dimitrios K.; Georgopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neuropsychiatric disorder, due to thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. It is traditionally described in chronic alcohol abusers; however obesity surgery is an emerging cause, as the number of bariatric procedures increases. A high index of clinical suspicion is required, since initial symptoms may be nonspecific and the classic triad of ophthalmoplegia, gait and stance disorders, and mental confusion is present only in one-third of patients. Laboratory tests can be within normal range and typical MRI brain lesions are found only in 50% of cases. Aggressive supplementation with intravenous thiamine should not be delayed until confirmation of diagnosis, as it may fully reverse symptoms, but almost half the patients will still display permanent neurological deficit. We present our experience with a fatal case of Wernicke's encephalopathy, following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. PMID:25276464

  2. Chronic Osteomyelitis of Clavicle in a Neonate: Report of Morbid Complication of Adjoining MRSA Abscess.

    PubMed

    Suranigi, Shishir Murugharaj; Joshi, Manoj; Deniese, Pascal Noel; Rangasamy, Kanagasabai; Najimudeen, Syed; Gnanadoss, James J

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis of clavicle is rare in neonates. Acute osteomyelitis of clavicle accounts for less than 3% of all osteomyelitis cases. It may occur due to contiguous spread, due to hematogenous spread, or secondary to subclavian catheterization. Chronic osteomyelitis may occur as a complication of residual adjoining abscess due to methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) sepsis. We report a newborn female with right shoulder abscess that developed chronic clavicular osteomyelitis in follow-up period after drainage. She required multiple drainage procedures and was later successfully managed with bone curettage and debridement. We report this case to highlight that a MRSA abscess may recur due to residual infection from a chronic osteomyelitis sinus. It may be misdiagnosed as hypergranulation tissue of nonhealing wound leading to inappropriate delay in treatment. High index of suspicion, aggressive initial management, and regular follow-up are imperative to prevent this morbid complication. PMID:27051549

  3. [ACUTE ABDOMEN CAUSED BY COMPLICATED FIBROID IN PREGNANCY. CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Atanasova, V; Petrakieva, N; Markov, P; Raycheva, I; Nikolov, A

    2015-01-01

    With the advancing maternal age the rate of fibroids in pregnancy is also growing. A small part of fibroids in pregnancy are complicated and in about 2.6% necessitate urgent surgical treatment. We present a clinical case of subserose fibroid at 20 gestational weeks complicated with acute abdomen treated urgently with normal continuation of pregnancy. PMID:26863797

  4. Burden of lymphatic filariasis morbidity in an area of low endemicity in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Netto, Maria José; Bonfim, Cristine; Brandão, Eduardo; Aguiar-Santos, Ana Maria; Medeiros, Zulma

    2016-11-01

    The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis has two main components: interrupting transmission of lymphatic filariasis (LF) and managing morbidity and preventing disability. However, interventions to prevent and manage LF-related disabilities in endemic communities have been of limited extent. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of morbidity and its correlation with filarial infection, thereby filling a gap that existed regarding the data on morbidity in Brazil. Presence of Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaria was investigated using the thick smear technique. Information on parasitosis-related clinical manifestations was obtained using a questionnaire applied by community health agents with previous training and capacitation to know about and identify the disease. To analyze correlations, Pearson's correlation coefficient was used with the corresponding statistical significance test. 23,673 individuals were investigated: 323 presented microfilaremia (1.36%) and 741 (3.13%) had clinical complaints that were attributable to LF. Acute dermatolymphangioadenitis (ADLA) was the most prevalent condition (2.2%). Lymphedema, ADLA and chyluria were more commonly reported among female patients. There were positive associations between all the clinical complaints reported and filarial infection. Hydrocele presented the most strongly positive association (r=0.699; p<0.001). The present study showed that there is an association between clinical condition reported and the rate of infection among people living in an area of low endemicity for LF. It contributes data that might provide support for healthcare systems and thus optimize disease management, through incorporating surveillance measures directed towards preventing disability and reducing the psychosocial and economic impact of the disease on poor populations living in areas endemic for LF. PMID:27427218

  5. Plasma Circulating Nucleic Acids Levels Increase According to the Morbidity of Plasmodium vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Bernardo S.; Vitorino, Barbara L. F.; Coelho, Helena C.; Menezes-Neto, Armando; Santos, Marina L. S.; Campos, Fernanda M. F.; Brito, Cristiana F.; Fontes, Cor J.; Lacerda, Marcus V.; Carvalho, Luzia H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Given the increasing evidence of Plasmodium vivax infections associated with severe and fatal disease, the identification of sensitive and reliable markers for vivax severity is crucial to improve patient care. Circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) have been increasingly recognized as powerful diagnostic and prognostic tools for various inflammatory diseases and tumors as their plasma concentrations increase according to malignancy. Given the marked inflammatory status of P. vivax infection, we investigated here the usefulness of CNAs as biomarkers for malaria morbidity. Methods and Findings CNAs levels in plasma from twenty-one acute P. vivax malaria patients from the Brazilian Amazon and 14 malaria non-exposed healthy donors were quantified by two different methodologies: amplification of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) genomic sequence by quantitative real time PCR (qPCR), and the fluorometric dsDNA quantification by Pico Green. CNAs levels were significantly increased in plasma from P. vivax patients as compared to healthy donors (p<0.0001). Importantly, plasma CNAs levels were strongly associated with vivax morbidity (p<0.0001), including a drop in platelet counts (p = 0.0021). These findings were further sustained when we assessed CNAS levels in plasma samples from 14 additional P. vivax patients of a different endemic area in Brazil, in which CNAS levels strongly correlated with thrombocytopenia (p = 0.0072). We further show that plasma CNAs levels decrease and reach physiological levels after antimalarial treatment. Although we found both host and parasite specific genomic sequences circulating in plasma, only host CNAs clearly reflected the clinical spectrum of P. vivax malaria. Conclusions Here, we provide the first evidence of increased plasma CNAs levels in malaria patients and reveal their potential as sensitive biomarkers for vivax malaria morbidity. PMID:21611202

  6. MORBIDITY AND SURVIVAL PROBABILITY IN BURN PATIENTS IN MODERN BURN CARE

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Pinto, Ruxandra; Kraft, Robert; Nathens, Avery B.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Klein, Matthew B.; Arnoldo, Brett D.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Characterizing burn sizes that are associated with an increased risk of mortality and morbidity is critical because it would allow identifying patients who might derive the greatest benefit from individualized, experimental, or innovative therapies. Although scores have been established to predict mortality, few data addressing other outcomes exist. The objective of this study was to determine burn sizes that are associated with increased mortality and morbidity after burn. Design and Patients Burn patients were prospectively enrolled as part of the multicenter prospective cohort study, Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury Glue Grant, with the following inclusion criteria: 0–99 years of age, admission within 96 hours after injury, and >20% total body surface area burns requiring at least one surgical intervention. Setting Six major burn centers in North America. Measurements and Main Results Burn size cutoff values were determined for mortality, burn wound infection (at least two infections), sepsis (as defined by ABA sepsis criteria), pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and multiple organ failure (DENVER2 score >3) for both children (<16 years) and adults (16–65 years). Five-hundred seventy-three patients were enrolled, of which 226 patients were children. Twenty-three patients were older than 65 years and were excluded from the cutoff analysis. In children, the cutoff burn size for mortality, sepsis, infection, and multiple organ failure was approximately 60% total body surface area burned. In adults, the cutoff for these outcomes was lower, at approximately 40% total body surface area burned. Conclusions In the modern burn care setting, adults with over 40% total body surface area burned and children with over 60% total body surface area burned are at high risk for morbidity and mortality, even in highly specialized centers. PMID:25559438

  7. Critical maternal health knowledge gaps in low- and middle-income countries for the post-2015 era.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Tamil; Langer, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Effective interventions to promote maternal health and address obstetric complications exist, however 800 women die every day during pregnancy and childbirth from largely preventable causes and more than 90% of these deaths occur in low and middle income countries (LMIC). In 2014, the Maternal Health Task Force consulted 26 global maternal health researchers to identify persistent and critical knowledge gaps to be filled to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality and improve maternal health. The vision of maternal health articulated was comprehensive and priorities for knowledge generation encompassed improving the availability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality of institutional labor and delivery services and other effective interventions, such as contraception and safe abortion services. Respondents emphasized the need for health systems research to identify models that can deliver what is known to be effective to prevent and treat the main causes of maternal death at scale in different contexts and to sustain coverage and quality over time. Researchers also emphasized the development of tools to measure quality of care and promote ongoing quality improvement at the facility, district, and national level. Knowledge generation to improve distribution and retention of healthcare workers, facilitate task shifting, develop and evaluate training models to improve "hands-on" skills and promote evidence-based practice, and increase managerial capacity at different levels of the health system were also prioritized. Interviewees noted that attitudes, behavior, and power relationships between health professionals and within institutions must be transformed to achieve coverage of high-quality maternal health services in LMIC. The increasing burden of non-communicable diseases, urbanization, and the persistence of social and economic inequality were identified as emerging challenges that require knowledge generation to improve health system responses and evaluate

  8. Acute appendicitis as a rare complication of gastric band

    PubMed Central

    Petridis, Christos; Neofytou, Kyriakos; Petrou, Athanasios; Georgiou, Chrysanthos

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding is a common and effective minimally invasive procedure in the treatment of morbid obesity. Common complications of the procedure include productive burping, ulceration, gastritis, erosion, slippage, problems with the port, bleeding and infection. We report a case of acute appendicitis caused by gastric banding in a female patient. Gastric band encircled the appendix causing lumen obstruction and infection. The patient developed symptoms of topical acute peritonitis and an appendisectomy was performed. PMID:24964326

  9. Impact of Postoperative Venous Thromboembolism on Postoperative Morbidity, Mortality, and Resource Utilization after Hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Newhook, Timothy E; LaPar, Damien J; Walters, Dustin M; Gupta, Shruti; Jolissaint, Joshua S; Adams, Reid B; Brayman, Kenneth L; Zaydfudim, Victor M; Bauer, Todd W

    2015-12-01

    The impact of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after hepatectomy on patient morbidity, mortality, and resource usage remains poorly defined. Better understanding of thromboembolic complications is needed to improve perioperative management and overall outcomes. About 3973 patients underwent hepatectomy within NSQIP between 2005 and 2008. Patient characteristics, operative features, and postoperative correlates of VTE were compared with identify risk factors for VTE and to assess its overall impact on postoperative outcomes. Overall incidence of postoperative VTE was 2.4 per cent. Risk factors for postoperative VTE included older age, male gender, compromised functional status, degree of intraoperative blood transfusion, preoperative albumin level (all P < 0.05), and extent of hepatectomy (P = 0.004). Importantly, major postoperative complications, including acute renal failure, pneumonia, sepsis, septic shock, reintubation, prolonged ventilation, cardiac arrest, and reoperation were all associated with higher rates of VTE (all P < 0.05). Operative mortality was increased among patients with VTE (6.5% vs 2.4%, P = 0.03), and patients with VTE had a 2-fold increase in hospital length of stay (12.0 vs 6.0 days, P < 0.001). Postoperative VTE remains a significant source of morbidity, mortality, and increased resource usage after hepatectomy in the United States. Routine aggressive VTE prophylaxis measures are imperative to avoid development of VTE among patients requiring hepatectomy. PMID:26736156

  10. Morbid obesity and the transition from welfare to work.

    PubMed

    Cawley, John; Danziger, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    This paper utilizes a rich longitudinal data set--the Women's Employment Study (WES)--to investigate whether obesity, which is common among women of low socioeconomic status, is a barrier to employment and earnings for current and former welfare recipients. We find that former welfare recipients who are both White and morbidly obese have been less successful in transitioning from welfare to work. These women are less likely to work at any survey wave, spend a greater percentage of months between waves receiving cash welfare, and have lower monthly earnings at each wave. The magnitude of the difference in labor market outcomes between the morbidly obese and those who are less heavy is in some cases similar in magnitude to the differences in these labor market outcomes between high school dropouts and graduates. In contrast, we find no such labor market differences associated with morbid obesity for African-American respondents. This paper documents the relationship between weight and labor market outcomes for the first time among the welfare population. In addition, it investigates whether the correlation for White females is due to unobserved heterogeneity. We find that after controlling for individual fixed effects, the point estimate of the correlation of morbid obesity and each of the labor market outcomes falls considerably and is no longer statistically significant. These results are consistent with unobserved heterogeneity causing the correlation between morbid obesity and labor market outcomes. Findings are similar after controlling for the respondent's mental and physical health. PMID:16201057

  11. Robotic transabdominal kidney transplantation in a morbidly obese patient.

    PubMed

    Giulianotti, P; Gorodner, V; Sbrana, F; Tzvetanov, I; Jeon, H; Bianco, F; Kinzer, K; Oberholzer, J; Benedetti, E

    2010-06-01

    Kidney transplantation in morbidly obese patients can be technically demanding. Furthermore, morbidly obese patients experience a high rate of wound infections and related complications, which mostly result from the longer length and extent of the incision. These complications can be avoided through minimally invasive surgery; however, conventional laparoscopic instruments are unsuitable for the safe performance of a kidney transplant in morbidly obese patients. Herein, we report the first minimally invasive, total robotic kidney transplant in a morbidly obese patient. A left, deceased donor kidney was transplanted into a 29-year-old woman with a body mass index (BMI) of 41 kg/m(2) who had been on hemodialysis for 5 years. The operation was performed intraabdominally using the DaVinci Robotic Surgical System with 4 trocars and a 7 cm midline incision. The operative time was 223 min, and the blood loss was less than 50 cc. The kidney had immediate graft function. No perioperative complications were observed, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 with normal kidney function. Minimally invasive access and robotic technology facilitated the safe performance of a successful kidney transplant in a morbidly obese patient. PMID:20486912

  12. Spatiotemporally-Resolved Air Exchange Rate as a Modifier of Acute Air Pollution-Related Morbidity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) conducts research in support of EPA mission to protect human health and the environment. HEASD research program supports Goal 1 (Clean Air) and Goal 4 (Healthy People) of EP...

  13. Antecedents of Maternal Separation Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fein, Greta G.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined antecedents of maternal separation anxiety in 83 Italian mothers prior to their infants or toddlers entering group care. Mothers' anxiety did not vary with the child's age. Anxious mothers were younger and less educated, received less support, had temperamentally negative infants, and provided less varied stimulation in the home. (MM)

  14. Plotting Maternity in Three Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinser, Amber E.

    2012-01-01

    This performance text examines complexities of personal and maternal identity in family life. Speaking in first, second, and third person voices, the author offers autoethnographic accounts of the tensions between separateness and connectedness, normative and subjective motherhood, and novice and seasoned perspectives. The piece functions as a…

  15. Androgyny and the Maternal Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Miriam M.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the movement toward androgyny based upon and fostered by an increasing societal emphasis upon "femininity" in its maternal (as opposed to its heterosexual) aspects. Argues that the masculine paradigm promotes differentiation between the sexes, especially the sex objectification of women. (Author/RK)

  16. Acute treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kowey, P R; Marinchak, R A; Rials, S J; Filart, R A

    1998-03-12

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a common clinical entity, responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, but it also accounts for a large percentage of healthcare dollar expenditures. Efforts to treat this arrhythmia in the past have focused on subacute antithrombotic therapy and eventually use of antiarrhythmic drugs for maintenance of sinus rhythm. However, there has been a growing interest in the concept of acute electrical and pharmacologic conversion. This treatment strategy has a number of benefits, including immediate alleviation of patient symptoms, avoidance of antithrombotic therapy, and prevention of electrophysiologic remodeling, which is thought to contribute to the perpetuation of the arrhythmia. There is also increasing evidence that this is a cost-effective strategy in that it may obviate admission to the hospital and the cost of long-term therapy. This article represents a summary of the treatments that may be used acutely to control the ventricular response to AFib, prevent thromboembolic events, and provide for acute conversion either pharmacologically or electrically. It includes information on modalities that are currently available and those that are under active development. We anticipate that an active, acute treatment approach to AFib and atrial flutter will become the therapeutic norm in the next few years, especially as the benefits of these interventions are demonstrated in clinical trials. PMID:9525568

  17. The Effect of Maternal Body Mass Index on Perinatal Outcomes in Women with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Nicole E.; Guild, Camelia; Cheng, Yvonne W.; Caughey, Aaron B.; Halloran, Donna R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of increasing maternal obesity, including superobesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 50 kg/m2), on perinatal outcomes in women with diabetes. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of birth records for all live-born nonanom-alous singleton infants ≥ 37 weeks’ gestation born to Missouri residents with diabetes from 2000 to 2006. Women with either pregestational or gestational diabetes were included. Results There were 14,595 births to women with diabetes meeting study criteria, including 7,082 women with a BMI > 30 kg/m2 (48.5%). Compared with normal-weight women with diabetes, increasing BMI category, especially superobesity, was associated with a significantly increased risk for preeclampsia (adjusted relative risk [aRR] 3.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5, 5.2) and macrosomia (aRR 3.0, 95% CI 1.8, 5.40). The majority of nulliparous obese women with diabetes delivered via cesarean including 50.5% of obese, 61.4% of morbidly obese, and 69.8% of superobese women. The incidence of primary elective cesarean among nulliparous women with diabetes increased significantly with increasing maternal BMI with over 33% of morbidly obese and 39% of superobese women with diabetes delivering electively by cesarean. Conclusion Increasing maternal obesity in women with diabetes is significantly associated with higher risks of perinatal complications, especially cesarean delivery. PMID:23696430

  18. [Cancer morbidity risks among workers of asbestos-cement productions].

    PubMed

    Nagornaia, A M; Varivonchik, D V; Kundiev, Iu I; Fedorenko, Z P; Gorokh, E L; Gulak, L O; Vitte, P N; Karakashian, A N; Lepeshkina, T R; Martynovskaia, T Iu

    2008-01-01

    The retrospective assessment of morbidity rates and cancer pathology risks in workers of asbestosis-cement enterprises of Ukraine has been made. It was established that annual cancer morbidity among workers makes 88,1 per 100 000 of workers (RR = 0.26, CI 95 % 0.06-1.01). The most often cancer pathology was located in digestive organs (48.1%), respiratory organs (18.5%) (lung cancer--11.1%). The mesothelioma of pleura, peritoneum and pericardium were not found. The risks (odds ratio--OR) of cancer morbidity were increased for such organs as: respiratory organs (OR = 2.37), skin (OR = 1.78), digestive organs (OR = 1.34). PMID:18467971

  19. Pregnancy with co-morbidities: Anesthetic aspects during operative intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Bajwa, Sukhwinder Kaur; Ghuman, Gagandeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    The presence of co-morbidities during pregnancy can pose numerous challenges to the attending anesthesiologists during operative deliveries or during the provision of labor analgesia services. The presence of cardiac diseases, endocrinological disorders, respiratory diseases, renal pathologies, hepatic dysfunction, anemia, neurological and musculoskeletal disorders, connective tissue diseases and many others not only influence the obstetric outcome, but can significantly impact the anesthetic technique. The choice of anesthesia during the pregnancy depends upon the type of surgery, the period of gestation, the site of surgery, general condition of patient and so on. Whatever, the anesthetic technique is chosen the methodology should be based on evidentially supported literature and the clinical judgment of the attending anesthesiologist. The list of co-morbid diseases is unending. However, the present review describes the common co-morbidities encountered during pregnancy and their anesthetic management during operative deliveries. PMID:25885972

  20. Respiratory morbidities among working children of gem polishing industries, India.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, R R; Saha, A; Parikh, J R

    2009-02-01

    There are millions of working children worldwide. In gem polishing industry, exposure to occupational hazards of dust and chemicals used in polishing of gemstone may result in respiratory symptoms and respiratory disorders. The present study included 586 exposed and 569 comparison group subjects. Data was collected through personal interview, clinical examination, and chest radiography. The respiratory morbidity was diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms and chest radiography. The study variables included age, sex, daily working hours, and duration of exposure. The mean age of the child laborers was 11.31 +/- 5.34 years. Prevalence of respiratory morbidity was significantly high in the female child laborers. The other study variables namely age, duration of exposure, and daily working hours were found to be statistically non-significant. The prevalence of respiratory morbidity among child laborers of gem polishing industry in Jaipur was found to be 7%. PMID:19318508

  1. Maternal use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors and risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Alwan, S; Bandoli, G; Chambers, C D

    2016-07-01

    Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in late pregnancy has been associated with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), a rare condition with substantial infant mortality and morbidity. Although the increase in absolute risk is small on a population level, it may be of concern to many patients. It remains unclear the extent to which the increased risks reported for PPHN are explained by the underlying maternal illness rather than the use of SSRIs. PMID:27060574

  2. Risk for childhood leukemia associated with maternal and paternal age.

    PubMed

    Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Thomopoulos, Thomas P; Gialamas, Spyros P; Karalexi, Maria A; Biniaris-Georgallis, Stylianos-Iason; Kontogeorgi, Evangelia; Papathoma, Paraskevi; Tsilimidos, Gerasimos; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Iliadou, Anastasia N; Petridou, Eleni T

    2015-12-01

    The role of reproductive factors, such as parental age, in the pathogenesis of childhood leukemias is being intensively examined; the results of individual studies are controversial. This meta-analysis aims to quantitatively synthesize the published data on the association between parental age and risk of two major distinct childhood leukemia types in the offspring. Eligible studies were identified and pooled relative risk (RR) estimates were calculated using random-effects models, separately for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Subgroup analyses were performed by study design, geographical region, adjustment factors; sensitivity analyses and meta-regression analyses were also undertaken. 77 studies (69 case-control and eight cohort) were deemed eligible. Older maternal and paternal age were associated with increased risk for childhood ALL (pooled RR = 1.05, 95 % CI 1.01-1.10; pooled RR = 1.04, 95 % CI 1.00-1.08, per 5 year increments, respectively). The association between maternal age and risk of childhood AML showed a U-shaped pattern, with symmetrically associated increased risk in the oldest (pooled RR = 1.23, 95 % CI 1.06-1.43) and the youngest (pooled RR = 1.23, 95 % CI 1.07-1.40) extremes. Lastly, only younger fathers were at increased risk of having a child with AML (pooled RR = 1.28, 95 % CI 1.04-1.59). In conclusion, maternal and paternal age represents a meaningful risk factor for childhood leukemia, albeit of different effect size by leukemia subtype. Genetic and socio-economic factors may underlie the observed associations. Well-adjusted studies, scheduled by large consortia, are anticipated to satisfactorily address methodological issues, whereas the potential underlying genetic mechanisms should be elucidated by basic research studies. PMID:26537708

  3. Estimating Benzathine Penicillin Need for the Treatment of Pregnant Women Diagnosed with Syphilis during Antenatal Care in High-Morbidity Countries

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Melanie M.; Nurse-Findlay, Stephen; Zhang, Xiulei; Hedman, Lisa; Kamb, Mary L.; Broutet, Nathalie; Kiarie, James

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital syphilis continues to be a preventable cause of global stillbirth and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Shortages of injectable penicillin, the only recommended treatment for pregnant women and infants with syphilis, have been reported by high-morbidity countries. We sought to estimate current and projected annual needs for benzathine penicillin in antenatal care settings for 30 high morbidity countries that account for approximately 33% of the global burden of congenital syphilis. Methods Proportions of antenatal care attendance, syphilis screening coverage in pregnancy, syphilis prevalence among pregnant women, and adverse pregnancy outcomes due to untreated maternal syphilis reported to WHO were applied to 2012 birth estimates for 30 high syphilis burden countries to estimate current and projected benzathine penicillin need for prevention of congenital syphilis. Results Using current antenatal care syphilis screening coverage and seroprevalence, we estimated the total number of women requiring treatment with at least one injection of 2.4 MU of benzathine penicillin in these 30 countries to be 351,016. Syphilis screening coverage at or above 95% for all 30 countries would increase the number of women requiring treatment with benzathine penicillin to 712,030. Based on WHO management guidelines, 351,016 doses of weight-based benzathine penicillin would also be needed for the live-born infants of mothers who test positive and are treated for syphilis in pregnancy. Assuming availability of penicillin and provision of treatment for all mothers diagnosed with syphilis, an estimated 95,938 adverse birth outcomes overall would be prevented including 37,822 stillbirths, 15,814 neonatal deaths, and 34,088 other congenital syphilis cases. Conclusion Penicillin need for maternal and infant syphilis treatment is high among this group of syphilis burdened countries. Initiatives to ensure a stable and adequate supply of benzathine penicillin for treatment

  4. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  5. Maternal control of early embryogenesis in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Smith, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte quality is a critical factor limiting the efficiency of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and pregnancy success in farm animals and humans. ART success is diminished with increased maternal age, suggesting a close link between poor oocyte quality and ovarian-aging. However, the regulation of oocyte quality remains poorly understood. Oocyte quality is functionally linked to ART success because the maternal-to-embryonic transition is dependent on stored maternal factors, which are accumulated in oocytes during oocyte development and growth. The maternal-to-embryonic transition consists of critical developmental processes including maternal RNA depletion and embryonic genome activation. In recent years, key maternal proteins encoded by maternal-effect genes have been determined, primarily using genetically modified mouse models. These proteins are implicated in various aspects of early embryonic development including maternal mRNA degradation, epigenetic reprogramming, signal transduction, protein translation and initiation of embryonic genome activation. Species differences exist in number of cell divisions encompassing the maternal-to-embryonic transition and maternal-effect genes controlling this developmental window. Perturbations of maternal control result in decreased oocyte quality, some of which are associated with ovarian aging. PMID:25695370

  6. Maternal Characteristics Predicting Young Girls’ Disruptive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    van der Molen, Elsa; Hipwell, Alison E.; Vermeiren, Robert; Loeber, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the relative predictive utility of maternal characteristics and parenting skills on the development of girls’ disruptive behavior. The current study used five waves of parent and child-report data from the ongoing Pittsburgh Girls Study to examine these relationships in a sample of 1,942 girls from age 7 to 12 years. Multivariate Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) analyses indicated that European American race, mother’s prenatal nicotine use, maternal depression, maternal conduct problems prior to age 15, and low maternal warmth explained unique variance. Maladaptive parenting partly mediated the effects of maternal depression and maternal conduct problems. Both current and early maternal risk factors have an impact on young girls’ disruptive behavior, providing support for the timing and focus of the prevention of girls’ disruptive behavior. PMID:21391016

  7. Maternal Undernutrition Programs Offspring Adrenal Expression of Steroidogenic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Khorram, Naseem M.; Magee, Thomas R.; Wang, Chen; Desai, Mina; Ross, Michael; Khorram, Omid

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of maternal undernutrition (MUN) on maternal and offspring adrenal steoridogenic enzymes. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were 50% food-restricted from day 10 of gestation until delivery. Control animals received ad libitum food. Offspring were killed on day 1 of life (P1) and at 9 months. We determined the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of steroidogneic enzymes by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerized chain reaction (RT-PCR). Maternal undernutrition inhibited maternal adrenal expression of P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1), 11 beta-hydroxylase (CYP11B1), aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) receptor (ACTH-R; MC2 gene) compared with control offspring. There was a marked downregulation in the expression of CYP11B1, CYP11B2, 11 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and 2 (HSD1 and HSD2), CYP11A1, ACTH receptor, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), and mineralocorticoid receptor (MCR; NR3C2 gene) mRNA in P1 MUN offspring (both genders), with no changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GCR). Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the PCR data for GCR and MCR in P1 offspring and demonstrated lower expression of leptin receptor protein (Ob-Ra/Ob-Rb) and mRNA in P1 MUN offspring. In 9-month adult male MUN offspring, the expression of HSD1, CYP11A1, CYP11B2, Ob-Ra/Ob-Rb, and GCR mRNA were significantly upregulated with a trend toward an increase in ACTH-R and a decrease in 17 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP17A1) expression. In adult female MUN offspring, similar to males, the expression of CYP11A1, ACTH-R, and Ob-Rb mRNA were increased, whereas GCR and CYP17A1 mRNA were decreased. These results indicate that the adrenal gland is a target of nutritional programming. In utero undernutrition has a global suppressive effect on maternal and P1 offspring adrenal steroidogenic enzymes in association with reduced circulating corticosterone levels in P1 offspring

  8. Differential modulation of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene transplacental carcinogenesis: Maternal diets rich in indole-3-carbinol versus sulforaphane

    SciTech Connect

    Shorey, Lyndsey E.; Madeen, Erin P.; Atwell, Lauren L.; Ho, Emily; Löhr, Christiane V.; Pereira, Clifford B.; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Williams, David E.

    2013-07-01

    Cruciferous vegetable components have been documented to exhibit anticancer properties. Targets of action span multiple mechanisms deregulated during cancer progression, ranging from altered carcinogen metabolism to the restoration of epigenetic machinery. Furthermore, the developing fetus is highly susceptible to changes in nutritional status and to environmental toxicants. Thus, we have exploited a mouse model of transplacental carcinogenesis to assess the impact of maternal dietary supplementation on cancer risk in offspring. In this study, transplacental and lactational exposure to a maternal dose of 15 mg/Kg B.W. of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) resulted in significant morbidity of offspring due to an aggressive T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. As in previous studies, indole-3-carbinol (I3C, feed to the dam at 100, 500 or 1000 ppm), derived from cruciferous vegetables, dose-dependently reduced lung tumor multiplicity and also increased offspring survival. Brussels sprout and broccoli sprout powders, selected for their relative abundance of I3C and the bioactive component sulforaphane (SFN), respectively, surprisingly enhanced DBC-induced morbidity and tumorigenesis when incorporated into the maternal diet at 10% wt/wt. Purified SFN, incorporated in the maternal diet at 400 ppm, also decreased the latency of DBC-dependent morbidity. Interestingly, I3C abrogated the effect of SFN when the two purified compounds were administered in equimolar combination (500 ppm I3C and 600 ppm SFN). SFN metabolites measured in the plasma of neonates positively correlated with exposure levels via the maternal diet but not with offspring mortality. These findings provide justification for further study of the safety and bioactivity of cruciferous vegetable phytochemicals at supplemental concentrations during the perinatal period. - Highlights: • Dietary supplementation may modulate cancer risk in a mouse model of lymphoma. • Cruciferous vegetables may not contain sufficient I3C

  9. Morbidity Related Groups (MRG) for Epidemiological Analysis in Outpatient Treatment.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Reinhard; Emcke, Timo; von Arnstedt, Eva; Heidbreder, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Each patient in outpatient treatment is assigned per quarter and corresponding physician to a case group that is strongly related to the morbidity (Morbidity Related Group, MRG). MRG is defined by the drug group on a four character level in the international anatomic-therapeutic-chemical (ATC) classification with the largest costs as an indicator for the severity of the drug treatment. Using severity levels we get a risk adjustment with respect to age and polypharmacy as an indicator for multimorbidity and treatment intensity. By application of MRG groups we generate a patient type classification in relation to physicians and a distance structure of the medical disciplines. PMID:27577493

  10. [Anorexia nervosa is frequently associated with psychiatric co-morbidity].

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Anna; Arnfred, Sidse Marie Hemmingsen

    2015-09-21

    Recent literature is explored focusing on the relationship between symptoms of anorexia nervosa (AN) and other psychiatric disorders and lines of treatment. In AN, restrictive subtype, anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorders are the most frequent co-morbidities. In AN, bulimic subtype, depression, emotional instability/borderline and dependency disorders are most frequent. Psychopharmacological treatment could be tried in cases with AN and co-morbid depression, but otherwise the evidence base is lacking and pharmacological treatment relies on case stories and experience. PMID:26418641

  11. Prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in visually impaired children.

    PubMed

    Bakhla, Ajay Kumar; Sinha, Vinod Kumar; Verma, Vijay; Sarkhel, Sujit

    2011-03-01

    This study was done to measure psychiatric morbidity and associated sociodemographic variables among visually impaired children. 92 students of age range 6 to 20 years from four schools for the blind, in Ranchi, were screened with verbal Hindi translation of General Health Questionnaire 60. Diagnostic Interview Schedule Parent version was applied to establish psychiatric diagnosis on primary caretakers of those who scored above cutoff. Fourteen scored above cut off and psychiatric diagnoses of 8 children were established. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among visually impaired children was found to be 8.69% No sociodemographic variable was associated with the occurrence of psychiatric illness. PMID:21169654

  12. Ureaplasma species: role in neonatal morbidities and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Viscardi, Rose Marie

    2014-01-01

    The genital mycoplasma species, Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum are the most common organisms isolated from infected amniotic fluid and placentas, and they contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes including preterm birth and neonatal morbidities. In our institution, almost half of the preterm infants of less than 32 weeks gestation are Ureaplasma-positive in one or more compartment (respiratory, blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid), indicating that these organisms are the most common pathogens affecting this population. This review will focus on the compelling epidemiological and experimental evidence linking perinatal Ureaplasma species exposure to important morbidities of prematurity, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular haemorrhage and necrotising enterocolitis. PMID:23960141

  13. The Evolution of Multivariate Maternal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Kuijper, Bram; Johnstone, Rufus A.; Townley, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest in predicting the social and ecological contexts that favor the evolution of maternal effects. Most predictions focus, however, on maternal effects that affect only a single character, whereas the evolution of maternal effects is poorly understood in the presence of suites of interacting traits. To overcome this, we simulate the evolution of multivariate maternal effects (captured by the matrix M) in a fluctuating environment. We find that the rate of environmental fluctuations has a substantial effect on the properties of M: in slowly changing environments, offspring are selected to have a multivariate phenotype roughly similar to the maternal phenotype, so that M is characterized by positive dominant eigenvalues; by contrast, rapidly changing environments favor Ms with dominant eigenvalues that are negative, as offspring favor a phenotype which substantially differs from the maternal phenotype. Moreover, when fluctuating selection on one maternal character is temporally delayed relative to selection on other traits, we find a striking pattern of cross-trait maternal effects in which maternal characters influence not only the same character in offspring, but also other offspring characters. Additionally, when selection on one character contains more stochastic noise relative to selection on other traits, large cross-trait maternal effects evolve from those maternal traits that experience the smallest amounts of noise. The presence of these cross-trait maternal effects shows that individual maternal effects cannot be studied in isolation, and that their study in a multivariate context may provide important insights about the nature of past selection. Our results call for more studies that measure multivariate maternal effects in wild populations. PMID:24722346

  14. Trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms over her child's life span: Relation to adrenocortical, cardiovascular, and emotional functioning in children

    PubMed Central

    Gump, Brooks B.; Reihman, Jacki; Stewart, Paul; Lonky, ED; Darvill, Tom; Granger, Douglas A.; Matthews, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal depression has a number of adverse effects on children. In the present study, maternal depressive symptoms were assessed (using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale) when their child was 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, 4.25 years, 6 years, 7 years, 8 years, and 10 years of age. At 9.5 years of age, children's (94 females, 82 males) depressive symptoms as well as cardiovascular and cortisol levels during baseline and two psychologically stressful tasks were measured. Using multilevel modeling, maternal depressive symptom trajectories were considered in relation to their child's adrenocortical and cardiovascular responses to acute stress. Our goal was to determine maternal depressive symptom trajectories for children with elevated cardiovascular and cortisol reactivity to acute stress and elevated depressive symptoms. In general, those mothers with chronically elevated depressive symptoms over their child's life span had children with lower initial cortisol, higher cardiac output and stroke volume in response to acute stress, lower vascular resistance during acute stress tasks, and significantly more depressive symptoms at 9.5 years of age. These results are discussed in the context of established associations among hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis dysregulation, depression, and cardiovascular disease. PMID:19144231

  15. Current Concepts of Maternal Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lowensohn, Richard I.; Stadler, Diane D.; Naze, Christie

    2016-01-01

    Background A nutrient-rich maternal diet before and during pregnancy is associated with improved fetal health, more appropriate birth weight, and increased rates of maternal and infant survival. Physicians need a better understanding of the role of diet in shaping fetal outcomes. Given this background, we reviewed and summarized articles on maternal nutrition found in MEDLINE since 1981, written in English, and limited to human subjects. For the Offspring Maternal diets high in sugar and fat lead to an increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease later in life. Folic acid should be supplemented prior to conception and continued through at least the first 28 days of fetal life to prevent neural tube defects, and vitamin C should be given to women who smoke to lower the incidence of asthma and wheezing in the children. Iodine deficiency is increasing, and iodine should be included in prenatal supplements. If the maternal hemoglobin is 7 g/dL or more, there is no evidence that iron supplementation is needed. Fish intake during pregnancy is protective against atopic outcomes, whereas high-meat diets contribute to elevated adult blood pressure and hypersecretion of cortisol. For the Mother Calcium supplementation lowers the risk of preeclampsia and hypertensive disease in pregnancy. Conclusions Given the limits of our current knowledge, a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and selected fish is desirable for the best outcomes. Diets high in sugar and fat lead to higher rates of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Folic acid, iodine, and calcium in all pregnant women and vitamin C in smokers are the only supplements so far shown to be of value for routine use. The physician treating a pregnant woman should be ready to advise a healthy diet for the benefit of the fetus. Target Audience Obstetricians and gynecologists, family physicians Learning Objectives After participating in this activity, the

  16. Neonatal respiratory distress in Omdurman Maternity Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Selma MA; Nasr, Abdelhaleem

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal respiratory distress (NRD) is a common neonatal problem, which is responsible for high morbidity and mortality. There are few published studies in developing countries addressing neonatal respiratory distress. There is no previously published study in Sudan on this problem. The objective of the study is to determine the frequency, different causes, immediate outcome. It was a prospective, descriptive, cross sectional hospital-based study which was carried out in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of Omdurman Maternity Hospital, between February-March 2013. The study enrolled all Sudanese newborns from 0-28 days including normal, low and high birth weight of different gestational ages admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit and diagnosed as neonatal respiratory distress. The frequency of NRD was calculated, the causes and immediate outcome were determined. Results showed that the frequency rate of NRD was (4.83%) among the total number of hospital (2071) live births during the period of the study. The commonest causes were transient tachypnoea of the newborn (TTN) in 28% of cases, sepsis in 24% of cases and hyaline membrane disease (HMD) in 15% of cases. The outcome of NRD was: cure in 56% of cases, death in 36% of cases, and patients discharged with complications in 8% of cases. In conclusion, the study confirmed the importance of NRD with a frequency rate of 4.83%, morbidity of 8% and mortality of 36% of cases. The causes and immediate outcome were determined and discussed. Some recommendations were suggested in order to reduce its frequency, morbidity and mortality. PMID:27493392

  17. Incidence and associated pre-morbid diagnoses of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bruce K.; Chandra, Rakesh K.; Pollak, Jonathan; Kato, Atsushi; Conley, David B.; Peters, Anju T.; Grammer, Leslie C.; Avila, Pedro C.; Kern, Robert C.; Stewart, Walter F.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Schwartz, Brian S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a prevalent condition with underexplored risk factors. Objectives To determine CRS incidence and evaluate associations with a range of pre-morbid medical conditions for CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP) and CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) using real-world clinical practice data. Methods Electronic health record (EHR) data from 446,480 Geisinger Clinic primary care patients was used for a retrospective longitudinal cohort study for data from 2001–2010. Using logistic regression, newly diagnosed CRS cases between 2007-2009 were compared to frequency-matched controls on pre-morbid factors in the immediate (0-6 months), intermediate (7-24 months) and entire observed timeframes prior to diagnosis. Results : The average incidence of CRS was 83 (±13) CRSwNP cases per 100,000 person-years and 1048 (±78) CRSsNP cases per 100,000 person-years. Between 2007-2009, 595 patients with incident CRSwNP and 7523 patients with incident CRSsNP were identified and compared to 8118 controls. Compared to controls and CRSsNP, CRSwNP patients were older and more likely to be male. Prior to diagnosis, CRS patients had a higher prevalence of acute rhinosinusitis, allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinitis, asthma, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), adenotonsillitis, sleep apnea, anxiety and headaches (all p < 0.001). CRSsNP had a higher pre-morbid prevalence of infections of the upper and lower airway, skin/soft tissue and urinary tract (all p < 0.001). In the immediate and intermediate timeframes analyzed, patients who developed CRS had more outpatient encounters and antibiotic prescriptions (p < 0.001) but guideline-recommended diagnostic testing was performed in a minority of cases. Conclusions Patients who are diagnosed with CRS have a higher pre-morbid prevalence of anxiety, headaches, GERD, sleep apnea and infections of the respiratory system and some non-respiratory sites that results in higher antibiotic, corticosteroid and health care

  18. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  19. Comparison of maternal and fetal outcomes of IVF and spontaneously conceived twin pregnancies: three year experience of a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Göçmen, Ahmet; Güven, Şirin; Bağci, Simge; Çekmez, Yasemin; Şanlıkan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare maternal and fetal outcomes of spontaneously conceived and in-vitro fertilization (IVF) twin pregnancies that were admitted to our obstetric clinic and delivered between January 1, 2011 to November 1, 2014. Material method: A total of 84 twin pregnancies were enrolled for the study and divided into two groups: group 1 as IVF (n = 19) and group 2 as spontaneously conceived (n = 65) twin pregnancies. Data of neonatal various morbidities needs neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), sepsis, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and maternal morbidities such as preeclampsia, eclampsia, postpartum bleeding, gestational diabetes mellitus(GDM) were collected by hospital records. Results: There were no statistical difference between two groups regarding hypertension related to pregnancy, intrauterine growth retardation, Apgar scores, NICU needs, birth weight and height (P > 0.05). The rate of premature rupture of membranes, maternal age, antenatal anemia and premature birth were detected higher in IVF group when compared with the other group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Although twin pregnancies, regardless of conception method are high risk pregnancies in terms of obstetric and perinatal outcomes, premature rupture of membranes, maternal age, antenatal anemia and premature birth risks are higher in IVF twin pregnancies. PMID:26131238

  20. Co morbidities of Myofascial Neck Pain among Information Technology Professionals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to identify the musculoskeletal co-morbidities of neck pain of myofascial origin among IT professionals. Methods A retrospective report analysis of 5357 IT professionals from various IT companies in India was conducted. Demographic details, type and intensity of the musculoskeletal problems, employee feedbacks on status of musculoskeletal health and physician’s diagnosis were analysed. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the age, gender, body area affected and nature of work. Chi square test was used to find the association between musculoskeletal co-morbidities and myofascial neck pain (MNP). Results The study participants were predominantly males (71%). 41% of the population used laptops, 35% desktops and 24% both. Neck pain was the commonest reported symptom, followed by low back, shoulder and arm pain respectively. Statistical analysis also revealed that low back pain and shoulder pain, had a significant association with neck pain. Further analysis revealed that there was a significant association between the presence of MNP and thoracic outlet syndrome (p < 0.001) and fibromyalgia syndrome (p < 0.001). Other than the listed co-morbidities, eye strain was also found to be associated with MNP. Conclusions Low back pain and shoulder pain was found to be co morbid symptoms noted among IT professionals with MNP. Thoracic outlet syndrome and fibromyalgia were found to be the most commonly associated disorders with MNP among IT professionals. PMID:25852935

  1. 76 FR 8294 - TRICARE Program; Surgery for Morbid Obesity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... rule in the Federal Register (47 FR 57491-57493) that restricted surgical intervention for morbid... Comments On October 29, 2009 (74 FR 55792-55794), the Office of the Secretary of Defense published a..., cholecystitis, narcolepsy, Pickwickian Syndrome (and other severe respiratory disease), hypothalamic...

  2. The Compression of Morbidity: Miscellaneous Comments about a Theme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fries, James F.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the Compression of Morbidity hypothesis, which maintains that the age of onset of significant disability may be moved upward by postponement of chronic illness. Objections to the thesis are examined, a series of qualitative and quantitative confusions are discussed, and predictions for the future offered. (Author/JAC)

  3. Interleukin-17A Gene Expression in Morbidly Obese Women.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Gonzalez, Fernando; Auguet, Teresa; Aragonès, Gemma; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Berlanga, Alba; Martinez, Salomé; Martí, Andreu; Sabench, Fátima; Hernandez, Mercé; Aguilar, Carmen; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Jorba, Rosa; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2015-01-01

    Data from recent studies conducted in rodent models and humans suggest that interleukin-17A (IL-17A) plays a role in the induction of inflammation in adipose tissue during obesity. The aim of this study was to assess the gene expression of IL-17A in adipose tissue of morbidly obese patients. We used RT-PCR to evaluate the expression of IL-17A and several adipo/cytokines in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) of 10 normal-weight control women (BMI < 25 kg/m2) and 30 morbidly obese women (MO, BMI > 40 kg/m2). We measured serum levels of IL-17A and adipo/cytokines in MO and normal weight women. IL-17A expression was significantly higher in VAT than in SAT in MO patients (p = 0.0127). It was very low in normal-weight controls in both VAT and SAT tissues. We found positive correlations between IL-17A and IL-6, lipocalin-2 and resistin in VAT of MO patients. The circulating level of IL-17A was higher in the normal-weight group than the MO patients (p = 0.032), and it was significantly related to adiponectin and TNFRII levels. In conclusion, IL-17A expression in VAT is increased in morbidly obese women, which suggests a link between obesity and innate immunity in low-grade chronic inflammation in morbidly obese women. PMID:26263971

  4. Interleukin-17A Gene Expression in Morbidly Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Gonzalez, Fernando; Auguet, Teresa; Aragonès, Gemma; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Berlanga, Alba; Martinez, Salomé; Martí, Andreu; Sabench, Fátima; Hernandez, Mercé; Aguilar, Carmen; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Jorba, Rosa; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2015-01-01

    Data from recent studies conducted in rodent models and humans suggest that interleukin-17A (IL-17A) plays a role in the induction of inflammation in adipose tissue during obesity. The aim of this study was to assess the gene expression of IL-17A in adipose tissue of morbidly obese patients. We used RT-PCR to evaluate the expression of IL-17A and several adipo/cytokines in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) of 10 normal-weight control women (BMI < 25 kg/m2) and 30 morbidly obese women (MO, BMI > 40 kg/m2). We measured serum levels of IL-17A and adipo/cytokines in MO and normal weight women. IL-17A expression was significantly higher in VAT than in SAT in MO patients (p = 0.0127). It was very low in normal-weight controls in both VAT and SAT tissues. We found positive correlations between IL-17A and IL-6, lipocalin-2 and resistin in VAT of MO patients. The circulating level of IL-17A was higher in the normal-weight group than the MO patients (p = 0.032), and it was significantly related to adiponectin and TNFRII levels. In conclusion, IL-17A expression in VAT is increased in morbidly obese women, which suggests a link between obesity and innate immunity in low-grade chronic inflammation in morbidly obese women. PMID:26263971

  5. Health and morbidity survey, Seychelles, 1956-57

    PubMed Central

    Spitz, A. J. W.

    1960-01-01

    Adequate knowledge of existing health and morbidity conditions is the basis for all planning of future health services. For this reason, a health and morbidity survey of the population of the Seychelles was carried out in 1956-57 under the joint auspices of the Seychelles Government and the World Health Organization. Statistical sampling methods were used and the information was obtained by the household interview method. Health, morbidity and relevant demographic data were thus disclosed for the first time for Seychelles. Basic information was obtained on: general morbidity of the population, including dental and nutritional status, malnutrition, incidence of intestinal diseases and other easily diagnosable conditions; growth and weight curves of children up to the age of 16; haemoglobin levels; erythrocyte sedimentation rates; general living conditions such as housing and overcrowding, social status and latrine arrangements; the connexion of soil pollution with the incidence of amoebiasis and helminthiasis; and lastly, the incidence of the sickle cell trait, eosinophilia and positive serological reactions to the Chediak test (for manifest or latent syphilis). The findings are presented with a minimum of remarks and interpretation. PMID:13833401

  6. Graph theory-based measures as predictors of gene morbidity.

    PubMed

    Massanet-Vila, Raimon; Caminal, Pere; Perera, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that some graph properties of protein interaction networks might be related with gene morbidity. In particular, it has been suggested that when a polymorphism affects a gene, it is more likely to produce a disease if the node degree in the interaction network is higher than for other genes. However, these results do not take into account the possible bias introduced by the variance in the amount of information available for different genes. This work models the relationship between the morbidity associated with a gene and the degrees of the nodes in the protein interaction network controlling the amount of information available in the literature. A set of 7461 genes and 3665 disease identifiers reported in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) was mined jointly with 9630 nodes and 38756 interactions of the Human Proteome Resource Database (HPRD). The information available from a gene was measured through PubMed mining. Results suggest that the correlation between the degree of a node in the protein interaction network and its morbidity is largely contributed by the information available from the gene. Even though the results suggest a positive correlation between the degree of a node and its morbidity while controlling the information factor, we believe this correlation has to be taken with caution for it can be affected by other factors not taken into account in this study. PMID:21096114

  7. Morbidity in early Parkinson's disease and prior to diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Rune; Kjellberg, Jakob; Ibsen, Rikke; Jennum, Poul

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonmotor symptoms are probably present prior to, early on, and following, a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Nonmotor symptoms may hold important information about the progression of Parkinson's disease. Objective To evaluated the total early and prediagnostic morbidities in the 3 years before a hospital contact leading to a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Methods Retrospective morbidity data from Danish National Patient Registry records (1997–2007) of 10,490 adult patients with a secondary care diagnosis of Parkinson's disease were compared with 42,505 control cases. Results Parkinson's disease was associated with significantly higher morbidity rates associated with conditions in the following categories: mental and psychiatric, nervous system, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal system and connective tissue, genitourinary, abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, injury, poisoning and certain other external causes, and other factors influencing health status and contact with health services. It was negatively associated with neoplasm, cardiovascular, and respiratory diseases. Conclusions Patients with a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease present significant differences in morbidities early on, following, and prior to, their diagnosis, compared with healthy controls. PMID:24944873

  8. Morbid Obesity and the Transition from Welfare to Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawley, John; Danziger, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    This paper utilizes a rich longitudinal data set--the Women's Employment Study (WES)--to investigate whether obesity, which is common among women of low socioeconomic status, is a barrier to employment and earnings for current and former welfare recipients. We find that former welfare recipients who are both White and morbidly obese have been less…

  9. Acute aortic dissection in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaohua; Yang, Shouguo; Wang, Fangshun; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic dissection occurring during pregnancy represents a lethal risk to both the mother and fetus. Management of parturient with acute aortic dissection is complex. We report our experience of two pregnancies with type A acute aortic dissection. One patient is a 31-year-old pregnant woman (33rd gestational week) with a bicuspid aortic valve and the other is a 32-year-old pregnant woman (30th gestational week) with the Marfan syndrome. In both cases, a combined emergency operation consisting of Cesarean section, total hysterectomy prior to corrective surgery for aortic dissection was successfully performed within a relatively short period of time after the onset. Both patients' postoperative recovery was uneventful, and we achieved a favorable maternal and fetal outcome. PMID:25085319

  10. Global Morbidity and Mortality of Leptospirosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Juan; Kane, Michael; Torgerson, Paul; Martinez-Silveira, Martha S.; Stein, Claudia; Abela-Ridder, Bernadette; Ko, Albert I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis, a spirochaetal zoonosis, occurs in diverse epidemiological settings and affects vulnerable populations, such as rural subsistence farmers and urban slum dwellers. Although leptospirosis is a life-threatening disease and recognized as an important cause of pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome, the lack of global estimates for morbidity and mortality has contributed to its neglected disease status. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a systematic review of published morbidity and mortality studies and databases to extract information on disease incidence and case fatality ratios. Linear regression and Monte Carlo modelling were used to obtain age and gender-adjusted estimates of disease morbidity for countries and Global Burden of Disease (GBD) and WHO regions. We estimated mortality using models that incorporated age and gender-adjusted disease morbidity and case fatality ratios. The review identified 80 studies on disease incidence from 34 countries that met quality criteria. In certain regions, such as Africa, few quality assured studies were identified. The regression model, which incorporated country-specific variables of population structure, life expectancy at birth, distance from the equator, tropical island, and urbanization, accounted for a significant proportion (R2 = 0.60) of the variation in observed disease incidence. We estimate that there were annually 1.03 million cases (95% CI 434,000–1,750,000) and 58,900 deaths (95% CI 23,800–95,900) due to leptospirosis worldwide. A large proportion of cases (48%, 95% CI 40–61%) and deaths (42%, 95% CI 34–53%) were estimated to occur in adult males with age of 20–49 years. Highest estimates of disease morbidity and mortality were observed in GBD regions of South and Southeast Asia, Oceania, Caribbean, Andean, Central, and Tropical Latin America, and East Sub-Saharan Africa. Conclusions/Significance Leptospirosis is among the leading zoonotic causes of morbidity worldwide and

  11. Maternal antioxidant blocks programmed cardiovascular and behavioural stress responses in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    ROGHAIR, Robert D.; WEMMIE, John A.; VOLK, Kenneth A.; SCHOLZ, Thomas D.; LAMB, Fred S.; SEGAR, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Intra-uterine growth restriction is an independent risk factor for adult psychiatric and cardiovascular diseases. In humans, intra-uterine growth restriction is associated with increased placental and fetal oxidative stress, as well as down-regulation of placental 11β-HSD (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase). Decreased placental 11β-HSD activity increases fetal exposure to maternal glucocorticoids, further increasing fetal oxidative stress. To explore the developmental origins of co-morbid hypertension and anxiety disorders, we increased fetal glucocorticoid exposure by administering the 11β-HSD inhibitor CBX (carbenoxolone; 12 mg · kg−1 of body weight · day−1) during the final week of murine gestation. We hypothesized that maternal antioxidant (tempol throughout pregnancy) would block glucocorticoid-programmed anxiety, vascular dysfunction and hypertension. Anxiety-related behaviour (conditioned fear) and the haemodynamic response to stress were measured in adult mice. Maternal CBX administration significantly increased conditioned fear responses of adult females. Among the offspring of CBX-injected dams, maternal tempol markedly attenuated the behavioural and cardiovascular responses to psychological stress. Compared with offspring of undisturbed dams, male offspring of dams that received daily third trimester saline injections had increased stress-evoked pressure responses that were blocked by maternal tempol. In contrast, tempol did not block CBX-induced aortic dysfunction in female mice (measured by myography and lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence). We conclude that maternal stress and exaggerated fetal glucocorticoid exposure enhance sex-specific stress responses, as well as alterations in aortic reactivity. Because concurrent tempol attenuated conditioned fear and stress reactivity even among the offspring of saline-injected dams, we speculate that antenatal stressors programme offspring stress reactivity in a cycle that may be broken by antenatal

  12. Assessing Community Based Improved Maternal Neonatal Child Survival (IMNCS) Program in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Sabuj Kanti; Chowdhury, Tridib Roy; Ishaque, Tanveen; Shah, Rasheduzzaman

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A community based approach before, during and after child birth has been proven effective address the burden of maternal, neonatal and child morbidity and mortality in the low and middle income countries. We aimed to examine the overall change in maternal and newborn health outcomes due the “Improved Maternal Newborn and Child Survival” (IMNCS) project, which was implemented by BRAC in rural communities of Bangladesh. Methods The intervention was implemented in four districts for duration of 5-years, while two districts served as comparison areas. The intervention was delivered by community health workers who were trained on essential maternal, neonatal and child health care services. A baseline survey was conducted in 2008 among 7, 200 women with pregnancy outcome in last year or having a currently alive child of 12–59 months. A follow-up survey was administered in 2012–13 among 4, 800 women of similar characteristics in the same villages. Findings We observed significant improvements in maternal and essential newborn care in intervention areas over time, especially in health care seeking behaviors. The proportion of births taking place at home declined in the intervention districts from 84.3% at baseline to 71.2% at end line (P<0.001). Proportion of deliveries with skilled attendant was higher in intervention districts (28%) compared to comparison districts (27.4%). The number of deliveries was almost doubled at public sector facility comparing with baseline (P<0.001). Significant improvement was also observed in healthy cord care practice, delayed bathing of the new-born and reduction of infant mortality in intervention districts compared to that of comparison districts. Conclusions This study demonstrates that community-based efforts offer encouraging evidence and value for combining maternal, neonatal and child health care package. This approach might be considered at larger scale in similar settings with limited resources. PMID:26340672

  13. The challenge of measuring multi-morbidity and its costs.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    The ageing of the population across developed countries and beyond has increased the importance of examining multi-morbidity. The recent paper by Arbelle et al. [Isr J of Health Policy Res. 2014;3:29] on multiple chronic conditions in Israel's Maccabi Health Care System (MHC) is a welcome and interesting contribution to the literature on this topic. They found that the prevalence of multiple chronic conditions among the MHC population rises with age, is lower for higher socioeconomic groups, and is higher than in a primary care population in Scotland studied by Barnett et al. [Lancet. 2012;380:37-43]. The difference in prevalence between the two studies is unlikely to reflect entirely, or probably even mainly, real differences in morbidity rates between the two countries. Systematic reviews have highlighted large differences in the prevalence of multi-morbidity in different studies. Although the Israeli and Scottish study used similar definitions and methods, the nature of the source data differed. It seems likely that the incentives to record the full range of patients' conditions may differ between data sources depending on the uses of the data, which may in turn depend on the country's health care financing system. If this is correct, it will complicate comparisons between different jurisdictions. It is important to consider not only the prevalence of multi-morbidity but also its costs to the health system and to wider society. Cost of illness studies can be helpful in informing decisions about prioritisation of resources. Multi-morbidity complicates such studies. The overall costs of health and social care for people with a specific condition would include costs relating to any comorbidities. To examine the marginal impact on overall costs of each condition among those with multiple conditions is likely to be complex and arguably not especially useful. PMID:25949796

  14. The world health organization multicountry survey on maternal and newborn health: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective interventions to reduce mortality and morbidity in maternal and newborn health already exist. Information about quality and performance of care and the use of critical interventions are useful for shaping improvements in health care and strengthening the contribution of health systems towards the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. The near-miss concept and the criterion-based clinical audit are proposed as useful approaches for obtaining such information in maternal and newborn health care. This paper presents the methods of the World Health Organization Multicountry Study in Maternal and Newborn Health. The main objectives of this study are to determine the prevalence of maternal near-miss cases in a worldwide network of health facilities, evaluate the quality of care using the maternal near-miss concept and the criterion-based clinical audit, and develop the near-miss concept in neonatal health. Methods/Design This is a large cross-sectional study being implemented in a worldwide network of health facilities. A total of 370 health facilities from 29 countries will take part in this study and produce nearly 275,000 observations. All women giving birth, all maternal near-miss cases regardless of the gestational age and delivery status and all maternal deaths during the study period comprise the study population. In each health facility, medical records of all eligible women will be reviewed during a data collection period that ranges from two to three months according to the annual number of deliveries. Discussion Implementing the systematic identification of near-miss cases, mapping the use of critical evidence-based interventions and analysing the corresponding indicators are just the initial steps for using the maternal near-miss concept as a tool to improve maternal and newborn health. The findings of projects using approaches similar to those described in this manuscript will be a good starter for a more comprehensive dialogue with

  15. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  16. Using the new ICD-MM classification system for attribution of cause of maternal death--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ameh, C A; Adegoke, A; Pattinson, R C; van den Broek, N

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the causes of and factors contributing to maternal deaths is critically important for development of interventions that reduce the global burden of maternal mortality and morbidity. The International Classification of Diseases-Maternal Mortality (ICD-MM) classification of cause of death during pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium was applied to data obtained from maternal death reviews (MDR) for 4558 maternal deaths from five countries in sub-Saharan Africa. None of the data sets identified type of maternal death. Information obtained via MDR is generally sufficient to agree on classification of cause of death to the levels of type and group. The terms 'underlying cause of death' and 'contributing conditions' were used differently in different settings and a specific underlying cause of death was frequently not recorded. Application of ICD-MM resulted in the reclassification of 3.1% (9/285) of cases to the group 'unanticipated complications of management', previously recorded as obstetric haemorrhage or unknown. An increased number of cases were assigned to the groups pregnancy-related infection (5.6-10.2%) and pregnancies with abortive outcome (3.4-4.9%) when a clear distinction was made between women who died 'with' HIV/AIDS of obstetric causes (direct maternal death) and AIDS-related indirect maternal deaths (group 'non-obstetric complications'). Similarly, anaemia and obstructed labour were more frequently identified as contributing factors than underlying cause of death. It would be helpful if MDR forms could have explicitly stated variables called: type, group and underlying cause of death as well as a dedicated section to the most frequently occurring contributing conditions recognised in that setting. PMID:25236631

  17. Reducing maternal, newborn, and infant mortality globally: an integrated action agenda.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Cabral, Sergio; Chan, Chok-Wan; Keenan, William J

    2012-10-01

    There has been increasing awareness over recent years of the persisting burden of worldwide maternal, newborn, and child mortality. The majority of maternal deaths occur during labor, delivery, and the immediate postpartum period, with obstetric hemorrhage as the primary medical cause of death. Other causes of maternal mortality include hypertensive diseases, sepsis/infections, obstructed labor, and abortion-related complications. Recent estimates indicate that in 2009 an estimated 3.3 million babies died in the first month of life and that overall, 7.3 million children under 5 die each year. Recent data also suggest that sufficient evidence- and consensus-based interventions exist to address reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health globally, and if implemented at scale, these have the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality. There is an urgent need to put elements in place to promote integrated interventions among healthcare professionals and their associations. What is needed is the political will and partnerships to implement evidence-based interventions at scale. PMID:22883919

  18. Decidual Cox2 inhibition improves fetal and maternal outcomes in a preeclampsia-like mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Ashley K.; Bartos, Amanda; Heyward, Christa Y.; Lob, Heinrich E.; Isroff, Catherine E.; Butler, Scott D.; Shapiro, Stephanie E.; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Davisson, Robin L.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a disorder of pregnancy that manifests as late gestational maternal hypertension and proteinuria and can be life-threatening to both the mother and baby. It is believed that abnormal placentation is responsible for the cascade of events leading to the maternal syndrome. Embryo implantation is critical to establishing a healthy pregnancy. Defective implantation can cause adverse “ripple effects,” leading to abnormal decidualization and placentation, retarded fetal development, and poor pregnancy outcomes, such as PE and fetal growth restriction. The precise mechanism(s) of implantation defects that lead to PE remain elusive. BPH/5 mice, which spontaneously develop the cardinal features of PE, show peri-implantation defects including upregulation of Cox2 and IL-15 at the maternal-fetal interface. This was associated with decreased decidual natural killer (dNK) cells, which have important roles in establishing placental perfusion. Interestingly, a single administration of a Cox2 inhibitor (celecoxib) during decidualization restrained Cox2 and IL-15 expression, restored dNK cell numbers, improved fetal growth, and attenuated late gestational hypertension in BPH/5 female mice. This study provides evidence that decidual overexpression of Cox2 and IL-15 may trigger the adverse pregnancy outcomes reflected in the preeclamptic syndrome, underscoring the idea that Cox2 inhibitor treatment is an effective strategy for the prevention of PE-associated fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. PMID:27159542

  19. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke. PMID:26802767

  20. Clinical management of patients with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Joseph W

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is a common and serious complication of congenital and acquired heart disease, and it is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. When a patient is admitted to the hospital with acute heart failure, there are several important goals for the hospital admission, including maintaining adequate perfusion, establishing the underlying aetiology for the heart failure, patient and family education, and discharge from the hospital in a stable condition. The pathway to home discharge is variable and may include inotropic therapy, mechanical circulatory support, and/or heart transplantation. This review will cover the epidemiology, presentation, and management of acute heart failure in children. PMID:26377712

  1. Too poor to live? A case study of vulnerability and maternal mortality in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Storeng, Katerini T; Drabo, Seydou; Filippi, Véronique

    2013-03-01

    This paper examines the concept of vulnerability in the context of maternal morbidity and mortality in Burkina Faso, an impoverished country in West Africa. Drawing on a longitudinal cohort study into the consequences of life-threatening or 'near miss' obstetric complications, we provide an in-depth case study of one woman's experience of such morbidity and its aftermath. We follow Kalizeta's trajectory from her near miss and the stillbirth of her child to her death from pregnancy-related hypertension after a subsequent delivery less than two years later, in order to examine the impact of severe and persistent illness and catastrophic health expenditure on her health and on her family's everyday life. Kalizeta's case illustrates how vulnerability in health emerges and is maintained or exacerbated over time. Even where social arrangements are supportive, structural impediments, including unaffordable and inadequate healthcare, can severely limit individual resilience to mitigate the negative social and economic consequences of ill health. PMID:23549700

  2. Acute pulmonary oedema in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A T; Solnordal, C B

    2012-06-01

    Acute pulmonary oedema in pregnant women is an uncommon but life-threatening event. The aims of this review are to address why pulmonary oedema occurs in pregnant women and to discuss immediate management. We performed a systematic literature search of electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library, using the key words obstetrics, pregnancy, acute pulmonary oedema, pregnancy complications, maternal, cardiac function and haemodynamics. We present a simple clinical classification of acute pulmonary oedema in pregnancy into pulmonary oedema occurring in normotensive or hypotensive women (i.e. without hypertension), and acute pulmonary oedema occurring in hypertensive women, which allows focused management. Pre-eclampsia remains an important cause of hypertensive acute pulmonary oedema in pregnancy and preventive strategies include close clinical monitoring and restricted fluid administration. Immediate management of acute pulmonary oedema includes oxygenation, ventilation and circulation control with venodilators. Pregnancy-specific issues include consideration of the physiological changes of pregnancy, the risk of aspiration and difficult airway, reduced respiratory and metabolic reserve, avoidance of aortocaval compression and delivery of the fetus. PMID:22420683

  3. Maternal Depression and Parent Management Training Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jack; McQuillin, Samuel; Butler, Ashley M; Axelrad, Marni E

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the impact of maternal depression on reductions in children's behavior problems severity following implementation of the Brief Behavioral Intervention-a brief, manualized parent management training treatment. The parents of 87 children aged 2-6 years of age received parent management training at a metropolitan hospital. Parents of participants completed measures of externalizing behavior and maternal depression. The association between pre-post treatment change in externalizing behavior and maternal depression was examined using an autoregressive cross-lagged model. Results showed that self-reported maternal depressive symptoms at pre-treatment negatively influenced the overall magnitude of reduction of reported externalizing behaviors in children following treatment. Results indicate that aspects of family functioning not specifically targeted by parent management training, such as maternal depression, significantly affect treatment outcomes. Clinicians providing parent management training may benefit from assessing for maternal depression and modifying treatment as indicated. PMID:27448152

  4. Essential pre-pregnancy and pregnancy interventions for improved maternal, newborn and child health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The statistics related to pregnancy and its outcomes are staggering: annually, an estimated 250000-280000 women die during childbirth. Unfortunately, a large number of women receive little or no care during or before pregnancy. At a period of critical vulnerability, interventions can be effectively delivered to improve the health of women and their newborns and also to make their pregnancy safe. This paper reviews the interventions that are most effective during preconception and pregnancy period and synergistically improve maternal and neonatal outcomes. Among pre-pregnancy interventions, family planning and advocating pregnancies at appropriate intervals; prevention and management of sexually transmitted infections including HIV; and peri-conceptual folic-acid supplementation have shown significant impact on reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. During pregnancy, interventions including antenatal care visit model; iron and folic acid supplementation; tetanus Immunisation; prevention and management of malaria; prevention and management of HIV and PMTCT; calcium for hypertension; anti-Platelet agents (low dose aspirin) for prevention of Pre-eclampsia; anti-hypertensives for treating severe hypertension; management of pregnancy-induced hypertension/eclampsia; external cephalic version for breech presentation at term (>36 weeks); management of preterm, premature rupture of membranes; management of unintended pregnancy; and home visits for women and children across the continuum of care have shown maximum impact on reducing the burden of maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality. All of the interventions summarized in this paper have the potential to improve maternal mortality rates and also contribute to better health care practices during preconception and periconception period. PMID:25178042

  5. Biological mechanisms for nutritional regulation of maternal health and fetal development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao; Imhoff-Kunsch, Beth; Girard, Amy Webb

    2012-07-01

    This review paper highlights mechanisms for nutritional regulation of maternal health and fetal development. Malnutrition (nutrient deficiencies or obesity) in pregnant women adversely affects their health by causing or exacerbating a plethora of problems, such as anaemia, maternal haemorrhage, insulin resistance, and hypertensive disorders (e.g. pre-eclampsia/eclampsia). Maternal malnutrition during gestation also impairs embryonic and fetal growth and development, resulting in deleterious outcomes, including intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), low birthweight, preterm birth, and birth defects (e.g. neural tube defects and iodine deficiency disorders). IUGR and preterm birth contribute to high rates of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Major common mechanisms responsible for malnutrition-induced IUGR and preterm birth include: (i) abnormal growth and development of the placenta; (ii) impaired placental transfer of nutrients from mother to fetus; (iii) endocrine disorders; and (iv) disturbances in normal metabolic processes. Activation of a series of physiological responses leading to premature and sustained contraction of the uterine myometrium also results in preterm birth. Recent epidemiologic studies have suggested a link between IUGR and chronic metabolic disease in children and adults, and the effects of IUGR may be carried forward to subsequent generations through epigenetics. While advanced medical therapies, which are generally unavailable in low-income countries, are required to support preterm and IUGR infants, optimal nutrition during pregnancy may help ameliorate many of these problems. Future studies are necessary to develop effective nutritional interventions to enhance fetal growth and development and alleviate the burden of maternal morbidity and mortality in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:22742599

  6. Evaluation of Maternal Complications in Severe Preeclampsia in a University Hospital in Tirana

    PubMed Central

    Ndoni, Eriseida; Hoxhallari, Redi; Bimbashi, Astrit

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preeclampsia is a hypertensive multisystem disorder of pregnancy that complicates up to 10% of pregnancies worldwide and is one of the leading causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. AIM: To evaluate maternal complications associated with severe preeclampsia. METHODS: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study conducted in the UHOG “Koço Gliozheni”, in Tirana. Primary outcomes evaluated: maternal death, eclampsia, stroke, HELLP syndrome, and pulmonary edema. Secondary outcomes: renal failure, admission in ICU, caesarean section, placental abruption, and postpartum hemorrhage. Fisher’s exact test and Chi-squared test were used as statistical methods. RESULTS: In women with severe preeclampsia we found higher rates of complications comparing to the group with preeclampsia. Eclampsia (1.5% vs. 7.1%, P < 0.001), HELLP syndrome (2.4% vs. 11.0%; P < 0.001), stroke (0.5% vs 1.9%, P = 0.105) pulmonary edema (0.25% vs. 1.3%, P = 0.0035), renal failure (0.9% vs. 2.6%, P = 0.107), admission in ICU (19.5% vs. 71.4%, P = 0.007), caesarean section rates (55.5% vs. 77%, P = 0.508), placental abruption (4.3% vs. 7.8%, P = 0.103) and severe postpartum hemorrhage (3.2% vs. 3.9%, P = 0.628). CONCLUSION: Severe preeclampsia is associated with high rates of maternal severe morbidity and early diagnosis and timely intervention can prevent life treating complications. PMID:27275340

  7. Adoption, ART, and a re-conception of the maternal body: toward embodied maternity.

    PubMed

    Brakman, Sarah-Vaughan; Scholz, Sally J

    2006-01-01

    We criticize a view of maternity that equates the natural with the genetic and biological and show how such a practice overdetermines the maternal body and the maternal experience for women who are mothers through adoption and ART (Assisted Reproductive Technologies). As an alternative, we propose a new framework designed to rethink maternal bodies through the lens of feminist embodiment. Feminist embodied maternity, as we call it, stresses the particularity of experience through subjective embodiment. A feminist embodied maternity emphasizes the physical relations of the subjective lived-body rather than the genetic or biological connections. Instead of universalizing claims about the maternal body, embodied maternity looks to communicable experiences and empathetic understanding. PMID:17111556

  8. Effects of prenatal depressive symptoms on maternal and infant cortisol reactivity.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Elizabeth C; Murphy, Susannah E; Ramchandani, Paul G

    2016-08-01

    Prenatal depression is associated with adverse offspring outcomes, and the prevailing mechanistic theory to account for mood-associated effects implicates alterations of the maternal and foetal hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axes. Recent research suggests that depression may be associated with a failure to attenuate cortisol reactivity during early pregnancy. The aim of the current study is to investigate whether this effect continues into mid and late gestation. A further aim is to test whether maternal prenatal cortisol reactivity directly predicts infant cortisol reactivity. One hundred three pregnant women were recruited during either the second or third trimester. Depressive symptoms were assessed by self-report, and maternal salivary cortisol responses to a stressor (infant distress film) were measured. Approximately 2 months after birth, mothers (n = 88) reported postnatal depression and infant salivary cortisol responses to inoculation were measured. Prenatal depression was not associated with cortisol reactivity to acute stress in mid and late pregnancy. Similarly, neither prenatal depression nor maternal prenatal cortisol reactivity predicted infant cortisol reactivity to inoculation at 2 months. If the effects of prenatal depression on foetal and infant development are mediated by alterations of the maternal and foetal HPA axes, then early pregnancy may be a particularly vulnerable period. Alternatively, changes to HPA reactivity may not be as central to this association as previously thought. PMID:26940835

  9. Systemic thrombolysis for acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Billie

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is a frequent cause of hospitalization and is associated with a wide range of symptom severity. Anticoagulants are the mainstay of treatment for acute pulmonary embolism; however, in patients with massive or submassive pulmonary embolism, advanced therapy with thrombolytics may be considered. The decision to use thrombolytic therapy for acute pulmonary embolism should be based on careful risk-benefit analysis for each patient, including risk of morbidity and mortality associated with the embolism and risk of bleeding associated with the thrombolytic. Alteplase is currently the thrombolytic agent most studied and with the most clinical experience for this indication, although the most appropriate dose remains controversial, especially in patients with low body weight. When considering thrombolysis, unfractionated heparin is the preferred initial anticoagulant due to its short duration of action and its reversibility should bleeding occur. PMID:25559613

  10. Anaesthetic management of acute airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Patrick; Wong, Jolin; Mok, May Un Sam

    2016-01-01

    The acutely obstructed airway is a medical emergency that can potentially result in serious morbidity and mortality. Apart from the latest advancements in anaesthetic techniques, equipment and drugs, publications relevant to our topic, including the United Kingdom’s 4th National Audit Project on major airway complications in 2011 and the updated American Society of Anesthesiologists’ difficult airway algorithm of 2013, have recently been published. The former contained many reports of adverse events associated with the management of acute airway obstruction. By analysing the data and concepts from these two publications, this review article provides an update on management techniques for the acutely obstructed airway. We discuss the principles and factors relevant to the decision-making process in formulating a logical management plan. PMID:26996162

  11. Organ protection possibilities in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M; Morales-Rull, J L

    2016-04-01

    Unlike chronic heart failure (HF), the treatment for acute HF has not changed over the last decade. The drugs employed have shown their ability to control symptoms but have not achieved organ protection or managed to reduce medium to long-term morbidity and mortality. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute HF suggest that treatment should be directed not only towards correcting the haemodynamic disorders and achieving symptomatic relief but also towards preventing organ damage, thereby counteracting myocardial remodelling and cardiac and extracardiac disorders. Compounds that exert vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory action in the acute phase of HF and can stop cell death, thereby boosting repair mechanisms, could have an essential role in organ protection. PMID:26896381

  12. Anaesthetic management of acute airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Patrick; Wong, Jolin; Mok, May Un Sam

    2016-03-01

    The acutely obstructed airway is a medical emergency that can potentially result in serious morbidity and mortality. Apart from the latest advancements in anaesthetic techniques, equipment and drugs, publications relevant to our topic, including the United Kingdom's 4th National Audit Project on major airway complications in 2011 and the updated American Society of Anesthesiologists' difficult airway algorithm of 2013, have recently been published. The former contained many reports of adverse events associated with the management of acute airway obstruction. By analysing the data and concepts from these two publications, this review article provides an update on management techniques for the acutely obstructed airway. We discuss the principles and factors relevant to the decision-making process in formulating a logical management plan. PMID:26996162

  13. Effect of nutrition improvement project on morbidity from infectious diseases in preschool children in Vietnam: comparison with control commune.

    PubMed

    English, R M; Badcock, J C; Giay, T; Ngu, T; Waters, A M; Bennett, S A

    1997-11-01

    A nutrition program based on home garden food production and nutrition education for mothers of young children was associated with significant reductions in morbidity from acute respiratory infection and diarrheal disease in preschool children in Viet Nam's Vinh Phu province. The nutrition program was implemented in Khai Xuan commune during 1991-93; Ching Cong commune, which did not receive the intervention, served as the control community. In Khai Xuan, the incidence of respiratory infections among children under 6 years of age decreased from 49.5% to 11.2% during the study period, while that of diarrheal disease dropped from 18.3% to 5.1%. The nutrition project was also associated with significant declines in severe pneumonia. No changes in morbidity occurred in the control commune. The intervention resulted in significantly higher intakes of vegetables, fruit, energy, protein, vitamin A, and iron by project children compared with controls. It is recommended that nutrition improvement be adopted as an infectious disease control strategy in international and national development programs, especially those in countries where respiratory and diarrheal infections are the major cause of child morbidity and mortality. PMID:9374884

  14. Maternal Engineered Nanomaterial Exposure and Fetal Microvascular Function: Does the Barker Hypothesis Apply?

    PubMed Central

    STAPLETON, Phoebe A.; MINARCHICK, Ms. Valerie C.; YI, Jinghai; ENGELS, Mr. Kevin; McBRIDE, Mr. Carroll R.; NURKIEWICZ, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The continued development and use of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) has given rise to concerns over the potential for human health effects. While the understanding of cardiovascular ENM toxicity is improving, one of the most complex and acutely demanding “special” circulations is the enhanced maternal system to support fetal development. The “Barker Hypothesis” proposes that fetal development within a hostile gestational environment may predispose/program future sensitivity. Therefore, the objective of this study was two-fold: 1) to determine if maternal ENM exposure alters uterine and/or fetal microvascular function and 2) test the Barker Hypothesis at the microvascular level. Study Design Pregnant (gestation day 10) Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to nano-titanium dioxide aerosols (11.3±0.039 (mg/m3)*hour, 5 hours/day, 8.2±0.85 days) to evaluate the maternal and fetal microvascular consequences of maternal exposure. Microvascular tissue isolation (gestation day 20) and arteriolar reactivity studies (<150μm passive diameter) of the uterine premyometrial and fetal tail arteries were conducted. Results ENM exposures led to significant maternal and fetal microvascular dysfunction which presented as robustly compromised endothelium-dependent and -independent reactivity to pharmacologic and mechanical stimuli. Isolated maternal uterine arteriolar reactivity was consistent with a metabolically impaired profile and hostile gestational environment, impacting fetal weight. The fetal microvessels isolated from exposed dams demonstrate significant impairments to signals of vasodilation specific to mechanistic signaling and shear stress. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report providing evidence that maternal ENM inhalation is capable of influencing fetal health, thereby supporting that the Barker Hypothesis is applicable at the microvascular level. PMID:23643573

  15. Use of evidence based practices to improve survival without severe morbidity for very preterm infants: results from the EPICE population based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Manktelow, Bradley N; Piedvache, Aurelie; Cuttini, Marina; Boyle, Elaine; van Heijst, Arno; Gadzinowski, Janusz; Van Reempts, Patrick; Huusom, Lene; Weber, Tom; Schmidt, Stephan; Barros, Henrique; Dillalo, Dominico; Toome, Liis; Norman, Mikael; Blondel, Beatrice; Bonet, Mercedes; Draper, Elisabeth S; Maier, Rolf F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the implementation of four high evidence practices for the care of very preterm infants to assess their use and impact in routine clinical practice and whether they constitute a driver for reducing mortality and neonatal morbidity. Design Prospective multinational population based observational study. Setting 19 regions from 11 European countries covering 850 000 annual births participating in the EPICE (Effective Perinatal Intensive Care in Europe for very preterm births) project. Participants 7336 infants born between 24+0 and 31+6 weeks’ gestation in 2011/12 without serious congenital anomalies and surviving to neonatal admission. Main outcome measures Combined use of four evidence based practices for infants born before 28 weeks’ gestation using an “all or none” approach: delivery in a maternity unit with appropriate level of neonatal care; administration of antenatal corticosteroids; prevention of hypothermia (temperature on admission to neonatal unit ≥36°C); surfactant used within two hours of birth or early nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Infant outcomes were in-hospital mortality, severe neonatal morbidity at discharge, and a composite measure of death or severe morbidity, or both. We modelled associations using risk ratios, with propensity score weighting to account for potential confounding bias. Analyses were adjusted for clustering within delivery hospital. Results Only 58.3% (n=4275) of infants received all evidence based practices for which they were eligible. Infants with low gestational age, growth restriction, low Apgar scores, and who were born on the day of maternal admission to hospital were less likely to receive evidence based care. After adjustment, evidence based care was associated with lower in-hospital mortality (risk ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.60 to 0.87) and in-hospital mortality or severe morbidity, or both (0.82, 0.73 to 0.92), corresponding to an estimated 18% decrease

  16. Metabolic alterations in morbid obesity. Influence on the haemorheological profile.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Amparo; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Suescun, Marta; Solá, Eva; Cámara, Rosa; Romagnoli, Marco; Bautista, Daniel; Laiz, Begoña

    2011-01-01

    There are few studies on haemorheological disturbances in morbidly obese patients. The role played by the metabolic syndrome on the rheological profile of morbidly obese subjects has not yet been established, and it is not clear whether morbidly obese, but "metabolically healthy", show rheological alterations. We aimed to determine the whole rheological profile in 136 morbidly obese patients and 136 normo-weight volunteers, along with plasma lipids, inflammatory and insulin resistance parameters. Patients had statistically higher glucose, triglycerides, HbA1c, leptin, insulin, HOMA, CRP, leucocytes, fibrinogen, plasma viscosity (p < 0.001, respectively), erythrocyte aggregation at 3 s-1 (p = 0.011) and lower erythrocyte elongation index 60 Pa (p = 0.015). In the multivariate regression analysis, the anthropometric, lipidic, insulin resistance and inflammatory parameters predicted haemorheological variables (p < 0.001). No differences were observed for the rheological parameters when morbidly obese subjects with (n = 75) and without (n = 61) the metabolic syndrome were compared (p > 0.05), indicating that the altered rheological profile not only related to the metabolic syndrome, but to obesity itself. When further patients were classified as "metabolically healthy" obese (n = 23) and "metabolically unhealthy" obese (n = 113), the latter presented higher insulin resistance (insulin p < 0.01, HOMA p < 0.05, glucose p < 0.001, triglycerides p < 0.05 and HbA1c p < 0.01) than the former, but no differences in the rheological parameters (p > 0.05) were observed. When "metabolically healthy" obese (n = 23) were compared with "metabolically healthy" controls (n = 81), the former still showed higher HOMA (p < 0.001), triglycerides (p < 0.05), CRP (p < 0.001) and HbA1c (p < 0.05), higher fibrinogen (p < 0.001), plasma viscosity (p < 0.001), erythrocyte aggregation at 3 s-1 (p < 0.05), but a lower erythrocyte elongation index 60 Pa (p < 0.05). Morbidly obese subjects present

  17. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  18. Evaluation of the Pathways for Students into Health Professions: The Training of Under-Represented Minority Students to Pursue Maternal and Child Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Faye J.; Inkelas, Moira; Perez, Victor H.; Verdugo, Bobby; Kuo, Alice A.

    2015-01-01

    The Pathways for Students into Health Professions program is one of four nationally funded programs by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the US Department of Health and Human Services to support the training of undergraduate students, particularly from under-represented minority groups to pursue maternal and child health professions. To assess the program’s impact on student ratings, knowledge, and interest in maternal and child health professions. A baseline survey on student ratings and knowledge in maternal and child health topics and careers, public health topics, and career development topics was provided to 32 students at the beginning of their first year in the program and approximately 1 year after participation. Half of the students (16 students) in the program from 2009–2011 were from traditionally underrepresented minority groups. After participation, students reported significantly higher ratings of interest in maternal and child health topics and careers and in receiving adequate academic and career guidance. Students also reported significantly higher knowledge of public health, childhood and maternal morbidity and mortality, health care disparities, and life course health development. The program’s didactic, experiential, and mentorship activities are changing student ratings and knowledge in a favorable direction toward maternal and child health careers and topics. Undergraduate training programs may be an important mechanism to strengthen the pipeline of a diverse healthcare workforce. PMID:25366098

  19. Evaluation of the pathways for students into health professions: the training of under-represented minority students to pursue maternal and child health professions.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Alma D; Holmes, Faye J; Inkelas, Moira; Perez, Victor H; Verdugo, Bobby; Kuo, Alice A

    2015-02-01

    The Pathways for Students into Health Professions program is one of four nationally funded programs by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the US Department of Health and Human Services to support the training of undergraduate students, particularly from under-represented minority groups to pursue maternal and child health professions. To assess the program's impact on student ratings, knowledge, and interest in maternal and child health professions. A baseline survey on student ratings and knowledge in maternal and child health topics and careers, public health topics, and career development topics was provided to 32 students at the beginning of their first year in the program and approximately 1 year after participation. Half of the students (16 students) in the program from 2009-2011 were from traditionally underrepresented minority groups. After participation, students reported significantly higher ratings of interest in maternal and child health topics and careers and in receiving adequate academic and career guidance. Students also reported significantly higher knowledge of public health, childhood and maternal morbidity and mortality, health care disparities, and life course health development. The program's didactic, experiential, and mentorship activities are changing student ratings and knowledge in a favorable direction toward maternal and child health careers and topics. Undergraduate training programs may be an important mechanism to strengthen the pipeline of a diverse healthcare workforce. PMID:25366098

  20. The Neuroendocrinology of Primate Maternal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Wendy; Maestripieri, Dario

    2010-01-01

    In nonhuman primates and humans, similar to other mammals, hormones are not strictly necessary for the expression of maternal behavior, but nevertheless influence variation in maternal responsiveness and parental behavior both within and between individuals. A growing number of correlational and experimental studies have indicated that high circulating estrogen concentrations during pregnancy increase maternal motivation and responsiveness to infant stimuli, while effects of prepartum or postpartum estrogens and progestogens on maternal behavior are less clear. Prolactin is thought to play a role in promoting paternal and alloparental care in primates, but little is known about the relationship between this hormone and maternal behavior. High circulating cortisol levels appear to enhance arousal and responsiveness to infant stimuli in young, relatively inexperienced female primates, but interfere with the expression of maternal behavior in older and more experienced mothers. Among neuropeptides and neurotransmitters, preliminary evidence indicates that oxytocin and endogenous opioids affect maternal attachment to infants, including maintenance of contact, grooming, and responses to separation. Brain serotonin affects anxiety and impulsivity, which in turn may affect maternal behaviors such as infant retrieval or rejection of infants’ attempts to make contact with the mother. Although our understanding of the neuroendocrine correlates of primate maternal behavior has grown substantially in the last two decades, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying these effects, e.g., the extent to which these mechanisms may involve changes in perception, emotion, or cognition. PMID:20888383

  1. Nutrition support in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Orestis; Lavrentieva, Athina; Botsios, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    In the majority (80%) of patients with acute pancreatitis, the disease is self limiting and, after a few days of withholding feeding and intravenous administration of fluids, patients can again be normally fed orally. In a small percentage of patients, the disease progresses to severe necrotic pancreatitis, with an intense systemic inflammatory response and often with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. As mortality is high in patients with severe disease and as mortality and morbidity rates are directly related to the failure of establishing a positive nitrogen balance, it is assumed that feeding will improve survival in patients with severe disease. The aim of nutritional support is to cover the elevated metabolic demands as much as possible, without stimulating pancreatic secretion and maximizing self-digestion. The administration of either total parenteral nutrition or jejunal nutrition does not stimulate pancreatic secretion. Recently, a series of controlled clinical studies has been conducted in order to evaluate the effectiveness of enteral nutrition with jejunal administration of the nutritional solution. The results have shown that enteral nutrition, as compared to total parenteral nutrition, was cheaper, safer and more effective as regards the suppression of the immunoinflammatory response, the decrease of septic complications, the need for surgery for the management of the complications of acute pancreatitis and the reduction of the total hospitalization period. It did not seem to affect mortality or the rate of non-septic complications. In conclusion, enteral nutrition should be the preferred route of nutritional support in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:18648127

  2. Management of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Doctor, Nilesh; Agarwal, Pravin; Gandhi, Vidhyachandra

    2012-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis. Severity of acute pancreatitis is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis. Risk factors independently determining the outcome of SAP are early multiorgan failure (MOF), infection of necrosis, and extended necrosis (>50%). Morbidity of SAP is biphasic, in the first week it is strongly related to systemic inflammatory response syndrome while, sepsis due to infected pancreatic necrosis leading to MOF syndrome occurs in the later course after the first week. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for necrotizing pancreatitis when performed after the first week of disease. Patients who suffer early organ dysfunctions or are at risk for developing a severe disease require early intensive care treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and systemic infection. Patients suffering infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis are candidates for intervention. Hospital mortality of SAP after interventional or surgical debridement has decreased to below 20% in high-volume centers. PMID:23372306

  3. Maternal and Adolescent Temperament as Predictors of Maternal Affective Behavior during Mother-Adolescent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Emily; Yap, Marie B. H.; Simmons, Julian G.; Sheeber, Lisa B.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined maternal and early adolescent temperament dimensions as predictors of maternal emotional behavior during mother-adolescent interactions. The sample comprised 151 early adolescents (aged 11-13) and their mothers (aged 29-57). Adolescent- and mother-reports of adolescent temperament and self-reports of maternal temperament were…

  4. Evidence from Maternity Leave Expansions of the Impact of Maternal Care on Early Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael; Milligan, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    We study the impact of maternal care on early child development using an expansion in Canadian maternity leave entitlements. Following the leave expansion, mothers who took leave spent 48-58 percent more time not working in their children's first year of life. This extra maternal care primarily crowded out home-based care by unlicensed…

  5. Maternal Moderators of Child Care: The Role of Maternal Separation Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Susan L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigated the relationships between maternal separation anxiety, maternal employment, and quality of child care for 49 mothers of 2- to 3-year olds in day care centers. Findings suggest that the mother's concern about separation is an important moderator of the effects of maternal employment and child care on children's development. (BB)

  6. [Occupational morbidity among coal miners in the RSFSR].

    PubMed

    Borisenkova, R V; Gvozdeva, L L; Stepanov, S A

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of occupational morbidity for 1982-1989 in coal extraction industry workers in the Russian Federation showed its high-level detection in coal-miners. Revealed was a decrease in dust-induced occupational diseases and a greater detection of vibration disease cases, which accounted for 50% in the occupational diseases' structure. In miners, vibration disease cases occurred equally often in coal mine face-workers and driving team workers. The face-workers also exhibited dust-induced diseases and locomotor system disorders. In open pit mines and coal-refining plants, occupational pathology cases were only sporadic. Detectability of occupational morbidity cases was highest in the Rostov Region, Kemerovo, Far-East and Komi coal mines. The performed analysis revealed factors which influence most of all the prevalent forms of occupational pathology, thus laying the basis for the elaboration of health improvement measures. PMID:1839012

  7. The prevention of psychological morbidity following perinatal death.

    PubMed Central

    Hammersley, L; Drinkwater, C

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, a significant volume of hospital-based literature has been produced about the management of women and their families after a perinatal death. There has also been a considerable amount of work in the voluntary sector which has recognized this as an area of unmet need. The introduction of regional neonatal intensive care units and the shift from secondary to primary care make the development of a structured community-based approach for this group of vulnerable patients increasingly important. This article documents the evidence for high levels of psychological morbidity following perinatal death, reviews a variety of interventions designed to reduce morbidity, and makes some tentative proposals about the key elements of an effective community-based support programme. PMID:9406496

  8. Haemodynamic monitoring of morbidly obese intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Lagrand, W K; van Slobbe-Bijlsma, E R; Schultz, M J

    2013-06-01

    Because of technical and practical difficulties in relation to increased body size, haemodynamic monitoring of morbidly obese critically ill patients (i.e. body mass index ≥40 kg÷m2) may be challenging. Obese and non-obese patients are not so different with respect to haemodynamic monitoring and goals. The critical care physician, however, should be aware of the basic principles of the monitoring tools used. The theoretical assumptions and calculations of these tools could be invalid because of the high body weight and fat distribution. Although the method of assessing haemodynamic data may be more complex in morbidly obese patients, its interpretation should not be different from that in non-obese patients. Indeed, when indexed for body surface area or (predicted) lean body mass, reliable haemodynamic data are comparable etween obese and non-obese individuals. PMID:23799309

  9. [MORBIDITY OF SUBMARINE CREW SAILORS IN LONG-DISTANCE CRUISES].

    PubMed

    Myznikov, I L; Burtsev, N N; Bondarenko N V; Khamidullina, A Ya

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity among the personnel of a Kola-based (beyond the Arctic circle) atomic (ASM) and diesel-powered (DSM) submarines in the course of long-distance cruises in different waters of the world ocean was studied. Statistics was collected from the reports of submarine medical officers since 1969. Levels and causes of morbidity were analyzed. According to the data of many years' observations, within the structure of primary diseases of military contractors on cruises the leading place has been occupied by respiratory disorders followed by skin and subcutaneous fat problems, and digestive diseases. Incidence of chronic diseases among ASM and DSM personnel was evaluated. The authors raise the issue of dental care quality provided to submariners. PMID:26554134

  10. Maternal miscarriage history and risk of anencephaly.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Muñoz, Julia; Lacasaña, Marina; Borja-Aburto, Victor Hugo

    2006-05-01

    Women with a history of reproductive loss may be at an increased risk of having an unfavourable outcome in subsequent pregnancies. Using data from a matched case-control study based on the record of the Epidemiological Surveillance System of Neural Tube Defects, we evaluated the association between history of maternal reproductive loss and the risk of anencephaly in three Mexican states. Mothers of 157 cases of anencephaly and 151 controls born during the period March 2000 to February 2001, were interviewed about their reproductive history and other additional factors, including socio-economic characteristics, prenatal care, use of tobacco and alcohol, presence of chronic diseases, acute illnesses and fever during the periconceptional period, and consumption of multivitamins and medicines during this period; mothers who reported no prior pregnancies were excluded from the analysis; 58 matched case-control pairs were used for the analysis. After adjusting for potential confounders, women with a history of miscarriage in previous pregnancies had 4.58 times more risk of having a child with anencephaly, than those who did not have this history; OR = 4.58, [95% CI 1.22, 17.23]. Our results suggest that a history of previous miscarriages is a risk indicator for anencephaly in future gestations. This does not necessarily mean that the miscarriage itself is the cause, but that common mechanisms could be involved in the aetiology of both events. Thus, women who have had histories of reproductive losses, especially miscarriages, should be a priority group for the primary and secondary prevention of neural tube defects. PMID:16629695

  11. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barr, Wendy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Acute diarrhea in adults is a common problem encountered by family physicians. The most common etiology is viral gastroenteritis, a self-limited disease. Increases in travel, comorbidities, and foodborne illness lead to more bacteria-related cases of acute diarrhea. A history and physical examination evaluating for risk factors and signs of inflammatory diarrhea and/or severe dehydration can direct any needed testing and treatment. Most patients do not require laboratory workup, and routine stool cultures are not recommended. Treatment focuses on preventing and treating dehydration. Diagnostic investigation should be reserved for patients with severe dehydration or illness, persistent fever, bloody stool, or immunosuppression, and for cases of suspected nosocomial infection or outbreak. Oral rehydration therapy with early refeeding is the preferred treatment for dehydration. Antimotility agents should be avoided in patients with bloody diarrhea, but loperamide/simethicone may improve symptoms in patients with watery diarrhea. Probiotic use may shorten the duration of illness. When used appropriately, antibiotics are effective in the treatment of shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, Clostridium difficile, traveler's diarrhea, and protozoal infections. Prevention of acute diarrhea is promoted through adequate hand washing, safe food preparation, access to clean water, and vaccinations. PMID:24506120

  12. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  13. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  14. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  15. Reducing the morbidity involved in harvesting autogenous rib cartilage.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Ralf; Magritz, Ralph

    2009-08-01

    Although the use of autogenous cartilage is the gold standard in auricular reconstruction, its main disadvantage is the morbidity due to harvesting the cartilage. This includes postoperative pain, visible scar, and possibly asymmetry and reduced stability of the thorax. To reduce all of these drawbacks, we describe some modifications that reduce pain to a low tolerable level, hide the scar invisibly in the submammary fold in females, and induce regeneration as well reestablish stability of the rib defect. PMID:19809948

  16. Gene polymorphisms and increased DNA damage in morbidly obese women.

    PubMed

    Luperini, B C O; Almeida, D C; Porto, M P; Marcondes, J P C; Prado, R P; Rasera, I; Oliveira, M R M; Salvadori, D M F

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is characterized by increased adipose tissue mass resulting from a chronic imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. Furthermore, there is a clearly defined relationship among fat mass expansion, chronic low-grade systemic inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation; leading to ROS-related pathological events. In the past years, genome-wide association studies have generated convincing evidence associating genetic variation at multiple regions of the genome with traits that reflect obesity. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the relationships among the gene polymorphisms ghrelin (GHRL-rs26802), ghrelin receptor (GHSR-rs572169), leptin (LEP-rs7799039), leptin receptor (LEPR-rs1137101) and fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO-rs9939609) and obesity. The relationships among these gene variants and the amount of DNA damage were also investigated. Three hundred Caucasian morbidly obese and 300 eutrophic (controls) women were recruited. In summary, the results demonstrated that the frequencies of the GHRL, GHSR, LEP and LEPR polymorphisms were not different between Brazilian white morbidly obese and eutrophic women. Exceptions were the AA-FTO genotype and allele A, which were significantly more frequent in obese women than in the controls (0.23% vs. 0.10%; 0.46 vs. 0.36, respectively), and the TT-FTO genotype and the T allele, which were less frequent in morbidly obese women (p<0.01). Furthermore, significant differences in the amount of genetic lesions associated with FTO variants were observed only in obese women. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the analyzed SNPs were not closely associated with morbid obesity, suggesting they are not the major contributors to obesity. Therefore, our data indicated that these gene variants are not good biomarkers for predicting risk susceptibility for obesity, whereas ROS generated by the inflammatory status might be one of the causes of DNA damage in obese women, favoring

  17. Surgical Management of Metabolic Syndrome Related to Morbid Obesity.

    PubMed

    Rehrig, Scott T

    2016-03-01

    Current treatment approaches in morbid obesity are multimodal in nature. Combination therapies include increases in moderate-intensity aerobic and resistance exercise; behavioral lifestyle changes to increase compliance with diet and activity recommendations; medical nutrition therapy; intensive medical therapy; and metabolic surgical procedures, such as gastric bypass and vertical sleeve gastrectomy. This article focuses on the preoperative evaluation and proper patient selection for metabolic surgery. The procedures are discussed relative to their anatomy, metabolic mechanism of action, and common adverse effects. PMID:26896207

  18. Psychological Morbidity Among Dermatological Patients in a Rural Setting

    PubMed Central

    Kosaraju, Sandeep Krishna Murthy; Reddy, Karumuri Siva Rami; Vadlamani, Naresh; Sandhya, Lakkireddy; Kalasapati, Lokesh; Maganti, Sowmya; Mary, Amudha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dermatological conditions have an impact on psychology of the patients. There is a dearth of studies regarding this field in Rural population of India. Aims And Objectives: The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the psychiatric morbidity in patients affected with Dermatological condition in a rural population and secondary objective is to assess the morbidity in dimensions of Depression Severity and the quality of life in the Emotional Sphere, Physical Symptoms, Psychosocial Functioning. Subjects And Methods: Seventy three rural patients were included in the study. PHQ9 and SKINDEX-29 was used to assess the psychiatric morbidity and quality of life. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS V 20. Chi-square test was used as a test of significance. Results: Significance has been found for duration of suffering from a dermatological condition and quality of life (p=0.03). Correlation has also been established between dermatological diagnosis with depression severity (p=0.004) or quality of life (p=0.004). In the sub scales of SKINDEX it was noted that overall dysfunction was notably more marked in Emotional Sphere and Psychosocial Functions than the Physical symptoms. Eczema was the most affected diagnosis in Skindex indicating a poor quality of life followed by psoriasis, Acne vulgaris and Seborrhoeic Dermatitis however, It was found that the majorly affected condition in depression severity was Psoriasis followed by Eczema, Acne Vulgaris and Seborrhoeic Dermatitis. Conclusion: There seems to be an increased morbidity among the rural population in depression severity and that of quality of life in terms of emotional sphere and psychosocial functioning. PMID:26677293

  19. Psychological Co-morbidity in Children with Specific Learning Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Manoj K; Biswas, Haritha; Padhy, Susanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Children under 19 years of age constitute over 40% of India's population and information about their mental health needs is a national imperative. Children with specific learning disorders (SLDs) exhibit academic difficulties disproportionate to their intellectual capacities. Prevalence of SLD ranges from 2% to 10%. Dyslexia (developmental reading disorder) is the most common type, affecting 80% of all SLD. About 30% of learning disabled children have behavioral and emotional problems, which range from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (most common) to depression, anxiety, suicide etc., to substance abuse (least common). Co-occurrence of such problems with SLD further adds to the academic difficulty. In such instances, diagnosis is difficult and tricky; improvement in academics demands comprehensive holistic treatment approach. SLD remains a large public health problem because of under-recognition, inadequate treatment and therefore merits greater effort to understand the co-morbidities, especially in the Indian population. As the literature is scarce regarding co-morbid conditions in learning disability in Indian scenario, the present study has tried to focus on Indian population. The educational concessions (recent most) given to such children by Central Board of Secondary Education, New Delhi are referred to. The issues to be addressed by the family physicians are: Low level of awareness among families and teachers, improper dissemination of accurate information about psychological problems, available help seeking avenues, need to develop service delivery models in rural and urban areas and focus on the integration of mental health and primary care keeping such co-morbidity in mind. PMID:25810984

  20. Management and morbidity of cellulitis of the leg.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, N H; Colver, G B; Paterson, W D

    1998-01-01

    Ascending cellulitis of the leg is a common emergency. An audit was conducted in two district general hospitals to determine how it is managed and the long-term morbidity, and to formulate a treatment strategy. Case notes were reviewed for 92 patients admitted to hospital under adult specialties. Mean duration of inpatient therapy was 10 days. A likely portal of entry was identified in 51/92 cases, of which the commonest were minor injuries and tinea pedis. Pathogens were rarely identified, group G streptococci being the single most frequent organism. Benzylpenicillin was administered in only 43 cases. Long-term morbidity, identified in 8 of 70 patients with over six months' follow-up, included persistent oedema (6) and leg ulceration (2); an additional 19 patients had either suffered previous episodes or experienced a further episode subsequently. Ascending cellulitis of the leg has substantial short-term and long-term morbidity. Important but often neglected therapeutic suggestions are the inclusion of benzylpenicillin in all cases without a contraindication, assessment and treatment of tinea pedis, use of support hosiery, and serological testing for streptococci to confirm the diagnosis in retrospect. The high frequency of recurrent episodes suggests that longer courses of penicillin, or penicillin prophylaxis, might be useful. PMID:10730111

  1. Psychiatric morbidity among physically ill persons in eastern Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shyangwa, P M; Joshi, D; Sherchan, S; Thapa, K B

    2009-06-01

    This cross-sectional hospital-based study investigated the prevalence and pattern of psychiatric morbidity among 151 physically ill psychiatric-referred cases admitted various departments in BPKIHS. Consecutive referral cases were initially worked up by junior residents and diagnosis/differential diagnosis was made by consultant according to ICD-10 diagnostic guidelines. Of total 151; M: 77 (50.9%) and F: 74 (49.1); Majority 38 (25.1%) of subjects were young with age 15-24 yrs and 95 (62.9%) were from plains. About 21.8% referrals came from internal medicine followed by emergency department, 9 (5.9%). The highest number of cases 48 (31.7%) had neuropsychiatric illnesses and 17.0% had some medical complications resulted from suicide act. Among psychiatric co morbidity, dissociative/conversion disorders were the commonest 26 (17.2%) followed by alcohol use-related disorders 25 (16.5%) and depressive disorder 20 (13.2%). To conclude, the co-occurrence of medical and psychological/psychiatric conditions is common, which demands timely identification and early interventions in order to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:19968153

  2. Prospective morbidity surveillance of Shell refinery and petrochemical employees.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S P; Dowd, C M; Cowles, S R; Ross, C E

    1991-03-01

    Results for a prospective morbidity study of 14,170 refinery and chemical workers from 1981 through 1988 are presented. Illness/absence data for this study were extracted from the morbidity section of the Shell Health Surveillance System which includes records of all illness/absences in excess of five days. Age adjusted annual morbidity frequency rates and annual durations of absence are presented by age, sex, job, and work status. Generally, rates and durations of absence were highest for older age groups, women, and production workers. Increased risk was associated with the presence of known disease risk factors. Overall, 48% of the employees had at least one illness/absence in excess of five days during the eight year period. Twelve per cent of the employees had four or more absences, which accounted for 54% of the total number of absences and 52% of the total work days lost. Among men, the five most common conditions accounted for 72% of all illness/absences. In descending order they were injuries (25%), respiratory illnesses (17%), musculoskeletal disorders (14%), digestive illnesses (9%), and heart disease (7%). Similar patterns were noted among women. These findings may be useful in setting priorities and directing efforts such as health education programmes and other strategies for the prevention of disease. PMID:2015205

  3. Apolipoprotein E Related Co-Morbidities and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Singhrao, Sim K; Harding, Alice; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Olsen, Ingar; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Crean, StJohn

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of advancement in clinical services is to provide a health care system that enhances an individual's quality of life. Incidence of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and associated dementia coupled with the advancing age of the population, have led to an increase in the worldwide challenge to the healthcare system. In order to overcome these challenges, prior knowledge of common, reliable risk factors and their effectors is essential. Oral health constitutes one such relatively unexplored but indispensable risk factor for aforementioned co-morbidities, in the form of poor oral hygiene and tooth loss during aging. Behavioral traits such as low education, smoking, poor diet, neglect of oral health, lack of exercise, and hypertension are few of the risk factors that are shared commonly among these conditions. In addition, common genetic susceptibility traits such as the apolipoprotein E gene, together with an individual's lifestyle can also influence the development of co-morbidities such as periodontitis, atherosclerosis/stroke, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease. This review specifically addresses the susceptibility of apolipoprotein E gene allele 4 as the plausible commonality for the etiology of co-morbidities that eventually result from periodontal diseases and ultimately progress to dementia. PMID:26923007

  4. Risk factors of morbidity and mortality following hip fracture surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Dong; Park, Sang Jin; Lee, Deok Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background The preoperative coexisting chronic systemic illness, delay in surgery, gender, and age were considered as risk factors for the complications after hip fracture surgery. The wider range of surgical delay and immobility-related pulmonary morbidity may affect postoperative complications and mortality. This study examined the risk factors for morbidity and mortality following the hip fracture surgery. Methods The patient data was collected retrospectively. The consecutive 506 patients with hip fracture surgery, aged 60 years or older, were included. The patients' age, gender, preexisting diseases, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, delay in surgical repair, duration of surgical procedure, and methods of anesthesia were noted. The thirty-day postoperative complications were reviewed, and cardiac complications, pulmonary complications, delirium, and death were recorded. The data was analyzed for postoperative complications and risk factors. Results Atelectasis was associated with postoperative pulmonary complications. Male gender and age ≥ 80 years were associated with an increased incidence of postoperative delirium. ASA classification 3 was associated with death. A delay in surgery was not associated with any complications. Preexisting diseases and methods of anesthesia did not affect mortality and postoperative complications. Conclusions The results suggest that a delay in surgery did not affect the postoperative complications and morbidity. PMID:23814650

  5. Psychological Co-morbidity in Children with Specific Learning Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Manoj K.; Biswas, Haritha; Padhy, Susanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Children under 19 years of age constitute over 40% of India's population and information about their mental health needs is a national imperative. Children with specific learning disorders (SLDs) exhibit academic difficulties disproportionate to their intellectual capacities. Prevalence of SLD ranges from 2% to 10%. Dyslexia (developmental reading disorder) is the most common type, affecting 80% of all SLD. About 30% of learning disabled children have behavioral and emotional problems, which range from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (most common) to depression, anxiety, suicide etc., to substance abuse (least common). Co-occurrence of such problems with SLD further adds to the academic difficulty. In such instances, diagnosis is difficult and tricky; improvement in academics demands comprehensive holistic treatment approach. SLD remains a large public health problem because of under-recognition, inadequate treatment and therefore merits greater effort to understand the co-morbidities, especially in the Indian population. As the literature is scarce regarding co-morbid conditions in learning disability in Indian scenario, the present study has tried to focus on Indian population. The educational concessions (recent most) given to such children by Central Board of Secondary Education, New Delhi are referred to. The issues to be addressed by the family physicians are: Low level of awareness among families and teachers, improper dissemination of accurate information about psychological problems, available help seeking avenues, need to develop service delivery models in rural and urban areas and focus on the integration of mental health and primary care keeping such co-morbidity in mind. PMID:25810984

  6. Robotic Hysterectomy Strategies in the Morbidly Obese Patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to present strategies for performing computer-enhanced telesurgery in the morbidly obese patient. Methods: This was a prospective, institutional review board-approved, descriptive feasibility study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2) conducted at a university-affiliated hospital. Twelve class III morbidly obese women with a body mass index of 40 kg/m2 or greater were selected to undergo robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy, classified as type IVE, with complete detachment of the cardinal-uterosacral ligament complex, unilateral or bilateral, with entry into the vagina was performed. Results: The median estimated blood loss was 146.3 mL (range, 15–550 mL), the mean length of stay in the hospital was 25.3 hours (range, 23–48 hours), and the complication rate was 0%. The rate of conversion to laparotomy was 8%. The median surgical time was 109.6 minutes (range, 99–145 minutes). Conclusion: Robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy can be a safe and effective method of performing hysterectomies in select morbidly obese patients, allowing them the opportunity to undergo minimally invasive surgery without increased perioperative complications. PMID:24018079

  7. Biliopancreatic Diversion with Gastrectomy as Surgical Treatment of Morbid Obesity.

    PubMed

    Marceau; Biron; St Georges R; Duclos; Potvin; Bourque

    1991-12-01

    The best procedure for the treatment of morbid obesity has not yet been defined. Biliopancreatic diversion is one of the techniques available, but its results have not been sufficiently documented and the addition of a subtotal gastrectomy to the diversion so as to avoid leaving a blind non-functioning stomach, is still questionable. The purpose of this paper is to report our experience with our first 149 consecutive patients who were treated by biliopancreatic diversion with subtotal gastrectomy for morbid obesity. Operative mortality was 3% and morbidity 12%. The weight loss was marked during the first 6 months and decreased during the following 12 months. The weight stabilized at 2 years and there was subsequently a small increase. In only two out of 48 cases was the weight loss less than 25% of the initial weight at 2 years. The undesirable side-effects were diarrhea in 6%, vomiting in 9% and dyspepsia in 4%. The intervention leads to a malabsorption of carotene, iron, albumin and calcium. Except for carotene the deficiencies were corrected by oral supplement. In two patients, with resistant deficiencies, the diversion was reversed. Eighty-eight percent of the patients are satisfied with this intervention. At 2 years, 70% have reached their weight loss objective without any major side-effects or nutritional deficiencies, but in 14% the outcome of the procedure must be considered unsatisfactory. Biliopancreatic diversion with subtotal gastrectomy is a major operation, but it gives encouraging results so far. PMID:10775939

  8. Marathon Maternity Oral History Project

    PubMed Central

    Orkin, Aaron; Newbery, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore how birthing and maternity care are understood and valued in a rural community. Design Oral history research. Setting The rural community of Marathon, Ont, with a population of approximately 3500. Participants A purposive selection of mothers, grandmothers, nurses, physicians, and community leaders in the Marathon medical catchment area. Methods Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample, employing an oral history research methodology. Interviews were conducted non-anonymously in order to preserve the identity and personhood of participants. Interview transcripts were edited into short narratives. Oral histories offer perspectives and information not revealed in other quantitative or qualitative research methodologies. Narratives re-personalize and humanize medical research by offering researchers and practitioners the opportunity to bear witness to the personal stories affected through medical decision making. Main findings Eleven stand-alone narratives, published in this issue of Canadian Family Physician, form the project’s findings. Similar to a literary text or short story, they are intended for personal reflection and interpretation by the reader. Presenting the results of these interviews as narratives requires the reader to participate in the research exercise and take part in listening to these women’s voices. The project’s narratives will be accessible to readers from academic and non-academic backgrounds and will interest readers in medicine and allied health professions, medical humanities, community development, gender studies, social anthropology and history, and literature. Conclusion Sharing personal birthing experiences might inspire others to reevaluate and reconsider birthing practices and services in other communities. Where local maternity services are under threat, Marathon’s stories might contribute to understanding the meaning and challenges of local birthing, and the implications of losing

  9. Heat- and cold-stress effects on cardiovascular mortality and morbidity among urban and rural populations in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Urban, Aleš; Davídkovová, Hana; Kyselý, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Several studies have examined the relationship of high and low air temperatures to cardiovascular mortality in the Czech Republic. Much less is understood about heat-/cold-related cardiovascular morbidity and possible regional differences. This paper compares the effects of warm and cold days on excess mortality and morbidity for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in the city of Prague and a rural region of southern Bohemia during 1994-2009. Population size and age structure are similar in the two regions. The results are evaluated for selected population groups (men and women). Excess mortality (number of deaths) and morbidity (number of hospital admissions) were determined as differences between observed and expected daily values, the latter being adjusted for long-term changes, annual and weekly cycles, and epidemics of influenza/acute respiratory infections. Generally higher relative excess CVD mortality on warm days than on cold days was identified in both regions. In contrast to mortality, weak excess CVD morbidity was observed for both warm and cold days. Different responses of individual CVDs to heat versus cold stress may be caused by the different nature of each CVD and different physiological processes induced by heat or cold stress. The slight differences between Prague and southern Bohemia in response to heat versus cold stress suggest the possible influence of environmental and socioeconomic factors such as the effects of urban heat island and exposure to air pollution, lifestyle differences, and divergence in population structure, which may result in differing vulnerability of urban versus rural population to temperature extremes. PMID:23793998

  10. Maternal mortality in Yazd Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Ghane-Ezabadi, Marzie; Vafaienasab, Mohammadreza; Dehghan, Ali; Ghasemi, Fateme; Zaidabadi, Mahbube; Zanbagh, Leila; Yazdian-Anari, Pouria; Teimoori, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Five hundred thousand maternal deaths occur each year worldwide, many of which are in developing countries. The maternal mortality rate is a measure that demonstrates the degree of adequacy of prenatal care and of economic and social conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and causes of pregnancy-related mortality rates in Yazd Province. Methods This cross-sectional study examined the maternal deaths related to pregnancy that were recorded in Yazd Province, Iran, from 2002 to 2011. All maternal deaths that occurred during pregnancy, during delivery, and 42 days after birth were analyzed in this study. The data were collected through a questionnaire, and both direct and indirect causes of maternal deaths were determined. Results Forty pregnancy-related deaths occurred in this period, and the maternal mortality rate was 20.8 deaths per 100,000 live births. The mean age of death in the mothers in this study was 29.17. Fifty-five percent of women of the women who died delivered their babies by cesarean section, and only 20% of them delivered their babies vaginally. Bleeding was the most common cause of maternal mortality (30%), and it was associated directly with maternal mortality. Furthermore 20% of the mothers died due to heart disease and cardiac complications, which were associated indirectly with maternal mortality. Conclusion Cesarean section and its complications were the main cause of death in many cases. Thus, providing a strategic plan to reduce the use of this procedure, educate mothers, and ensure adequate access to pre-maternal care and to care during pregnancy are the most important measures that can be taken to decrease the maternal mortality rate. PMID:27054003

  11. The Flavonoid Isoliquiritigenin Reduces Lung Inflammation and Mouse Morbidity during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Traboulsi, Hussein; Cloutier, Alexandre; Boyapelly, Kumaraswamy; Bonin, Marc-André; Marsault, Éric; Cantin, André M.

    2015-01-01

    The host response to influenza virus infection is characterized by an acute lung inflammatory response in which intense inflammatory cell recruitment, hypercytokinemia, and a high level of oxidative stress are present. The sum of these events contributes to the virus-induced lung damage that leads to high a level of morbidity and mortality in susceptible infected patients. In this context, we identified compounds that can simultaneously reduce the excessive inflammatory response and the viral replication as a strategy to treat influenza virus infection. We investigated the anti-inflammatory and antiviral potential activities of isoliquiritigenin (ILG). Interestingly, we demonstrated that ILG is a potent inhibitor of influenza virus replication in human bronchial epithelial cells (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 24.7 μM). In addition, our results showed that this molecule inhibits the expression of inflammatory cytokines induced after the infection of cells with influenza virus. We demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory activity of ILG in the context of influenza virus infection is dependent on the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma pathway. Interestingly, ILG phosphate (ILG-p)-treated mice displayed decreased lung inflammation as depicted by reduced cytokine gene expression and inflammatory cell recruitment. We also demonstrated that influenza virus-specific CD8+ effector T cell recruitment was reduced up to 60% in the lungs of mice treated with ILG-p (10 mg/kg) compared to that in saline-treated mice. Finally, we showed that administration of ILG-p reduced lung viral titers and morbidity of mice infected with the PR8/H1N1 virus. PMID:26248373

  12. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies. PMID:26331971

  13. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies. PMID:26331971

  14. Maternal mortality in southern India.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S; Amalraj, A

    1994-01-01

    In a 4 year prospective community survey of 20,000 women randomly selected in North Arcot District of Tamil Nadu State in South India, the maternal mortality rates per 1,000 liveborn were estimated to be 17.4 and 16.6 for rural and semi-urban areas, respectively. The rates based only on direct causes were 11.9 in rural and 14.4 in semi-urban areas. As expected, these figures are considerably higher than those based on official or hospital statistics. Factors associated with such high mortality and the implications for programme planning and implementation are discussed. PMID:7855917

  15. Maternal Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chebbo, Ahmad; Tan, Susanna; Kassis, Christelle; Tamura, Leslie; Carlson, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The year 2015 marked the 200th anniversary of the birth of Ignaz Semmelweis, the Hungarian physician who identified unhygienic practices of physicians as a major cause of childbed fever or puerperal sepsis. Although such practices have largely disappeared as a factor in the development of chorioamnionitis and postpartum or puerperal endometritis, it is appropriate that this article on sepsis in pregnancy acknowledges his contributions to maternal health. This review describes the incidence and mortality of sepsis in pregnancy, methods to identify and define sepsis in this population, including scoring systems, causes, and sites of infection during pregnancy and parturition and management guidelines. PMID:26600449

  16. Staff experiences of providing maternity services in rural southern Tanzania – a focus on equipment, drug and supply issues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The poor maintenance of equipment and inadequate supplies of drugs and other items contribute to the low quality of maternity services often found in rural settings in low- and middle-income countries, and raise the risk of adverse patient outcomes through delaying care provision. We aim to describe staff experiences of providing maternal and neonatal care in rural health facilities in Southern Tanzania, focusing on issues related to equipment, drugs and supplies. Methods Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with different staff cadres from all facility levels in order to explore experiences and views of providing maternity care in the context of poorly maintained equipment, and insufficient drugs and other supplies. A facility survey quantified the availability of relevant items. Results The facility survey, which found many missing or broken items and frequent stock outs, corroborated staff reports of providing care in the context of missing or broken care items. Staff reported increased workloads, reduced morale, difficulties in providing optimal maternity care, and carrying out procedures with potential health risks to themselves as a result. Conclusions Inadequately stocked and equipped facilities compromise the health system’s ability to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity by affecting staff personally and professionally, which hinders the provision of timely and appropriate interventions. Improving stock control and maintaining equipment could benefit mothers and babies, not only through removing restrictions to the availability of care, but also through improving staff working conditions. PMID:23410228

  17. Neuropsychiatric co-morbidities in non-demented Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Nirendra Kumar; Goyal, Vinay; Kumar, Nand; Shukla, Garima; Srivastava, Achal Kumar; Singh, Sumit; Behari, Madhuri

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate neuropsychiatric co-morbidities (depression, psychosis and anxiety) in non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Background: Non-motor symptoms like neuropsychiatric co-morbidities are common in Parkinson's disease and may predate motor symptoms. Currently there is scarcity of data regarding neuropsychiatry manifestations in Indian patients with PD. Methods: In this cross-sectional study consecutive 126 non-demented patients with PD (MMSE ≥25) were enrolled. They were assessed using Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) stage, Schwab and England (S&E) scale of activity of daily life. Mini-international neuropsychiatric interview (MINI) was used for diagnosis of depression, psychosis and anxiety. Beck's depression inventory (BDI), Brief psychiatric rating scale (BSRS) and Hamilton rating scale for anxiety (HAM-A) scales were used for assessment of severity of depression, psychosis and anxiety respectively. Results: Mean age and duration of disease was 57.9 ± 10.9 years and 7.3 ± 3.6 years respectively. At least one of the neuropsychiatric co-morbidity was present in 64% patients. Depression, suicidal risk, psychosis and anxiety were present in 43.7%, 31%, 23.8% and 35.7% respectively. Visual hallucinations (20.6%) were most frequent, followed by tactile (13.5%), auditory (7.2%) and olfactory hallucinations (1.6%). Patients with depression had higher motor disability (UPDRS-motor score 33.1 ± 14.0 vs 27.3 ± 13.3; and UPDRS-total 50.7 ± 21.8 vs 41.0 ± 20.3, all p values <0.05). Patients with psychosis were older (63.6 ± 8.0 years vs 56.1 ± 11.1 years, p < 0.05) and had longer duration of illness (8.6 ± 3.4 years vs 6.9 ± 3.5, p < 0.05). Conclusions: About two third patients with Parkinson's disease have associated neuropsychiatric co-morbidities. Depression was more frequent in patients with higher disability and psychosis with longer duration of disease and older age. These co-morbidities

  18. The Impact of Early Age at First Childbirth on Maternal and Infant Health

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Cassandra M.; Wendt, Amanda; Peters, Stacey; Hogue, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this review was to assess whether early age at first childbirth is associated with increased risk of poor pregnancy outcomes. Early age at childbirth is variously defined in studies of its effect on maternal and infant health. In this systematic review, we limit analysis to studies of at least moderate quality that examine first births among young mothers, where young maternal age is defined as low gynaecological age (≤2 years since menarche) or as a chronological age ≤16 years at conception or delivery. We conduct meta-analyses for specific maternal or infant health outcomes when there are at least three moderate quality studies that define the exposure and outcome in a similar manner and provide odds ratios or risk ratios as their effect estimates. We conclude that the overall evidence of effect for very young maternal age (<15 years or <2 years post-menarche) on infant outcomes is moderate; that is, future studies are likely to refine the estimate of effect or precision but not to change the conclusion. Evidence points to an impact of young maternal age on low birthweight and preterm birth, which may mediate other infant outcomes such as neonatal mortality. The evidence that young maternal age increases risk for maternal anaemia is also fairly strong, although information on other nutritional outcomes and maternal morbidity/mortality is less clear. Many of the differences observed among older teenagers with respect to infant outcomes may be because of socio-economic or behavioural differences, although these may vary by country/ setting. Future, high quality observational studies in low income settings are recommended in order to address the question of generalisability of evidence. In particular, studies in low income countries need to consider low gynaecological age, rather than simply chronological age, as an exposure. As well, country-specific studies should measure the minimum age at which childbearing for teens has similar associations

  19. Renal and urological diseases of the newborn neonatal acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Kirtida

    2014-01-01

    Survival of critically ill neonates in the intensive care unit has improved over the past decades reflecting improvements in obstetric, delivery room and neonatal intensive care, however, morbidity remains significant. Acute kidney injury is a common occurrence in these neonates and despite improved understanding of the pathophysiology and management of acute kidney injury in full term and preterm infants, the mortality remains as high as 61%. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that despite recovery from the acute injury, these infants are at risk for developing hypertension and chronic kidney disease later in life. Emphasis on improving our capability to detect renal insult and injury early, before renal failure occurs, and identification of novel therapeutic agents to prevent and treat acute kidney injury may impact mortality and morbidity. This review focuses on our current knowledge of acute kidney injury in the newborn, approaches to investigating and managing this complication and what future trends in this field may bring. PMID:25088261

  20. Spatiotemporally‐Resolved Air Exchange Rate as a Modifier of Acute Air Pollution‐Related Morbidity in AtlantaMorbidity in Atlanta

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies frequently use central site concentrations as surrogates of exposure to air pollutants. Variability in air pollutant infiltration due to differential air exchange rates (AERs) is potentially a major factor affecting the relationship between central site c...